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Sample records for maximal phrenic nerve

  1. Quantitative assessment of integrated phrenic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2016-06-01

    Integrated electrical activity in the phrenic nerve is commonly used to assess within-animal changes in phrenic motor output. Because of concerns regarding the consistency of nerve recordings, activity is most often expressed as a percent change from baseline values. However, absolute values of nerve activity are necessary to assess the impact of neural injury or disease on phrenic motor output. To date, no systematic evaluations of the repeatability/reliability have been made among animals when phrenic recordings are performed by an experienced investigator using standardized methods. We performed a meta-analysis of studies reporting integrated phrenic nerve activity in many rat groups by the same experienced investigator; comparisons were made during baseline and maximal chemoreceptor stimulation in 14 wild-type Harlan and 14 Taconic Sprague Dawley groups, and in 3 pre-symptomatic and 11 end-stage SOD1(G93A) Taconic rat groups (an ALS model). Meta-analysis results indicate: (1) consistent measurements of integrated phrenic activity in each sub-strain of wild-type rats; (2) with bilateral nerve recordings, left-to-right integrated phrenic activity ratios are ∼1.0; and (3) consistently reduced activity in end-stage SOD1(G93A) rats. Thus, with appropriate precautions, integrated phrenic nerve activity enables robust, quantitative comparisons among nerves or experimental groups, including differences caused by neuromuscular disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Thoracoscopic phrenic nerve patch insulation to avoid phrenic nerve stimulation with cardiac resynchronization therapy

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    Masatsugu Nozoe, MD, PhD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old female was implanted with a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT device, with the left ventricular lead implanted through a transvenous approach. One day after implantation, diaphragmatic stimulation was observed when the patient was in the seated position, which could not be resolved by device reprogramming. We performed thoracoscopic phrenic nerve insulation using a Gore-Tex patch. The left phrenic nerve was carefully detached from the pericardial adipose tissue, and a Gore-Tex patch was inserted between the phrenic nerve and pericardium using a thoracoscopic technique. This approach represents a potential option for the management of uncontrollable phrenic nerve stimulation during CRT.

  3. Internal Thoracic Artery Encircled by an Unusual Phrenic Nerve Loop

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    Robert Fu-Chean Chen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an anatomic variation of the phrenic nerve. During a routine gross anatomical dissection course at our medical university, we found an unusual loop of the left phrenic nerve around the internal thoracic artery, about 1 cm from the take-off of the left subclavian artery. The phrenic nerve is close to the internal thoracic artery and is easily injured when dissecting the internal thoracic artery for coronary artery bypass conduit. Therefore, we suggest that the anatomic relationship of the phrenic nerve and internal thoracic artery is important in preventing incidental injury of the phrenic nerve.

  4. Thoracoscopic phrenic nerve patch insulation to avoid phrenic nerve stimulation with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nozoe, Masatsugu; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Koyama, Junjiroh; Oshitomi, Takashi; Honda, Toshihiro; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Iwatani, Kazunori; Hirayama, Touitsu; Nakao, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old female was implanted with a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device, with the left ventricular lead implanted through a transvenous approach. One day after implantation, diaphragmatic stimulation was observed when the patient was in the seated position, which could not be resolved by device reprogramming. We performed thoracoscopic phrenic nerve insulation using a Gore-Tex patch. The left phrenic nerve was carefully detached from the pericardial adipose tissue, and a Gore...

  5. Phrenic Nerve Stimulation: Technology and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdunnur, Shane V; Kim, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve stimulation is a technique used to reanimate the diaphragm of patients with central nervous system etiologies of respiratory insufficiency. Current clinical indications include congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, spinal cord injury above C4, brain stem injury, and idiopathic severe sleep apnea. Presurgical evaluation ensures proper patient selection by validating the intact circuit from the phrenic nerve through alveolar oxygenation. The procedure involves placing leads around the phrenic nerves bilaterally and attaching these leads to radio receivers in a subcutaneous pocket. The rate and amplitude of the current is adjusted via an external radio transmitter. After implantation, each patient progresses through a conditioning phase that strengthens the diaphragm and progressively provides independence from the mechanical ventilator. Studies indicate that patients and families experience an improved quality of life and are satisfied with the results. Phrenic nerve stimulation provides a safe and effective means for reanimating the diaphragm for certain patients with respiratory insufficiency, providing independence from mechanical ventilation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Imaging of Pericardiophrenic Bundles Using Multislice Spiral Computed Tomography for Phrenic Nerve Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Jing; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Meng-Chao; Sun, Huan; Zeng, Hong; Yang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    Phrenic nerve injury and diaphragmatic stimulation are common complications following arrhythmia ablation and pacing therapies. Preoperative comprehension of phrenic nerve anatomy via non-invasive CT imaging may help to minimize the electrophysiological procedure-related complications. Coronary CT angiography data of 121 consecutive patients were collected. Imaging of left and right pericardiophrenic bundles was performed with volume rendering and multi-planar reformation techniques. The shortest spatial distances between phrenic nerves and key electrophysiology-related structures were determined. The frequencies of the shortest distances ≤5 mm, >5 mm and direct contact between phrenic nerves and adjacent structures were calculated. Left and right pericardiophrenic bundles were identified in 86.8% and 51.2% of the patients, respectively. The right phrenic nerve was phrenic nerve, phrenic nerve was phrenic nerve had a distance phrenic nerve showed a distance phrenic nerve anatomy, which might facilitate avoidance of the phrenic nerve-related complications in interventional electrophysiology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ultrasound-guided continuous phrenic nerve block for persistent hiccups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renes, S.H.; Geffen, G.J. van; Rettig, H.C.; Gielen, M.J.M.; Scheffer, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phrenic nerve block can be performed and repeated if necessary for persistent hiccups, when conservative and pharmacological treatment is unsuccessful. We report the first description of an in-plane ultrasound (US)-guided phrenic nerve block (PhNB) with a catheter, after US investigation

  8. Evaluation of phrenic nerve and diaphragm function with peripheral nerve stimulation and M-mode ultrasonography in potential pediatric phrenic nerve or diaphragm pacing candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalsky, Andrew J; Lesser, Daniel J; McDonald, Craig M

    2015-02-01

    Assessing phrenic nerve function in the setting of diaphragmatic paralysis in diaphragm pacing candidates can be challenging. Traditional imaging modalities and electrodiagnostic evaluations are technically difficult. Either modality alone is not a direct measure of the function of the phrenic nerve and diaphragm unit. In this article, the authors present their method for evaluating phrenic nerve function and the resulting diaphragm function. Stimulating the phrenic nerve with transcutaneous stimulation and directly observing the resulting movement of the hemidiaphragm with M-mode ultrasonography provides quantitative data for predicting the success of advancing technologies such as phrenic nerve pacing and diaphragm pacing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator... Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator is a device that provides electrical stimulation of a patient's phrenic nerve to...

  10. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  11. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-02-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering 'excellent' and 'good' muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  12. Chitosan tubes can restore the function of resected phrenic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobuyoshi; Matsumoto, Isao; Suzuki, Mitsutaka; Kaneko, Mami; Nitta, Kanae; Seguchi, Ryuta; Ooi, Akishi; Takemura, Hirofumi

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported that the phrenic nerve could be morphologically repaired by implantation of a chitosan nanofibre tube (C-tube). In the current study, we investigated whether implantation of C-tubes could improve the function of an injured phrenic nerve using a beagle dog model. Seven beagle dogs underwent right thoracotomy under general anaesthesia. An approximately 5 mm length of the right phrenic nerve was resected. Five dogs had a C-tube implantation (C-tube group) and other two dogs did not have the C-tube implantation (control group). Diaphragm movements were longitudinally measured by X-ray fluoroscopy before surgery, immediately after the surgery, and 3, 6 and 12 months after the surgery. The diaphragm movement was determined by diaphragm levels at inspiration and expiration phases, and the excursion difference between them was calculated. At 12 months after the surgery, rethoracotomy was performed to examine electrical phrenic nerve conduction. The C-tube and phrenic nerve were then excised for histological assessment of nerve regeneration. Three of the five animals of the C-tube group showed improvement of diaphragm movement with time. In these three animals, slow phrenic nerve conduction was observed. Histological assessment showed that the injured nerve was connected by newly regenerating nerve fibres surrounded by granulation tissue within the C-tube. On the other hand, the animals in the control group and two animals of the C-tube group showed neither improved diaphragm movement, nor electrical conduction to the diaphragm. No nerve fibre regeneration was found by histology. Our results suggest that, in addition to morphological improvement, C-tube implantation can functionally improve the injured phrenic nerve by promoting phrenic nerve regeneration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  13. Diaphragmatic height index: new diagnostic test for phrenic nerve dysfunction.

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    Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Limthongthang, Roongsak; Vathana, Torpon; Kaewpornsawan, Kamolporn; Songcharoen, Panupan; Wongtrakul, Saichol

    2012-11-01

    The diaphragmatic height index (DHI) was developed to measure the difference in diaphragm levels. The purpose of this study was to set definite DHI values and test the accuracy of these values for use as a new diagnostic test for phrenic nerve dysfunction. All data for this study were obtained from medical charts and retrospectively reviewed. One hundred sixty-five patients with brachial plexus injury who had undergone nerve transfers between 2005 and 2008 were divided into Groups A and B. Group A consisted of 40 patients (mean age 28.0 years) who had sustained concomitant injury of the brachial plexus and phrenic nerves. Patients in Group A1 had right phrenic nerve injury and those in Group A2 had left phrenic nerve injury. Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve was considered the gold standard in assessing nerve function in all patients with brachial plexus injury. Group B consisted of 125 patients (mean age 28.7 years) with brachial plexus injury and normal phrenic nerve function. Group C, the control group, consisted of 80 patients with nonbrachial plexus injury (mean age 34.0 years) who had undergone other kinds of orthopedic operations between April and June 2009. Standard posteroanterior chest radiographs were blindly interpreted using the Siriraj inhouse picture archiving and communication system in all 245 patients in the study. First, a reference line (R line) was drawn along the inferior endplate of T-10. Then, 2 lines (lines A and B) were drawn through the highest point of each diaphragm and parallel to the R line. The difference between these 2 lines divided by the height of T-10 was defined as the DHI. The cutoff points of the DHI for diagnosing right and left phrenic nerve dysfunction were analyzed with a receiver operating characteristic curve. The accuracy of these DHI values was then evaluated. The DHI in Group C was 0.64 ± 0.44, slightly higher than the DHI in Group B, with no significant difference. Diaphragmatic

  14. Phrenic nerve reconstruction in complete video-assisted thoracic surgery.

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    Kawashima, Shun; Kohno, Tadasu; Fujimori, Sakashi; Yokomakura, Naoya; Ikeda, Takeshi; Harano, Takashi; Suzuki, Souichiro; Iida, Takahiro; Sakai, Emi

    2015-01-01

    Primary or metastatic lung cancer or mediastinal tumours may at times involve the phrenic nerve and pericardium. To remove the pathology en bloc, the phrenic nerve must be resected. This results in phrenic nerve paralysis, which in turn reduces pulmonary function and quality of life. As a curative measure of this paralysis and thus a preventive measure against decreased pulmonary function and quality of life, we have performed immediate phrenic nerve reconstruction under complete video-assisted thoracic surgery, and with minimal additional stress to the patient. This study sought to ascertain the utility of this procedure from an evaluation of the cases experienced to date. We performed 6 cases of complete video-assisted thoracic surgery phrenic nerve reconstruction from October 2009 to December 2013 in patients who had undergone phrenic nerve resection or separation to remove tumours en bloc. In all cases, it was difficult to separate the phrenic nerve from the tumour. Reconstruction involved direct anastomosis in 3 cases and intercostal nerve interposition anastomosis in the remaining 3 cases. In the 6 patients (3 men, 3 women; mean age 50.8 years), we performed two right-sided and four left-sided procedures. The mean anastomosis time was 5.3 min for direct anastomosis and 35.3 min for intercostal nerve interposition anastomosis. Postoperative phrenic nerve function was measured on chest X-ray during inspiration and expiration. Direct anastomosis was effective in 2 of the 3 patients, and intercostal nerve interposition anastomosis was effective in all 3 patients. Diaphragm function was confirmed on X-ray to be improved in these 5 patients. Complete video-assisted thoracic surgery phrenic nerve reconstruction was effective for direct anastomosis as well as for intercostal nerve interposition anastomosis in a small sample of selected patients. The procedure shows promise for phrenic nerve reconstruction and further data should be accumulated over time. © The

  15. Phrenic nerve blocage with spinal anesthesia for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication

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    Murat Dursun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case, we describe a patient having laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF under spinal anesthesia with phrenic nerve blockade. It’s emphasized that in this type of operations, spinal anesthesia may be an alternative method rather the general anesthesia and the resulting shoulder pain in laparoscopic surgery performed under spinal anesthesia can be prevented by phrenic nerve blockade. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (2: 186-188

  16. Histopathology of cryoballoon ablation-induced phrenic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Jason G; Dubuc, Marc; Ferreira, Jose; Guerra, Peter G; Landry, Evelyn; Coulombe, Nicolas; Rivard, Lena; Macle, Laurent; Thibault, Bernard; Talajic, Mario; Roy, Denis; Khairy, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Hemi-diaphragmatic paralysis is the most common complication associated with cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation, yet the histopathology of phrenic nerve injury has not been well described. A preclinical randomized study was conducted to characterize the histopathology of phrenic nerve injury induced by cryoballoon ablation and assess the potential for electromyographic (EMG) monitoring to limit phrenic nerve damage. Thirty-two dogs underwent cryoballoon ablation of the right superior pulmonary vein with the objective of inducing phrenic nerve injury. Animals were randomized 1:1 to standard monitoring (i.e., interruption of ablation upon reduction in diaphragmatic motion) versus EMG guidance (i.e., cessation of ablation upon a 30% reduction in the diaphragmatic compound motor action potential [CMAP] amplitude). The acute procedural endpoint was achieved in all dogs. Phrenic nerve injury was characterized by Wallerian degeneration, with subperineural injury to large myelinated axons and evidence of axonal regeneration. The degree of phrenic nerve injury paralleled the reduction in CMAP amplitude (P = 0.007). Animals randomized to EMG guidance had a lower incidence of acute hemi-diaphragmatic paralysis (50% vs 100%; P = 0.001), persistent paralysis at 30 days (21% vs 75%; multivariate odds ratio 0.12, 95% confidence interval [0.02, 0.69], P = 0.017), and a lesser severity of histologic injury (P = 0.001). Mature pulmonary vein ablation lesion characteristics, including circumferentiality and transmurality, were similar in both groups. Phrenic nerve injury induced by cryoballoon ablation is axonal in nature and characterized by Wallerian degeneration, with potential for recovery. An EMG-guided approach is superior to standard monitoring in limiting phrenic nerve damage. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Left phrenic nerve anatomy relative to the coronary venous system: Implications for phrenic nerve stimulation during cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Julianne H; Goff, Ryan P; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively characterize anatomy of the human phrenic nerve in relation to the coronary venous system, to reduce undesired phrenic nerve stimulation during left-sided lead implantations. We obtained CT scans while injecting contrast into coronary veins of 15 perfusion-fixed human heart-lung blocs. A radiopaque wire was glued to the phrenic nerve under CT, then we created three-dimensional models of anatomy and measured anatomical parameters. The left phrenic nerve typically coursed over the basal region of the anterior interventricular vein, mid region of left marginal veins, and apical region of inferior and middle cardiac veins. There was large variation associated with the average angle between nerve and veins. Average angle across all coronary sinus tributaries was fairly consistent (101.3°-111.1°). The phrenic nerve coursed closest to the middle cardiac vein and left marginal veins. The phrenic nerve overlapped a left marginal vein in >50% of specimens. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Phrenic nerves and diaphragms in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, J; Weber, U; Schröder, J M; Lemke, R; Althoff, H

    1998-01-30

    Disturbances of the respiratory system may be an important factor in the cascade of events leading to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Even though the diaphragm is the major respiratory muscle in infants, little is known about alterations of this muscle and of the phrenic nerve in SIDS. In the present study, diaphragms and phrenic nerves of 24 SIDS infants and seven controls were analyzed. Morphometric analysis revealed only slightly larger cross sectional areas of phrenic nerve axons but no increase in myelin sheath thickness in SIDS cases. However, in one SIDS case, myelinated nerve fibre density was severely reduced. Using electron microscopy, several nerve fibres of SIDS infants showed focal accumulations of neurofilaments. Muscle fibre diameters in SIDS diaphragms were significantly larger compared to controls (P fibre ruptures and contracture bands were found. These prominent nonspecific ultrastructural alterations should advise caution in the interpretation of morphometric data. Thus, in some cases exemplified by one case of the present series, decreased density of phrenic nerve myelinated axons might contribute to SIDS. Still, the present results indicate that development of phrenic nerves and diaphragms is not delayed in most SIDS infants.

  19. Phrenic Nerve Reconstruction and Bilateral Diaphragm Plication After Lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Shuichi; Yamada, Tetsu; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Ishinagi, Hiroyoshi; Matsuoka, Takahisa; Nagai, Shinjiro; Matsuoka, Katsunari; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

    2017-07-01

    A 49-year-old man with left phrenic nerve paralysis caused by mediastinal tumor resection 28 years earlier was found to have a nodule in the right upper lobe. The right phrenic nerve was severed during right upper lobectomy but was reconstructed along with bilateral plication of the diaphragm. The patient was weaned from the ventilator during the daytime on postoperative day 13 and was discharged home on postoperative day 48. Three months postoperatively, chest fluoroscopic imaging showed recovery of movement of the right diaphragm. Nerve conduction studies showed improvement of function of the reconstructed right phrenic nerve. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CT anatomy of right phrenic nerve and pulmonary ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkmen, Y.M.; Kazam, E.; Auh, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the right phrenic nerve and the right pulmonary ligament was studied in eight cadavers and 100 computed tomographic (CT) examinations. The pulmonary ligament originates below the inferior pulmonary vein and is constantly posterior to the inferior vena cava. The lower end of the right phrenic nerve, on the other hand, descends over the lateral surface of the inferior vena cava, accompanied by the right cardiophrenic artery. The nerve spreads over the diaphragm within a thick parietal pleural fold, wrapped in a fatty tissue, and this should not be confused with pulmonary ligament on CT

  1. Phrenic nerve conduction studies: normative data and technical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analucia Abreu Maranhão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of the present study was to define normative data of phrenic nerve conduction parameters of a healthy population. Methods: Phrenic nerve conduction studies were performed in 27 healthy volunteers. Results: The normative limits for expiratory phrenic nerve compound muscle action potential were: amplitude (0.47 mv - 0.83 mv, latency (5.74 ms - 7.10 ms, area (6.20 ms/mv - 7.20 ms/mv and duration (18.30 ms - 20.96 ms. Inspiratory normative limits were: amplitude (0.67 mv - 1.11 mv, latency (5.90 ms - 6.34 ms, area (5.62 ms/mv - 6.72 ms/mv and duration (13.77 ms - 15.37 ms. Conclusion: The best point of phrenic nerve stimulus in the neck varies among individuals between the medial and lateral border of the clavicular head of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and stimulation of both sites, then choosing the best phrenic nerve response, seems to be the appropriate procedure.

  2. Phrenic nerve conduction studies: normative data and technical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Analucia Abreu; Carvalho, Sonia Regina da Silva; Caetano, Marcelo Ribeiro; Alamy, Alexandre Hofke; Peixoto, Eduardo Mesquita; Filgueiras, Pedro Del Esporte Peçanha

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to define normative data of phrenic nerve conduction parameters of a healthy population. Phrenic nerve conduction studies were performed in 27 healthy volunteers. The normative limits for expiratory phrenic nerve compound muscle action potential were: amplitude (0.47 mv - 0.83 mv), latency (5.74 ms - 7.10 ms), area (6.20 ms/mv - 7.20 ms/mv) and duration (18.30 ms - 20.96 ms). Inspiratory normative limits were: amplitude (0.67 mv - 1.11 mv), latency (5.90 ms - 6.34 ms), area (5.62 ms/mv - 6.72 ms/mv) and duration (13.77 ms - 15.37 ms). The best point of phrenic nerve stimulus in the neck varies among individuals between the medial and lateral border of the clavicular head of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and stimulation of both sites, then choosing the best phrenic nerve response, seems to be the appropriate procedure.

  3. Phrenic Nerve Palsy as Initial Presentation of Large Retrosternal Goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Arsheed Hussain; Hakeem, Imtiyaz Hussain; Wani, Fozia Jeelani

    2016-12-01

    Unilateral phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is extremely rare event. This is a case report of a 57-year-old woman with history of cough and breathlessness of 3 months duration, unaware of the thyroid mass. She had large cervico-mediastinal goiter and chest radiograph revealed raised left sided hemidiaphragm. Chest CT scan did not reveal any lung parenchymal or mediastinal pathology. The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy through a cervical approach. The final pathology was in favor of multinodular goitre. Even after 1 year of follow up, phrenic nerve palsy did not improve indicating permanent damage. Phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is unusual event. This case is reported not only because of the rare nature of presentation, but also to make clinicians aware of the entity so that early intervention may prevent attendant morbidity.

  4. Mapping for Acute Transvenous Phrenic Nerve Stimulation Study (MAPS Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Lukas R C; Gerritse, Bart; Scheiner, Avram; Kornet, Lilian

    2017-03-01

    Central sleep apnea syndrome, correlated with the occurrence of heart failure, is characterized by periods of insufficient ventilation during sleep. This acute study in 15 patients aims to map the venous system and determine if diaphragmatic movement can be achieved by phrenic nerve stimulation at various locations within the venous system. Subjects underwent a scheduled catheter ablation procedure. During the procedural waiting time, one multielectrode electrophysiology catheter was subsequently placed at the superior and inferior vena cava and the junctions of the left jugular and left brachiocephalic vein and right jugular and right brachiocephalic vein, for phrenic nerve stimulation (1-2 seconds ON/2-3 seconds OFF, 40 Hz, pulse width 210 μs). Diaphragmatic movement was assessed manually and by a breathing mask. During a follow-up assessment between 2 and 4 weeks postprocedure, occurrence of adverse events was assessed. In all patients diaphragmatic movement was induced at one or more locations using a median threshold of at least 2 V and maximally 7.5 V (i.e., e 3.3 mA, 14.2 mA). The lowest median current to obtain diaphragmatic stimulation without discomfort was found for the right brachiocephalic vein (4.7 mA). In 12/15 patients diaphragmatic movement could be induced without any discomfort, but in three patients hiccups occurred. Diaphragmatic stimulation from the brachiocephalic and caval veins is feasible. Potential side effects should be eliminated by adapting the stimulation pattern. This information could be used to design a catheter, combining cardiac pacing with enhancing diaphragm movement during a sleep apnea episode. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The subdiaphragmatic part of the phrenic nerve - morphometry and connections to autonomic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Marios; Du Plessis, Maira; Louis, Robert G; Tubbs, R Shane; Wartmann, Christopher T; Apaydin, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    Few anatomical textbooks offer much information concerning the anatomy and distribution of the phrenic nerve inferior to the diaphragm. The aim of this study was to identify the subdiaphragmatic distribution of the phrenic nerve, the presence of phrenic ganglia, and possible connections to the celiac plexus. One hundred and thirty formalin-fixed adult cadavers were studied. The right phrenic nerve was found inferior to the diaphragm in 98% with 49.1% displaying a right phrenic ganglion. In 22.8% there was an additional smaller ganglion (right accessory phrenic ganglion). The remaining 50.9% had no grossly identifiable right phrenic ganglion. Most (65.5% of specimens) exhibited plexiform communications with the celiac ganglion, aorticorenal ganglion, and suprarenal gland. The left phrenic nerve inferior to the diaphragm was observed in 60% of specimens with 19% containing a left phrenic ganglion. No accessory left phrenic ganglia were observed. The left phrenic ganglion exhibited plexiform communications to several ganglia in 71.4% of specimens. Histologically, the right phrenic and left phrenic ganglia contained large soma concentrated in their peripheries. Both phrenic nerves and ganglia were closely related to the diaphragmatic crura. Surgically, sutures to approximate the crura for repair of hiatal hernias must be placed above the ganglia in order to avoid iatrogenic injuries to the autonomic supply to the diaphragm and abdomen. These findings could also provide a better understanding of the anatomy and distribution of the fibers of that autonomic supply. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Low vulnerability of the right phrenic nerve to electroporation ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, Vincent J. H. M.; Neven, KGEJ; van Wessel, Harri; Vink, Aryan; Doevendans, Pieter A. F. M.; Wittkampf, Fred H. M.

    BACKGROUND Circular electroporation ablation is a novel ablation modality for electrical pulmonary vein isolation. With a single 200-3 application, deep circular myocardial lesions can be created. However, the acute and chronic effects of this energy source on phrenic nerve (PN) function are

  7. In vitro assessment of induced phrenic nerve cryothermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Ryan P; Bersie, Stephanie M; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    Phrenic nerve injury, both left and right, is considered a significant complication of cryoballoon ablation for treatment of drug-refractory atrial fibrillation, and functional recovery of the phrenic nerve can take anywhere from hours to months. The purpose of this study was to focus on short periods of cooling to determine the minimal amount of cooling that may terminate nerve function related to cryo ablation. Left and/or right phrenic nerves were dissected from the pericardium and connective tissue of swine (n = 35 preparations). Nerves were placed in a recording chamber modified with a thermocouple array. This apparatus was placed in a digital water bath to maintain an internal chamber temperature of 37°C. Nerves were stimulated proximally with a 1-V, 0.1-ms square wave. Bipolar compound action potentials were recorded proximal and distal to the site of ablation both before and after ablation, then analyzed to determine changes in latency, amplitude, and duration. Temperatures were recorded at a rate of 5 Hz, and maximum cooling rates were calculated. Phrenic nerves were found to elicit compound action potentials upon stimulation for periods up to 4 hours minimum. Average conduction velocity was 56.7 ± 14.7 m/s preablation and 49.8 ± 16.6 m/s postablation (P = .17). Cooling to mild subzero temperatures ceased production of action potentials for >1 hour. Taking into account the data presented here, previous publications, and a conservative stance, during cryotherapy applications, cooling of the nerve to below 4°C should be avoided whenever possible. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Phrenic Nerve Injury After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Clementy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic Nerve Injury (PNI has been well studied by cardiac surgeons. More recently it has been recognized as a potential complication of catheter ablation with a prevalence of 0.11 to 0.48 % after atrial fibrillation (AF ablation. This review will focus on PNI after AF ablation. Anatomical studies have shown a close relationship between the right phrenic nerve and it's proximity to the superior vena cava (SVC, and the antero-inferior part of the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV. In addition, the proximity of the left phrenic nerve to the left atrial appendage has been well established. Independent of the type of ablation catheter (4mm, 8 mm, irrigated tip, balloon or energy source used (radiofrequency (RF, ultrasound, cryothermia, and laser; the risk of PNI exists during ablation at the critical areas listed above. Although up to thirty-one percent of patients with PNI after AF ablation remain asymptomatic, dyspnea remain the cardinal symptom and is present in all symptomatic patients. Despite the theoretical risk for significant adverse effect on functional status and quality of life, short-term outcomes from published studies appear favorable with 81% of patients with PNI having a complete recovery after 7 ± 7 months.Conclusion: Existing studies have described PNI as an uncommon but avoidable complication in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for AF. Prior to ablation at the SVC, antero-inferior RSPV ostium or the left atrial appendage, pacing should be performed before energy delivery. If phrenic nerve capture is documented, energy delivery should be avoided at this site. Electrophysiologist's vigilance as well as pacing prior to ablation at high risk sites in close proximity to the phrenic nerve are the currently available tools to avoid the complication of PNI.

  9. Phrenic Nerve Palsy Secondary to Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: A Diagnosis Commonly Overlooked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Tom; Walsh, Ronan; Burke, Conor; McGowan, Aisling; Faul, John; Cormican, Liam

    2017-04-01

    Neuralgic Amyotrophy (NA) or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is an idiopathic neuropathy commonly affecting the brachial plexus. Associated phrenic nerve involvement, though recognised, is thought to be very rare. We present a case series of four patients (all male, mean age 53) presenting with dyspnoea preceded by severe self-limiting upper limb and shoulder pain, with an elevated hemi-diaphragm on clinical examination and chest X-ray. Neurological examination of the upper limb at the time of presentation was normal. Diaphragmatic fluoroscopy confirmed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. Pulmonary function testing demonstrated characteristic reduction in forced vital capacity between supine and sitting position (mean 50%, range 42-65% predicted, mean change 23%, range 22-46%), reduced maximal inspiratory pressures (mean 61%, range 43-86% predicted), reduced sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (mean 88.25, range 66-109 cm H 2 O) and preserved maximal expiratory pressure (mean 107%, range 83-130% predicted). Phrenic nerve conduction studies confirmed phrenic nerve palsy. All patients were managed conservatively. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 3 years. Symptoms and lung function variables normalised in three patients and improved significantly in the fourth. The classic history of severe ipsilateral shoulder and upper limb neuromuscular pain should be elicited and thus NA considered in the differential for a unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis, even in the absence of neurological signs. Parsonage-Turner syndrome is likely to represent a significantly under-diagnosed aetiology of phrenic nerve palsy. Conservative management as opposed to surgical intervention is advocated as most patients demonstrate gradual resolution over time in this case series.

  10. Long pacing pulses reduce phrenic nerve stimulation in left ventricular pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortshøj, Søren; Heath, Finn; Haugland, Morten; Eschen, Ole; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe; Riahi, Sam; Toft, Egon; Struijk, Johannes Jan

    2014-05-01

    Phrenic nerve stimulation is a major obstacle in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Activation characteristics of the heart and phrenic nerve are different with higher chronaxie for the heart. Therefore, longer pulse durations could be beneficial in preventing phrenic nerve stimulation during CRT due to a decreased threshold for the heart compared with the phrenic nerve. We investigated if long pulse durations decreased left ventricular (LV) thresholds relatively to phrenic nerve thresholds in humans. Eleven patients, with indication for CRT and phrenic nerve stimulation at the intended pacing site, underwent determination of thresholds for the heart and phrenic nerve at different pulse durations (0.3-2.9 milliseconds). The resulting strength duration curves were analyzed by determining chronaxie and rheobase. Comparisons for those parameters were made between the heart and phrenic nerve, and between the models of Weiss and Lapicque as well. In 9 of 11 cases, the thresholds decreased faster for the LV than for the phrenic nerve with increasing pulse duration. In 3 cases, the thresholds changed from unfavorable for LV stimulation to more than a factor 2 in favor of the LV. The greatest change occurred for pulse durations up to 1.5 milliseconds. The chronaxie of the heart was significantly higher than the chronaxie of the phrenic nerve (0.47 milliseconds vs. 0.22 milliseconds [P = 0.029, Lapicque] and 0.79 milliseconds vs. 0.27 milliseconds [P = 0.033, Weiss]). Long pulse durations lead to a decreased threshold of the heart relatively to the phrenic nerve and may prevent stimulation of the phrenic nerve in a clinical setting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Phrenic nerve stimulation for the treatment of central sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, William T; Jagielski, Dariusz; Oldenburg, Olaf; Augostini, Ralph; Krueger, Steven; Kolodziej, Adam; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen; Khayat, Rami; Merliss, Andrew; Harsch, Manya R; Holcomb, Richard G; Javaheri, Shahrokh; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate chronic, transvenous, unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation to treat central sleep apnea (CSA) in a prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized study. CSA occurs predominantly in patients with heart failure and increases the risk for morbidity and mortality. Established therapies for CSA are lacking, and those available are limited by poor patient adherence. Fifty-seven patients with CSA underwent baseline polysomnography followed by transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation system implantation and follow-up. Feasibility was assessed by implantation success rate and therapy delivery. Safety was evaluated by monitoring of device- and procedure-related adverse events. Efficacy was evaluated by changes in the apnea-hypopnea index at 3 months. Quality of life at 6 months was evaluated using a sleepiness questionnaire, patient global assessment, and, in patients with heart failure at baseline, the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire. The study met its primary end point, demonstrating a 55% reduction in apnea-hypopnea index from baseline to 3 months (49.5 ± 14.6 episodes/h vs. 22.4 ± 13.6 episodes/h of sleep; p phrenic nerve stimulation appears safe and effective for treating CSA. These findings should be confirmed in a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. (Chronic Evaluation of Respicardia Therapy; NCT01124370). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cryoablation of focal tachycardia originating from the right atrial free wall during upstream phrenic pacing to avoid phrenic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsrude, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of the potential for phrenic nerve injury (PNI) often prompts less aggressive attempts at catheter ablation of multiple forms of tachycardia or abandoning ablation altogether. Some novel techniques to avoid PNI during catheter ablation have been described. Five patients (age: 13-57 years, three females) with ectopic atrial tachycardia originating from the right atrial free wall (RAFW) near the phrenic nerve underwent electrophysiology study with three-dimensional mapping and endocardial cryoablation. Upstream phrenic pacing was performed after cryoadherence was achieved, and cryoablation of ectopic foci was performed during close observation for occurrence of PNI and tachycardia elimination. Cryoablation acutely eliminated five of six atrial tachycardias originating close to the phrenic nerve. Transient PNI during cryothermy occurred in two patients, and resolved within 3 minutes. Patients were observed overnight on telemetry, with no early recurrences of targeted atrial tachycardias and no evidence of PNI. At last follow-up of 1-39 months, four patients were arrhythmia free on no medications. Catheter cryoablation during simultaneous upstream phrenic nerve pacing can lead to safe and effective elimination of focal atrial tachycardias originating from the RAFW close to the phrenic nerve. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Phrenic nerve injury after radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors: retrospective evaluation of the incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yusuke; Hiraki, Takao; Gobara, Hideo; Uka, Mayu; Masaoka, Yoshihisa; Tada, Akihiro; Toyooka, Shinichi; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Mimura, Hidefumi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2012-06-01

    To retrospectively investigate the incidence of and risk factors for phrenic nerve injury after radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tumors. The study included 814 RF ablation procedures of lung tumors. To evaluate the development of phrenic nerve injury, chest radiographs obtained before and after the procedure were examined. Phrenic nerve injury was assumed to have developed if the diaphragmatic level was elevated after the procedure. To identify risk factors for phrenic nerve injury, multiple variables were compared between cases of phrenic nerve injury and randomly selected controls by using univariate analyses. Multivariate analysis was then performed to identify independent risk factors. Evaluation of phrenic nerve injury from chest radiographs was possible after 786 procedures. Evidence of phrenic nerve injury developed after 10 cases (1.3%). Univariate analysis revealed that larger tumor size (≥ 20 mm; P = .014), proximity of the phrenic nerve to the tumor (phrenic nerve injury. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the proximity of the phrenic nerve to the tumor (phrenic nerve injury after RF ablation was 1.3%. The proximity of the phrenic nerve to the tumor was an independent risk factor for phrenic nerve injury. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Mid-Term Changes of Pulmonary Function Tests After Phrenic Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, Masoud; Hassanpour, Seyed Esmail; Khodayari, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    In the restoration of elbow flexion, the phrenic nerve has proven to be a good donor, but considering the role of the phrenic nerve in respiratory function, we cannot disregard the potential dangers of this method. In the current study, we reviewed the results of pulmonary function tests (PFT) in four patients who underwent phrenic nerve transfer. We reviewed the results of serial spirometry tests, which were performed before and after phrenic nerve transfer surgery. All patients regained Biceps power to M3 strength or above. None of our patients experienced pulmonary problems or respiratory complaints, but a significant reduction of spirometric parameters occurred after surgery. This study highlights the close link between the role of the phrenic nerve and pulmonary function, such that the use of this nerve as a transfer donor leads to spirometric impairments.

  15. Epicardial Ablation: Prevention of Phrenic Nerve Damage by Pericardial Injection of Saline and the Use of a Steerable Sheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kars Neven, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of the close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the pericardium, phrenic nerve damage caused by epicardial ablation can easily occur. We report two cases of epicardial VT ablation where pericardial injection of saline, combined with the use of a steerable sheath, successfully prevents the phrenic nerve from being damaged.

  16. Automatic Identification and Reconstruction of the Right Phrenic Nerve on Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Bamps, Kobe; Cuypers, Céline; Polmans, Pieter; Claesen, Luc; Koopman, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    An automatic computer algorithm was successfully constructed, enabling identification and reconstruction of the right phrenic nerve on high resolution coronary computed tomography scans. This could lead to a substantial reduction in the incidence of phrenic nerve paralysis during pulmonary vein isolation using ballon techniques.

  17. A Novel Method to Prevent Phrenic Nerve Injury During Catheter Ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Buch, Eric; Vaseghi, Marmar; Cesario, David A; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2006-01-01

    Epicardial catheter ablation is increasingly important in the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias. Collateral damage to adjacent structures like the phrenic nerve is an important concern with epicardial ablation. This report describes the use of a novel method to prevent phrenic nerve injury during epicardial ablation of ventricular tachycardia.

  18. The prognostic value of concurrent phrenic nerve palsy in newborn babies with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Kawabata, Hidehiko

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of concurrent phrenic nerve palsy for predicting spontaneous motor recovery in neonatal brachial plexus palsy. We reviewed the records of 366 neonates with brachial plexus palsy. The clinical and follow-up data of patients with and without phrenic nerve palsy were compared. Of 366 newborn babies with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, 21 (6%) had concurrent phrenic nerve palsy. Sixteen of these neonates had upper-type palsy and 5 had total-type palsy. Poor spontaneous motor recovery was observed in 13 neonates with concurrent phrenic nerve palsy (62%) and in 129 without concurrent phrenic nerve palsy (39%). Among neonates born via vertex delivery, poor motor recovery was observed in 7 of 9 (78%) neonates with concurrent phrenic nerve palsy and 115 of 296 (39%) without concurrent phrenic nerve palsy. Concurrent phrenic nerve palsy in neonates with brachial plexus palsy has prognostic value in predicting poor spontaneous motor recovery of the brachial plexus, particularly after vertex delivery. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A rare case of diaphragmatic paralysis due to isolated phrenic nerve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-04

    Nov 4, 2008 ... Isolated phrenic nerve palsy is a rare condition resulting from birth injury, with many possible complications such as diaphragmatic paralysis, pulmonary infection, chronic lung disease, growth failure and even death.1-3 I report a case of neonatal isolated phrenic nerve palsy in an infant delivered.

  20. Mapping of the left-sided phrenic nerve course in patients undergoing left atrial catheter ablations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huemer, Martin; Wutzler, Alexander; Parwani, Abdul S; Attanasio, Philipp; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik

    2014-09-01

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation has been associated with left-sided phrenic nerve palsy. Knowledge of the individual left phrenic nerve course therefore is essential to prevent nerve injury. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of an intraprocedural pace mapping and reconstruction of the left phrenic nerve course and to characterize which anatomical areas are affected. In patients undergoing left atrial catheter ablation, a three-dimensional map of the left atrial anatomical structures was created. The left-sided phrenic nerve course was determined by high-output pace mapping and reconstructed in the map. In this study, 40 patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial tachycardias were included. Left phrenic nerve capture was observed in 23 (57.5%) patients. Phrenic nerve was captured in 22 (55%) patients inside the left atrial appendage, in 22 (55%) in distal parts, in 21 (53%) in medial parts, and in two (5%) in ostial parts of the appendage. In three (7.5%) patients, capture was found in the distal coronary sinus and in one (2.5%) patient in the left atrium near the left atrial appendage ostium. Ablation target was changed due to direct spatial relationship to the phrenic nerve in three (7.5%) patients. No phrenic nerve palsy was observed. Left-sided phrenic nerve capture was found inside and around the left atrial appendage in the majority of patients and additionally in the distal coronary sinus. Phrenic nerve mapping and reconstruction can easily be performed and should be considered prior catheter ablations in potential affected areas. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Robotic phrenic nerve harvest: a feasibility study in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto de Melo, P; Miyamoto, H; Serradori, T; Ruggiero Mantovani, G; Selber, J; Facca, S; Xu, W-D; Santelmo, N; Liverneaux, P

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the feasibility of robotic phrenic nerve harvest in a pig model. A surgical robot (Da Vinci S™ system, Intuitive Surgical(®), Sunnyvale, CA) was installed with three ports on the pig's left chest. The phrenic nerve was transected distally where it enters the diaphragm. The phrenic nerve harvest was successfully performed in 45 minutes without major complications. The advantages of robotic microsurgery for phrenic nerve harvest are the motion scaling up to 5 times, elimination of physiological tremor, and free movement of joint-equipped robotic arms. Robot-assisted neurolysis may be clinically useful for harvesting the phrenic nerve for brachial plexus reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Phrenic nerve neurotization utilizing the spinal accessory nerve: technical note with potential application in patients with high cervical quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Pearson, Blake; Loukas, Marios; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oakes, W Jerry

    2008-11-01

    High cervical quadriplegia is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Artificial respiration in these patients carries significant long-term risks such as infection, atelectasis, and respiratory failure. As phrenic nerve pacing has been proven to free many of these patients from ventilatory dependency, we hypothesized that neurotization of the phrenic nerve with the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) may offer one potential alternative to phrenic nerve stimulation via pacing and may be more efficacious and longer lasting without the complications of an implantable device. Ten cadavers (20 sides) underwent exposure of the cervical phrenic nerve and the SAN in the posterior cervical triangle. The SAN was split into anterior and posterior halves and the anterior half transposed to the ipsilateral phrenic nerve as it crossed the anterior scalene muscle. The mean distance between the cervical phrenic nerve and the SAN in the posterior cervical triangle was 2.5 cm proximally, 4 cm at a midpoint, and 6 cm distally. The range for these measurements was 2 to 4 cm, 3.5 to 5 cm, and 4 to 8.5 cm, respectively. The mean excess length of SAN available after transposition to the more anteromedially placed phrenic nerve was 5 cm (range 4 to 6.5 cm). The mean diameter of these regional parts of the spinal accessory and phrenic nerves was 2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found for measurements between sides. To our knowledge, using the SAN for neurotization to the phrenic nerve for potential use in patients with spinal cord injury has not been previously explored. Following clinical trials, these data may provide a mechanism for self stimulation of the diaphragm and obviate phrenic nerve pacing in patients with high cervical quadriplegia. Our study found that such a maneuver is technically feasible in the cadaver.

  3. Phrenic Nerve Conduction Abnormalities Correlate with Diaphragmatic Descent in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tantawi, Gihan A Younis; Imam, Mohamed H; Morsi, Tamer S

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragmatic weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is ascribed to hyperinflation-induced diaphragm shortening as well as impairment in cellular and subcellular structures. Although phrenic neuropathy is known to cause diaphragmatic weakness, phrenic neuropathy is rarely considered in COPD. This work aimed at assessing phrenic nerve conduction in COPD and its relation to radiographic hyperinflation and pulmonary function. Forty COPD patients were evaluated. Radiographic parameters of lung hyperinflation were measured on postero-anterior and lateral chest x-ray films. Flow volume loop parameters were obtained from all patients. Motor conduction study of the phrenic nerves was performed and potentials were recorded over the xiphoid process and the ipsilateral 7th intercostal space. Twenty-seven healthy subjects were enrolled as controls. Parameters of phrenic nerve conduction differed significantly in patients compared to controls. Phrenic nerve abnormalities were detected in 17 patients (42.5%). Electrophysiological measures correlated with diaphragmatic angle of depression on lateral view films and with lung height on postero-anterior films. They did not correlate with the flow volume loop data or disease severity score. Phrenic nerve conduction abnormality is an appreciated finding in COPD. Nerve stretching associated with diaphragmatic descent can be a suggested mechanism for nerve lesion. The presence of phrenic neuropathy may be an additional contributing factor to diaphragmatic dysfunction in COPD patients.

  4. Vocal cord collapse during phrenic nerve-paced respiration in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Mark C; Preciado, Diego A

    2012-01-01

    Phrenic nerve pacing can be used to treat congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS). We report how the lack of normal vocal cord tone during phrenic paced respiration can result in passive vocal cord collapse and produce obstructive symptoms. We describe a case of passive vocal cord collapse during phrenic nerve paced respiration in a patient with CCHS. As far as we know, this is the first report of this etiology of airway obstruction. The patient, a 7-year-old with CCHS and normal waking vocal cord movement, continued to require nightly continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) despite successful utilization of phrenic nerve pacers. On direct laryngoscopy, the patient's larynx was observed while the diaphragmatic pacers were sequentially engaged. No abnormal vocal cord stimulation was witnessed during engaging of either phrenic nerve stimulator. However, the lack of normal inspiratory vocal cord abduction during phrenic nerve-paced respiration resulted in vocal cord collapse and partial obstruction due to passive adduction of the vocal cords through the Bernoulli effect. Bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation resulted in more vocal cord collapse than unilateral stimulation. The lack of vocal cord abduction on inspiration presents a limit to phrenic nerve pacers.

  5. Electrophysiological evaluation of phrenic nerve injury during cardiac surgery – a prospective, controlled, clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ege Turan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to some reports, left hemidiaphragmatic paralysis due to phrenic nerve injury may occur following cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study was to document the effects on phrenic nerve injury of whole body hypothermia, use of ice-slush around the heart and mammary artery harvesting. Methods Electrophysiology of phrenic nerves was studied bilaterally in 78 subjects before and three weeks after cardiac or peripheral vascular surgery. In 49 patients, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG and heart valve replacement with moderate hypothermic (mean 28°C cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB were performed. In the other 29, CABG with beating heart was performed, or, in several cases, peripheral vascular surgery with normothermia. Results In all patients, measurements of bilateral phrenic nerve function were within normal limits before surgery. Three weeks after surgery, left phrenic nerve function was absent in five patients in the CPB and hypothermia group (3 in CABG and 2 in valve replacement. No phrenic nerve dysfunction was observed after surgery in the CABG with beating heart (no CPB or the peripheral vascular groups. Except in the five patients with left phrenic nerve paralysis, mean phrenic nerve conduction latency time (ms and amplitude (mV did not differ statistically before and after surgery in either group (p > 0.05. Conclusions Our results indicate that CPB with hypothermia and local ice-slush application around the heart play a role in phrenic nerve injury following cardiac surgery. Furthermore, phrenic nerve injury during cardiac surgery occurred in 10.2 % of our patients (CABG with CPB plus valve surgery.

  6. Phrenic nerve protection via packing of gauze into the pericardial space during ablation of cristal atrial tachycardia in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Fuchigami, Tai; Nabeshima, Taisuke; Sashinami, Arata; Nakayashiro, Mami

    2016-03-01

    The success of catheter ablation of focal atrial tachycardia is limited by possible collateral damage to the phrenic nerve. Protection of the phrenic nerve is required. Here we present a case of a 9-year-old girl having a history of an unsuccessful catheter ablation of a focal atrial tachycardia near the crista terminalis (because of proximity of the phrenic nerve) who underwent a successful ablation by means of a novel technique for phrenic nerve protection: packing of gauze into the pericardial space. This method is a viable approach for patients with a failed endocardial ablation due to the proximity of the phrenic nerve.

  7. Prospective Evaluation of Electromyography-Guided Phrenic Nerve Monitoring During Superior Vena Cava Isolation to Anticipate Phrenic Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Ichihara, Noboru; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Hachiya, Hitoshi; Araki, Makoto; Takagi, Takamitsu; Iwasawa, Jin; Kuroi, Akio; Hirao, Kenzo; Iesaka, Yoshito

    2016-04-01

    Right phrenic nerve injury (PNI) is a major concern during superior vena cava (SVC) isolation due to the anatomical close proximity. The functional and histological severity of PNI parallels the degree of the reduction in the compound motor action potential (CMAP) amplitude. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring CMAPs during SVC isolation to anticipate PNI during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Thirty-nine paroxysmal AF patients were prospectively enrolled. Radiofrequency energy was delivered point-by-point for 30 seconds with 20 W until eliminating all SVC potentials after the pulmonary vein isolation. Right diaphragmatic CMAPs were obtained from modified surface electrodes by pacing from the right subclavian vein. Radiofrequency applications were applied without fluoroscopy under CMAP monitoring at sites with phrenic nerve capture by high output pacing. Electrical SVC isolation was successfully achieved with a mean of 9.4 ± 3.3 applications in all patients. In 3 (7.5%) patients, the SVC was isolated without radiofrequency delivery at phrenic nerve capture sites. Among a total of 346 applications in the remaining 36 patients, 71 (20.5%) were delivered while monitoring CMAPs. In 1 (1.4%) application, the RF application was interrupted due to a decrease in the CMAP amplitude. However, no PNI was detected on fluoroscopy, and the decreased amplitude recovered spontaneously. The remaining 70 (98.6%) applications exhibited no significant changes in the CMAP amplitude throughout the applications (from 1.01 ± 0.47 to 0.98 ± 0.45 mV, P = 0.383). Stable right diaphragmatic CMAPs could be obtained, and monitoring CMAPs might be useful for anticipating right PNI during SVC isolation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparative study of phrenic and intercostal nerve transfers for elbow flexion after global brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuzhou; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Global brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) are devastating events frequently resulting in severe functional impairment. The widely used nerve transfer sources for elbow flexion in patients with global BPIs include intercostal and phrenic nerves. The aim of this study was to compare phrenic and intercostal nerve transfers for elbow flexion after global BPI. A retrospective review of 33 patients treated with phrenic and intercostal nerve transfer for elbow flexion in posttraumatic global root avulsion BPI was carried out. In the phrenic nerve transfer group, the phrenic nerve was transferred to the anterolateral bundle of the anterior division of the upper trunk (23 patients); in the intercostal nerve transfer group, three intercostal nerves were coapted to the anterolateral bundles of the musculocutaneous nerve. The British Medical Research Council (MRC) grading system, angle of elbow flexion, and electromyography (EMG) were used to evaluate the recovery of elbow flexion at least 3 years postoperatively. The efficiency of motor function in the phrenic nerve transfer group was 83%, while it was 70% in the intercostal nerve transfer group. The two groups were not statistically different in terms of the MRC grade (p=0.646) and EMG results (p=0.646). The outstanding rates of angle of elbow flexion were 48% and 40% in the phrenic and intercostal nerve transfer groups, respectively. There was no significant difference of outstanding rates in the angle of elbow flexion between the two groups. Phrenic nerve transfer had a higher proportion of good prognosis for elbow flexion than intercostal nerve transfer, but the effective and outstanding rate had no significant difference for biceps reinnervation between the two groups according to MRC grading, angle of elbow flexion, and EMG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prognosis of phrenic nerve injury following thoracic interventions: four new cases and a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowska, Monika; de Carvalho, Mamede

    2012-04-01

    Phrenic nerve lesion is a known complication of thoracic surgical intervention, but it is rarely described following thymectomy and lung surgery. To review the literature on thoracic intervention and phrenic nerve lesion and to describe four new cases, in which regular neurophysiological studies were performed. We reviewed the literature concerning phrenic nerve lesion after cardiac, lung and thymus surgical interventions. We described four cases of phrenic nerve lesion, three associated with thymectomy and one in lung surgery. The review shows that cryogenic or thermal injuries during cardiac surgeries are associated with good prognosis. The information on the outcome of phrenic nerve lesion in thymectomy or lung surgery is insufficient. Our cases and this review suggest that phrenic lesion in the last two interventions are associated with a poor recovery. Our data suggests that the prognosis of phrenic nerve lesion following thoracic intervention depends on the nature of the damage. Probably, in thymectomy and lung surgery, nerve stretch or laceration are involved, consequently the outcome is poorer in comparison with cardiac surgery, where cold lesion is more frequent. Neurophysiological tests give a direct, quantified and reliable assessment of nerve regeneration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Phrenic nerve palsy associated with birth trauma--case reports and a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Hayashi, Masaharu; Hishiki, Tomoro; Suyama, Maiko; Mizuochi, Hiromi; Uchikawa, Hideki; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Yoshida, Hideo; Kohno, Yoichi

    2013-04-01

    Phrenic nerve palsy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused by excessive cervical extension due to birth trauma or cardiac surgery. We describe two new patients with phrenic nerve palsy associated with birth trauma. Both patients exhibited profound dyspnea and general hypotonia immediately after birth. A chest roentgenogram and fluoroscopy revealed elevation of the diaphragm, leading to a diagnosis of phrenic nerve palsy associated with birth trauma. Since they had intermittently exhibited dyspnea and recurrent infection, we performed video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) plication in both cases, at an early and a late stage, respectively. Both patients subsequently exhibited a dramatic improvement in dyspnea and recurrent respiratory infection. Interestingly, the late stage operated infant exhibited spontaneous recovery at 7 months with cessation of mechanical ventilation once. However, this recovery was transient and subsequently led to an increased ventilation volume demand, finally resulting in surgical treatment at 15 months. Histological examination of the diaphragm at this time showed grouped muscle atrophy caused by phrenic nerve degeneration. To our knowledge, this is the first pathologically proven report of grouped muscle atrophy of the diaphragm due to phrenic nerve degeneration, suggesting that partial impairment of phrenic nerves resulted in respiratory dysfunction with incomplete recovery. We conclude that recently developed VATS plication is a safe and effective treatment for infants with phrenic nerve palsy, and should be considered as a surgical treatment at an early period. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Neurotization of the phrenic nerve with accessory nerve for high cervical spinal cord injury with respiratory distress: an anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ce; Zhang, Ying; Nicholas, Tsai; Wu, Guoxin; Shi, Sheng; Bo, Yin; Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Xuhui; Yuan, Wen

    2014-01-01

    High cervical spinal cord injury is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Traditional treatments carry various complications such as infection, pacemaker failure and undesirable movement. Thus, a secure surgical strategy with fewer complications analogous to physiological ventilation is still required. We hope to offer one potential method to decrease the complications and improve survival qualities of patients from the aspect of anatomy. The purpose of the study is to provide anatomic details on the accessory nerve and phrenic nerve for neurotization in patients with high spinal cord injuries. 38 cadavers (76 accessory and 76 phrenic nerves) were dissected in the study. The width, length and thickness of each accessory nerve and phrenic nerve above clavicle were measured. The distances from several landmarks on accessory nerve to the origin and the end of the phrenic nerve above clavicle were measured too. Then, the number of motor nerve fibers on different sections of the nerves was calculated using the technique of immunohistochemistry. The accessory nerves distal to its sternocleidomastoid muscular branches were 1.52 ± 0.32 mm ~1.54 ± 0.29 mm in width, 0.52 ± 0.18 mm ~ 0.56 ± 0.20mm in thickness and 9.52 ± 0.98 cm in length. And the phrenic nerves above clavicle were 1.44 ± 0.23 mm ~ 1.45 ± 0.24 mm in width, 0.47 ± 0.15 mm ~ 0.56 ± 0.25 mm in thickness and 6.48 ± 0.78 cm in length. The distance between the starting point of accessory nerve and phrenic nerve were 3.24 ± 1.17 cm, and the distance between the starting point of accessory nerve and the end of the phrenic nerve above clavicle were 8.72 ± 0.84 cm. The numbers of motor nerve fibers in accessory nerve were 1,038 ± 320~1,102 ± 216, before giving out the sternocleidomastoid muscular branches. The number of motor nerve fibers in the phrenic nerve was 911 ± 321~1,338 ± 467. The accessory nerve and the phrenic were similar in width, thickness and the number of motor nerve fibers. And

  12. Sonoanatomical Change of Phrenic Nerve According to Posture During Ultrasound-Guided Stellate Ganglion Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joeng, Eui Soo; Jeong, Young Cheol; Park, Bum Jun; Kang, Seok; Yang, Seung Nam; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the risk of phrenic nerve injury during ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block (US-SGB) according to sonoanatomy of the phrenic nerve, and determine a safer posture for needle insertion by assessing its relationship with surrounding structure according to positional change. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers were recruited and underwent ultrasound in two postures, i.e., supine position with the neck extension and head rotation, and lateral decubitus position. The transducer was placed at the anterior tubercle of the C6 level to identify phrenic nerve. The cross-sectional area (CSA), depth from skin, distance between phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle of C6 transverse process, and the angle formed by anterior tubercle, posterior tubercle and phrenic nerve were measured. The phrenic nerve was clearly identified in the intermuscular fascia layer between the anterior scalene and sternocleidomastoid muscles. The distance between the phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle was 10.33±3.20 mm with the supine position and 9.20±3.31 mm with the lateral decubitus position, respectively. The mean CSA and skin depth of phrenic nerve were not statistically different between the two positions. The angle with the supine position was 48.37°±27.43°, and 58.89°±30.02° with the lateral decubitus position. The difference of angle between the two positions was statistically significant. Ultrasound is a useful tool for assessing the phrenic nerve and its anatomical relation with other cervical structures. In addition, lateral decubitus position seems to be safer by providing wider angle for needle insertion than the supine position in US-SGB.

  13. The terminal latency of the phrenic nerve correlates with respiratory symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Sung; Park, Donghwi

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the electrophysiological parameters in phrenic nerve conduction studies (NCS) that sensitively reflect latent respiratory insufficiency present in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Forty-nine patients with ALS were examined, and after exclusion, 21 patients with ALS and their phrenic NCS results were reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups according to their respiratory sub-score in the ALS functional rating scale - revised (Group A, sub-score 12vs. Group B, sub-score 11). We compared the parameters of phrenic NCS between the two groups. There were no significant differences in the clinical characteristics between the two groups. Using a multivariate model, we found that the terminal latency of the phrenic nerve was the only parameter that was associated with early symptoms of respiratory insufficiency (pphrenic nerve was 7.65ms (sensitivity 80%, specificity 68.2%). The significantly prolonged terminal latency of the phrenic nerve in our study may reflect a profound distal motor axonal dysfunction of the phrenic nerve in patients with ALS in the early stage of respiratory insufficiency that can be used as a sensitive electrophysiological marker reflecting respiratory symptoms in ALS. The terminal latency of the phrenic nerve is useful for early detection of respiratory insufficiency in patients with ALS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Anatomical feasibility of vagus nerve esophageal branch transfer to the phrenic nerve☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ce; Liu, Jun; Yuan, Wen; Zhou, Xuhui; Wang, Xinwei; Xu, Peng; Chen, Jian; Wu, Guoxin; Shi, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    This study measured the vagus and phrenic nerves from 12 adult cadavers. We found that the width and thickness of the vagus and phrenic nerves were different in the chest. The distance from the point of the vagus nerve and phrenic nerve on the plane of the inferior border of portal pulmonary arteries (T point) was approximately 7 cm to the diaphragm and was approximately 10 cm to the clavicle level. The number of motor fibers in the vagus nerves was 1 716 ± 362, and the number of nerve fibers was 4 473 ± 653. The number of motor fibers in the phrenic nerves ranged from 3 078 ± 684 to 4 794 ± 638, and the number of nerve fibers ranged from 3 437 ± 642 to 5 071 ± 723. No significant difference was found in the total number of nerve fibers. The results suggest that width, thickness, and total number of nerve fibers are similar between the vagus and phrenic nerves, but the number of motor fibers is different between them. PMID:25745467

  15. Recurrent intractable hiccups treated by cervical phrenic nerve block under electromyography: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Young Jo; Song, Dae Heon; Kim, Jae Jun; Kim, Young Du; Kim, Chi Kyung; Moon, Seok Whan

    2015-11-01

    Intractable or persistent hiccups require intensive or invasive treatments. The use of a phrenic nerve block or destructive treatment for intractable hiccups has been reported to be a useful and discrete method that might be valuable to patients with this distressing problem and for whom diverse management efforts have failed. We herein report a successful treatment using a removable and adjustable ligature for the phrenic nerve in a patient with recurrent and intractable hiccups, which was employed under the guidance of electromyography.

  16. Effect of phrenic nerve palsy on early postoperative lung function after pneumonectomy: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Gregor J; Mauss, Karl; Carboni, Giovanni L; Hoksch, Beatrix; Kuster, Roland; Ott, Sebastian R; Schmid, Ralph A

    2013-12-01

    The issue of phrenic nerve preservation during pneumonectomy is still an unanswered question. So far, its direct effect on immediate postoperative pulmonary lung function has never been evaluated in a prospective trial. We conducted a prospective crossover study including 10 patients undergoing pneumonectomy for lung cancer between July 2011 and July 2012. After written informed consent, all consecutive patients who agreed to take part in the study and in whom preservation of the phrenic nerve during operation was possible, were included in the study. Upon completion of lung resection, a catheter was placed in the proximal paraphrenic tissue on the pericardial surface. After an initial phase of recovery of 5 days all patients underwent ultrasonographic assessment of diaphragmatic motion followed by lung function testing with and without induced phrenic nerve palsy. The controlled, temporary paralysis of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm was achieved by local administration of lidocaine 1% at a rate of 3 mL/h (30 mg/h) via the above-mentioned catheter. Temporary phrenic nerve palsy was accomplished in all but 1 patient with suspected catheter dislocation. Spirometry showed a significant decrease in dynamic lung volumes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity; p phrenic nerve palsy causes a significant impairment of dynamic lung volumes during the early postoperative period after pneumonectomy. Therefore, in these already compromised patients, intraoperative phrenic nerve injury should be avoided whenever possible. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Thoracoscopic patch insulation to correct phrenic nerve stimulation secondary to cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediratta, Neeraj; Barker, Diane; McKevith, James; Davies, Peter; Belchambers, Sandra; Rao, Archana

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy is an established therapy for heart failure, improving quality of life and prognosis. Despite advances in technique, available leads and delivery systems, trans-venous left ventricular (LV) lead positioning remains dependent on the patient's underlying venous anatomy. The left phrenic nerve courses over the surface of the pericardium laterally and may be stimulated by the LV pacing lead, causing uncomfortable diaphragmatic twitch. This paper describes a video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) procedure to correct phrenic nerve stimulation secondary to cardiac resynchronization therapy. Most current ways of avoiding phrenic stimulation involve either electronic reprogramming to distance the phrenic nerve from the stimulation circuit or repositioning the lead. We describe a case where the phrenic nerve was surgically insulated from the stimulating current by insinuating a patch of bovine pericardium between the epicardium and native pericardium of the heart thus completely resolving previously intolerable and incessant diaphragmatic twitch. The procedure was performed under general anaesthesia with single-lung ventilation and minimal use of neuromuscular blocking agents. Surgical patch insulation of the phrenic nerve was performed using minimally invasive VATS surgery, as a short-stay procedure, with no complications. No diaphragmatic twitch occurred post-surgery and the patient continued to gain symptomatic benefit from cardiac synchronization therapy (New York Heart Association Class III to II), enabling return to work. In cases where the trans-venous position of a LV lead is limited by troublesome phrenic nerve stimulation, thoracoscopic surgical patch insulation of the phrenic nerve could be considered to allow beneficial cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  18. Phrenic Nerve Palsy and Regional Anesthesia for Shoulder Surgery: Anatomical, Physiologic, and Clinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Boghdadly, Kariem; Chin, Ki Jinn; Chan, Vincent W S

    2017-07-01

    Regional anesthesia has an established role in providing perioperative analgesia for shoulder surgery. However, phrenic nerve palsy is a significant complication that potentially limits the use of regional anesthesia, particularly in high-risk patients. The authors describe the anatomical, physiologic, and clinical principles relevant to phrenic nerve palsy in this context. They also present a comprehensive review of the strategies for reducing phrenic nerve palsy and its clinical impact while ensuring adequate analgesia for shoulder surgery. The most important of these include limiting local anesthetic dose and injection volume and performing the injection further away from the C5-C6 nerve roots. Targeting peripheral nerves supplying the shoulder, such as the suprascapular and axillary nerves, may be an effective alternative to brachial plexus blockade in selected patients. The optimal regional anesthetic approach in shoulder surgery should be tailored to individual patients based on comorbidities, type of surgery, and the principles described in this article.

  19. SELECTIVE LARYNGEAL ABDUCTOR REINNERVATION IN CATS USING A PHRENIC-NERVE TRANSFER AND ORG-2766

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAHIEU, HF; VANLITHBIJL, JT; GROENHOUT, C; TONNAER, JADM; DEWILDE, P

    Reinnervation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve following nerve injury often leads to laryngeal synkinesis. Selective reinnervation of adductor and abductor muscles might be able to avoid synkinesis. This study presents the results of selective abductor reinnervation in cats, using a phrenic nerve

  20. Subclavian vein pacing and venous pressure waveform measurement for phrenic nerve monitoring during cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Justin; Singarayar, Suresh; Kabunga, Peter; McGuire, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    The phrenic nerves may be damaged during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. Phrenic nerve function is routinely monitored during ablation by stimulating the right phrenic nerve from a site in the superior vena cava (SVC) and manually assessing the strength of diaphragmatic contraction. However the optimal stimulation site, method of assessing diaphragmatic contraction, and techniques for monitoring the left phrenic nerve have not been established. We assessed novel techniques to monitor phrenic nerve function during cryoablation procedures. Pacing threshold and stability of phrenic nerve capture were assessed when pacing from the SVC, left and right subclavian veins. Femoral venous pressure waveforms were used to monitor the strength of diaphragmatic contraction. Stable capture of the left phrenic nerve by stimulation in the left subclavian vein was achieved in 96 of 100 patients, with a median capture threshold of 2.5 mA [inter-quartile range (IQR) 1.4-5.0 mA]. Stimulation of the right phrenic nerve from the subclavian vein was superior to stimulation from the SVC with lower pacing thresholds (1.8 mA IQR 1.4-3.3 vs. 6.0 mA IQR 3.4-8.0, P phrenic nerve palsy. The left phrenic nerve can be stimulated from the left subclavian vein. The subclavian veins are the optimal sites for phrenic nerve stimulation. Monitoring the femoral venous pressure waveform is a novel technique for detecting impending phrenic nerve damage. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Periodicity during hypercapnic and hypoxic stimulus is crucial in distinct aspects of phrenic nerve plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipica, I; Pavlinac Dodig, I; Pecotic, R; Dogas, Z; Valic, Z; Valic, M

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine pattern sensitivity of phrenic nerve plasticity in respect to different respiratory challenges. We compared long-term effects of intermittent and continuous hypercapnic and hypoxic stimuli, and combined intermittent hypercapnia and hypoxia on phrenic nerve plasticity. Adult, male, urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, mechanically ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to: acute intermittent hypercapnia (AIHc or AIHc(O2)), acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH), combined intermittent hypercapnia and hypoxia (AIHcH), continuous hypercapnia (CHc), or continuous hypoxia (CH). Peak phrenic nerve activity (pPNA) and burst frequency were analyzed during baseline (T0), hypercapnia or hypoxia exposures, at 15, 30, and 60 min (T60) after the end of the stimulus. Exposure to acute intermittent hypercapnia elicited decrease of phrenic nerve frequency from 44.25+/-4.06 at T0 to 35.29+/-5.21 at T60, (P=0.038, AIHc) and from 45.5+/-2.62 to 37.17+/-3.68 breaths/min (P=0.049, AIHc(O2)), i.e. frequency phrenic long term depression was induced. Exposure to AIH elicited increase of pPNA at T60 by 141.0+/-28.2 % compared to baseline (P=0.015), i.e. phrenic long-term facilitation was induced. Exposure to AIHcH, CHc, or CH protocols failed to induce long-term plasticity of the phrenic nerve. Thus, we conclude that intermittency of the hypercapnic or hypoxic stimuli is needed to evoke phrenic nerve plasticity.

  2. Abnormal Origin and Course of the Accessory Phrenic Nerve: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevas, George; Koutsouflianiotis, Konstantinos; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis; Spyridakis, Ioannis

    In the current cadaveric study an unusual sizeable accessory phrenic nerve (APN) was encountered emerging from the trunk of the supraclavicular nerves and forming a triangular loop that was anastomosing with the phrenic nerve. That neural loop surrounded the superficial cervical artery which displayed a spiral course. The form of a triangular loop of APN involving the aforementioned artery and originating from the supraclavicular nerve to the best of our knowledge has not been documented previously in the literature. The variable morphological features of the APN along with its clinical applications are briefly discussed.

  3. Abnormal Origin and Course of the Accessory Phrenic Nerve: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Paraskevas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the current cadaveric study an unusual sizeable accessory phrenic nerve (APN was encountered emerging from the trunk of the supraclavicular nerves and forming a triangular loop that was anastomosing with the phrenic nerve. That neural loop surrounded the superficial cervical artery which displayed a spiral course. The form of a triangular loop of APN involving the aforementioned artery and originating from the supraclavicular nerve to the best of our knowledge has not been documented previously in the literature. The variable morphological features of the APN along with its clinical applications are briefly discussed.

  4. MRI Reconstructions of Human Phrenic Nerve Anatomy and Computational Modeling of Cryoballoon Ablative Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Ryan P; Spencer, Julianne H; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2016-04-01

    The primary goal of this computational modeling study was to better quantify the relative distance of the phrenic nerves to areas where cryoballoon ablations may be applied within the left atria. Phrenic nerve injury can be a significant complication of applied ablative therapies for treatment of drug refractory atrial fibrillation. To date, published reports suggest that such injuries may occur more frequently in cryoballoon ablations than in radiofrequency therapies. Ten human heart-lung blocs were prepared in an end-diastolic state, scanned with MRI, and analyzed using Mimics software as a means to make anatomical measurements. Next, generated computer models of ArticFront cryoballoons (23, 28 mm) were mated with reconstructed pulmonary vein ostias to determine relative distances between the phrenic nerves and projected balloon placements, simulating pulmonary vein isolation. The effects of deep seating balloons were also investigated. Interestingly, the relative anatomical differences in placement of 23 and 28 mm cryoballoons were quite small, e.g., the determined difference between mid spline distance to the phrenic nerves between the two cryoballoon sizes was only 1.7 ± 1.2 mm. Furthermore, the right phrenic nerves were commonly closer to the pulmonary veins than the left, and surprisingly tips of balloons were further from the nerves, yet balloon size choice did not significantly alter calculated distance to the nerves. Such computational modeling is considered as a useful tool for both clinicians and device designers to better understand these associated anatomies that, in turn, may lead to optimization of therapeutic treatments.

  5. Anatomical study of phrenic nerve course in relation to neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Tomohiro; Usami, Akinobu; Kishi, Asuka; Kon, Hideki; Takada, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The present study sought to clarify the course of the phrenic nerve and its correlation with anatomical landmarks in the neck region. We examined 17 cadavers (30 sides). In each, the phrenic nerves was dissected from the lateral side of the neck, and its position within the triangle formed by the mastoid process and sternal and acromial ends of the clavicle was determined. The point where the phrenic nerve arises in the posterior triangle was found to be similar to the point where the cutaneous blanches of the cervical plexus emerge at the middle of the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. In the supraclavian triangle, the phrenic nerve crosses the anterior border of the anterior scalene muscle near Erb's point where the superficial point is 2-3 cm superior from the clavicle and posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The phrenic nerve arises in the posterior triangle near the nerve point, then descends to the anterior surface of the anterior scalene muscle in the supraclavian triangle. It is necessary to be aware of the supraclavian triangle below Erb's point during neck dissection procedures.

  6. Can bilateral bronchospasm be a sign of unilateral phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular brachial plexus block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Chaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks facilitate ambulatory anesthesia for upper limb surgeries. Unilateral phrenic nerve blockade is a common complication after interscalene brachial plexus block, rather than the supraclavicular block. We report a case of severe respiratory distress and bilateral bronchospasm following ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patient did not have clinical features of pneumothorax or drug allergy and was managed with oxygen therapy and salbutamol nebulization. Chest X-ray revealed elevated right hemidiaphragm confirming unilateral phrenic nerve paresis.

  7. The phrenic nerve with accompanying vessels: a silent cause of cardiovascular border obliteration on chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhana, Shiri; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Ogihara, Yukihiro; Aso, Nobuya; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Uetani, Masataka

    2015-12-01

    Our aim was to clarify the frequency of cardiovascular border obliteration on frontal chest radiography and to prove that the phrenic nerve with accompanying vessels can be considered as a cause of obliteration of cardiovascular border on an otherwise normal chest radiography. Two radiologists reviewed chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) images of 100 individuals. CT confirmed the absence of intrapulmonary or extrapulmonary abnormalities in all of them. We examined the frequency of cardiovascular border obliteration on frontal chest radiography and summarized the causes of obliteration as pericardial fat pad, phrenic nerve, intrafissure fat, pulmonary vessels, and others, comparing them with CT in each case. Cardiovascular border was obliterated on frontal chest radiography in 46 cases on the right and in 61 on the left. The phrenic nerve with accompanying vessels was found to be a cause of obliteration in 34 of 46 cases (74%) on the right and 29 of 61 (48%) cases on the left. The phrenic nerve was the most frequent cause of cardiovascular border obliteration on both sides. The phrenic nerve with accompanying vessels, forming a prominent fold of parietal pleura, can be attributed as a cause of cardiovascular border obliteration on frontal chest radiography.

  8. Functional restoration of diaphragmatic paralysis: an evaluation of phrenic nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Matthew R; Elkwood, Andrew I; Colicchio, Alan R; CeCe, John; Jarrahy, Reza; Willekes, Lourens J; Rose, Michael I; Brown, David

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis causes respiratory deficits and can occur after iatrogenic or traumatic phrenic nerve injury in the neck or chest. Patients are evaluated using spirometry and imaging studies; however, phrenic nerve conduction studies and electromyography are not widely available or considered; thus, the degree of dysfunction is often unknown. Treatment has been limited to diaphragmatic plication. Phrenic nerve operations to restore diaphragmatic function may broaden therapeutic options. An interventional study of 92 patients with symptomatic diaphragmatic paralysis assigned 68 (based on their clinical condition) to phrenic nerve surgical intervention (PS), 24 to nonsurgical (NS) care, and evaluated a third group of 68 patients (derived from literature review) treated with diaphragmatic plication (DP). Variables for assessment included spirometry, the Short-Form 36-Item survey, electrodiagnostics, and complications. In the PS group, there was an average 13% improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (p Phrenic nerve operations for functional restoration of the paralyzed diaphragm should be part of the standard treatment algorithm in the management of symptomatic patients with this condition. Assessment of neuromuscular dysfunction can aid in determining the most effective therapy. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of spinal GABAergic circuits in the control of phrenic nerve motor output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, Vitaliy; Ghali, Michael G Z; Rogers, Robert F

    2015-06-01

    While supraspinal mechanisms underlying respiratory pattern formation are well characterized, the contribution of spinal circuitry to the same remains poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that intraspinal GABAergic circuits are involved in shaping phrenic motor output. To this end, we performed bilateral phrenic nerve recordings in anesthetized adult rats and observed neurogram changes in response to knocking down expression of both isoforms (65 and 67 kDa) of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65/67) using microinjections of anti-GAD65/67 short-interference RNA (siRNA) in the phrenic nucleus. The number of GAD65/67-positive cells was drastically reduced on the side of siRNA microinjections, especially in the lateral aspects of Rexed's laminae VII and IX in the ventral horn of cervical segment C4, but not contralateral to microinjections. We hypothesize that intraspinal GABAergic control of phrenic output is primarily phasic, but also plays an important role in tonic regulation of phrenic discharge. Also, we identified respiration-modulated GABAergic interneurons (both inspiratory and expiratory) located slightly dorsal to the phrenic nucleus. Our data provide the first direct evidence for the existence of intraspinal GABAergic circuits contributing to the formation of phrenic output. The physiological role of local intraspinal inhibition, independent of descending direct bulbospinal control, is discussed. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Comparative study of phrenic nerve transfers with and without nerve graft for elbow flexion after global brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuzhou; Lao, Jie; Gao, Kaiming; Gu, Yudong; Zhao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Nerve transfer is a valuable surgical technique in peripheral nerve reconstruction, especially in brachial plexus injuries. Phrenic nerve transfer for elbow flexion was proved to be one of the optimal procedures in the treatment of brachial plexus injuries in the study of Gu et al. The aim of this study was to compare phrenic nerve transfers with and without nerve graft for elbow flexion after brachial plexus injury. A retrospective review of 33 patients treated with phrenic nerve transfer for elbow flexion in posttraumatic global root avulsion brachial plexus injury was carried out. All the 33 patients were confirmed to have global root avulsion brachial plexus injury by preoperative and intraoperative electromyography (EMG), physical examination and especially by intraoperative exploration. There were two types of phrenic nerve transfers: type1 - the phrenic nerve to anterolateral bundle of anterior division of upper trunk (14 patients); type 2 - the phrenic nerve via nerve graft to anterolateral bundle of musculocutaneous nerve (19 patients). Motor function and EMG evaluation were performed at least 3 years after surgery. The efficiency of motor function in type 1 was 86%, while it was 84% in type 2. The two groups were not statistically different in terms of Medical Research Council (MRC) grade (p=1.000) and EMG results (p=1.000). There were seven patients with more than 4 month's delay of surgery, among whom only three patients regained biceps power to M3 strength or above (43%). A total of 26 patients had reconstruction done within 4 months, among whom 25 patients recovered to M3 strength or above (96%). There was a statistically significant difference of motor function between the delay of surgery within 4 months and more than 4 months (p=0.008). Phrenic nerve transfers with and without nerve graft for elbow flexion after brachial plexus injury had no significant difference for biceps reinnervation according to MRC grading and EMG. A delay of the surgery

  11. A ferromagnetic surgical system reduces phrenic nerve injury in redo congenital cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkawa, Takeshi; Holloway, Jessica; Tang, Xinyu; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Imamura, Michiaki

    2017-05-01

    A ferromagnetic surgical system (FMwand®) is a new type of dissection device expected to reduce the risk of adjacent tissue damage. We reviewed 426 congenital cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass through redo sternotomy to assess if this device prevented phrenic nerve injury. The ferromagnetic surgical system was used in 203 operations (47.7%) with regular electrocautery and scissors. The preoperative and operative details were similar between the operations with or without the ferromagnetic surgical system. The incidence of phrenic nerve injury was significantly lower with the ferromagnetic surgical system (0% vs 2.7%, P = 0.031). A logistic regression model showed that the use of the ferromagnetic surgical system was significantly associated with reduced odds of phrenic nerve injury (P < 0.001). © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurofibromas of the Phrenic Nerve: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael G Z; Srinivasan, Visish M; Jea, Andrew; Slopis, John M; McCutcheon, Ian E

    2016-04-01

    Phrenic neurofibromas are a rare pathologic entity, with 9 cases described in the English literature. They may occur in conjunction with or independently of neurofibromatosis type 1. Phrenic neurofibromas pose distinct therapeutic challenges compared with the more common phrenic schwannoma. We describe here a 12-year-old boy with neurofibroma of the left phrenic nerve presenting as dextroposition of the heart after paralysis of the left hemidiaphragm allowed herniation of abdominal contents into the left hemithorax and displaced the heart. Surgical resection of the tumor followed by diaphragmatic plication was performed to assess its degree of malignancy, reduce abdominal herniation, and improve lung capacity. The operation markedly improved his hemidiaphragmatic elevation. The spectrum of management options ranges from conservative surveillance to open thoracic surgery. Functional preservation of the phrenic nerve is technically challenging, and although phrenic neurofibromas often present with absent function that cannot be recovered, surgical intervention can be fruitful in restoring lung capacity through diaphragmatic reconstruction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preventing phrenic nerve stimulation by a patch insulation in an intact swine heart model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Long Huang

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS could be prevented by a silastic patch over the epicardial lead. We studied the effects in preventing PNS by placing a silastic patch directly over an epicardial lead or placing a graft around the phrenic nerve (PN.Fourteen Lanyu swine were enrolled. A bipolar lead was placed epicardially on the left ventricle (LV inferior to the PN. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD lead was placed into the right ventricle (RV. The maximal influential distance (MID was measured under 3 pacing configurations to express the influential electrical field on the PN. The threshold of the LV and PN were evaluated epicardially. Then, PTFE patches of different sizes (10×10 mm, 20×20 mm and 30×30 mm were placed between the LV lead and PN to study the rise in PN threshold in 7 swine. On the other hand, the PN were surrounded by a PTFE graft of different lengths (10 mm, 20 mm, and 30 mm in the remaining 7 swine. LV-bipolar pacing showed the shortest MID when compared to the other 2 unipolar pacing configurations at pacing voltage of 10 V. The patch was most effective in preventing PNS during LV-bipolar pacing. PNS was prevented under all circumstances with a larger PTFE patch (30×30 mm or long graft (30 mm.PNS was avoided by placing a PTFE patch over the LV lead or a graft around the PN despite pacing configurations. Hence if PNS persisted during CRT implantation, a PTFE patch on the LV lead or a graft around the PN could be considered.

  14. Visualization of the diaphragm muscle with ultrasound improves diagnostic accuracy of phrenic nerve conduction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Utz, Michael; Patrick, Erica; Rheinwald, Nicole; Downs, Marlene; Dilek, Nuran; Dogra, Vikram; Logigian, Eric L

    2014-05-01

    Evaluation of phrenic neuropathy (PN) with phrenic nerve conduction studies (PNCS) is associated with false negatives. Visualization of diaphragmatic muscle twitch with diaphragm ultrasound (DUS) when performing PNCS may help to solve this problem. We performed bilateral, simultaneous DUS-PNCS in 10 healthy adults and 12 patients with PN. The amplitude of the diaphragm compound muscle action potential (CMAP) (on PNCS) and twitch (on DUS) was calculated. Control subjects had phrenic CMAP (on PCNS). In the 12 patients with PN, 12 phrenic neuropathies were detected. Three of these patients had either significant side-to-side asymmetry or absolute reduction in diaphragm movement that was not detected with PNCS. There were no cases in which the PNCS showed an abnormality but the DUS did not. The addition of DUS to PNCS enhances diagnostic accuracy in PN. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Diaphragmatic paralysis evaluated by phrenic nerve stimulation during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound

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    McCauley, R.G.K.; Labib, K.B.

    1984-10-01

    Stimulation of the phrenic nerve by supplying an electrical impulse to the neck during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound (sonoscopy) of the diaphragm allows more precise functional evaluation than fluoroscopy and/or sonoscopy alone. This is especially true of patients who are unable to cooperate because the are on a ventilator, unconscious, or very young. The authors cite cases in which diaphragmatic paralysis was diagnosed by conventional methods but stimulation of the phrenic nerve demonstrated good diaphragmatic motion, leading to a change in prognosis in some cases and a change in therapy in others.

  16. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

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    Nahum, E.; Ben-Ari, J.; Schonfeld, T. [Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Horev, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2001-06-01

    A 3{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  17. Diaphragmatic paralysis evaluated by phrenic nerve stimulation during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, R.G.K.; Labib, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    Stimulation of the phrenic nerve by supplying an electrical impulse to the neck during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound (sonoscopy) of the diaphragm allows more precise functional evaluation than fluoroscopy and/or sonoscopy alone. This is especially true of patients who are unable to cooperate because the are on a ventilator, unconscious, or very young. The authors cite cases in which diaphragmatic paralysis was diagnosed by conventional methods but stimulation of the phrenic nerve demonstrated good diaphragmatic motion, leading to a change in prognosis in some cases and a change in therapy in others

  18. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahum, E.; Ben-Ari, J.; Schonfeld, T.; Horev, G.

    2001-01-01

    A 3 1 / 2 -year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  19. Immediate balloon deflation for prevention of persistent phrenic nerve palsy during pulmonary vein isolation by balloon cryoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Justin; Sepahpour, Ali; Chan, Kim H; Singarayar, Suresh; McGuire, Mark A

    2013-05-01

    Persistent phrenic nerve palsy is the most frequent complication of cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation and can be disabling. To describe a technique-immediate balloon deflation (IBD)-for the prevention of persistent phrenic nerve palsy, provide data for its use, and describe in vitro simulations performed to investigate the effect of IBD on the atrium and pulmonary vein. Cryoballoon procedures for atrial fibrillation were analyzed retrospectively (n = 130). IBD was performed in patients developing phrenic nerve dysfunction (n = 22). In vitro simulations were performed by using phantoms. No adverse events occurred, and all patients recovered normal phrenic nerve function before leaving the procedure room. No patient developed persistent phrenic nerve palsy. The mean cryoablation time to onset of phrenic nerve dysfunction was 144 ± 64 seconds. Transient phrenic nerve dysfunction was seen more frequently with the 23-mm balloon than with the 28-mm balloon (11 of 39 cases vs 11 of 81 cases; P = .036). Balloon rewarming was faster following IBD. The time to return to 0 and 20° C was shorter in the IBD group (6.7 vs 8.9 seconds; P = .007 and 16.7 vs 37.6 seconds; Pphrenic nerve palsy. Simulations suggest that IBD is unlikely to damage the atrium or pulmonary vein. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluoroscopy of spontaneous breathing is more sensitive than phrenic nerve stimulation for detection of right phrenic nerve injury during cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhart, Markus; Nielson, Annika; Andrié, René P; Mittmann-Braun, Erica L; Stöckigt, Florian; Kreuz, Jens; Nickenig, Georg; Schrickel, Jan W; Lickfett, Lars M

    2014-08-01

    Right phrenic nerve palsy (PNP) is a typical complication of cryoballoon ablation of the right-sided pulmonary veins (PVs). Phrenic nerve function can be monitored by palpating the abdomen during phrenic nerve pacing from the superior vena cava (SVC pacing) or by fluoroscopy of spontaneous breathing. We sought to compare the sensitivity of these 2 techniques during cryoballoon ablation for detection of PNP. A total of 133 patients undergoing cryoballoon ablation were monitored with both SVC pacing and fluoroscopy of spontaneous breathing during ablation of the right superior PV. PNP occurred in 27/133 patients (20.0%). Most patients (89%) had spontaneous recovery of phrenic nerve function at the end of the procedure or on the following day. Three patients were discharged with persistent PNP. All PNP were detected first by fluoroscopic observation of diaphragm movement during spontaneous breathing, while diaphragm could still be stimulated by SVC pacing. In patients with no recovery until discharge, PNP occurred at a significantly earlier time (86 ± 34 seconds vs. 296 ± 159 seconds, P < 0.001). No recovery occurred in 2/4 patients who were ablated with a 23 mm cryoballoon as opposed to 1/23 patients with a 28 mm cryoballoon (P = 0.049). Fluoroscopic assessment of diaphragm movement during spontaneous breathing is more sensitive for detection PNP as compared to SVC pacing. PNP as assessed by fluoroscopy is frequent (20.0%) and carries a high rate of recovery (89%) until discharge. Early onset of PNP and use of 23 mm cryoballoon are associated with PNP persisting beyond hospital discharge. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Phrenic nerve block caused by interscalene brachial plexus block: breathing effects of different sites of injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Lars; Martini, Stefan; Kesselmeier, Miriam; Armbruster, Wolf; Notheisen, Thomas; Adamzik, Michael; Eichholz, Rϋdiger

    2016-07-29

    Interscalene brachial plexus (ISB) block is often associated with phrenic nerve block and diaphragmatic paresis. The goal of our study was to test if the anterior or the posterior ultrasound guided approach of the ISB is associated with a lower incidence of phrenic nerve blocks and impaired lung function. This was a prospective, randomized and single-blinded study of 84 patients scheduled for elective shoulder surgery who fullfilled the inclusion and exclusion critereria. Patients were randomized in two groups to receive either the anterior (n = 42) or the posterior (n = 42) approach for ISB. Clinical data were recorded. In both groups patients received ISB with a total injection volume of 15 ml of ropivacaine 1 %. Spirometry was conducted at baseline (T0) and 30 min (T30) after accomplishing the block. Changes in spirometrical variables between T0 and T30 were investigated by Wilcoxon signed-rank test for each puncture approach. The temporal difference between the posterior and the anterior puncture approach groups were again analyzed by the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. The spirometric results showed a significant decrease in vital capacity, forced expiratory volume per second, and maximum nasal inspiratory breathing after the Interscalene brachial plexus block; indicating a phrenic nerve block (p Wilcoxon signed-rank). A significant difference in the development of the spirometric parameters between the anterior and the posterior group could not be identified (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test). Despite the changes in spirometry, no cases of dyspnea were reported. A different site of injection (anterior or posterior) did not show an effect in reducing the cervical block spread of the local anesthetic and the incidence of phrenic nerve blocks during during ultrasound guided Interscalene brachial plexus block. Clinical breathing effects of phrenic nerve blocks are, however, usually well compensated, and subjective dyspnea did not occur in our patients. German

  2. Functional restoration of the paralyzed diaphragm in high cervical quadriplegia via phrenic nerve neurotization utilizing the functional spinal accessory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-liang; Li, Jian-jun; Zhang, Shao-cheng; Du, Liang-jie; Gao, Feng; Li, Jun; Wang, Yu-ming; Gong, Hui-ming; Cheng, Liang

    2011-08-01

    The authors report a case of functional improvement of the paralyzed diaphragm in high cervical quadriplegia via phrenic nerve neurotization using a functional spinal accessory nerve. Complete spinal cord injury at the C-2 level was diagnosed in a 44-year-old man. Left diaphragm activity was decreased, and the right diaphragm was completely paralyzed. When the level of metabolism or activity (for example, fever, sitting, or speech) slightly increased, dyspnea occurred. The patient underwent neurotization of the right phrenic nerve with the trapezius branch of the right spinal accessory nerve at 11 months postinjury. Four weeks after surgery, training of the synchronous activities of the trapezius muscle and inspiration was conducted. Six months after surgery, motion was observed in the previously paralyzed right diaphragm. The lung function evaluation indicated improvements in vital capacity and tidal volume. This patient was able to sit in a wheelchair and conduct outdoor activities without assisted ventilation 12 months after surgery.

  3. Phrenic Nerve Transfer for Reconstruction of Elbow Extension in Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Leandro P; Socolovsky, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Background Restoring elbow extension is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus in patients with a flail arm. Based upon the good results obtained using the phrenic nerve to restore elbow flexion and shoulder stability, we hypothesized that this nerve could also be employed to reconstruct elbow extension in patients with severe brachial plexus injuries. Methods A retrospective study of 10 patients in which the phrenic nerve targeted the radial nerve (7 patients) or the branch to the long head of the triceps (3 patients) as a surgical strategy for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Results The mean postoperative follow-up time was 34 months. At final follow-up, elbow extension graded as M4 was measured in three patients, Medical Research Council MRC M3 in five patients, and M2 in one patient, while one patient experienced no measurable recovery (M0). No patient complained or demonstrated any signs of respiratory insufficiency postoperatively. Conclusions The phrenic nerve is a reliable donor for reanimation of elbow extension in such cases, and the branch to the long head of the triceps should be considered as a better target for the nerve transfer. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Successful Reinnervation of the Diaphragm After Intercostal to Phrenic Nerve Neurotization in Patients With High Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandra, Kulvir S; Harari, Martin; Price, Thea P; Greaney, Patrick J; Weinstein, Michael S

    2017-08-01

    Our objective in this study was to extend diaphragmatic pacing therapy to include paraplegic patients with high cervical spinal cord injuries between C3 and C5. Diaphragmatic pacing has been used in patients experiencing ventilator-dependent respiratory failure due to spinal cord injury as a means to reduce or eliminate the need for mechanical ventilation. However, this technique relies on intact phrenic nerve function. Recently, phrenic nerve reconstruction with intercostal nerve grafting has expanded the indications for diaphragmatic pacing. Our study aimed to evaluate early outcomes and efficacy of intercostal nerve transfer in diaphragmatic pacing. Four ventilator-dependent patients with high cervical spinal cord injuries were selected for this study. Each patient demonstrated absence of phrenic nerve function via external neck stimulation and laparoscopic diaphragm mapping. Each patient underwent intercostal to phrenic nerve grafting with implantation of a phrenic nerve pacer. The patients were followed, and ventilator dependence was reassessed at 1 year postoperatively. Our primary outcome was measured by the amount of time our patients tolerated off the ventilator per day. We found that all 4 patients have tolerated paced breathing independent of mechanical ventilation, with 1 patient achieving 24 hours of tracheostomy collar. From this study, intercostal to phrenic nerve transfer seems to be a promising approach in reducing or eliminating ventilator support in patients with C3 to C5 high spinal cord injury.

  5. The importance of phrenic nerve preservation and its effect on long-term postoperative lung function after pneumonectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Gregor J; Poulson, Jannie Lysgaard; Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten Rune; Elle, Bo; Schmid, Ralph A; Licht, Peter B

    2016-04-01

    The importance of phrenic nerve preservation during pneumonectomy remains controversial. We previously demonstrated that preservation of the phrenic nerve in the immediate postoperative period preserved lung function by 3-5% but little is known about its long-term effects. We, therefore, decided to investigate the effect of temporary ipsilateral cervical phrenic nerve block on dynamic lung volumes in mid- to long-term pneumonectomy patients. We investigated 14 patients after a median of 9 years post pneumonectomy (range: 1-15 years). Lung function testing (spirometry) and fluoroscopic and/or sonographic assessment of diaphragmatic motion on the pneumonectomy side were performed before and after ultrasonographic-guided ipsilateral cervical phrenic nerve block by infiltration with lidocaine. Ipsilateral phrenic nerve block was successfully achieved in 12 patients (86%). In the remaining 2 patients, diaphragmatic motion was already paradoxical before the nerve block. We found no significant difference on dynamic lung function values (FEV1 'before' 1.39 ± 0.44 vs FEV1 'after' 1.38 ± 0.40; P = 0.81). Induction of a temporary diaphragmatic palsy did not significantly influence dynamic lung volumes in mid- to long-term pneumonectomy patients, suggesting that preservation of the phrenic nerve is of greater importance in the immediate postoperative period after pneumonectomy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Marked lateral deviation of the phrenic nerve due to variant origin and course of the thyrocervical trunk: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogami, Keiko; Saiki, K; Okamoto, K; Wakebe, T; Manabe, Y; Imamura, T; Tsurumoto, T

    2016-05-01

    Phrenic nerve impairment can often lead to serious respiratory disorders under various pathological conditions. During routine dissection of an 88-year-old Japanese male cadaver, a victim of heart failure, we recognized an extremely rare variation of the right thyrocervical trunk arising from the subclavian artery laterally to the anterior scalene muscle. In addition to that, the ipsilateral phrenic nerve was drawn and displaced remarkably laterad by this vessel. We examined all of the branches arising from subclavian arteries, phrenic nerves and diaphragm muscles. The embryological background of this arterial variation is considered. The marked displacement with prolonged strain had a potential to cause phrenic nerve impairment with an atrophic change of the diaphragm muscle. Recently many image diagnostic technologies have been developed and are often used. However, it is still possible that rare variations like this case may be overlooked and can only be recognized by intimate regional examination while keeping these rare variations in mind.

  7. The phrenic nerve transfer in the treatment of a septuagenarian with brachial plexus avulsion injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ye; Lao, Jie

    2018-05-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer has been a well-established procedure for restoring elbow flexion function in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury. Concerning about probably detrimental respiratory effects brought by the operation, however, stirred up quite a bit of controversy. We present a case report of the successful application of phrenic nerve as donor to reinnervate the biceps in a septuagenarian with brachial plexus avulsion injury, not accompanied with significant clinical respiratory problem.

  8. [Treatment of bilateral vocal cord paralysis by hemi-phrenic nerve transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W; Li, M; Zheng, H L; Sun, L; Chen, S C; Chen, D H; Liu, F; Zhu, M H; Zhang, C Y; Wang, W

    2017-04-07

    Objective: To investigate the surgical effect of reinnervation of bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid muscles(PCA) with left hemi-phrenic nerve and endoscopic laser arytenoid resection in bilateral vocal cord fold paralysis(BVFP) and to analyze the pros and cons of the two methods. Methods: One hundred and seventeen BVFP patients who underwent reinnervation of bilateral PCA using the left hemi-phrenic nerve approach (nerve group, n =52) or laser arytenoidectomy(laser group, n =65) were enrolled in this study from Jan.2009 to Dec.2015.Vocal perception evaluation, video stroboscopy, pulmonary function test and laryngeal electromyography were preformed in all patients both preoperatively and postoperative1y.Extubution rate was calculated postoperative1y. Results: Most of the vocal function parameters in nerve group were improved postoperatively compared with preoperative parameters, albeit without a significant difference( P >0.05), while laser group showed a significant deterioration in voice quality postoperative1y( P nerve group was larger than that in laser group ( P nerve group were inhale physiological vocal cord abductions. Postoperative glottal closure showed no significant difference in nerve group ( P >0.05), while showed various increment in laser group( P nerve group and laser group respectively. In both groups, patients presented aspiration symptoms postoperatively, and rdieved soon, except 2 patients in laser group suffered repeated aspiration. Conclusions: Reinnervation of bilateral PCA muscles using left hemi-phrenic nerve can restore inspiratory vocal fold abduction to a satisfactory extent while preserving phonatory function at the preoperative level without evident morbidity, and do not affect swallowing function, greatly improving the quality of life of the patients.

  9. Rehabilitation, Using Guided Cerebral Plasticity, of a Brachial Plexus Injury Treated with Intercostal and Phrenic Nerve Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Lars B; Andersson, Gert; Backman, Clas; Svensson, Hampus; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after surgical reconstruction of a brachial plexus injury using nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures is a function of peripheral nerve regeneration and cerebral reorganization. A 15-year-old boy, with traumatic avulsion of nerve roots C5-C7 and a non-rupture of C8-T1, was operated 3 weeks after the injury with nerve transfers: (a) terminal part of the accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve, (b) the second and third intercostal nerves to the axillary nerve, and (c) the fourth to sixth intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. A second operation-free contralateral gracilis muscle transfer directly innervated by the phrenic nerve-was done after 2 years due to insufficient recovery of the biceps muscle function. One year later, electromyography showed activation of the biceps muscle essentially with coughing through the intercostal nerves, and of the transferred gracilis muscle by deep breathing through the phrenic nerve. Voluntary flexion of the elbow elicited clear activity in the biceps/gracilis muscles with decreasing activity in intercostal muscles distal to the transferred intercostal nerves (i.e., corresponding to eighth intercostal), indicating cerebral plasticity, where neural control of elbow flexion is gradually separated from control of breathing. To restore voluntary elbow function after nerve transfers, the rehabilitation of patients operated with intercostal nerve transfers should concentrate on transferring coughing function, while patients with phrenic nerve transfers should focus on transferring deep breathing function.

  10. Phrenic Nerve Conduction Study in the Early Stage of Guillain-Barre Syndrome as a Predictor of Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Barun Kumar; Pandit, Alak

    2018-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has unpredictable clinical course with severe complication of respiratory failure. To identify clinical profiles and electrophysiological study particularly non-invasive Phrenic nerve conduction study in patients of early GBS to predict respiratory failure. 64 adult (age≥18yrs) patients of early GBS (onset ≤ 14 days) during the study period from January 2014 to October 2015 were evaluated by clinical profiles of age, gender, antecedent infection, time to peak disability, single breath counts, cranial nerve involvement, autonomic dysfunction and non-invasive Phrenic nerve conduction study. Patients with predisposition factors of polyneuropathy like diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, vitamin deficiency, renal failure were excluded. Among 64 patients abnormal phrenic nerve conduction study was seen in 65.62% cases (42/64) and 45.23% (19/42) of them developed respiratory failure. Phrenic nerve sum latency, amplitude, duration and area were abnormal in those who developed respiratory failure and they had sum of phrenic nerve latency >28 msec, sum of CMAP amplitude 50 msec and sum of area phrenic nerve study developed respiratory failure. It was found that age, gender, preceding infection, autonomic involvement and types of GB syndrome had no influence on development of respiratory failure (p>0.05). Rapid disease progression to peak disability, more severe disease, shorter single breath counts and cranial nerve involvement were seen more often in patients with respiratory failure. Abnormal Phrenic nerve conduction study in the early Guillain-Barré syndrome might be of great value independently in predicting impending respiratory failure.

  11. Phrenic Nerve Conduction Study in the Early Stage of Guillain–Barre Syndrome as a Predictor of Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Barun Kumar; Pandit, Alak

    2018-01-01

    Background: Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has unpredictable clinical course with severe complication of respiratory failure. Objective: To identify clinical profiles and electrophysiological study particularly non-invasive Phrenic nerve conduction study in patients of early GBS to predict respiratory failure. Methods: 64 adult (age≥18yrs) patients of early GBS (onset ≤ 14 days) during the study period from January 2014 to October 2015 were evaluated by clinical profiles of age, gender, antecedent infection, time to peak disability, single breath counts, cranial nerve involvement, autonomic dysfunction and non-invasive Phrenic nerve conduction study. Patients with predisposition factors of polyneuropathy like diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, vitamin deficiency, renal failure were excluded. Results: Among 64 patients abnormal phrenic nerve conduction study was seen in 65.62% cases (42/64) and 45.23% (19/42) of them developed respiratory failure. Phrenic nerve sum latency, amplitude, duration and area were abnormal in those who developed respiratory failure and they had sum of phrenic nerve latency >28 msec, sum of CMAP amplitude 50 msec and sum of area phrenic nerve study developed respiratory failure. It was found that age, gender, preceding infection, autonomic involvement and types of GB syndrome had no influence on development of respiratory failure (p>0.05). Rapid disease progression to peak disability, more severe disease, shorter single breath counts and cranial nerve involvement were seen more often in patients with respiratory failure. Conclusion: Abnormal Phrenic nerve conduction study in the early Guillain-Barré syndrome might be of great value independently in predicting impending respiratory failure. PMID:29720799

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Catheter Complicated by Persistent Phrenic Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Koogler

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old male presented for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA in the beach chair position. A preoperative interscalene nerve catheter was placed under direct ultrasound-guidance utilizing a posterior in-plane approach. On POD 2, the catheter was removed. Three weeks postoperatively, the patient reported worsening dyspnea with a subsequent chest X-ray demonstrating an elevated right hemidiaphragm. Pulmonary function testing revealed worsening deficit from presurgical values consistent with phrenic nerve palsy. The patient decided to continue conservative management and declined further invasive testing or treatment. He was followed for one year postoperatively with moderate improvement of his exertional dyspnea over that period of time. The close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the brachial plexus in combination with its frequent anatomical variation can lead to unintentional mechanical trauma, intraneural injection, or chemical injury during performance of ISB. The only previously identified risk factor for PPNP is cervical degenerative disc disease. Although PPNP has been reported following TSA in the beach chair position without the presence of a nerve block, it is typically presumed as a complication of the interscalene block. Previously published case reports and case series of PPNP complicating ISBs all describe nerve blocks performed with either paresthesia technique or localization with nerve stimulation. We report a case of a patient experiencing PPNP following an ultrasound-guided placement of an interscalene nerve catheter.

  13. Early hemi-diaphragmatic plication following intraoperative phrenic nerve transection during complete AV canal repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamad Alowayshiq

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral diaphragmatic palsy reduces pulmonary function by about 25% in older children and usually it is well tolerated; however, it causes severe respiratory distress in infants and young children. Diaphragmatic plication performed later than 10 days after cardiac surgery for patients under 1 year of age was associated with higher incidence of pneumonia and mortality. The management of the diaphragmatic paralysis due to phrenic nerve injury aiming mainly to preserve the respiratory function. Until now, the optimal management of diaphragmatic palsy in children who have undergone cardiac surgery remains controversial and consists of prolonged ventilation or diaphragmatic plication. In our case, many factors supported early diaphragmatic plication, the age of the patient, post-operative AV canal repair with severe pulmonary hypertension, and clear transection of the left phrenic nerve diagnosed intraoperatively.

  14. Super-response to cardiac resynchronization therapy may predict late phrenic nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliá, Justo; López-Gil, María; Fontenla, Adolfo; Lozano, Álvaro; Villagraz, Lola; Salguero, Rafael; Arribas, Fernando

    2017-11-22

    Changes in the anatomical relationship between left phrenic nerve and coronary veins may occur due to the reverse remodelling observed in super-responders to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and might be the underlying mechanism in patients developing late-onset phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS) without evidence of lead dislodgement (LD). In this study, we sought to evaluate the role of super-response (SR) to CRT as a potential predictor of late-onset PNS. Consecutive patients implanted with a left ventricular (LV) lead in a single centre were retrospectively analysed. Phrenic nerve stimulation was classified as 'early' when it occurred within 3 months of implantation and 'late' for occurrences thereafter. 'Late' PNS was considered related to LD (LD-PNS) when LV threshold differed by > 1 V or impedance >250 Ω from baseline values or in case of radiological displacement. Cases not meeting the former criteria were classified as 'non-LD-PNS'. Super-response was defined as a decrease ≥30% of the left ventricluar end-systolic volume at 1-year echocardiography. At 32 ± 7 months follow-up, PNS occurred in 20 of 139 patients. Late non-LD-PNS incidence was significantly higher in the SR group (8/61; 13.1%) when compared with the non-SR (1/78; 1.3%) (P = 0.010). Super-response remained the only predictor of non-LD-PNS at multivariate analysis (odds ratio: 11.62, 95% confidence interval 1.41-95.68, P = 0.023). Incidence of late non-LD-PNS is higher among SR to CRT, suggesting a potential role of the changes in the anatomical relationship between left phrenic nerve and coronary veins. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Imaging before cryoablation of atrial fibrillation: is phrenic nerve palsy predictable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canpolat, Uğur; Aytemir, Kudret; Hızal, Mustafa; Hazırolan, Tuncay; Yorgun, Hikmet; Sahiner, Levent; Kaya, Ergun Barış; Oto, Ali

    2014-04-01

    Multidetector computerized tomography (MDCT) with improved temporal and spatial resolution is one of the most commonly used non-invasive tests for evaluation of pulmonary veins (PVs) and adjacent structures before cryoablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). Identification of spatial neighbouring of phrenic nerves is important to decrease likelihood of phrenic nerve palsy (PNP). The purpose of our study is to clarify the course of right phrenic nerve, its relations to PVs using 64-slice MDCT, and effect on occurrence of PNP. A total of 162 patients underwent MDCT with 3D reconstruction of left atrium prior to cryoablation for AF. The location of the right pericardiophrenic artery (RPA) was identified on axial images and artery distance to the right upper PV (RUPV) ostium was measured in 3D image. Right pericardiophrenic artery was detectable in 145 of 162 (89.5%) patients (52.4% male, age 54.5 ± 10.1 years, and 80.7% paroxysmal AF). Acute procedural success rate was 96.2%. Mean procedural and fluoroscopy times were 74.4 ± 6.2 and 15.7 ± 4.3 min. Transient right PNP was developed in four (2.75%) patients. RUPV ostium to RPA distance was lower in patients with PNP (P = 0.033). In multivariate regression analysis, only RUPV ostium to RPA distance (odds ratio: 2.95; 95% confidence interval: 1.76-4.66, P = 0.001) was the independent predictor of PNP occurrence during cryoablation. Our results revealed that pre-ablation cardiac imaging with 64-slice MDCT adequately detected RPA bordering the phrenic nerve, which was an important determinant of PNP development during cryoballoon-based AF ablation.

  16. Partial recovery of respiratory function and diaphragm reinnervation following unilateral vagus nerve to phrenic nerve anastomosis in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiang Wen

    Full Text Available Respiratory dysfunction is the leading cause of mortality following upper cervical spinal cord injury (SCI. Reinnervation of the paralyzed diaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and a donor nerve is a potential strategy to mitigate ventilatory deficits. In this study, anastomosis of vagus nerve (VN to phrenic nerve (PN in rabbits was performed to assess the potential capacity of the VN to compensate for lost PN inputs. At first, we compared spontaneous discharge pattern, nerve thickness and number of motor fibers between these nerves. The PN exhibited a highly rhythmic discharge while the VN exhibited a variable frequency discharge pattern. The rabbit VN had fewer motor axons (105.3±12.1 vs. 268.1±15.4. Nerve conduction and respiratory function were measured 20 weeks after left PN transection with or without left VN-PN anastomosis. Compared to rabbits subjected to unilateral phrenicotomy without VN-PN anastomosis, diaphragm muscle action potential (AP amplitude was improved by 292%, distal latency by 695%, peak inspiratory flow (PIF by 22.6%, peak expiratory flow (PRF by 36.4%, and tidal volume by 21.8% in the anastomosis group. However, PIF recovery was only 28.0%, PEF 28.2%, and tidal volume 31.2% of Control. Our results suggested that VN-PN anastomosis is a promising therapeutic strategy for partial restoration of diaphragm reinnervation, but further modification and improvements are necessary to realize the full potential of this technique.

  17. Phrenic nerve decompression for the management of unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis - preoperative evaluation and operative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshide, Reid; Brown, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (UDP) can be a very disabling, typically causing shortness of breath and reduced exercise tolerance. We present a case of a surgical decompression of the phrenic nerve of a patient who presented with UDP, which occurred following cervical spine surgery. The workup for the etiology of UDP demonstrated paradoxical movement on "sniff test" and notably impaired pulmonary function tests. Seven months following the onset of the UDP, he underwent a surgical decompression of the phrenic nerve at the level of the anterior scalene. He noted rapid symptomatic improvement following surgery and reversal of the above noted objective findings was documented. At his 4-year follow-up, he had complete resolution of his clinical symptoms. Repeated physiologic testing of his respiratory function had shown a complete reversal of his UDP. Anatomical compression of the phrenic nerve by redundant neck vasculature should be considered in the differential diagnosis of UDP. Here we demonstrated the techniques in workup and surgical management, with both subjective and objective evidence of success.

  18. Phrenic nerve decompression for the management of unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis – preoperative evaluation and operative technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshide, Reid; Brown, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (UDP) can be a very disabling, typically causing shortness of breath and reduced exercise tolerance. We present a case of a surgical decompression of the phrenic nerve of a patient who presented with UDP, which occurred following cervical spine surgery. Methods: The workup for the etiology of UDP demonstrated paradoxical movement on “sniff test” and notably impaired pulmonary function tests. Seven months following the onset of the UDP, he underwent a surgical decompression of the phrenic nerve at the level of the anterior scalene. Results: He noted rapid symptomatic improvement following surgery and reversal of the above noted objective findings was documented. At his 4-year follow-up, he had complete resolution of his clinical symptoms. Repeated physiologic testing of his respiratory function had shown a complete reversal of his UDP. Conclusions: Anatomical compression of the phrenic nerve by redundant neck vasculature should be considered in the differential diagnosis of UDP. Here we demonstrated the techniques in workup and surgical management, with both subjective and objective evidence of success. PMID:29184705

  19. Effects of cartap on isolated mouse phrenic nerve diaphragm and its related mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, J W; Kang, J J; Liu, S H; Jeng, C R; Cheng, Y W; Hu, C M; Tsai, S F; Wang, S C; Pang, V F

    2000-06-01

    Cartap, a nereistoxin analogue pesticide, is reported to have no irritation to eyes in rabbits. However, we have demonstrated recently that cartap could actually cause acute death in rabbits via ocular exposure. Our preliminary study with isolated mouse phrenic nerve diaphragms has shown that instead of neuromuscular blockade, cartap caused muscular contracture. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of cartap on the neuromuscular junction in more detail and to investigate its possible underlying mechanism with isolated mouse phrenic nerve diaphragms and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles. Cartap or nereistoxin at various concentrations was added in the organ bath with isolated mouse phrenic nerve diaphragm and both nerve- and muscle-evoked twitches were recorded. Instead of blocking the neuromuscular transmission as nereistoxin did, cartap caused contracture in stimulated or quiescent isolated mouse phrenic nerve diaphragm. Both the cartap-induced muscular contracture force and the time interval to initiate the contracture were dose-dependent. The contracture induced by cartap was not affected by the pretreatment of the diaphragm with the acetylcholine receptor blocker alpha-bungarotoxin; the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin; or various Ca(2+) channel blockers, NiCl(2), verapamil, and nifedipine. On the contrary, the contracture was significantly inhibited when the diaphragm was pretreated with ryanodine or EGTA containing Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution or in combination. This suggested that both internal and extracellular Ca(2+) might participate in cartap-induced skeletal muscle contracture. Moreover, cartap inhibited the [(3)H]-ryanodine binding to the Ca(2+) release channel of SR in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, cartap could induce a significant reduction in Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of SR vesicles at a relatively high dose. The results suggested that cartap might cause the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and the release of internal Ca(2

  20. Morphometric analysis of the phrenic nerve in male and female Wistar-Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Rodrigues

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ventilatory differences between rat strains and genders have been described but the morphology of the phrenic nerve has not been investigated in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rats. A descriptive and morphometric study of the phrenic nerves of male (N = 8 and female (N = 9 SHR, and male (N = 5 and female (N = 6 WKY is presented. After arterial pressure and heart rate recordings, the phrenic nerves of 20-week-old animals were prepared for epoxy resin embedding and light microscopy. Morphometric analysis performed with the aid of computer software that took into consideration the fascicle area and diameter, as well as myelinated fiber profile and Schwann cell nucleus number per area. Phrenic nerves were generally larger in males than in females on both strains but larger in WKY compared to SHR for both genders. Myelinated fiber numbers (male SHR = 228 ± 13; female SHR = 258 ± 4; male WKY = 382 ± 23; female WKY = 442 ± 11 for proximal right segments and density (N/mm²; male SHR = 7048 ± 537; female SHR = 10355 ± 359; male WKY = 9457 ± 1437; female WKY = 14351 ± 1448 for proximal right segments were significantly larger in females of both groups and remarkably larger in WKY than SHR for both genders. Strain and gender differences in phrenic nerve myelinated fiber number are described for the first time in this experimental model of hypertension, indicating the need for thorough functional studies of this nerve in male and female SHR.

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Phrenic Nerve Block for Intractable Hiccups following Placement of Esophageal Stent for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsanious, David; Khoury, Spiro; Martinez, Edgar; Nawras, Ali; Filatoff, Gregory; Ajabnoor, Hossam; Darr, Umar; Atallah, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Hiccups are actions consisting of sudden contractions of the diaphragm and intercostals followed by a sudden inspiration and transient closure of the vocal cords. They are generally short lived and benign; however, in extreme and rare cases, such as esophageal carcinoma, they can become persistent or intractable, up to and involving significant pain, dramatically impacting the patient's quality of life. This case involves a 60-year-old man with a known history of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. He was considered to have high surgical risk, and therefore he received palliative care through the use of fully covered metallic esophageal self-expandable stents due to a spontaneous perforated esophagus, after which he developed intractable hiccups and associated mediastinal pain. Conservative treatment, including baclofen, chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, and omeprazole, provided no relief for his symptoms. The patient was referred to pain management from gastroenterology for consultation on pain control. He ultimately received an ultrasound-guided left phrenic nerve block with bupivacaine and depomedrol, and 3 days later underwent the identical procedure on the right phrenic nerve. This led to complete resolution of his hiccups and associated mediastinal pain. At follow-up, 2 and 4 weeks after the left phrenic nerve block, the patient was found to maintain complete alleviation of the hiccups. Esophageal dilatation and/or phrenic or vagal afferent fiber irritation can be suspected in cases of intractable hiccups secondary to esophageal stenting. Regional anesthesia of the phrenic nerve through ultrasound guidance offers a long-term therapeutic option for intractable hiccups and associated mediastinal pain in selected patients with esophageal carcinoma after stent placement. Esophageal stent, esophageal stenting, intractable hiccups, intractable singultus, phrenic nerve block, phrenic nerve, ultrasound, palliative care, esophageal carcinoma.

  2. Outcome following phrenic nerve transfer to musculocutaneous nerve in patients with traumatic brachial palsy: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendonça Cardoso, Marcio; Gepp, Ricardo; Correa, José Fernando Guedes

    2016-09-01

    The phrenic nerve can be transferred to the musculocutaneous nerve in patients with traumatic brachial plexus palsy in order to recover biceps strength, but the results are controversial. There is also a concern about pulmonary function after phrenic nerve transection. In this paper, we performed a qualitative systematic review, evaluating outcomes after this procedure. A systematic review of published studies was undertaken in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Data were extracted from the selected papers and related to: publication, study design, outcome (biceps strength in accordance with BMRC and pulmonary function) and population. Study quality was assessed using the "strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology" (STROBE) standard or the CONSORT checklist, depending on the study design. Seven studies were selected for this systematic review after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. One hundred twenty-four patients completed follow-up, and most of them were graded M3 or M4 (70.1 %) for biceps strength at the final evaluation. Pulmonary function was analyzed in five studies. It was not possible to perform a statistical comparison between studies because the authors used different parameters for evaluation. Most of the patients exhibited a decrease in pulmonary function tests immediately after surgery, with recovery in the following months. Study quality was determined using STROBE in six articles, and the global score varied from 8 to 21. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve can recover biceps strength ≥M3 (BMRC) in most patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury. Early postoperative findings revealed that the development of pulmonary symptoms is rare, but it cannot be concluded that the procedure is safe because there is no study evaluating pulmonary function in old age.

  3. Mechanism to preserve phrenic nerve function during photosensitization reaction: drug uptake and photosensitization reaction effect on electric propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Haruka; Hamada, Risa; Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2018-02-01

    To study a mechanism of phrenic nerve preservation phenomena during a photosensitization reaction, we investigated an uptake of talaporfin sodium and photosensitization reaction effect on an electric propagation. Right phrenic nerve was completely preserved after superior vena cava isolations using the photosensitization reaction in canine animal experiments, in spite of adjacent myocardium was electrically blocked. We predicted that low drug uptake and/or low photosensitization reaction effect on the nerve might be a mechanism of that phenomena. To investigate uptake to various nerve tissue, a healthy extracted crayfish ventral nerve cord and an extracted porcine phrenic nerve were immersed in 20 μg/ml talaporfin sodium solution for 0-240 min. The mean talaporfin sodium fluorescence brightness increased depending on the immersion time. This brightness saturated around the immersion time of 120 min. We found that talaporfin sodium uptake inside the perineurium which directly related to the electric propagation function was lower than that of outside in the porcine phrenic nerve. To investigate photosensitization reaction effect on electric propagation, the crayfish nerve was immersed into the same solution for 15 min and irradiated by a 663 nm laser light with 120 mW/cm2. Since we found the action potential disappeared when the irradiation time was 25-65 s, we consider that the crayfish nerve does not tolerant to the photosensitization reaction on electric propagation function at atmospheric pressure. From these results, we think that the low uptake of talaporfin sodium inside the perineurium and low oxygen partial pressure of nerve might be the possible mechanism to preserve phrenic nerve in vivo.

  4. Clinical experience with a novel electromyographic approach to preventing phrenic nerve injury during cryoballoon ablation in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondésert, Blandine; Andrade, Jason G; Khairy, Paul; Guerra, Peter G; Dyrda, Katia; Macle, Laurent; Rivard, Léna; Thibault, Bernard; Talajic, Mario; Roy, Denis; Dubuc, Marc; Shohoudi, Azadeh

    2014-08-01

    Phrenic nerve palsy remains the most frequent complication associated with cryoballoon-based pulmonary vein (PV) isolation. We sought to characterize our experience using a novel monitoring technique for the prevention of phrenic nerve palsy. Two hundred consecutive cryoballoon-based PV isolation procedures between October 2010 and October 2013 were studied. In addition to standard abdominal palpation during right phrenic nerve pacing from the superior vena cava, all patients underwent diaphragmatic electromyographic monitoring using surface electrodes. Cryoablation was terminated on any perceived reduction in diaphragmatic motion or a 30% decrease in the compound motor action potential (CMAP). During right-sided ablation, a ≥30% reduction in CMAP amplitude occurred in 49 patients (24.5%). Diaphragmatic motion decreased in 30 of 49 patients and was preceded by a 30% reduction in CMAP amplitude in all. In 82% of cases, this reduction in CMAP amplitude occurred during right superior PV isolation. The baseline CMAP amplitude was 946.5±609.2 mV and decreased by 13.8±13.8% at the end of application. This decrease was more marked in the 33 PVs with a reduction in diaphragmatic motion than in those without (40.9±15.3% versus 11.3±10.5%; Pphrenic nerve palsy persisted beyond the end of the procedure, with all cases recovering within 6 months. Despite the shortened application all veins were isolated. At repeat procedure the right-sided PVs reconnected less frequently than the left-sided PVs in those with phrenic nerve palsy. Electromyographic phrenic nerve monitoring using the surface CMAP is reliable, easy to perform, and offers an early warning to impending phrenic nerve injury. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Phrenic nerve stimulation during neck dissection for advanced thyroid cancer involving level IV: is it worth doing it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Carlos S; Dueñas, Juan P; Marulanda, Marcela; Pérez, Diana; Londoňo, Andres; Roy, Soham; Khadem, Mai Al

    2017-03-01

    During thyroidectomy and neck dissection surgery for advanced or recurrent metastatic thyroid cancer under intraoperative monitoring, we used the available technology to assess the feasibility of such an intervention to monitor those patients with phrenic nerves at risk. A retrospective review of patients operated on from January 2009 to December 2015 by a single surgeon (CSD) was conducted. Patients who had neck and mediastinal dissection, with or without total thyroidectomy, due to advanced or recurrent metastatic disease to the neck were selected. The procedures were done under intraoperative nerve monitoring using nerve monitoring systems (NIM 2.0 or 3.0; Medtronic, Jacksonville, FL, USA). A total of 19 patients were included in the study, with a mean age of 57.6 years ± 16.3 and a male/female ratio of 10:9. Overall, all patients had an intact phrenic nerve at the conclusion of the surgery. One patient had an aggressive tumor that precluded sacrifice of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve and ipsilateral thoracic duct. The procedure was complicated by a temporary impairment of the diaphragm contraction with intraoperative nerve monitoring as well as a chyle fistula. This was due to the manipulation of the tissue surrounding the phrenic nerve. Intraoperative nerve monitoring of the phrenic nerve offers the surgeon a "potential" method of ensuring phrenic nerve integrity in cases of advanced thyroid cancers with gross level IV metastatic disease. Further prospective studies are needed to assess the risks of this intervention and evaluate the method of recording diaphragm contraction movement.

  6. Management of Pleural Space After Lung Resection by Cryoneuroablation of Phrenic Nerve: A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Jie; Ou, De-Bin; Lin, Xing; Ye, Ming-Fang

    2017-06-01

    Residual air space problems after pulmonary lobectomy are an important concern in thoracic surgical practice, and various procedures have been applied to manage them. This study describes a novel technique using controllable paralysis of the diaphragm by localized freezing of the phrenic nerve, and assesses the effectiveness of this procedure to reduce air space after pulmonary lobectomy. In this prospective randomized study, 207 patients who underwent lobectomy or bilobectomy and systematic mediastinal node dissection in our department between January 2009 and November 2013 were randomly allocated to a cryoneuroablation group or a conventional group. Patients in the cryoneuroablation group (n = 104) received phrenic nerve cryoneuroablation after lung procedures, and patients in the conventional group (n = 103) did not receive cryoneuroablation after the procedure. Data regarding preoperative clinical and surgical characteristics in both groups were collected. Both groups were compared with regard to postoperative parameters such as total amount of pleural drainage, duration of chest tube placement, length of hospital stay, requirement for repeat chest drain insertion, prolonged air leak, and residual space. Perioperative lung function was also compared in both groups. Recovery of diaphragmatic movement in the cryoneuroablation group was checked by fluoroscopy on the 15th, 30th, and 60th day after surgery. There was no statistically significant difference in patient characteristics between the 2 groups; nor was there a difference in terms of hospital stay, new drain requirement, and incidence of empyema. In comparison with the conventional group, the cryoneuroablation group had less total drainage (1024 ± 562 vs 1520 ± 631 mL, P phrenic nerve offers a reasonable option for prevention of residual air space following major pulmonary resection.

  7. The phrenic nerve as a donor for brachial plexus injuries: is it safe and effective? Case series and literature analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Mariano; di Masi, Gilda; Bonilla, Gonzalo; Domínguez Paez, Miguel; Robla, Javier; Calvache Cabrera, Camilo

    2015-06-01

    Controversy exists surrounding the use of the phrenic nerve for transfer in severe brachial plexus injuries. The objectives of this study are: (1) to present the experience of the authors using the phrenic nerve in a single institution; and (2) to thoroughly review the existing literature to date. Adult patients with C5-D1 and C5-C8 lesions and a phrenic nerve transfer were retrospectively included. Patients with follow-up shorter than 18 months were excluded. The MRC muscle strength grading system was used to rate the outcome. Clinical repercussions relating to sectioning of the phrenic nerve were studied. An intense rehabilitation program was started after surgery, and compliance to this program was monitored using a previously described scale. Statistical analysis was performed with the obtained data. Fifty-one patients were included. The mean time between trauma and surgery was 5.7 months. Three-quarters of the patients had C5-D1, with the remainder C5-C8. Mean post-operative follow-up was 32.5 months A MRC of M4 was achieved in 62.7% patients, M3 21.6%, M2 in 3.9%, and M1 in 11.8%. The only significant differences between the two groups were in graft length (9.8 vs. 15.1 cm, p = 0.01); and in the rehabilitation compliance score (2.86 vs. 2.00, p = 0.01). Results of phrenic nerve transfer are predictable and good, especially if the grafts are short and the rehabilitation is adequate. It may adversely affect respiratory function tests, but this rarely correlates clinically. Contraindications to the use of the phrenic nerve exist and should be respected.

  8. Occurrence of phrenic nerve stimulation in cardiac resynchronization therapy patients: the role of left ventricular lead type and placement site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Mauro; Exner, Derek V; Crossley, George H; Ramza, Brian; Coutu, Benoit; Tomassoni, Gery; Kranig, Wolfgang; Li, Shelby; Kristiansen, Nina; Voss, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS) has been reported in ∼1 in 4 patients undergoing left ventricular (LV) pacing. The occurrence of PNS over mid-term follow-up and the significance of PNS are less certain. Data from 1307 patients enrolled in pre-market studies of LV leads manufactured by Medtronic (models 4193 and 4195 unipolar, 4194, 4196, 4296, and 4396 bipolar) were pooled. Left ventricular lead location was recorded at implant using a common classification scheme. Phrenic nerve stimulation symptoms were either spontaneously reported or identified at scheduled follow-up visits. A PNS-related complication was defined as PNS resulting in invasive intervention or the termination of LV pacing. Average follow-up was 14.9 months (range 0.0-46.6). Phrenic nerve stimulation symptoms occurred in 169 patients (12.9%). Phrenic nerve stimulation-related complications occurred in 21 of 1307 patients (1.6%); 16 of 738 (2.2%) in the unipolar lead studies, and 5 of 569 (0.9%) in the bipolar lead studies (P = 0.08). Phrenic nerve stimulation was more frequent at middle-lateral/posterior, and apical LV sites (139/1010) vs. basal-posterior/lateral/anterior, and middle-anterior sites (20/297; P= 0.01). As compared with an anterior LV lead position, a lateral LV pacing site was associated with over a four-fold higher risk of PNS (P= 0.005) and an apical LV pacing site was associated with over six-fold higher risk of PNS (P= 0.001). Phrenic nerve stimulation occurred in 13% of patients undergoing LV lead placement and was more common at mid-lateral/posterior, and LV apical sites. Most cases (123/139; 88%) of PNS were mitigated via electrical reprogramming, without the need for invasive intervention.

  9. Femoral venous pressure waveform as indicator of phrenic nerve injury in the setting of second-generation cryoballoon ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnai, Giacomo; de Asmundis, Carlo; Ströker, Erwin; Hünük, Burak; Moran, Darragh; Ruggiero, Diego; De Regibus, Valentina; Coutino-Moreno, Hugo Enrique; Takarada, Ken; Choudhury, Rajin; Poelaert, Jan; Verborgh, Christian; Brugada, Pedro; Chierchia, Gian-Battista

    2017-07-01

    Femoral venous pressure waveform (VPW) analysis has been recently described as a novel method to assess phrenic nerve function during atrial fibrillation ablation procedures by means of the cryoballoon technique. In this study, we sought to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this technique, with respect to the incidence of phrenic nerve injury (PNI), in comparison with the traditional abdominal palpation technique alone. Consecutive patients undergoing second-generation cryoballoon ablation (CB-A) from June 2014 to June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Diagnosis of PNI was made if any reduced motility or paralysis of the hemidiaphragm was detected on fluoroscopy. During the study period, a total of 350 consecutive patients (man 67%, age 57.2 ± 12.9 years) were enrolled (200 using traditional phrenic nerve assessment and 150 using VPW monitoring). The incidence of PNI in the overall population was 8.0% (28/350); of these, eight were impending PNI (2.3%), 14 transient (4.0%), and six persistent (1.7%). Patients having undergone CB-A with traditional assessment experienced 18 phrenic nerve palsies (9.0%) vs two in 'VPW monitoring' group (1.3%; P = 0.002). Specifically, the former presented 12 transient (6.0%) and six persistent (3.0%) phrenic nerve palsies, and the latter exhibited two transient (1.3%; P = 0.03) and no persistent (0%; P = 0.04) phrenic nerve palsies. In conclusion, this novel method assessing the VPW for predicting PNI is inexpensive, easily available, with reproducible measurements, and appears to be more effective than traditional assessment methods.

  10. Effects of ischemic phrenic nerve root ganglion injury on respiratory disturbances in subarachnoid hemorrhage: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvi, Hızır; Demir, Recep; Aygül, Recep; Kotan, Dilcan; Calik, Muhammet; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu

    2013-12-30

    Phrenic nerves have important roles on the management of respiration rhythm. Diaphragm paralysis is possible in phrenic nerve roots ischemia in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We examined whether there is a relationship between phrenic nerve root ischemia and respiratory disturbances in SAH. This study was conducted on 5 healthy control and 14 rabbits with experimentally induced SAH by injecting autologous blood into their cisterna magna. Animals were followed up via monitors for detecting the heart and respiration rhythms for 20 days and then decapitaed by humanely. Normal and degenerated neuron densities of phrenic nerve root at the level of C4 dorsal root ganglia (C4DRG) were estimated by Stereological methods. Between the mean numerical density of degenerated neurons of C4DRG and respiratory rate/minute of groups were compared statistically. Phrenic nerve roots, artery and diaphragm muscles degeneration was detected in respiratory arrest developed animals. The mean neuronal density of C4DRG was 13272 ±1201/mm3 with a mean respiration rate of 23 ±4/min in the control group. The mean degenerated neuron density was 2.240 ±450/mm(3) and respiration rhythm was 31 ±6/min in survivors. But, the mean degenerated neuron density was 5850 ±650/mm(3) and mean respiration rhythm was 34 ±7/min in respiratory arrest developed animals (n = 7). A linear relationship was noticed between the degenerated neuron density of C4DRG and respiraton rate (r = -0.758; p Phrenic nerve root ischemia may be an important factor in respiration rhythms deteriorations in SAH which has not been mentioned in the literature.

  11. Unique Phrenic Nerve-Sparing Regional Anesthetic Technique for Pain Management after Shoulder Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason K. Panchamia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ipsilateral phrenic nerve blockade is a common adverse event after an interscalene brachial plexus block, which can result in respiratory deterioration in patients with preexisting pulmonary conditions. Diaphragm-sparing nerve block techniques are continuing to evolve, with the intention of providing satisfactory postoperative analgesia while minimizing hemidiaphragmatic paralysis after shoulder surgery. Case Report. We report the successful application of a combined ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block and suprascapular nerve block in a patient with a complicated pulmonary history undergoing a total shoulder replacement. Conclusion. This case report briefly reviews the important innervations to the shoulder joint and examines the utility of the infraclavicular brachial plexus block for postoperative pain management.

  12. Laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Schreiber, A; Callegari, I; Moglia, A; Alfonsi, E; Pareyson, D

    2016-07-01

    Lower cranial and phrenic nerve involvement is exceptional in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Here we report the occurrence of reversible laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with HNPP. The patient recalled several episodes of reversible weakness and numbness of his feet and hands since the age of 30 years. His medical history was uneventful, apart from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). At age 44, following severe weight loss, he presented with progressive dysphonia and hoarseness. EMG of cricoarytenoid and thyroarytenoid muscles and laryngeal fibroscopy confirmed vocal cord paralysis. These speech disturbances gradually regressed. Two years later, he reported rapidly worsening dyspnea. Electroneurography showed increased distal latency of the right phrenic nerve and diaphragm ultrasonography documented reduced right hemi-diaphragm excursion. Six months later and after optimization of CODP treatment, his respiratory function had improved and both phrenic nerve conduction and diaphragm excursion were completely restored. We hypothesize that chronic cough and nerve stretching in the context of CODP, together with severe weight loss, may have triggered the nerve paralysis in this patient. Our report highlights the need for optimal management of comorbidities such as CODP as well as careful control of weight in HNPP patients to avoid potentially harmful complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ramification and distribution of the phrenic nerves in diaphragm of horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Santiago

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available The phrenic nerve distribution in 50 diaphragmas from mixed breeding adult horses (25 males and 25 females obtained from a slaughter house ("Avante", located in Araguari, State of Minas Gerais, was studied. The results indicated the following characteristics: 1 the ventral branch and laterodorsal trunk were extended 42 times (84% to the right side, 5 times (10% to the left, while the dorsal and the lateroventral trunk were 40 times (80% to the left and 2 times (4% to the right. The common origin of the dorsal, lateral and ventral branch were 6 times (12% to the right and 5 times (10% to the left. 2 The right and left bifurcation of the phrenic nerve were symmetrically arranged in: laterodorsal trunk and ventral branch 9 times (18%; lateroventral trunk and dorsal branch 5 times (10% and simultaneously in lateral and ventral dorsal branches 2 times (4%. 3 The right and left dorsal branches of the phrenic nerve were always distributed on the limbar portion (medial and lateral pillar in relation to their origins. The distribution of the nervous fillets from the right dorsal branch to the dorsal foliolo was: one fillet 10 times (20% and 2 fillets 1 time (2% respectively. To the tendinous center one fillet (2% was observed. From the left dorsal branch in 50 times (100% there was one fillet going to the right medial pillar. In relation to the left dorsal foliolo there was: one fillet 3 times (6% and 2 fillets 3 times (6% and in relation to the tendinous center there was: one fillet 3 times (6%; 2 fillets 2 times (4% and 4 fillets just once (2%. 4 From the right and left lateral branches of the phrenic nerve in all observations (100% there were fillets going to the lateral dorsal region in both sides. The distribution of the emerging fibers from the right lateral branch to the do sal foliolo was 1  fillet 6 times (12%; 2 fillets 3 times (6%; 3 fillets 1 time (2% and to the right lateral pillar 1 fillet 2 times (4%. The distribution of the emerging

  14. Electromyographic monitoring for prevention of phrenic nerve palsy in second-generation cryoballoon procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Frédéric; Koutbi, Linda; Gitenay, Edouard; Hourdain, Jérome; Maille, Baptiste; Trévisan, Lory; Deharo, Jean-Claude

    2015-04-01

    Electromyography-guided phrenic nerve (PN) monitoring using a catheter positioned in a hepatic vein can aid in preventing phrenic nerve palsy (PNP) during cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation. We wanted to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of PN monitoring during procedures using second-generation cryoballoons. This study included 140 patients (43 women) in whom pulmonary vein isolation was performed using a second-generation cryoballoon. Electromyography-guided PN monitoring was performed by pacing the right PN at 60 per minute and recording diaphragmatic compound motor action potential (CMAP) via a quadripolar catheter positioned in a hepatic vein. If a 30% decrease in CMAP amplitude was observed, cryoapplication was discontinued with forced deflation to avoid a PNP. Monitoring was unfeasible in 8 of 140 patients (5.7%), PNP occurred in 1. Stable CMAP amplitudes were achieved before ablation in 132 of 140 patients (94.3%). In 18 of 132 patients (13.6%), a 30% decrease in CMAP amplitude occurred and cryoablation was discontinued. Each time, recovery of CMAP amplitude took <60 s. In 9 of 18 cases, a second cryoapplication in the same pulmonary vein was safely performed. We observed no PNP or complication related to electromyography-guided PN monitoring. Electromyography-guided PN monitoring using a catheter positioned in a hepatic vein seems feasible and effective to prevent PNP during cryoballoon ablation using second-generation cryoballoon. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Phrenic nerve paralysis during cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation: a comparison between the first- and second-generation balloon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casado-Arroyo, R.; Chierchia, G.B.; Conte, G.; Levinstein, M.; Sieira, J.; Rodriguez-Manero, M.; Giovanni, G.; Baltogiannis, Y.; Wauters, K.; Asmundis, C. de; Sarkozy, A.; Brugada, P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phrenic nerve palsy (PNP) is the most frequently observed complication during cryoballoon ablation (CB; Arctic Front, Medtronic, MN) occurring in roughly 7%-9% of the cases. The new second-generation cryoballoon ablation Arctic Front Advance (CB-A) (Arctic Front) has recently been

  16. Reinnervation of the diaphragm by the inferior laryngeal nerve to the phrenic nerve in ventilator-dependent tetraplegic patients with C3-5 damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verin, Eric; Morelot-Panzini, Capucine; Gonzalez-Bermejo, Jesus; Veber, Benoit; Perrouin Verbe, Brigitte; Soudrie, Brigitte; Leroi, Anne Marie; Marie, Jean Paul; Similowski, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of unilateral diaphragmatic reinnervation in humans by the inferior laryngeal nerve. This pilot study included chronically ventilated tetraplegic patients with destruction of phrenic nerve motoneurons. Five patients were included. They all had a high level of tetraplegia, with phrenic nerve motor neuron destruction. They were highly dependent on ventilation, without any possibility of weaning. They did not have other chronic pathologies, especially laryngeal disease. They all had diaphragmatic explorations to diagnose the destruction of the motoneurons of the phrenic nerves and nasoendoscopy to be sure that they did not have laryngeal or pharyngeal disease. Then, surgical anastomosis of the right phrenic nerve was performed with the inferior laryngeal nerve, by a cervical approach. A laryngeal reinnervation was performed at the same time, using the ansa hypoglossi. One patient was excluded because of a functional phrenic nerve and one patient died 6 months after the surgery of a cardiac arrest. The remaining three patients were evaluated after the anastomosis every 6 months. They did not present any swallowing or vocal alterations. In these three patients, the diaphragmatic explorations showed that there was a recovery of the diaphragmatic electromyogram of the right and left hemidiaphragms after 1 year. Two patients had surgical diaphragmatic explorations for diaphragmatic pacing 18-24 months after the reinnervation with excellent results. At 36 months, none of the patients could restore their automatic ventilation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that diaphragmatic reinnervation by the inferior laryngeal nerve is effective, without any vocal or swallowing complications.

  17. End-to-side neurotization with the phrenic nerve in restoring the function of toe extension: an experimental study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaotian; Chen, Chao; Yang, Jianyun; Yu, Cong

    2018-06-01

    The phrenic nerve being transferred to the posterior division of the lower trunk with end-to-end neurorrhaphy is reported to be effective in restoring the function of digit extension in literature. However, the phrenic nerve is extremely important in respiration. We designed an animal experiment to discover whether the phrenic nerve being transferred to the posterior division of the lower trunk with end-to-side neurotization was feasible and provided the theoretical basis. A sum of 36 Sprague-Dawley rats was randomly assigned to one of two groups. In Group A, the phrenic nerve was transferred to the posterior division of the lower trunk with end-to-side neurotization. In Group B, the posterior division of the lower trunk was directly sutured. The results of behavioral assessment, electrophysiology, histology and nerve fiber count and muscle weight at 12 weeks postoperatively were recorded. In Group A, none of the rats experienced tachypnea. The motion of slight toe extension was observed. The results of electrophysiology, histology and nerve fiber count and muscle weight in Group A were not as well as those of Group B, but gradually improved with time. The phrenic nerve being transferred to the posterior division of lower trunk with end-to-side neurotization can partially restore the function of toe extension in a rat model. Whether the function of digit extension can be restored by the phrenic nerve with end-to-side neurotization in humans still needs more practice in clinic.

  18. [Phrenic nerve stimulation protects against mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction through myogenic regulatory factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, G H; Chen, M; Zhan, W F; Hu, B; Zhang, H X

    2018-02-12

    Objective: To explore the protective effect of electrical stimulation of phrenic nerve on diaphragmatic function during mechanical ventilation. Methods: Forty healthy adult SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: blank control group (BC), spontaneous breathing group (SB), electrical stimulation group (ES), mechanical ventilation group (MV), and electrical stimulation and mechanical ventilation group (MS). The rats in each group were treated for 18 h except for the BC group. After treatment, the diaphragm muscle tissue was obtained and the diaphragm contractility including peak-to-peak value(Vpp) and maximum rate of contraction(+ dT/dt max) were measured. Expression of MyoD and myogenin were detected. Results: Except for the ES and the MS groups, there was a significant difference for peak-to-peak value (Vpp) between each 2 groups ( P mechanical ventilation induced diaphragmatic function damage, and therefore plays a protective effect on the diaphragm.

  19. Unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation for neurogenic hypoventilation in Arnold Chiari malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Garg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Long- term ventilator dependence in patients with neurogenic hypoventilation is associated with significant morbidity and restricts mobility. Diaphragmatic pacing by phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS is a viable alternative. This is a case report of patient with Arnold-Chiari malformation with extensive syrinx who had neurogenic hypoventilation during sleep even after foramen magnum decompression and resolution of the syrinx. Unilateral PNS was done using spinal cord stimulator. With intermittent stimulation for 8 h while asleep, patient could be weaned off the ventilator completely. At 2 years follow- up, patient is ambulant and has returned to his routine activities. PNS is a good treatment tool in patients with neurogenic hypoventilation. Spinal cord stimulator can be used with optimal results. This is first such reported case of using spinal cord stimulator for PNS from India.

  20. Epicardial phrenic nerve displacement during catheter ablation of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias: procedural experience and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Barbhaiya, Chirag R; Baldinger, Samuel H; Koplan, Bruce A; Maytin, Melanie; Epstein, Laurence M; John, Roy M; Michaud, Gregory F; Tedrow, Usha B; Stevenson, William G

    2015-08-01

    Arrhythmia origin in close proximity to the phrenic nerve (PN) can hinder successful catheter ablation. We describe our approach with epicardial PN displacement in such instances. PN displacement via percutaneous pericardial access was attempted in 13 patients (age 49±16 years, 9 females) with either atrial tachycardia (6 patients) or atrial fibrillation triggered from a superior vena cava focus (1 patient) adjacent to the right PN or epicardial ventricular tachycardia origin adjacent to the left PN (6 patients). An epicardially placed steerable sheath/4 mm-catheter combination (5 patients) or a vascular or an esophageal balloon (8 patients) was ultimately successful. Balloon placement was often difficult requiring manipulation via a steerable sheath. In 2 ventricular tachycardia cases, absence of PN capture was achieved only once the balloon was directly over the ablation catheter. In 3 atrial tachycardia patients, PN displacement was not possible with a balloon; however, a steerable sheath/catheter combination was ultimately successful. PN displacement allowed acute abolishment of all targeted arrhythmias. No PN injury occurred acutely or in follow up. Two patients developed acute complications (pleuro-pericardial fistula 1 and pericardial bleeding 1). Survival free of target arrhythmia was achieved in all atrial tachycardia patients; however, a nontargeted ventricular tachycardia recurred in 1 patient at a median of 13 months' follow up. Arrhythmias originating in close proximity to the PN can be targeted successfully with PN displacement with an epicardially placed steerable sheath/catheter combination, or balloon, but this strategy can be difficult to implement. Better tools for phrenic nerve protection are desirable. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Effect of Gymnodinium breve toxin in the rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J. P.; Shinnick-Gallagher, P.

    1980-01-01

    1 The effects of a crude fraction of Gymnodinium breve toxin (GBTX) were studied on the rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation. 2 Indirectly stimulated muscle contractions were more sensitive to blockade by increasing concentrations of GBTX (0.25 microgram/ml to 10 micrograms/ml) than direct muscle contractions. 3 GBTX increased miniature endplate potential (m.e.p.p.) frequency and depolarized the resting membrane potential of the muscle fibres at the endplate and in non-synaptic regions of muscle fibre. 4 A concentration-dependent biphasic effect on m.e.p.p. amplitude was evident. At lower concentrations m.e.p.p. amplitudes were depressed whereas at high concentrations they were increased. 5 GBTX blocked endplate potentials (e.p.ps) in concentrations (0.5 microgram/ml to 2 micrograms/ml) that did not block m.e.p.ps. 6 Muscle fibre action potentials recorded from cells held at control membrane potential by hyperpolarizing current were not altered by toxin treatment. No repetitive e.p.ps, or muscle action potentials were observed. 7 These data suggest that GBTX may block indirectly stimulated muscle contractions and e.p.ps by depolarizing the nerve terminal in a manner similar to the observed depolarization of the muscle fibre. The depolarization of the nerve terminal may be sufficient to inhibit transmitter release. PMID:7190451

  2. In patients with a tumour invading the phrenic nerve does prophylactic diaphragm plication improve postoperative lung function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Gwyn W; Dunn, William G; Asif, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'In patients with tumours involving the phrenic nerve, does prophylactic diaphragm plication improve lung function following tumour resection?' Using the reported search, 258 papers were found of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Three case reports and one case series represent 37 patients in the literature along with two relevant animal studies. Patients treated with prophylactic plication at the time of injury or sacrifice of the phrenic nerve had reduced radiological evidence of diaphragm paralysis, lower reported shortness of breath and reduced requirement for ventilatory support. In patients with prophylactic diaphragm plication and a concurrent pulmonary resection, the predicted postoperative lung function correlated closely with the postoperative measured FEV1, FVC and gas transfer. The postoperative measured FEV1 was reported as 86-98%, the FVC 82-89% and gas transfer 97% of the predicted values. Two animal models investigate the mechanics of respiration, spirometry and gas exchange following diaphragmatic plication. A randomized control study in four dogs measured a 50% reduction in tidal volume and respiratory rate, a 40% decrease in arterial PO2 and a 43% increase in arterial CO2 when the phrenic nerve was crushed in animals with a pneumonectomy but without prophylactic diaphragm plication. A further randomized control animal study with 28 dogs found that plicating the diaphragm after unilateral phrenic nerve transection resulted in a significant increase in tidal volume and lung compliance and a significant decrease in respiratory frequency and the work of breathing. Prophylactic diaphragm plication may preserve lung function, reduce the risk of

  3. Diaphragmatic reinnervation in ventilator-dependent patients with cervical spinal cord injury and concomitant phrenic nerve lesions using simultaneous nerve transfers and implantable neurostimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Matthew R; Elkwood, Andrew I; Aboharb, Farid; Cece, John; Brown, David; Rezzadeh, Kameron; Jarrahy, Reza

    2015-06-01

    Patients who are ventilator dependent as a result of combined cervical spinal cord injury and phrenic nerve lesions are generally considered to be unsuitable candidates for diaphragmatic pacing due to loss of phrenic nerve integrity and denervation of the diaphragm. There is limited data regarding efficacy of simultaneous nerve transfers and diaphragmatic pacemakers in the treatment of this patient population. A retrospective review was conducted of 14 consecutive patients with combined lesions of the cervical spinal cord and phrenic nerves, and with complete ventilator dependence, who were treated with simultaneous microsurgical nerve transfer and implantation of diaphragmatic pacemakers. Parameters of interest included time to recovery of diaphragm electromyographic activity, average time pacing without the ventilator, and percent reduction in ventilator dependence. Recovery of diaphragm electromyographic activity was demonstrated in 13 of 14 (93%) patients. Eight of these 13 (62%) patients achieved sustainable periods (> 1 h/d) of ventilator weaning (mean = 10 h/d [n = 8]). Two patients recovered voluntary control of diaphragmatic activity and regained the capacity for spontaneous respiration. The one patient who did not exhibit diaphragmatic reinnervation remains within 12 months of initial treatment. Surgical intervention resulted in a 25% reduction (p nerve transfers and pacemaker implantation can result in reinnervation of the diaphragm and lead to successful ventilator weaning. Our favorable outcomes support consideration of this surgical method for appropriate patients who would otherwise have no alternative therapy to achieve sustained periods of ventilator independence. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. The Effects of Phrenic Nerve Degeneration by Axotomy and Crush on the Electrical Activities of Diaphragm Muscles of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkiş, Mehmet Eşref; Kavak, Servet; Sayır, Fuat; Him, Aydin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of axotomy and crush-related degeneration on the electrical activities of diaphragm muscle strips of experimental rats. In the present study, twenty-one male Wistar-albino rats were used and divided into three groups. The animals in the first group were not crushed or axotomized and served as controls. Phrenic nerves of the rats in the second and third groups were crushed or axotomized in the diaphragm muscle. Resting membrane potential (RMP) was decreased significantly in both crush and axotomy of diaphragm muscle strips of experimental rats (p phrenic nerves may produce electrical activities in the diaphragm muscle of the rat by depolarization time and half-repolarization time prolonged in crush and axotomy rats.

  5. Effects of rocuronium and vecuronium on initial rundown of endplate potentials in the isolated phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation of rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun; Liu, Yong-Qin; Zhang, Han-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Rocuronium and vecuronium, two non-depolarizing neuromuscular blockers, have been widely used in surgery procedures. However, their electrophysiological properties need to be more widely explored. We examined the effects of rocuronium and vecuronium on initial rundown of endplate potential amplitudes in the non-uniform stretched muscle preparation of the rat isolated phrenic nerve diaphragm. More specifically, the endplate potentials were recorded with one microelectrode from a single endplat...

  6. Early hemi-diaphragmatic plication through a video assisted mini-thoracotomy in postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Visouli, Aikaterini N.; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Christofis, Christos; Stylianaki, Aikaterini; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Courcoutsakis, Nicolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    New symptom onset of respiratory distress without other cause, and new hemi-diaphragmatic elevation on chest radiography postcardiotomy, are usually adequate for the diagnosis of phrenic nerve paresis. The symptom severity varies (asymptomatic state to severe respiratory failure) depending on the degree of the lesion (paresis vs. paralysis), the laterality (unilateral or bilateral), the age, and the co-morbidity (respiratory, cardiac disease, morbid obesity, etc). Surgical treatment (hemi-diaphragmatic plication) is indicated only in the presence of symptoms. The established surgical treatment is plication of the affected hemidiaphragm which is generally considered safe and effective. Several techniques and approaches are employed for diaphragmatic plication (thoracotomy, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, video-assisted mini-thoracotomy, laparoscopic surgery). The timing of surgery depends on the severity and the progression of symptoms. In infants and young children with postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis the clinical status is usually severe (failure to wean from mechanical ventilation), and early plication is indicated. Adults with postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis usually suffer from chronic dyspnoea, and, in the absence of respiratory distress, conservative treatment is recommended for 6 months -2 years, since improvement is often observed. Nevertheless, earlier surgical treatment may be indicated in non-resolving respiratory failure. We present early (25th day postcardiotomy) right hemi-diaphragm plication, through a video assisted mini-thoracotomy in a high risk patient with postcardiotomy phrenic nerve paresis and respiratory distress. Early surgery with minimal surgical trauma, short operative time, minimal blood loss and postoperative pain, led to fast rehabilitation and avoidance of prolonged hospitalization complications. The relevant literature is discussed. PMID:23304442

  7. A Case of Death Secondary to Phrenic Nerve Palsy after Huge Mediastinal Teratoma 
Resection in Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanda CHENG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal teratomas, not common in clinical, are often some case reports, female more than male, most are benign. It can occur anywhere of body midline; sacrococcygeal teratoma is the most common and the second most frequent site of extragonadal teratomas is mediastinum. Benign is more commom and malignant is very rarely seen. Completely surgical resection is the main and effective treatment. This review reports a case of neonatal teratoma, which is complicated with a fatal phrenic nerve palsy after surgery.

  8. An Unusual Case of Neuralgic Amyotrophy Presenting with Bilateral Phrenic Nerve and Vocal Cord Paresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Holtbernd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuralgic amyotrophy (brachial plexus neuropathy, brachial plexus neuritis, or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is an uncommon inflammatory condition typically characterized by acute and severe shoulder pain followed by paresis with muscle weakness and atrophy of the upper limb or shoulder girdle. We report an unusual clinical manifestation of neuralgic amyotrophy, namely bilateral phrenic nerve palsy with concomitant laryngeal paresis. Case Report: A 55-year-old male presented with orthopnea and aphonia after an episode of bilateral shoulder pain preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection. Spirometry, chest X-ray and videolaryngoscopy revealed bilateral and simultaneous paresis of the diaphragm and the vocal cords. Clinical examination at admission and at the 2-month follow-up did not show upper limb weakness or atrophy, except for a mild atrophy of the right supraspinatus muscle. An electromyography of the upper limb muscles and nerve conduction studies did not reveal signs of denervation. Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid and an MRI of the neuraxis were unremarkable. After treatment with prednisolone, vocal cord function markedly improved within 8 weeks, whereas paresis of the diaphragm persisted. Conclusion: Shoulder pain followed by diaphragmatic paralysis with dyspnea and hoarseness may be a manifestation of neuralgic amyotrophy even if upper limb or shoulder girdle palsies are absent.

  9. Impediment in upper airway stabilizing forces assessed by phrenic nerve stimulation in sleep apnea patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vérin E

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The forces developed during inspiration play a key role in determining upper airway stability and the occurrence of nocturnal breathing disorders. Phrenic nerve stimulation applied during wakefulness is a unique tool to assess Upper airway dynamic properties and to measure the overall mechanical effects of the inspiratory process on UA stability. Objectives To compare the flow/pressure responses to inspiratory and expiratory twitches between sleep apnea subjects and normal subjects. Methods Inspiratory and expiratory twitches using magnetic nerve stimulation completed in eleven untreated sleep apnea subjects and ten normal subjects. Results In both groups, higher flow and pressure were reached during inspiratory twitches. The two groups showed no differences in expiratory twitch parameters. During inspiration, the pressure at which flow-limitation occurred was more negative in normals than in apneic subjects, but not reaching significance (p = 0.07. The relationship between pharyngeal pressure and flow adequately fitted with a polynomial regression model providing a measurement of upper airway critical pressure during twitch. This pressure significantly decreased in normals from expiratory to inspiratory twitches (-11.1 ± 1.6 and -15.7 ± 1.0 cm H2O respectively, 95% CI 1.6–7.6, p Conclusion Inspiratory-related upper airway dilating forces are impeded in sleep apnea patients.

  10. Reinnervation of bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid muscles using the left phrenic nerve in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of reinnervation of the bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis. METHODS: Forty-four patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis who underwent reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve were enrolled in this study. Videostroboscopy, perceptual evaluation, acoustic analysis, maximum phonation time, pulmonary function testing, and laryngeal electromyography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients were followed-up for at least 1 year after surgery. RESULTS: Videostroboscopy showed that within 1 year after reinnervation, abductive movement could be observed in the left vocal folds of 87% of patients and the right vocal folds of 72% of patients. Abductive excursion on the left side was significantly larger than that on the right side (P 0.05. No patients developed immediate dyspnea after surgery, and the pulmonary function parameters recovered to normal reference value levels within 1 year. Postoperative laryngeal electromyography confirmed successful reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles. Eighty-seven percent of patients in this series were decannulated and did not show obvious dyspnea after physical activity. Those who were decannulated after subsequent arytenoidectomy were not included in calculating the success rate of decannulation. CONCLUSIONS: Reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve can restore inspiratory vocal fold abduction to a physiologically satisfactory extent while preserving phonatory function at the preoperative level without evident morbidity.

  11. Reinnervation of Bilateral Posterior Cricoarytenoid Muscles Using the Left Phrenic Nerve in Patients with Bilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongliang; Chen, Donghui; Zhu, Minhui; Wang, Wei; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Caiyun

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of reinnervation of the bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscles using the left phrenic nerve in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis. Methods Forty-four patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis who underwent reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve were enrolled in this study. Videostroboscopy, perceptual evaluation, acoustic analysis, maximum phonation time, pulmonary function testing, and laryngeal electromyography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients were followed-up for at least 1 year after surgery. Results Videostroboscopy showed that within 1 year after reinnervation, abductive movement could be observed in the left vocal folds of 87% of patients and the right vocal folds of 72% of patients. Abductive excursion on the left side was significantly larger than that on the right side (P 0.05). No patients developed immediate dyspnea after surgery, and the pulmonary function parameters recovered to normal reference value levels within 1 year. Postoperative laryngeal electromyography confirmed successful reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles. Eighty-seven percent of patients in this series were decannulated and did not show obvious dyspnea after physical activity. Those who were decannulated after subsequent arytenoidectomy were not included in calculating the success rate of decannulation. Conclusions Reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve can restore inspiratory vocal fold abduction to a physiologically satisfactory extent while preserving phonatory function at the preoperative level without evident morbidity. PMID:24098581

  12. Phrenic and hypoglossal nerve activity during respiratory response to hypoxia in 6-OHDA unilateral model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Kryspin; Budzińska, Krystyna; Kaczyńska, Katarzyna

    2017-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients apart from motor dysfunctions exhibit respiratory disturbances. Their mechanism is still unknown and requires investigation. Our research was designed to examine the activity of phrenic (PHR) and hypoglossal (HG) nerves activity during a hypoxic respiratory response in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD. Male adult Wistar rats were injected unilaterally with 6-OHDA (20μg) or the vehicle into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB). Two weeks after the surgery the activity of the phrenic and hypoglossal nerve was registered in anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated rats under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Lesion effectiveness was confirmed by the cylinder test, performed before the MFB injection and 14days after, before the respiratory experiment. 6-OHDA lesioned animals showed a significant increase in normoxic inspiratory time. Expiratory time and total time of the respiratory cycle were prolonged in PD rats after hypoxia. The amplitude of the PHR activity and its minute activity were increased in comparison to the sham group at recovery time and during 30s of hypoxia. The amplitude of the HG activity was increased in response to hypoxia in 6-OHDA lesioned animals. The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons decreased the pre-inspiratory/inspiratory ratio of the hypoglossal burst amplitude during and after hypoxia. Unilateral MFB lesion changed the activity of the phrenic and hypoglossal nerves. The altered pre-inspiratory hypoglossal nerve activity indicates modifications to the central mechanisms controlling the activity of the HG nerve and may explain respiratory disorders seen in PD, i.e. apnea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Phrenic nerve block with ultrasound-guidance for treatment of hiccups: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyylampi Ville

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Persistent hiccups can be more than a simple and short-lived nuisance and therefore sometimes call for serious consideration. Hiccupping episodes that last only a few minutes may be annoying, but persistent hiccups may initiate many major complications. Case presentation A 72-year-old Caucasian man with spinal stenosis presented for L4-5 laminectomy under spinal anesthesia. The surgery and anesthesia, as well as the perioperative period, passed without any incident, except for persistent postoperative hiccups not responding to conservative and pharmacological treatment. Hiccups resulted in a prolonged hospital stay as they lasted until the seventh postoperative day. On that day, a right-sided ultrasound-guided phrenic nerve block with 5 ml of bupivacaine 5 mg/ml with epinephrine was performed successfully with a single-injection technique. Ten minutes after the procedure the hiccups vanished and a partial sensomotoric block of his right shoulder developed. No adverse effect occurred; our patient could be discharged on the same day and the hiccups did not return. Conclusion Ultrasound provides us with non-invasive information regarding anatomy and allows anesthesiologists to visualize needle insertion, to identify the exact location of the injected solution and to avoid such structures as arteries or veins. As such, this method should be actively utilized. In cases where both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments prove to be ineffective when treating persistent hiccups, a single-shot ultrasound-guided technique should be considered before the patient becomes exhausted.

  14. Long-Term Follow-Up after Phrenic Nerve Reconstruction for Diaphragmatic Paralysis: A Review of 180 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Matthew R; Elkwood, Andrew I; Brown, David; Cece, John; Martins, Catarina; Bauer, Thomas; Weissler, Jason; Rezzadeh, Kameron; Jarrahy, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background  Phrenic nerve reconstruction has been evaluated as a method of restoring functional activity and may be an effective alternative to diaphragm plication. Longer follow-up and a larger cohort for analysis are necessary to confirm the efficacy of this procedure for diaphragmatic paralysis. Methods  A total of 180 patients treated with phrenic nerve reconstruction for chronic diaphragmatic paralysis were followed for a median 2.7 years. Assessment parameters included: 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) physical functioning survey, spirometry, chest fluoroscopy, electrodiagnostic evaluation, a five-item questionnaire to assess specific functional issues, and overall patient-reported outcome. Results  Overall, 134 males and 46 females with an average age of 56 years (range: 10-79 years) were treated. Mean baseline percent predicted values for forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity, vital capacity, and total lung capacity, were 61, 63, 67, and 75%, respectively. The corresponding percent improvements in percent predicted values were: 11, 6, 9, and 13% ( p ≤ 0.01; ≤ 0.01; ≤ 0.05; ≤ 0.01). Mean preoperative SF-36 physical functioning survey scores were 39%, and an improvement to 65% was demonstrated following surgery ( p  ≤ 0.0001). Nerve conduction latency, improved by an average 23% ( p  ≤ 0.005), and there was a corresponding 125% increase in diaphragm motor amplitude ( p  ≤ 0.0001). A total of 89% of patients reported an overall improvement in breathing function. Conclusion  Long-term assessment of phrenic nerve reconstruction for diaphragmatic paralysis indicates functional correction and symptomatic relief. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Phrenic nerve injury: An underrecognized and potentially preventable complication of pulmonary vein isolation using a wide-area circumferential ablation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong Ji, Sang; Dewire, Jane; Barcelon, Bernadette; Philips, Binu; Catanzaro, John; Nazarian, Saman; Cheng, Alan; Spragg, David; Tandri, Harikrishna; Bansal, Sandeep; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Rickard, Jack; Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Sinha, Sunil; Marine, Joseph E; Calkins, Hugh; Berger, Ronald

    2013-10-01

    Phrenic nerve injury (PNI) is a well-known, although uncommon, complication of pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) using radiofrequency energy. Currently, there is no consensus about how to avoid or minimize this injury. The purpose of this study was to determine how often the phrenic nerve, as identified using a high-output pacing, lies along the ablation trajectory of a wide-area circumferential lesion set. We also sought to determine if PVI can be achieved without phrenic nerve injury by modifying the ablation lesion set so as to avoid those areas where phrenic nerve capture (PNC) is observed. We prospectively enrolled 100 consecutive patients (age 61.7 ± 9.2 years old, 75 men) who underwent RF PVI using a wide-area circumferential ablation approach. A high-output (20 mA at 2 milliseconds) endocardial pacing protocol was performed around the right pulmonary veins and the carina where a usual ablation lesion set would be made. A total of 30% of patients had PNC and required modification of ablation lines. In the group of patients with PNC, the carina was the most common site of capture (85%) followed by anterior right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV) (70%) and anterior right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV) (30%). A total of 25% of PNC group had capture in all 3 (RSPV, RIPV, and carina) regions. There was no difference in the clinical characteristics between the groups with and without PNC. RF PVI caused no PNI in either group. High output pacing around the right pulmonary veins and the carina reveals that the phrenic nerve lies along a wide-area circumferential ablation trajectory in 30% of patients. Modification of ablation lines to avoid these sites may prevent phrenic nerve injury during RF PVI. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Evaluating the evidence: is phrenic nerve stimulation a safe and effective tool for decreasing ventilator dependence in patients with high cervical spinal cord injuries and central hypoventilation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Emily P; Payne, Russell A; Hazard, Sprague; Rizk, Elias

    2016-06-01

    Case reports, case series and case control studies have looked at the use of phrenic nerve stimulators in the setting of high spinal cord injuries and central hypoventilation syndromes dating back to the 1980s. We evaluated the evidence related to this topic by performing a systematic review of the published literature. Search terms "phrenic nerve stimulation," "phrenic nerve and spinal cord injury," and "phrenic nerve and central hypoventilation" were entered into standard search engines in a systematic fashion. Articles were reviewed by two study authors and graded independently for class of evidence according to published guidelines. The published evidence was reviewed, and the overall body of evidence was evaluated using the grading of recommendations, assesment, development and evaluations (GRADE) criteria Balshem et al. (J Clin Epidemiol 64:401-406, 2011). Our initial search yielded 420 articles. There were no class I, II, or III studies. There were 18 relevant class IV articles. There were no discrepancies among article ratings (i.e., kappa = 1). A meta-analysis could not be performed due to the low quality of the available evidence. The overall quality of the body of evidence was evaluated using GRADE criteria and fell within the "very poor" category. The quality of the published literature for phrenic nerve stimulation is poor. Our review of the literature suggests that phrenic nerve stimulation is a safe and effective option for decreasing ventilator dependence in high spinal cord injuries and central hypoventilation; however, we are left with critical questions that provide crucial directions for future studies.

  17. Ventilator waveforms on anesthesia machine: a simple tool for intraoperative mapping of phrenic nerve and mid-cervical roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulis, George; Papagrigoriou, Eirini; Sindou, Marc

    2015-12-01

    A crucial aspect of surgery on the supraclavicular region, lateral neck, and mid-cervical vertebral region is the identification and sparing of the phrenic nerve and cervical (C4) root that are responsible for diaphragmatic innervation. Therefore intraoperative mapping of these nerve structures can be useful for difficult cases. Electrical stimulation with simultaneous observation of the ventilator waveforms of the anesthesia machine provides an effective method for the precise intraoperative mapping of these structures. In the literature, there is only one publication reporting the use of one of the waveforms (capnography) for this purpose. Capnography and pressure-time waveforms, two mandatory curves in anesthesiological monitoring, were studied under electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve (one patient) and the C4 root (eight patients). The aim was to detect changes that would verify diaphragmatic contraction. No modifications in anesthesia or surgery and no additional maneuvers were required. In all patients, stimulation was followed by identifiable changes in the two waveforms, compatible with diaphragmatic contraction: acute reduction in amplitude on capnography and repetitive saw-like elevations on pressure-time curve. Frequency of patterns on pressure-time curve coincided with the frequency of stimulation; therefore the two recordings were complementary. This simple method proved effective in identifying the neural structures responsible for diaphragmatic function. We therefore suggest that it should be employed in the various types of surgery where these structures are at risk.

  18. Botulinum Neurotoxins: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis Using the Mouse Phrenic Nerve Hemidiaphragm Assay (MPN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Bigalke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The historical method for the detection of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT is represented by the mouse bioassay (MBA measuring the animal survival rate. Since the endpoint of the MBA is the death of the mice due to paralysis of the respiratory muscle, an ex vivo animal replacement method, called mouse phrenic nerve (MPN assay, employs the isolated N. phrenicus-hemidiaphragm tissue. Here, BoNT causes a dose-dependent characteristic decrease of the contraction amplitude of the indirectly stimulated muscle. Within the EQuATox BoNT proficiency 13 test samples were analysed using the MPN assay by serial dilution to a bath concentration resulting in a paralysis time within the range of calibration curves generated with BoNT/A, B and E standards, respectively. For serotype identification the diluted samples were pre-incubated with polyclonal anti-BoNT/A, B or E antitoxin or a combination of each. All 13 samples were qualitatively correctly identified thereby delivering superior results compared to single in vitro methods like LFA, ELISA and LC-MS/MS. Having characterized the BoNT serotype, the final bath concentrations were calculated using the calibration curves and then multiplied by the respective dilution factor to obtain the sample concentration. Depending on the source of the BoNT standards used, the quantitation of ten BoNT/A containing samples delivered a mean z-score of 7 and of three BoNT/B or BoNT/E containing samples z-scores <2, respectively.

  19. Left is right and right is wrong: fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in left hemi-diaphragm due to right phrenic nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old Indian man, a recently diagnosed case of the right lung carcinoma underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) for staging of the malignancy. PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake in the right lung mass, consistent with the known primary tumor. Right hemidiaphragm was found to be elevated on CT, suggesting right diaphragmatic paresis. The PET scan demonstrated asymmetric, intense FDG uptake in the left hemidiaphragm and accessory muscles of respiration, which was possibly due to compensatory increased workload related to contralateral right diaphragmatic paresis. The right diaphragmatic paresis was hypothesized to be caused by phrenic nerve palsy by right lung neoplasm. (author)

  20. Left is right and right is wrong: Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in left hemi-diaphragm due to right phrenic nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old Indian man, a recently diagnosed case of the right lung carcinoma underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) for staging of the malignancy. PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake in the right lung mass, consistent with the known primary tumor. Right hemidiaphragm was found to be elevated on CT, suggesting right diaphragmatic paresis. The PET scan demonstrated asymmetric, intense FDG uptake in the left hemidiaphragm and accessory muscles of respiration, which was possibly due to compensatory increased workload related to contralateral right diaphragmatic paresis. The right diaphragmatic paresis was hypothesized to be caused by phrenic nerve palsy by right lung neoplasm.

  1. Correspondence in relation to the case report "Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note." published in May issue of Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhakta Pradipta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comment on 'Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note' Bhagat H, Agarwal A, Sharma MS Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury 2008, 3:14 (22 May 2008

  2. Fascicular Phrenic Nerve Neurotization for Restoring Physiological Motion in a Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Reconstruction With a Reverse Innervated Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Ricardo; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago; Costa, Joana; Estevão-Costa, José; Monteiro, Diana; Dias, Mariana; Braga, José; Silva, Alvaro; Azevedo, Inês; Amarante, José Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a severe developmental anomaly characterized by the malformation of the diaphragm. An innervated reversed latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction for recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia has been described as an alternative to prosthetic patch repair to achieve pleuroperitoneal separation. However, there is very little supporting scientific data; therefore, there is no real basic understanding of the condition of the phrenic nerve in the absence of diaphragmatic muscle or even the neurotization options for restoring neodiaphragmatic muscle motion. We have reviewed the literature regarding phrenic nerve anatomy and neurotization options, and to our knowledge, this is the first time that the application of a fascicular repair is being described where the continuity of one remaining fascicle of the diaphragm has been preserved close to the phrenic nerve distal division. The procedure was undertaken in a 3 year-old boy, with the diagnosis of congenital large posteromedial diaphragmatic hernia and dependence of mechanical ventilation in consequence of severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia.The phrenic nerve divides itself into several terminal branches, usually three, at the diaphragm level, or just above it. This allows the selective coaptation of separate fascicular branches. In the case described, videofluoroscopy evaluation showed no evidence of paradoxical neodiaphragmatic motion, with synchronous contraction movements and intact pleura-peritoneal separation. The child is now asymptomatic and shows improvement of his previous restrictive pulmonary disease.We believe that fascicular repair can achieve some reinnervation of the flap without jeopardizing the potential of diaphragmatic function by contraction of reminiscent native diaphragm.

  3. Detecting the transport of materials with axoplasm along the axon at the early stage after phrenic nerve neurotization via SPECT on a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wendong; Xu Jianguang; Gu Yudong; Jin Shaojin; Lin Xiangtong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility of estimating the regenerative quality of transferred phrenic nerve by SPECT. Methods: Two tracers, 131 I-tyrosine and 99 Tc m -methylene diphosphonic acid (MDP) were selected. SPECT compounded with high-energy collimation implement (for 131 I) and low-energy collimation implement (for 99 Tc m ) was used. A rabbit model was set up. 131 I-tyrosine was injected into the normal sciatic nerve and transferred phrenic nerve by micro-syringe. The SPECT scanning was carried out at different intervals. The tracing image of 131 I was used for detecting the material migration along the axon and bone image of 99 Tc m -MDP was used for the bone orientation, these two images were interinfiltrated then. Results: The radioactivity of 131 I-tyrosine could be detected by SPECT, the transportation speed was about 30 mm/d in rabbit's normal sciatic nerve. For phrenic nerve transfer group, the 131 I-tyrosine was transported distally to the anastomotic site along with axoplasm in good regeneration group one month after anastomosis, the transportation speed was 40 mm/d. In scar group, the 131 I-tyrosine was accumulated approximately at the anastomotic site and could not be transported distally. Conclusions: The image of 131 I-tyrosine transported with nerve axoplasm could be displayed by SPECT in vivo. The method could be used to detect the circulation of regenerated axoplasm passing through the anastomotic site at the early stage after nerve transferring operation

  4. Left lower lobe atelectasis and consolidation following cardiac surgery: the effect of topical cooling on the phrenic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, J.J.; Cascade, P.N.; Rubenfire, M.; Wajszczuk, W.; Kerin, N.Z.

    1982-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective analyses of chest radiographs of patients following coronary artery bypass surgery were undertaken. Left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis developed in 13 of 40 (32.5%) patients who were operated upon without topical cooling of the heart with ice, and in 77 of 122 (63.1%) patients in one group and 34 of 40 (85.0%) patients in another group who were operated upon with topical cooling of the heart with ice. This difference was highly significant (p<0.001). Of the patients in one group in whom left lower lobe abnormality developed, 69.2% had paralysis or paresis of the left hemidiaphragm. It is evident that application of ice to the phrenic nerve can lead to temporary paralysis of the left leaf of the diaphragm, with subsequent development of left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis

  5. Left lower lobe atelectasis and consolidation following cardiac surgery: the effect of topical cooling on the phrenic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, J.J.; Cascade, P.N.; Rubenfire, M.; Wajszczuk, W.; Kerin, N.Z.

    1982-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective analyses of chest radiographs of patients following coronary artery bypass surgery were undertaken. Left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis developed in 13 of 40 (32.5%) patients who were operated upon without topical cooling of the heart with ice, and in 77 of 122 (63.1%) patients in one group and 34 of 40 (85.0%) patients in another group who were operated upon with topical cooling of the heart with ice. This difference was highly significant (p<0.001). Of the patients in one group in whom left lower lobe abnormality developed, 69.2% had paralysis or paresis of the left hemidiaphragm. It is evident that application of ice to the phrenic nerve can lead to temporary paralysis of the left leaf of the diaphragm, with subsequent development of left lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate and/or atelectasis.

  6. Direct Coaptation of the Phrenic Nerve With the Posterior Division of the Lower Trunk to Restore Finger and Elbow Extension Function in Patients With Total Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-feng; Li, Peng-cheng; Xue, Yun-hao; Zou, Ji-yao; Li, Wen-jun; Li, Yucheng

    2016-02-01

    To overcome the mismatch in nerve sizes in phrenic nerve transfer to the radial nerve for elbow and finger extension reanimation for patients with total brachial plexus injuries (TBPI), a selective neurotization procedure was designed. To investigate the long-term results of phrenic nerve transfer to the posterior division of the lower trunk with direct coaptation in restoring elbow and finger extension after TBPI. Phrenic nerve was transferred to and directly coapted with the posterior division of the lower trunk in 27 patients with TBPI. Seven patients were <18 years old (adolescent group), and the remaining 20 patients ≥18 years (adult group). Postoperative mean follow-up period was 54 ± 9 months (range, 48-85 months). The motor function attained M3 or greater in 81.5% of patients for elbow extension and in 48% of patients for finger extension. The percentage of patients who regained M3 or greater muscle power of finger extension in the adolescent group and the adult group was 71.4%, and 40%, respectively. Meanwhile, 85.7% in the adolescent group and 80% in the adult group achieved M3 or greater muscle power of elbow extension. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups. The elbow extension and finger extension were synchronous contractions and did not become independent of respiratory effort. This procedure simultaneously and effectively restores the function of elbow and finger extension in patients after TBPI. However, the patients could not do elbow and finger extension separately.

  7. Phrenic nerve paralysis during cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation: a comparison between the first- and second-generation balloon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Arroyo, Ruben; Chierchia, Gian-Battista; Conte, Giulio; Levinstein, Moisés; Sieira, Juan; Rodriguez-Mañero, Moises; di Giovanni, Giacomo; Baltogiannis, Yannis; Wauters, Kristel; de Asmundis, Carlo; Sarkozy, Andrea; Brugada, Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Phrenic nerve palsy (PNP) is the most frequently observed complication during cryoballoon ablation (CB; Arctic Front, Medtronic, MN) occurring in roughly 7%-9% of the cases. The new second-generation cryoballoon ablation Arctic Front Advance (CB-A) (Arctic Front) has recently been launched in the market. To evaluate the incidence of right PNP with the new CB-A in comparison with the first-generation balloon in a series of consecutive patients that underwent pulmonary vein isolation with this modality. The study was designed as an observational study with a prospective follow-up. In total, 121 consecutive patients were included: 80 patients with the CB (group 1) and 41 with the CB-A (group 2). Mean procedural times, fluoroscopic times, and time to pulmonary vein isolation documented by real-time recordings were significantly lower in group 2 (P ≤ .05). The occurrence of PNP was significantly higher in group 2 (6.25% [5 of 80] in group 1 vs 19.5% [8 of 41] in group 2; P = .033). At 7 months, PNP persisted in 1 (2.5%) patient in the CB-A group. Right PNP seems to occur in a significantly larger number of patients with the second-generation CB-A. However, this complication is reversible in nearly all cases on short-term follow-up. More refined phrenic nerve monitoring during right-sided pulmonary vein ablation and less vigorous wedging maneuvers in the pulmonary vein ostia might significantly reduce the occurrence of this complication. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Radioactive choline uptake in the isolated rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparation. A biochemical and autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldsema-Currie, R.D.; van Marle, J.; Langemeijer, M.W.; Lind, A.; van Weeren-Kramer, J.

    1984-10-01

    When hemidiaphragms are stimulated via the phrenic nerve in the presence of 10 microM radioactive choline (Ch), the rate of radioactive Ch uptake in the endplate-rich area (EPA) is greater than that in the endplate-poor muscle (M). Ch uptake in the EPA is temperature-dependent, with a Q10 of 2.9 and an activation energy of 19.5 kcal/mol. It is inhibited in a Na+-depleted medium, in the absence of Ca2+, and by 10-20 microM hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) and it is not inhibited by alpha-bungarotoxin even when the muscle is completely paralyzed. In the absence of stimulation the rate of uptake in the EPA is slightly, but not significantly, greater than in M. Using autoradiography, we find an enhanced amount of isotope in the nerve terminals and their immediate vicinities compared with the muscle fibres, in both stimulated and unstimulated hemidiaphragms. There is no enhanced uptake of isotope into the nerve terminals in stimulated tissues in the presence of 26 microM HC-3. The uptake of isotope into the muscle is not altered by any of these treatments. There is a positive correlation between the initial rate of radioactive Ch uptake in the EPA and the amount of isotope in the nerve terminals (the mean corrected grain density above the nerve terminals). Without correcting for the large amount of diffusion that occurs, the ratio of the grain density above the synapses to that above the muscle fibres is 1.66 in tissue stimulated at 1 Hz, 1.04 in stimulated tissues in the presence of 26 microM HC-3, and 1.31 in unstimulated tissues.

  9. Phrenic nerve deficits and neurological immunopathology associated with acute West Nile virus infection in mice and hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukor, Katherine; Wang, Hong; Hurst, Brett L; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Van Wettere, Arnaud; Pilowsky, Paul M; Morrey, John D

    2017-04-01

    Neurological respiratory deficits are serious outcomes of West Nile virus (WNV) disease. WNV patients requiring intubation have a poor prognosis. We previously reported that WNV-infected rodents also appear to have respiratory deficits when assessed by whole-body plethysmography and diaphragmatic electromyography. The purpose of this study was to determine if the nature of the respiratory deficits in WNV-infected rodents is neurological and if deficits are due to a disorder of brainstem respiratory centers, cervical spinal cord (CSC) phrenic motor neuron (PMN) circuitry, or both. We recorded phrenic nerve (PN) activity and found that in WNV-infected mice, PN amplitude is reduced, corroborating a neurological basis for respiratory deficits. These results were associated with a reduction in CSC motor neuron number. We found no dramatic deficits, however, in brainstem-mediated breathing rhythm generation or responses to hypercapnia. PN frequency and pattern parameters were normal, and all PN parameters changed appropriately upon a CO 2 challenge. Histological analysis revealed generalized microglia activation, astrocyte reactivity, T cell and neutrophil infiltration, and mild histopathologic lesions in both the brainstem and CSC, but none of these were tightly correlated with PN function. Similar results in PN activity, brainstem function, motor neuron number, and histopathology were seen in WNV-infected hamsters, except that histopathologic lesions were more severe. Taken together, the results suggest that respiratory deficits in acute WNV infection are primarily due to a lower motor neuron disorder affecting PMNs and the PN rather than a brainstem disorder. Future efforts should focus on markers of neuronal dysfunction, axonal degeneration, and myelination.

  10. Using anatomical landmark to avoid phrenic nerve injury during balloon-based procedures in atrial fibrillation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicolina M; Segars, Larry; Kauffman, Travis; Olinger, Anthony B

    2017-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an arrhythmia which affects as many as 2.7 million Americans. AF should be treated, because it can lead to a four-to-fivefold increased risk of experiencing a stroke. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for the treatment of drug refractory and symptomatic paroxysmal AF denote catheter ablation as the standard of care. The newest ablation treatment, cryoballoon, uses a cold balloon tip. The biggest risk factor associated with the cryoballoon ablation is phrenic nerve injury (PNI). The purpose of this study is to measure relevant distances from specific landmarks to the right phrenic nerve (RPN) to create a safe zone for physicians. Using 30 cadaveric specimens, we measured laterally from the right superior pulmonary vein orifice (RSPV) to the RPN at the level of the sixth thoracic vertebra and laterally from the lateral border of the sixth thoracic vertebral body (T6) to the RPN. The depth and width of the left atrium (LA) were also measured to establish a cross-sectional area of the LA. The cross-sectional area of the LA was then correlated with the averaged measurements to see if the area of the LA could be a predictor of the location of the RPN. The average distance from the RPN-RSPV was 9.6 mm (range 4.3-18.8 mm). The average RPN-T6 distance was 30.6 mm (range 13.7-49.9 mm). There was a non-significant trend that suggests as the size of the LA increases, the measured distances also increased. Using the lateral border of the sixth thoracic vertebra as a landmark, which can be viewed under fluoroscopy during the procedure, physicians can triangulate the distance to the RSPV and determine the approximate position of the RPN. Furthermore, physicians can perform a preoperative echocardiogram to determine the size of the LA to assist in determining the position of the RPN with the hopes of avoiding injury to the RPN.

  11. A randomised, controlled, double-blind trial of ultrasound-guided phrenic nerve block to prevent shoulder pain after thoracic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, M R; Laursen, C B; Berg, H

    2016-01-01

    to receive an ultrasound-guided supraclavicular phrenic nerve block with 10 ml ropivacaine or 10 ml saline (placebo) immediately following surgery. A nerve catheter was subsequently inserted and treatment continued for 3 days. The study drug was pharmaceutically pre-packed in sequentially numbered identical...... vials assuring that all participants, healthcare providers and data collectors were blinded. The primary outcome was the incidence of unilateral shoulder pain within the first 6 h after surgery. Pain was evaluated using a numeric rating scale. Nine of 38 patients in the ropivacaine group and 26 of 38...

  12. Creatine and creatine pyruvate reduce hypoxia-induced effects on phrenic nerve activity in the juvenile mouse respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Monika; Bischoff, Anna M; Kruzliak, Peter; Opatrilova, Radka; Bovell, Douglas; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2016-08-01

    Adequate concentrations of ATP are required to preserve physiological cell functions and protect tissue from hypoxic damage. Decreased oxygen concentration results in ATP synthesis relying increasingly on the presence of phosphocreatine. The lack of ATP through hypoxic insult to neurons that generate or regulate respiratory function, would lead to the cessation of breathing (apnea). It is not clear whether creatine plays a role in maintaining respiratory phrenic nerve (PN) activity during hypoxic challenge. The aim of the study was to test the effects of exogenously applied creatine or creatine pyruvate in maintaining PN induced respiratory rhythm against the deleterious effects of severe hypoxic insult using Working Heart-Brainstem (WHB) preparations of juvenile Swiss type mice. WHB's were perfused with control perfusate or perfusate containing either creatine [100μM] or creatine pyruvate [100μM] prior to hypoxic challenge and PN activity recorded throughout. Results showed that severe hypoxic challenge resulted in an initial transient increase in PN activity, followed by a reduction in that activity leading to respiratory apnea. The results demonstrated that perfusing the WHB preparation with creatine or creatine pyruvate, significantly reduced the onset of apnea compared to control conditions, with creatine pyruvate being the more effective substance. Overall, creatine and creatine pyruvate each produced time-dependent degrees of protection against severe hypoxic-induced disturbances of PN activity. The underlying protective mechanisms are unknown and need further investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Left Phrenic Nerve Stimulation Due to Breakage of the Endocardial Right Ventricular Lead at the Costoclavicular Ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Fujimori, MD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 78-year-old man with a permanent pacemaker (PM implanted in his left prepectoral area reported twitches in his left lateral abdominal region. Chest X-rays revealed a broken right atrial (RA lead and a fracture of the right ventricular (RV lead at the left costoclavicular ligament. The electrocardiogram (ECG and the Holler ECG revealed atrial fibrillation (AF and an improperly functioning PM. We observed that the twitching seemed to correspond with each pacing beat and that it did not appear with his own beat. We suspected that the twitching was due to electric current leakage from the broken RV lead. We performed a PM re-implantation with a screw-in RV lead using the extrathoracic approach. After re-implantation the twitching disappeared. Costoclavicular ligament related electrode lead fractures are not uncommon and electric current leaks can be a source of problems in cardiac pacing. In this case, the electric current leak from the broken RV lead at the costoclavicular ligament stimulated the left phrenic nerve.

  14. The crossed phrenic phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki

    2017-01-01

    The cervical spine is the most common site of traumatic vertebral column injuries. Respiratory insufficiency constitutes a significant proportion of the morbidity burden and is the most common cause of mortality in these patients. In seeking to enhance our capacity to treat specifically the respiratory dysfunction following spinal cord injury, investigators have studied the “crossed phrenic phenomenon”, wherein contraction of a hemidiaphragm paralyzed by a complete hemisection of the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord above the phrenic nucleus can be induced by respiratory stressors and recovers spontaneously over time. Strengthening of latent contralateral projections to the phrenic nucleus and sprouting of new descending axons have been proposed as mechanisms contributing to the observed recovery. We have recently demonstrated recovery of spontaneous crossed phrenic activity occurring over minutes to hours in C1-hemisected unanesthetized decerebrate rats. The specific neurochemical and molecular pathways underlying crossed phrenic activity following injury require further clarification. A thorough understanding of these is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for respiratory neurorehabilitation following spinal trauma. Animal studies provide preliminary evidence for the utility of neuropharmacological manipulation of serotonergic and adenosinergic pathways, nerve grafts, olfactory ensheathing cells, intraspinal microstimulation and a possible role for dorsal rhizotomy in recovering phrenic activity following spinal cord injury PMID:28761411

  15. The crossed phrenic phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael George Zaki Ghali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cervical spine is the most common site of traumatic vertebral column injuries. Respiratory insufficiency constitutes a significant proportion of the morbidity burden and is the most common cause of mortality in these patients. In seeking to enhance our capacity to treat specifically the respiratory dysfunction following spinal cord injury, investigators have studied the “crossed phrenic phenomenon”, wherein contraction of a hemidiaphragm paralyzed by a complete hemisection of the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord above the phrenic nucleus can be induced by respiratory stressors and recovers spontaneously over time. Strengthening of latent contralateral projections to the phrenic nucleus and sprouting of new descending axons have been proposed as mechanisms contributing to the observed recovery. We have recently demonstrated recovery of spontaneous crossed phrenic activity occurring over minutes to hours in C1-hemisected unanesthetized decerebrate rats. The specific neurochemical and molecular pathways underlying crossed phrenic activity following injury require further clarification. A thorough understanding of these is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for respiratory neurorehabilitation following spinal trauma. Animal studies provide preliminary evidence for the utility of neuropharmacological manipulation of serotonergic and adenosinergic pathways, nerve grafts, olfactory ensheathing cells, intraspinal microstimulation and a possible role for dorsal rhizotomy in recovering phrenic activity following spinal cord injury

  16. The crossed phrenic phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki

    2017-06-01

    The cervical spine is the most common site of traumatic vertebral column injuries. Respiratory insufficiency constitutes a significant proportion of the morbidity burden and is the most common cause of mortality in these patients. In seeking to enhance our capacity to treat specifically the respiratory dysfunction following spinal cord injury, investigators have studied the "crossed phrenic phenomenon", wherein contraction of a hemidiaphragm paralyzed by a complete hemisection of the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord above the phrenic nucleus can be induced by respiratory stressors and recovers spontaneously over time. Strengthening of latent contralateral projections to the phrenic nucleus and sprouting of new descending axons have been proposed as mechanisms contributing to the observed recovery. We have recently demonstrated recovery of spontaneous crossed phrenic activity occurring over minutes to hours in C 1 -hemisected unanesthetized decerebrate rats. The specific neurochemical and molecular pathways underlying crossed phrenic activity following injury require further clarification. A thorough understanding of these is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for respiratory neurorehabilitation following spinal trauma. Animal studies provide preliminary evidence for the utility of neuropharmacological manipulation of serotonergic and adenosinergic pathways, nerve grafts, olfactory ensheathing cells, intraspinal microstimulation and a possible role for dorsal rhizotomy in recovering phrenic activity following spinal cord injury.

  17. Comparative study on the analgesic effect of acute ipsilateral shoulder pain after open thoracotomy between preoperative ultrasound guided suprascapular nerve block (SNB) and intraoperative phrenic nerve infiltration (PNI) in cancer lung patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfokery, Bassel M; Tawfic, Sahar A; Abdelrahman, Abdelrahman M; Abbas, Dina N; Abdelghaffar, Ikramy M

    2018-03-01

    Acute ipsilateral shoulder pain (ISP) is a common complaint in patients after thoracotomy. The incidence ranges from 21% to 97%. Unfortunately, clinical studies did not put enough focus on ISP post thoracic surgery. This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of suprascapular nerve block (SNB) and phrenic nerve infiltration (PNI) for controlling ISP. One hundred and thirty-five lung cancer patients (135) scheduled for open-lung surgery were randomly allocated into three equal groups; control group: received thoracic epidural with general anesthesia, suprascapular group: (SNB) one hour before the operation with 10 ml bupivacaine plus thoracic epidural with general anesthesia and phrenic nerve group: (PNI) was performed by the operating surgeon with 10 ml bupivacaine plus thoracic epidural with general anesthesia. The visual analogue score (VAS) of ISP, rescue of ketorolac for break through shoulder pain, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and arterial blood gases were measured every 6 h postoperatively for 48 h. The VAS, rescue doses of ketorolc and PEFR were significantly lower in the phrenic nerve group (P-value 0.05). PNI is more effective than SNB for ISP. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  18. A randomised, controlled, double-blind trial of ultrasound-guided phrenic nerve block to prevent shoulder pain after thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, M R; Laursen, C B; Berg, H; Holm, J H; Hansen, L N; Ørding, H; Andersen, C; Licht, P B; Toft, P

    2016-12-01

    Moderate to severe ipsilateral shoulder pain is a common complaint following thoracic surgery. In this prospective, parallel-group study at Odense University Hospital, 76 patients (aged > 18 years) scheduled for lobectomy or pneumonectomy were randomised 1:1 using a computer-generated list to receive an ultrasound-guided supraclavicular phrenic nerve block with 10 ml ropivacaine or 10 ml saline (placebo) immediately following surgery. A nerve catheter was subsequently inserted and treatment continued for 3 days. The study drug was pharmaceutically pre-packed in sequentially numbered identical vials assuring that all participants, healthcare providers and data collectors were blinded. The primary outcome was the incidence of unilateral shoulder pain within the first 6 h after surgery. Pain was evaluated using a numeric rating scale. Nine of 38 patients in the ropivacaine group and 26 of 38 patients in the placebo group experienced shoulder pain during the first 6 h after surgery (absolute risk reduction 44% (95% CI 22-67%), relative risk reduction 65% (95% CI 41-80%); p = 0.00009). No major complications, including respiratory compromise or nerve injury, were observed. We conclude that ultrasound-guided supraclavicular phrenic nerve block is an effective technique for reducing the incidence of ipsilateral shoulder pain after thoracic surgery. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Role of high-resolution image integration to visualize left phrenic nerve and coronary arteries during epicardial ventricular tachycardia ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Seigo; Sacher, Frédéric; Mahida, Saagar; Berte, Benjamin; Lim, Han S; Komatsu, Yuki; Amraoui, Sana; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Laurent, François; Montaudon, Michel; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre; Cochet, Hubert

    2015-04-01

    Epicardial ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation is associated with risks of coronary artery (CA) and phrenic nerve (PN) injury. We investigated the role of multidetector computed tomography in visualizing CA and PN during VT ablation. Ninety-five consecutive patients (86 men; age, 57 ± 15) with VT underwent cardiac multidetector computed tomography. The PN detection rate and anatomic variability were analyzed. In 49 patients undergoing epicardial mapping, real-time multidetector computed tomographic integration was used to display CAs/PN locations in 3-dimensional mapping systems. Elimination of local abnormal ventricular activities (LAVAs) was used as ablation end point. The distribution of CAs/PN with respect to LAVA was analyzed and compared between VT etiologies. Multidetector computed tomography detected PN in 81 patients (85%). Epicardial LAVAs were observed in 44 of 49 patients (15 ischemic cardiomyopathy, 15 nonischemic cardiomyopathy, and 14 arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy) with a mean of 35 ± 37 LAVA points/patient. LAVAs were located within 1 cm from CAs and PN in 35 (80%) and 18 (37%) patients, respectively. The prevalence of LAVA adjacent to CAs was higher in nonischemic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy than in ischemic cardiomyopathy (100% versus 86% versus 53%; P < 0.01). The prevalence of LAVAs adjacent to PN was higher in nonischemic cardiomyopathy than in ischemic cardiomyopathy (93% versus 27%; P < 0.001). Epicardial ablation was performed in 37 patients (76%). Epicardial LAVAs could not be eliminated because of the proximity to CAs or PN in 8 patients (18%). The epicardial electrophysiological VT substrate is often close to CAs and PN in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. High-resolution image integration is potentially useful to minimize risks of PN and CA injury during epicardial VT ablation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Safety and feasibility of chronic transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation for treatment of central sleep apnea in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xilong; Ding, Ning; Ni, Buqing; Yang, Bing; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is common in patients with heart failure (HF) and is associated with poor quality of life and prognosis. Early acute studies using transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS) to treat CSA in HF have shown a significantly reduction of CSA and improvement of key polysomnographic parameters. In this study, we evaluated the safety of and efficiency chronic transvenous PNS with an implanted neurostimulator in HF patients with CSA. This study was a prospective, nonrandomized evaluation of unilateral transvenous PNS in eight HF patients with CSA. The stimulation lead, which connected to a proprietary neurostimulator, was positioned in either the left pericardiophrenic or right brachiocephalic vein. Monitoring during implantation and 6-monthly follow-ups were performed. Six of the implanted eight patients completed the study (one was lost to follow-up; one died from pneumonia). Neither side effects nor adverse events related to stimulation occurred. During the 6-monthly follow-ups, one patient had a lead dislodgement in the first month and the lead was subsequently repositioned. No additional lead dislodgements occurred. There were no significant changes in sleep habits, appetite, bleeding or infections. Compared with the parameters before stimulator implantation, there were significant improvement in apnea-hypopnea index, central apnea index, left ventricular ejection fraction and 6-min walk distance (all P < 0.01). Use of chronic transvenous PNS appears to be safe and feasible in HF patients with CSA. Large multicenter studies are needed to confirm safety and efficacy in this population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effects of magnesium chloride on rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade and sugammadex reversal in an isolated rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparation: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Tae-Yun; You, Hwang-Ju; Cho, Choon-Kyu; Choi, Hey Ran; Kim, Yong Beom; Shin, Yong Sup; Yang, Hong Seuk

    2018-03-01

    Magnesium potentiates the effects of nondepolarising muscle relaxants. However, few studies have used magnesium chloride (MgCl2). Sugammadex reverses neuromuscular block by steroidal nondepolarising muscle relaxants. To assess the effects of MgCl2 on rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade and its reversal by sugammadex. In-vitro experimental study. Animal laboratory, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea, from 20 March 2016 to 3 April 2016. Forty male Sprague Dawley rats. Left phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragms from 40 Sprague Dawley rats were allocated randomly to four groups (1, 2, 3 and 4 mmol l MgCl2 group, n = 10 each). Rocuronium was administered cumulatively until the first twitch of train-of-four (TOF) disappeared completely. Then, equimolar sugammadex was administered. The effective concentration (EC) of rocuronium was obtained in each group. After administering sugammadex, recovery of the first twitch height and the TOF ratio were measured for 30 min. EC50, EC90 and EC95 significantly decreased as the concentration of MgCl2 increased (all P ≤ 0.001), except the comparison between the 3 and 4 mmol l MgCl2 groups. After administration of sugammadex, the maximal TOF ratio (%) was lower in the 4 mmol l MgCl2 group than the 1 mmol l MgCl2 group [median 91.7 interquartile range (83.4 to 95.8) vs. 98.3 interquartile range (92.2 to 103.4), P = 0.049]. The mean time (s) from sugammadex injection to achieving maximal first twitch was significantly prolonged in the 4 mmol l MgCl2 group vs. the 1 mmol l MgCl2 and 2 mmol l MgCl2 groups [1483.9 (± 237.0) vs. 1039.0 (± 351.8) and 926.0 (± 278.1), P = 0.022 and 0.002, respectively]. Increases in MgCl2 concentration reduce the ECs of rocuronium. In addition, administering sugammadex equimolar to the administered rocuronium shows limited efficacy as MgCl2 concentration is increased. The in-vitro study was not registered in a database.

  2. Transvenous stimulation of the phrenic nerve for the treatment of central sleep apnoea: 12 months' experience with the remedē® System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielski, Dariusz; Ponikowski, Piotr; Augostini, Ralph; Kolodziej, Adam; Khayat, Rami; Abraham, William T

    2016-11-01

    Patients with central sleep apnoea (CSA) often have poor quality of life and are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This study sought to evaluate the 12-month clinical outcomes of patients with CSA treated with unilateral transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation in the prospective, multicentre, non-randomized remedē ® System pilot study. Forty-seven patients with CSA were treated with the remedē ® System (Respicardia Inc., Minnetonka, MN, USA) for a minimum of 3 months. Sleep-disordered breathing parameters were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) at 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up. Sleep symptoms and quality of life were also evaluated. Forty-one patients completed all follow-up PSGs and were included in the analysis. At 12 months, there was sustained improvement compared with baseline in the apnoea-hypopnoea index (49.9 ± 15.1 vs. 27.5 ± 18.3 events/h, P phrenic nerve stimulation is associated with sustained improvement in key sleep parameters, sleep symptoms, and quality of life over 12 months of follow-up. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  3. A comparison of pneumotorax and phrenic nerve pulsy complications using the methods: supraclavicular nerve block, routine and ten degree cephalic route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hasan Teimori

    2004-08-01

    Conclusions: Therefore in this method, incidence of pneumothorax and phrenic never pulsy is decreased. Suggested that this method and the other methods compare and use this method with more confidence.

  4. Retrograde Neuroanatomical Tracing of Phrenic Motor Neurons in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Hontoir, Fanny; De Knoop, Alexis; De Swert, Kathleen; Nicaise, Charles

    2018-02-22

    Phrenic motor neurons are cervical motor neurons originating from C3 to C6 levels in most mammalian species. Axonal projections converge into phrenic nerves innervating the respiratory diaphragm. In spinal cord slices, phrenic motor neurons cannot be identified from other motor neurons on morphological or biochemical criteria. We provide the description of procedures for visualizing phrenic motor neuron cell bodies in mice, following intrapleural injections of cholera toxin subunit beta (CTB) conjugated to a fluorophore. This fluorescent neuroanatomical tracer has the ability to be caught up at the diaphragm neuromuscular junction, be carried retrogradely along the phrenic axons and reach the phrenic cell bodies. Two methodological approaches of intrapleural CTB delivery are compared: transdiaphragmatic versus transthoracic injections. Both approaches are successful and result in similar number of CTB-labeled phrenic motor neurons. In conclusion, these techniques can be applied to visualize or quantify the phrenic motor neurons in various experimental studies such as those focused on the diaphragm-phrenic circuitry.

  5. Decreased spinal synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons elicit localized inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, K.A.; Baker-Herman, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Phrenic motor neurons receive rhythmic synaptic inputs throughout life. Since even brief disruption in phrenic neural activity is detrimental to life, on-going neural activity may play a key role in shaping phrenic motor output. To test the hypothesis that spinal mechanisms sense and respond to reduced phrenic activity, anesthetized, ventilated rats received micro-injections of procaine in the C2 ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) to transiently (~30 min) block axon conduction in bulbospinal axons from medullary respiratory neurons that innervate one phrenic motor pool; during procaine injections, contralateral phrenic neural activity was maintained. Once axon conduction resumed, a prolonged increase in phrenic burst amplitude was observed in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve, demonstrating inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and atypical PKC (aPKC) activity in spinal segments containing the phrenic motor nucleus impaired ipsilateral iPMF, suggesting a key role for spinal TNFα and aPKC in iPMF following unilateral axon conduction block. A small phrenic burst amplitude facilitation was also observed contralateral to axon conduction block, indicating crossed spinal phrenic motor facilitation (csPMF). csPMF was independent of spinal TNFα and aPKC. Ipsilateral iPMF and csPMF following unilateral withdrawal of phrenic synaptic inputs were associated with proportional increases in phrenic responses to chemoreceptor stimulation (hypercapnia), suggesting iPMF and csPMF increase phrenic dynamic range. These data suggest that local, spinal mechanisms sense and respond to reduced synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons. We hypothesize that iPMF and csPMF may represent compensatory mechanisms that assure adequate motor output is maintained in a physiological system in which prolonged inactivity ends life. PMID:24681155

  6. Decreased spinal synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons elicit localized inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, K A; Baker-Herman, T L

    2014-06-01

    Phrenic motor neurons receive rhythmic synaptic inputs throughout life. Since even brief disruption in phrenic neural activity is detrimental to life, on-going neural activity may play a key role in shaping phrenic motor output. To test the hypothesis that spinal mechanisms sense and respond to reduced phrenic activity, anesthetized, ventilated rats received micro-injections of procaine in the C2 ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) to transiently (~30min) block axon conduction in bulbospinal axons from medullary respiratory neurons that innervate one phrenic motor pool; during procaine injections, contralateral phrenic neural activity was maintained. Once axon conduction resumed, a prolonged increase in phrenic burst amplitude was observed in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve, demonstrating inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and atypical PKC (aPKC) activity in spinal segments containing the phrenic motor nucleus impaired ipsilateral iPMF, suggesting a key role for spinal TNFα and aPKC in iPMF following unilateral axon conduction block. A small phrenic burst amplitude facilitation was also observed contralateral to axon conduction block, indicating crossed spinal phrenic motor facilitation (csPMF). csPMF was independent of spinal TNFα and aPKC. Ipsilateral iPMF and csPMF following unilateral withdrawal of phrenic synaptic inputs were associated with proportional increases in phrenic responses to chemoreceptor stimulation (hypercapnia), suggesting iPMF and csPMF increase phrenic dynamic range. These data suggest that local, spinal mechanisms sense and respond to reduced synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons. We hypothesize that iPMF and csPMF may represent compensatory mechanisms that assure adequate motor output is maintained in a physiological system in which prolonged inactivity ends life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inflammatory nodule mimicking a phrenic neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Jacopo; Scarnecchia, Elisa; Del Sordo, Rachele; Cagini, Lucio; Puma, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Isolated phrenic nerve nodule is usually a primitive tumour. Surgery is diagnostic and therapeutic at the same time. We report the case of a completely serum-negative Caucasian male with a right diaphragmatic relaxation associated to an isolated small nodule of the phrenic nerve. The patient was referred to our unit complaining shortness of breath and progressive fatigue. A standard chest X-ray showed right diaphragmatic palsy; chest scanning revealed a nodular lesion belonging to the right phrenic nerve. Positron emission tomography was negative for glucose uptake. The preoperative diagnosis of primitive neurogenic tumour was thus supposed, and the patient treated by the lesion's surgical resection along with diaphragmatic plication. Histopathological examination revealed an idiopathic inflammatory nodule of the phrenic nerve. Such condition has not previously been reported in the literature among the possible aetiology of a diaphragmatic relaxation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Fluoroscopic position of the second-generation cryoballoon during ablation in the right superior pulmonary vein as a predictor of phrenic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Yukio; Ströker, Erwin; Irfan, Ghazala; Mugnai, Giacomo; Ciconte, Giuseppe; Hünük, Burak; Velagić, Vedran; Overeinder, Ingrid; Tanaka, Kaoru; Brugada, Pedro; de Asmundis, Carlo; Chierchia, Gian-Battista

    2016-08-01

    Phrenic nerve injury (PNI) is the most frequently observed complication during pulmonary vein isolation procedure using the second-generation cryoballoon (CB). Our objective was to analyse the correlation between the fluoroscopic position of the 28 mm CB during ablation in the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV) and the occurrence of PNI. A total of 165 patients having undergone the large 28 mm CB ablation were retrospectively reviewed. Positioning of the CB relative to the cardiac silhouette was classified under fluoroscopic guidance in antero-posterior projection during RSPV ablation. Regarding the lower half of the balloon, CB positioning was defined as follows: (A) completely inside the cardiac shadow; (B1) Phrenic nerve injury occurred in 9.7% (16/165) during ablation in the RSPV. The occurrence of PNI was 0.9, 10.6, and 90.1% in positions A, B1, and B2, respectively (A vs. B1, P = 0.01; B1 vs. B2, P < 0.0001). Among other pre-procedural and procedural variables, the B2 position was the strongest independent determinant for predicting PNI at RSPV (P = 0.001, odds ratio: 119.9; 95% confidence interval: 11.6-1234.7) after multivariable analysis. The incidence of PNI at the RSPV significantly increased in case of more distal positioning of the CB relative to the cardiac shadow. This simple and straightforward intra-procedural indicator might prone the operators to attempt occluding the RPSV more proximally in order to avoid PNI. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Phrenic neuropathy in chronic renal failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Zifko, U.; Auinger, M.; Albrecht, G.; Kästenbauer, T.; Lahrmann, H.; Grisold, W.; Wanke, T.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Peripheral neuropathy and alterations in diaphragmatic muscle function are frequently caused by uraemia. Phrenic nerve function in patients with end stage renal failure, however, has not been examined to date. METHODS--An electrophysiological study of the phrenic nerve was performed to determine its possible involvement in 32 nondiabetic patients with end stage renal disease undergoing chronic haemodialysis. RESULTS--Seventeen patients had electrophysiological signs of peripheral ...

  10. Phrenicotomy alters phrenic long-term facilitation following intermittent hypoxia in anesthetized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhu, M. S.; Lee, K. Z.; Fregosi, R. F.; Fuller, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) can induce a persistent increase in neural drive to the respiratory muscles known as long-term facilitation (LTF). LTF of phrenic inspiratory activity is often studied in anesthetized animals after phrenicotomy (PhrX), with subsequent recordings being made from the proximal stump of the phrenic nerve. However, severing afferent and efferent axons in the phrenic nerve has the potential to alter the excitability of phrenic motoneurons, which has been hypothesized to be...

  11. Phrenic motor neuron adenosine 2A receptors elicit phrenic motor facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven, Yasin B; Perim, Raphael R; Hobson, Orinda R; Simon, Alec K; Tadjalli, Arash; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2018-04-15

    Although adenosine 2A (A 2A ) receptor activation triggers specific cell signalling cascades, the ensuing physiological outcomes depend on the specific cell type expressing these receptors. Cervical spinal adenosine 2A (A 2A ) receptor activation elicits a prolonged facilitation in phrenic nerve activity, which was nearly abolished following intrapleural A 2A receptor siRNA injections. A 2A receptor siRNA injections selectively knocked down A 2A receptors in cholera toxin B-subunit-identified phrenic motor neurons, sparing cervical non-phrenic motor neurons. Collectively, our results support the hypothesis that phrenic motor neurons express the A 2A receptors relevant to A 2A receptor-induced phrenic motor facilitation. Upregulation of A 2A receptor expression in the phrenic motor neurons per se may potentially be a useful approach to increase phrenic motor neuron excitability in conditions such as spinal cord injury. Cervical spinal adenosine 2A (A 2A ) receptor activation elicits a prolonged increase in phrenic nerve activity, an effect known as phrenic motor facilitation (pMF). The specific cervical spinal cells expressing the relevant A 2A receptors for pMF are unknown. This is an important question since the physiological outcome of A 2A receptor activation is highly cell type specific. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that the relevant A 2A receptors for pMF are expressed in phrenic motor neurons per se versus non-phrenic neurons of the cervical spinal cord. A 2A receptor immunostaining significantly colocalized with NeuN-positive neurons (89 ± 2%). Intrapleural siRNA injections were used to selectively knock down A 2A receptors in cholera toxin B-subunit-labelled phrenic motor neurons. A 2A receptor knock-down was verified by a ∼45% decrease in A 2A receptor immunoreactivity within phrenic motor neurons versus non-targeting siRNAs (siNT; P phrenic motor neurons. In rats that were anaesthetized, subjected to neuromuscular blockade and ventilated, p

  12. Maintained inspiratory activity during proportional assist ventilation in surfactant-depleted cats early after surfactant instillation: phrenic nerve and pulmonary stretch receptor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaller Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspiratory activity is a prerequisite for successful application of patient triggered ventilation such as proportional assist ventilation (PAV. It has recently been reported that surfactant instillation increases the activity of slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors (PSRs followed by a shorter inspiratory time (Sindelar et al, J Appl Physiol, 2005 [Epub ahead of print]. Changes in lung mechanics, as observed in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome and after surfactant treatment, might therefore influence the inspiratory activity when applying PAV early after surfactant treatment. Objective To investigate the regulation of breathing and ventilatory response in surfactant-depleted young cats during PAV and during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP early after surfactant instillation in relation to phrenic nerve activity (PNA and the activity of PSRs. Methods Seven anesthetized, endotracheally intubated young cats were exposed to periods of CPAP and PAV with the same end-expiratory pressure (0.2–0.5 kPa before and after lung lavage and after surfactant instillation. PAV was set to compensate for 75% of the lung elastic recoil. Results Tidal volume and respiratory rate were higher with lower PaCO2 and higher PaO2 during PAV than during CPAP both before and after surfactant instillation (p Conclusion PSR activity and the control of breathing are maintained during PAV in surfactant-depleted cats early after surfactant instillation, with a higher ventilatory response and a lower breathing effort than during CPAP.

  13. The importance of phrenic nerve preservation and its effect on long-term postoperative lung function after pneumonectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocher, Gregor J; Lysgaard, Jannie; Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten Rune

    2016-01-01

    %). In the remaining 2 patients, diaphragmatic motion was already paradoxical before the nerve block. We found no significant difference on dynamic lung function values (FEV1 'before' 1.39 ± 0.44 vs FEV1 'after' 1.38 ± 0.40; P = 0.81). CONCLUSIONS: Induction of a temporary diaphragmatic palsy did not significantly...

  14. Histological identification of phrenic afferent projections to the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Jayakrishnan; Bezdudnaya, Tatiana; Zholudeva, Lyandysha V; Detloff, Megan R; Reier, Paul J; Lane, Michael A; Fuller, David D

    2017-02-01

    Limited data are available regarding the spinal projections of afferent fibers in the phrenic nerve. We describe a method that robustly labels phrenic afferent spinal projections in adult rats. The proximal end of the cut phrenic nerve was secured in a microtube filled with a transganglionic tracer (cholera toxin β-subunit, CT-β, or Cascade Blue) and tissues harvested 96-h later. Robust CT-β labeling occurred in C3-C5 dorsal root ganglia cell bodies and phrenic afferent projections were identified in the mid-cervical dorsal horn (laminae I-III), intermediate grey matter (laminae IV, VII) and near the central canal (laminae X). Afferent fiber labeling was reduced or absent when CT-β was delivered to the intrapleural space or directly to the hemidiaphragm. Soaking the phrenic nerve with Cascade Blue also produced robust labeling of mid-cervical dorsal root ganglia cells bodies, and primary afferent fibers were observed in spinal grey matter and dorsal white matter. Our results show that the 'nerve soak' method effectively labels both phrenic motoneurons and phrenic afferent projections, and show that primary afferents project throughout the ipsilateral mid-cervical gray matter. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Antagonism of botulinum toxin-induced muscle weakness by aminopyridines in rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, M.; Scovill, J.; Deshpande, S.S.

    1993-05-13

    The effects of the potassium channel inhibitor and putative botulinum toxin antagonists 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP) were investigated in vitro on the contractile and electrophysiological properties of rat diaphragm muscle. In the presence of 300 pM botulinum toxin A (BoTx A), twitches elicited by supramaximal nerve stimulation (0. 1 Hz) were reduced by over 80% in 3 hr. The time to block decreased with increases in temperature, toxin concentration and stimulation frequency. Addition of 4-AP or 3,4-DAP led to a prompt reversal of the BoTx A-induced depression of twitch tension. This reversal was concentration-dependent such that, in the presence of 1 mM 4-AP, reversal of the BoTx A-induced blockade was complete in 6.7 min. The beneficial effect of the APs were well maintained and persisted for up to 6 hr after addition. Application of 1 microns M neostigmine 1 hr after 3,4-DAP produced a further potentiation of twitch tensions, but this action lasted for < 5 min and led to the appearance of tetanic fade during repetitive stimulation. It is concluded that the APs are of benefit in antagonizing the muscle paralysis following exposure to botulinum toxin. Co-application of neostigmine, however, appears to confer no additional benefit.

  16. Dynamic changes in phrenic motor output following high cervical hemisection in the decerebrate rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki; Marchenko, Vitaliy

    2015-09-01

    Hemisection of the spinal cord at C2 eliminates ipsilateral descending drive to the phrenic nucleus and causes hemidiaphragmatic paralysis in rats. Phrenic nerve (PhN) or diaphragmatic activity ipsilateral to hemisection can occasionally be induced acutely following hemisection by respiratory stressors (i.e., hypercapnia, asphyxia, contralateral phrenicotomy) and becomes spontaneously active days-to-weeks later. These investigations, however, are potentially confounded by the use of anesthesia, which may suppress spontaneously-active crossed phrenic pathways. Experiments were performed on vecuronium-paralyzed, unanesthetized, decerebrate adult male rats and whole PhN activity recorded continuously before, during, and after high cervical hemisection at the C1 spinal level. Crossed phrenic activity recovered spontaneously over minutes-to-hours with maximal recovery of 11.8 ± 3.1% (m ± SE) in the PhN ipsilateral to hemisection. Additionally, there was a significant increase in PhN activity contralateral to hemisection of 221.0 ± 4 0.4% (m ± SE); since animals were artificially-ventilated, these changes likely represent an increase in central respiratory drive. These results underscore the state-dependence of crossed bulbophrenic projections and suggest that unanesthetized models may be more sensitive in detecting acute recovery of respiratory output following spinal cord injury (SCI). Additionally, our results may suggest an important role for a group of C1-C2 neurons exhibiting respiratory-related activity, spared by the higher level of hemisection. These units may function as relays of polysynaptic bulbophrenic pathways and/or provide excitatory drive to phrenic motoneurons. Our findings provide a new model for investigating acute respiratory recovery following cervical SCI, the high C1-hemisected unanesthetized decerebrate rat and suggest a centrally-mediated increase in central respiratory drive in response to high cervical SCI. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  17. Phrenic motor outputs in response to bronchopulmonary C‐fibre activation following chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Key points Activation of bronchopulmonary C‐fibres, the main chemosensitive afferents in the lung, can induce pulmonary chemoreflexes to modulate respiratory activity.Following chronic cervical spinal cord injury, bronchopulmonary C‐fibre activation‐induced inhibition of phrenic activity was exaggerated.Supersensitivity of phrenic motor outputs to the inhibitory effect of bronchopulmonary C‐fibre activation is due to a shift of phrenic motoneuron types and slow recovery of phrenic motoneuron discharge in cervical spinal cord‐injured animals.These data suggest that activation of bronchopulmonary C‐fibres may retard phrenic output recovery following cervical spinal cord injury.The alteration of phenotype and discharge pattern of phrenic motoneuron enables us to understand the impact of spinal cord injury on spinal respiratory activity. Abstract Cervical spinal injury interrupts bulbospinal pathways and results in cessation of phrenic bursting ipsilateral to the lesion. The ipsilateral phrenic activity can partially recover over weeks to months following injury due to the activation of latent crossed spinal pathways and exhibits a greater capacity to increase activity during respiratory challenges than the contralateral phrenic nerve. However, whether the bilateral phrenic nerves demonstrate differential responses to respiratory inhibitory inputs is unclear. Accordingly, the present study examined bilateral phrenic bursting in response to capsaicin‐induced pulmonary chemoreflexes, a robust respiratory inhibitory stimulus. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity was recorded in anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats at 8–9 weeks after C2 hemisection (C2Hx) or C2 laminectomy. Intra‐jugular capsaicin (1.5 μg kg−1) injection was performed to activate the bronchopulmonary C‐fibres to evoke pulmonary chemoreflexes. The present results indicate that capsaicin‐induced prolongation of expiratory duration was significantly attenuated in C2Hx

  18. Phrenic motor outputs in response to bronchopulmonary C-fibre activation following chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze

    2016-10-15

    Activation of bronchopulmonary C-fibres, the main chemosensitive afferents in the lung, can induce pulmonary chemoreflexes to modulate respiratory activity. Following chronic cervical spinal cord injury, bronchopulmonary C-fibre activation-induced inhibition of phrenic activity was exaggerated. Supersensitivity of phrenic motor outputs to the inhibitory effect of bronchopulmonary C-fibre activation is due to a shift of phrenic motoneuron types and slow recovery of phrenic motoneuron discharge in cervical spinal cord-injured animals. These data suggest that activation of bronchopulmonary C-fibres may retard phrenic output recovery following cervical spinal cord injury. The alteration of phenotype and discharge pattern of phrenic motoneuron enables us to understand the impact of spinal cord injury on spinal respiratory activity. Cervical spinal injury interrupts bulbospinal pathways and results in cessation of phrenic bursting ipsilateral to the lesion. The ipsilateral phrenic activity can partially recover over weeks to months following injury due to the activation of latent crossed spinal pathways and exhibits a greater capacity to increase activity during respiratory challenges than the contralateral phrenic nerve. However, whether the bilateral phrenic nerves demonstrate differential responses to respiratory inhibitory inputs is unclear. Accordingly, the present study examined bilateral phrenic bursting in response to capsaicin-induced pulmonary chemoreflexes, a robust respiratory inhibitory stimulus. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity was recorded in anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats at 8-9 weeks after C2 hemisection (C2Hx) or C2 laminectomy. Intra-jugular capsaicin (1.5 μg kg -1 ) injection was performed to activate the bronchopulmonary C-fibres to evoke pulmonary chemoreflexes. The present results indicate that capsaicin-induced prolongation of expiratory duration was significantly attenuated in C2Hx animals. However, ipsilateral phrenic

  19. Phrenic pacing compared with mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Packert; Laub, Michael; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2017-01-01

    mechanical ventilator dependent tetraplegics met the inclusion criteria. Data were retrieved from medical records and a structured follow-up interview with seven individuals from each group. RESULTS: No significant differences were found when comparing age at injury, time since injury, length...... of hospitalization, incidence of pneumonia, number of pneumonia hospitalizations, number of tracheal suctions, speech quality and activities of daily living or quality of life. On the Short Form Health Survey (SF36) mental health summary the median for both users of phrenic nerve pacing and users of mechanical...... ventilation was one s.d. above the mean of a standard population. CONCLUSIONS: Nine people have had a phrenic nerve pacer implanted. They do not significantly differ from a group of home mechanical ventilator dependent tetraplegics on a number of performance measures, but both groups seem to have better...

  20. Comparison of tissue distribution, phrenic nerve involvement, and epidural spread in standard- vs low-volume ultrasound-guided interscalene plexus block using contrast magnetic resonance imaging: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stundner, O; Meissnitzer, M; Brummett, C M; Moser, S; Forstner, R; Koköfer, A; Danninger, T; Gerner, P; Kirchmair, L; Fritsch, G

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound guidance allows for the use of much lower volumes of local anaesthetics for nerve blocks, which may be associated with less aberrant spread and fewer complications. This randomized, controlled study used contrast magnetic resonance imaging to view the differential-volume local anaesthetic distribution, and compared analgesic efficacy and respiratory impairment. Thirty patients undergoing shoulder surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound-guided interscalene block by a single, blinded operator with injection of ropivacaine 0.75% (either 20 or 5 ml) plus the contrast dye gadopentetate dimeglumine, followed by magnetic resonance imaging. The primary outcome was epidural spread. Secondary outcomes were central non-epidural spread, contralateral epidural spread, spread to the phrenic nerve, spirometry, ultrasound investigation of the diaphragm, block duration, pain scores during the first 24 h, time to first analgesic consumption, and total analgesic consumption. All blocks provided fast onset and adequate intra- and postoperative analgesia, with no significant differences in pain scores at any time point. Epidural spread occurred in two subjects of each group (13.3%); however, spread to the intervertebral foramen and phrenic nerve and extensive i.m. local anaesthetic deposition were significantly more frequent in the 20 ml group. Diaphragmatic paralysis occurred twice as frequently (n=8 vs 4), and changes from baseline peak respiratory flow rate were larger [Δ=-2.66 (1.99 sd) vs -1.69 (2.0 sd) l min(-1)] in the 20 ml group. This study demonstrates that interscalene block is associated with epidural spread irrespective of injection volume; however, less central (foraminal) and aberrant spread after low-volume injection may be associated with a more favourable risk profile. This study was registered with the European Medicines Agency (Eudra-CT number 2013-004219-36) and with the US National Institutes' of Health registry and results base, clinicaltrials

  1. Vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy activates the vocal folds maximally at therapeutic levels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardesch, J.J.; Sikken, J.R.; Veltink, Petrus H.; van der Aa, H.E.; Hageman, G.; Buschman, H.P.J.

    Purpose Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for medically refractory epilepsy can give hoarseness due to stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. For a group of VNS-therapy users this side-effect interferes severely with their daily activities. Our goal was to investigate the severity of

  2. The effect of magnesium sulfate concentration on the effective concentration of rocuronium, and sugammadex-mediated reversal, in isolated left phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm preparations from the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Choon-Kyu; Sung, Tae-Yun; Choi, Seok-Jun; Choi, Hey-Ran; Kim, Yong Beom; Lee, Jung-Un; Yang, Hong-Seuk

    2018-05-30

    Perioperative magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is used for analgesic, anti-arrhythmic, and obstetric purposes. The effects of MgSO4 on the neuromuscular blockade (NMB) induced by rocuronium, and the sugammadex reversal thereof, have not been clearly quantified. We investigated the effect increase concentrations of MgSO4 on the NMB by rocuronium, and sugammadex reversal, in isolated left phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm (PNHD) preparations from the rat. Rat PNHD preparations were randomly allocated to one of four groups varying in terms of MgSO4 concentration (1, 2, 3, and 4 mM, each n = 10, in Krebs solution). The train-of-four (TOF) and twitch height responses were recorded mechanomyographically. The preparations were treated with incrementally increasing doses of rocuronium and each group's effective concentration (EC)50, EC90, and EC95 of rocuronium were calculated via nonlinear regression. Then, sugammadex was administered in doses equimolar to rocuronium. The recovery index, time to T1 height >95% of control, and the time to a TOF ratio (TOFR) >0.9 after sugammadex administration were measured. The EC50, EC90, and EC95 of rocuronium fell significantly as the magnesium level increased. The EC50, EC90, and EC95 of rocuronium did not differ between the 3 and 4 mM groups. The recovery index, time to T1 height >95% of control, and time to a TOFR >0.9 after sugammadex administration did not differ among the four groups. Increases in the magnesium concentration in rat PNHD preparations proportionally enhanced the NMB induced by rocuronium but did not affect reversal by equimolar amounts of sugammadex.

  3. Phrenic motoneurons: output elements of a highly organized intraspinal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki

    2018-03-01

    pontomedullary respiratory network generates the respiratory pattern and relays it to bulbar and spinal respiratory motor outputs. The phrenic motor system controlling diaphragm contraction receives and processes descending commands to produce orderly, synchronous, and cycle-to-cycle-reproducible spatiotemporal firing. Multiple investigators have studied phrenic motoneurons (PhMNs) in an attempt to shed light on local mechanisms underlying phrenic pattern formation. I and colleagues (Marchenko V, Ghali MG, Rogers RF. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 308: R916-R926, 2015.) recorded PhMNs in unanesthetized, decerebrate rats and related their activity to simultaneous phrenic nerve (PhN) activity by creating a time-frequency representation of PhMN-PhN power and coherence. On the basis of their temporal firing patterns and relationship to PhN activity, we categorized PhMNs into three classes, each of which emerges as a result of intrinsic biophysical and network properties and organizes the orderly contraction of diaphragm motor fibers. For example, early inspiratory diaphragmatic activation by the early coherent burst generated by high-frequency PhMNs may be necessary to prime it to overcome its initial inertia. We have also demonstrated the existence of a prominent role for local intraspinal inhibitory mechanisms in shaping phrenic pattern formation. The objective of this review is to relate and synthesize recent findings with those of previous studies with the aim of demonstrating that the phrenic nucleus is a region of active local processing, rather than a passive relay of descending inputs.

  4. Phrenic motoneuron discharge patterns following chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Dougherty, Brendan J.; Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Lane, Michael A.; Reier, Paul J.; Fuller, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) dramatically disrupts synaptic inputs and triggers biochemical, as well as morphological, plasticity in relation to the phrenic motor neuron (PhMN) pool. Accordingly, our primary purpose was to determine if chronic SCI induces fundamental changes in the recruitment profile and discharge patterns of PhMNs. Individual PhMN action potentials were recorded from the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to lateral cervical (C2) hemisection injury (C2Hx) in anesthetized adult male rats at 2, 4 or 8 wks post-injury and in uninjured controls. PhMNs were phenotypically classified as early (Early-I) or late inspiratory (Late-I), or silent according to discharge patterns. Following C2Hx, the distribution of PhMNs was dominated by Late-I and silent cells. Late-I burst parameters (e.g., spikes per breath, burst frequency and duration) were initially reduced but returned towards control values by 8 wks post-injury. In addition, a unique PhMN burst pattern emerged after C2Hx in which Early-I cells burst tonically during hypocapnic inspiratory apnea. We also quantified the impact of gradual reductions in end-tidal CO2 partial pressure (PETCO2) on bilateral phrenic nerve activity. Compared to control rats, as PETCO2 declined, the C2Hx animals had greater inspiratory frequencies (breaths*min−1) and more substantial decreases in ipsilateral phrenic burst amplitude. We conclude that the primary physiological impact of C2Hx on ipsilateral PhMN burst patterns is a persistent delay in burst onset, transient reductions in burst frequency, and the emergence of tonic burst patterns. The inspiratory frequency data suggest that plasticity in brainstem networks is likely to play an important role in phrenic motor output after cervical SCI. PMID:23954215

  5. Phrenic motoneuron discharge patterns following chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Dougherty, Brendan J; Sandhu, Milapjit S; Lane, Michael A; Reier, Paul J; Fuller, David D

    2013-11-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) dramatically disrupts synaptic inputs and triggers biochemical, as well as morphological, plasticity in relation to the phrenic motor neuron (PhMN) pool. Accordingly, our primary purpose was to determine if chronic SCI induces fundamental changes in the recruitment profile and discharge patterns of PhMNs. Individual PhMN action potentials were recorded from the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to lateral cervical (C2) hemisection injury (C2Hx) in anesthetized adult male rats at 2, 4 or 8 wks post-injury and in uninjured controls. PhMNs were phenotypically classified as early (Early-I) or late inspiratory (Late-I), or silent according to discharge patterns. Following C2Hx, the distribution of PhMNs was dominated by Late-I and silent cells. Late-I burst parameters (e.g., spikes per breath, burst frequency and duration) were initially reduced but returned towards control values by 8wks post-injury. In addition, a unique PhMN burst pattern emerged after C2Hx in which Early-I cells burst tonically during hypocapnic inspiratory apnea. We also quantified the impact of gradual reductions in end-tidal CO2 partial pressure (PETCO2) on bilateral phrenic nerve activity. Compared to control rats, as PETCO2 declined, the C2Hx animals had greater inspiratory frequencies (breaths∗min(-1)) and more substantial decreases in ipsilateral phrenic burst amplitude. We conclude that the primary physiological impact of C2Hx on ipsilateral PhMN burst patterns is a persistent delay in burst onset, transient reductions in burst frequency, and the emergence of tonic burst patterns. The inspiratory frequency data suggest that plasticity in brainstem networks is likely to play an important role in phrenic motor output after cervical SCI. © 2013.

  6. Anatomy and physiology of phrenic afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Jayakrishnan; Streeter, Kristi A; Turner, Sara M F; Sunshine, Michael D; Bolser, Donald C; Fox, Emily J; Davenport, Paul W; Fuller, David D

    2017-12-01

    Large-diameter myelinated phrenic afferents discharge in phase with diaphragm contraction, and smaller diameter fibers discharge across the respiratory cycle. In this article, we review the phrenic afferent literature and highlight areas in need of further study. We conclude that 1 ) activation of both myelinated and nonmyelinated phrenic sensory afferents can influence respiratory motor output on a breath-by-breath basis; 2 ) the relative impact of phrenic afferents substantially increases with diaphragm work and fatigue; 3 ) activation of phrenic afferents has a powerful impact on sympathetic motor outflow, and 4 ) phrenic afferents contribute to diaphragm somatosensation and the conscious perception of breathing. Much remains to be learned regarding the spinal and supraspinal distribution and synaptic contacts of myelinated and nonmyelinated phrenic afferents. Similarly, very little is known regarding the potential role of phrenic afferent neurons in triggering or modulating expression of respiratory neuroplasticity. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Inhibition of protein kinase A activity depresses phrenic drive and glycinergic signalling, but not rhythmogenesis in anaesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, P G R; Sousa, L O; Tallapragada, V J; Goodchild, A K

    2013-07-01

    The cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway plays a critical role in regulating neuronal activity. Yet, how PKA signalling shapes the population activity of neurons that regulate respiratory rhythm and motor patterns in vivo is poorly defined. We determined the respiratory effects of focally inhibiting endogenous PKA activity in defined classes of respiratory neurons in the ventrolateral medulla and spinal cord by microinjection of the membrane-permeable PKA inhibitor Rp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate (Rp-cAMPS) in urethane-anaesthetized adult Sprague Dawley rats. Phrenic nerve activity, end-tidal CO2 and arterial pressure were recorded. Rp-cAMPS in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) caused powerful, dose-dependent depression of phrenic burst amplitude and inspiratory period. Rp-cAMPS powerfully depressed burst amplitude in the phrenic premotor nucleus, but had no effect at the phrenic motor nucleus, suggesting a lack of persistent PKA activity here. Surprisingly, inhibition of PKA activity in the preBötC increased phrenic burst frequency, whereas in the Bötzinger complex phrenic frequency decreased. Pretreating the preBötC with strychnine, but not bicuculline, blocked the Rp-cAMPS-evoked increase in frequency, but not the depression of phrenic burst amplitude. We conclude that endogenous PKA activity in excitatory inspiratory preBötzinger neurons and phrenic premotor neurons, but not motor neurons, regulates network inspiratory drive currents that underpin the intensity of phrenic nerve discharge. We show that inhibition of PKA activity reduces tonic glycinergic transmission that normally restrains the frequency of rhythmic respiratory activity. Finally, we suggest that the maintenance of the respiratory rhythm in vivo is not dependent on endogenous cAMP-PKA signalling. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Usefulness of phrenic latency and forced vital capacity in patients with ALS with latent respiratory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soonwook; Min, Ju-Hong; Cho, Hye-Jin; Joo, Byung-Euk; Cho, Eun Bin; Seok, Jin Myoung; Kim, Min-Ji; Kim, Byoung Joon

    2015-07-01

    The pulmonary function test (PFT) is a non-invasive and easily available technique to assess respiratory function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, patients with dyspnea sometimes show normal PFT findings. Herein, we investigated whether phrenic nerve conduction study (NCS) and PFT are useful to evaluate respiratory function of patients with ALS with normal value ranges in the PFT. We prospectively enrolled 34 patients with definite or probable ALS, who showed FVC (%) ⩾80 of predicted and 78 healthy subjects. PFT and phrenic NCS were performed with the measurement of forced vital capacity (FVC, %), forced expiratory volumes in 1s (FEV1, %), FEV1/FCV ratio (%), and phrenic compound muscle action potential amplitude, and latency. Compared to healthy controls, ALS patients showed delayed phrenic nerve latency and the decrease of FVC (%) (p=0.006 and pphrenic latency (AUC=0.7655) and FVC (%) (AUC=0.8239) discriminated ALS patients from healthy subjects. We demonstrated that ALS patients had early respiratory dysfunction, despite normal PFT findings. Phrenic latency and FVC (%) can be helpful to discriminate ALS patients with latent respiratory dysfunction from healthy subjects. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Decreased spinal synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons elicit localized inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Streeter, K.A.; Baker-Herman, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Phrenic motor neurons receive rhythmic synaptic inputs throughout life. Since even brief disruption in phrenic neural activity is detrimental to life, on-going neural activity may play a key role in shaping phrenic motor output. To test the hypothesis that spinal mechanisms sense and respond to reduced phrenic activity, anesthetized, ventilated rats received micro-injections of procaine in the C2 ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) to transiently (~30 min) block axon conduction in bulbospinal axons...

  10. Degeneration of Phrenic Motor Neurons Induces Long-Term Diaphragm Deficits following Mid-Cervical Spinal Contusion in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaise, Charles; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Hala, Tamara J.; Regan, Kathleen A.; Frank, David M.; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Leroy, Karelle; Pochet, Roland; Wright, Megan C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A primary cause of morbidity and mortality following cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is respiratory compromise, regardless of the level of trauma. In particular, SCI at mid-cervical regions targets degeneration of both descending bulbospinal respiratory axons and cell bodies of phrenic motor neurons, resulting in deficits in the function of the diaphragm, the primary muscle of inspiration. Contusion-type trauma to the cervical spinal cord is one of the most common forms of human SCI; however, few studies have evaluated mid-cervical contusion in animal models or characterized consequent histopathological and functional effects of degeneration of phrenic motor neuron–diaphragm circuitry. We have generated a mouse model of cervical contusion SCI that unilaterally targets both C4 and C5 levels, the location of the phrenic motor neuron pool, and have examined histological and functional outcomes for up to 6 weeks post-injury. We report that phrenic motor neuron loss in cervical spinal cord, phrenic nerve axonal degeneration, and denervation at diaphragm neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) resulted in compromised ipsilateral diaphragm function, as demonstrated by persistent reduction in diaphragm compound muscle action potential amplitudes following phrenic nerve stimulation and abnormalities in spontaneous diaphragm electromyography (EMG) recordings. This injury paradigm is reproducible, does not require ventilatory assistance, and provides proof-of-principle that generation of unilateral cervical contusion is a feasible strategy for modeling diaphragmatic/respiratory deficits in mice. This study and its accompanying analyses pave the way for using transgenic mouse technology to explore the function of specific genes in the pathophysiology of phrenic motor neuron degeneration and respiratory dysfunction following cervical SCI. PMID:23176637

  11. High-frequency epidural stimulation across the respiratory cycle evokes phrenic short-term potentiation after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Streeter, Kristi A; Hanna, Marie H; Stamas, Anna C; Reier, Paul J; Baekey, David M; Fuller, David D

    2017-10-01

    C2 spinal hemilesion (C2Hx) paralyzes the ipsilateral diaphragm, but recovery is possible through activation of "crossed spinal" synaptic inputs to ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons. We tested the hypothesis that high-frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) would potentiate ipsilateral phrenic output after subacute and chronic C2Hx. HF-ES (300 Hz) was applied to the ventrolateral C4 or T2 spinal cord ipsilateral to C2Hx in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats. Stimulus duration was 60 s, and currents ranged from 100 to 1,000 µA. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity and ipsilateral hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity were recorded before and after HF-ES. Higher T2 stimulus currents potentiated ipsilateral phasic inspiratory activity at both 2 and 12 wk post-C2Hx, whereas higher stimulus currents delivered at C4 potentiated ipsilateral phasic phrenic activity only at 12 wk ( P = 0.028). Meanwhile, tonic output in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve reached 500% of baseline values at the high currents with no difference between 2 and 12 wk. HF-ES did not trigger inspiratory burst-frequency changes. Similar responses occurred following T2 HF-ES. Increases in contralateral phrenic and XII nerve output were induced by C4 and T2 HF-ES at higher currents, but the relative magnitude of these changes was small compared with the ipsilateral phrenic response. We conclude that following incomplete cervical spinal cord injury, HF-ES of the ventrolateral midcervical or thoracic spinal cord can potentiate efferent phrenic motor output with little impact on inspiratory burst frequency. However, the substantial increases in tonic output indicate that the uninterrupted 60-s stimulation paradigm used is unlikely to be useful for respiratory muscle activation after spinal injury. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Previous studies reported that high-frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) activates the diaphragm following acute spinal transection. This study examined HF-ES and phrenic motor output

  12. Cervical spinal demyelination with ethidium bromide impairs respiratory (phrenic) activity and forelimb motor behavior in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Punzo, Antonio M.; Duncan, Ian D.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Johnson, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Although respiratory complications are a major cause of morbidity/mortality in many neural injuries or diseases, little is known concerning mechanisms whereby deficient myelin impairs breathing, or how patients compensate for such changes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that respiratory and forelimb motor function are impaired in a rat model of focal dorsolateral spinal demyelination (ethidium bromide, EB). Ventilation, phrenic nerve activity and horizontal ladder walking were performed 7-14 days post-C2 injection of EB or vehicle (SHAM). EB caused dorsolateral demyelination at C2-C3 followed by signficant spontaneous remyelination at 14 days post-EB. Although ventilation did not differ between groups, ipsilateral integrated phrenic nerve burst amplitude was significantly reduced versus SHAM during chemoreceptor activation at 7 days post-EB but recovered by 14 days. The ratio of ipsi- to contralateral phrenic nerve amplitude correlated with cross-sectional lesion area. This ratio was significantly reduced 7 days post-EB versus SHAM during baseline conditions, and versus SHAM and 14 day groups during chemoreceptor activation. Limb function ipsilateral to EB was impaired 7 days post-EB and partially recovered by 14 days post-EB. EB provides a reversible model of focal, spinal demyelination, and may be a useful model to study mechanisms of functional impairment and recovery via motor plasticity, or the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions to reduce severity or duration of disease. PMID:23159317

  13. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  14. Phrenic long-term facilitation requires PKCθ activity within phrenic motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinney, Michael J; Fields, Daryl P; Huxtable, Adrianne G; Peterson, Timothy J; Dale, Erica A; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-05-27

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces a form of spinal motor plasticity known as phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF); pLTF is a prolonged increase in phrenic motor output after AIH has ended. In anesthetized rats, we demonstrate that pLTF requires activity of the novel PKC isoform, PKCθ, and that the relevant PKCθ is within phrenic motor neurons. Whereas spinal PKCθ inhibitors block pLTF, inhibitors targeting other PKC isoforms do not. PKCθ is highly expressed in phrenic motor neurons, and PKCθ knockdown with intrapleural siRNAs abolishes pLTF. Intrapleural siRNAs targeting PKCζ, an atypical PKC isoform expressed in phrenic motor neurons that underlies a distinct form of phrenic motor plasticity, does not affect pLTF. Thus, PKCθ plays a critical role in spinal AIH-induced respiratory motor plasticity, and the relevant PKCθ is localized within phrenic motor neurons. Intrapleural siRNA delivery has considerable potential as a therapeutic tool to selectively manipulate plasticity in vital respiratory motor neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358107-11$15.00/0.

  15. The pattern and extent of retrograde transsynaptic transport of WGA-Alexa 488 in the phrenic motor system is dependent upon the site of application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshgarian, Harry G; Buttry, Janelle L

    2014-01-30

    The first aim of the study was to determine if WGA-Alexa 488 would undergo retrograde transsynaptic transport in the phrenic motor system as we have shown with WGA-HRP in a previous study. The advantage of using WGA-Alexa 488 is that labeled neurons could be isolated and analyzed for intracellular molecular mechanisms without exposing tissue sections to chemicals for histochemical staining. The second aim of the study was to investigate the pattern and extent of labeling that occurs when WGA-Alexa 488 is applied to the cervical phrenic nerve as compared to intradiaphragmatic injection. After injecting the hemidiaphragm ipsilateral to a C2 spinal cord hemisection, WGA-Alexa 488 presumably diffused to the contralateral hemidiaphragm and labeled the phrenic nuclei bilaterally. In all animals with hemidiaphragmatic injection, the rostral ventral respiratory group (rVRG) was also labeled bilaterally in the medulla. Thus, injection of WGA-Alexa 488 into the diaphragm results in retrograde transsynaptic transport in the phrenic motor system. After applying WGA-Alexa 488 to the ipsilateral intact cervical phrenic nerve in both C2 hemisected rats and rats with a sham hemisection, only ipsilateral phrenic neurons were labeled; there was no labeling of the rVRG or any other center in the medulla. These results suggest that WGA-Alexa 488 must be applied in the vicinity of the phrenic myoneural junction where there is a high concentration of WGA receptors in order for transsynaptic transport to occur. The present study provides investigators with a new tool to study plasticity in the respiratory system after spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. WGA-Alexa transsynaptic labeling in the phrenic motor system of adult rats: Intrapleural injection versus intradiaphragmatic injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttry, Janelle L; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2015-02-15

    Intrapleural injection of CTB-Alexa 488, a retrograde tracer, provides an alternative labeling technique to the surgically invasive laparotomy required for intradiaphragmatic injection. However, CTB-Alexa 488 is incapable of crossing synapses restricting the tracer to the phrenic nuclei and the intercostal motor nuclei in the spinal cord. Intrapleural injection of WGA-Alexa 488, a transsynaptic tracer, provides a method to label the respiratory motor pathway in both the spinal cord and medulla. Intradiaphragmatic injection of WGA-Alexa 594 and vagal nerve injections of True blue were used to confirm the phrenic nuclei and to differentiate between the rVRG and the NA in the medulla. Following intrapleural injection, WGA-Alexa 488 was retrogradely transported to the phrenic nuclei and to the intercostal motor nuclei. Subsequently WGA-Alexa 488 was transsynaptically transported from the phrenic motoneurons to the pre-motor neurons in the rVRG that provide the descending drive to the phrenic neurons during inspiration. In addition WGA-Alexa 488 was identified in select cells of the NA confirmed by a dual label of both WGA-Alexa 488 and True blue. WGA-Alexa 488 demonstrates retrograde transsynaptic labeling following intrapleural injection whereas the previous method of injecting CTB-Alexa 488 only demonstrates retrograde labeling. Intrapleural injection of WGA-Alexa fluor conjugates is an effective method to transsynaptically label the phrenic motor system providing an alternative for the invasive laparotomy required for intradiaphragmatic injections. Furthermore, the study provides the first anatomical evidence of a direct synaptic relationship between rVRG and select NA cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Repeated intravenous doxapram induces phrenic motor facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, M S; Lee, K Z; Gonzalez-Rothi, E J; Fuller, D D

    2013-12-01

    Doxapram is a respiratory stimulant used to treat hypoventilation. Here we investigated whether doxapram could also trigger respiratory neuroplasticity. Specifically, we hypothesized that intermittent delivery of doxapram at low doses would lead to long-lasting increases (i.e., facilitation) of phrenic motor output in anesthetized, vagotomized, and mechanically-ventilated rats. Doxapram was delivered intravenously in a single bolus (2 or 6mg/kg) or as a series of 3 injections (2mg/kg) at 5min intervals. Control groups received pH-matched saline injections (vehicle) or no treatment (anesthesia time control). Doxapram evoked an immediate increase in phrenic output in all groups, but a persistent increase in burst amplitude only occurred after repeated dosing with 2mg/kg. At 60min following the last injection, phrenic burst amplitude was 168±24% of baseline (%BL) in the group receiving 3 injections (Pphrenic response to doxapram (2mg/kg) was reduced by 68% suggesting that at low doses the drug was acting primarily via the carotid chemoreceptors. We conclude that intermittent application of doxapram can trigger phrenic neuroplasticity, and this approach might be of use in the context of respiratory rehabilitation following neurologic injury. © 2013.

  18. Intermittent hypercapnia-induced phrenic long-term depression is revealed after serotonin receptor blockade with methysergide in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valic, Maja; Pecotic, Renata; Pavlinac Dodig, Ivana; Valic, Zoran; Stipica, Ivona; Dogas, Zoran

    2016-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Intermittent hypercapnia is a concomitant feature of breathing disorders. Hypercapnic stimuli evoke a form of respiratory plasticity known as phrenic long-term depression in experimental animals. This study was performed to investigate the putative role of serotonin receptors in the initiation of phrenic long-term depression in anaesthetized rats. What is the main finding and its importance? Phrenic nerve long-term depression was revealed in animals pretreated with the serotonin broad-spectrum antagonist, methysergide. This study highlights that serotonin receptors modulate respiratory plasticity evoked by acute intermittent hypercapnia in anaesthetized rats. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that intermittent hypercapnia can evoke a form of respiratory plasticity known as long-term depression of the phrenic nerve (pLTD) and that 5-HT receptors play a role in the initiation of pLTD. Adult male urethane-anaesthetized, vagotomized, paralysed, mechanically ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to an acute intermittent hypercapnia protocol. One group received i.v. injection of the non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist methysergide and another group received i.v. injection of the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 20 min before exposure to intermittent hypercapnia. A control group received i.v. injection of saline. Peak phrenic nerve activity and respiratory rhythm parameters were analysed at baseline (T0), during each of five hypercapnic episodes, and 15, 30 and 60 min (T60) after the last hypercapnia. Intravenous injection of methysergide before exposure to acute intermittent hypercapnia induced development of amplitude pLTD at T60 (decreased by 46.1 ± 6.9%, P = 0.003). Conversely, in control and WAY-100635-pretreated animals, exposure to acute intermittent hypercapnia did not evoke amplitude pLTD. However, a long-term decrease in phrenic nerve frequency was evoked both in control (42 ± 4

  19. Restoration of diaphragmatic function after diaphragm reinnervation by inferior laryngeal nerve; experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Barros Angelique

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To assess the possibilities of reinnervation in a paralyzed hemidiaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and inferior laryngeal nerve in rabbits. Reinnervation of a paralyzed diaphragm could be an alternative to treat patients with ventilatory insufficiency due to upper cervical spine injuries. Material and method Rabbits were divided into five groups of seven rabbits each. Groups I and II were respectively the healthy and the denervated control groups. The 3 other groups were all reinnervated using three different surgical procedures. In groups III and IV, phrenic nerve was respectively anastomosed with the abductor branch of the inferior laryngeal nerve and with the trunk of the inferior laryngeal nerve. In group V, the fifth and fourth cervical roots were respectively anastomosed with the abductor branch of the inferior laryngeal nerve and with the nerve of the sternothyroid muscle (originating from the hypoglossal nerve. Animals were evaluated 4 months later using electromyography, transdiaphragmatic pressure measurements, sonomicrometry and histological examination. Results A poor inspiratory activity was found in quiet breathing in the reinnervated groups, with an increasing pattern of activity during effort. In the reinnervated groups, transdiaphragmatic pressure measurements and sonomicrometry were higher in group III with no significant differencewith groups IV and V. Conclusion Inspiratory contractility of an hemidiaphragm could be restored with immediate anastomosis after phrenic nerve section between phrenic nerve and inferior laryngeal nerve.

  20. Mechanisms of Enhanced Phrenic Long-Term Facilitation in SOD1G93A Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriotomo, Irawan; Grebe, Ashley M.

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative motor neuron disease, causing muscle paralysis and death from respiratory failure. Effective means to preserve/restore ventilation are necessary to increase the quality and duration of life in ALS patients. At disease end-stage in a rat ALS model (SOD1G93A), acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) restores phrenic nerve activity to normal levels via enhanced phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF). Mechanisms enhancing pLTF in end-stage SOD1G93A rats are not known. Moderate AIH-induced pLTF is normally elicited via cellular mechanisms that require the following: Gq-protein-coupled 5-HT2 receptor activation, new BDNF synthesis, and MEK/ERK signaling (the Q pathway). In contrast, severe AIH elicits pLTF via a distinct mechanism that requires the following: Gs-protein-coupled adenosine 2A receptor activation, new TrkB synthesis, and PI3K/Akt signaling (the S pathway). In end-stage male SOD1G93A rats and wild-type littermates, we investigated relative Q versus S pathway contributions to enhanced pLTF via intrathecal (C4) delivery of small interfering RNAs targeting BDNF or TrkB mRNA, and MEK/ERK (U0126) or PI3 kinase/Akt (PI828) inhibitors. In anesthetized, paralyzed and ventilated rats, moderate AIH-induced pLTF was abolished by siBDNF and UO126, but not siTrkB or PI828, demonstrating that enhanced pLTF occurs via the Q pathway. Although phrenic motor neuron numbers were decreased in end-stage SOD1G93A rats (∼30% survival; p phrenic motor neurons (p phrenic motor plasticity results from amplification of normal cellular mechanisms versus addition/substitution of alternative mechanisms. Greater understanding of mechanisms underlying phrenic motor plasticity in ALS may guide development of new therapies to preserve and/or restore breathing in ALS patients. PMID:28500219

  1. Mechanisms of Enhanced Phrenic Long-Term Facilitation in SOD1G93A Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L; Satriotomo, Irawan; Allen, Latoya L; Grebe, Ashley M; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2017-06-14

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative motor neuron disease, causing muscle paralysis and death from respiratory failure. Effective means to preserve/restore ventilation are necessary to increase the quality and duration of life in ALS patients. At disease end-stage in a rat ALS model ( SOD1 G93A ), acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) restores phrenic nerve activity to normal levels via enhanced phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF). Mechanisms enhancing pLTF in end-stage SOD1 G93A rats are not known. Moderate AIH-induced pLTF is normally elicited via cellular mechanisms that require the following: G q -protein-coupled 5-HT 2 receptor activation, new BDNF synthesis, and MEK/ERK signaling (the Q pathway). In contrast, severe AIH elicits pLTF via a distinct mechanism that requires the following: G s -protein-coupled adenosine 2A receptor activation, new TrkB synthesis, and PI3K/Akt signaling (the S pathway). In end-stage male S OD1 G93A rats and wild-type littermates, we investigated relative Q versus S pathway contributions to enhanced pLTF via intrathecal (C4) delivery of small interfering RNAs targeting BDNF or TrkB mRNA, and MEK/ERK (U0126) or PI3 kinase/Akt (PI828) inhibitors. In anesthetized, paralyzed and ventilated rats, moderate AIH-induced pLTF was abolished by siBDNF and UO126, but not siTrkB or PI828, demonstrating that enhanced pLTF occurs via the Q pathway. Although phrenic motor neuron numbers were decreased in end-stage SOD1 G93A rats (∼30% survival; p phrenic motor neurons ( p phrenic motor plasticity results from amplification of normal cellular mechanisms versus addition/substitution of alternative mechanisms. Greater understanding of mechanisms underlying phrenic motor plasticity in ALS may guide development of new therapies to preserve and/or restore breathing in ALS patients. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/375834-12$15.00/0.

  2. Cervical spinal erythropoietin induces phrenic motor facilitation via ERK and Akt signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Erica A.; Satriotomo, Irawan; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is typically known for its role in erythropoiesis, but is also a potent neurotrophic/neuroprotective factor for spinal motor neurons. Another trophic factor regulated by Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), signals via ERK and Akt activation to elicit long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation (pMF). Since EPO also signals via ERK and Akt activation, we tested the hypothesis that EPO elicits similar pMF. Using retrograde labeling and immunohistochemical techniques, we demonstrate in adult, male, Sprague-Dawley rats that EPO and its receptor, EPO-R, are expressed in identified phrenic motor neurons. Intrathecal EPO at C4 elicits long-lasting pMF; integrated phrenic nerve burst amplitude increased >90 min post-injection (63±12% baseline 90 min post-injection; pphrenic motor neurons; EPO also increased pAkt (1.6 fold vs controls; pphrenic motor neurons (p<0.05), indicating a complex interaction between these kinases. We conclude that EPO elicits spinal plasticity in respiratory motor control. Since EPO expression is hypoxia-sensitive, it may play a role in respiratory plasticity in conditions of prolonged or recurrent low oxygen. PMID:22539857

  3. Inferior phrenic artery embolization in the treatment of hepatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprat, G.; Charnsangavej, C.; Wallace, S.; Carrasco, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-nine inferior phrenic artery embolizations were performed in 20 patients with primary or metastatic hepatic neoplasms. All patients had interruption of their hepatic arteries by previous infusion of chemotherapy, hepatic arterial embolization or surgical ligation. In one patient, bilateral pleural effusions developed following embolization of the inferior phrenic artery. No other severe complications occurred. Inferior phrenic artery embolization is a safe procedure and permits the continuation of transcatheter treatment of hepatic neoplasms. (orig.)

  4. Inferior phrenic artery embolization in the treatment of hepatic neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duprat, G.; Charnsangavej, C.; Wallace, S.; Carrasco, C.H.

    Twenty-nine inferior phrenic artery embolizations were performed in 20 patients with primary or metastatic hepatic neoplasms. All patients had interruption of their hepatic arteries by previous infusion of chemotherapy, hepatic arterial embolization or surgical ligation. In one patient, bilateral pleural effusions developed following embolization of the inferior phrenic artery. No other severe complications occurred. Inferior phrenic artery embolization is a safe procedure and permits the continuation of transcatheter treatment of hepatic neoplasms.

  5. Neural control of phrenic motoneuron discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Fuller, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Phrenic motoneurons (PMNs) provide a synaptic relay between bulbospinal respiratory pathways and the diaphragm muscle. PMNs also receive propriospinal inputs, although the functional role of these interneuronal projections has not been established. Here we review the literature regarding PMN discharge patterns during breathing and the potential mechanisms that underlie PMN recruitment. Anatomical and neurophysiological studies indicate that PMNs form a heterogeneous pool, with respiratory-related PMN discharge and recruitment patterns likely determined by a balance between intrinsic MN properties and extrinsic synaptic inputs. We also review the limited literature regarding PMN bursting during respiratory plasticity. Differential recruitment or rate modulation of PMN subtypes may underlie phrenic motor plasticity following neural injury and/or respiratory stimulation; however this possibility remains relatively unexplored. PMID:21376841

  6. Hepatocellular carcinomas supplied by inferior phrenic arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, N; Iwasaki, T; Chida, N; Suzuki, S; Akahane, T; Kobayashi, N; Ishii, M; Toyota, T

    1998-07-01

    To assess the arterial supply to hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) by inferior phrenic arteries (IPA). A total of 126 consecutive cases of HCC were studied by contract-enhanced CT and conventional arteriography. Blood supply from an IPA was suspected when the size of the HCC mass as seen on contrast-enhanced CT did not match the size of the tumor mass as seen on hepatic arteriography. Inferior phrenic arteriography was employed to confirm these findings. HCCs fed by the IPA were analyzed in terms of size, location, and history of prior treatment. In 14 (11%) of the 126 cases, the tumor was found to have a blood supply from an IPA. Eleven of these tumors were located in segments 2 and 7. Three tumors, which had not been treated previously, had a blood supply from an IPA. Six tumors were almost exclusively fed by an IPA and were located in segments 1, 1, and 4. HCCs located in segments which form the bare area of the liver (S1, S2, S7) can be supplied by an IPA. This should be suspected when a lesion or part of a lesion is identified on contrast-enhanced CT but not on hepatic arteriography.

  7. Hepatocellular carcinomas supplied by inferior phrenic arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, N.; Iwasaki, T.; Akahane, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Ishii, M.; Toyota, T.; Chida, N.; Suzuki, S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the arterial supply to hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) by inferior phrenic arteries (IPA). Material and Methods: A total of 126 consecutive cases of HCC were studied by contrast-enhanced CT and conventional arteriography. Blood supply from an IPA was suspected when the size of the HCC mass as seen on contrast-enhanced CT did not match the size of the tumor mass as seen on hepatic arteriography. Inferior phrenic arteriography was employed to confirm these findings. HCCs fed by the IPA were analyzed in terms of size, location, and history of prior treatment. Results: In 14 (11%) of the 126 cases, the tumor was found to have a blood supply from an IPA. Eleven of these tumors were located in segments 2 and 7. Three tumors, which had not been treated previously, had a blood supply from an IPA. Six tumors were almost exclusively fed by an IPA and were located in segments 7, 1, and 4. Conclusion: HCCs located in segments which form the bare area of the liver (S1, S2, S7) can be supplied by an IPA. This should be suspected when a lesion or part of a lesion is identified on contrast-enhanced CT but not on hepatic arteriography. (orig.)

  8. Hepatocellular carcinomas supplied by inferior phrenic arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, N.; Iwasaki, T.; Akahane, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Ishii, M.; Toyota, T. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Third Dept. of Internal Medicine; Chida, N.; Suzuki, S. [National Sendai Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Gastroenterology

    1998-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the arterial supply to hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) by inferior phrenic arteries (IPA). Material and Methods: A total of 126 consecutive cases of HCC were studied by contrast-enhanced CT and conventional arteriography. Blood supply from an IPA was suspected when the size of the HCC mass as seen on contrast-enhanced CT did not match the size of the tumor mass as seen on hepatic arteriography. Inferior phrenic arteriography was employed to confirm these findings. HCCs fed by the IPA were analyzed in terms of size, location, and history of prior treatment. Results: In 14 (11%) of the 126 cases, the tumor was found to have a blood supply from an IPA. Eleven of these tumors were located in segments 2 and 7. Three tumors, which had not been treated previously, had a blood supply from an IPA. Six tumors were almost exclusively fed by an IPA and were located in segments 7, 1, and 4. Conclusion: HCCs located in segments which form the bare area of the liver (S1, S2, S7) can be supplied by an IPA. This should be suspected when a lesion or part of a lesion is identified on contrast-enhanced CT but not on hepatic arteriography. (orig.)

  9. Phrenic motor neuron TrkB expression is necessary for acute intermittent hypoxia-induced phrenic long-term facilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Dale, Erica A.; Fields, Daryl P.; Devinney, Michael J.; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2016-01-01

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a form of hypoxia-induced spinal respiratory motor plasticity that requires new synthesis of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and activation of its high-affinity receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB). Since the cellular location of relevant TrkB receptors is not known, we utilized intrapleural siRNA injections to selectively knock down TrkB receptor protein within phrenic motor neurons. TrkB receptors within phrenic motor neurons are n...

  10. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  11. Bloqueio do nervo frênico após realização de bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via interescalênica: relato de caso A bloqueo del nervio frénico después de la realización de bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía interescalénica: relato de caso Phrenic nerve block after interscalene brachial plexus block: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Henrique Cangiani

    2008-04-01

    embargo, en su mayoría, sin repercusiones clínicas importantes. El objetivo de este relato fue presentar un caso en que ocurrió bloqueo del nervio frénico, con comprometimiento ventilatorio en paciente con insuficiencia renal crónica, sometido a la instalación de fístula arterio-venosa extensa, bajo bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía perivascular interescalénica. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo masculino, 50 años, tabaquista, portador de insuficiencia renal crónica en régimen de hemodiálisis, hipertensión arterial, hepatitis C, diabetes melito, enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica, sometido a la instalación de fístula arterio-venosa extensa en el miembro superior derecho bajo bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía interescalénica. El plexo braquial fue localizado con la utilización del estimulador de nervio periférico. Se inyectaron 35 mL de una solución de anestésico local constituida de una mezcla de lidocaína a 2% con epinefrina a 1:200.000 y ropivacaína a 0,75% en partes iguales. Al final de la inyección el paciente estaba lúcido, pero sin embargo con disnea y predominio de incursión respiratoria intercostal ipsilateral al bloqueo. No había murmullo vesicular en la base del hemitórax derecho. La SpO2 se mantuvo en un 95%, con catéter nasal de oxígeno. No fue necesaria la instalación de métodos de auxilio ventilatorio invasivo. La radiografía del tórax reveló que el hemidiafragma derecho ocupaba el 5° espacio intercostal. El cuadro clínico se revirtió en tres horas. CONCLUSIONES: El caso mostró que hubo parálisis total del nervio frénico con síntomas respiratorios. A pesar de no haber sido necesaria la terapéutica invasiva para el tratamiento, queda el aviso aquí para la restricción de la indicación de la técnica en esos casos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Phrenic nerve block is a common adverse event of brachial plexus block. However, in most cases it does not have any important clinical repercussion. The objective

  12. Phrenic motor neuron TrkB expression is necessary for acute intermittent hypoxia-induced phrenic long-term facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Erica A; Fields, Daryl P; Devinney, Michael J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2017-01-01

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a form of hypoxia-induced spinal respiratory motor plasticity that requires new synthesis of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and activation of its high-affinity receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB). Since the cellular location of relevant TrkB receptors is not known, we utilized intrapleural siRNA injections to selectively knock down TrkB receptor protein within phrenic motor neurons. TrkB receptors within phrenic motor neurons are necessary for BDNF-dependent acute intermittent hypoxia-induced pLTF, demonstrating that phrenic motor neurons are a critical site of respiratory motor plasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intermittent apnea elicits inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation via a retinoic acid- and protein synthesis-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertsch, Nathan A; Baker, Tracy L

    2017-11-01

    Respiratory motoneuron pools must provide rhythmic inspiratory drive that is robust and reliable, yet dynamic enough to respond to respiratory challenges. One form of plasticity that is hypothesized to contribute to motor output stability by sensing and responding to inadequate respiratory neural activity is inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF), an increase in inspiratory output triggered by a reduction in phrenic synaptic inputs. Evidence suggests that mechanisms giving rise to iPMF differ depending on the pattern of reduced respiratory neural activity (i.e., neural apnea). A prolonged neural apnea elicits iPMF via a spinal TNF-α-induced increase in atypical PKC activity, but little is known regarding mechanisms that elicit iPMF following intermittent neural apnea. We tested the hypothesis that iPMF triggered by intermittent neural apnea requires retinoic acid and protein synthesis. Phrenic nerve activity was recorded in urethane-anesthetized and -ventilated rats treated intrathecally with an inhibitor of retinoic acid synthesis (4-diethlyaminobenzaldehyde, DEAB), a protein synthesis inhibitor (emetine), or vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid) before intermittent (5 episodes, ~1.25 min each) or prolonged (30 min) neural apnea. Both DEAB and emetine abolished iPMF elicited by intermittent neural apnea but had no effect on iPMF elicited by a prolonged neural apnea. Thus different patterns of reduced respiratory neural activity elicit phenotypically similar iPMF via distinct spinal mechanisms. Understanding mechanisms that allow respiratory motoneurons to dynamically tune their output may have important implications in the context of respiratory control disorders that involve varied patterns of reduced respiratory neural activity, such as central sleep apnea and spinal cord injury. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We identify spinal retinoic acid and protein synthesis as critical components in the cellular cascade whereby repetitive reductions in respiratory

  14. Phrenic palsy and analgesic quality of continuous supraclavicular vs. interscalene plexus blocks after shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, T; Feldmann, C; Müller, H H; Nentwig, L; Beermann, A; El-Zayat, B F; Zoremba, M; Wulf, H; Steinfeldt, T

    2016-09-01

    Hemidiaphragmatic palsy is a common consequence of the interscalene brachial plexus block. It occurs less commonly with the supraclavicular approach. Register data suggest that the analgesic quality of a supraclavicular blockade is sufficient for arthroscopic shoulder surgery, although data on the post-operative analgesic effect are lacking. After approval by the ethics committee, patients having arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anaesthesia were randomized to receive a continuous interscalene or supraclavicular blockade. Phrenic nerve function was evaluated through ultrasound examination of the diaphragm in combination with spirometry. Pain scores at rest and activity etc. were determined before catheter insertion, during observation in the post- anaesthesia care unit (PACU) and on post-operative day 1 (POD1). The initial application of 10 ml of ropivacaine 0.2% was followed by continuous application of 4 ml of ropivacaine 0.2%, plus a patient controlled analgesia (PCA) bolus of 4 ml/h. One hundred and twenty patients were randomized, of which 114 data sets were analysed. Complete hemidiaphragmatic paresis occurred in 43% of the interscalene group vs. 24% in the supraclavicular group during PACU stay. Rates of dyspnoea and hoarseness were similar. Horner's syndrome occurred in 21% of the interscalene but only 3% of the supraclavicular group on POD1. Pain scores were comparable for pain at rest and during stress at each time point. This trial showed a significantly greater incidence of phrenic nerve palsy of the interscalene group in PACU, but not on POD1. Post-operative analgesic quality was similar in both groups. Continuous supraclavicular blockade is a suitable alternative to the continuous interscalene technique. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mammalian target of rapamycin is required for phrenic long-term facilitation following severe but not moderate acute intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Brendan J; Fields, Daryl P; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-09-01

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a persistent increase in phrenic nerve activity after acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH). Distinct cell-signaling cascades give rise to pLTF depending on the severity of hypoxemia within hypoxic episodes. Moderate AIH (mAIH; three 5-min episodes, PaO2 ∼35-55 mmHG) elicits pLTF by a serotonin (5-HT)-dependent mechanism that requires new synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activation of its high-affinity receptor (TrkB), and ERK MAPK signaling. In contrast, severe AIH (sAIH; three 5-min episodes, PaO2 ∼25-30 mmHG) elicits pLTF by an adenosine-dependent mechanism that requires new TrkB synthesis and Akt signaling. Although both mechanisms require spinal protein synthesis, the newly synthesized proteins are distinct, as are the neurochemicals inducing plasticity (serotonin vs. adenosine). In many forms of neuroplasticity, new protein synthesis requires translational regulation via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Since Akt regulates mTOR activity, we hypothesized that mTOR activity is necessary for sAIH- but not mAIH-induced pLTF. Phrenic nerve activity in anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated rats was recorded before, during, and 60 min after mAIH or sAIH. Rats were pretreated with intrathecal injections of 20% DMSO (vehicle controls) or rapamycin (0.1 mM, 12 μl), a selective mTOR complex 1 inhibitor. Consistent with our hypothesis, rapamycin blocked sAIH- but not mAIH-induced pLTF. Thus spinal mTOR activity is required for adenosine-dependent (sAIH) but not serotonin-dependent (mAIH) pLTF, suggesting that distinct mechanisms regulate new protein synthesis in these forms of spinal neuroplasticity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Evaluation of nerve transfer options for treating total brachial plexus avulsion injury: A retrospective study of 73 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kai-Ming; Hu, Jing-Jing; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin

    2018-03-01

    Despite recent great progress in diagnosis and microsurgical repair, the prognosis in total brachial plexus-avulsion injury remains unfavorable. Insufficient number of donors and unreasonable use of donor nerves might be key factors. To identify an optimal treatment strategy for this condition, we conducted a retrospective review. Seventy-three patients with total brachial plexus avulsion injury were followed up for an average of 7.3 years. Our analysis demonstrated no significant difference in elbow-flexion recovery between phrenic nerve-transfer (25 cases), phrenic nerve-graft (19 cases), intercostal nerve (17 cases), or contralateral C 7 -transfer (12 cases) groups. Restoration of shoulder function was attempted through anterior accessory nerve (27 cases), posterior accessory nerve (10 cases), intercostal nerve (5 cases), or accessory + intercostal nerve transfer (31 cases). Accessory nerve + intercostal nerve transfer was the most effective method. A significantly greater amount of elbow extension was observed in patients with intercostal nerve transfer (25 cases) than in those with contralateral C 7 transfer (10 cases). Recovery of median nerve function was noticeably better for those who received entire contralateral C 7 transfer (33 cases) than for those who received partial contralateral C 7 transfer (40 cases). Wrist and finger extension were reconstructed by intercostal nerve transfer (31 cases). Overall, the recommended surgical treatment for total brachial plexus-avulsion injury is phrenic nerve transfer for elbow flexion, accessory nerve + intercostal nerve transfer for shoulder function, intercostal nerves transfer for elbow extension, entire contralateral C 7 transfer for median nerve function, and intercostal nerve transfer for finger extension. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT03166033).

  17. Evaluation of nerve transfer options for treating total brachial plexus avulsion injury: a retrospective study of 73 participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kai-ming; Hu, Jing-jing; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Despite recent great progress in diagnosis and microsurgical repair, the prognosis in total brachial plexus-avulsion injury remains unfavorable. Insufficient number of donors and unreasonable use of donor nerves might be key factors. To identify an optimal treatment strategy for this condition, we conducted a retrospective review. Seventy-three patients with total brachial plexus avulsion injury were followed up for an average of 7.3 years. Our analysis demonstrated no significant difference in elbow-flexion recovery between phrenic nerve-transfer (25 cases), phrenic nerve-graft (19 cases), intercostal nerve (17 cases), or contralateral C7-transfer (12 cases) groups. Restoration of shoulder function was attempted through anterior accessory nerve (27 cases), posterior accessory nerve (10 cases), intercostal nerve (5 cases), or accessory + intercostal nerve transfer (31 cases). Accessory nerve + intercostal nerve transfer was the most effective method. A significantly greater amount of elbow extension was observed in patients with intercostal nerve transfer (25 cases) than in those with contralateral C7 transfer (10 cases). Recovery of median nerve function was noticeably better for those who received entire contralateral C7 transfer (33 cases) than for those who received partial contralateral C7 transfer (40 cases). Wrist and finger extension were reconstructed by intercostal nerve transfer (31 cases). Overall, the recommended surgical treatment for total brachial plexus-avulsion injury is phrenic nerve transfer for elbow flexion, accessory nerve + intercostal nerve transfer for shoulder function, intercostal nerves transfer for elbow extension, entire contralateral C7 transfer for median nerve function, and intercostal nerve transfer for finger extension. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT03166033). PMID:29623932

  18. Distribution of serotonin 2A and 2C receptor mRNA expression in the cervical ventral horn and phrenic motoneurons following spinal cord hemisection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, G J; Zhou, S Y; Walker, P D; Goshgarian, H G

    2001-06-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury leads to a disruption of bulbospinal innervation from medullary respiratory centers to phrenic motoneurons. Animal models utilizing cervical hemisection result in inhibition of ipsilateral phrenic nerve activity, leading to paralysis of the hemidiaphragm. We have previously demonstrated a role for serotonin (5-HT) as one potential modulator of respiratory recovery following cervical hemisection, a mechanism that likely occurs via 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2C receptors. The present study was designed to specifically examine if 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2C receptors are colocalized with phrenic motoneurons in both intact and spinal-hemisected rats. Adult female rats (250-350 g; n = 6 per group) received a left cervical (C2) hemisection and were injected with the fluorescent retrograde neuronal tracer Fluorogold into the left hemidiaphragm. Twenty-four hours later, animals were killed and spinal cords processed for in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Using (35)S-labeled cRNA probes, cervical spinal cords were probed for 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA expression and double-labeled using an antibody to Fluorogold to detect phrenic motoneurons. Expression of both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA was detected in motoneurons of the cervical ventral horn. Despite positive expression of both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA-hybridization signal over phrenic motoneurons, only 5-HT2A silver grains achieved a signal-to-noise ratio representative of colocalization. 5-HT2A mRNA levels in identified phrenic motoneurons were not significantly altered following cervical hemisection compared to sham-operated controls. Selective colocalization of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA with phrenic motoneurons may have implications for recently observed 5-HT2A receptor-mediated regulation of respiratory activity and/or recovery in both intact and injury-compromised states. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Nerve Blocks A nerve block is an injection to ... the limitations of Nerve Block? What is a Nerve Block? A nerve block is an anesthetic and/ ...

  20. Entropy maximization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. It is shown that (i) every probability density is the unique maximizer of relative entropy in an appropriate class and (ii) in the class of all pdf f that satisfy. ∫ fhi dμ = λi for i = 1, 2,...,...k the maximizer of entropy is an f0 that is pro- portional to exp(. ∑ ci hi ) for some choice of ci . An extension of this to a continuum of.

  1. Entropy Maximization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that (i) every probability density is the unique maximizer of relative entropy in an appropriate class and (ii) in the class of all pdf that satisfy ∫ f h i d = i for i = 1 , 2 , … , … k the maximizer of entropy is an f 0 that is proportional to exp ⁡ ( ∑ c i h i ) for some choice of c i . An extension of this to a continuum of ...

  2. Cortical Reorganization in Dual Innervation by Single Peripheral Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mou-Xiong; Shen, Yun-Dong; Hua, Xu-Yun; Hou, Ao-Lin; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2017-09-21

    Functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury and repair is related with cortical reorganization. However, the mechanism of innervating dual targets by 1 donor nerve is largely unknown. To investigate the cortical reorganization when the phrenic nerve simultaneously innervates the diaphragm and biceps. Total brachial plexus (C5-T1) injury rats were repaired by phrenic nerve-musculocutaneous nerve transfer with end-to-side (n = 15) or end-to-end (n = 15) neurorrhaphy. Brachial plexus avulsion (n = 5) and sham surgery (n = 5) rats were included for control. Behavioral observation, electromyography, and histologic studies were used for confirming peripheral nerve reinnervation. Cortical representations of the diaphragm and reinnervated biceps were studied by intracortical microstimulation techniques before and at months 0.5, 3, 5, 7, and 10 after surgery. At month 0.5 after complete brachial plexus injury, the motor representation of the injured forelimb disappeared. The diaphragm representation was preserved in the "end-to-side" group but absent in the "end-to-end" group. Rhythmic contraction of biceps appeared in "end-to-end" and "end-to-side" groups, and the biceps representation reappeared in the original biceps and diaphragm areas at months 3 and 5. At month 10, it was completely located in the original biceps area in the "end-to-end" group. Part of the biceps representation remained in the original diaphragm area in the "end-to-side" group. Destroying the contralateral motor cortex did not eliminate respiration-related contraction of biceps. The brain tends to resume biceps representation from the original diaphragm area to the original biceps area following phrenic nerve transfer. The original diaphragm area partly preserves reinnervated biceps representation after end-to-side transfer. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  3. Phrenic paralysis during cardiac electronic device implantation: incidence, causes and clinical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gil, María; Fontenla, Adolfo; Juliá, Justo; Parra, Juan José; Arribas, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Phrenic paralysis is a known complication of central venous catheterization, but it is not listed as a complication related to cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) implants. The aim of this study is to describe the incidence, causes, clinical picture, and management of phrenic paralysis occurring in this scenario. We retrospectively analysed data from our CIED implantation database and identified those patients who suffered phrenic paralysis during the implantation procedure. Four of 891 patients (subclavian puncture in 626) developed phrenic paralysis during pacemaker or defibrillator implant procedures. Severe respiratory failure needing ventilatory support occurred in two, being the phrenic paralysis transient in all of the cases. Transient phrenic paralysis may occur during CIED implantation probably related to the infiltration of local anaesthesia in the subclavian area. Mechanism, prevention, and management are discussed. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Targeted Delivery of TrkB Receptor to Phrenic Motoneurons Enhances Functional Recovery of Rhythmic Phrenic Activity after Cervical Spinal Hemisection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gransee, Heather M.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive recovery of rhythmic phrenic activity occurs over time after a spinal cord hemisection involving unilateral transection of anterolateral funiculi at C2 (SH). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acting through its full-length tropomyosin related kinase receptor subtype B (TrkB.FL) contributes to neuroplasticity after spinal cord injury, but the specific cellular substrates remain unclear. We hypothesized that selectively targeting increased TrkB.FL expression to phrenic motoneurons would be sufficient to enhance recovery of rhythmic phrenic activity after SH. Several adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes expressing GFP were screened to determine specificity for phrenic motoneuron transduction via intrapleural injection in adult rats. GFP expression was present in the cervical spinal cord 3 weeks after treatment with AAV serotypes 7, 8, and 9, but not with AAV2, 6, or rhesus-10. Overall, AAV7 produced the most consistent GFP expression in phrenic motoneurons. SH was performed 3 weeks after intrapleural injection of AAV7 expressing human TrkB.FL-FLAG or saline. Delivery of TrkB.FL-FLAG to phrenic motoneurons was confirmed by FLAG protein expression in the phrenic motor nucleus and human TrkB.FL mRNA expression in microdissected phrenic motoneurons. In all SH rats, absence of ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity was confirmed at 3 days post-SH, verifying complete interruption of ipsilateral descending drive to phrenic motoneurons. At 14 days post-SH, all AAV7-TrkB.FL treated rats (n = 11) displayed recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity compared to 3 out of 8 untreated SH rats (pphrenic motoneurons is sufficient to enhance recovery of ipsilateral rhythmic phrenic activity after SH, indicating that selectively targeting gene expression in spared motoneurons below the level of spinal cord injury may promote functional recovery. PMID:23724091

  5. Attempt of peripheral nerve reconstruction during lung cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hanyue; Hu, Yingjie; Huang, Jia; Yang, Yunhai; Xing, Kaichen; Luo, Qingquan

    2018-05-01

    Vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury are not rare complications of lung cancer surgery and can cause lethal consequences. Until now, no optimal method other than paying greater attention during surgery has been available. Four patients underwent lung surgery that involved RLN or vagus nerve injury. The left RLN or vagus nerve was cut off and then reconstructed immediately during surgery. Two patients underwent direct anastomosis, while the remaining two underwent phrenic nerve replacing tension-relieving anastomosis. All patients were able to speak immediately after recovery. No or minimal glottal gap was observed during laryngoscopy conducted on the second day after surgery. Most patients achieved full recovery of voice quality. Immediate reconstruction of RLN is technically feasible and can be carried out with satisfying short-term and long-term outcomes. © 2018 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Pinched Nerve Information Page Pinched Nerve Information Page What research is being done? Within the NINDS research programs, pinched nerves are addressed primarily through studies associated with pain ...

  7. Influência da nifedipina no bloqueio neuromuscular produzido pelo atracúrio e pelo cisatracúrio: estudo em preparações nervo frênico-diafragma de rato Influencia de la nifedipina en el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por atracurio y cisatracurio: estudio en preparación nervio frénico diafragma de ratón Influence of nifedipine on the neuromuscular block produced by atracurium and cistracurium: study in rat phrenic-diaphragmatic nerve preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Rodrigues de Sousa

    2006-04-01

    neuromuscular del atracurio y del cisatracurio, no cambió el potencial de membrana y produjo el aumento inicial en la frecuencia de los PPTM, seguida de bloqueo. CONCLUSIONES: La nifedipina, en la concentración empleada, potenció el bloqueo neuromuscular que el atracurio e cisatracurio produjeron. Estudios electrofisiológicos demostraron una acción presináptica y la ausencia de acción despolarizante sobre la fibra muscular.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Calcium channel blockers may interact with neuromuscular blockers, increasing its effects. Research studies about this interaction display controversial results. In some studies these drugs produced neuromuscular blockage, or contracture, or no effect at all was proved over skeletal neuromuscular response. This study assessed the nifedipine effects over muscular responses and its possible interaction with neuromuscular blockers in rat diaphragm. METHODS: A number of 25 rats were used, weighing between 250 and 300 g and sacrificed under anesthesia with intraperitoneal pentobarbital (40 mg.kg-1. Preparation was mounted according to the technique described by Bulbring. Diaphragm was kept under tension, connected to an isometric transducer and subjected to an indirect stimulation of 0.1 Hz frequency. Diaphragm contractions were registered on a physiograph. In order to evaluate the effect of these drugs on neuromuscular transmission, they were added separately or associated to the preparation, on the following concentrations: nifedipine (4 µg.mL-1; atracurium (20 µg.mL-1; cistracurium (3 µg.mL-1. On phrenic-nerve preparation, the assessed items were: 1 the extent of diaphragm muscle response to indirect stimulation, before and 45 minutes after adding nifedipine and neuromuscular blockers separately and after the association of both drugs; 2 nifedipine effects on membrane potentials (MP and miniature end-plate potentials (MEPP. RESULTS: Employed separately, nifedipine did not alter the extent of muscular responses, but it did

  8. Influência do lítio no bloqueio neuromuscular produzido pelo atracúrio e pelo cisatracúrio: estudo em preparações nervo frênico-diafragma de rato Influencia del litio en el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el atracurio y por el cisatracurio: estudio en preparo nervio frénico-diafragma del ratón Influence of lithium on the neuromuscular blockade produced by atracurium and cisatracurium: study on rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta Cristina Antoniassi Fernandes

    2007-06-01

    alteraciones en los potenciales de placa terminal en miniatura mostraron una acción presináptica.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Lithium is widely used for the treatment of bipolar disorders and can interact with neuromuscular blockers. There is a controversy about the mechanisms by which it affects neuromuscular transmission and its interaction with neuromuscular blockers. The objective of this study was to evaluate, on the rat diaphragm, the effects of lithium on the muscular response and indirect stimulation, and the possible interaction with neuromuscular blockers. METHODS: Rats weighing between 250 and 300 g were sacrificed under urethane anesthesia. The phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation was assembled according to the Bulbring technique. The diaphragm was kept under tension, connected to an isometric transducer, and submitted to indirect stimulation with a frequency of 0.1 Hz. The contractions of the diaphragm were registered on a physiograph. The analysis of the amplitude of the muscular responses evaluated: the effects of the isolated drugs: lithium (1.5 mg.mL-1; atracurium (20 µg.mL-1, and cisatracurium (3 µg.mL-1; the lithium-neuromuscular blockers association; and the effects of lithium on the neuromuscular blockade produced by atracurium (35 µg.mL-1 and cisatracurium (5 µg.mL-1. The effects were evaluated before and 45 minutes after the addition of the drugs. The effects of lithium on membrane potentials (MP and miniature end-plate potentials (MEPP were also evaluated. RESULTS: Lithium by itself did not change the amplitude of the muscular responses, but it decreased significantly the neuromuscular blockade produced by atracurium and cisatracurium. It did not change MP and caused an initial increase in MEPP. CONCLUSIONS: Lithium by itself did not compromise neuromuscular transmission and increased the resistance to the effects of atracurium and cisatracurium. It did not show any action on the muscle fiber, and the changes in miniature end-plate potentials

  9. The evaluation of the right inferior phrenic artery diameter in cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Kaan; Balci, Yuksel; Tok, Sermin; Ucbilek, Enver; Kara, Engin; Kaya, Omer

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between right inferior phrenic artery diameter and portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. CT examinations of 38 patients with chronic liver disease (patient group) and 40 patients without any liver disease (control group) were evaluated. The right inferior phrenic artery diameter of the patient and control group were measured. CT findings of portal hypertension, which were accepted as ascites, collaterals, splenomegaly and portal vein diameter greater than 13 mm, were determined and scored in the patient group. Patients obtained scores between one and four with respect to portal hypertension findings, and the scores were compared with phrenic artery diameters. Child-Pugh and MELD scores of the patients were also calculated. The mean diameter of the right inferior phrenic artery in the patient group was larger than that in the control group (p phrenic artery diameter of the patients with score 1 was significantly different from those with score 2 (p = 0.028), score 3 (p = 0.001) and score 4 (p = 0.005). We found a linear and moderate relationship between phrenic artery diameter values and Child-Pugh scores (p = 0.012, r = 0.405). Dilatation of the right inferior phrenic artery in cirrhotic patients may be a nonspecific sign of developing portal hypertension.

  10. Evaluation of detectability of right inferior phrenic artery root in dynamic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Osamu [Akashi Municipal Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Kizu, Osamu; Shimizu, Toshihisa; Takahashi, Takeshi; Ohno, Koji; Ohmura, Makoto; Maeda, Tomoho

    1995-05-01

    We evaluated the detectability of the root of the right inferior phrenic artery in dynamic CT over the entire liver as used for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. The results showed no detection in three cases, poor detection in seven, detection in 12 and good detection in eight. The right inferior phrenic artery could be detected in many cases. Identification was easier in cases with direct branching from the aorta. It can be concluded that for angiographic examination, dynamic CT over the entire liver is useful for catheterization to the right inferior phrenic artery. (author).

  11. Evaluation of detectability of right inferior phrenic artery root in dynamic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Kizu, Osamu; Shimizu, Toshihisa; Takahashi, Takeshi; Ohno, Koji; Ohmura, Makoto; Maeda, Tomoho.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the detectability of the root of the right inferior phrenic artery in dynamic CT over the entire liver as used for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. The results showed no detection in three cases, poor detection in seven, detection in 12 and good detection in eight. The right inferior phrenic artery could be detected in many cases. Identification was easier in cases with direct branching from the aorta. It can be concluded that for angiographic examination, dynamic CT over the entire liver is useful for catheterization to the right inferior phrenic artery. (author)

  12. Diaphragm-Sparing Nerve Blocks for Shoulder Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, De Q H; Elgueta, Maria Francisca; Aliste, Julian; Finlayson, Roderick J

    Shoulder surgery can result in significant postoperative pain. Interscalene brachial plexus blocks (ISBs) constitute the current criterion standard for analgesia but may be contraindicated in patients with pulmonary pathology due to the inherent risk of phrenic nerve block and symptomatic hemidiaphragmatic paralysis. Although ultrasound-guided ISB with small volumes (5 mL), dilute local anesthetic (LA) concentrations, and LA injection 4 mm lateral to the brachial plexus have been shown to reduce the risk of phrenic nerve block, no single intervention can decrease its incidence below 20%. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular blocks with LA injection posterolateral to the brachial plexus may anesthetize the shoulder without incidental diaphragmatic dysfunction, but further confirmatory trials are required. Ultrasound-guided C7 root blocks also seem to offer an attractive, diaphragm-sparing alternative to ISB. However, additional large-scale studies are needed to confirm their efficacy and to quantify the risk of periforaminal vascular breach. Combined axillary-suprascapular nerve blocks may provide adequate postoperative analgesia for minor shoulder surgery but do not compare favorably to ISB for major surgical procedures. One intriguing solution lies in the combined use of infraclavicular brachial plexus blocks and suprascapular nerve blocks. Theoretically, the infraclavicular approach targets the posterior and lateral cords, thus anesthetizing the axillary nerve (which supplies the anterior and posterior shoulder joint), as well as the subscapular and lateral pectoral nerves (both of which supply the anterior shoulder joint), whereas the suprascapular nerve block anesthetizes the posterior shoulder. Future randomized trials are required to validate the efficacy of combined infraclavicular-suprascapular blocks for shoulder surgery.

  13. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vianney eRozand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 minutes each: i high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task, ii moderate mental exertion (congruent Stroop task, iii low mental exertion (watching a movie. In each condition, mental exertion was combined with ten intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensor muscles (one maximal voluntary contraction every 3 minutes. Neuromuscular function was assessed using electrical nerve stimulation. Maximal voluntary torque, maximal muscle activation and other neuromuscular parameters were similar across mental exertion conditions and did not change over time. These findings suggest that mental exertion does not affect neuromuscular function during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors.

  14. Phrenic Arterial Injury Presenting as Delayed Hemothorax Complicating Simple Rib Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Hong Joon; Lee, Jun Wan; Kim, Kun Dong; You, In Sool

    2016-01-01

    Delayed hemothorax after blunt torso injury is rare, but might be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of delayed hemothorax bleeding from phrenic artery injury in a 24-year-old woman. The patient suffered from multiple rib fractures on the right side, a right hemopneumothorax, thoracic vertebral injury and a pelvic bone fracture after a fall from a fourth floor window. Delayed hemothorax associated with phrenic artery bleeding, caused by a stab injury from a...

  15. Phrenic motoneuron expression of serotonergic and glutamatergic receptors following upper cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Carlos B.; Bailey, Jeffrey P.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C.

    2012-01-01

    Following cervical spinal cord injury at C2 (SH hemisection model) there is progressive recovery of phrenic activity. Neuroplasticity in the postsynaptic expression of neurotransmitter receptors may contribute to functional recovery. Phrenic motoneurons express multiple serotonergic (5-HTR) and glutamatergic (GluR) receptors, but the timing and possible role of these different neurotransmitter receptor subtypes in the neuroplasticity following SH are not clear. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that there is an increased expression of serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmitter receptors within phrenic motoneurons after SH. In adult male rats, phrenic motoneurons were labeled retrogradely by intrapleural injection of Alexa 488-conjugated cholera toxin B. In thin (10 μm) frozen sections of the spinal cord, fluorescently-labeled phrenic motoneurons were visualized for laser capture microdissection (LCM). Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR in LCM samples, the time course of changes in 5-HTR and GluR mRNA expression was determined in phrenic motoneurons up to 21 days post-SH. Expression of 5-HTR subtypes 1b, 2a and 2c and GluR subtypes AMPA, NMDA, mGluR1 and mGluR5 was evident in phrenic motoneurons from control and SH rats. Phrenic motoneuron expression of 5-HTR2a increased ~8-fold (relative to control) at 14 days post-SH, whereas NMDA expression increased ~16-fold by 21-days post-SH. There were no other significant changes in receptor expression at any time post-SH. This is the first study to systematically document changes in motoneuron expression of multiple neurotransmitter receptors involved in regulation of motoneuron excitability. By providing information on the neuroplasticity of receptors expressed in a motoneuron pool that is inactivated by a higher-level spinal cord injury, appropriate pharmacological targets can be identified to alter motoneuron excitability. PMID:22227062

  16. Autoregulation of neuromuscular transmission by nerve terminals. Annual report, 1 July 1983-1 July 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierkamper, G.G.

    1984-09-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate three mechanisms through which acetycholine (ACh) release may be modulated prejunctionally at the motor nerve terminal of skeletal muscle: (1) prejunctional cholinoceptor regulation of ACh release, (2) modulation of ACh release through preconditioning patterns of nerve stimulation, and (3) precursor control of ACh release. Neuromuscular transmission has been assessed in the vascular perfused rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation (VPRH) by measuring the release of ACh directly by radioenzymatic assay or by chemiluminescence assay, and indirectly by intracellular recordings and by force of contradiction (FC) measurements. Additional experiments have been done on rat sciatic nerve in order to examine the axonal transport of nicotinic binding sites. The mouse hemidiahragm preparation has been used to study antidromic activity (backfiring) in the phrenic nerve in the presence of an anticholinesterase agent. The data resulting from the project support the concept that the nerve terminal possesses local mechanism for modulating ACh release. Attempts have been made to understand the normal function of these mechanisms and then to explore their activity under demanding physological conditions, drug exposure, and in the presence of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors.

  17. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  18. Glucose metabolism of isolated perfused rat hemidiaphragms stimulated via the phrenic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, D.J.P.; Bowen-Kelly, E.; Bierkamper, G.

    1986-01-01

    Few investigations using indirect electrical stimulation of diaphragm muscles have measured metabolic pathways involved in energy production. In this study, hemidiaphragm (HD) glucose catabolism was determined while resting and during stimulation with trains of either five (T5) or fifteen (T15) 50 Hz bursts per second. Tissues were perfused and bathed in HEPES buffer pH 7.4 equilibrated with 100% O 2 , and containing 11mM [U- 14 C][5- 3 H] D-glucose. Resting glucose catabolism via the Emden-Meyerhof pathway was indicated by a 3 H 2 O production rate of 1.45 +/- 0.07 μmol/h/HD (+/- S.E.M., n = 3), of which 47% was recovered as 14 C lactate. Following an initial decline in peak isometric tension from 100 g within the first 30 min, T5 and T15 stimulation gave constant tensions of 48 and 22 g during the next 60 min, respectively. These tensions were associated with linear rates of 3 H 2 O production of 2.93 +/- 0.41 and 2.84 +/- 0.25 μmol/h/HD (+/- S.E.M., n = 3). Since T5 and T15 stimulation had no significant effect on lactate formation from either exogenous or endogenous sources, the observed increased glycolytic rate was assumed to be associated with enhanced mitochondrial oxidation of glucose carbons to CO 2 . Increased oxidative catabolism of glucose could therefore be correlated with the increased energy demands of a stimulated diaphragm

  19. Glucose metabolism of isolated perfused rat hemidiaphragms stimulated via the phrenic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, D.J.P.; Bowen-Kelly, E.; Bierkamper, G.

    1986-03-01

    Few investigations using indirect electrical stimulation of diaphragm muscles have measured metabolic pathways involved in energy production. In this study, hemidiaphragm (HD) glucose catabolism was determined while resting and during stimulation with trains of either five (T5) or fifteen (T15) 50 Hz bursts per second. Tissues were perfused and bathed in HEPES buffer pH 7.4 equilibrated with 100% O/sub 2/, and containing 11mM (U-/sup 14/C)(5-/sup 3/H) D-glucose. Resting glucose catabolism via the Emden-Meyerhof pathway was indicated by a /sup 3/H/sub 2/O production rate of 1.45 +/- 0.07 ..mu..mol/h/HD (+/- S.E.M., n = 3), of which 47% was recovered as /sup 14/C lactate. Following an initial decline in peak isometric tension from 100 g within the first 30 min, T5 and T15 stimulation gave constant tensions of 48 and 22 g during the next 60 min, respectively. These tensions were associated with linear rates of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O production of 2.93 +/- 0.41 and 2.84 +/- 0.25 ..mu..mol/h/HD (+/- S.E.M., n = 3). Since T5 and T15 stimulation had no significant effect on lactate formation from either exogenous or endogenous sources, the observed increased glycolytic rate was assumed to be associated with enhanced mitochondrial oxidation of glucose carbons to CO/sub 2/. Increased oxidative catabolism of glucose could therefore be correlated with the increased energy demands of a stimulated diaphragm.

  20. Spinal TNFα is necessary for inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broytman, Oleg; Baertsch, Nathan A; Baker-Herman, Tracy L

    2013-01-01

    A prolonged reduction in central neural respiratory activity elicits a form of plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF), a ‘rebound’ increase in phrenic burst amplitude apparent once respiratory neural activity is restored. iPMF requires atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) activity within spinal segments containing the phrenic motor nucleus to stabilize an early transient increase in phrenic burst amplitude and to form long-lasting iPMF following reduced respiratory neural activity. Upstream signal(s) leading to spinal aPKC activation are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that spinal tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) is necessary for iPMF via an aPKC-dependent mechanism. Anaesthetized, ventilated rats were exposed to a 30 min neural apnoea; upon resumption of respiratory neural activity, a prolonged increase in phrenic burst amplitude (42 ± 9% baseline; P phrenic motor nucleus prior to neural apnoea blocked long-lasting iPMF (2 ± 8% baseline; P > 0.05). Intrathecal TNFα without neural apnoea was sufficient to elicit long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation (pMF; 62 ± 7% baseline; P < 0.05). Similar to iPMF, TNFα-induced pMF required spinal aPKC activity, as intrathecal delivery of a ζ-pseudosubstrate inhibitory peptide (PKCζ-PS) 35 min following intrathecal TNFα arrested TNFα-induced pMF (28 ± 8% baseline; P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that: (1) spinal TNFα is necessary for iPMF; and (2) spinal TNFα is sufficient to elicit pMF via a similar aPKC-dependent mechanism. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits iPMF via a TNFα-dependent increase in spinal aPKC activity. PMID:23878370

  1. Spinal atypical protein kinase C activity is necessary to stabilize inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strey, K.A.; Nichols, N.L.; Baertsch, N.A.; Broytman, O.; Baker-Herman, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    The neural network controlling breathing must establish rhythmic motor output at a level adequate to sustain life. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a novel form of plasticity in circuits driving the diaphragm known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF), a rebound increase in phrenic inspiratory output observed once respiratory neural drive is restored. The mechanisms underlying iPMF are unknown. Here, we demonstrate in anesthetized rats that spinal mechanisms give rise to iPMF, and that iPMF consists of at least two mechanistically distinct phases: 1) an early, labile phase that requires atypical PKC (PKCζ and/or PKCΙ/λ) activity to transition to a 2) late, stable phase. Early (but not late) iPMF is associated with increased interactions between PKCζ/Ι and the scaffolding protein ZIP/p62 in spinal regions associated with the phrenic motor pool. Although PKCζ/Ι activity is necessary for iPMF, spinal aPKC activity is not necessary for phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia, an activity-independent form of spinal respiratory plasticity. Thus, while iPMF and pLTF both manifest as prolonged increases in phrenic burst amplitude, they arise from distinct spinal cellular pathways. Our data are consistent with the hypotheses that: 1) local mechanisms sense and respond to reduced respiratory-related activity in the phrenic motor pool, and 2) inactivity-induced increases in phrenic inspiratory output require local PKCζ/Ι activity to stabilize into a long-lasting iPMF. Although the physiological role of iPMF is unknown, we suspect that iPMF represents a compensatory mechanism, assuring adequate motor output in a physiological system where prolonged inactivity ends life. PMID:23152633

  2. Functional recovery after cervical spinal cord injury: Role of neurotrophin and glutamatergic signaling in phrenic motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Luther C; Gransee, Heather M; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-06-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts descending neural drive to phrenic motoneurons causing diaphragm muscle (DIAm) paralysis. Recent studies using a well-established model of SCI, unilateral spinal hemisection of the C2 segment of the cervical spinal cord (SH), provide novel information regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of functional recovery after SCI. Over time post-SH, gradual recovery of rhythmic ipsilateral DIAm activity occurs. Recovery of ipsilateral DIAm electromyogram (EMG) activity following SH is enhanced by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the region of the phrenic motoneuron pool. Delivery of exogenous BDNF either via intrathecal infusion or via mesenchymal stem cells engineered to release BDNF similarly enhance recovery. Conversely, recovery after SH is blunted by quenching endogenous BDNF with the fusion-protein TrkB-Fc in the region of the phrenic motoneuron pool or by selective inhibition of TrkB kinase activity using a chemical-genetic approach in TrkB(F616A) mice. Furthermore, the importance of BDNF signaling via TrkB receptors at phrenic motoneurons is highlighted by the blunting of recovery by siRNA-mediated downregulation of TrkB receptor expression in phrenic motoneurons and by the enhancement of recovery evident following virally-induced increases in TrkB expression specifically in phrenic motoneurons. BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates synaptic plasticity in various neuronal systems, including glutamatergic pathways. Glutamatergic neurotransmission constitutes the main inspiratory-related, excitatory drive to motoneurons, and following SH, spontaneous neuroplasticity is associated with increased expression of ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in phrenic motoneurons. Evidence for the role of BDNF/TrkB and glutamatergic signaling in recovery of DIAm activity following cervical SCI is reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Damage to cranial and peripheral nerves following patency restoration of the internal carotid artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrcha, P; Ciostek, P; Szopiński, P; Noszczyk, W

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was an assessment of the incidence of injury to cranial and peripheral nerves as complication of patency restoration of the internal carotid artery, and analysis of the effect of peripheral nerve injury on the results of carotid patency restoration. From Oct 1987 to Sept 1999 543 procedures were carried out for restoration of patency of the internal carotid artery. After the operation hypoglossus nerve injury was found in 7 cases (1.4%), vagus injury in 9 (1.8%). Signs of exclusively recurrent laryngeal nerve damage were found in 6 cases (1.2%). Glossopharyngeus nerve was damaged in 2 cases (0.4%), transient phrenic nerve palsy as a result of conduction anaesthesia was noted in 2 cases (0.4%). Damage to the transverse cervical nerve was found in 96 cases (60%). In 2 patients (1.2%) lower position of mouth angle was due to section of the mandibular ramus of the facial nerve. In another 2 cases skin sensation disturbances were a consequence of lesion of the auricularis magnus nerve and always they coexisted with signs of transverse cervical nerve damage. damage to the cranial nerves during operation for carotid patency restoration are frequent but mostly they are not connected with any health risks and often they regress spontaneously.

  4. The bulbospinal network controlling the phrenic motor system: Laterality and course of descending projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki

    2017-08-01

    The respiratory rhythm is generated by the parafacial respiratory group, Bötzinger complex, and pre-Bötzinger complex and relayed to pre-motor neurons, which in turn project to and control respiratory motor outputs in the brainstem and spinal cord. The phrenic nucleus is one such target, containing phrenic motoneurons (PhMNs), which supply the diaphragm, the primary inspiratory muscle in mammals. While some investigators have demonstrated both ipsi- and contralateral bulbophrenic projections, there exists controversy regarding the relative physiological contribution of each to phasic and tonic drive to PhMNs and at which levels decussations occur. Following C1- or C2 spinal cord hemisection-induced silencing of the ipsilateral phrenic/diaphragm activity, respiratory stressor-induced, as well as spontaneous, recovery of crossed phrenic activity is observed, suggesting an important contribution of pathways crossing below the level of injury in driving phrenic motor output. The precise mechanisms underlying this recovery are debated. In this review, we seek to present a comprehensive discussion of the organization of the bulbospinal network controlling PhMNs, a thorough appreciation of which is necessary for understanding neural respiratory control, accurate interpretation of studies investigating respiratory recovery following spinal cord injury, and targeted development of therapies for respiratory neurorehabilitation in patients sustaining high cervical cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Massive hemothorax due to inferior phrenic artery injury after blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Makoto; Shibuya, Kei; Kaneko, Minoru; Koizumi, Ayana; Murata, Masato; Nakajima, Jun; Hagiwara, Shuichi; Kanbe, Masahiko; Koyama, Yoshinori; Tsushima, Yoshito; Oshima, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the inferior phrenic artery after blunt trauma is an extremely rare event, and it may occur under unanticipated conditions. This case report describes an injury to the left inferior phrenic artery caused by blunt trauma, which was complicated by massive hemothorax, and treated with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). An 81 year-old female hit by a car while walking at the traffic intersection was transferred to the emergency department, computed tomography scanning revealed active extravasations of the contrast medium within the retrocrural space and from branches of the internal iliac artery. The patient underwent repeated angiography, and active extravasation of contrast medium was observed between the retrocrural space and the right pleural space originating from the left inferior phrenic artery. The injured left inferior phrenic artery was successfully embolized with N-butyl cyanoacrylate, resulting in stabilization of the patient's clinical condition. Inferior phrenic artery injury should be recognized as a rare phenomenon and causative factor for hemothorax. TAE represents a safe and effective treatment for this complication and obviates the need for a thoracotomy.

  6. Profit maximization mitigates competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierker, Egbert; Grodal, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    We consider oligopolistic markets in which the notion of shareholders' utility is well-defined and compare the Bertrand-Nash equilibria in case of utility maximization with those under the usual profit maximization hypothesis. Our main result states that profit maximization leads to less price...... competition than utility maximization. Since profit maximization tends to raise prices, it may be regarded as beneficial for the owners as a whole. Moreover, if profit maximization is a good proxy for utility maximization, then there is no need for a general equilibrium analysis that takes the distribution...... of profits among consumers fully into account and partial equilibrium analysis suffices...

  7. Peripheral nerve involvement in Bell's palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bueri

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of patients with Bell's palsy were studied in order to disclose the presence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. 20 patients, 8 male and 12 female, with recent Bell's palsy as their unique disease were examined, in all cases other causes of polyneuropathy were ruled out. Patients were investigated with CSF examination, facial nerve latencies in the affected and in the sound sides, and maximal motor nerve conduction velocities, as well as motor terminal latencies from the right median and peroneal nerves. CSF laboratory examination was normal in all cases. Facial nerve latencies were abnormal in all patients in the affected side, and they differed significantly from those of control group in the clinically sound side. Half of the patients showed abnormal values in the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities and motor terminal latencies of the right median and peroneal nerves. These results agree with previous reports which have pointed out that other cranial nerves may be affected in Bell's palsy. However, we have found a higher frequency of peripheral nerve involvement in this entity. These findings, support the hypothesis that in some patients Bell's palsy is the component of a more widespread disease, affecting other cranial and peripheral nerves.

  8. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the ulnar nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  9. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  10. Reconstruction of phrenic neuron identity in embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Carolina Barcellos; Kanning, Kevin C; Kreis, Patricia; Stevenson, Danielle; Crossley, Martin; Nowak, Magdalena; Iacovino, Michelina; Kyba, Michael; Chambers, David; Blanc, Eric; Lieberam, Ivo

    2014-02-01

    Air breathing is an essential motor function for vertebrates living on land. The rhythm that drives breathing is generated within the central nervous system and relayed via specialised subsets of spinal motor neurons to muscles that regulate lung volume. In mammals, a key respiratory muscle is the diaphragm, which is innervated by motor neurons in the phrenic nucleus. Remarkably, relatively little is known about how this crucial subtype of motor neuron is generated during embryogenesis. Here, we used direct differentiation of motor neurons from mouse embryonic stem cells as a tool to identify genes that direct phrenic neuron identity. We find that three determinants, Pou3f1, Hoxa5 and Notch, act in combination to promote a phrenic neuron molecular identity. We show that Notch signalling induces Pou3f1 in developing motor neurons in vitro and in vivo. This suggests that the phrenic neuron lineage is established through a local source of Notch ligand at mid-cervical levels. Furthermore, we find that the cadherins Pcdh10, which is regulated by Pou3f1 and Hoxa5, and Cdh10, which is controlled by Pou3f1, are both mediators of like-like clustering of motor neuron cell bodies. This specific Pcdh10/Cdh10 activity might provide the means by which phrenic neurons are assembled into a distinct nucleus. Our study provides a framework for understanding how phrenic neuron identity is conferred and will help to generate this rare and inaccessible yet vital neuronal subtype directly from pluripotent stem cells, thus facilitating subsequent functional investigations.

  11. Ultrasound-guided greater auricular nerve block as sole anesthetic for ear surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Ritchie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A greater auricular nerve (GAN block was used as the sole anesthetic for facial surgery in an 80-year-old male patient with multiple comorbidities which would have made general anesthesia challenging. The GAN provides sensation to the ear, mastoid process, parotid gland, and angle of the mandible. In addition to anesthesia for operating room surgery, the GAN block can be used for outpatient or emergency department procedures without the need for a separate anesthesia team. Although this nerve block has been performed using landmark-based techniques, the ultrasoundguided version offers several potential advantages. These advantages include increased reliability of the nerve block, as well as prevention of inadvertent vascular puncture or blockade of the phrenic nerve, brachial plexus, or deep cervical plexus. The increasing access to ultrasound technology for medical care providers outside the operating room makes this ultrasound guided block an increasingly viable alternative.

  12. CT and angiographic appearances of hepatocellular carcinoma partially fed by right inferior phrenic artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtomo, Kuni; Furui, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Hiroki; Yashiro, Naofumi; Araki, Tsutomu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1983-04-01

    CT and angiographic appearances of 8 hepatocellular carcinomas which were partially fed by right inferior phrenic artery were discussed. CT demonstrated tumor fully occupied posterior segment of right hepatic lobe in 6 cases which were composed of 3 solitary massive, 2 massive nodular and 1 confluent massive angiographically. In the other 2 cases, CT showed encapsulated tumor in posterior inferior portion of posterior segment protruded from the liver. In 6 out of these 8 cases, tumor vessels and tumor stain were chiefly derived from posterior branch of right inferior phrenic artery.

  13. CT and angiographic appearances of hepatocellular carcinoma partially feeded by right inferior phrenic artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtomo, Kuni; Furui, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Hiroki; Yashiro, Naofumi; Araki, Tsutomu

    1983-01-01

    CT and angiographic appearances of 8 hepatocellular carcinomas which were partially feeded by right inferior phrenic artery were discussed. CT demonstrated tumor fully occupied posterior segment of right hepatic lobe in 6 cases which were composed of 3 solitary massive, 2 massive nodular and 1 confluent massive angiographically. In the other 2 cases, CT showed encapsulated tumor in posterior inferior portion of posterior segment protruded from the liver. In 6 out of these 8 cases, tumor vessels and tumor stain were chiefly derived from posterior branch of right inferior phrenic artery. (author)

  14. CO2 sensitivity of the complexity of phrenic neurograms in the piglet during early maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Metin

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of hypercapnia on the dynamics of the phrenic neurogram in the piglet in two different age groups: 3-7 days (n = 11) and 10-16 days (n = 9). The phrenic neurogram was recorded from 17 piglets (3-16 days old) during control (40% O2 with 3-5% end-tidal CO2), mild hypercapnia (40% O2 with 7% CO2) and severe hypercapnia (40% O2 with 15% CO2) and analyzed using the approximate entropy (ApEn) method. The mean values of the approximate entropy (complexity) of phrenic neurograms during the first 7 days of the postnatal age were 1.56 ± 0.1 (standard deviation) during normal breathing, 1.51 ± 0.1 during mild hypercapnia and 1.37 ± 0.08 during severe hypercapnia. These values for the 10-16 days age group were 1.51 ± 0.1 during control, 1.49 ± 0.11 during mild hypercapnia and 1.38 ± 0.05 during severe hypercapnia. The mean values of phrenic neurogram durations during the first 7 days of the postnatal age were 0.82 ± 0.03 (standard deviation) s during normal breathing, 0.85 ± 0.007 s during mild hypercapnia and 0.65 ± 0.05 s during severe hypercapnia. These values for the 10-16 days age group were 0.97 ± 0.09 s during control, 1.10 ± 0.05 during mild hypercapnia and 0.78 ± 0.05 s during severe hypercapnia. Our results show that the complexity values of the phrenic neurogram were significantly decreased when the CO2 concentration was shifted from control or mild to severe hypercapnia (p phrenic neurogram decreased when the concentration was shifted from control or mild to severe hypercapnia (p phrenic neurogram were observed between control and mild hypercapnia concentration. These results suggest that severe hypercapnia can be characterized with a significant decrease of the complexity values and durations of the phrenic neurogram during inspiration during early maturation.

  15. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ziman, Mario, E-mail: ziman@savba.sk [RCQI, Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, Botanická 68a, 60200 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  16. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro; Ziman, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  17. Transcatheter lipiodol chemo-embolization of the inferior phrenic artery in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fanghong; Luo Zuyan; Yuan Jianhua; Yu Wenqiang; Cai Xuexiang; Hu Tingyang; Liu Zijiang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of transcatheter lipiodol chemo-embolization therapy (TOCE) for HCC via inferior phrenic artery (IPA) and to analyse the location of the tumor feeding inferior phrenic artery. Methods: Twenty-five cases of HCC underwent the procedure of TOCE via the IPA, as well as the hepatic artery using Seldinger's method. The patterns of tumor growth included huge type in 12 cases, solitary nodular type in 8 cases and multiple nodular type in 5 cases. Hepatic artery and inferior phrenic artery chemo-embolization were performed in all cases. Results: Inferior phrenic artery originated from celiac trunk in 16 cases (64%); abdomen aorta around celiac trunk in 8(32%). The site-sort tumors supplied by IPA in right lobe (VII, VIII segment) were 23 cases and left lobe (IV segment) 2 cases. The cumulative survival rates of IPA chemo-embolization for hepatocellular carcinoma were 84%(1 year) and 68%(2 years). No severe complications occurred. Conclusions: TOCE of the IPA is a safe and effective method in the management of HCC supplied by IPA. When the tumor site is adjacent to diaphragm, hepatic ligaments or bare area, may arouse the blood supply by IPA, especially in no tumor staining or staining defect in hepatic artery angiography but tumor enhancement on CT, and increase of the level of serum α-fetoprotein

  18. Hypoxia triggers short term potentiation of phrenic motoneuron discharge after chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Dougherty, Brendan J.; Reier, Paul J.; Fuller, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated exposure to hypoxia can induce spinal neuroplasticity as well as respiratory and somatic motor recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of the present study was to define the capacity for a single bout of hypoxia to trigger short-term plasticity in phrenic output after cervical SCI, and to determine the phrenic motoneuron (PhrMN) bursting and recruitment patterns underlying the response. Hypoxia-induced short term potentiation (STP) of phrenic motor output was quantified in anesthetized rats 11 wks following lateral spinal hemisection at C2 (C2Hx). A 3-min hypoxic episode (12–14% O2) always triggered STP of inspiratory burst amplitude, the magnitude of which was greater in phrenic bursting ipsilateral vs. contralateral to C2Hx. We next determined if STP could be evoked in recruited (silent) PhrMNs ipsilateral to C2Hx. Individual PhrMN action potentials were recorded during and following hypoxia using a “single fiber” approach. STP of bursting activity did not occur in cells initiating bursting at inspiratory onset, but was robust in recruited PhrMNs as well as previously active cells initiating bursting later in the inspiratory effort. We conclude that following chronic C2Hx, a single bout of hypoxia triggers recruitment of PhrMNs in the ipsilateral spinal cord with bursting that persists beyond the hypoxic exposure. The results provide further support for the use of short bouts of hypoxia as a neurorehabilitative training modality following SCI. PMID:25448009

  19. Maximizers versus satisficers

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew M. Parker; Wandi Bruine de Bruin; Baruch Fischhoff

    2007-01-01

    Our previous research suggests that people reporting a stronger desire to maximize obtain worse life outcomes (Bruine de Bruin et al., 2007). Here, we examine whether this finding may be explained by the decision-making styles of self-reported maximizers. Expanding on Schwartz et al. (2002), we find that self-reported maximizers are more likely to show problematic decision-making styles, as evidenced by self-reports of less behavioral coping, greater dependence on others when making decisions...

  20. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golodova, E; Shchepakina, E

    2006-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models

  1. Acetazolamide on the ventral medulla of the cat increases phrenic output and delays the ventilatory response to CO sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, E.L.; Aihua Li; Nattie, E.E. (Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Acetazolamide applied to the surface of the rostral ventrolateral medulla or microinjected beneath the medullary surface in chloralose-urethan-anesthetized, vagotomized, carotid denervated, paralyzed, servo-ventilated cats produced a long-lasting increase in phrenic minute ventilation. Extracellular pH measured beneath the rostral ventrolateral medulla exhibited a long-lasting decrease after surface acetazolamide but was not a good predictor, in each individual animal, of changes in phrenic activity. Medullary carbonic anhydrase inhibition reduced the slope and the half-time of the phrenic response to rapid step CO{sub 2} increases. Conversely, acetazolamide did not effect the phrenic response to steady state CO{sub 2} increases. These data indicate that localized inhibition of medullary carbonic anhydrase causes a centrally mediated increase in ventilation that the authors attribute to medullary tissue acidosis. In addition, these data indicate that medullary carbonic anhydrase may play a role in central CO{sub 2} chemotransduction.

  2. Ultrasound-guided axillary nerve block for ED incision and drainage of deltoid abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Claire; Herring, Andrew A

    2017-07-01

    Deltoid abscesses are common and painful, often a consequence of injection drug use and seen frequently in emergency departments (EDs). The required incision and drainage can be completed successfully with effective pain relief using a peripheral nerve block. The brachial plexus nerve block works well, however it is technically complex with a low, but potentially serious, risk of complications such as phrenic nerve paralysis. Selective blockade of the axillary nerve eliminates the risks associated with a brachial plexus block, while providing more specific anesthesia for the deltoid region. Our initial experience suggests that the axillary nerve block (ANB) is a technically simple, safe, and effective way to manage the pain of deltoid abscesses and the necessary incision and drainage (I&D). The block involves using ultrasound guidance to inject a 20mL bolus of local anesthetic into the quadrangular space surrounding the axillary nerve (inferior to the posterolateral aspect of the acromion, near the overlap of the long head of triceps brachii and teres minor). Once injected the local will anesthetize the axillary nerve resulting in analgesia of the cutaneous area of the lateral shoulder and the deeper tissues including the deltoid muscle. Further research will clarify questions about the volume and concentration of local anesthetic, the role of injected adjuncts, and expected duration of analgesia and anesthesia. Herein we present a description of an axillary nerve block successfully used for deltoid abscess I&D in the ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Maximally multipartite entangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Parisi, Giorgio; Pascazio, Saverio

    2008-06-01

    We introduce the notion of maximally multipartite entangled states of n qubits as a generalization of the bipartite case. These pure states have a bipartite entanglement that does not depend on the bipartition and is maximal for all possible bipartitions. They are solutions of a minimization problem. Examples for small n are investigated, both analytically and numerically.

  4. Maximizers versus satisficers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Parker

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Our previous research suggests that people reporting a stronger desire to maximize obtain worse life outcomes (Bruine de Bruin et al., 2007. Here, we examine whether this finding may be explained by the decision-making styles of self-reported maximizers. Expanding on Schwartz et al. (2002, we find that self-reported maximizers are more likely to show problematic decision-making styles, as evidenced by self-reports of less behavioral coping, greater dependence on others when making decisions, more avoidance of decision making, and greater tendency to experience regret. Contrary to predictions, self-reported maximizers were more likely to report spontaneous decision making. However, the relationship between self-reported maximizing and worse life outcomes is largely unaffected by controls for measures of other decision-making styles, decision-making competence, and demographic variables.

  5. Is CP violation maximal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronau, M.

    1984-01-01

    Two ambiguities are noted in the definition of the concept of maximal CP violation. The phase convention ambiguity is overcome by introducing a CP violating phase in the quark mixing matrix U which is invariant under rephasing transformations. The second ambiguity, related to the parametrization of U, is resolved by finding a single empirically viable definition of maximal CP violation when assuming that U does not single out one generation. Considerable improvement in the calculation of nonleptonic weak amplitudes is required to test the conjecture of maximal CP violation. 21 references

  6. Phrenic Arterial Injury Presenting as Delayed Hemothorax Complicating Simple Rib Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hong Joon; Lee, Jun Wan; Kim, Kun Dong; You, In Sool

    2016-04-01

    Delayed hemothorax after blunt torso injury is rare, but might be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of delayed hemothorax bleeding from phrenic artery injury in a 24-year-old woman. The patient suffered from multiple rib fractures on the right side, a right hemopneumothorax, thoracic vertebral injury and a pelvic bone fracture after a fall from a fourth floor window. Delayed hemothorax associated with phrenic artery bleeding, caused by a stab injury from a fractured rib segment, was treated successfully by a minimally invasive thoracoscopic surgery. Here, we have shown that fracture of a lower rib or ribs might be accompanied by delayed massive hemothorax that can be rapidly identified and promptly managed by thoracoscopic means.

  7. Pleural and Pulmonary Staining at Inferior Phrenic Arteriography Mimicking a Tumor Staining of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deok Hee; Hwang, Jae Cheol; Lim, Soo Mee; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Song, Ho-Young

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the findings of pleural and pulmonary staining of the inferior phrenic artery, which can be confused with tumor staining during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of hepatoma.Methods: Fifteen patients who showed pleural and pulmonary staining without relationship to hepatic masses at inferior phrenic arteriography were enrolled. The staining was noted at initial TACE (n = 8), at successive TACE (n = 5), and after hepatic surgery (n = 2). The angiographic pattern, the presence of pleural change on computed tomography (CT), and clinical history were evaluated.Results: Draining pulmonary veins were seen in all cases. The lower margin of the staining corresponded to the lower margin of the pleura in 10 patients. CT showed pleural and/or pulmonary abnormalities in all cases. After embolization of the inferior phrenic artery, the accumulation of iodized oil in the lung was noted.Conclusion: Understanding the CT and angiographic findings of pleural and pulmonary staining during TACE may help differentiate benign staining from tumor staining

  8. CT evaluation of hepatocellular carcinomas supplied by right inferior phrenic arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Ming; Zhu Mingxia; Huang Yonghuo

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the CT appearance of the hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) supplied by the right inferior phrenic arteries (RIPA). Methods: A total of 195 consecutive cases of HCCs examined with helical CT and arteriography were studied. 15 proven HCCs cases were supplied by the RIPA. On arterial-phase CT images, the size of the RIPA, the left inferior phrenic arteries, and HCCs were measured, and the origin of RIPA and the location of HCCs were recorded. The CT findings in these 15 cases were correlated with arterio-graphic images. Results: CT showed RIPA on the right diaphragmatic crus as high attenuation in all patients. The origin of RIPA was demonstrated in 11 cases. The diameter of the RIPA (3.1 +- 1.1) mm was larger than that of the left inferior phrenic artery (1.3 +- 0.4) mm (P < 0.05). Conclusion: On CT images, if the RIPA asymmetrically dilates, and its diameter is larger than 2.5 mm, it is suggested that the HCC is supplied by the RIPA

  9. The Anterior Branch of the Left Inferior Phrenic Artery Arising from the Right Inferior Phrenic Artery: An Angiographic and CT Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hieda, Masashi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Masaki; Horiguchi, Jun; Ito, Katsuhide

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the frequency and anatomical pattern of the anterior branch of the left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA) arising from the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA). Angiography of the RIPA for patients (n = 140) with hepatic malignancy was retrospectively reviewed. The frequency at which the anterior branch of the LIPA arose from the RIPA was 14.3% (20 of 140 patients [pts]). Among the three branches that may arise from the RIPA in these cases (the anterior branch of the LIPA and the anterior and posterior branches of the RIPA), the anterior branch of the LIPA was the first branch of the RIPA in 9 of 20 pts (45%), and the posterior branch of the RIPA in 11 of 20 pts (55%). The anterior branch of the LIPA ran along the ventral side of the esophagus or stomach and supplied the esophagogastric region and dome of the left diaphragm in all cases. In conclusion, the anterior branch of the LIPA arises from the RIPA at a comparatively high frequency. In embolization of the RIPA, to effectively treat and avoid possible complications, interventionalists should be aware of this potential variant anatomy.

  10. Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages. You have one connecting ... retina) to your brain. Damage to an optic nerve can cause vision loss. The type of vision ...

  11. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  12. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  13. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  14. Traditional Chinese herbal formula relieves snoring by modulating activities of upper airway related nerves in aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung KT

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Kou-Toung Chung,* Chih-Hsiang Hsu,* Ching-Lung Lin, Sheue-Er Wang, Chung-Hsin WuDepartment of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workAim: The present study investigated whether intraperitoneal treatment with the herbal formula B210 ([B210]; a herbal composition of Gastrodia elata and Cinnamomum cassia can reduce snoring in aged rats. Also, we studied possible neural mechanisms involved in B210 treatment and subsequent reduced snoring in rats.Methods and result: We compared pressure and frequency of snoring, activities of phrenic nerve (PNA, activities of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLNA and activities of hypoglossal nerve (HNA, inspiratory time (TI and expiratory time (TE of PNA, and pre-inspiratory time (Pre-TI of HNA in aged rats between sham and B210 treatment groups (30 mg/mL dissolved in DMSO. We found that aged rats that received B210 treatment had significantly reduced pressure and frequency of snoring than rats who received sham treatment. Also, we observed that aged rats that received B210 treatment had significantly increased PNA, RLNA, and HNA, extended TI and TE of PNA, and prolonged Pre-TI of HNA compared to rats that received sham treatment. In other words, B210 treatment may relieve snoring through modulating activities and breathing time of upper airway related nerves in aged rats.Conclusion: We suggested that the B210 might be a potential herbal formula for snoring remission.Keywords: Chinese herbal medicine, snoring remission, upper airway, phrenic nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, hypoglossal nerve

  15. Guinea pig maximization test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1985-01-01

    Guinea pig maximization tests (GPMT) with chlorocresol were performed to ascertain whether the sensitization rate was affected by minor changes in the Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) emulsion used. Three types of emulsion were evaluated: the oil phase was mixed with propylene glycol, saline...

  16. Coordinated Respiratory Motor Activity in Nerves Innervating the Upper Airway Muscles in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Tachikawa

    Full Text Available Maintaining the patency of the upper airway during breathing is of vital importance. The activity of various muscles is related to the patency of the upper airway. In the present study, we examined the respiratory motor activity in the efferent nerves innervating the upper airway muscles to determine the movements of the upper airway during respiration under normocapnic conditions (pH = 7.4 and in hypercapnic acidosis (pH = 7.2. Experiments were performed on arterially perfused decerebrate rats aged between postnatal days 21-35. We recorded the efferent nerve activity in a branch of the cervical spinal nerve innervating the infrahyoid muscles (CN, the hypoglossal nerve (HGN, the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN, and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN with the phrenic nerve (PN. Inspiratory nerve discharges were observed in all these nerves under normocapnic conditions. The onset of inspiratory discharges in the CN and HGN was slightly prior to those in the SLN and RLN. When the CO2 concentration in the perfusate was increased from 5% to 8% to prepare for hypercapnic acidosis, the peak amplitudes of the inspiratory discharges in all the recorded nerves were increased. Moreover, hypercapnic acidosis induced pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, SLN, and RLN. The onset of pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, and SLN was prior to that of discharges in the RLN. These results suggest that the securing of the airway that occurs a certain time before dilation of the glottis may facilitate ventilation and improve hypercapnic acidosis.

  17. Tri-maximal vs. bi-maximal neutrino mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, W.G

    2000-01-01

    It is argued that data from atmospheric and solar neutrino experiments point strongly to tri-maximal or bi-maximal lepton mixing. While ('optimised') bi-maximal mixing gives an excellent a posteriori fit to the data, tri-maximal mixing is an a priori hypothesis, which is not excluded, taking account of terrestrial matter effects

  18. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  19. Surgical management of third nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Third nerve paralysis has been known to be associated with a wide spectrum of presentation and other associated factors such as the presence of ptosis, pupillary involvement, amblyopia, aberrant regeneration, poor bell′s phenomenon, superior oblique (SO overaction, and lateral rectus (LR contracture. Correction of strabismus due to third nerve palsy can be complex as four out of the six extraocular muscles are involved and therefore should be approached differently. Third nerve palsy can be congenital or acquired. The common causes of isolated third nerve palsy in children are congenital (43%, trauma (20%, inflammation (13%, aneurysm (7%, and ophthalmoplegic migraine. Whereas, in adult population, common etiologies are vasculopathic disorders (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, aneurysm, and trauma. Treatment can be both nonsurgical and surgical. As nonsurgical modalities are not of much help, surgery remains the main-stay of treatment. Surgical strategies are different for complete and partial third nerve palsy. Surgery for complete third nerve palsy may involve supra-maximal recession - resection of the recti. This may be combined with SO transposition and augmented by surgery on the other eye. For partial third nerve, palsy surgery is determined according to nature and extent of involvement of extraocular muscles.

  20. Surgical management of third nerve palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anupam; Bahuguna, Chirag; Nagpal, Ritu; Kumar, Barun

    2016-01-01

    Third nerve paralysis has been known to be associated with a wide spectrum of presentation and other associated factors such as the presence of ptosis, pupillary involvement, amblyopia, aberrant regeneration, poor bell's phenomenon, superior oblique (SO) overaction, and lateral rectus (LR) contracture. Correction of strabismus due to third nerve palsy can be complex as four out of the six extraocular muscles are involved and therefore should be approached differently. Third nerve palsy can be congenital or acquired. The common causes of isolated third nerve palsy in children are congenital (43%), trauma (20%), inflammation (13%), aneurysm (7%), and ophthalmoplegic migraine. Whereas, in adult population, common etiologies are vasculopathic disorders (diabetes mellitus, hypertension), aneurysm, and trauma. Treatment can be both nonsurgical and surgical. As nonsurgical modalities are not of much help, surgery remains the main-stay of treatment. Surgical strategies are different for complete and partial third nerve palsy. Surgery for complete third nerve palsy may involve supra-maximal recession - resection of the recti. This may be combined with SO transposition and augmented by surgery on the other eye. For partial third nerve, palsy surgery is determined according to nature and extent of involvement of extraocular muscles. PMID:27433033

  1. Phrenic motor unit recruitment during ventilatory and non-ventilatory behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2011-10-15

    Phrenic motoneurons are located in the cervical spinal cord and innervate the diaphragm muscle, the main inspiratory muscle in mammals. Similar to other skeletal muscles, phrenic motoneurons and diaphragm muscle fibers form motor units which are the final element of neuromotor control. In addition to their role in sustaining ventilation, phrenic motor units are active in other non-ventilatory behaviors important for airway clearance such as coughing or sneezing. Diaphragm muscle fibers comprise all fiber types and are commonly classified based on expression of contractile proteins including myosin heavy chain isoforms. Although there are differences in contractile and fatigue properties across motor units, there is a matching of properties for the motor neuron and muscle fibers within a motor unit. Motor units are generally recruited in order such that fatigue-resistant motor units are recruited earlier and more often than more fatigable motor units. Thus, in sustaining ventilation, fatigue-resistant motor units are likely required. Based on a series of studies in cats, hamsters and rats, an orderly model of motor unit recruitment was proposed that takes into consideration the maximum forces generated by single type-identified diaphragm muscle fibers as well as the proportion of the different motor unit types. Using this model, eupnea can be accomplished by activation of only slow-twitch diaphragm motor units and only a subset of fast-twitch, fatigue-resistant units. Activation of fast-twitch fatigable motor units only becomes necessary when accomplishing tasks that require greater force generation by the diaphragm muscle, e.g., sneezing and coughing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The usefulness of computerized tomography in the evaluation of cardio phrenic angle lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marins, J.L.; Cazerta, N.M.G.; Prando, A.; Pereira, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in categorizing lesions of the cardio phrenic angles is showed. Twenty five patients with abnormalities in these sites were studied by CT. These abnormalities included ten cases of lymphomatous adenopathy, two cases of metastatic adenopathy, four cases of pericardial cyst, four cases of loculated pleural effusion, and five cases of prominent epicardial fat. A correct evaluation of all cases was possible by utilizing the CT densities numbers and the topographic characteristics of the lesions. CT showed high sensitivity in detecting paracardiac adenopathy which may affect the staging and treatment of neoplasia. (author)

  3. Gamma loop contributing to maximal voluntary contractions in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagbarth, K E; Kunesch, E J; Nordin, M; Schmidt, R; Wallin, E U

    1986-01-01

    A local anaesthetic drug was injected around the peroneal nerve in healthy subjects in order to investigate whether the resulting loss in foot dorsiflexion power in part depended on a gamma-fibre block preventing 'internal' activation of spindle end-organs and thereby depriving the alpha-motoneurones of an excitatory spindle inflow during contraction. The motor outcome of maximal dorsiflexion efforts was assessed by measuring firing rates of individual motor units in the anterior tibial (t.a.) muscle, mean voltage e.m.g. from the pretibial muscles, dorsiflexion force and range of voluntary foot dorsiflexion movements. The tests were performed with and without peripheral conditioning stimuli, such as agonist or antagonist muscle vibration or imposed stretch of the contracting muscles. As compared to control values of t.a. motor unit firing rates in maximal isometric voluntary contractions, the firing rates were lower and more irregular during maximal dorsiflexion efforts performed during subtotal peroneal nerve blocks. During the development of paresis a gradual reduction of motor unit firing rates was observed before the units ceased responding to the voluntary commands. This change in motor unit behaviour was accompanied by a reduction of the mean voltage e.m.g. activity in the pretibial muscles. At a given stage of anaesthesia the e.m.g. responses to maximal voluntary efforts were more affected than the responses evoked by electric nerve stimuli delivered proximal to the block, indicating that impaired impulse transmission in alpha motor fibres was not the sole cause of the paresis. The inability to generate high and regular motor unit firing rates during peroneal nerve blocks was accentuated by vibration applied over the antagonistic calf muscles. By contrast, in eight out of ten experiments agonist stretch or vibration caused an enhancement of motor unit firing during the maximal force tasks. The reverse effects of agonist and antagonist vibration on the

  4. MAXIM: The Blackhole Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith; Cash, Webster; Gorenstein, Paul; Windt, David; Kaaret, Phil; Reynolds, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The Beyond Einstein Program in NASA's Office of Space Science Structure and Evolution of the Universe theme spells out the top level scientific requirements for a Black Hole Imager in its strategic plan. The MAXIM mission will provide better than one tenth of a microarcsecond imaging in the X-ray band in order to satisfy these requirements. We will overview the driving requirements to achieve these goals and ultimately resolve the event horizon of a supermassive black hole. We will present the current status of this effort that includes a study of a baseline design as well as two alternative approaches.

  5. Social group utility maximization

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Xiaowen; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Junshan

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explains how to leverage mobile users' social relationships to improve the interactions of mobile devices in mobile networks. It develops a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework that captures diverse social ties of mobile users and diverse physical coupling of mobile devices. Key topics include random access control, power control, spectrum access, and location privacy.This brief also investigates SGUM-based power control game and random access control game, for which it establishes the socially-aware Nash equilibrium (SNE). It then examines the critical SGUM-b

  6. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a low noise high gain CMOS amplifier for minute nerve signals is presented. The amplifier is constructed in a fully differential topology to maximize noise rejection. By using a mixture of weak- and strong inversion transistors, optimal noise suppression in the amplifier is achieved....... A continuous-time current-steering offset-compensation technique is utilized in order to minimize the noise contribution and to minimize dynamic impact on the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard digital 0...

  7. The vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoudiba, F; Toulgoat, F; Sarrazin, J-L

    2013-10-01

    The vestibulocochlear nerve (8th cranial nerve) is a sensory nerve. It is made up of two nerves, the cochlear, which transmits sound and the vestibular which controls balance. It is an intracranial nerve which runs from the sensory receptors in the internal ear to the brain stem nuclei and finally to the auditory areas: the post-central gyrus and superior temporal auditory cortex. The most common lesions responsible for damage to VIII are vestibular Schwannomas. This report reviews the anatomy and various investigations of the nerve. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation are differentially expressed following intermittent vs. sustained neural apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertsch, N. A.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal motor output known as inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF, respectively). We hypothesized that, similar to other forms of respiratory plasticity, iPMF and iHMF are pattern sensitive. Central respiratory neural activity was reversibly reduced in ventilated rats by hyperventilating below the CO2 apneic threshold to create brief intermittent neural apneas (5, ∼1.5 min each, separated by 5 min), a single brief massed neural apnea (7.5 min), or a single prolonged neural apnea (30 min). Upon restoration of respiratory neural activity, long-lasting (>60 min) iPMF was apparent following brief intermittent and prolonged, but not brief massed, neural apnea. Further, brief intermittent and prolonged neural apnea elicited an increase in the maximum phrenic response to high CO2, suggesting that iPMF is associated with an increase in phrenic dynamic range. By contrast, only prolonged neural apnea elicited iHMF, which was transient in duration (<15 min). Intermittent, massed, and prolonged neural apnea all elicited a modest transient facilitation of respiratory frequency. These results indicate that iPMF, but not iHMF, is pattern sensitive, and that the response to respiratory neural inactivity is motor pool specific. PMID:23493368

  9. Anatomical Recruitment of Spinal V2a Interneurons into Phrenic Motor Circuitry after High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholudeva, Lyandysha V; Karliner, Jordyn S; Dougherty, Kimberly J; Lane, Michael A

    2017-11-01

    More than half of all spinal cord injuries (SCIs) occur at the cervical level, often resulting in impaired respiration. Despite this devastating outcome, there is substantial evidence for endogenous neuroplasticity after cervical SCI. Spinal interneurons are widely recognized as being an essential anatomical component of this plasticity by contributing to novel neuronal pathways that can result in functional improvement. The identity of spinal interneurons involved with respiratory plasticity post-SCI, however, has remained largely unknown. Using a transgenic Chx10-eGFP mouse line (Strain 011391-UCD), the present study is the first to demonstrate the recruitment of excitatory interneurons into injured phrenic circuitry after a high cervical SCI. Diaphragm electromyography and anatomical analysis were used to confirm lesion-induced functional deficits and document extent of the lesion, respectively. Transneuronal tracing with pseudorabies virus (PRV) was used to identify interneurons within the phrenic circuitry. There was a robust increase in the number of PRV-labeled V2a interneurons ipsilateral to the C2 hemisection, demonstrating that significant numbers of these excitatory spinal interneurons were anatomically recruited into the phrenic motor pathway two weeks after injury, a time known to correspond with functional phrenic plasticity. Understanding this anatomical spinal plasticity and the neural substrates associated with functional compensation or recovery post-SCI in a controlled, experimental setting may help shed light onto possible cellular therapeutic candidates that can be targeted to enhance spontaneous recovery.

  10. Common and separate origins of the left and right inferior phrenic artery with a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terayama, H; Yi, S-Q; Tanaka, O; Kanazawa, T; Suyama, K; Kosemura, N; Tetsu, S; Yamazaki, H; Sakamoto, R; Kawakami, S; Suzuki, T; Sakabe, K

    2017-01-01

    In a 94-year-old male cadaver, upon which routine dissection was being conducted, a rare variation was found in the gastrophrenic trunk (GPT), the common trunk of the left gastric artery (LGA), right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA), and left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA); the GPT arises from the abdominal aorta. A hepatosplenic trunk accompanied the variation. In this variation, the RIPA first branched from the GPT and then to the LIPA and LGA. Variations in the common trunk of the LIPA and RIPA in the GPT are common, but to our knowledge, a variation (separate inferior phrenic artery in the GPT) similar to our findings has not been previously reported. We discuss the incidence and developmental and clinical significance of this variation with a detailed review of the literature. Knowledge of such a case has important clinical significance for invasive and non-invasive arterial procedures. Therefore, different variations concerning the LGA and inferior phrenic artery should be considered during surgical and non-surgical evaluations.

  11. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  12. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  13. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  14. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... later on. Inflammation of the tendons ( tendonitis ) or joints ( arthritis ) can also put pressure on the nerve. ... how fast electrical signals move through a nerve Neuromuscular ultrasound to view problems with the muscles and ...

  15. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  16. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeumer, T.; Grimm, A.; Schelle, T.

    2017-01-01

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [de

  17. Intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C Michel

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of intraoperative monitoring is to preserve function and prevent injury to the nervous system at a time when clinical examination is not possible. Cranial nerves are delicate structures and are susceptible to damage by mechanical trauma or ischemia during intracranial and extracranial surgery. A number of reliable electrodiagnostic techniques, including nerve conduction studies, electromyography, and the recording of evoked potentials have been adapted to the study of cranial nerve function during surgery. A growing body of evidence supports the utility of intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerve nerves during selected surgical procedures.

  18. Demonstration of the right inferior phrenic artery by using multislice helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shaohong; Liu Xin; Cai Zulong; Zhao Hong; Yang Li

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the origin of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) in normal and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and provide valuable anatomical information for angiographers before and after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Methods: Four hundred and forty consecutive patients including 133 HCC cases who had biphase abdominal CT were assessed in this study. The routine abdominal enhanced CT scan (GE, LightSpeed16) was performed with 120 kV, 200-240 mAs, 10 mm collimation, 1.375 pitch, and 10 mm reconstruction interval at 22-25 seconds for arterial phase triggered by timing bolus, 60 seconds for portal venous phase after injection of 100 ml contrast material (300 mg I/ml) at a rate of 3.5 ml/s. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were generated using 1.25 mm images reconstructed with 1 mm interval in arterial phase and reviewed by two radiologists. An enhanced artery medial-posterior to the IVC, originated from aorta or its branches to the diaphragmatic dome was interpreted as the RIPA. Results: The RIPA was showed in all 440 patients (100%). Among 218 (49.5%) RIPAs originated from the aorta, 140 were from the fight side of the aorta, 22 from the left side of the aorta, 56 from the anterior wall of the aorta, 36 RIPAs had the same origin with the left inferior phrenic artery. Among 138 (31.4%) RIPAs from the celiac artery, 10 RIPAs had the same origin with the left gastric artery, and 33 RIPAs had the same origin with the left inferior phrenic artery. 78 (17.7%) were from the fight renal artery, 6 (1.4%) were from the left gastric artery (the left gastric artery from aorta). The dilatation of the RIPA was demonstrated in 16 of 133 hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Conclusion: Multislice helical CT could demonstrate the origin of the RIPA in arterial phase and provide useful anatomical information for angiographer before and after TACE. (authors)

  19. Dual Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Gastric Varix Draining into the Left Adrenal Vein and Left Inferior Phrenic Vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Norifumi; Ninoi, Teruhisa; Kitayama, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Akira; Sakai, Yukimasa; Sato, Kimihiko; Hamuro, Masao; Nakamura, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi; Yamada, Ryusaku

    2004-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman with a gastric varix, draining into a dilated left adrenal vein and a left inferior phrenic vein, was treated with dual balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). Under balloon occlusion of the left adrenal vein and the left inferior phrenic vein, retrograde injection of a sclerosant (5% ethanolamine oleate) into the gastric varix was performed. Two weeks later, disappearance of flow in the gastric varix was confirmed on endoscopic ultrasound examination

  20. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration of gastric varix draining via the left inferior phrenic vein into the left hepatic vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibukuro, Kenji; Mori, Koichi; Tsukiyama, Toshitaka; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Yukako; Tagawa, Kazumi

    1999-01-01

    We encountered a patient with gastric varix draining not via the usual left suprarenal vein but via the left inferior phrenic vein joining the left hepatic vein. Transfemoral balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) of the varix was performed under balloon occlusion of the left inferior phrenic vein via the left hepatic vein and retrograde injection of the sclerosing agent (5% of ethanolamine oleate) into the gastric varix. Disappearance of the gastric varix was confirmed on endoscopic examination 2 months later.

  1. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  2. Maximal Bell's inequality violation for non-maximal entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Khanna, F.; Mann, A.; Revzen, M.; Santana, A.

    2004-01-01

    Bell's inequality violation (BIQV) for correlations of polarization is studied for a product state of two two-mode squeezed vacuum (TMSV) states. The violation allowed is shown to attain its maximal limit for all values of the squeezing parameter, ζ. We show via an explicit example that a state whose entanglement is not maximal allow maximal BIQV. The Wigner function of the state is non-negative and the average value of either polarization is nil

  3. Origin of a common trunk for the inferior phrenic arteries from the right renal artery: a new anatomic vascular variant with clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaz, On; Topaz, Allyne; Polkampally, Pritam R; Damiano, Thomas; King, Christopher A

    2010-01-01

    The inferior phrenic arteries constitute a pair of important vessels, supplying multiple organs including the diaphragm, adrenal glands, esophagus, stomach, liver, inferior vena cava, and retroperitoneum. The vast majority (80-90%) of inferior phrenic arteries originate as separate vessels with near equal frequency from either the abdominal aorta or the celiac trunk. Infrequently, the right and left inferior phrenic arteries can arise in the form of a common trunk from the aorta or from the celiac trunk. We herein present three patients with a new anatomic vascular variant: a common trunk of the inferior phrenic arteries arising from the right renal artery. In one case, the left inferior phrenic branch of the common trunk provided collaterals connecting with a supra-diaphragmatic branch of the left internal mammary artery and in another with the lateral wall of the pericardium. Angiographic identification of a common trunk for the inferior phrenic arteries arising from the right renal artery is important for proper diagnosis and clinical management. The presence of this unique vascular variant can impact revascularization of the renal arteries. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. CT arteriography via the right inferior phrenic artery developed parasitic perfusion into the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Yoshitaka; Arai, Yasuaki; Sueyoshi, Satoshi; Yamagami, Takuji; Aramaki, Takeshi; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Matsueda, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Fumio; Takeuchi, Yoshihito.

    1998-01-01

    The distribution of arterial blood flow via the right inferior phrenic artery (rt-IPA) developing parasitic perfusion into the liver was evaluated by CT arteriography (CTA) in 50 cases with hepatic tumors. In all cases, CTA via rt-IPA showed hyperperfusion area including hepatic tumors in the posterior segment and the caudate lobe of the liver, and adding the left hepatic lobe in cases with hepatic arterial occlusion. In 82% of 33 cases obtained both CTA via rt-IPA and CTA via hepatic artery, the hyperperfusion area on CTA via rt-IPA exactly corresponded to perfusion defect area on CTA via hepatic artery. CTA was much useful for understanding hemodynamics in cases with parasitic perfusion into the liver and it could make transcatheter arterial therapy more effective. (author)

  5. CT arteriography via the right inferior phrenic artery developed parasitic perfusion into the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, Yoshitaka; Arai, Yasuaki; Sueyoshi, Satoshi; Yamagami, Takuji; Aramaki, Takeshi; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Matsueda, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Fumio [Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Takeuchi, Yoshihito

    1998-02-01

    The distribution of arterial blood flow via the right inferior phrenic artery (rt-IPA) developing parasitic perfusion into the liver was evaluated by CT arteriography (CTA) in 50 cases with hepatic tumors. In all cases, CTA via rt-IPA showed hyperperfusion area including hepatic tumors in the posterior segment and the caudate lobe of the liver, and adding the left hepatic lobe in cases with hepatic arterial occlusion. In 82% of 33 cases obtained both CTA via rt-IPA and CTA via hepatic artery, the hyperperfusion area on CTA via rt-IPA exactly corresponded to perfusion defect area on CTA via hepatic artery. CTA was much useful for understanding hemodynamics in cases with parasitic perfusion into the liver and it could make transcatheter arterial therapy more effective. (author)

  6. Spinal NMDA receptor activation constrains inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation in Charles River Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, K A; Baker-Herman, T L

    2014-10-01

    Reduced spinal synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons elicit a unique form of spinal plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF requires tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) activity within spinal segments containing the phrenic motor nucleus to stabilize early, transient increases in phrenic burst amplitude into long-lasting iPMF. Here we tested the hypothesis that spinal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation constrains long-lasting iPMF in some rat substrains. Phrenic motor output was recorded in anesthetized, ventilated Harlan (HSD) and Charles River (CRSD) Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to a 30-min central neural apnea. HSD rats expressed a robust, long-lasting (>60 min) increase in phrenic burst amplitude (i.e., long-lasting iPMF) when respiratory neural activity was restored. By contrast, CRSD rats expressed an attenuated, transient (∼15 min) iPMF. Spinal NMDAR inhibition with DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) before neural apnea or shortly (4 min) prior to the resumption of respiratory neural activity revealed long-lasting iPMF in CRSD rats that was phenotypically similar to that in HSD rats. By contrast, APV did not alter iPMF expression in HSD rats. Spinal TNF-α or aPKC inhibition impaired long-lasting iPMF enabled by NMDAR inhibition in CRSD rats, suggesting that similar mechanisms give rise to long-lasting iPMF in CRSD rats with NMDAR inhibition as those giving rise to long-lasting iPMF in HSD rats. These results suggest that NMDAR activation can impose constraints on TNF-α-induced aPKC activation after neural apnea, impairing stabilization of transient iPMF into long-lasting iPMF. These data may have important implications for understanding differential responses to reduced respiratory neural activity in a heterogeneous human population. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Phrenic long-term facilitation following intrapleural CTB-SAP-induced respiratory motor neuron death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L; Craig, Taylor A; Tanner, Miles A

    2017-08-16

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disease leading to progressive motor neuron degeneration and death by ventilatory failure. In a rat model of ALS (SOD1 G93A ), phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) is enhanced greater than expected at disease end-stage but the mechanism is unknown. We suggest that one trigger for this enhancement is motor neuron death itself. Intrapleural injections of cholera toxin B fragment conjugated to saporin (CTB-SAP) selectively kill respiratory motor neurons and mimic motor neuron death observed in SOD1 G93A rats. This CTB-SAP model allows us to study the impact of respiratory motor neuron death on breathing without many complications attendant to ALS. Here, we tested the hypothesis that phrenic motor neuron death is sufficient to enhance pLTF. pLTF was assessed in anesthetized, paralyzed and ventilated Sprague Dawley rats 7 and 28days following bilateral intrapleural injections of: 1) CTB-SAP (25μg), or 2) un-conjugated CTB and SAP (control). CTB-SAP enhanced pLTF at 7 (CTB-SAP: 162±18%, n=8 vs. 63±3%; n=8; pSAP: 64±10%, n=10 vs. 60±13; n=8; p>0.05). Thus, pLTF at 7 (not 28) days post-CTB-SAP closely resembles pLTF in end-stage ALS rats, suggesting that processes unique to the early period of motor neuron death enhance pLTF. This project increases our understanding of respiratory plasticity and its implications for breathing in motor neuron disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Forces necessary for the disruption of the cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-04-01

    Manipulation of the cisternal segment of cranial nerves is often performed by the neurosurgeon. To date, attempts at quantifying the forces necessary to disrupt these nerves in situ, to our knowledge, has not been performed. The present study seeks to further elucidate the forces necessary to disrupt the cranial nerves while within the subarachnoid space. The cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII were exposed in six unfixed cadavers, all less than 6 hr postmortem. Forces to failure were then measured. Mean forces necessary to disrupt nerves for left sides in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, III, VIII, XI, VI, V, and II, respectively. Mean forces for right-sided cranial nerves in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, VIII, V, VI, XI, III, and II, respectively. Overall, cranial nerves requiring the least amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV, VII, and IX. Those requiring the highest amount of force included cranial nerves II, V, VI, and XI. There was an approximately ten-fold difference between the least and greatest forces required to failure. Cranial nerve III was found to require significantly (P cranial nerves II through XII. We found that cranial nerve IX consistently took the least amount of force until its failure and cranial nerve II took the greatest. Other cranial nerves that took relatively small amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV and VII. Although in vivo damage can occur prior to failure of a cranial nerve, our data may serve to provide a rough estimation for the maximal amount of tension that can be applied to a cranial nerve that is manipulated while within its cistern.

  9. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  10. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  11. Maximally Symmetric Composite Higgs Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csáki, Csaba; Ma, Teng; Shu, Jing

    2017-09-29

    Maximal symmetry is a novel tool for composite pseudo Goldstone boson Higgs models: it is a remnant of an enhanced global symmetry of the composite fermion sector involving a twisting with the Higgs field. Maximal symmetry has far-reaching consequences: it ensures that the Higgs potential is finite and fully calculable, and also minimizes the tuning. We present a detailed analysis of the maximally symmetric SO(5)/SO(4) model and comment on its observational consequences.

  12. Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum mechanics. S M ROY. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India. Abstract. Recently Auberson, Mahoux, Roy and Singh have proved a long standing conjecture of Roy and Singh: In 2N-dimensional phase space, ...

  13. Evaluation of Na+/K+ pump function following repetitive activity in mouse peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Krarup, Christian

    2006-01-01

    excitability measures simultaneously from the evoked plantar compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and sciatic compound nerve action potential (CNAP). Three minutes after repetitive supramaximal stimulation maximal CMAP and CNAP amplitudes recovered but the threshold was increased approximately 40% for motor...

  14. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoshima, Kazumitsu; Nishiura, Iwao; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1986-01-01

    Several kinds of the lumbosacral nerve root anomalies have already been recognized, and the conjoined nerve roots is the most common among them. It does not make symptoms by itself, but if there is a causation of neural entrapment, for example, disc herniation, lateral recessus stenosis, spondylolisthesis, etc., so called ''biradicular syndrome'' should occur. Anomalies of the lumbosacral nerve roots, if not properly recognized, may lead to injury of these nerves during operation of the lumbar spine. Recently, the chance of finding these anomalous roots has been increased more and more with the use of metrizamide myelography and metrizamide CT, because of the improvement of the opacification of nerve roots. We describe the findings of the anomalous roots as revealed by these two methods. They demonstrate two nerve roots running parallel and the asymmetrical wide root sleeve. Under such circumstances, it is important to distinguish the anomalous roots from the normal ventral and dorsal roots. (author)

  15. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. Variations in the origin of inferior phrenic arteries and their relationship to celiac axis variations on CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslaner, Ramazan; Pekcevik, Yeliz; Sahin, Hilal [Dept. of Radiology, Tepecik Training and Research Hospital, Izmir (Turkmenistan); Toka, Onur [Dept. of Statistics, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2017-04-15

    Knowing the origin of the inferior phrenic artery (IPA) is important prior to surgical interventions and interventional radiological procedures related to IPA. We aimed to identify variations in the origin of IPA and to investigate the relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variations using computed tomography angiography (CTA). The CTA images of 1000 patients (737 male and 263 female, the mean age 60, range 18–94 years) were reviewed in an analysis of IPA and celiac axis variations. The origin of IPA was divided into two groups, those originating as a common trunk and those originating independently without a truncus. The relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variation was analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test. Both IPAs originated from a common trunk in 295 (29.5%) patients. From which the majority of the common trunk originated from the aorta. Contrastingly, the inferior phrenic arteries originated from different origins in 705 (70.5%) patients. The majority of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) and the left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA) originated independently from the celiac axis. Variation in the celiac axis were detected in 110 (11%) patients. The origin of IPA was found to be significantly different in the presence of celiac axis variation. The majority of IPA originated from the aorta in patients with a common IPA trunk, while the majority of RIPA and LIPA originating from the celiac axis in patients without a common IPA trunk. Thus, the origin of IPA may widely differ in the presence of celiac axis variation.

  17. Variations in the origin of inferior phrenic arteries and their relationship to celiac axis variations on CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslaner, Ramazan; Pekcevik, Yeliz; Sahin, Hilal; Toka, Onur

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the origin of the inferior phrenic artery (IPA) is important prior to surgical interventions and interventional radiological procedures related to IPA. We aimed to identify variations in the origin of IPA and to investigate the relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variations using computed tomography angiography (CTA). The CTA images of 1000 patients (737 male and 263 female, the mean age 60, range 18–94 years) were reviewed in an analysis of IPA and celiac axis variations. The origin of IPA was divided into two groups, those originating as a common trunk and those originating independently without a truncus. The relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variation was analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test. Both IPAs originated from a common trunk in 295 (29.5%) patients. From which the majority of the common trunk originated from the aorta. Contrastingly, the inferior phrenic arteries originated from different origins in 705 (70.5%) patients. The majority of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) and the left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA) originated independently from the celiac axis. Variation in the celiac axis were detected in 110 (11%) patients. The origin of IPA was found to be significantly different in the presence of celiac axis variation. The majority of IPA originated from the aorta in patients with a common IPA trunk, while the majority of RIPA and LIPA originating from the celiac axis in patients without a common IPA trunk. Thus, the origin of IPA may widely differ in the presence of celiac axis variation

  18. Variations in the Origin of Inferior Phrenic Arteries and Their Relationship to Celiac Axis Variations on CT Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslaner, Ramazan; Pekcevik, Yeliz; Sahin, Hilal; Toka, Onur

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the origin of the inferior phrenic artery (IPA) is important prior to surgical interventions and interventional radiological procedures related to IPA. We aimed to identify variations in the origin of IPA and to investigate the relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variations using computed tomography angiography (CTA). The CTA images of 1000 patients (737 male and 263 female, the mean age 60, range 18-94 years) were reviewed in an analysis of IPA and celiac axis variations. The origin of IPA was divided into two groups, those originating as a common trunk and those originating independently without a truncus. The relationship between the origin of IPA and celiac axis variation was analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test. Both IPAs originated from a common trunk in 295 (29.5%) patients. From which the majority of the common trunk originated from the aorta. Contrastingly, the inferior phrenic arteries originated from different origins in 705 (70.5%) patients. The majority of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) and the left inferior phrenic artery (LIPA) originated independently from the celiac axis. Variation in the celiac axis were detected in 110 (11%) patients. The origin of IPA was found to be significantly different in the presence of celiac axis variation. The majority of IPA originated from the aorta in patients with a common IPA trunk, while the majority of RIPA and LIPA originating from the celiac axis in patients without a common IPA trunk. Thus, the origin of IPA may widely differ in the presence of celiac axis variation.

  19. MDCT Anatomic Assessment of Right Inferior Phrenic Artery Origin Related to Potential Supply to Hepatocellular Carcinoma and its Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basile, Antonio; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Montineri, Arturo; Puleo, Stefano; Massa Saluzzo, Cesare; Runza, Giuseppe; Coppolino, Francesco; Ettorre, Giovanni Carlo; Patti, Maria Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To prospectively assess the anatomic variation of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) origin with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scans in relation to the technical and angiographic findings during transcatheter arterial embolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. Two hundred patients with hepatocellular carcinomas were examined with 16-section CT during the arterial phase. The anatomy of the inferior phrenic arteries was recorded, with particular reference to their origin. All patients with subcapsular HCC located at segments VII and VIII underwent arteriography of the RIPA with subsequent embolization if neoplastic supply was detected. Results. The RIPA origin was detected in all cases (sensitivity 100%), while the left inferior phrenic artery origin was detected in 187 cases (sensitivity 93.5%). RIPAs originated from the aorta (49%), celiac trunk (41%), right renal artery (5.5%), left gastric artery (4%), and proper hepatic artery (0.5%), with 13 types of combinations with the left IPA. Twenty-nine patients showed subcapsular HCCs in segments VII and VIII and all but one underwent RIPA selective angiography, followed by embolization in 7 cases. Conclusion. MDCT assesses well the anatomy of RIPAs, which is fundamental for planning subsequent cannulation and embolization of extrahepatic RIPA supply to HCC

  20. Combined KHFAC + DC nerve block without onset or reduced nerve conductivity after block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Manfred; Vrabec, Tina; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Niloy; Bhadra, Narendra; Kilgore, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) waveforms have been shown to provide peripheral nerve conductivity block in many acute and chronic animal models. KHFAC nerve block could be used to address multiple disorders caused by neural over-activity, including blocking pain and spasticity. However, one drawback of KHFAC block is a transient activation of nerve fibers during the initiation of the nerve block, called the onset response. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using charge balanced direct current (CBDC) waveforms to temporarily block motor nerve conductivity distally to the KHFAC electrodes to mitigate the block onset-response. Approach. A total of eight animals were used in this study. A set of four animals were used to assess feasibility and reproducibility of a combined KHFAC + CBDC block. A following randomized study, conducted on a second set of four animals, compared the onset response resulting from KHFAC alone and combined KHFAC + CBDC waveforms. To quantify the onset, peak forces and the force-time integral were measured during KHFAC block initiation. Nerve conductivity was monitored throughout the study by comparing muscle twitch forces evoked by supra-maximal stimulation proximal and distal to the block electrodes. Each animal of the randomized study received at least 300 s (range: 318-1563 s) of cumulative dc to investigate the impact of combined KHFAC + CBDC on nerve viability. Main results. The peak onset force was reduced significantly from 20.73 N (range: 18.6-26.5 N) with KHFAC alone to 0.45 N (range: 0.2-0.7 N) with the combined CBDC and KHFAC block waveform (p conductivity was observed after application of the combined KHFAC + CBDC block relative to KHFAC waveforms. Significance. The distal application of CBDC can significantly reduce or even completely prevent the KHFAC onset response without a change in nerve conductivity.

  1. Communication between radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Marathe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve is usually a branch of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. It innervates triceps, anconeous, brachialis, brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus muscles and gives the posterior cutaneous nerve of the arm, lower lateral cutaneous nerve of arm, posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm; without exhibiting any communication with the medial cutaneous nerve of forearm or any other nerve. We report communication between the radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm on the left side in a 58-year-old male cadaver. The right sided structures were found to be normal. Neurosurgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of axilla and upper arm.

  2. Maximizing and customer loyalty: Are maximizers less loyal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Lai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite their efforts to choose the best of all available solutions, maximizers seem to be more inclined than satisficers to regret their choices and to experience post-decisional dissonance. Maximizers may therefore be expected to change their decisions more frequently and hence exhibit lower customer loyalty to providers of products and services compared to satisficers. Findings from the study reported here (N = 1978 support this prediction. Maximizers reported significantly higher intentions to switch to another service provider (television provider than satisficers. Maximizers' intentions to switch appear to be intensified and mediated by higher proneness to regret, increased desire to discuss relevant choices with others, higher levels of perceived knowledge of alternatives, and higher ego involvement in the end product, compared to satisficers. Opportunities for future research are suggested.

  3. Implications of maximal Jarlskog invariant and maximal CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Jauregui, E.; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico

    2001-04-01

    We argue here why CP violating phase Φ in the quark mixing matrix is maximal, that is, Φ=90 . In the Standard Model CP violation is related to the Jarlskog invariant J, which can be obtained from non commuting Hermitian mass matrices. In this article we derive the conditions to have Hermitian mass matrices which give maximal Jarlskog invariant J and maximal CP violating phase Φ. We find that all squared moduli of the quark mixing elements have a singular point when the CP violation phase Φ takes the value Φ=90 . This special feature of the Jarlskog invariant J and the quark mixing matrix is a clear and precise indication that CP violating Phase Φ is maximal in order to let nature treat democratically all of the quark mixing matrix moduli. (orig.)

  4. Phenomenology of maximal and near-maximal lepton mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Pena-Garay, Carlos; Nir, Yosef; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2001-01-01

    The possible existence of maximal or near-maximal lepton mixing constitutes an intriguing challenge for fundamental theories of flavor. We study the phenomenological consequences of maximal and near-maximal mixing of the electron neutrino with other (x=tau and/or muon) neutrinos. We describe the deviations from maximal mixing in terms of a parameter ε(equivalent to)1-2sin 2 θ ex and quantify the present experimental status for |ε| e mixing comes from solar neutrino experiments. We find that the global analysis of solar neutrino data allows maximal mixing with confidence level better than 99% for 10 -8 eV 2 ∼ 2 ∼ -7 eV 2 . In the mass ranges Δm 2 ∼>1.5x10 -5 eV 2 and 4x10 -10 eV 2 ∼ 2 ∼ -7 eV 2 the full interval |ε| e mixing in atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay

  5. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes in sensation or movement No history of injury to the area No signs of nerve damage These medicines reduce swelling and pressure on the nerve. They may be injected directly into the area or taken by mouth. Other medicines include: Over-the-counter pain ...

  7. Tibial nerve (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve is commonly injured by fractures or other injury to the back of the knee or the lower leg. It may be affected by systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. The nerve can also be damaged by pressure from a tumor, abscess, or bleeding into the ...

  8. Maximal quantum Fisher information matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu; Yuan, Haidong

    2017-01-01

    We study the existence of the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix in the multi-parameter quantum estimation, which bounds the ultimate precision limit. We show that when the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix exists, it can be directly obtained from the underlying dynamics. Examples are then provided to demonstrate the usefulness of the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix by deriving various trade-off relations in multi-parameter quantum estimation and obtaining the bounds for the scalings of the precision limit. (paper)

  9. Retropharyngeal Contralateral C7 Nerve Transfer to the Lower Trunk for Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Technique and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Anthony T; Sparkman, Darlene M; van Belle, Christopher J; Yakuboff, Kevin P; Schwentker, Ann R

    2018-05-01

    Brachial plexus birth injuries with multiple nerve root avulsions present a particularly difficult reconstructive challenge because of the limited availability of donor nerves. The contralateral C7 has been described for brachial plexus reconstruction in adults but has not been well-studied in the pediatric population. We present our technique and results for retropharyngeal contralateral C7 nerve transfer to the lower trunk for brachial plexus birth injury. We performed a retrospective review. Any child aged less than 2 years was included. Charts were analyzed for patient demographic data, operative variables, functional outcomes, complications, and length of follow-up. We had a total of 5 patients. Average nerve graft length was 3 cm. All patients had return of hand sensation to the ulnar nerve distribution as evidenced by a pinch test, unprompted use of the recipient limb without mirror movement, and an Active Movement Scale (AMS) of at least 2/7 for finger and thumb flexion; one patient had an AMS of 7/7 for finger and thumb flexion. Only one patient had return of ulnar intrinsic hand function with an AMS of 3/7. Two patients had temporary triceps weakness in the donor limb and one had clinically insignificant temporary phrenic nerve paresis. No complications were related to the retropharyngeal nerve dissection in any patient. Average follow-up was 3.3 years. The retropharyngeal contralateral C7 nerve transfer is a safe way to supply extra axons to the severely injured arm in brachial plexus birth injuries with no permanent donor limb deficits. Early functional recovery in these patients, with regard to hand function and sensation, is promising. Therapeutic V. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Maximize x(a - x)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Five different methods for determining the maximizing condition for x(a - x) are presented. Included is the ancient Greek version and a method attributed to Fermat. None of the proofs use calculus. (LS)

  11. Finding Maximal Quasiperiodicities in Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Pedersen, Christian N. S.

    2000-01-01

    of length n in time O(n log n) and space O(n). Our algorithm uses the suffix tree as the fundamental data structure combined with efficient methods for merging and performing multiple searches in search trees. Besides finding all maximal quasiperiodic substrings, our algorithm also marks the nodes......Apostolico and Ehrenfeucht defined the notion of a maximal quasiperiodic substring and gave an algorithm that finds all maximal quasiperiodic substrings in a string of length n in time O(n log2 n). In this paper we give an algorithm that finds all maximal quasiperiodic substrings in a string...... in the suffix tree that have a superprimitive path-label....

  12. On the maximal diphoton width

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto; Strumia, Alessandro; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the 750 GeV diphoton excess found at LHC, we compute the maximal width into $\\gamma\\gamma$ that a neutral scalar can acquire through a loop of charged fermions or scalars as function of the maximal scale at which the theory holds, taking into account vacuum (meta)stability bounds. We show how an extra gauge symmetry can qualitatively weaken such bounds, and explore collider probes and connections with Dark Matter.

  13. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozic, D; Nagulic, M; Ostojic, J

    2006-01-01

    We present the short-term follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) studies and 1H-MR spectroscopy in a child with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve associated with other less aggressive cranial nerve schwannomas. The tumor revealed perineural extension and diffuse nerve...

  14. Basic and clinical studies of visualizing right inferior phrenic artery by multi detector row-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Takemura, Akihiro; Matsui, Osamu; Takada, Tadanori; Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Matsuura, Yukihiro

    2007-01-01

    To perform transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) successfully, it is important to obtain information about parasitic arterial supply to the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Among these extrahepatic collateral vessels, the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) is the most frequent and important extrahepatic collateral artery supplying the HCC. In the present study, we obtained multi-planar reformation (MPR) images of RIPA using multi detector row computed tomography (MDCT), assessed the ability of MDCT to demonstrate the origin of RIPA, and then analyzed the morphology of the origin. In a basic study using an original phantom simulating vessel origin, the origin was poorly visualized depending on the phantom diameter and angle of the origin to the scanned section. A clinical study was performed in 28 patients with HCC who underwent both MDCT and angiography within a short period. In 19 of 28 patients, RIPA originated at the celiac artery. In 3 patients, RIPA originated at the right renal artery, and in 6, directly at the abdominal aorta. The origin of RIPA was categorized into four patterns according to the inclination of the origin on transverse sections of MDCT. RIPA that originated at the right renal artery and showed an upward course perpendicular to the scan section of MDCT were most clearly visualized at the origin. In addition, RIPA could be observed in an optional direction on the workstation. Pre-angiographic visualization of the origin of RIPA may save angiographic time, curtail contrast medium, and reduce radiation exposure. (author)

  15. Maximization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garmroodi Asil

    2017-09-01

    To further reduce the sulfur dioxide emission of the entire refining process, two scenarios of acid gas or air preheats are investigated when either of them is used simultaneously with the third enrichment scheme. The maximum overall sulfur recovery efficiency and highest combustion chamber temperature is slightly higher for acid gas preheats but air preheat is more favorable because it is more benign. To the best of our knowledge, optimization of the entire GTU + enrichment section and SRU processes has not been addressed previously.

  16. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0047 TITLE: Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ahmet Höke...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0047 Nanofiber nerve guide for peripheral nerve repair and regeneration 5b. GRANT NUMBER...goal of this collaborative research project was to develop next generation engineered nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with aligned nanofibers and

  17. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  18. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  19. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  20. Maximizing Entropy over Markov Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Fabrizio; Legay, Axel; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2013-01-01

    The channel capacity of a deterministic system with confidential data is an upper bound on the amount of bits of data an attacker can learn from the system. We encode all possible attacks to a system using a probabilistic specification, an Interval Markov Chain. Then the channel capacity...... as a reward function, a polynomial algorithm to verify the existence of an system maximizing entropy among those respecting a specification, a procedure for the maximization of reward functions over Interval Markov Chains and its application to synthesize an implementation maximizing entropy. We show how...... to use Interval Markov Chains to model abstractions of deterministic systems with confidential data, and use the above results to compute their channel capacity. These results are a foundation for ongoing work on computing channel capacity for abstractions of programs derived from code....

  1. Maximizing entropy over Markov processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Fabrizio; Legay, Axel; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2014-01-01

    The channel capacity of a deterministic system with confidential data is an upper bound on the amount of bits of data an attacker can learn from the system. We encode all possible attacks to a system using a probabilistic specification, an Interval Markov Chain. Then the channel capacity...... as a reward function, a polynomial algorithm to verify the existence of a system maximizing entropy among those respecting a specification, a procedure for the maximization of reward functions over Interval Markov Chains and its application to synthesize an implementation maximizing entropy. We show how...... to use Interval Markov Chains to model abstractions of deterministic systems with confidential data, and use the above results to compute their channel capacity. These results are a foundation for ongoing work on computing channel capacity for abstractions of programs derived from code. © 2014 Elsevier...

  2. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  3. A novel combination of peripheral nerve blocks for arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, D; Flohr-Madsen, S; Meknas, K; Wilsgaard, T; Ytrebø, L M; Klaastad, Ø

    2017-10-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block is currently the gold standard for intra- and post-operative pain management for patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. However, it is associated with block related complications, of which effect on the phrenic nerve have been of most interest. Side effects caused by general anesthesia, when this is required, are also a concern. We hypothesized that the combination of superficial cervical plexus block, suprascapular nerve block, and infraclavicular brachial plexus block would provide a good alternative to interscalene block and general anesthesia. Twenty adult patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery received a combination of superficial cervical plexus block (5 ml ropivacaine 0.5%), suprascapular nerve block (4 ml ropivacaine 0.5%), and lateral sagittal infraclavicular block (31 ml ropivacaine 0.75%). The primary aim was to find the proportion of patients who could be operated under light propofol sedation, without the need for opioids or artificial airway. Secondary aims were patients' satisfaction and surgeons' judgment of the operating conditions. Nineteen of twenty patients (95% CI: 85-100) underwent arthroscopic shoulder surgery with light propofol sedation, but without opioids or artificial airway. The excluded patient was not comfortable in the beach chair position and therefore received general anesthesia. All patients were satisfied with the treatment on follow-up interviews. The surgeons rated the operating conditions as good for all patients. The novel combination of a superficial cervical plexus block, a suprascapular nerve block, and an infraclavicular nerve block provides an alternative anesthetic modality for arthroscopic shoulder surgery. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Intrathecal Spread of Injectate Following an Ultrasound-Guided Selective C5 Nerve Root Injection in a Human Cadaver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falyar, Christian R; Abercrombie, Caroline; Becker, Robert; Biddle, Chuck

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided selective C5 nerve root blocks have been described in several case reports as a safe and effective means to anesthetize the distal clavicle while maintaining innervation of the upper extremity and preserving diaphragmatic function. In this study, cadavers were injected with 5 mL of 0.5% methylene blue dye under ultrasound guidance to investigate possible proximal and distal spread of injectate along the brachial plexus, if any. Following the injections, the specimens were dissected and examined to determine the distribution of dye and the structures affected. One injection revealed dye extended proximally into the epidural space, which penetrated the dura mater and was present on the spinal cord and brainstem. Dye was noted distally to the divisions in 3 injections. The anterior scalene muscle and phrenic nerve were stained in all 4 injections. It appears unlikely that local anesthetic spread is limited to the nerve root following an ultrasound-guided selective C5 nerve root injection. Under certain conditions, intrathecal spread also appears possible, which has major patient safety implications. Additional safety measures, such as injection pressure monitoring, should be incorporated into this block, or approaches that are more distal should be considered for the acute pain management of distal clavicle fractures.

  5. On the appearance of acetylcholine receptors in denervated rat diaphragm, and its dependence on nerve stump length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchitel, O.; Robbins, N.

    1978-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) sensitivity and extrajunctional receptor distribution of the rat diaphragm were closely monitored during the early period following denervation. Both contracture in response to 10 μg/ml of ACh and extrajunctional binding of [ 125 I]alpha-bungarotoxin ([ 125 I]α-BTX) were first detectable 30 h after cutting the phrenic nerve in the thorax. If the nerve were cut more proximally, leaving a 3.5 cm distal nerve stump, the same level of ACh contracture and [ 125 I]α-BTX binding did not appear until 40 h after operation. This 10-h delay was far longer than the 3-h delay in transmission failure reportedly dependent on stump length. The earliest detectable extrajunctional [ 125 I]α-BTX binding appeared throughout the entire muscle fiber, and was not localized to the endplate region as would be expected if degeneration in the nerve terminal induced new receptors. However, later significant increases in [ 125 I]α-BTX binding at the endplate region could have resulted from such degeneration. All these results are consistent with neurotrophic regulation of muscle ACh receptors, working via a mechanism involving axonal transport. (Auth.)

  6. Severe acute intermittent hypoxia elicits phrenic long-term facilitation by a novel adenosine-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Dale, Erica A.

    2012-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia [AIH; 3, 5-min episodes; 35–45 mmHg arterial Po2 (PaO2)] elicits serotonin-dependent phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF), a form of phrenic motor facilitation (pMF) initiated by Gq protein-coupled metabotropic 5-HT2 receptors. An alternate pathway to pMF is induced by Gs protein-coupled metabotropic receptors, including adenosine A2A receptors. AIH-induced pLTF is dominated by the serotonin-dependent pathway and is actually restrained via inhibition from the adenosine-dependent pathway. Here, we hypothesized that severe AIH shifts pLTF from a serotonin-dependent to an adenosine-dependent form of pMF. pLTF induced by severe (25–30 mmHg PaO2) and moderate (45–55 mmHg PaO2) AIH were compared in anesthetized rats, with and without intrathecal (C4) spinal A2A (MSX-3, 130 ng/kg, 12 μl) or 5-HT receptor antagonist (methysergide, 300 μg/kg, 15 μl) injections. During severe, but not moderate AIH, progressive augmentation of the phrenic response during hypoxic episodes was observed. Severe AIH (78% ± 8% 90 min post-AIH, n = 6) elicited greater pLTF vs. moderate AIH (41% ± 12%, n = 8; P MSX-3 (28% ± 6%; n = 6; P 0.05). Thus severe AIH shifts pLTF from a serotonin-dependent to an adenosine-dependent mechanism; the adenosinergic pathway inhibits the serotonergic pathway following moderate AIH. Here we demonstrate a novel adenosine-dependent pathway to pLTF following severe AIH. Shifts in the mechanisms of respiratory plasticity provide the ventilatory control system greater flexibility as challenges that differ in severity are confronted. PMID:22403346

  7. Acute intermittent hypoxia induced phrenic long-term facilitation despite increased SOD1 expression in a rat model of ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L; Satriotomo, Irawan; Harrigan, Daniel J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor neuron death. Since most ALS patients succumb to ventilatory failure from loss of respiratory motor neurons, any effective ALS treatment must preserve and/or restore breathing capacity. In rats over-expressing mutated super-oxide dismutase-1 (SOD1(G93A)), the capacity to increase phrenic motor output is decreased at disease end-stage, suggesting imminent ventilatory failure. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF), a form of spinal respiratory motor plasticity with potential to restore phrenic motor output in clinical disorders that compromise breathing. Since pLTF requires NADPH oxidase activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, it is blocked by NADPH oxidase inhibition and SOD mimetics in normal rats. Thus, we hypothesized that SOD1(G93A) (mutant; MT) rats do not express AIH-induced pLTF due to over-expression of active mutant superoxide dismutase-1. AIH-induced pLTF and hypoglossal (XII) LTF were assessed in young, pre-symptomatic and end-stage anesthetized MT rats and age-matched wild-type littermates. Contrary to predictions, pLTF and XII LTF were observed in MT rats at all ages; at end-stage, pLTF was actually enhanced. SOD1 levels were elevated in young and pre-symptomatic MT rats, yet superoxide accumulation in putative phrenic motor neurons (assessed with dihydroethidium) was unchanged; however, superoxide accumulation significantly decreased at end-stage. Thus, compensatory mechanisms appear to maintain ROS homoeostasis until late in disease progression, preserving AIH-induced respiratory plasticity. Following intrathecal injections of an NADPH oxidase inhibitor (apocynin; 600 μM; 12 μL), pLTF was abolished in pre-symptomatic, but not end-stage MT rats, demonstrating that pLTF is NADPH oxidase dependent in pre-symptomatic, but NADPH oxidase independent in end-stage MT rats. Mechanisms

  8. End-to-side neurorrhaphy repairs peripheral nerve injury: sensory nerve induces motor nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Zhang, She-Hong; Wang, Tao; Peng, Feng; Han, Dong; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-01

    End-to-side neurorrhaphy is an option in the treatment of the long segment defects of a nerve. It involves suturing the distal stump of the disconnected nerve (recipient nerve) to the side of the intimate adjacent nerve (donor nerve). However, the motor-sensory specificity after end-to-side neurorrhaphy remains unclear. This study sought to evaluate whether cutaneous sensory nerve regeneration induces motor nerves after end-to-side neurorrhaphy. Thirty rats were randomized into three groups: (1) end-to-side neurorrhaphy using the ulnar nerve (mixed sensory and motor) as the donor nerve and the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve as the recipient nerve; (2) the sham group: ulnar nerve and cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve were just exposed; and (3) the transected nerve group: cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve was transected and the stumps were turned over and tied. At 5 months, acetylcholinesterase staining results showed that 34% ± 16% of the myelinated axons were stained in the end-to-side group, and none of the myelinated axons were stained in either the sham or transected nerve groups. Retrograde fluorescent tracing of spinal motor neurons and dorsal root ganglion showed the proportion of motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the end-to-side group was 21% ± 5%. In contrast, no motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the sham group and transected nerve group were found in the spinal cord segment. These results confirmed that motor neuron regeneration occurred after cutaneous nerve end-to-side neurorrhaphy.

  9. Chamaebatiaria millefolium (Torr.) Maxim.: fernbush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy L. Shaw; Emerenciana G. Hurd

    2008-01-01

    Fernbush - Chamaebatiaria millefolium (Torr.) Maxim. - the only species in its genus, is endemic to the Great Basin, Colorado Plateau, and adjacent areas of the western United States. It is an upright, generally multistemmed, sweetly aromatic shrub 0.3 to 2 m tall. Bark of young branches is brown and becomes smooth and gray with age. Leaves are leathery, alternate,...

  10. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  11. Inferior phrenic arteries supply to the pulmonary hemorrhagic lesions: angiographic identification and interventional management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Maoqiang; Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Song Peng; Wang Zhijun; Wang Zhongpu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe the manifestations of the inferior phrenic arteries (IPA) supply to the pulmonary hemorrhagic lesions and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of the IPA. Methods: The clinical data and imaging findings of eighteen patients with the additional blood supply to the pulmonary hemorrhagic lesions from the IPA were evaluated retrospectively. The causes of the bleeding were lung malignancies in 9, bronchiectasis in 7, and chronic inflammation in 2 patients. TAE supplementally was performed in patients with IPA supply to the pulmonary lesions, using polyvinyl alcohol particles, gelatin sponge particles, and microcoils. Results: Selective arteriogram demonstrates an enlarged IPA, with numerous branches and hypervascularity in all 18 cases, with tumor staining in 9, the contrast material extravasation in 6, and non-specific staining in 2 cases. In addition, IPA-to-pulmonary shunting was found in 9 cases. All the lesions supplying by IPA were adjacent to the pleurae, including adjacent to the diaphragmatic pleura in 11, the mediastinal pleura in 5, and the lateral pleura of the lower lobe in 2 cases. Technical success of IPA embolization was achieved in the 18 cases. Embolization of other nonbronchial systemic arteries (the internal thoracic artery in 7 and intercostal artery in 3) was performed at the same session. All bleeding ceased immediately after' supplemental IPA embolization. Follow-up time ranged from 8 months to 4 years. Mild recurrent hemoptysis occurred in 3 patients at 1,2, 6 months respectively, after the embolization. These patients were responsive to conservative management. Recurrent bleeding did not occur in 15 patients during the follow-up. Conclusion: The pulmonary hemorrhagic lesions, especially adjacent to the diaphragmatic and mediastinal pleurae, can be supplied by IPA, and may result in clinical failure following BAE. Supplemental TAE of IPA is a safe and effective adjunct to BAE in

  12. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  13. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  14. Chitin biological absorbable catheters bridging sural nerve grafts transplanted into sciatic nerve defects promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Jian-Wei; Qin, Li-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of chitin biological absorbable catheters in a rat model of autologous nerve transplantation. A segment of sciatic nerve was removed to produce a sciatic nerve defect, and the sural nerve was cut from the ipsilateral leg and used as a graft to bridge the defect, with or without use of a chitin biological absorbable catheter surrounding the graft. The number and morphology of regenerating myelinated fibers, nerve conduction velocity, nerve function index, triceps surae muscle morphology, and sensory function were evaluated at 9 and 12 months after surgery. All of the above parameters were improved in rats in which the nerve graft was bridged with chitin biological absorbable catheters compared with rats without catheters. The results of this study indicate that use of chitin biological absorbable catheters to surround sural nerve grafts bridging sciatic nerve defects promotes recovery of structural, motor, and sensory function and improves muscle fiber morphology. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushchina, Evgeniya V.; Shukla, Sachin; Varaksin, Anatoly A.; Obukhov, Dmitry K.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve fibers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantitative assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal concentration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury. In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1–4 days of culture. The present findings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration. PMID:27212918

  16. 142 Key words: Brachialis, radial nerve, musculocutaneous nerve.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AWORI KIRSTEEN

    The innervation of brachialis muscle by the musculocutaneous nerve has been described as either type I or type II and the main trunk to this muscle is rarely absent. The contribution .... brachialis muscle by fiber analysis of supply nerves].

  17. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    counterparts in the peripheral nervous system, in some instances without peripheral nervous system symptoms. Both hereditary and acquired demyelinating neuropathies have been studied and the effects on nerve pathophysiology have been compared with degeneration and regeneration of axons. SUMMARY: Excitability......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve...... excitability studies are relatively novel but are acquiring an increasingly important role in the study of peripheral nerves. RECENT FINDINGS: By measuring responses in nerve that are related to nodal function (strength-duration time constant, rheobase and recovery cycle) and internodal function (threshold...

  18. IMNN: Information Maximizing Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, Tom; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2018-04-01

    This software trains artificial neural networks to find non-linear functionals of data that maximize Fisher information: information maximizing neural networks (IMNNs). As compressing large data sets vastly simplifies both frequentist and Bayesian inference, important information may be inadvertently missed. Likelihood-free inference based on automatically derived IMNN summaries produces summaries that are good approximations to sufficient statistics. IMNNs are robustly capable of automatically finding optimal, non-linear summaries of the data even in cases where linear compression fails: inferring the variance of Gaussian signal in the presence of noise, inferring cosmological parameters from mock simulations of the Lyman-α forest in quasar spectra, and inferring frequency-domain parameters from LISA-like detections of gravitational waveforms. In this final case, the IMNN summary outperforms linear data compression by avoiding the introduction of spurious likelihood maxima.

  19. Is the β phase maximal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrandis, Javier

    2005-01-01

    The current experimental determination of the absolute values of the CKM elements indicates that 2 vertical bar V ub /V cb V us vertical bar =(1-z), with z given by z=0.19+/-0.14. This fact implies that irrespective of the form of the quark Yukawa matrices, the measured value of the SM CP phase β is approximately the maximum allowed by the measured absolute values of the CKM elements. This is β=(π/6-z/3) for γ=(π/3+z/3), which implies α=π/2. Alternatively, assuming that β is exactly maximal and using the experimental measurement sin(2β)=0.726+/-0.037, the phase γ is predicted to be γ=(π/2-β)=66.3 o +/-1.7 o . The maximality of β, if confirmed by near-future experiments, may give us some clues as to the origin of CP violation

  20. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  1. Strategy to maximize maintenance operation

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This project presents a strategic analysis to maximize maintenance operations in Alcan Kitimat Works in British Columbia. The project studies the role of maintenance in improving its overall maintenance performance. It provides strategic alternatives and specific recommendations addressing Kitimat Works key strategic issues and problems. A comprehensive industry and competitive analysis identifies the industry structure and its competitive forces. In the mature aluminium industry, the bargain...

  2. Scalable Nonlinear AUC Maximization Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Majdi; Ray, Indrakshi; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    The area under the ROC curve (AUC) is a measure of interest in various machine learning and data mining applications. It has been widely used to evaluate classification performance on heavily imbalanced data. The kernelized AUC maximization machines have established a superior generalization ability compared to linear AUC machines because of their capability in modeling the complex nonlinear structure underlying most real world-data. However, the high training complexity renders the kernelize...

  3. Lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. FLOUTING MAXIMS IN INDONESIA LAWAK KLUB CONVERSATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmawati Sukmaningrum

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the types of maxims flouted in the conversation in famous comedy show, Indonesia Lawak Club. Likewise, it also tries to reveal the speakers‘ intention of flouting the maxim in the conversation during the show. The writers use descriptive qualitative method in conducting this research. The data is taken from the dialogue of Indonesia Lawak club and then analyzed based on Grice‘s cooperative principles. The researchers read the dialogue‘s transcripts, identify the maxims, and interpret the data to find the speakers‘ intention for flouting the maxims in the communication. The results show that there are four types of maxims flouted in the dialogue. Those are maxim of quality (23%, maxim of quantity (11%, maxim of manner (31%, and maxim of relevance (35. Flouting the maxims in the conversations is intended to make the speakers feel uncomfortable with the conversation, show arrogances, show disagreement or agreement, and ridicule other speakers.

  5. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  6. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  7. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  8. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  9. Complications after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization via the inferior phrenic arteries: incidence, risk factors, and prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Maoqiang; Liu Fengyong; Guan Jun; Gu Xiaofang; Lin Hanying; Wang Zhiqiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the frequency, patterns of the angiographic findings and risk factors for development of complications after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) via the inferior phrenic artery (IPA). Methods: One hundred and sixty eight patients with hepatic tumor fed by the IPA underwent a total of 226 procedures of TACE of the IPA, with combined routine TACEO (88.7%) or without (11.3%) the combination of routine TACE of the hepatic artery. TACE of the malignancy was performed with an emulsion of iodized oil and anti-cancer agents and then followed by gelatin sponge particle injection. The complications were assessed on clinical observation, laboratory tests, and computed tomographic (CT) images after TACE of the IPA; and finally were correlated with the angiographic findings of the IPA. Results: The tumor supplied by IPA was noted at initial TACE in 25 (14.9%), at successive TACE in 97 (57.8%), after percutaneous tumor ablation guided by ultrasound in 28 (16.7%), and after hepatic surgery in 18 (10.7%) cases. The abnormal findings on arteriography showed enlargement of the IPA with tumor staining in all cases, dense non-tumor staining in 61 (36.3%), artery-to-artery anastomosis in 62(36.9%), arteriovenous shunts in 12(7.1%) cases. 96.4% of these patients complained of shoulder pain during TACE of the IPA. The cumulative complication rate after the procedure was 8.9%, including hiccup in 13 cases (5.8%), chest pain with cough and mild hemoptysis in 9 (4.0%), phrenoparalysis in 8 (3.5%), angina with abnormal ECG in 4 (1.8%), increasing of CPK, AST, and ALT significantly in 6 (2.7%), transient myeloparalysis in 2 (0.9%), and subphrenic abscess in 2 cases (0.9%). Two patients with the subphrenic abscess were successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage and antibiotics. The symptoms of these mild complications subsided with symptomatic treatment. Conclusions: Complications of TACE via the IPA occur in about 9% of the patients and

  10. Assessment of nerve regeneration across nerve allografts treated with tacrolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisheng, Han; Songjie, Zuo; Xin, Li

    2008-01-01

    Although regeneration of nerve allotransplant is a major concern in the clinic, there have been few papers quantitatively assessing functional recovery of animals' nerve allografts in the long term. In this study, functional recovery, histopathological study, and immunohistochemistry changes of rat nerve allograft with FK506 were investigated up to 12 weeks without slaughtering. C57 and SD rats were used for transplantation. The donor's nerve was sliced and transplanted into the recipient. The sciatic nerve was epineurally sutured with 10-0 nylon. In total, 30 models of transplantation were performed and divided into 3 groups that were either treated with FK506 or not. Functional recovery of the grafted nerve was serially assessed by the pin click test, walking track analysis and electrophysiological evaluations. A histopathological study and immunohistochemistry study were done in the all of the models. Nerve allografts treated with FK506 have no immune rejection through 12 weeks. Sensibility had similarly improved in both isografts and allografts. There has been no difference in each graft. Walk track analysis demonstrates significant recovery of motor function of the nerve graft. No histological results of difference were found up to 12 weeks in each graft. In the rodent nerve graft model, FK506 prevented nerve allograft rejection across a major histocompatibility barrier. Sensory recovery seems to be superior to motor function. Nerve isograft and allograft treated with FK506 have no significant difference in function recovery, histopathological result, and immunohistochemistry changes.

  11. Biocompatibility of Different Nerve Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, Felix; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Fansa, Hisham

    2009-01-01

    Bridging nerve gaps with suitable grafts is a major clinical problem. The autologous nerve graft is considered to be the gold standard, providing the best functional results; however, donor site morbidity is still a major disadvantage. Various attempts have been made to overcome the problems of autologous nerve grafts with artificial nerve tubes, which are “ready-to-use” in almost every situation. A wide range of materials have been used in animal models but only few have been applied to date clinically, where biocompatibility is an inevitable prerequisite. This review gives an idea about artificial nerve tubes with special focus on their biocompatibility in animals and humans.

  12. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  13. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Foer, Bert; Kenis, Christoph; Van Melkebeke, Deborah; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; Somers, Thomas; Pouillon, Marc; Offeciers, Erwin; Casselman, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  14. Maximal Abelian sets of roots

    CERN Document Server

    Lawther, R

    2018-01-01

    In this work the author lets \\Phi be an irreducible root system, with Coxeter group W. He considers subsets of \\Phi which are abelian, meaning that no two roots in the set have sum in \\Phi \\cup \\{ 0 \\}. He classifies all maximal abelian sets (i.e., abelian sets properly contained in no other) up to the action of W: for each W-orbit of maximal abelian sets we provide an explicit representative X, identify the (setwise) stabilizer W_X of X in W, and decompose X into W_X-orbits. Abelian sets of roots are closely related to abelian unipotent subgroups of simple algebraic groups, and thus to abelian p-subgroups of finite groups of Lie type over fields of characteristic p. Parts of the work presented here have been used to confirm the p-rank of E_8(p^n), and (somewhat unexpectedly) to obtain for the first time the 2-ranks of the Monster and Baby Monster sporadic groups, together with the double cover of the latter. Root systems of classical type are dealt with quickly here; the vast majority of the present work con...

  15. Spinal 5-HT7 Receptors and Protein Kinase A Constrain Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Phrenic Long-term Facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, M.S.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a form of serotonin-dependent respiratory plasticity induced by acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH). pLTF requires spinal Gq protein-coupled serotonin-2 receptor (5-HT2) activation, new synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and activation of its high-affinity receptor, TrkB. Intrathecal injections of selective agonists for Gs protein-coupled receptors (adenosine 2A and serotonin-7; 5-HT7) also induce long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation via TrkB “trans-activation.” Since serotonin release near phrenic motor neurons may activate multiple serotonin receptor subtypes, we tested the hypothesis that 5-HT7 receptor activation contributes to AIH-induced pLTF. A selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (SB-269970, 5mM, 12μl) was administered intrathecally at C4 to anesthetized, vagotomized and ventilated rats prior to AIH (3, 5-min episodes, 11% O2). Contrary to predictions, pLTF was greater in SB-269970 treated versus control rats (80±11% vs 45±6% 60 min post-AIH; p<0.05). Hypoglossal LTF was unaffected by spinal 5-HT7 receptor inhibition, suggesting that drug effects were localized to the spinal cord. Since 5-HT7 receptors are coupled to protein kinase A (PKA), we tested the hypothesis that PKA inhibits AIH-induced pLTF. Similar to 5-HT7 receptor inhibition, spinal PKA inhibition (KT-5720, 100μM, 15μl) enhanced pLTF (99±15% 60 min post-AIH; p<0.05). Conversely, PKA activation (8-br-cAMP, 100μM, 15μl) blunted pLTF versus control rats (16±5% vs 45±6% 60 min post-AIH; p<0.05). These findings suggest a novel mechanism whereby spinal Gs protein-coupled 5-HT7 receptors constrain AIH-induced pLTF via PKA activity. PMID:23850591

  16. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  17. Maximizing benefits from resource development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjelbred, B.

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of Norwegian petroleum policy are to maximize the value creation for the country, develop a national oil and gas industry, and to be at the environmental forefront of long term resource management and coexistence with other industries. The paper presents a graph depicting production and net export of crude oil for countries around the world for 2002. Norway produced 3.41 mill b/d and exported 3.22 mill b/d. Norwegian petroleum policy measures include effective regulation and government ownership, research and technology development, and internationalisation. Research and development has been in five priority areas, including enhanced recovery, environmental protection, deep water recovery, small fields, and the gas value chain. The benefits of internationalisation includes capitalizing on Norwegian competency, exploiting emerging markets and the assurance of long-term value creation and employment. 5 figs

  18. Maximizing synchronizability of duplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiang; Emenheiser, Jeffrey; Wu, Xiaoqun; Lu, Jun-an; D'Souza, Raissa M.

    2018-01-01

    We study the synchronizability of duplex networks formed by two randomly generated network layers with different patterns of interlayer node connections. According to the master stability function, we use the smallest nonzero eigenvalue and the eigenratio between the largest and the second smallest eigenvalues of supra-Laplacian matrices to characterize synchronizability on various duplexes. We find that the interlayer linking weight and linking fraction have a profound impact on synchronizability of duplex networks. The increasingly large inter-layer coupling weight is found to cause either decreasing or constant synchronizability for different classes of network dynamics. In addition, negative node degree correlation across interlayer links outperforms positive degree correlation when most interlayer links are present. The reverse is true when a few interlayer links are present. The numerical results and understanding based on these representative duplex networks are illustrative and instructive for building insights into maximizing synchronizability of more realistic multiplex networks.

  19. The detectability of the origin of the inferior phrenic artery by paging method on multidetector-row CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terayama, Koshi

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the ability to detect the origin of the inferior phrenic artery (IPA) by paging method on multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) angiography. In 104 patients who underwent multidetector-row CT, detectability of the origin of the IPA was assessed. In addition, in 30 patients in whom arteriographic study was performed, the IPA findings on multidetector-row CT were compared with those on arteriography. In 100 patients (96%) the origin of the right IPA was demonstrated with multidetector-row CT and in 93 patients (89%) the origin of the left IPA was demonstrated. CT angiographic findings concurred with arteriographic findings in all 30 patients (100%) who underwent arteriographic study. In conclusion, paging method on multidetector-row CT angiography provides valuable anatomical information regarding IPA. (author)

  20. Developmental plasticity of phrenic motoneuron and diaphragm properties with the inception of inspiratory drive transmission in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, John J; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The review outlines data consistent with the hypothesis that inspiratory drive transmission that generates fetal breathing movements (FBMs) is essential for the developmental plasticity of phrenic motoneurons (PMNs) and diaphragm musculature prior to birth. A systematic examination during the perinatal period demonstrated a very marked transformation of PMN and diaphragm properties coinciding with the onset and strengthening of inspiratory drive and FBMs in utero. This included studies of age-dependent changes of: i) morphology, neuronal coupling, passive and electrophysiological properties of PMNs; ii) rhythmic inspiratory activity in vitro; iii) FBMs generated in vivo detected by ultrasonography; iv) contractile and end-plate potential properties of diaphragm musculature. We also propose how the hypothesis can be further evaluated with studies of perinatal hypoglossal motoneuron-tongue musculature and the use of Dbx1 null mice that provide an experimental model lacking descending inspiratory drive transmission in utero. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  2. VIOLATION OF CONVERSATION MAXIM ON TV ADVERTISEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desak Putu Eka Pratiwi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Maxim is a principle that must be obeyed by all participants textually and interpersonally in order to have a smooth communication process. Conversation maxim is divided into four namely maxim of quality, maxim of quantity, maxim of relevance, and maxim of manner of speaking. Violation of the maxim may occur in a conversation in which the information the speaker has is not delivered well to his speaking partner. Violation of the maxim in a conversation will result in an awkward impression. The example of violation is the given information that is redundant, untrue, irrelevant, or convoluted. Advertisers often deliberately violate the maxim to create unique and controversial advertisements. This study aims to examine the violation of maxims in conversations of TV ads. The source of data in this research is food advertisements aired on TV media. Documentation and observation methods are applied to obtain qualitative data. The theory used in this study is a maxim theory proposed by Grice (1975. The results of the data analysis are presented with informal method. The results of this study show an interesting fact that the violation of maxim in a conversation found in the advertisement exactly makes the advertisements very attractive and have a high value.

  3. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber...... function after nerve regeneration. Methods: Twenty-one median or ulnar nerve lesions were repaired by a collagen nerve conduit or direct suture. Quantitative sensory hand function and sensory conduction studies by near-nerve technique, including tactile stimulation of mechanoreceptors, were followed for 2...... years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. Results: At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p nerve action potentials (SNAPs) remained dispersed and areas recovered to 23 ± 2...

  4. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Spinal Accessory and Hypoglossal Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Benn E

    2018-01-01

    Multiple techniques have been developed for the electrodiagnostic evaluation of cranial nerves XI and XII. Each of these carries both benefits and limitations, with more techniques and data being available in the literature for spinal accessory than hypoglossal nerve evaluation. Spinal accessory and hypoglossal neuropathy are relatively uncommon cranial mononeuropathies that may be evaluated in the outpatient electrodiagnostic laboratory setting. A review of available literature using PubMed was conducted regarding electrodiagnostic technique in the evaluation of spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves searching for both routine nerve conduction studies and repetitive nerve conduction studies. The review provided herein provides a resource by which clinical neurophysiologists may develop and implement clinical and research protocols for the evaluation of both of these lower cranial nerves in the outpatient setting.

  5. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  6. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Cranial Nerves IX and X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Martins, Melina P; Moreira, Ana Lucila; Martins, Carlos R; Kimaid, Paulo A T; França, Marcondes C

    2018-01-01

    The cranial nerves IX and X emerge from medulla oblongata and have motor, sensory, and parasympathetic functions. Some of these are amenable to neurophysiological assessment. It is often hard to separate the individual contribution of each nerve; in fact, some of the techniques are indeed a composite functional measure of both nerves. The main methods are the evaluation of the swallowing function (combined IX and X), laryngeal electromyogram (predominant motor vagal function), and heart rate variability (predominant parasympathetic vagal function). This review describes, therefore, the techniques that best evaluate the major symptoms presented in IX and X cranial nerve disturbance: dysphagia, dysphonia, and autonomic parasympathetic dysfunction.

  7. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  8. Maximizing ROI (return on information)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, B.

    2000-05-01

    The role and importance of managing information are discussed, underscoring the importance by quoting from the report of the International Data Corporation, according to which Fortune 500 companies lost $ 12 billion in 1999 due to inefficiencies resulting from intellectual re-work, substandard performance , and inability to find knowledge resources. The report predicts that this figure will rise to $ 31.5 billion by 2003. Key impediments to implementing knowledge management systems are identified as : the cost and human resources requirement of deployment; inflexibility of historical systems to adapt to change; and the difficulty of achieving corporate acceptance of inflexible software products that require changes in 'normal' ways of doing business. The author recommends the use of model, document and rule-independent systems with a document centered interface (DCI), employing rapid application development (RAD) and object technologies and visual model development, which eliminate these problems, making it possible for companies to maximize their return on information (ROI), and achieve substantial savings in implementation costs.

  9. Maximizing the optical network capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A; Lavery, Domaniç; Alvarado, Alex; Killey, Robert I

    2016-03-06

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facia...

  11. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  12. Tenascin-C in peripheral nerve morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquet, M; Wehrle-Haller, B

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) molecule tenascin/cytotactin (TN-C) is expressed at a high level by satellite (glial precursor) cells in developing peripheral nerves of the chick embryo; synthesis of its mRNA peaks at the time period when axonal growth is maximal. When offered as a substrate in vitro, TN-C mediates neurite outgrowth by both motor and sensory neurons. The ability to grow neurites on TN-C is developmentally regulated: sensory neurons from 4-day chick embryos (the stage at which peripheral nerves start to develop) grow immediately and rapidly, whereas neurons from older embryos respond with a long delay. A TN-C domain responsible for this activity is located within the C-terminal (distal) portion of TN-C subunits. Integrin receptors seem to be involved on peripheral neurites because their growth on TN-C is completely blocked by antibodies to beta 1 integrins. In striking contrast to neuronal processes, nerve satellite cells can attach to a TN-C substrate but are completely inhibited in their migratory activity. Artificial substrate borders between tenascin and fibronectin or laminin act as selective barriers that allow neurites to pass while holding up satellite cells. The repulsive action of TN-C on satellite cells is similar to that observed for other cell types and is likely to be mediated by additional TN-C domains. In view of these data, it is surprising that mice seem to develop normally without a functional TN-C gene. TN-C is likely to be redundant, that is, its dual action on cell adhesion is shared by other molecules.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Transient femoral nerve palsy following ilioinguinal nerve block for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Background: Elective inguinal hernia repair in young fit patients is preferably done under ilioinguinal nerve block anesthesia in the ambulatory setting to improve ... Conclusion: TFNP is a rare complication of ilioinguinal nerve block which delays patient discharge postambulatory hernioplasty.

  14. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Trigeminal and Facial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Iryna M; Estephan, Bachir

    2018-01-01

    The clinical examination of the trigeminal and facial nerves provides significant diagnostic value, especially in the localization of lesions in disorders affecting the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The electrodiagnostic evaluation of these nerves and their pathways adds further accuracy and reliability to the diagnostic investigation and the localization process, especially when different testing methods are combined based on the clinical presentation and the electrophysiological findings. The diagnostic uniqueness of the trigeminal and facial nerves is their connectivity and their coparticipation in reflexes commonly used in clinical practice, namely the blink and corneal reflexes. The other reflexes used in the diagnostic process and lesion localization are very nerve specific and add more diagnostic yield to the workup of certain disorders of the nervous system. This article provides a review of commonly used electrodiagnostic studies and techniques in the evaluation and lesion localization of cranial nerves V and VII.

  15. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  16. AUC-Maximizing Ensembles through Metalearning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeDell, Erin; van der Laan, Mark J; Petersen, Maya

    2016-05-01

    Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) is often used to measure the performance of an estimator in binary classification problems. An AUC-maximizing classifier can have significant advantages in cases where ranking correctness is valued or if the outcome is rare. In a Super Learner ensemble, maximization of the AUC can be achieved by the use of an AUC-maximining metalearning algorithm. We discuss an implementation of an AUC-maximization technique that is formulated as a nonlinear optimization problem. We also evaluate the effectiveness of a large number of different nonlinear optimization algorithms to maximize the cross-validated AUC of the ensemble fit. The results provide evidence that AUC-maximizing metalearners can, and often do, out-perform non-AUC-maximizing metalearning methods, with respect to ensemble AUC. The results also demonstrate that as the level of imbalance in the training data increases, the Super Learner ensemble outperforms the top base algorithm by a larger degree.

  17. On maximal massive 3D supergravity

    OpenAIRE

    Bergshoeff , Eric A; Hohm , Olaf; Rosseel , Jan; Townsend , Paul K

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT We construct, at the linearized level, the three-dimensional (3D) N = 4 supersymmetric " general massive supergravity " and the maximally supersymmetric N = 8 " new massive supergravity ". We also construct the maximally supersymmetric linearized N = 7 topologically massive supergravity, although we expect N = 6 to be maximal at the non-linear level. (Bergshoeff, Eric A) (Hohm, Olaf) (Rosseel, Jan) P.K.Townsend@da...

  18. Inclusive Fitness Maximization:An Axiomatic Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Okasha, Samir; Weymark, John; Bossert, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Kin selection theorists argue that evolution in social contexts will lead organisms to behave as if maximizing their inclusive, as opposed to personal, fitness. The inclusive fitness concept allows biologists to treat organisms as akin to rational agents seeking to maximize a utility function. Here we develop this idea and place it on a firm footing by employing a standard decision-theoretic methodology. We show how the principle of inclusive fitness maximization and a related principle of qu...

  19. Activity versus outcome maximization in time management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkoc, Selin A; Tonietto, Gabriela N

    2018-04-30

    Feeling time-pressed has become ubiquitous. Time management strategies have emerged to help individuals fit in more of their desired and necessary activities. We provide a review of these strategies. In doing so, we distinguish between two, often competing, motives people have in managing their time: activity maximization and outcome maximization. The emerging literature points to an important dilemma: a given strategy that maximizes the number of activities might be detrimental to outcome maximization. We discuss such factors that might hinder performance in work tasks and enjoyment in leisure tasks. Finally, we provide theoretically grounded recommendations that can help balance these two important goals in time management. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. On the maximal superalgebras of supersymmetric backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, Jose; Hackett-Jones, Emily; Moutsopoulos, George; Simon, Joan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we give a precise definition of the notion of a maximal superalgebra of certain types of supersymmetric supergravity backgrounds, including the Freund-Rubin backgrounds, and propose a geometric construction extending the well-known construction of its Killing superalgebra. We determine the structure of maximal Lie superalgebras and show that there is a finite number of isomorphism classes, all related via contractions from an orthosymplectic Lie superalgebra. We use the structure theory to show that maximally supersymmetric waves do not possess such a maximal superalgebra, but that the maximally supersymmetric Freund-Rubin backgrounds do. We perform the explicit geometric construction of the maximal superalgebra of AdS 4 X S 7 and find that it is isomorphic to osp(1|32). We propose an algebraic construction of the maximal superalgebra of any background asymptotic to AdS 4 X S 7 and we test this proposal by computing the maximal superalgebra of the M2-brane in its two maximally supersymmetric limits, finding agreement.

  1. Task-oriented maximally entangled states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Pankaj; Pradhan, B

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the notion of a task-oriented maximally entangled state (TMES). This notion depends on the task for which a quantum state is used as the resource. TMESs are the states that can be used to carry out the task maximally. This concept may be more useful than that of a general maximally entangled state in the case of a multipartite system. We illustrate this idea by giving an operational definition of maximally entangled states on the basis of communication tasks of teleportation and superdense coding. We also give examples and a procedure to obtain such TMESs for n-qubit systems.

  2. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography; Diagnostische Nervensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumer, T. [Universitaet zu Luebeck CBBM, Haus 66, Institut fuer Neurogenetik, Luebeck (Germany); Grimm, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Schelle, T. [Staedtisches Klinikum Dessau, Neurologische Klinik, Dessau (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Diagnostik von Nervenlaesionen ist ein bildgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung des peripheren Nervs und seiner ihn umgebenden Strukturen fuer eine aetiologische Einordnung erforderlich. Mit der klinisch-neurologischen Untersuchung und Elektrophysiologie ist eine funktionelle Aussage ueber die Nervenlaesion moeglich. In der Standard-MRT-Untersuchung wird der periphere Nerv nur unzureichend gut dargestellt. Die MRT-Neurographie ist ein sehr gutes, aber auch zeit- und ressourcenintensives Verfahren. Nutzung des Ultraschalls fuer die

  3. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  4. Maximally Entangled Multipartite States: A Brief Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enríquez, M; Wintrowicz, I; Życzkowski, K

    2016-01-01

    The problem of identifying maximally entangled quantum states of a composite quantum systems is analyzed. We review some states of multipartite systems distinguished with respect to certain measures of quantum entanglement. Numerical results obtained for 4-qubit pure states illustrate the fact that the notion of maximally entangled state depends on the measure used. (paper)

  5. Utility maximization and mode of payment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, R.H.; Ridder, G.; Heijmans, R.D.H.; Pollock, D.S.G.; Satorra, A.

    2000-01-01

    The implications of stochastic utility maximization in a model of choice of payment are examined. Three types of compatibility with utility maximization are distinguished: global compatibility, local compatibility on an interval, and local compatibility on a finite set of points. Keywords:

  6. Corporate Social Responsibility and Profit Maximizing Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Becchetti, Leonardo; Giallonardo, Luisa; Tessitore, Maria Elisabetta

    2005-01-01

    We examine the behavior of a profit maximizing monopolist in a horizontal differentiation model in which consumers differ in their degree of social responsibility (SR) and consumers SR is dynamically influenced by habit persistence. The model outlines parametric conditions under which (consumer driven) corporate social responsibility is an optimal choice compatible with profit maximizing behavior.

  7. Inclusive fitness maximization: An axiomatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasha, Samir; Weymark, John A; Bossert, Walter

    2014-06-07

    Kin selection theorists argue that evolution in social contexts will lead organisms to behave as if maximizing their inclusive, as opposed to personal, fitness. The inclusive fitness concept allows biologists to treat organisms as akin to rational agents seeking to maximize a utility function. Here we develop this idea and place it on a firm footing by employing a standard decision-theoretic methodology. We show how the principle of inclusive fitness maximization and a related principle of quasi-inclusive fitness maximization can be derived from axioms on an individual׳s 'as if preferences' (binary choices) for the case in which phenotypic effects are additive. Our results help integrate evolutionary theory and rational choice theory, help draw out the behavioural implications of inclusive fitness maximization, and point to a possible way in which evolution could lead organisms to implement it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Maximal Entanglement in High Energy Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Cervera-Lierta, José I. Latorre, Juan Rojo, Luca Rottoli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyze how maximal entanglement is generated at the fundamental level in QED by studying correlations between helicity states in tree-level scattering processes at high energy. We demonstrate that two mechanisms for the generation of maximal entanglement are at work: i $s$-channel processes where the virtual photon carries equal overlaps of the helicities of the final state particles, and ii the indistinguishable superposition between $t$- and $u$-channels. We then study whether requiring maximal entanglement constrains the coupling structure of QED and the weak interactions. In the case of photon-electron interactions unconstrained by gauge symmetry, we show how this requirement allows reproducing QED. For $Z$-mediated weak scattering, the maximal entanglement principle leads to non-trivial predictions for the value of the weak mixing angle $\\theta_W$. Our results are a first step towards understanding the connections between maximal entanglement and the fundamental symmetries of high-energy physics.

  9. Sensory nerve function and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various gap lengths with nerve guides and autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dunnen, WFA; Meek, MF

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sensory nerve recovery and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various lengths of nerve gaps in the sciatic nerve of the rat, using different techniques. Group 4, in which the longest nerve gap (15 mm) was reconstructed with a thin-walled

  10. Microsurgical reconstruction of large nerve defects using autologous nerve grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoutis, N K; Gerostathopoulos, N E; Efstathopoulos, D G; Misitizis, D P; Bouchlis, G N; Anagnostou, S K

    1994-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1993, 643 patients with peripheral nerve trauma were treated in our clinic. Primary neurorraphy was performed in 431 of these patients and nerve grafting in 212 patients. We present the functional results after nerve grafting in 93 patients with large nerve defects who were followed for more than 2 years. Evaluation of function was based on the Medical Research Council (MRC) classification for motor and sensory recovery. Factors affecting functional outcome, such as age of the patient, denervation time, length of the defect, and level of the injury were noted. Good results according to the MRC classification were obtained in the majority of cases, although function remained less than that of the uninjured side.

  11. Electrophysiology of Extraocular Cranial Nerves: Oculomotor, Trochlear, and Abducens Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Praveen; Balzer, Jeffery R; Anetakis, Katherine; Crammond, Donald J; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2018-01-01

    The utility of extraocular cranial nerve electrophysiologic recordings lies primarily in the operating room during skull base surgeries. Surgical manipulation during skull base surgeries poses a risk of injury to multiple cranial nerves, including those innervating extraocular muscles. Because tumors distort normal anatomic relationships, it becomes particularly challenging to identify cranial nerve structures. Studies have reported the benefits of using intraoperative spontaneous electromyographic recordings and compound muscle action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation in preventing postoperative neurologic deficits. Apart from surgical applications, electromyography of extraocular muscles has also been used to guide botulinum toxin injections in patients with strabismus and as an adjuvant diagnostic test in myasthenia gravis. In this article, we briefly review the rationale, current available techniques to monitor extraocular cranial nerves, technical difficulties, clinical and surgical applications, as well as future directions for research.

  12. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  13. [Effectiveness of magnetotherapy in optic nerve atrophy. A preliminary study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobina, L V; Orlovskaia, L S; Sokov, S L; Sabaeva, G F; Kondé, L A; Iakovlev, A A

    1990-01-01

    Magnetotherapy effects on visual functions (vision acuity and field), on retinal bioelectric activity, on conductive vision system, and on intraocular circulation were studied in 88 patients (160 eyes) with optic nerve atrophy. A Soviet Polyus-1 low-frequency magnetotherapy apparatus was employed with magnetic induction of about 10 mT, exposure 7-10 min, 10-15 sessions per course. Vision acuity of patients with its low (below 0.04 diopters) values improved in 50 percent of cases. The number of patients with vision acuity of 0.2 diopters has increased from 46 before treatment to 75. Magnetotherapy improved ocular hemodynamics in patients with optic nerve atrophy, it reduced the time of stimulation conduction along the vision routes and stimulated the retinal ganglia cells. The maximal effect was achieved after 10 magnetotherapy sessions. A repeated course carried out in 6-8 months promoted a stabilization of the process.

  14. POROSITY OF THE WALL OF A NEUROLAC (R) NERVE CONDUIT HAMPERS NERVE REGENERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, Marcel F.; Den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2009-01-01

    One way to improve nerve regeneration and bridge longer nerve gaps may be the use of semipermeable/porous conduits. With porosity less biomaterial is used for the nerve conduit. We evaluated the short-term effects of porous Neurolac (R) nerve conduits for in vivo peripheral nerve regeneration. In 10

  15. Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guides perform better than autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenDunnen, WFA; VanderLei, B; Schakenraad, JM; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, E; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Bartels, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed and quality of nerve regeneration after reconstruction using a biodegradable nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve regeneration using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. Nerve regeneration

  16. Scaffoldless tissue-engineered nerve conduit promotes peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery after tibial nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron M. Adams; Keith W. VanDusen; Tatiana Y. Kostrominova; Jacob P. Mertens; Lisa M. Larkin

    2017-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerve tissue may cause loss of function in both the nerve and the targeted muscles it innervates. This study compared the repair capability of engineered nerve conduit (ENC), engineered fibroblast conduit (EFC), and autograft in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap. ENCs were fabricated utilizing primary fibroblasts and the nerve cells of rats on embryonic day 15 (E15). EFCs were fabricated utilizing primary fi-broblasts only. Following a 12-week recovery, nerve repair was assessed by measuring contractile properties in the medial gastrocnemius muscle, distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, and histology of muscle and nerve. The autografts, ENCs and EFCs reestablished 96%, 87% and 84% of native distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, 100%, 44% and 44% of native specific force of medical gastrocnemius, and 63%, 61% and 67% of native medial gastrocnemius mass, re-spectively. Histology of the repaired nerve revealed large axons in the autograft, larger but fewer axons in the ENC repair, and many smaller axons in the EFC repair. Muscle histology revealed similar muscle fiber cross-sectional areas among autograft, ENC and EFC repairs. In conclusion, both ENCs and EFCs promot-ed nerve regeneration in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap repair, suggesting that the E15 rat nerve cells may not be necessary for nerve regeneration, and EFC alone can suffice for peripheral nerve injury repair.

  17. Bilateral absence of musculocutaneous nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathada V Ravishankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus is an important group of spinal nerve plexus that supplies the muscles of the upper limb via the ventral rami of the Cervical 5 - Thoracic 1 fibers of the spinal nerves. It is not uncommon to notice the variations during cadaveric dissections in many regions of the body, at different levels, such as, roots, trunks, division, cords, communications, and branches as reported in the literature. Although the nerve supply of the body musculature takes place in the fetal life itself, its course, branching pattern, innervations, and communication can show variable patterns as the fetal development progresses. One such anomaly was noticed during our routine cadaveric dissection in the Department of Anatomy, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Belgaum, showing bilateral absence of the musculocutaneous nerve, which obviously drew the attention of the students of medicine, physiotherapy, and learning clinicians as well.

  18. Imaging of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, F. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francis.Veillon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Ramos-Taboada, L.; Abu-Eid, M. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Charpiot, A. [Service d' ORL, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Riehm, S. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve.

  19. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    These antimicrobial peptides are implicated in the resistance of epithelial surfaces to microbial colonisation and have been shown to be upregulated...be equivalent to standard autograft repair in rodent models. Outcomes have now been validated in a large animal (swine) model with 5 cm ulnar nerve...Goals of the Project Task 1– Determine mechanical properties, seal strength and resistance to biodegradation of candidate photochemical nerve wrap

  20. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Aboshanif; Omi, Eigo; Honda, Kohei; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Methods: Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients). All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB) grade VI, either caused by...

  1. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves......, plexus, or root lesions). Furthermore pathological processes may result in either demyelination, axonal degeneration or both. In order to reach an exact diagnosis of any neuropathy electrophysiological studies are crucial to obtain information about these variables. Conventional electrophysiological...

  2. Optic nerve invasion of uveal melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Isager, Peter; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    in Denmark between 1942 and 2001 were reviewed (n=157). Histopathological characteristics and depth of optic nerve invasion were recorded. The material was compared with a control material from the same period consisting of 85 cases randomly drawn from all choroidal/ciliary body melanomas without optic nerve...... juxtapapillary tumors invading the optic nerve because of simple proximity to the nerve. A neurotropic subtype invades the optic nerve and retina in a diffuse fashion unrelated to tumor size or location. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jan...

  3. A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Maldonado, Andrés A; Stoves, Yolanda; Fries, Fabian N; Li, Rong; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The accessory nerve is frequently repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve available is often insufficient or marginal (under tension) for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer (neurotization), necessitating an interpositional graft. An attractive maneuver would facilitate lengthening of the accessory nerve for direct coaptation. The aim of the present study was to identify an anatomical method for such lengthening. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were identified medial to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and the anatomy of the accessory nerve/cervical nerve fibers within the SCM was documented. The cervical nerve connections were cut. Lengths of the accessory nerve were measured. Samples of the cut C-2 and C-3 nerves were examined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The anatomy and adjacent neural connections within the SCM are complicated. However, after the accessory nerve was "detethered" from within the SCM and following transection, the additional length of the accessory nerve increased from a mean of 6 cm to a mean of 10.5 cm (increase of 4.5 cm) after cutting the C-2 connections, and from a mean of 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm (increase of 3.5 cm) after cutting the C-3 connections. The additional length of accessory nerve even allowed direct repair of an infraclavicular target (i.e., the proximal musculocutaneous nerve). The cervical nerve connections were shown not to contain motor fibers. CONCLUSIONS An additional length of the accessory nerve made available in the posterior cervical triangle can facilitate direct repair or neurotization procedures, thus eliminating the need for an interpositional nerve graft, decreasing the time/distance for regeneration and potentially improving clinical outcomes.

  4. Unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji

    1982-01-01

    The present authors report a case of unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis which shows interesting CT findings which suggest its mechanism. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebral concussion soon after a traffic accident. A CT scan was performed soon after admission. A high-density spot was noted at the medial aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, where the oculomotor nerve emerged from the midbrain, and an irregular, slender, high-density area was delineated in the right dorsolateral surface of the midbrain. Although the right hemiparesis had already improved by the next morning, the function of the left oculomotor nerve has been completely disturbed for the three months since the injury. In our case, it is speculated that an avulsion of the left oculomotor nerve rootlet occurred at the time of impact as the mechanism of the oculomotor nerve paralysis. A CT taken soon after the head injury showed a high-density spot; this was considered to be a hemorrhage occurring because of the avulsion of the nerve rootlet at the medial surface of the cerebral peduncle. (J.P.N.)

  5. Bipartite Bell Inequality and Maximal Violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Fei Shaoming; Li-Jost Xian-Qing

    2011-01-01

    We present new bell inequalities for arbitrary dimensional bipartite quantum systems. The maximal violation of the inequalities is computed. The Bell inequality is capable of detecting quantum entanglement of both pure and mixed quantum states more effectively. (general)

  6. HEALTH INSURANCE: CONTRIBUTIONS AND REIMBURSEMENT MAXIMAL

    CERN Document Server

    HR Division

    2000-01-01

    Affected by both the salary adjustment index on 1.1.2000 and the evolution of the staff members and fellows population, the average reference salary, which is used as an index for fixed contributions and reimbursement maximal, has changed significantly. An adjustment of the amounts of the reimbursement maximal and the fixed contributions is therefore necessary, as from 1 January 2000.Reimbursement maximalThe revised reimbursement maximal will appear on the leaflet summarising the benefits for the year 2000, which will soon be available from the divisional secretariats and from the AUSTRIA office at CERN.Fixed contributionsThe fixed contributions, applicable to some categories of voluntarily insured persons, are set as follows (amounts in CHF for monthly contributions):voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with complete coverage:815,- (was 803,- in 1999)voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with reduced coverage:407,- (was 402,- in 1999)voluntarily insured no longer dependent child:326,- (was 321...

  7. Maximal Inequalities for Dependent Random Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Jorgensen, Jorgen

    2016-01-01

    Maximal inequalities play a crucial role in many probabilistic limit theorem; for instance, the law of large numbers, the law of the iterated logarithm, the martingale limit theorem and the central limit theorem. Let X-1, X-2,... be random variables with partial sums S-k = X-1 + ... + X-k. Then a......Maximal inequalities play a crucial role in many probabilistic limit theorem; for instance, the law of large numbers, the law of the iterated logarithm, the martingale limit theorem and the central limit theorem. Let X-1, X-2,... be random variables with partial sums S-k = X-1 + ... + X......-k. Then a maximal inequality gives conditions ensuring that the maximal partial sum M-n = max(1) (...

  8. Maximizing Function through Intelligent Robot Actuator Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maximizing Function through Intelligent Robot Actuator Control Successful missions to Mars and beyond will only be possible with the support of high-performance...

  9. An ethical justification of profit maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Carsten Allan

    2010-01-01

    In much of the literature on business ethics and corporate social responsibility, it is more or less taken for granted that attempts to maximize profits are inherently unethical. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether an ethical argument can be given in support of profit maximizing...... behaviour. It is argued that some form of consequential ethics must be applied, and that both profit seeking and profit maximization can be defended from a rule-consequential point of view. It is noted, however, that the result does not apply unconditionally, but requires that certain form of profit (and...... utility) maximizing actions are ruled out, e.g., by behavioural norms or formal institutions....

  10. A definition of maximal CP-violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, M.

    1985-01-01

    The unitary matrix of quark flavour mixing is parametrized in a general way, permitting a mathematically natural definition of maximal CP violation. Present data turn out to violate this definition by 2-3 standard deviations. (orig.)

  11. A cosmological problem for maximally symmetric supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, G.; Ross, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    Under very general considerations it is shown that inflationary models of the universe based on maximally symmetric supergravity with flat potentials are unable to resolve the cosmological energy density (Polonyi) problem. (orig.)

  12. Insulin resistance and maximal oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibaek, Marie; Vestergaard, Henrik; Burchardt, Hans

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, and physical fitness all correlate with insulin resistance, but the relative importance of each component is unknown. HYPOTHESIS: This study was undertaken to determine the relationship between insulin resistance, maximal oxygen uptake......, and the presence of either diabetes or ischemic heart disease. METHODS: The study population comprised 33 patients with and without diabetes and ischemic heart disease. Insulin resistance was measured by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; maximal oxygen uptake was measured during a bicycle exercise test. RESULTS......: There was a strong correlation between maximal oxygen uptake and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (r = 0.7, p = 0.001), and maximal oxygen uptake was the only factor of importance for determining insulin sensitivity in a model, which also included the presence of diabetes and ischemic heart disease. CONCLUSION...

  13. Maximal supergravities and the E10 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, Axel; Nicolai, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    The maximal rank hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebra e 10 has been conjectured to play a prominent role in the unification of duality symmetries in string and M theory. We review some recent developments supporting this conjecture

  14. The First Experience of Triple Nerve Transfer in Proximal Radial Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Andalib, Sasan

    2018-01-01

    Injury to distal portion of posterior cord of brachial plexus leads to palsy of radial and axillary nerves. Symptoms are usually motor deficits of the deltoid muscle; triceps brachii muscle; and extensor muscles of the wrist, thumb, and fingers. Tendon transfers, nerve grafts, and nerve transfers are options for surgical treatment of proximal radial nerve palsy to restore some motor functions. Tendon transfer is painful, requires a long immobilization, and decreases donor muscle strength; nevertheless, nerve transfer produces promising outcomes. We present a patient with proximal radial nerve palsy following a blunt injury undergoing triple nerve transfer. The patient was involved in a motorcycle accident with complete palsy of the radial and axillary nerves. After 6 months, on admission, he showed spontaneous recovery of axillary nerve palsy, but radial nerve palsy remained. We performed triple nerve transfer, fascicle of ulnar nerve to long head of the triceps branch of radial nerve, flexor digitorum superficialis branch of median nerve to extensor carpi radialis brevis branch of radial nerve, and flexor carpi radialis branch of median nerve to posterior interosseous nerve, for restoration of elbow, wrist, and finger extensions, respectively. Our experience confirmed functional elbow, wrist, and finger extensions in the patient. Triple nerve transfer restores functions of the upper limb in patients with debilitating radial nerve palsy after blunt injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity elicit spinal TNF-α-independent, atypical PKC-dependent inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertsch, Nathan A; Baker-Herman, Tracy L

    2015-04-15

    In many neural networks, mechanisms of compensatory plasticity respond to prolonged reductions in neural activity by increasing cellular excitability or synaptic strength. In the respiratory control system, a prolonged reduction in synaptic inputs to the phrenic motor pool elicits a TNF-α- and atypical PKC-dependent form of spinal plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). Although iPMF may be elicited by a prolonged reduction in respiratory neural activity, iPMF is more efficiently induced when reduced respiratory neural activity (neural apnea) occurs intermittently. Mechanisms giving rise to iPMF following intermittent neural apnea are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that iPMF following intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity requires spinal TNF-α and aPKC. Phrenic motor output was recorded in anesthetized and ventilated rats exposed to brief intermittent (5, ∼1.25 min), brief sustained (∼6.25 min), or prolonged sustained (30 min) neural apnea. iPMF was elicited following brief intermittent and prolonged sustained neural apnea, but not following brief sustained neural apnea. Unlike iPMF following prolonged neural apnea, spinal TNF-α was not required to initiate iPMF during intermittent neural apnea; however, aPKC was still required for its stabilization. These results suggest that different patterns of respiratory neural activity induce iPMF through distinct cellular mechanisms but ultimately converge on a similar downstream pathway. Understanding the diverse cellular mechanisms that give rise to inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity may lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat devastating respiratory control disorders when endogenous compensatory mechanisms fail. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Gaussian maximally multipartite-entangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano; Pascazio, Saverio

    2009-12-01

    We study maximally multipartite-entangled states in the context of Gaussian continuous variable quantum systems. By considering multimode Gaussian states with constrained energy, we show that perfect maximally multipartite-entangled states, which exhibit the maximum amount of bipartite entanglement for all bipartitions, only exist for systems containing n=2 or 3 modes. We further numerically investigate the structure of these states and their frustration for n≤7 .

  17. Gaussian maximally multipartite-entangled states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Pascazio, Saverio; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    We study maximally multipartite-entangled states in the context of Gaussian continuous variable quantum systems. By considering multimode Gaussian states with constrained energy, we show that perfect maximally multipartite-entangled states, which exhibit the maximum amount of bipartite entanglement for all bipartitions, only exist for systems containing n=2 or 3 modes. We further numerically investigate the structure of these states and their frustration for n≤7.

  18. Neutrino mass textures with maximal CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Ichiro; Kitabayashi, Teruyuki; Yasue, Masaki

    2005-01-01

    We show three types of neutrino mass textures, which give maximal CP violation as well as maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing. These textures are described by six real mass parameters: one specified by two complex flavor neutrino masses and two constrained ones and the others specified by three complex flavor neutrino masses. In each texture, we calculate mixing angles and masses, which are consistent with observed data, as well as Majorana CP phases

  19. Why firms should not always maximize profits

    OpenAIRE

    Kolstad, Ivar

    2006-01-01

    Though corporate social responsibility (CSR) is on the agenda of most major corporations, corporate executives still largely support the view that corporations should maximize the returns to their owners. There are two lines of defence for this position. One is the Friedmanian view that maximizing owner returns is the corporate social responsibility of corporations. The other is a position voiced by many executives, that CSR and profits go together. This paper argues that the first position i...

  20. Maximally Informative Observables and Categorical Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiang, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    We formulate the problem of perception in the framework of information theory, and prove that categorical perception is equivalent to the existence of an observable that has the maximum possible information on the target of perception. We call such an observable maximally informative. Regardless whether categorical perception is real, maximally informative observables can form the basis of a theory of perception. We conclude with the implications of such a theory for the problem of speech per...

  1. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar RIM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ‘watch and see’ the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important to release the nerve tension before transferring the patient to the operation room. If close reduction fails, we proceed to explore the nerve together with open reduction of the fracture. In iatrogenic nerve injury, we recommend nerve exploration to determine the surgical procedure that is causing the injury. Primary nerve exploration will allow early assessment of the injured nerve and minimize subsequent surgery.

  2. Combined Use of an Occlusion Balloon Catheter and a Microcatheter for Embolization of the Unselectable Right Inferior Phrenic Artery Supplying Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyayama, Shiro; Matsui, Osamu; Taki, Keiichi; Minami, Tetsuya; Ito, Chiharu; Shinmura, Rieko; Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Miki; Notsumata, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    We report the combined use of an occlusion balloon catheter and a microcatheter for transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) fed by the unselectable right inferior phrenic artery (IPA). In one case, HCC was fed by the reconstructed right IPA via a small branch arising from the proximate portion of the celiac artery. In another, the tumor was fed by the right IPA that had been previously embolized with coils. TAE was successfully performed through a microcatheter placed in the celiac artery immediately proximal to the occluding balloon catheter of the celiac trunk and coil embolization of the left gastric artery

  3. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ?cross-bridging? to promote nerve regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Tessa; Eva, Placheta; Borschel, Gregory H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour per...

  4. Stimulation of the sensory pudendal nerve increases bladder capacity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokanson, James A; Langdale, Christopher L; Sridhar, Arun; Grill, Warren M

    2018-04-01

    Pudendal nerve stimulation is a promising treatment approach for lower urinary tract dysfunction, including symptoms of overactive bladder. Despite some promising clinical studies, there remain many unknowns as to how best to stimulate the pudendal nerve to maximize therapeutic efficacy. We quantified changes in bladder capacity and voiding efficiency during single-fill cystometry in response to electrical stimulation of the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve in urethane-anesthetized female Wistar rats. Increases in bladder capacity were dependent on both stimulation amplitude and rate. Stimulation that produced increases in bladder capacity also led to reductions in voiding efficiency. Also, there was a stimulation carryover effect, and increases in bladder capacity persisted during several nonstimulated trials following stimulated trials. Intravesically administered PGE 2 reduced bladder capacity, producing a model of overactive bladder (OAB), and sensory pudendal nerve stimulation again increased bladder capacity but also reduced voiding efficiency. This study serves as a basis for future studies that seek to maximize the therapeutic efficacy of sensory pudendal nerve stimulation for the symptoms of OAB.

  5. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    OpenAIRE

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    With reference to the discussion about shareholder versus stakeholder maximization it is argued that the normal type of maximization is in fact stakeholder-owner maxi-mization. This means maximization of the sum of the value of the shares and stake-holder benefits belonging to the dominating stakeholder-owner. Maximization of shareholder value is a special case of owner-maximization, and only under quite re-strictive assumptions shareholder maximization is larger or equal to stakeholder-owner...

  6. Failure of controlling massive hemoptysis in bronchiectasis through BAE due to aberration blood supply from inferior phrenic arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Wang Maoqiang; Song Peng; Wang Zhijun; Wang Zhongpu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe the manifestations of the inferior phrenic arterial (IPA) blood supply in hemoptysis of bronchiectasis and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE)of the IPA. Methods: During the past 5 years, 62 patients with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis underwent BAE including 10 with additional blood supply from IPA. Mean patient age was 42.5 years (range, 26-58 years). Supplemental TAE using gelatin sponge particles and microcoils was undertaken in IPA supplying cases. The imaging findings of the IPA angiography, the predictive factors, the technique and clinical significance including safety of IPA embolization, were evaluated. Results: Selective arteriogram demonstrated enlargement of IPA, with numerous branches and neovasculature in all 10 cases, including contrast material extravasation in 4, and non-specific staining in 6 cases. In addition, there were IPA-to- pulmonary shunting in 8 cases, adjacent to the pleurae involving diaphragmatic and mediastinal pleura in 6 and only mediastinal pleura in 4. Technical success of IPA embolization was achieved in all 10 cases. Embolization of other nonbronchial systemic arteries (the internal thoracic artery in 4 and intercostal artery in 2)were performed at the same session. All bleedings ceased immediately after supplemental IPA embolization. Follow- up ranged from 8 months to 3 years, including mild recurrent hemoptysis in 2 patients at 2, 3 months respectively, but responsible to conservative management and no recurrent bleeding in 8 patients. Conclusion: Bronchiectatic hemoptysis may be further supplied by IPA, resulting in clinical failure of BAE and supplemental TAE of IPA is a safe and effective adjunct to BAE in the management. (authors)

  7. Reduced phrenic motoneuron recruitment during sustained inspiratory threshold loading compared to single-breath loading: a twitch interpolation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Raux

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In humans, inspiratory constraints engage cortical networks involving the supplementary motor area. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI shows that the spread and intensity of the corresponding respiratory-related cortical activation dramatically decrease when a discrete load becomes sustained. This has been interpreted as reflecting motor cortical reorganisation and automatisation, but could proceed from sensory and/or affective habituation. To corroborate the existence of motor reorganisation between single-breath and sustained inspiratory loading (namely changes in motor neurones recruitment, we conducted a diaphragm twitch interpolation study based on the hypothesis that motor reorganisation should result in changes in the twitch interpolation slope. Fourteen healthy subjects (age: 21 – 40 years were studied. Bilateral phrenic stimulation was delivered at rest, upon prepared and targeted voluntary inspiratory efforts (vol, upon unprepared inspiratory efforts against a single-breath inspiratory threshold load (single-breath, and upon sustained inspiratory efforts against the same type of load (continuous. The slope of the relationship between diaphragm twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure and the underlying transdiaphragmatic pressure was –1.1 ± 0.2 during vol, –1.5 ± 0.7 during single-breath, and -0.6 ± 0.4 during continuous (all slopes expressed in percent of baseline.percent of baseline-1 all comparisons significant at the 5% level. The contribution of the diaphragm to inspiration, as assessed by the gastric pressure to transdiaphragmatic pressure ratio, was 31 ± 17 % during vol, 22 ± 16 % during single-breath (p=0.13, and 19 ± 9 % during continuous (p = 0.0015 vs. vol. This study shows that the relationship between the amplitude of the transdiaphragmatic pressure produced by a diaphragm twitch and its counterpart produced by the underlying diaphragm contraction is not unequivocal. If twitch interpolation is interpreted as

  8. Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks--is documentation and education feasible using only text and pictures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarne Skjødt Worm

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: With the advancement of ultrasound-guidance for peripheral nerve blocks, still pictures from representative ultrasonograms are increasingly used for clinical procedure documentation of the procedure and for educational purposes in textbook materials. However, little is actually known about the clinical and educational usefulness of these still pictures, in particular how well nerve structures can be identified compared to real-time ultrasound examination. We aimed to quantify gross visibility or ultrastructure using still picture sonograms compared to real time ultrasound for trainees and experts, for large or small nerves, and discuss the clinical or educational relevance of these findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We undertook a clinical study to quantify the maximal gross visibility or ultrastructure of seven peripheral nerves identified by either real time ultrasound (clinical cohort, n = 635 or by still picture ultrasonograms (clinical cohort, n = 112. In addition, we undertook a study on test subjects (n = 4 to quantify interobserver variations and potential bias among expert and trainee observers. RESULTS: When comparing real time ultrasound and interpretation of still picture sonograms, gross identification of large nerves was reduced by 15% and 40% by expert and trainee observers, respectively, while gross identification of small nerves was reduced by 29% and 66%. Identification of within-nerve ultrastructure was even less. For all nerve sizes, trainees were unable to identify any anatomical structure in 24 to 34%, while experts were unable to identify anything in 9 to 10%. CONCLUSION: Exhaustive ultrasonography experience and real time ultrasound measurements seem to be keystones in obtaining optimal nerve identification. In contrast the use of still pictures appears to be insufficient for documentation as well as educational purposes. Alternatives such as video clips or enhanced picture technology are encouraged

  9. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  10. Electrodiagnosis and nerve conduction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posuniak, E A

    1984-08-01

    The use of electrodiagnostic techniques in evaluation of complaints in the lower extremities provides an objective method of assessment. A basic understanding of principles of neurophysiology, EMG and NCV methodology, and neuropathology of peripheral nerves greatly enhances physical diagnosis and improves the state of the art in treatment of the lower extremity, especially foot and ankle injuries. Familiarity with the method of reporting electrodiagnostic studies and appreciation of the electromyographer's interpretation of the EMG/NCV studies also reflects an enhanced fund of knowledge, skills, and attitudes as pertains to one's level of professional expertise. Information regarding the etiology of positive sharp waves, fibrillation potentials, fasciculation, and normal motor action potentials and conduction studies serves as a sound basis for the appreciation of the categories of nerve injury. Competence in understanding the degree of axonal or myelin function or dysfunction in a nerve improve one's effectiveness not only in medical/surgical treatment but in prognostication of recovery of function. A review of the entrapment syndromes in the lower extremity with emphasis on tarsal tunnel syndrome summarizes the most common nerve entrapments germane to the practice of podiatry. With regard to tarsal tunnel syndrome, the earliest electrodiagnostic study to suggest compression was reported to be the EMG of the foot and leg muscles, even before prolonged nerve latency was noted.

  11. Intraoperative Ultrasound for Peripheral Nerve Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsey, Matthew; Wilson, Thomas J; Henning, Phillip Troy; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2017-10-01

    Offering real-time, high-resolution images via intraoperative ultrasound is advantageous for a variety of peripheral nerve applications. To highlight the advantages of ultrasound, its extraoperative uses are reviewed. The current intraoperative uses, including nerve localization, real-time evaluation of peripheral nerve tumors, and implantation of leads for peripheral nerve stimulation, are reviewed. Although intraoperative peripheral nerve localization has been performed previously using guide wires and surgical dyes, the authors' approach using ultrasound-guided instrument clamps helps guide surgical dissection to the target nerve, which could lead to more timely operations and shorter incisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  13. Vacua of maximal gauged D=3 supergravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischbacher, T; Nicolai, H; Samtleben, H

    2002-01-01

    We analyse the scalar potentials of maximal gauged three-dimensional supergravities which reveal a surprisingly rich structure. In contrast to maximal supergravities in dimensions D≥4, all these theories possess a maximally supersymmetric (N=16) ground state with negative cosmological constant Λ 2 gauged theory, whose maximally supersymmetric groundstate has Λ = 0. We compute the mass spectra of bosonic and fermionic fluctuations around these vacua and identify the unitary irreducible representations of the relevant background (super)isometry groups to which they belong. In addition, we find several stationary points which are not maximally supersymmetric, and determine their complete mass spectra as well. In particular, we show that there are analogues of all stationary points found in higher dimensions, among them are de Sitter (dS) vacua in the theories with noncompact gauge groups SO(5, 3) 2 and SO(4, 4) 2 , as well as anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacua in the compact gauged theory preserving 1/4 and 1/8 of the supersymmetries. All the dS vacua have tachyonic instabilities, whereas there do exist nonsupersymmetric AdS vacua which are stable, again in contrast to the D≥4 theories

  14. Nerve ultrasound shows subclinical peripheral nerve involvement in neurofibromatosis type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telleman, Johan A; Stellingwerff, Menno D; Brekelmans, Geert J; Visser, Leo H

    2018-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is mainly associated with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Peripheral nerve involvement is described in symptomatic patients, but evidence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement is scarce. We conducted a cross-sectional pilot study in 2 asymptomatic and 3 minimally symptomatic patients with NF2 to detect subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. Patients underwent clinical examination, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS). A total of 30 schwannomas were found, divided over 20 nerve segments (33.9% of all investigated nerve segments). All patients had at least 1 schwannoma. Schwannomas were identified with HRUS in 37% of clinically unaffected nerve segments and 50% of nerve segments with normal NCS findings. HRUS shows frequent subclinical peripheral nerve involvement in NF2. Clinicians should consider peripheral nerve involvement as a cause of weakness and sensory loss in the extremities in patients with this disease. Muscle Nerve 57: 312-316, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Use of Degradable Nerve Conduits for Human Nerve Repair: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Meek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of peripheral nerve injury continues to be a major clinical challenge. The most widely used technique for bridging defects in peripheral nerves is the use of autologous nerve grafts. This technique, however, has some disadvantages. Many alternative experimental techniques have thus been developed, such as degradable nerve conduits. Degradable nerve guides have been extensively studied in animal experimental studies. However, the repair of human nerves by degradable nerve conduits has been limited to only a few clinical studies. In this paper, an overview of the available international published literature on degradable nerve conduits for bridging human peripheral nerve defects is presented for literature available until 2004. Also, the philosophy on the use of nerve guides and nerve grafts is given.

  16. Raman spectroscopic detection of peripheral nerves towards nerve-sparing surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery, namely nerve-sparing surgery, is now promising technique to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery as an aspect of the improvement of quality of life of patients. Detection of peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves is required for the nerve-sparing surgery; however, conventional nerve identification scheme is sometimes difficult to identify peripheral nerves due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues or its limited application to only motor peripheral nerves. To overcome these issues, we proposed a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerves by means of Raman spectroscopy. We found several fingerprints of peripheral myelinated and unmyelinated nerves by employing a modified principal component analysis of typical spectra including myelinated nerve, unmyelinated nerve, and adjacent tissues. We finally realized the sensitivity of 94.2% and the selectivity of 92.0% for peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves against adjacent tissues. Although further development of an intraoperative Raman spectroscopy system is required for clinical use, our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future.

  17. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  18. An information maximization model of eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renninger, Laura Walker; Coughlan, James; Verghese, Preeti; Malik, Jitendra

    2005-01-01

    We propose a sequential information maximization model as a general strategy for programming eye movements. The model reconstructs high-resolution visual information from a sequence of fixations, taking into account the fall-off in resolution from the fovea to the periphery. From this framework we get a simple rule for predicting fixation sequences: after each fixation, fixate next at the location that minimizes uncertainty (maximizes information) about the stimulus. By comparing our model performance to human eye movement data and to predictions from a saliency and random model, we demonstrate that our model is best at predicting fixation locations. Modeling additional biological constraints will improve the prediction of fixation sequences. Our results suggest that information maximization is a useful principle for programming eye movements.

  19. Utility Maximization in Nonconvex Wireless Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Brehmer, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    This monograph formulates a framework for modeling and solving utility maximization problems in nonconvex wireless systems. First, a model for utility optimization in wireless systems is defined. The model is general enough to encompass a wide array of system configurations and performance objectives. Based on the general model, a set of methods for solving utility maximization problems is developed. The development is based on a careful examination of the properties that are required for the application of each method. The focus is on problems whose initial formulation does not allow for a solution by standard convex methods. Solution approaches that take into account the nonconvexities inherent to wireless systems are discussed in detail. The monograph concludes with two case studies that demonstrate the application of the proposed framework to utility maximization in multi-antenna broadcast channels.

  20. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslantunali D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available D Arslantunali,1–3,* T Dursun,1,2,* D Yucel,1,4,5 N Hasirci,1,2,6 V Hasirci,1,2,7 1BIOMATEN, Center of Excellence in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Biotechnology, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Bioengineering, Gumushane University, Gumushane, Turkey; 4Faculty of Engineering, Department of Medical Engineering, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 6Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 7Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type are being presented. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

  1. Relationships between the integrity and function of lumbar nerve roots as assessed by diffusion tensor imaging and neurophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiou, S.Y.; Strutton, P.H. [Imperial College London, The Nick Davey Laboratory, Division of Surgery, Human Performance Group, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hellyer, P.J. [Imperial College London, Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, Division of Brain Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Sharp, D.J. [Imperial College London, Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, Division of Brain Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Newbould, R.D. [Imanova, Ltd, London (United Kingdom); Patel, M.C. [Charing Cross Hospital, Imaging Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has shown promise in the measurement of peripheral nerve integrity, although the optimal way to apply the technique for the study of lumbar spinal nerves is unclear. The aims of this study are to use an improved DTI acquisition to investigate lumbar nerve root integrity and correlate this with functional measures using neurophysiology. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent 3 T DTI of the L5/S1 area. Regions of interest were applied to L5 and S1 nerve roots, and DTI metrics (fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity) were derived. Neurophysiological measures were obtained from muscles innervated by L5/S1 nerves; these included the slope of motor-evoked potential input-output curves, F-wave latency, maximal motor response, and central and peripheral motor conduction times. DTI metrics were similar between the left and right sides and between vertebral levels. Conversely, significant differences in DTI measures were seen along the course of the nerves. Regression analyses revealed that DTI metrics of the L5 nerve correlated with neurophysiological measures from the muscle innervated by it. The current findings suggest that DTI has the potential to be used for assessing lumbar spinal nerve integrity and that parameters derived from DTI provide quantitative information which reflects their function. (orig.)

  2. Enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration through asymmetrically porous nerve guide conduit with nerve growth factor gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Heang; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Tae Ho; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Lee, Jin Ho

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a nerve guide conduit (NGC) with nerve growth factor (NGF) gradient along the longitudinal direction by rolling a porous polycaprolactone membrane with NGF concentration gradient. The NGF immobilized on the membrane was continuously released for up to 35 days, and the released amount of the NGF from the membrane gradually increased from the proximal to distal NGF ends, which may allow a neurotrophic factor gradient in the tubular NGC for a sufficient period. From the in vitro cell culture experiment, it was observed that the PC12 cells sense the NGF concentration gradient on the membrane for the cell proliferation and differentiation. From the in vivo animal experiment using a long gap (20 mm) sciatic nerve defect model of rats, the NGC with NGF concentration gradient allowed more rapid nerve regeneration through the NGC than the NGC itself and NGC immobilized with uniformly distributed NGF. The NGC with NGF concentration gradient seems to be a promising strategy for the peripheral nerve regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 52-64, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Maximizing band gaps in plate structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    periodic plate using Bloch theory, which conveniently reduces the maximization problem to that of a single base cell. Secondly, we construct a finite periodic plate using a number of the optimized base cells in a postprocessed version. The dynamic properties of the finite plate are investigated......Band gaps, i.e., frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate, can be found in elastic structures for which there is a certain periodic modulation of the material properties or structure. In this paper, we maximize the band gap size for bending waves in a Mindlin plate. We analyze an infinite...... theoretically and experimentally and the issue of finite size effects is addressed....

  4. Singularity Structure of Maximally Supersymmetric Scattering Amplitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Bourjaily, Jacob L.; Cachazo, Freddy

    2014-01-01

    We present evidence that loop amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric (N=4) Yang-Mills theory (SYM) beyond the planar limit share some of the remarkable structures of the planar theory. In particular, we show that through two loops, the four-particle amplitude in full N=4 SYM has only logarithmic ...... singularities and is free of any poles at infinity—properties closely related to uniform transcendentality and the UV finiteness of the theory. We also briefly comment on implications for maximal (N=8) supergravity theory (SUGRA)....

  5. Learning curves for mutual information maximization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanczik, R.

    2003-01-01

    An unsupervised learning procedure based on maximizing the mutual information between the outputs of two networks receiving different but statistically dependent inputs is analyzed [S. Becker and G. Hinton, Nature (London) 355, 161 (1992)]. For a generic data model, I show that in the large sample limit the structure in the data is recognized by mutual information maximization. For a more restricted model, where the networks are similar to perceptrons, I calculate the learning curves for zero-temperature Gibbs learning. These show that convergence can be rather slow, and a way of regularizing the procedure is considered

  6. Finding Maximal Pairs with Bounded Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Lyngsø, Rune B.; Pedersen, Christian N. S.

    1999-01-01

    . In this paper we present methods for finding all maximal pairs under various constraints on the gap. In a string of length n we can find all maximal pairs with gap in an upper and lower bounded interval in time O(n log n+z) where z is the number of reported pairs. If the upper bound is removed the time reduces...... to O(n+z). Since a tandem repeat is a pair where the gap is zero, our methods can be seen as a generalization of finding tandem repeats. The running time of our methods equals the running time of well known methods for finding tandem repeats....

  7. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  8. Imaging of the optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Minerva; Masterson, Karen; Delavelle, Jacqueline; Viallon, Magalie; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Becker, Christoph D.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  9. Transient Femoral Nerve Palsy Following Ilioinguinal Nerve Block ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-20

    Apr 20, 2018 ... a 3‑year period under ilioinguinal nerve block only were assessed for evidence of TFNP. All patients ... loss over the anterior aspect of the thigh, weakness of extension at the knee joint, .... and may result in falls with fractures which carry severe ... recovery of the palsy and subsequently discharged same.

  10. Functional nerve recovery after bridging a 15 mm gap in rat sciatic nerve with a biodegradable nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Klok, F; Robinson, PH; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of nerve function was evaluated after bridging a 15 mm sciatic nerve gap in 51 rats with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide. Recovery of function was investigated by analysing the footprints, by analysing video recordings of gait, by electrically eliciting the

  11. Nerve supply to the pelvis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nerves that branch off the central nervous system (CNS) provide messages to the muscles and organs for normal ... be compromised. In multiple sclerosis, the demyelinization of nerve cells may lead to bowel incontinence, bladder problems ...

  12. Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP Ajay Jawahar MD ... spinal cord is the thick, whitish bundle of nerve tissue that extends from the lowest part of ...

  13. Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000326.htm Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care To use the ... or at other unusual times. Treating and Preventing Nerve Damage from Diabetes Treating diabetic neuropathy can make ...

  14. Reconstruction of facial nerve injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Adel; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ron M

    2011-05-01

    Facial nerve trauma is uncommon in children, and many spontaneously recover some function; nonetheless, loss of facial nerve activity leads to functional impairment of ocular and oral sphincters and nasal orifice. In many cases, the impediment posed by facial asymmetry and reduced mimetic function more significantly affects the child's psychosocial interactions. As such, reconstruction of the facial nerve affords great benefits in quality of life. The therapeutic strategy is dependent on numerous factors, including the cause of facial nerve injury, the deficit, the prognosis for recovery, and the time elapsed since the injury. The options for treatment include a diverse range of surgical techniques including static lifts and slings, nerve repairs, nerve grafts and nerve transfers, regional, and microvascular free muscle transfer. We review our strategies for addressing facial nerve injuries in children.

  15. Cranial nerve palsies in Nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Introduction. Cranial nerve palsy is a common clinical problem ... Methodology ... The two cases with three-nerve involvement were re- lated to viral encephalitis and cerebral contusion from ... RTA = road traffic accident.

  16. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  17. a technique to repair peripheral nerve injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    attached nerve does occi.rr, and functional recovery (sensory and motor) has been demonstrated. ..... Brachial plexus. Upper trunk to lower. 19 Nov 1998 ... Fractured. 13 Mar 1998 Mid shaft hiunerus Radial nerve to. 14 Mar 1999 humerus cut.

  18. External laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery: is the nerve stimulator necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aina, E N; Hisham, A N

    2001-09-01

    To find out the incidence and type of external laryngeal nerves during operations on the thyroid, and to assess the role of a nerve stimulator in detecting them. Prospective, non-randomised study. Teaching hospital, Malaysia. 317 patients who had 447 dissections between early January 1998 and late November 1999. Number and type of nerves crossing the cricothyroid space, and the usefulness of the nerve stimulator in finding them. The nerve stimulator was used in 206/447 dissections (46%). 392 external laryngeal nerves were seen (88%), of which 196/206 (95%) were detected with the stimulator. However, without the stimulator 196 nerves were detected out of 241 dissections (81%). The stimulator detected 47 (23%) Type I nerves (nerve > 1 cm from the upper edge of superior pole); 86 (42%) Type IIa nerves (nerve edge of superior pole); and 63 (31%) Type IIb nerves (nerve below upper edge of superior pole). 10 nerves were not detected. When the stimulator was not used the corresponding figures were 32 (13%), 113 (47%), and 51 (21%), and 45 nerves were not seen. If the nerve cannot be found we recommend dissection of capsule close to the medial border of the upper pole of the thyroid to avoid injury to the nerve. Although the use of the nerve stimulator seems desirable, it confers no added advantage in finding the nerve. In the event of uncertainty about whether a structure is the nerve, the stimulator may help to confirm it. However, exposure of the cricothyroid space is most important for good exposure in searching for the external laryngeal nerve.

  19. Secondary digital nerve repair in the foot with resorbable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve conduits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA; Robinson, PH

    Nerve guides are increasingly being used in peripheral nerve repair. In the last decade, Much preclinical research has been undertaken into a resorbable nerve guide composed of p(DLLA-epsilon-CL). This report describes the results of secondary digital nerve reconstruction in the foot in a patient

  20. Peripheral nerve regeneration through P(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Dunnen, WFA; Meek, MF; Robinson, PH; Schakernraad, JM

    1998-01-01

    P(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides can be used perfectly for short nerve gaps in rats, and are even better than short autologous nerve grafts. The tube dimensions, such as the internal diameter and wall thickness, are very important for the final outcome of peripheral nerve regeneration, as well as the

  1. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  2. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of cranial nerve involvement in cryptococcal meningitis.

  3. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  4. Maximizing the Range of a Projectile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ronald A.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses solutions to the problem of maximizing the range of a projectile. Presents three references that solve the problem with and without the use of calculus. Offers a fourth solution suitable for introductory physics courses that relies more on trigonometry and the geometry of the problem. (MDH)

  5. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen; Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle

  6. Ehrenfest's Lottery--Time and Entropy Maximization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    Successful teaching of the Second Law of Thermodynamics suffers from limited simple examples linking equilibrium to entropy maximization. I describe a thought experiment connecting entropy to a lottery that mixes marbles amongst a collection of urns. This mixing obeys diffusion-like dynamics. Equilibrium is achieved when the marble distribution is…

  7. Reserve design to maximize species persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Haight; Laurel E. Travis

    2008-01-01

    We develop a reserve design strategy to maximize the probability of species persistence predicted by a stochastic, individual-based, metapopulation model. Because the population model does not fit exact optimization procedures, our strategy involves deriving promising solutions from theory, obtaining promising solutions from a simulation optimization heuristic, and...

  8. Maximal indecomposable past sets and event horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolak, A.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of maximal indecomposable past sets MIPs is demonstrated using the Kuratowski-Zorn lemma. A criterion for the existence of an absolute event horizon in space-time is given in terms of MIPs and a relation to black hole event horizon is shown. (author)

  9. Maximization of eigenvalues using topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2000-01-01

    to localized modes in low density areas. The topology optimization problem is formulated using the SIMP method. Special attention is paid to a numerical method for removing localized eigenmodes in low density areas. The method is applied to numerical examples of maximizing the first eigenfrequency, One example...

  10. Maximizing Resource Utilization in Video Streaming Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsmirat, Mohammad Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Video streaming has recently grown dramatically in popularity over the Internet, Cable TV, and wire-less networks. Because of the resource demanding nature of video streaming applications, maximizing resource utilization in any video streaming system is a key factor to increase the scalability and decrease the cost of the system. Resources to…

  11. A THEORY OF MAXIMIZING SENSORY INFORMATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van

    1992-01-01

    A theory is developed on the assumption that early sensory processing aims at maximizing the information rate in the channels connecting the sensory system to more central parts of the brain, where it is assumed that these channels are noisy and have a limited dynamic range. Given a stimulus power

  12. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly vari...

  13. A Model of College Tuition Maximization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshardt, Donald I.; Lichtenstein, Larry; Zaporowski, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a series of models for optimal tuition pricing for private colleges and universities. The university is assumed to be a profit maximizing, price discriminating monopolist. The enrollment decision of student's is stochastic in nature. The university offers an effective tuition rate, comprised of stipulated tuition less financial…

  14. Logit Analysis for Profit Maximizing Loan Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, David L.; Mortensen, Timothy L.; Leistritz, F. Larry

    1988-01-01

    Lending criteria and loan classification methods are developed. Rating system breaking points are analyzed to present a method to maximize loan revenues. Financial characteristics of farmers are used as determinants of delinquency in a multivariate logistic model. Results indicate that debt-to-asset and operating ration are most indicative of default.

  15. Divisão e distribuição dos nervos frênicos no diafragma de búfalo (Bubalus bubalis Linnaeus, 1758) da raça Murrah

    OpenAIRE

    Arnóbio Amanajás Tocantins Neto; Nilson Ferreira; Maria Angélica Miglino; Wilson Machado de Souza

    1994-01-01

    Based on the dissection of 30 diaphragms of adult male buffaloes of the Murrah breed, the authors studied the division and distribution of the phrenic nerves and the results found were as the follow: the phrenic nerves terminate in bifurcation both in dorsal branches and ventrolateral trunks at right (36.7%) and into left (100%) sides. The phrenic nerves terminate in bifurcation only to the right (46.7%) branches and dorsolateral trunks. The phrenic nerves terminate by trifurcation, only at t...

  16. Developing maximal neuromuscular power: Part 1--biological basis of maximal power production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2011-01-01

    This series of reviews focuses on the most important neuromuscular function in many sport performances, the ability to generate maximal muscular power. Part 1 focuses on the factors that affect maximal power production, while part 2, which will follow in a forthcoming edition of Sports Medicine, explores the practical application of these findings by reviewing the scientific literature relevant to the development of training programmes that most effectively enhance maximal power production. The ability of the neuromuscular system to generate maximal power is affected by a range of interrelated factors. Maximal muscular power is defined and limited by the force-velocity relationship and affected by the length-tension relationship. The ability to generate maximal power is influenced by the type of muscle action involved and, in particular, the time available to develop force, storage and utilization of elastic energy, interactions of contractile and elastic elements, potentiation of contractile and elastic filaments as well as stretch reflexes. Furthermore, maximal power production is influenced by morphological factors including fibre type contribution to whole muscle area, muscle architectural features and tendon properties as well as neural factors including motor unit recruitment, firing frequency, synchronization and inter-muscular coordination. In addition, acute changes in the muscle environment (i.e. alterations resulting from fatigue, changes in hormone milieu and muscle temperature) impact the ability to generate maximal power. Resistance training has been shown to impact each of these neuromuscular factors in quite specific ways. Therefore, an understanding of the biological basis of maximal power production is essential for developing training programmes that effectively enhance maximal power production in the human.

  17. Ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athale, S.; Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroradiology Section, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 F. Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78284-7800 (United States); Hallet, K.K. [Neuropathology Department, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Ganglioglioma of the cranial nerves is extremely rare; only a few cases involving the optic nerves have been reported. We present a case of ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve, which was isointense with the brain stem on all MRI sequences and showed no contrast enhancement. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  18. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... An infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at the time of delivery. ...

  19. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used...

  20. Understanding Violations of Gricean Maxims in Preschoolers and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mako eOkanda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study used a revised Conversational Violations Test to examine Gricean maxim violations in 4- to 6-year-old Japanese children and adults. Participants’ understanding of the following maxims was assessed: be informative (first maxim of quantity, avoid redundancy (second maxim of quantity, be truthful (maxim of quality, be relevant (maxim of relation, avoid ambiguity (second maxim of manner, and be polite (maxim of politeness. Sensitivity to violations of Gricean maxims increased with age: 4-year-olds’ understanding of maxims was near chance, 5-year-olds understood some maxims (first maxim of quantity and maxims of quality, relation, and manner, and 6-year-olds and adults understood all maxims. Preschoolers acquired the maxim of relation first and had the greatest difficulty understanding the second maxim of quantity. Children and adults differed in their comprehension of the maxim of politeness. The development of the pragmatic understanding of Gricean maxims and implications for the construction of developmental tasks from early childhood to adulthood are discussed.