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Sample records for maurer technology noble

  1. Bill Maurer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Tooker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Professor Bill Maurer is a renowned cultural anthropologist who conducts research on law, property, money and finance, focusing on the technological infrastructures and social relations of exchange and payment. Professor Maurer graduated from Stanford University in 1994 with a PhD in Anthropology. He moved to UC Irvine in 1996 as Assistant Professor, going on to become Chair of UC Irvine’s Department of Anthropology (2005-2011 and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies in the Social Sciences (2011-2013. In July 2013 he assumed his current role as Dean of UC Irvine’s School of Social Sciences. Professor Maurer has published on topics ranging from offshore financial services to mobile phone-enabled money transfers, Islamic finance, alternative currencies, and the future of money. He is founding director of the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and was the founding co-director of the Intel Science and Technology Center in Social Computing. He is the editor of six collections, as well as the author of Recharting the Caribbean: Land, Law and Citizenship in the British Virgin Islands (1997, Pious Property: Islamic Mortgages in the United States (2006, and Mutual Life, Limited: Islamic Banking, Alternative Currencies, Lateral Reason (2005. The latter received the Victor Turner Prize in 2005. Professor Maurer visited the University of Warwick in September 2014 under the auspices of Warwick’s Global Governance GRP.

  2. Maurer-cartan forms for fields on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piuze, Emmanuel; Sporring, Jon; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2015-01-01

    We study the space of first order models of smooth frame fields using the method of moving frames. By exploiting the Maurer-Cartan matrix of connection forms we develop geometrical embeddings for frame fields which lie on spherical, ellipsoidal and generalized helicoid surfaces. We design methods...

  3. BRST, generalized Maurer-Cartan equations and CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitlin, Anton M. [Department of Mathematics, Yale University, 442 Dunham Lab, 10 Hillhouse Ave., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); St. Petersburg Department of Steklov Mathematical Institute, Fontanka, 27, St. Petersburg 191023 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: zam@math.ipme.ru

    2006-12-25

    The paper is devoted to the study of BRST charge in perturbed two-dimensional conformal field theory. The main goal is to write the operator equation expressing the conservation law of BRST charge in perturbed theory in terms of purely algebraic operations on the corresponding operator algebra, which are defined via the OPE. The corresponding equations are constructed and their symmetries are studied up to the second order in formal coupling constant. It appears that the obtained equations can be interpreted as generalized Maurer-Cartan ones. We study two concrete examples in detail: the bosonic nonlinear sigma model and perturbed first order theory. In particular, we show that the Einstein equations, which are the conformal invariance conditions for both these perturbed theories, expanded up to the second order, can be rewritten in such generalized Maurer-Cartan form.

  4. Generating higher-order Lie algebras by expanding Maurer-Cartan forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caroca, R.; Merino, N.; Salgado, P.; Perez, A.

    2009-01-01

    By means of a generalization of the Maurer-Cartan expansion method, we construct a procedure to obtain expanded higher-order Lie algebras. The expanded higher-order Maurer-Cartan equations for the case G=V 0 +V 1 are found. A dual formulation for the S-expansion multialgebra procedure is also considered. The expanded higher-order Maurer-Cartan equations are recovered from S-expansion formalism by choosing a special semigroup. This dual method could be useful in finding a generalization to the case of a generalized free differential algebra, which may be relevant for physical applications in, e.g., higher-spin gauge theories.

  5. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  6. Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The noble gases are the group of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon - in the rightmost column of the periodic table of the elements, those which have "filled" outermost shells of electrons (two for helium, eight for the others). This configuration of electrons results in a neutral atom that has relatively low electron affinity and relatively high ionization energy. In consequence, in most natural circumstances these elements do not form chemical compounds, whence they are called "noble." Similarly, much more so than other elements in most circumstances, they partition strongly into a gas phase (as monatomic gas), so that they are called the "noble gases" (also, "inert gases"). (It should be noted, of course, that there is a sixth noble gas, radon, but all isotopes of radon are radioactive, with maximum half-life a few days, so that radon occurs in nature only because of recent production in the U-Th decay chains. The factors that govern the distribution of radon isotopes are thus quite different from those for the five gases cited. There are interesting stories about radon, but they are very different from those about the first five noble gases, and are thus outside the scope of this chapter.)In the nuclear fires in which the elements are forged, the creation and destruction of a given nuclear species depends on its nuclear properties, not on whether it will have a filled outermost shell when things cool off and nuclei begin to gather electrons. The numerology of nuclear physics is different from that of chemistry, so that in the cosmos at large there is nothing systematically special about the abundances of the noble gases as compared to other elements. We live in a very nonrepresentative part of the cosmos, however. As is discussed elsewhere in this volume, the outstanding generalization about the geo-/cosmochemistry of the terrestrial planets is that at some point thermodynamic conditions dictated phase separation of solids from gases, and that the

  7. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact: Biorecycling Technologies, Inc., Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant, Fresno County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a proposal from the California Energy Commission for partial funding up to $1,500,000 of the construction of the biorecycling Technologies, Inc., (BTI) Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant in Fresno County, California. BTI along with its contractors and business partners would develop the plant, which would use manure and green waste to produce biogas and a variety of organic fertilizer products. The California Energy Commission has requested funding from the DOE Commercialization Ventures program to assist in the construction of the plant, which would produce up to one megawatt of electricity by burning biogas in a cogeneration unit. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with funding development of the proposed project.

  8. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact: Biorecycling Technologies, Inc., Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant, Fresno County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a proposal from the California Energy Commission for partial funding up to $1,500,000 of the construction of the biorecycling Technologies, Inc., (BTI) Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant in Fresno County, California. BTI along with its contractors and business partners would develop the plant, which would use manure and green waste to produce biogas and a variety of organic fertilizer products. The California Energy Commission has requested funding from the DOE Commercialization Ventures program to assist in the construction of the plant, which would produce up to one megawatt of electricity by burning biogas in a cogeneration unit. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with funding development of the proposed project

  9. Noble Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Bolozdynya, Alexander I; Doke, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    This book discusses the physical properties of noble fluids, operational principles of detectors based on these media, and the best technical solutions to the design of these detectors. Essential attention is given to detector technology: purification methods and monitoring of purity, information readout methods, electronics, detection of hard ultra-violet light emission, selection of materials, cryogenics etc.The book is mostly addressed to physicists and graduate students involved in the preparation of fundamental next generation experiments, nuclear engineers developing instrumentation

  10. Marginal discrepancy of noble metal-ceramic fixed dental prosthesis frameworks fabricated by conventional and digital technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, Ahmed; Haney, Stephan; Verrett, Ronald; Mansueto, Michael; Cray, James; Johnson, Russell

    2018-02-01

    Studies evaluating the marginal adaptation of available computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) noble alloys for metal-ceramic prostheses are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the vertical marginal adaptation of cast, milled, and direct metal laser sintered (DMLS) noble metal-ceramic 3-unit fixed partial denture (FDP) frameworks before and after fit adjustments. Two typodont teeth were prepared for metal-ceramic FDP abutments. An acrylic resin pattern of the prepared teeth was fabricated and cast in nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloy. Each specimen group (cast, milled, DMLS) was composed of 12 casts made from 12 impressions (n=12). A single design for the FDP substructure was created on a laboratory scanner and used for designing the specimens in the 3 groups. Each specimen was fitted to its corresponding cast by using up to 5 adjustment cycles, and marginal discrepancies were measured on the master Ni-Cr model before and after laboratory fit adjustments. The milled and DMLS groups had smaller marginal discrepancy measurements than those of the cast group (PDMLS and cast groups (F=30.643, P<.001). Metal-ceramic noble alloy frameworks fabricated by using a CAD-CAM workflow had significantly smaller marginal discrepancies compared with those with a traditional cast workflow, with the milled group demonstrating the best marginal fit among the 3 test groups. Manual refining significantly enhanced the marginal fit of all groups. All 3 groups demonstrated marginal discrepancies within the range of clinical acceptability. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  12. Noble gas absorption process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    A method of removing a noble gas from air comprising the use of activated carbon filters in stages in which absorption and desorption steps in succession are conducted in order to increase the capacity of the filters is described. (U.S.)

  13. Noble Gases in Lakes and Ground Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Kipfer, Rolf; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Peeters, Frank; Stute, Marvin

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to most other fields of noble gas geochemistry that mostly regard atmospheric noble gases as 'contamination,' air-derived noble gases make up the far largest and hence most important contribution to the noble gas abundance in meteoric waters, such as lakes and ground waters. Atmospheric noble gases enter the meteoric water cycle by gas partitioning during air / water exchange with the atmosphere. In lakes and oceans noble gases are exchanged with the free atmosphere at the surface...

  14. Noble gas atoms as chemical impurities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Mudryi, A.V.; Minaev, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of noble gas atoms implanted in silicon is studied by the luminescence method. The energy position of Moessbauer-type luminescence bands with zero-phonon lines 1.0148, 1.0120, 1.0097, 1.0048 eV and others connected with implanted atoms of neon, helium, argon, krypton, respectively, indicates the formation of deep energy levels in the forbidden gap of silicon. Implantation of the noble gas isotopes confirms their participation in formation processes of the luminescence centers in silicon. The temperature range of existence and the symmetry of defects incorporating the noble gas atoms are found. It is noted that noble gas atoms form impurity complexes with deep energy levels and their behaviour in crystals does not differ from that of main doped or residual technological impurity atoms. (author)

  15. Selective noble gases monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janecka, S.; Jancik, O.; Kapisovsky, V.; Kubik, I.; Sevecka, S.

    1995-01-01

    The monitoring of leak releases from ventilation stack of NPP requires a system by several orders more sensitive then currently used radiometer Kalina, designed to cover the range up to a design-based accident. To reach this goal a noble gases monitor with a germanium detector (MPVG) has been developed. It enables nuclide selective monitoring of current value of volume activity of particular nuclides in ventilation stack and daily releases of noble gases (balancing). MPVG can be viewed as a system build of three levels of subsystem: measuring level; control level; presentation level. Measuring level consists of gamma-spectroscopy system and operational parameters monitoring unit (flow rate, temperature, humidity). Control level provides communication between presentation and measuring level, acquisition of operational parameters and power supply. The presentation level of MPVG enables: 1) the measured data storage in predetermined time intervals; 2) the presentation of measured and evaluated values of radiation characteristics. The monitored radionuclides - default set: argon-41, krypton-85m, krypton-87, krypton-88, krypton-89, xenon-131m, xenon-133, xenon-133m, xenon-135, xenon-135m, xenon-137 and xenon-138. The values of volume activities observed at maximum releases have been approximately ten times higher. In that case in balancing some other nuclides exceed corresponding detection limits: 88 Kr(67; 22) Bq/m 3 ; 85m Kr(17; 7) Bq/m 3 ; 135m Xe(7.1; 0.5) Bq/m 3 ; 138 Xe(5.9; 0.9) Bq/m 3 . (J.K.)

  16. Selective noble gases monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janecka, S; Jancik, O; Kapisovsky, V; Kubik, I; Sevecka, S [Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute, a.s., Trnava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The monitoring of leak releases from ventilation stack of NPP requires a system by several orders more sensitive then currently used radiometer Kalina, designed to cover the range up to a design-based accident. To reach this goal a noble gases monitor with a germanium detector (MPVG) has been developed. It enables nuclide selective monitoring of current value of volume activity of particular nuclides in ventilation stack and daily releases of noble gases (balancing). MPVG can be viewed as a system build of three levels of subsystem: measuring level; control level; presentation level. Measuring level consists of gamma-spectroscopy system and operational parameters monitoring unit (flow rate, temperature, humidity). Control level provides communication between presentation and measuring level, acquisition of operational parameters and power supply. The presentation level of MPVG enables: 1) the measured data storage in predetermined time intervals; 2) the presentation of measured and evaluated values of radiation characteristics. The monitored radionuclides - default set: argon-41, krypton-85m, krypton-87, krypton-88, krypton-89, xenon-131m, xenon-133, xenon-133m, xenon-135, xenon-135m, xenon-137 and xenon-138. The values of volume activities observed at maximum releases have been approximately ten times higher. In that case in balancing some other nuclides exceed corresponding detection limits: {sup 88}Kr(67; 22) Bq/m{sup 3}; {sup 85m}Kr(17; 7) Bq/m{sup 3}; {sup 135m}Xe(7.1; 0.5) Bq/m{sup 3}; {sup 138}Xe(5.9; 0.9) Bq/m{sup 3}. (J.K.).

  17. Noble gases solubility in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovetto, Rosa; Fernandez Prini, Roberto.

    1980-07-01

    The available experimental data of solubility of noble gases in water for temperatures smaller than 330 0 C have been critically surveyed. Due to the unique structure of the solvent, the solubility of noble gases in water decreases with temperature passing through a temperature of minimum solubility which is different for each gas, and then increases at higher temperatures. As aresult of the analysis of the experimental data and of the features of the solute-solvent interaction, a generalized equation is proposed which enables thecalculation of Henry's coefficient at different temperatures for all noble gases. (author) [es

  18. Structural energetics of noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujibur Rahman, S.M.

    1982-06-01

    Structural energetics of the noble metals, namely Cu, Ag, and Au are investigated by employing a single-parameter pseudopotential. The calculations show that the lowest energy for all of these metals corresponds to FCC - their observed crystal structure. The one-electron contribution to the free energy is found to dominate the structural prediction for these metals. The present investigation strongly emphasizes that the effects due to band hybridization and core-core exchange play a significant role on the structural stability of the noble metals. (author)

  19. Muonium formation in noble gases and noble gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambaugh, R.D.; Casperson, D.E.; Crane, T.W.; Hughes, V.W.; Kaspar, H.F.; Souder, P.; Thompson, P.A.; Orth, H.; zu Putlitz, G.; Denison, A.B.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment is reported to study the behavior of positive muons stopped in He, Ne, and Xe in order to provide a more complete understanding of muonium formation in the noble gases. Free muon and muonium precession are plotted. (U.S.)

  20. International Conference on LIght Detection in Noble Elements

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the Light Detection in Noble Elements (LIDINE) 2015 conference is to promote discussion between the members of the particle and nuclear physics communities about light and charge collection in detectors based on liquid or gaseous noble elements, xenon and argon being the most common, but neon and helium also in use, and represented at this conference. The neutrino physics, ultra-cold neutron study, dark matter search, and medical physics communities all utilize noble-based detector technologies, recording UV scintillation and/or ionization. Therefore, this will be an interdisciplinary opportunity for information exchange, and a chance for each of these communities enumerated above, in the U.S. as well as abroad, to expand their technical knowledge bases.

  1. The Inert and the Noble

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 3. The Inert and the Noble. A G Samuelson. Article-in-a-Box Volume 4 Issue 3 March 1999 pp 3-5 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India.

  2. Exotic species with explicit noble metal-noble gas-noble metal linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Norberto; Restrepo, Albeiro; Hadad, C Z

    2018-02-14

    We present a study of the isoelectronic Pt 2 Ng 2 F 4 and [Au 2 Ng 2 F 4 ] 2+ species with noble gas atoms (Ng = Kr, Xe, Rn) acting as links bridging the two noble metal atoms. The stability of the species is investigated using several thermodynamic, kinetic and reactivity indicators. The results are compared against [AuXe 4 ] 2+ , which is thermodynamically unstable in the gas phase but is stabilized in the solid state to the point that it has been experimentally detected as [AuXe 4 ](Sb 2 F 11 ) 2 (S. Seidel and K. Seppelt, Science, 2000, 290, 117-118). Our results indicate that improving upon [AuXe 4 ] 2+ , these exotic combinations between the a priori non-reactive noble metals and noble gases lead to metastable species, and, therefore, they have the possibility of existing in the solid state under adequate conditions. Our calculations include accurate energies and geometries at both the CCSD/SDDALL and MP2/SDDALL levels. We offer a detailed description of the nature of the bonding interactions using orbital and density-based analyses. The computational evidence suggests partially covalent and ionic interactions as the stabilization factors.

  3. Noble Gas Concept Of Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-01-20

    The intent of this document is to provide the reader with an understanding of a general approach to performing the noble gas component of an On Site Inspection or OSI. The authors of this document recognize that owing to the wide range of scenarios that are possible for carrying out an underground nuclear explosion, the diverse sets of information that might be available to the inspection team initially and the potential range of political and physical constraints imposed during the inspection, a satisfactory prescriptive approach to carrying out the noble gas component of an OSI is unlikely. Rather, the authors intend only to aid the reader in understanding what a reasonable course of actions or responses may be as performed by an inspection team (IT) during a general OSI. If this document helps to inform the intuition of the reader about addressing the challenges resulting from the inevitable deviations from this general scenario, it will have achieved its intent.

  4. Noble-Metal Chalcogenide Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourdine Zibouche

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the stability and the electronic properties of hypothetical noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes PtS2, PtSe2, PdS2 and PdSe2 by means of density functional theory calculations. Our findings show that the strain energy decreases inverse quadratically with the tube diameter, as is typical for other nanotubes. Moreover, the strain energy is independent of the tube chirality and converges towards the same value for large diameters. The band-structure calculations show that all noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes are indirect band gap semiconductors. The corresponding band gaps increase with the nanotube diameter rapidly approaching the respective pristine 2D monolayer limit.

  5. Noble Gas Release Signal as a Precursor to Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S. J.; Lee, H.; Gardner, W. P.

    2017-12-01

    We present empirical results of rock strain, microfracturing, acoustic emissions, and noble gas release from laboratory triaxial experiments for a granite, basalt, shale and bedded rock salt. Noble gases are released and measured real-time during deformation using mass spectrometry. The gas release represents a precursive signal to macrofracture. Gas release is associated with increased acoustic emissions indicating that microfracturing is required to release gas and create pathways for the gas to be sensed. The gas released depends on initial gas content, pore structure and its evolution during deformation, the deformation amount, matrix permeability, deformation style and the stress/strain history. Gases are released from inter and intracrystalline sites; release rate increases as strain and microfracturing increases. The gas composition depends on lithology, geologic history and age, fluids present, and radioisotope concentrations that affect radiogenic noble gas isotope (e.g. 4He,40Ar) production. Noble gas emission and its relationship to crustal processes such as seismicity and volcanism, tectonic velocities, qualitative estimates of deep permeability, age dating of groundwater, and a signature of nuclear weapon detonation. Our result show that mechanical deformation of crustal materials is an important process controlling gas release from rocks and minerals, and should be considered in techniques which utilize gas release and/or accumulation. We propose using noble gas release to signal rock deformation in boreholes, mines and waste repositories. We postulate each rock exhibits a gas release signature which is microstructure, stress, strain, and/or permanent deformation dependent. Calibration of such relationships, for example relating gas release per rock unit volume to strain may be used to quantify rock deformation and develop predictive models.Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and

  6. Electrocatalysis of chemically synthesized noble metal nanoparticles on carbon electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs), such as platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) NPs are promising catalysts for dioxygen reduction and oxidation of molecules such as formic acid and ethanol in fuel cells. Carbon nanomaterials are ideal supporting materials for electrochemical catalysts due to their good...... by electrochemical SPM. This study offers promise for development of new high-efficiency catalyst types with low-cost for fuel cell technology...

  7. Noble gases in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, M.; Burdine, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    Radioactive noble gases have made a significant contribution to diagnostic nuclear medicine. In the area of regional assessment of pulmonary function, 133 Xe has had its greatest clinical impact. Following a breath of 133 Xe gas, pulmonary ventilation can be measured using a scintillation camera or other appropriate radiation detector. If 133 Xe dissolved in saline is injected intravenously, both pulmonary capillary perfusion and ventilation can be measured since 90 percent of the highly insoluble xenon escapes into the alveoli during the first passage through the lungs. Radionuclide pulmonary function tests provide the first qualitative means of assessing lung ventilation and blood flow on a regional basis, and have recently been extended to include quantification of various parameters of lung function by means of a small computer interfaced to the scintillation camera. 133 Xe is also used in the measurement of organ blood flow following injection into a vessel leading into an organ such as the brain, heart kidneys, or muscles

  8. Subsurface Noble Gas Sampling Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sun, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The intent of this document is to provide information about best available approaches for performing subsurface soil gas sampling during an On Site Inspection or OSI. This information is based on field sampling experiments, computer simulations and data from the NA-22 Noble Gas Signature Experiment Test Bed at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS). The approaches should optimize the gas concentration from the subsurface cavity or chimney regime while simultaneously minimizing the potential for atmospheric radioxenon and near-surface Argon-37 contamination. Where possible, we quantitatively assess differences in sampling practices for the same sets of environmental conditions. We recognize that all sampling scenarios cannot be addressed. However, if this document helps to inform the intuition of the reader about addressing the challenges resulting from the inevitable deviations from the scenario assumed here, it will have achieved its goal.

  9. Recovery and use of fission product noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, G.A.; Rohmann, C.A.; Perrigo, L.D.

    1980-06-01

    Noble metals in fission products are of strategic value. Market prices for noble metals are rising more rapidly than recovery costs. A promising concept has been developed for recovery of noble metals from fission product waste. Although the assessment was made only for the three noble metal fission products (Rh, Pd, Ru), there are other fission products and actinides which have potential value

  10. The predicted effectiveness of noble metal treatment at the Chinshan boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh Tsungkuang; Chu Fang; Chang Ching; Huang Chiashen

    2000-01-01

    The technique of noble metal treatment (NMT) available in a form of noble metal cooling (NMC) or noble metal chemical addition (NMCA), was introduced to enhance effectiveness of hydrogen water chemistry. Since it is technically difficult to gain access to an entire primary heat transport circuit (PHTC) of a BWR and monitor variation on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), a question whether the NMC technology is indeed effective for lowering the ECP of every location in a BWR is not still well understood at the moment. Then, computer modeling is so far the best tool to help investigate effectiveness of the NMT along PHCT of the BWR. Here was discussed on how the computer model was calibrated by using measured chemistry data obtained from No. 2 unit (BWR) in the Kuosheng Plant. The effect of noble metal treatment coupled with hydrogen water chemistry has been quantitatively molded, on a base of two different sets of ECD enhancement data. It was predicted that No. 1 unit in the Chinshan could be protected by noble metal treatment with lower [H 2 ] FW . In the case of competitive enhancing factors for the ECDs of oxygen reduction, hydrogen peroxide reduction, and hydrogen oxidation reactions, HWC had always to be present for noble metal treatment to be effective for protecting a reactor. Otherwise, according to a model calculation based upon the results from Kim's work, the ECP might instead be increased due to the enhanced reduction reaction rate of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, especially in the near core regions. (G.K.)

  11. Synthesis of Zeolite Materials for Noble Gas Separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achey, R.; Rivera, O.; Wellons, M.; Hunter, D.

    2017-01-01

    Microporous zeolite adsorbent materials are widely used as a medium for separating gases. Adsorbent gas separation systems can run at ambient temperature and require minimal pressure to flow the input gas stream across the adsorbent bed. This allows for low energy consumption relative to other types of separation systems. Specific zeolites also have a high capacity and selectivity for the gases of interest, leading to compact and efficient separation systems. These characteristics are particularly advantageous for the application of signatures detection for non-proliferation, which often requires portable systems with low power draw. Savannah River National Laboratory currently is the leader in using zeolites for noble gas sampling for non-proliferation detection platforms. However, there is a constant customer need for improved sampling capabilities. Development of improved zeolite materials will lead to improved sampling technology. Microwave-assisted and conventional hydrothermal synthesis have been used to make a variety of zeolites tailored for noble gas separation. Materials characterization data collected in this project has been used to help guide the synthesis of improved zeolite materials. Candidate materials have been down-selected based on highest available surface area, maximum overall capacity for gas adsorption and highest selectivity. The creation of improved adsorbent materials initiated in this project will lead to development of more compact, efficient and effective noble gas collectors and concentrators. The work performed in this project will be used as a foundation for funding proposals for further material development as well as possible industrial applications.

  12. Synthesis of Zeolite Materials for Noble Gas Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achey, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rivera, O. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wellons, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hunter, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-10-02

    Microporous zeolite adsorbent materials are widely used as a medium for separating gases. Adsorbent gas separation systems can run at ambient temperature and require minimal pressure to flow the input gas stream across the adsorbent bed. This allows for low energy consumption relative to other types of separation systems. Specific zeolites also have a high capacity and selectivity for the gases of interest, leading to compact and efficient separation systems. These characteristics are particularly advantageous for the application of signatures detection for non-proliferation, which often requires portable systems with low power draw. Savannah River National Laboratory currently is the leader in using zeolites for noble gas sampling for non-proliferation detection platforms. However, there is a constant customer need for improved sampling capabilities. Development of improved zeolite materials will lead to improved sampling technology. Microwave-assisted and conventional hydrothermal synthesis have been used to make a variety of zeolites tailored for noble gas separation. Materials characterization data collected in this project has been used to help guide the synthesis of improved zeolite materials. Candidate materials have been down-selected based on highest available surface area, maximum overall capacity for gas adsorption and highest selectivity. The creation of improved adsorbent materials initiated in this project will lead to development of more compact, efficient and effective noble gas collectors and concentrators. The work performed in this project will be used as a foundation for funding proposals for further material development as well as possible industrial applications.

  13. Application of noble metals on line in Cofrentes NPP and operation experience; Aplicacion de metales nobles en linea en C.N. Cofrentes y experiencia de operacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Zapata, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    Cofrentes NPP implemented in 2010 the Noble Metal Chemistry as a mitigation technique for the Primary System materials protection against IGSCC. the paper describes briefly the technology fundamentals, the implementation of the specific project, the initial application and the operating experience along the last 3 cycles of the plant. (Author)

  14. Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro V. Baptista

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the use of nanomaterials has been having a great impact in biosensing. In particular, the unique properties of noble metal nanoparticles have allowed for the development of new biosensing platforms with enhanced capabilities in the specific detection of bioanalytes. Noble metal nanoparticles show unique physicochemical properties (such as ease of functionalization via simple chemistry and high surface-to-volume ratios that allied with their unique spectral and optical properties have prompted the development of a plethora of biosensing platforms. Additionally, they also provide an additional or enhanced layer of application for commonly used techniques, such as fluorescence, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Herein we review the use of noble metal nanoparticles for biosensing strategies—from synthesis and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics laboratory.

  15. Noble gases in common rocks and their bearing on noble gas occurrences in the hydrological cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazor, E.

    1978-10-01

    The comparison of the noble gases contents in different rocks and in thermal and cold water sources in the French Massif Central was aimed to define the amounts and nature of noble gases contributed by country rocks as opposed to atmospheric noble gases brought in by recharged water. No difference in the noble gas contents was found between waters coming in igneous rocks to those issuing in sedimentary rocks. In both, significant variations in the contents of atmospheric and radiogenic noble gases were found. Radiogenic helium has been found to reveal a positive correlation to the contents of atmospheric Ne, Ar, Kr. This indicates water recharge into the deep part of the systems, mixing with radiogenic He and Ar flushed from igneous and sedimentary rocks and subsequent partial gas loss. Loss of gas is evident from the observed low noble gas contents. These losses have been accompanied by a reversed retention pattern of Ne, Ar, Xc. This reversed retention pattern cannot be an artifact of sampling as well as cannot result by partial steam loss. A similar interpretation for the observed noble gas depletions that agrees with the fact that the observed fractionation patterns are not ''normal'' is given by deuterium and oxygen-18. The stable isotope data seem to exclude partial steam losses

  16. Noble Gas signatures of Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, P. H.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Tyne, R. L.; Hillegonds, D.; Byrne, D. J.; Landon, M. K.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Noble gases are powerful tracers of fluids from various oil and gas production activities in hydrocarbon reservoirs and nearby groundwater. Non-radiogenic noble gases are introduced into undisturbed oil and natural gas reservoirs through exchange with formation waters [1-3]. Reservoirs with extensive hydraulic fracturing, injection for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and/or waste disposal also show evidence for a component of noble gases introduced from air [4]. Isotopic and elemental ratios of noble gases can be used to 1) assess the migration history of the injected and formation fluids, and 2) determine the extent of exchange between multiphase fluids in different reservoirs. We present noble gas isotope and abundance data from casing, separator and injectate gases of the Lost Hills and Fruitvale oil fields in the San Joaquin basin, California. Samples were collected as part of the California State Water Resource Control Board's Oil and Gas Regional Groundwater Monitoring Program. Lost Hills (n=7) and Fruitvale (n=2) gases are geochemically distinct and duplicate samples are highly reproducible. Lost Hills casing gas samples were collected from areas where EOR and hydraulic fracturing has occurred in the past several years, and from areas where EOR is absent. The Fruitvale samples were collected from a re-injection port. All samples are radiogenic in their He isotopes, typical of a crustal environment, and show enrichments in heavy noble gases, resulting from preferential adsorption on sediments. Fruitvale samples reflect air-like surface conditions, with higher air-derived noble gas concentrations. Lost Hills gases show a gradation from pristine crustal signatures - indicative of closed-system exchange with formation fluids - to strongly air-contaminated signatures in the EOR region. Pristine samples can be used to determine the extent of hydrocarbon exchange with fluids, whereas samples with excess air can be used to quantify the extent of EOR. Determining noble

  17. Recovery of noble metals from fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenson, G.A.; Platt, A.M.; Mellinger, G.B.; Bjorklund, W.J.

    1982-11-01

    Scoping studies were started in 1979 to develop a cost-effective, waste-management-compatible process to extract noble metals from fission products. The process, involving the reaction with glassmelting chemicals, a metal oxide (PbO), and a reducing agent (charcoal), was demonstrated for recovering noble metals from simulated high-level waste oxides. The process has now been demonstrated on a laboratory scale (100 g) using irradiated fuels. Recoveries in the recovered lead averaged 80% for Pd, 60% for Rh, and 14% Ru. The resulting glass product was homogeneous in appearance, and the chemical durability was comparable to other waste oxides

  18. 77 FR 70159 - Marble River, LLC v. Noble Clinton Windpark I, LLC, Noble Ellenburg Windpark, LLC, Noble...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL13-20-000] Marble River... Commission's (Commission) Rules of Practice and Procedure, Marble River, LLC (Marble River or Complainant.... (NYISO or Respondent), alleging that Noble failed to pay Marble River for headroom created by common...

  19. Natural Death and the Noble Savage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Tony

    1995-01-01

    The belief that dying and grieving are natural processes is widely held in modern bereavement care. Examines four assumption often made in this connection: (1) most primitive cultures deal with death in an accepting way; (2) this way is different than our own; (3) it is a good and noble way; and (4) traditional societies see death as natural. (JBJ)

  20. The end of a noble narrative?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James; Murray, Philomena

    2015-01-01

    of the forerunner to the current EU we ask if this noble narrative of war and peace, which is at the heart of European integration, at an end. We argue that this principled account is likely to remain just one of several narratives of European integration, but with its reputation somewhat tarnished. Fresh...

  1. Noble gases as cardioprotectants - translatability and mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Kirsten F.; Weber, Nina C.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Preckel, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Several noble gases, although classified as inert substances, exert a tissue-protective effect in different experimental models when applied before organ ischaemia as an early or late preconditioning stimulus, after ischaemia as a post-conditioning stimulus or when given in combination before,

  2. Organ protection by the noble gas helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, K.F.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to investigate whether helium induces preconditioning in humans, and to elucidate the mechanisms behind this possible protection. First, we collected data regarding organ protective effects of noble gases in general, and of helium in particular (chapters 1-3). In chapter

  3. Primordial Noble Gases from Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Lu, X.; Brodholt, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Recent partitioning experiment suggests helium is more compatible in iron melt than in molten silicates at high pressures (> 10 GPa) (1), thus provide the possibility of the core as being the primordial noble gases warehouse that is responsible for the high primordial/radiogenic noble gas isotopic ratios observed in plume-related basalts. However, the possible transportation mechanism of the noble gases from the core to the overlying mantle is still ambiguous, understanding how this process would affect the noble gas isotopic characteristics of the mantle is critical to validate this core reservoir model. As diffusion is a dominant mass transport process that plays an important role in chemical exchange at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), we have determined the diffusion coefficients of helium, neon and argon in major lower mantle minerals, i.e. periclase (MgO), bridgemanite (MgSiO3-Pv) and post-perovskite (MgSiO3-PPv), by first-principles calculation based on density functional theory (DFT). As expected, the diffusion rate of helium is the fastest at the CMB, which is in the range of 3 × 10-10 to 1 × 10-8 m2/s. The neon diffusion is slightly slower, from 5 × 10-10 to 5 × 10-9 m2/s. Argon diffuses slowest at the rate from 1 × 10-10 to 2 × 10-10 m2/s. We have further simulated the evolution of noble gas isotopic ratios in the mantle near the CMB. Considering its close relationship with the mantle plumes and very likely to be the direct source of "hot-spot" basalts, we took a close investigation on the large low-shear-velocity provinces (LLSVPs). Under reasonable assumptions based on our diffusion parameters, the modelling results indicate that LLSVP is capable of generating all the noble gas isotope signals, e.g., 3He/4He = 55 Ra, 3He/22Ne = 3.1, 3He/36Ar = 0.82, 40Ar/36Ar = 9500, that are in good agreement with the observed values in "hot-spot" basalts (2). Therefore, this core-reservior hypothesis is a self-consistent model that can fits in multiple noble gas

  4. Nanoparticles of noble metals in the supergene zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhmodik, S. M.; Kalinin, Yu. A.; Roslyakov, N. A.; Mironov, A. G.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Belyanin, D. K.; Nemirovskaya, N. A.; Spiridonov, A. M.; Nesterenko, G. V.; Airiyants, E. V.; Moroz, T. N.; Bul'bak, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    Formation of noble metal nanoparticles is related to various geological processes in the supergene zone. Dispersed mineral phases appear during weathering of rocks with active participation of microorganisms, formation of soil, in aqueous medium and atmosphere. Invisible gold and other noble metals are incorporated into oxides, hydroxides, and sulfides, as well as in dispersed organic and inorganic carbonic matter. Sulfide minerals that occur in bedrocks and ores unaltered by exogenic processes and in cementation zone are among the main concentrators of noble metal nanoparticles. The ability of gold particles to disaggregate is well-known and creates problems in technological and analytical practice. When Au and PGE nanoparticles and clusters occur, these problems are augmented because of their unusual reactions and physicochemical properties. The studied gold, magnetite, titanomagnetite and pyrite microspherules from cementation zone and clay minerals of laterites in Republic of Guinea widen the knowledge of their abundance and inferred formation conditions, in particular, in the contemporary supergene zone. Morphology and composition of micrometer-sized Au mineral spherules were studied with SEM and laser microprobe. The newly formed segregations of secondary gold on the surface of its residual grains were also an object of investigation. The character of such overgrowths is the most indicative for nanoparticles. The newly formed Au particles provide evidence for redistribution of ultradispersed gold during weathering. There are serious prerequisites to state that microorganisms substantially control unusual nano-sized microspherical morphology of gold particles in the supergene zone. This is supported by experiments indicating active absorption of gold by microorganisms and direct evidence for participation of Ralstonia metallidurans bacteria in the formation of peculiar corroded bacteriomorphic surface of gold grains. In addition, the areas enriched in carbon

  5. Optical Properties and Immunoassay Applications of Noble Metal Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, S.; Zhou, W.

    2010-01-01

    Noble metal, especially gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles exhibit unique and tunable optical properties on account of their surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In this paper, we mainly discussed the theory background of the enhanced optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. Mie theory, transfer matrix method, discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method, and finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method applied brute-force computational methods for different nanoparticles optical properties. Some important nanostructure fabrication technologies such as nanosphere lithography (NSL) and focused ion beam (FIB) are also introduced in this paper. Moreover, these fabricated nanostructures are used in the plasmonic sensing fields. The binding signal between the antibody and antigen, amyloid-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs)-potential Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers, and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in nano-Moore per liter (nM) concentration level are detected by our designed nanobiosensor. They have many potential applications in the biosensor, environment protection, food security, and medicine safety for health, and so forth, fields.

  6. Noble gas confinement for reactor fuel melting accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    In the unlikely event of a fuel melting accident, radioactive material would be released into the reactor room. This radioactive material would consist of particulate matter, iodine, tritium, and the noble gases krypton and xenon. In the case of reactors with containment domes the gases would be contained for subsequent cleanup. For reactors without contaiment the particulates and the iodine can be effectively removed with HEPA and carbon filters of current technology; however, noble gases cannot be easily removed and would be released to the atmosphere. In either case, it would be highly desirable to have a system that could be brought online to treat this contaminated air to minimize the population dose. A low temperature adsorption system has been developed at the Savannah River Laboratory to remove the airborne radioactive material from such a fuel melting accident. Over two dozen materials have been tested in extensive laboratory studies, and hydrogen mordenite and silver mordenite were found to be the most promising adsorbents. A full-scale conceptual design has also been developed. Results of the laboratory studies and the conceptual design are discussed along with plans for further development of this concept

  7. Optical Properties and Immunoassay Applications of Noble Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoli Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Noble metal, especially gold (Au and silver (Ag nanoparticles exhibit unique and tunable optical properties on account of their surface plasmon resonance (SPR. In this paper, we mainly discussed the theory background of the enhanced optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. Mie theory, transfer matrix method, discrete dipole approximation (DDA method, and finite-difference time domain (FDTD method applied brute-force computational methods for different nanoparticles optical properties. Some important nanostructure fabrication technologies such as nanosphere lithography (NSL and focused ion beam (FIB are also introduced in this paper. Moreover, these fabricated nanostructures are used in the plasmonic sensing fields. The binding signal between the antibody and antigen, amyloid-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs-potential Alzheimer's disease (AD biomarkers, and staphylococcal enterotixn B (SEB in nano-Moore per liter (nM concentration level are detected by our designed nanobiosensor. They have many potential applications in the biosensor, environment protection, food security, and medicine safety for health, and so forth, fields.

  8. Noble gas confinement for reactor fuel melting accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the unlikely event of a fuel melting accident radioactive material would be released into the reactor room. This radioactive material would consist of particulate matter, iodine, tritium, and the noble gases krypton and xenon. In the case of reactors with containment domes, the gases would be contained for subsequent cleanup. For reactors without containment the particulates and the iodine can be effectively removed with HEPA and carbon filters of current technology; however, noble gases cannot be easily removed and would be released to the atmosphere. In either case, it would be highly desirable to have a system that could be brought online to treat this contaminated air to minimize the population dose. A low temperature adsorption system has been developed at the Savannah River Laboratory to remove the airborne radioactive material from such a fuel melting accident. Over two dozen materials have been tested in extensive laboratory studies, and hydrogen mordensite and silver mordenite were found to be the most promising absorbents. A full-scale conceptual design has also been developed. Results of the laboratory studies and the conceptual design will be discussed along with plans for further development of this concept

  9. The Role of Noble Metal Addition Methods on BWR Shut Down Dose Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, Robert L.; Garcia Susan, E.

    2012-09-01

    Noble metal addition technology was developed for the BWR as a means of establishing low electrochemical corrosion potentials (ECP) on structural materials to mitigate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). When the reactor water molar ratio of H 2 / (O 2 +H 2 O 2 ) is > 2 on noble metal treated surfaces, the resulting ECP is near -500 mV (SHE), well into the mitigation range. This ratio can be achieved in most areas of the reactor with feedwater hydrogen additions in the range of 0.2 mg/kg, a condition that does not increase the radiation level in the main steam, a side effect of conventional hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). The resulting low ECP on the surface of stainless steel piping and components results in a change in form of the stable corrosion film to a spinel structure. Since it is the 60 Co incorporated into the corrosion film that is the primary source term of shutdown dose rates in BWRs, the structure and composition of the film can have a large influence in the resulting dose rates. The results of the first generation of noble metal technology, noble metal chemical addition (NMCA), showed that the reactor water ratio of 60 Co (s)/Zn (s) was a key parameter in determining shut down dose rate values. This paper will review that history and provide mechanistic understanding of how initial post NMCA dose rates are established and change with time. On-line noble metal chemical addition (OLNC) is the second generation of noble metal technology. The method utilizes the on-line injection of dilute Na 2 Pt (OH) 6 into the feedwater over a period of approximately 10 days. The first application of OLNC occurred at a European reactor in July of 2005 and to date over 20 BWRs have applied the technology, with many more applications scheduled. It is expected that OLNC will become the de facto standard because it eliminates 60 hours of outage application time and it addresses the crack flanking concerns that can arise under certain conditions. Because both

  10. Noble gas enrichment studies at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groth, M.; Andrew, P.; Fundamenski, W.; Guo, H.Y.; Hillis, D.L.; Hogan, J.T.; Horton, L.D.; Matthews, G.F.; Meigs, A.G.; Morgan, P.M.; Stamp, M.F.; Hellermann, M. von

    2001-01-01

    Adequate helium exhaust has been achieved in reactor-relevant ELMy H-mode plasmas in JET performed in the MKII AP and MKII GB divertor geometry. The divertor-characteristic quantities of noble gas compression and enrichment have been experimentally inferred from Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy measurements in the core plasma, and from spectroscopic analysis of a Penning gauge discharge in the exhaust gas. The retention of helium was found to be satisfactory for a next-step device, with enrichment factors exceeding 0.1. The helium enrichment decreases with increasing core plasma density, while the neon enrichment has the opposite behaviour. Analytic and numerical analyses of these plasmas using the divertor impurity code package DIVIMP/NIMBUS support the explanation that the enrichment of noble gases depends significantly on the penetration depth of the impurity neutrals with respect to the fuel atoms. Changes of the divertor plasma configuration and divertor geometry have no effect on the enrichment

  11. One parameter model potential for noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrees, M.; Khwaja, F.A.; Razmi, M.S.K.

    1981-08-01

    A phenomenological one parameter model potential which includes s-d hybridization and core-core exchange contributions is proposed for noble metals. A number of interesting properties like liquid metal resistivities, band gaps, thermoelectric powers and ion-ion interaction potentials are calculated for Cu, Ag and Au. The results obtained are in better agreement with experiment than the ones predicted by the other model potentials in the literature. (author)

  12. Engineering noble metal nanomaterials for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingguo; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Tiankai; Liu, Yanbiao; Ong, Choon Nam; Xie, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    Besides being valuable assets in our daily lives, noble metals (namely, gold, silver, and platinum) also feature many intriguing physical and chemical properties when their sizes are reduced to the nano- or even subnano-scale; such assets may significantly increase the values of the noble metals as functional materials for tackling important societal issues related to human health and the environment. Among which, designing/engineering of noble metal nanomaterials (NMNs) to address challenging issues in the environment has attracted recent interest in the community. In general, the use of NMNs for environmental applications is highly dependent on the physical and chemical properties of NMNs. Such properties can be readily controlled by tailoring the attributes of NMNs, including their size, shape, composition, and surface. In this feature article, we discuss recent progress in the rational design and engineering of NMNs with particular focus on their applications in the field of environmental sensing and catalysis. The development of functional NMNs for environmental applications is highly interdisciplinary, which requires concerted efforts from the communities of materials science, chemistry, engineering, and environmental science.

  13. Engineering noble metal nanomaterials for environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingguo; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Tiankai; Liu, Yanbiao; Ong, Choon Nam; Xie, Jianping

    2015-05-07

    Besides being valuable assets in our daily lives, noble metals (namely, gold, silver, and platinum) also feature many intriguing physical and chemical properties when their sizes are reduced to the nano- or even subnano-scale; such assets may significantly increase the values of the noble metals as functional materials for tackling important societal issues related to human health and the environment. Among which, designing/engineering of noble metal nanomaterials (NMNs) to address challenging issues in the environment has attracted recent interest in the community. In general, the use of NMNs for environmental applications is highly dependent on the physical and chemical properties of NMNs. Such properties can be readily controlled by tailoring the attributes of NMNs, including their size, shape, composition, and surface. In this feature article, we discuss recent progress in the rational design and engineering of NMNs with particular focus on their applications in the field of environmental sensing and catalysis. The development of functional NMNs for environmental applications is highly interdisciplinary, which requires concerted efforts from the communities of materials science, chemistry, engineering, and environmental science.

  14. The International Monitoring System's Noble Gas Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auer, M.

    2015-01-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) is a unique global network for surveillance of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. A major component of the IMS is the radionuclide monitoring network since, among all IMS technologies, it can provide the most unequivocal evidence for a nuclear explosion. The radionuclide monitoring component is unprecedented in its combination of global coverage, sensitivity, network density and temporal resolution. In particular for the detection of underground or underwater nuclear tests, forty of the eighty radionuclide stations will eventually be equipped with sensors to measure the Xenon isotopes Xe-131m (τ 1/2 = 11:8 d), Xe-133 (τ 1/2 = 5:25 d), Xe-133m (τ 1/2 = 2:2 d) and Xe-135 (τ 1/2 = 9:14 h). These are among the isotopes with the highest yields in fission of uranium or plutonium with half-lives long enough to be detected at large distances from the point of emission. As of today, 31 noble gas systems have been installed and are sending data to the International Data Centre. The noble gas systems installed at the stations are automated and sample Xenon continuously from atmospheric air for 12 or 24 hours at an air flow of 0.5 to several m 3 /h by absorption of Xenon on activated charcoal. Detection of the Xenon isotopes is either by high resolution gamma spectrometry or by beta-gamma coincidence spectrometry. With the currently available equipment, detection limits of 0.2 mBq/m 3 can be achieved. An overview on the existing technology and future developments as well as on the interpretation of measurement results is given. (author)

  15. The Behavior and Effects of the Noble Metals in the DWPF Melter System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.E.; Bickford, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    Governments worldwide have committed to stabilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) by vitrification to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. All of these nuclear wastes contain the fission-product noble metals: ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium. SRS wastes also contain natural silver from iodine scrubbers. Closely associated with the noble metals are the fission products selenium and tellurium which are chemical analogs of sulfur and which combine with noble metals to influence their behavior and properties. Experience has shown that these melt insoluble metals and their compounds tend to settle to the floor of Joule-heated ceramic melters. In fact, almost all of the major research and production facilities have experienced some operational problem which can be associated with the presence of dense accumulations of these relatively conductive metals and/or their compounds. In most cases, these deposits have led to a loss of production capability, in some cases, to the point that melter operation could not continue. HLW nuclear waste vitrification facilities in the United States are the Department of Energy's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the planned Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the operating West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. An extensive noble metals testing program was begun in 1990. The objectives of this task were to explore the effects of the noble metals on the DWPF melter feed preparation and waste vitrification processes. This report focuses on the vitrification portion of the test program

  16. Polymer-noble metal nanocomposites: Review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Folarin, OM

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available because of their multi-functionality, ease of process-ability, potential for large-scale manufacturing, significantly lighter than metals, ease of synthesis when compared to the oxide/noble metal multi-layers (Gass et al., 2006; Lee et al., 2003.... their easy aggregation arising from their high surface free energy (Lee et al., 2006). In the design of nanocomposites, one must consider the properties of the polymer matrix as well as the stability of the nanoparticles and more importantly...

  17. Positron scattering from noble gases future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A C L; Caradonna, P; Makochekanwa, C; Slaughter, D S; Sullivan, J P; Buckman, S J [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Mitroy, J, E-mail: acj107@rsphysse.anu.edu.a [Faculty of Education Health and Science, Charles Darwin University, NT (Australia)

    2009-11-01

    Recent results for positron scattering from noble gases over an energy range from 0.5 to 60eV are presented. Measurements include the grand total ({sigma}{sub GT}), Ps formation ({sigma}{sub Ps}) and Grand total - Ps formation (({sigma}{sub GT}-P{sub s}) cross sections. Some preliminary DCS results will also be presented. Work on a formulation of modified effective range theory (MERT) is being undertaken to determine the value of the scattering length which may be useful for identifying a bound state. Plans for experiments on metal atoms will be outlined.

  18. Non-noble metal fuel cell catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhongwei; Zhang, Jiujun

    2014-01-01

    Written and edited by a group of top scientists and engineers in the field of fuel cell catalysts from both industry and academia, this book provides a complete overview of this hot topic. It covers the synthesis, characterization, activity validation and modeling of different non-noble metal and metalfree electrocatalysts for the reduction of oxygen, as well as their integration into acid or alkaline polymer exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and their performance validation, while also discussing those factors that will drive fuel cell commercialization. With its well-structured app

  19. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: Counting noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe new work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions). When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. We show that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective. (orig./FKS)

  20. Spectrophotometric methods for determining noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gur'eva, R.F.; Savvin, S.B.

    2002-01-01

    The main trends of the development of spectrophotometric methods for determining noble metals (NMs) including ruthenium are considered. One of these trends is the synthesis and study of new, highly sensitive and selective organic reagents for determining NMs in solutions and solid phase. Another trend is the search for and developing of new methodological approaches (techniques) and color reactions, including those that involve modified and immobilized reagents. The third trend includes the improvement of equipment and automation. It is shown that the present-day spectrophotometry can provide the determination of NMs in samples with concentrations from several to 10 -4 % (photometry and differential photometry) and down to 10 -7 % (test and sorption-spectroscopic methods based on photometry and diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy, including the use of chromaticity functions) [ru

  1. Noble Metal Nanoparticles Applications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Conde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has prompted new and improved materials for biomedical applications with particular emphasis in therapy and diagnostics. Special interest has been directed at providing enhanced molecular therapeutics for cancer, where conventional approaches do not effectively differentiate between cancerous and normal cells; that is, they lack specificity. This normally causes systemic toxicity and severe and adverse side effects with concomitant loss of quality of life. Because of their small size, nanoparticles can readily interact with biomolecules both at surface and inside cells, yielding better signals and target specificity for diagnostics and therapeutics. This way, a variety of nanoparticles with the possibility of diversified modification with biomolecules have been investigated for biomedical applications including their use in highly sensitive imaging assays, thermal ablation, and radiotherapy enhancement as well as drug and gene delivery and silencing. Here, we review the available noble metal nanoparticles for cancer therapy, with particular focus on those already being translated into clinical settings.

  2. Wide range noble gas radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlman, H.S. III; Wyvill, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention contemplates providing a sample system for effluent from a nuclear process wherein the effluent in a first mode passes through a sample chamber whose noble gases are quantitatively detected. The sample of the first mode is continued until the detector count rate reaches a predetermined maximum. The detector establishes a control signal which is applied to terminate the first mode effluent flow to the chamber, evacuate the chamber to a predetermined value of vacuum and connect the effluent into the sample chamber with a predetermined mode of flow rate different from the rate of the first mode to establish a sample concentration in the chamber within the range of the detector. A subsequent predetermined minimum rate will generate a signal to reconnect the sample chamber to the first mode connection and thereby cycle the system back to its first mode of operation

  3. Noble gases recycled into the mantle through cold subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smye, Andrew J.; Jackson, Colin R. M.; Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Hesse, Marc A.; Parman, Steve W.; Shuster, David L.; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2017-08-01

    Subduction of hydrous and carbonated oceanic lithosphere replenishes the mantle volatile inventory. Substantial uncertainties exist on the magnitudes of the recycled volatile fluxes and it is unclear whether Earth surface reservoirs are undergoing net-loss or net-gain of H2O and CO2. Here, we use noble gases as tracers for deep volatile cycling. Specifically, we construct and apply a kinetic model to estimate the effect of subduction zone metamorphism on the elemental composition of noble gases in amphibole - a common constituent of altered oceanic crust. We show that progressive dehydration of the slab leads to the extraction of noble gases, linking noble gas recycling to H2O. Noble gases are strongly fractionated within hot subduction zones, whereas minimal fractionation occurs along colder subduction geotherms. In the context of our modelling, this implies that the mantle heavy noble gas inventory is dominated by the injection of noble gases through cold subduction zones. For cold subduction zones, we estimate a present-day bulk recycling efficiency, past the depth of amphibole breakdown, of 5-35% and 60-80% for 36Ar and H2O bound within oceanic crust, respectively. Given that hotter subduction dominates over geologic history, this result highlights the importance of cooler subduction zones in regassing the mantle and in affecting the modern volatile budget of Earth's interior.

  4. Development of guidelines on the application of noble metals to BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.J. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Cowan, R.L

    2002-07-01

    Water Chemistry plays a critical role in determining the economics of BWR (boiling water reactor) operation. The chemistry controls the probability of repairs due to stress corrosion cracking of piping and internals, the operating and shutdown dose rates (and thus personnel exposure), radiation waste generation and fuel corrosion performance. Simultaneously addressing the adverse effects from these phenomena requires a delicate balance of chemistry variables. Earlier papers have reviewed the technologies that have evolved to provide this balance including specific impurity limits, hydrogen water chemistry, and isotopically depleted zinc injection. This paper addresses the experience with the latest technology, noble metal chemical addition (NMCA). (authors)

  5. Development of guidelines on the application of noble metals to BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.J.; Cowan, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Water Chemistry plays a critical role in determining the economics of BWR (boiling water reactor) operation. The chemistry controls the probability of repairs due to stress corrosion cracking of piping and internals, the operating and shutdown dose rates (and thus personnel exposure), radiation waste generation and fuel corrosion performance. Simultaneously addressing the adverse effects from these phenomena requires a delicate balance of chemistry variables. Earlier papers have reviewed the technologies that have evolved to provide this balance including specific impurity limits, hydrogen water chemistry, and isotopically depleted zinc injection. This paper addresses the experience with the latest technology, noble metal chemical addition (NMCA). (authors)

  6. High Voltage in Noble Liquids for High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebel, B. [Fermilab; Bernard, E. [Yale U.; Faham, C. H. [LBL, Berkeley; Ito, T. M. [Los Alamos; Lundberg, B. [Maryland U.; Messina, M. [Columbia U.; Monrabal, F. [Valencia U., IFIC; Pereverzev, S. P. [LLNL, Livermore; Resnati, F. [Zurich, ETH; Rowson, P. C. [SLAC; Soderberg, M. [Fermilab; Strauss, T. [Bern U.; Tomas, A. [Imperial Coll., London; Va' vra, J. [SLAC; Wang, H. [UCLA

    2014-08-22

    A workshop was held at Fermilab November 8-9, 2013 to discuss the challenges of using high voltage in noble liquids. The participants spanned the fields of neutrino, dark matter, and electric dipole moment physics. All presentations at the workshop were made in plenary sessions. This document summarizes the experiences and lessons learned from experiments in these fields at developing high voltage systems in noble liquids.

  7. Noble Gas Measurement and Analysis Technique for Monitoring Reprocessing Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William S. Charlton

    1999-01-01

    An environmental monitoring technique using analysis of stable noble gas isotopic ratios on-stack at a reprocessing facility was developed. This technique integrates existing technologies to strengthen safeguards at reprocessing facilities. The isotopic ratios are measured using a mass spectrometry system and are compared to a database of calculated isotopic ratios using a Bayesian data analysis method to determine specific fuel parameters (e.g., burnup, fuel type, fuel age, etc.). These inferred parameters can be used by investigators to verify operator declarations. A user-friendly software application (named NOVA) was developed for the application of this technique. NOVA included a Visual Basic user interface coupling a Bayesian data analysis procedure to a reactor physics database (calculated using the Monteburns 3.01 code system). The integrated system (mass spectrometry, reactor modeling, and data analysis) was validated using on-stack measurements during the reprocessing of target fuel from a U.S. production reactor and gas samples from the processing of EBR-II fast breeder reactor driver fuel. These measurements led to an inferred burnup that matched the declared burnup with sufficient accuracy and consistency for most safeguards applications. The NOVA code was also tested using numerous light water reactor measurements from the literature. NOVA was capable of accurately determining spent fuel type, burnup, and fuel age for these experimental results. Work should continue to demonstrate the robustness of this system for production, power, and research reactor fuels

  8. Monitoring of noble gas radioisotopes in nuclear power plant effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabat, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous radionuclides in the effluents of nuclear facilities is an essential requirement in effluent management programs. Since there is no practical way of removing noble gas radioisotopes from air at release pathways, their accurate monitoring is essential for providing appropriate environmental protection. Emitted γ dose-rate is the limiting factor for concentration-time integral of noble gas in gaseous effluents of reactor facilities. The external exposure to the public from a semi-infinite cloud is directly proportional to both the noble gas isotope concentration and the integrated γ energy per disintegration. Both can be directly measured in gaseous effluent pathways with a suitable detector. The capability of NaI(T1), CaF 2 (Eu) and plastic scintillation detectors to measure the γ-Ci.MeV content of noble gas releases was experimentally evaluated. The combination of CaF 2 (Eu) detector in a pressurized through-flow chamber, with a charge integrating scaler well complied with both γ energy response and detection sensitivity requirements. Noble gas source terms and effluent monitoring criteria are discussed, theoretical and experimental results are presented and a practical, on-line noble gas monitoring system is described

  9. Noble gas atmospheric monitoring at reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhleh, C.W.; Perry, R.T. Jr.; Poths, J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Fearey, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    The discovery in Iraq after the Gulf War of the existence of a large clandestine nuclear-weapon program has led to an across-the-board international effort, dubbed Programme 93+2, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. One particularly significant potential change is the introduction of environmental monitoring (EM) techniques as an adjunct to traditional safeguards methods. Monitoring of stable noble gas (Kr, Xe) isotopic abundances at reprocessing plant stacks appears to be able to yield information on the burnup and type of the fuel being processed. To estimate the size of these signals, model calculations of the production of stable Kr, Xe nuclides in reactor fuel and the subsequent dilution of these nuclides in the plant stack are carried out for two case studies: reprocessing of PWR fuel with a burnup of 35 GWd/tU, and reprocessing of CAND fuel with a burnup of 1 GWd/tU. For each case, a maximum-likelihood analysis is used to determine the fuel burnup and type from the isotopic data

  10. Noble magnetic barriers in the ASDEX UG tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Halima; Punjabi, Alkesh; Vazquez, Justin

    2010-02-01

    The second-order perturbation method of creating invariant tori inside chaos in Hamiltonian systems (Ali, H.; Punjabi, A. Plasma Phys. Contr. F. 2007, 49, 1565-1582) is applied to the axially symmetric divertor experiment upgrade (ASDEX UG) tokamak to build noble irrational magnetic barriers inside chaos created by resonant magnetic perturbations (m, n)=(3, 2)+(4, 3), with m and n the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers of the Fourier expansion of the magnetic perturbation. The radial dependence of the Fourier modes is ignored. The modes are considered to be locked and have the same amplitude δ. A symplectic mathematical mapping in magnetic coordinates is used to integrate magnetic field line trajectories in the ASDEX UG. Tori with noble irrational rotational transform are the last ones to be destroyed by perturbation in Hamiltonian systems. For this reason, noble irrational magnetic barriers are built inside chaos, and the strongest noble irrational barrier is identified. Three candidate locations for the strongest noble barrier in ASDEX UG are selected. All three candidate locations are chosen to be roughly midway between the resonant rational surfaces ψ32 and ψ43. ψ is the magnetic coordinate of the flux surface. The three candidate surfaces are the noble irrational surfaces close to the surface with q value that is a mediant of q=3/2 and 4/3, q value of the physical midpoint of the two resonant surfaces, and the q value of the surface where the islands of the two perturbing modes just overlap. These q values of the candidate surfaces are denoted by q MED, q MID, and q OVERLAP. The strongest noble barrier close to q MED has the continued fraction representation (CFR) [1;2,2,1∞] and exists for δ≤2.6599×10-4; the strongest noble barrier close to q MID has CFR [1;2,2,2,1∞] and exists for δ≤4.6311×10-4; and the strongest noble barrier close to q OVERLAP has CFR [1;2,2,6,2,1∞] and exists for δ≤1.367770×10-4. From these results, the strongest

  11. Efficient recovery of gold and other noble metals from electronic and other scraps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hidetoshi

    1987-01-01

    Pure gold is extracted from crude gold by the solvent extraction method in the recovery and refining process for Noble metals recovered from electronic and other scraps. This solvent extraction method is advantageous in that it facilitates rapid processing, thereby reducing the interest burden of gold staying too long in the unit. Therefore, the method is also used in the refining of platinum and palladium. Technological innovation has created more complex and diversified types of scraps, and efforts are being made to accommodate ourselves to such a trend.

  12. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  13. Comparison of the tensile bond strength of high-noble, noble, and base metal alloys bonded to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, D; Nayir, E; Pamuk, S

    2000-11-01

    Although the bond strengths of various resin composite luting materials have been reported in the literature, the evaluation of these systems with various cast alloys of different compositions has not been completely clarified. To evaluate the tensile bond strength of sandblasted high-noble, noble, and base metal alloys bonded to etched enamel by 2 different bonding agents of different chemical composition: Panavia-Ex (BIS-GMA) and Super-Bond (4-META acrylic). Flat enamel surfaces were prepared on buccal surfaces of 60 extracted noncarious human incisors. Teeth were divided into 3 groups of 20 each. Twenty circular disks of 5 mm diameter were prepared for casting for each group. Group I was cast with a high-noble, group II with a noble, and group III with a base metal alloy. The surfaces of the disks were sandblasted with 250 microm Al(2)O(3). Ten disks of each group were bonded to exposed enamel surfaces with Super-Bond and 10 disks with Panavia-Ex as recommended by the manufacturer. The tensile bond strength was measured with an Instron universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred. Two-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the results. The differences in bond strengths of Super-Bond and Panavia-Ex with different alloys were not significant. The highest bond strengths were obtained in base metal alloys, followed by noble and high-noble alloys. These results were significant. Panavia-Ex and Super-Bond exhibited comparable tensile bond strengths. For both luting agents, the highest bond strengths were achieved with base metal alloys and the lowest with high-noble alloys.

  14. Solubility investigations in support of ultrasensitive noble gas detector development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K.C.; Andersen, A.; Russ, W.R.; Stuenkel, D.; Valentine, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Cincinnati (UC) have been developing a new class of ultrasensitive noble gas detectors that are based upon the ANL discovery that corn oil has a high affinity for heavy noble gas absorption at room temperature but releases the noble gases with warming or by other low-energy-input means. Environmental applications for this new class of fluid-based detectors include ultrahigh sensitivity radioxenon detectors for comprehensive test ban treaty surveillance, improved fission gas detectors for enhanced environmental surveillance in the vicinity of US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed facilities, and improved integrating Rn detectors for earthquake prediction. They present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the solubility phenomena of heavy noble gases (Rn, Xe, and Kr) in triglyceride oils. They intend for the findings presented herein to be used to guide future selection, development, and refinement of vegetable and other hydrocarbon oils to bring further enhancements to noble gas detection efficiencies

  15. Solubility investigations in support of ultrasensitive noble gas detector development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K. C.

    1998-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Cincinnati (UC) have been developing a new class of ultrasensitive noble gas detectors that are based upon the ANL discovery that corn oil has a high affinity for heavy noble gas absorption at room temperature, but releases the noble gases with warming or by other low-energy-input means. Environmental applications for this new class of fluid-based detectors include ultrahigh sensitivity radioxenon detectors for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Surveillance, improved fission gas detectors for enhanced environmental surveillance in the vicinity of DOE, DOD, and NRC-licensed facilities, and improved integrating Rn detectors for earthquake prediction. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the solubility phenomena of heavy noble gases (Rn, Xe, and Kr) in triglyceride oils. It is the authors' intention that the findings presented herein may be used to guide future selection, development, and refinement of vegetable and other hydrocarbon oils to bring further enhancements to noble gas detection efficiencies

  16. Noble gas solubility in silicate melts:a review of experimentation and theory, and implications regarding magma degassing processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paonita

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Noble gas solubility in silicate melts and glasses has gained a crucial role in Earth Sciences investigations and in the studies of non-crystalline materials on a micro to a macro-scale. Due to their special geochemical features, noble gases are in fact ideal tracers of magma degassing. Their inert nature also allows them to be used to probe the structure of silicate melts. Owing to the development of modern high pressure and temperature technologies, a large number of experimental investigations have been performed on this subject in recent times. This paper reviews the related literature, and tries to define our present state of knowledge, the problems encountered in the experimental procedures and the theoretical questions which remain unresolved. Throughout the manuscript I will also try to show how the thermodynamic and structural interpretations of the growing experimental dataset are greatly improving our understanding of the dissolution mechanisms, although there are still several points under discussion. Our improved capability of predicting noble gas solubilities in conditions closer to those found in magma has allowed scientists to develop quantitative models of magma degassing, which provide constraints on a number of questions of geological impact. Despite these recent improvements, noble gas solubility in more complex systems involving the main volatiles in magmas, is poorly known and a lot of work must be done. Expertise from other fields would be extremely valuable to upcoming research, thus focus should be placed on the structural aspects and the practical and commercial interests of the study of noble gas solubility.

  17. Investigation of noble metal deposition behaviour in boiling water reactors. The NORA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, Stefan; Karastoyanov, Vasil; Abolhassani-Dadras, Sousan; Guenther-Leopold, Ines; Kivel, Niko

    2010-01-01

    NobleChem trademark is a technology developed by General Electric to reduce stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in reactor internals and recirculation pipes of boiling water reactors (BWRs) while preventing the negative side effects of classic hydrogen water chemistry. Noble metals (Pt, Rh) acting as electrocatalysts for the recombination of O 2 and H 2 O 2 with H 2 to H 2 O and thus reducing the corrosion potential more efficiently are injected into the feedwater during reactor shutdown (classic method) or on-line during power operation. They are claimed to deposit as very fine metallic particles on all water-wetted surfaces, including the most critical regions inside existing cracks, and to stay electrocatalytic over long periods of time. The effectiveness of this technology in plants still remains to be demonstrated. Based on highly credible laboratory experiments down to the sub-μg . kg -1 Pt concentration range, SCC mitigation may be expected, provided that a stoichiometric excess of H 2 and a sufficient surface coverage with very fine Pt particles exist simultaneously at the critical locations [1]. Very little is known about the deposition and (re-)distribution behaviour of the Pt in the reactor. For the validation of this technique the research project NORA (noble metal deposition behaviour in BWRs) has been started at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with two main objectives: (i) to gain phenomenological insights and a better basic understanding of the Pt distribution and deposition behaviour in BWRs; (ii) to develop and qualify a non-destructive technique to characterise the size and distribution of the Pt particles and the local concentration of Pt on reactor components. This paper presents the objectives of the project, the planned work and a brief description of the status of the project. (orig.)

  18. Investigation of the noble metal deposition behaviour in boiling water reactors - the NORA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Karastoyanov, V.; Abolhassani-Dadras, S.; Guenther-Leopold, I.; Kivel, N.

    2010-01-01

    NobleChem™ is a technology developed by General Electric to reduce stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in reactor internals and recirculation pipes of boiling water reactors (BWRs) while preventing the negative side effects of classical hydrogen water chemistry. Noble metals (Pt, Rh) acting as electrocatalysts for the recombination of O 2 and H 2 O 2 with H 2 to H 2 O and thus reducing the corrosion potential more efficiently are injected into the feed water during reactor shut-down (classical method) or on-line during power operation. They are claimed to deposit as very fine metallic particles on all water-wetted surfaces including the most critical regions inside existing cracks and to stay electrocatalytic over long periods of time. The effectiveness of this technology in plants remains still to be demonstrated. Based on highly credible laboratory experiments down to the sub-ppb Pt concentration range, SCC mitigation may be expected, provided that a stoichiometric excess of H 2 and a sufficient surface coverage with very fine Pt particles exist simultaneously at the critical locations. Very little is known about the deposition and (re-)distribution behaviour of the Pt in the reactor. For the validation of this technique the research project NORA (noble metal deposition behaviour in BWRs) has been started at PSI with two main objectives: (i) to gain phenomenological insights and a better basic understanding of the Pt distribution and deposition behaviour in BWRs; (ii) to develop and qualify a non-destructive technique to characterise the size and distribution of the Pt particles and its local concentration on reactor components. This paper presents the objectives of the project, the planned work and a brief description of the status of the project. (author)

  19. Development of detection techniques for the Swedish noble gas sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringbom, A.

    1998-11-01

    A short review on the radioactive properties of noble gas isotopes relevant for monitoring of nuclear activities is given, together with a brief discussion of the existing systems for detection of radioactive noble gases. A 4π detection system to be used in the automatic version of the Swedish noble gas sampling device is described. Monte Carlo calculations of the total gamma and beta efficiency for different detector designs have been performed, together with estimates of the resulting minimum detectable concentration (MDC). The estimated MDC values for detection of the 133g Xe 81 keV and the 135g Xe 250 keV gamma lines are around 0.3 mBq/m 3 in both cases. This is a factor of three lower than the detection limit required for a sampling station in the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty monitoring network. The possibility to modify the system to detect 85 Kr is also discussed

  20. Noble gas separation with the use of inorganic adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pence, D.T.; Chou, C.C.; Christian, J.D.; Paplawsky, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    A noble gas separation process is proposed for application to airborne nuclear fuel reprocessing plant effluents. The process involves the use of inorganic adsorbents for the removal of contaminant gases and noble gas separation through selective adsorption. Water and carbon dioxide are removed with selected zeolites that do not appreciably adsorb the noble gases. Xenon is essentially quantitatively removed with a specially developed adsorbent using conventional adsorption-desorption techniques. Oxygen is removed to low ppM levels by the use of a rapid cycle adsorption technique on a special adsorbent leaving a krypton-nitrogen mixture. Krypton is separated from nitrogen with a special adsorbent operated at about -80 0 C. Because the separation process does not require high pressures and oxygen is readily removed to sufficiently limit ozone formation to insignificant levels, appreciable capital and operating cost savings with this process are possible compared with other proposed processes. In addition, the proposed process is safer to operate

  1. Biomimetic synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chin-Yi

    At the nanometer scale, the physical and chemical properties of materials heavily depend on their sizes and shapes. This fact has triggered considerable efforts in developing controllable nanomaterial synthesis. The controlled growth of colloidal nanocrystal is a kinetic process, in which high-energy facets grow faster and then vanish, leading to a nanocrystal enclosed by low-energy facets. Identifying a surfactant that can selectively bind to a particular crystal facet and thus lower its surface energy, is critical and challenging in shape controlled synthesis of nanocrystals. Biomolecules exhibiting exquisite molecular recognition properties can be exploited to precisely engineer nanostructured materials. In the first part of my thesis, we employed the phage display technique to select a specific multifunctional peptide sequence which can bind on Pd surface and mediate Pd crystal nucleation and growth, achieving size controlled synthesis of Pd nanocrystals in aqueous solution. We further demonstrated a rational biomimetic approach to the predictable synthesis of nanocrystals enclosed by a particular facet in the case of Pt. Specifically, Pt {100} and Pt {111} facet-specific peptides were identified and used to synthesize Pt nanocubes and Pt nano-tetrahedrons, respectively. The mechanistic studies of Pt {111} facet-specific peptide had led us to study the facet-selective adsorption of aromatic molecules on noble metal surfaces. The discoveries had achieved the development of design strategies to select facet-selective molecules which can synthesize nanocrystals with expected shapes in both Pt and Pd system. At last, we exploited Pt facet-specific peptides and controlled the molecular interaction to produce one- and three- dimensional nanostructures composed of anisotropic nanoparticles in synthetic conditions without supramolecular pre-organization, demonstrating the full potential of biomolecules in mediating material formation process. My research on biomimetic

  2. The Effect of Aqueous Alteration on Primordial Noble Gases in CM Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, D.; Busemann, H.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Maden, C.

    2017-07-01

    We have analyzed 32 CM chondrites for their noble gas contents and isotopic compositions and calculated CRE ages. Correlated effects of parent body aqueous alteration with primordial noble gas contents were detected.

  3. The interpretation of ellipsometric measurements of ion bombardment of noble gases on semiconductor surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.H.M.; Slager, U.C.; van Silfhout, Arend

    1985-01-01

    Low energy noble gas ion bombardment and thermal desorption studies were carried out on Si(111) and analysed, in situ, using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The amorphous layer thickness and implanted noble gas fraction were calculated.

  4. Effective collision frequency of electrons in noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baille, P.; Chang, J.-S.; Claude, A.; Yau, A.W.; Hobson, R.M.; Ogram, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    The electron-neutral collision frequency in the noble gases has been calculated using recent numerical results for momentum transfer cross sections by assuming a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. In all these gases, except for argon, good agreement is obtained with most previously published experimental and theoretical data. Mean free path, mobilities and diffusion coefficients are also calculated from the resulting effective collision frequencies. The empirical formulae are presented for an electron temperature dependence of the electron-neutral collision frequency for all noble gases up to Tsub(e) < approximately 25.000 K. (author)

  5. Time-dependent behavior of positrons in noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadehra, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium behaviors of positrons in several noble gases are reviewed. Our novel procedure for obtaining the time-dependent behavior of various swarm parameters -- such as the positron drift velocity, average positron energy, positron annihilation rate (or equivalently Z eff ) etc. -- for positrons in pure ambient gases subjected to external electrostatic fields is described. Summaries of time-dependent as well as electric field-dependent results for positron swarms in various noble gases are presented. New time-dependent results for positron swarms in neon are also described in detail. 36 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Isotopic mass-dependence of noble gas diffusion coefficients inwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2007-06-25

    Noble gas isotopes are used extensively as tracers inhydrologic and paleoclimatic studies. These applications requireknowledge of the isotopic mass (m) dependence of noble gas diffusioncoefficients in water (D), which has not been measured but is estimatedusing experimental D-values for the major isotopes along with an untestedrelationship from kinetic theory, D prop m-0.5. We applied moleculardynamics methods to determine the mass dependence of D for four noblegases at 298 K, finding that D prop m-beta with beta<0.2, whichrefutes the kinetic theory model underlying all currentapplications.

  7. Effect of noble gas ion pre-irradiation on deuterium retention in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; Zhao, Z. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Yuan, Y.; Morgan, T. W.; Guo, L. P.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B. Y.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.; Lu, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Impurity seeding of noble gases is an effective way of decreasing the heat loads onto the divertor targets in fusion devices. To investigate the effect of noble gases on deuterium retention, tungsten targets have been implanted by different noble gas ions and subsequently exposed to deuterium

  8. Laser-polarized noble gases: a powerful probe for biology, medicine, and subatomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    For over a decade, laser-polarized noble gases such as ^3He and ^129Xe have proven useful for a wide range of scientific inquiries. These include investigations of pulmonary disease using the polarized gas as a signal source for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), measurements of various aspects of nucleon structure, and tests of fundamental symmetries. Early efforts were often limited by expensive and bulky laser systems, but ongoing advancements in solid-state lasers have enabled increasingly large volumes of polarized gas to be produced with steadily improved polarization. Equally important have been advances in the fundamental understanding of spin exchange. This has led, for example, to the introduction of hybrid mixtures of alkali metals that can increase the efficiency of spin exchange by an order of magnitude. As a consequence of these advances, the figure of merit for polarized nuclear targets has increased by roughly three orders of magnitude in comparison to early accelerator-based experiments. And in MRI applications, it has become possible to pursue increasingly sophisticated imaging protocols that provide a wide range of diagnostic information. Even the earliest noble-gas MR images of the gas space of the human lung provided unprecedented resolution. More recent work includes the use of diffusion-sensitizing pulse sequences to study lung microstructure, and tagging techniques that enable the visualization (in real-time MRI movies) of gas flow during breathing. The range of applications of laser-polarized noble gases is continuing to grow, and it is notable that with an improved understanding of the underlying physics, it is quite likely that the capabilities of this useful technology will expand for some time to come.

  9. EOSN: A TOUGH2 module for noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-01-01

    We developed a new fluid property module for TOUGH2, called EOSN, to simulate transport of noble gases in the subsurface. Currently, users may select any of five different noble gases as well as CO2, two at a time. For the three gas components (air and two user-specified noble gases) in EOSN, the Henry's coefficients and the diffusivities in the gas phase are no longer assumed constants, but are temperature dependent. We used the Crovetto et al. (1982) model to estimate Henry's coefficients, and the Reid et al. (1987) correlations to calculate gas phase diffusivities. The new module requires users to provide names of the selected noble gases, which properties are provided internally. There are options for users to specify any (non-zero) molecular weights and half-lives for the gas components. We provide two examples to show applications of TOUGH2IEOSN. While temperature effects are relatively insignificant for one example problem where advection is dominant, they cause almost an order of magnitude difference for the other case where diffusion becomes a dominant process and temperature variations are relatively large. It appears that thermodynamic effects on gas diffusivities and Henry's coefficients can be important for low-permeability porous media and zones with large temperature variations

  10. Chemical reactivity of the compressed noble gas atoms and their ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Attempts are made to gain insights into the effect of confinement of noble gas atoms on their various reactivity indices. Systems become harder, less polarizable and difficult to excite as the compression increases. Ionization also causes similar effects. A quantum fluid density functional technique is adopted in order to study ...

  11. EOSN: A TOUGH2 module for noble gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-03-07

    We developed a new fluid property module for TOUGH2, called EOSN, to simulate transport of noble gases in the subsurface. Currently, users may select any of five different noble gases as well as CO2, two at a time. For the three gas components (air and two user-specified noble gases) in EOSN, the Henry's coefficients and the diffusivities in the gas phase are no longer assumed constants, but are temperature dependent. We used the Crovetto et al. (1982) model to estimate Henry's coefficients, and the Reid et al. (1987) correlations to calculate gas phase diffusivities. The new module requires users to provide names of the selected noble gases, which properties are provided internally. There are options for users to specify any (non-zero) molecular weights and half-lives for the gas components. We provide two examples to show applications of TOUGH2IEOSN. While temperature effects are relatively insignificant for one example problem where advection is dominant, they cause almost an order of magnitude difference for the other case where diffusion becomes a dominant process and temperature variations are relatively large. It appears that thermodynamic effects on gas diffusivities and Henry's coefficients can be important for low-permeability porous media and zones with large temperature variations.

  12. Noble metals in cretaceous/tertiary sediments from El Kef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuslys, M.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    1983-01-01

    Sediments from El Kef, Tunisia, were analysed by RNAA for Au, Ir and Os. All three elements show a 10-20 fold enrichment at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. This enrichment must be the result of the addition of material with a high concentration of noble metals. It is plausible that this exotic material has an extra-terrestrial origin. (orig.)

  13. Noble metals in Cretaceous/Tertiary sediments from El Kef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuslys, M.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    1983-01-01

    Sediments from El Kef, Tunisia, were analysed by RNAA for Au, Ir and Os. All three elements show a 10-20 fold enrichment at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. This enrichment must be the result of the addition of material with a high concentration of noble metals. It is plausible that this exotic material has an extraterrestrial origin. (orig.)

  14. Noble Metal/Ceramic Composites in Flame Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Heiko; Madler, Lutz; Strobel, Reto

    conditions influence the resulting noble metal particles size in those systems [1]. For every specific application the particle size and the metal/metal oxide interaction affect the performance of these nano-composite materials [2]. Recently, aerosol processes have been successfully used to produce platinum...

  15. Interaction between Nafion ionomer and noble metal catalyst for PEMFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    The implement of polymer impregnation in electrode structure (catalyst layer) decreasing the noble metal catalyst loading by a factor of ten , , is one of the essential mile stones in the evolution of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells’ development among the application of catalyst support and e...

  16. Recovery of noble metals from HLLW using photocatalytic reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, T.; Uetake, N.; Kawamura, F.; Yusa, H.

    1987-01-01

    In high-level liquid waste (HLLW) from fuel reprocessing plants, noble metals (palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium), which account for ∼ 10 wt% of fission products, exist as ions. These metals are very useful as catalytic material in automobile exhaust systems and other chemical processes, but they are rare in nature, making their recovery from fission products highly desirable. The ions of noble metals in solution have the feature that their reduction potential from ion to metal is relatively high compared with that of other fission product ions, so they can be selectively separated as a metal by a reduction process. The authors think a photoreduction process using a photocatalysts, which functions as photon-electron conversion agent, is suitable for the recovery of noble metals from HLLW for three reasons: (1) this process uses no reduction agents, which usually degrade the nitric acid, so that coprecipitation of other fission products does not occur. (2) The reactions are induced by light, which does not contaminate the reaction system, and in contrast with ordinary photo-redox reactions, the quantum yield is quite high. (3) As the photocatalyst does not change in the reaction, it can be used again and again. The report shows the results of fundamental experiments on the application of photocatalytic reduction to the recovery of noble metal ions in nitric acid solution

  17. A novel method for fission product noble gas sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, S.K.; Prakash, Vivek; Singh, G.K.; Vinay, Kr.; Awsthi, A.; Bihari, K.; Joyson, R.; Manu, K.; Gupta, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    Noble gases occur to some extent in the Earth's atmosphere, but the concentrations of all but argon are exceedingly low. Argon is plentiful, constituting almost 1 % of the air. Fission Product Noble Gases (FPNG) are produced by nuclear fission and large parts of FPNG is produced in Nuclear reactions. FPNG are b-j emitters and contributing significantly in public dose. During normal operation of reactor release of FPNG is negligible but its release increases in case of fuel failure. Xenon, a member of FPNG family helps in identification of fuel failure and its extent in PHWRs. Due to above reasons it becomes necessary to assess the FPNG release during operation of NPPs. Presently used methodology of assessment of FPNG, at almost all power stations is Computer based gamma ray spectrometry. This provides fission product Noble gases nuclide identification through peak search of spectra. The air sample for the same is collected by grab sampling method, which has inherent disadvantages. An alternate method was developed at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) - 3 and 4 for assessment of FPNG, which uses adsorption phenomena for collection of air samples. This report presents details of sampling method for FPNG and noble gases in different systems of Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  18. The Origin of Noble Gas Isotopic Heterogeneity in Icelandic Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, E. T.; Honda, M.; McDougall, I.

    2001-01-01

    Two models for generation of heterogeneous He, Ne and Ar isotopic ratios in Icelandic basalts are evaluated using a mixing model and the observed noble gas elemental ratios in Icelandic basalts,Ocean island Basalt (OIBs) and Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORBs). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Noble Gases in the Hamlet Meteorite (LL4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, S.; Sabe, Y.; Shiraishi, T.; Matsuda, J.

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed noble gases in a bulk sample and an HF-HCl residue of Hamlet (LL4). The Xe composition of the residue shows that no diamond is contained in the residue. The 20Ne/22Ne ratio of Hamlet Ne-Q has been determined to be 11.0 ± 0.5.

  20. Consistent measurements comparing the drift features of noble gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, U; Fortunato, E M; Kirchner, J; Rosera, K; Uchida, Y

    1999-01-01

    We present a consistent set of measurements of electron drift velocities and Lorentz deflection angles for all noble gases with methane and ethane as quenchers in magnetic fields up to 0.8 T. Empirical descriptions are also presented. Details on the World Wide Web allow for guided design and optimization of future detectors.

  1. Spectrochemical determination of impurities and noble metal traces in carnallite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldbart, Z.; Carmi, U.; Harrel, A.

    1978-02-01

    A spectrochemical method was developed for the determination of impurities and noble metal traces in carnallite by DC arc excitation. The investigated sample is brought to a standard form of potassium-magnesium sulphate mixed with graphite. Detection limits of 1-10 ppm were determined for 27 elements; the dynamical detection range is 1-400 ppm

  2. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Noble County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  3. Magneto-optical Kerr spectroscopy of noble metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uba, L.; Uba, S.; Antonov, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    Magneto-optical (MO) response of the noble metals Cu, Ag, and Au in the joint experimental and ab initio theoretical study is reported. The magneto-optical polar Kerr effect (MOKE) spectra of the noble-metal films were measured with the high sensitivity in the applied magnetic field of 1.5 T over the photon energy range 0.74-5.8 eV. Complete set of the optical conductivity tensor elements was determined precisely from the MOKE and the optical spectra measured at the same energy points. The importance of the off-diagonal intraband Drude-type transitions is demonstrated explicitly for each noble metal and found to be a substantial contribution to the observed spectra. It is shown that the first-principles calculations using the spin-polarized fully relativistic Dirac linear-muffin-tin-orbital method with the inclusion of correlation effects by GGA+U approach reproduce well the experimental spectra and allow to explain the microscopic origin of the noble metals' magneto-optical response in terms of interband transitions. Although the energy band structures of Cu, Ag, and Au are very similar, there are some distinctive differences in bandwidths and the energy positions of the bands (especially in X and L symmetry points), mainly due to different spin-orbit splitting and differences in the spatial extent of 3 d , 4 d , and 5 d valence wave functions of noble metals. It was found that the small differences in the band positions lead to significant differences in the MO properties of three noble metals. Although the spin-orbit interaction in Au is about six times larger than in Cu, and approximately two times larger than in Ag, the absolute value of Kerr rotation in Au is of the same magnitude as in Cu and one order of magnitude smaller as compared to Ag. The sharp Kerr effect spectral peak in Ag is not due to the electronic interband transitions, but rather to the plasma-edge splitting. The band-by-band decomposition of the Cu, Ag, and Au MO spectra is presented and the

  4. Bioactivity of noble metal nanoparticles decorated with biopolymers and their application in drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mahendra; Ingle, Avinash P; Gupta, Indarchand; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-30

    The unique properties of nanomaterials can be applied to solve different problems including new ways of drug delivery. Noble metal nanoparticles are most promising because they have been used for medicinal purposes since ancient time. It is evident from the past studies that the metallic nanoparticles are much more effective against various microorganisms when compared to their conventional counterparts. However, decoration of such nanoparticles with biomaterials add more advantages to their antimicrobial activity. Decoration of metal nanoparticles with biopolymers is a quite new area of research. Studies performed hitherto shown that nanoparticles of noble metals like silver, gold and platinum demonstrated better antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities when conjugated with biopolymers. The development of such technology has potential to develop materials that are more effective in the field of health science. Considering the importance and uniqueness of this concept, the present review aims to discuss the use of biopolymer-decorated metal nanoparticles for combating various diseases caused by microbial pathogens. Moreover, the nanotoxicity aspect has also been discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Noble metal catalysts in the production of biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A.

    2013-11-01

    The energy demand is increasing in the world together with the need to ensure energy security and the desire to decrease greenhouse gas emissions. While several renewable alternatives are available for the production of electricity, e.g. solar energy, wind power, and hydrogen, biomass is the only renewable source that can meet the demand for carbon-based liquid fuels and chemicals. The technology applied in the conversion of biomass depends on the type and complexity of the biomass, and the desired fuel. Hydrogen and hydrogen-rich mixtures (synthesis gas) are promising energy sources as they are more efficient and cleaner than existing fuels, especially when they are used in fuel cells. Hydrotreatment is a catalytic process that can be used in the conversion of biomass or biomass-derived liquids into fuels. In autothermal reforming (ATR), catalysts are used in the production of hydrogen-rich mixtures from conventional fuels or bio-fuels. The different nature of biomass and biomass-derived liquids and mineral oil makes the use of catalysts developed for the petroleum industry challenging. This requires the improvement of available catalysts and the development of new ones. To overcome the limitations of conventional hydrotreatment and ATR catalysts, zirconia-supported mono- and bimetallic rhodium, palladium, and platinum catalysts were developed and tested in the upgrading of model compounds for wood-based pyrolysis oil and in the production of hydrogen, using model compounds for gasoline and diesel. Catalysts were also tested in the ATR of ethanol. For comparative purposes commercial catalysts were tested and the results obtained with model compounds were compared with those obtained with real feedstocks (hydrotreatmet tests with wood-based pyrolysis oil and ATR tests with NExBTL renewable diesel). Noble metal catalysts were active and selective in the hydrotreatment of guaiacol used as the model compound for the lignin fraction of wood-based pyrolysis oil and wood

  6. Evaluation of HWVP feed preparation chemistry for an NCAW simulant -- Fiscal year 1993: Effect of noble metals concentration on offgas generation and ammonia formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patello, G.K.; Wiemers, K.D.; Bell, R.D.; Smith, H.D.; Williford, R.E.; Clemmer, R.G.

    1995-03-01

    The High-Level Waste Vitrification Program is developing technology for the Department of Energy to immobilize high-level and transuranic wastes as glass for permanent disposal. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting laboratory-scale melter feed preparation studies using a HWVP simulated waste slurry, Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW). A FY 1993 laboratory-scale study focused on the effects of noble metals (Pd, Rh, and Ru) on feed preparation offgas generation and NH 3 production. The noble metals catalyze H 2 and NH 3 production, which leads to safety concerns. The information gained from this study is intended to be used for technology development in pilot scale testing and design of the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility. Six laboratory-scale feed preparation tests were performed as part of the FY 1993 testing activities using nonradioactive NCAW simulant. Tests were performed with 10%, 25%, 50% of nominal noble metals content. Also tested were 25% of the nominal Rh and a repeat of 25% nominal noble metals. The results of the test activities are described. 6 refs., 28 figs., 12 tabs

  7. Evaluation of HWVP feed preparation chemistry for an NCAW simulant -- Fiscal year 1993: Effect of noble metals concentration on offgas generation and ammonia formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patello, G.K.; Wiemers, K.D.; Bell, R.D.; Smith, H.D.; Williford, R.E.; Clemmer, R.G.

    1995-03-01

    The High-Level Waste Vitrification Program is developing technology for the Department of Energy to immobilize high-level and transuranic wastes as glass for permanent disposal. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting laboratory-scale melter feed preparation studies using a HWVP simulated waste slurry, Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW). A FY 1993 laboratory-scale study focused on the effects of noble metals (Pd, Rh, and Ru) on feed preparation offgas generation and NH{sub 3} production. The noble metals catalyze H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} production, which leads to safety concerns. The information gained from this study is intended to be used for technology development in pilot scale testing and design of the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility. Six laboratory-scale feed preparation tests were performed as part of the FY 1993 testing activities using nonradioactive NCAW simulant. Tests were performed with 10%, 25%, 50% of nominal noble metals content. Also tested were 25% of the nominal Rh and a repeat of 25% nominal noble metals. The results of the test activities are described. 6 refs., 28 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (transport in the pore space and identifying the origin of bio- and geogenic fluids in (un) consolidated sediments [1]. Advanced techniques that combine crushing and sieving speleothem samples in ultra-high-vacuum to a specific grain size allow to separate air and water-bearing fluid inclusions and thus enables noble-gas-based reconstruction of environmental conditions from water masses as small as 1mg [2]. B. The coupling of noble gas analysis with approaches of gas chromatography permits combined analysis of noble gases and other gases species (e.g., SF6, CFCs, O2, N2) from a single water sample. The new method substantially improves ground water dating by SF6 and CFCs as excess air is quantified from the same sample and hence can adequately be corrected for [3]. Portable membrane-inlet mass spectrometers enable the quasi-continuous and real-time analysis of noble gases and other dissolved gases directly in the field, allowing, for instance, quantification of O2 turnover rates on small time scales [4]. C. New technical developments perfect 222Rn analysis in water by the synchronous the determination of the short-lived 220Rn. The combined 220,222Rn analysis sheds light on the emanation behaviour of radon by identifying soil water content to be the crucial control of 220Rn occurrence in the environment

  9. Noble gas atmospheric monitoring for international safeguards at reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhleh, C.W.; Poths, J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Perry, R.T. Jr.; Wilson, W.B.; Fearey, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    The use of environmental sampling is a major component of the improvements of International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards being carried out under Program 93+2. Nonradioactive noble gas isotopic measurements in the effluent stream of large reprocessing facilities may provide useful confirmatory information on the burnup and reactor type of the spent fuel undergoing reprocessing. The authors have taken and analyzed stack samples at an operating facility. The data show clear fission signals. The authors are currently applying a maximum-likelihood estimation procedure to determine the fuel burnup from these data. They anticipate that the general features involved in the table noble gas problem--selection of appropriate signals, measurement of those signals under realistic conditions, and inverse calculation of parameters of interest from the environmental data--will be present in all environmental sampling problems. These methods should therefore be widely applicable

  10. Fluorescence emissions from mixtures of Hg with the noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodworth, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Fluorescence emissions from mixtures of Hg with high pressure Xe, Kr, and Ar (approx.1 torr Hg, 10 3 --10 4 torr noble gas) have been studied using a short-pulse relativistic electron beam as an excitation source. Hg--noble gas molecular bands were observed on the red sides of the Hg lines (1849 and 2537 A) as well as on the red sides of the Hg visible lines (7 3 S 1 →6 3 P 0 , 1 , 2 ). Temporal histories and production efficiencies of the molecular emissions were determined and a model was formulated for the time histories of the HgXe 2600 A bands. Possible applications to high power laser systems are discussed

  11. Cryogenic system for collecting noble gases from boiling water reactor off-gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmauch, G.E.

    1973-01-01

    In boiling water reactors, noncondensible gases are expelled from the main condenser. This off-gas stream is composed largely of radiolytic hydrogen and oxygen, air in-leakage, and traces of fission product krypton and xenon. In the Air Products' treatment system, the stoichiometric hydrogen and oxygen are reacted to form water in a catalytic recombiner. The design of the catalytic recombiner is an extension of industrial gas technology developed for purification of argon and helium. The off-gas after the recombiner is processed by cryogenic air-separation technology. The gas is compressed, passed into a reversing heat exchanger where water vapor and carbon dioxide are frozen out, further cooled, and expanded into a distillation column where refrigeration is provided by addition of liquid nitrogen. More than 99.99 percent of the krypton and essentially 100 percent of the xenon entering the column are accumulated in the column bottoms. Every three to six months, the noble-gas concentrate accumulated in the column bottom is removed as liquid, vaporized, diluted with steam, mixed with hydrogen in slight excess of oxygen content, and fed to a small recombiner where all the oxygen reacts to form water. The resulting gas stream, containing from 20 to 40 percent noble gases, is compressed into small storage cylinders for indefinite retention or for decay of all fission gases except krypton-85, followed by subsequent release under controlled conditions and favorable meteorology. This treatment system is based on proven technology that is practiced throughout the industrial gas industry. Only the presence of radioactive materials in the process stream and the application in a nuclear power plant environment are new. Adaptations to meet these new conditions can be made without sacrificing performance, reliability, or safety

  12. Liquid state properties of certain noble and transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuiyan, G.M.; Rahman, A.; Khaleque, M.A.; Rashid, R.I.M.A.; Mujibur Rahman, S.M.

    1998-07-01

    Certain structural, thermodynamic and atomic transport properties of a number of liquid noble and transition metals are reported. The underlying theory combines together a simple form of the N-body potential and the thermodynamically self-consistent variational modified hypernetted chain (VMHNC) theory of liquid. The static structure factors calculated by using the VMHNC resemble the hard sphere (HS) values. Consequently the HS model is used to calculate the thermodynamic properties viz. specific heat, entropy, isothermal compressibility and atomic transport properties. (author)

  13. Noble gases in ten stone meteorites from Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.W.; Schultz, L.

    1980-01-01

    The concentrations and isotopic composition of noble gases have been determined in all ten stone meteorites recovered in Antarctica during 1976-1977 by a U.S.-Japanese expedition. From a comparison of spallogenic and radiogenic gas components it is concluded that the chondrites Mt. Baldr (a) and Mt. Baldr (b) belong to the same fall but that all other stone meteorites are individual finds. (orig.)

  14. Behaviour of quadrupole mass spectrometer towards noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasibullah

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a quadrupole mass spectrometric set-up for noble gas analysis with its potential application to material accountancy at the input accountability tank of a reprocessing facility. Linear dependence of ion source pressure on the inlet pressure was considered to be practicable criterion for the functionality of the instrument. Short term and long term sensitivity variations have also been discussed. No memory effect was observed under the experimental conditions. (author)

  15. The electron energy distribution function of noble gases with flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karditsas, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The treatment of the Boltzmann equation by several investigators, for the determination of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in noble gases was restricted to static discharges. It is of great interest to magnetoplasmadynamic power generation to develop the Boltzmann equation to account for the effect of the bulk fluid flow on the EEDF. The two term expansion of the Boltzmann equation, as given, results in additional terms introduced to the equations due to the bulk fluid flow, with velocity u

  16. Removing radioactive noble gases from nuclear process off-gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofredo, A.

    1977-01-01

    A system is claimed for separating, concentrating and storing radioactive krypton and xenon in the off-gases from a boiling water reactor, wherein adsorption and cryogenic distillation are both efficiently used for rapid and positive separation and removal of the radioactive noble gases, and for limiting such gases in circulation in the system to low inventory at all times, and wherein the system is self-regulating to eliminate operator options or attention

  17. Neutron activation analysis for noble metals in matte leach residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The development of the neutron activation analysis technique as a method for rapid and precise determinations of platinum group metals in matte leach residues depends on obtaining a method for effecting complete and homogeneous sample dilution. A simple method for solid dilution of metal samples is outlined in this study, which provided a basis for the accurate determination of all the noble metals by the Neutron Activation Analysis technique

  18. Near transferable phenomenological n-body potentials for noble metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontikis, Vassilis; Baldinozzi, Gianguido; Luneville, Laurence; Simeone, David

    2017-09-06

    We present a semi-empirical model of cohesion in noble metals with suitable parameters reproducing a selected set of experimental properties of perfect and defective lattices in noble metals. It consists of two short-range, n-body terms accounting respectively for attractive and repulsive interactions, the former deriving from the second moment approximation of the tight-binding scheme and the latter from the gas approximation of the kinetic energy of electrons. The stability of the face centred cubic versus the hexagonal compact stacking is obtained via a long-range, pairwise function of customary use with ionic pseudo-potentials. Lattice dynamics, molecular statics, molecular dynamics and nudged elastic band calculations show that, unlike previous potentials, this cohesion model reproduces and predicts quite accurately thermodynamic properties in noble metals. In particular, computed surface energies, largely underestimated by existing empirical cohesion models, compare favourably with measured values, whereas predicted unstable stacking-fault energy profiles fit almost perfectly ab initio evaluations from the literature. All together the results suggest that this semi-empirical model is nearly transferable.

  19. Possible solar noble-gas component in Hawaiian basalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Masahiko; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A. (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Research School of Earth Sciences); Clague, D.A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1991-01-10

    The noble-gas elemental and isotopic composition in the Earth is significantly different from that of the present atmosphere, and provides an important clue to the origin and history of the Earth and its atmosphere. Possible candidates for the noble-gas composition of the primordial Earth include a solar-like component, a planetary-like component (as observed in primitive meteorites) and a component similar in composition to the present atmosphere. In an attempt to identify the contributions of such components, we have measured isotope ratios of helium and neon in fresh basaltic glasses dredged from Loihi seamount and the East Rift Zone of Kilauea. We find a systematic enrichment in {sup 20}Ne and {sup 21}Ne relative to {sup 22}Ne, compared with atmospheric neon. The helium and neon isotope signatures observed in our samples can be explained by mixing of solar, present atmospheric, radiogenic and nucleogenic components. These data suggest that the noble-gas isotopic composition of the mantle source of the Hawaiian plume is different from that of the present atmosphere, and that it includes a significant solar-like component. We infer that this component was acquired during the formation of the Earth. (author).

  20. Development of detection techniques for the Swedish noble gas sampler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringbom, A

    1998-11-01

    A short review on the radioactive properties of noble gas isotopes relevant for monitoring of nuclear activities is given, together with a brief discussion of the existing systems for detection of radioactive noble gases. A 4{pi} detection system to be used in the automatic version of the Swedish noble gas sampling device is described. Monte Carlo calculations of the total gamma and beta efficiency for different detector designs have been performed, together with estimates of the resulting minimum detectable concentration (MDC). The estimated MDC values for detection of the {sup 133g}Xe 81 keV and the {sup 135g}Xe 250 keV gamma lines are around 0.3 mBq/m{sup 3} in both cases. This is a factor of three lower than the detection limit required for a sampling station in the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty monitoring network. The possibility to modify the system to detect {sup 85}Kr is also discussed 27 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs

  1. First ECR-Ionized Noble Gas Radioisotopes at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Wenander, F; Gaubert, G; Jardin, P; Lettry, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    The production of light noble gas radioisotopes with high ionization potentials has been hampered by modest ionization efficiencies for standard plasma ion-sources. However, the decay losses are minimal as the lingering time of light noble gases within plasma ion-sources is negligible when compared to its diffusion out of the target material. Previous singly charged ECRIS have shown a higher efficiency but also a lingering time of the order of 1 s and a total weight that prevents remote handling by the ISOLDE robot. The compact MINIMONO efficiently addressed the lingering time and weight issues. In addition, the MINIMONO maintained the high off-line ionization efficiency for light noble gases. This paper describes a standard ISOLDE target unit equipped with a MINIMONO ion-source and the first tests. The ion-source has been tested off-line and equipped with a CaO target for on-line tests. Valuable information was gained about high current (100-500 muA) transport through the ISOLDE mass separators designed for ...

  2. Measuring the noble metal and iodine composition of extracted noble metal phase from spent nuclear fuel using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomares, R.I.; Dayman, K.J.; Landsberger, S.; Biegalski, S.R.; Soderquist, C.Z.; Casella, A.J.; Brady Raap, M.C.; Schwantes, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Masses of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and radionuclides are identified and the masses quantified using neutron activation analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO 2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO 2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. - Highlights: • The noble metal phase was chemically extracted from spent nuclear fuel and analyzed non-destructively. • Noble metal phase nuclides and long-lived iodine were identified and quantified using neutron activation analysis. • Activation to shorter-lived radionuclides allowed rapid analysis of long-lived fission products in spent fuel using gamma spectrometry

  3. Cucurbit[6]uril: A Possible Host for Noble Gas Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sudip; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2015-08-27

    Density functional and ab initio molecular dynamics studies are carried out to investigate the stability of noble gas encapsulated cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) systems. Interaction energy, dissociation energy and dissociation enthalpy are calculated to understand the efficacy of CB[6] in encapsulating noble gas atoms. CB[6] could encapsulate up to three Ne atoms having dissociation energy (zero-point energy corrected) in the range of 3.4-4.1 kcal/mol, whereas due to larger size, only one Ar or Kr atom encapsulated analogues would be viable. The dissociation energy value for the second Ar atom is only 1.0 kcal/mol. On the other hand, the same for the second Kr is -0.5 kcal/mol, implying the instability of the system. The noble gas dissociation processes are endothermic in nature, which increases gradually along Ne to Kr. Kr encapsulated analogue is found to be viable at room temperature. However, low temperature is needed for Ne and Ar encapsulated analogues. The temperature-pressure phase diagram highlights the region in which association and dissociation processes of Kr@CB[6] would be favorable. At ambient temperature and pressure, CB[6] may be used as an effective noble gas carrier. Wiberg bond indices, noncovalent interaction indices, electron density, and energy decomposition analyses are used to explore the nature of interaction between noble gas atoms and CB[6]. Dispersion interaction is found to be the most important term in the attraction energy. Ne and Ar atoms in one Ng entrapped analogue are found to stay inside the cavity of CB[6] throughout the simulation at 298 K. However, during simulation Ng2 units in Ng2@CB[6] flip toward the open faces of CB[6]. After 1 ps, one Ne atom of Ne3@CB[6] almost reaches the open face keeping other two Ne atoms inside. At lower temperature (77 K), all the Ng atoms in Ngn@CB[6] remain well inside the cavity of CB[6] throughout the simulation time (1 ps).

  4. Mantle Noble Gas Contents Controlled by Subduction of Serpentinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, J. A.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Smye, A.; Jackson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Geochemical analyses of exhumed subduction zone material1, well gases2, MORB, and OIBs3 indicate that noble gases are being recycled from the surface of the earth into the mantle. However, the path taken by these noble gases is unclear. To estimate the distribution and quantity of Ar, Kr, and Xe in subducting slabs, a model consisting of layers of sediments, altered oceanic crust (AOC), and serpentinite (hydrously altered mantle) has been developed. The noble gas contents of sediments and AOC were calculated using the least air-like and most gas-rich analyses from natural systems4,5, while serpentinite was modelled using both data from natural systems1 and experimentally determined solubilities. Layer thicknesses were assessed over a range of values: 1 to 12 km of sediments, 5 to 9 km of AOC, and 1 to 30 km of serpentinite. In all cases, the serpentinite layer contains at least an order of magnitude more Ar and Kr than the other layers. For realistic layer thicknesses (1 km of sediments, 6 km of AOC, and 3 km of serpentinite), Xe is distributed roughly equally between the three layers. By incorporating global subduction rates6, fluxes of the heavy noble gases into the mantle have been calculated as 4 · 1012 mol/Ma for 36Ar, 6 · 1011 mol/Ma for 84Kr, and 8 · 109 mol/Ma for 130Xe. These fluxes are equivalent to the total 84Kr and 130Xe contents of the depleted and bulk mantle over 1 and 10 Ma7. Similarly, the flux of 36Ar is equivalent over 1 and 100 Ma. Since the Kr and Xe have not been completely overprinted by recycling, the large majority of subducted noble gases must escape in the subduction zone. However, even the small amounts that are subducted deeper have affected the mantle as measured in both MORB and OIBs. 1. Kendrick, M.A. et al., Nature Geoscience, 4, 807-812, 2011 2. Holland, G. and Ballentine, C.J., Nature, 441, 186-191, 2006 3. Parai, R. and Mukhopadhyay, S., G3, 16, 719-735, 2015 4. Matsuda, J. and Nagao, K., Geochemical Journal, 20, 71-80, 1986

  5. Polarization of stable and radioactive noble gas nuclei by spin exchange with laser pumped alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calaprice, F.; Happer, W.; Schreiber, D.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclei of noble gases can be strongly polarized by spin exchange with sufficiently dense optically pumped alkali vapors. Only a small fraction of the spin angular momentum of the alkali atoms is transferred to the nuclear spin of the noble gas. Most of the spin angular momentum is lost to translational angular momentum of the alkali and noble gas atoms about each other. For heavy noble gases most of the angular momentum transfer occurs in alkali-noble-gas van der Waals molecules. The transfer efficiency depends on the formation and breakup rates of the van der Waals molecules in the ambient gas. Experimental methods to measure the spin transfer efficiencies have been developed. Nuclei of radioactive noble gases have been polarized by these methods, and the polarization has been detected by observing the anisotropy of the radioactive decay products. Very precise measurements of the magnetic moments of the radioactive nuclei have been made. 12 references, 9 figures

  6. Behavior of shut-down dose rate of recirculation piping of BWR under noble metal application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuse, Motomasa; Nagase, Makoto; Aizawa, Motohiro; Wada, Yoichi; Ishida, Kazushige; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Hettiarachchi, Samson; Weber, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The cause of shut-down dose rate change of the recirculation piping observed in KKM (Kern Kraftwerk Mühleberg) after application of noble metal injection method is analyzed. The plant experienced the sharp decrease of piping dose rate in the cycle just after the application of noble metal(classic NobleChem TM ) and re-buildup of radioactivity in the subsequent several cycles. After the application of online noble metal injection (online NobleChem TM ), gradual decrease of dose rate has been observed. The presence of a certain amount of noble metal on the iron rich oxide film promotes the dissolution of the oxide under hydrogen addition, resulting in a decrease of deposited noble metal on the oxide film surface as well as of radioactive species in the film. Under the condition of lower amount of noble metal on the surface oxides, the oxidant species, especially hydrogen peroxide, slightly increases facilitating the re-growth of iron rich oxides along with re-buildup of radioactivity. After the application of online noble metal injection during each cycle, gradual dissolution of iron rich oxides and gradual decrease of radioactivity in the oxides proceed to decrease the piping dose rate. In the radioactivity decreasing phase, the presence of zinc is considered to assist the suppression of radioactivity buildup in the oxide film. From the analysis, treating piping surface with platinum after chemical decontamination process is expected to work well for suppression of the piping dose rate. (author)

  7. The behavior and effects of the noble metals in the DWPF melter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, N.D.; Smith, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fission-product noble metals have caused severe operating problems in numerous worldwide waste vitrification facilities. These dense, highly conductive noble metals have tended to accumulate on the floor of joule-heated glass melters causing electrical distortions which have, in some occurrences, rendered the melter inoperable. A pilot scale vitrification research facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Laboratory has been operated for more than a year with simulated feed streams containing noble metals. In this paper the behavior of these noble metals in the melter system and final glass product and their effects on the scaled DWPF-type melter are discussed

  8. Inert anode containing base metal and noble metal useful for the electrolytic production of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua

    2000-01-01

    An inert anode for production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a base metal selected from Cu and Ag, and at least one noble metal selected from Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os. The inert anode may optionally be formed of sintered particles having interior portions containing more base metal than noble metal and exterior portions containing more noble metal than base metal. In a preferred embodiment, the base metal comprises Cu, and the noble metal comprises Ag, Pd or a combination thereof.

  9. Effective Giromagnetic Ratios in Artifical Nuclear Magnetization Pumping of the Noble Gases Mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov E.N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic of the nuclear magnetization of the two noble gases mix was studied in this research. Nuclear magnetization pumped along the induction of external magnetic field. Vector of nuclear magnetization is given a tilt by the week rotational magnetic field, which makes NMR for noble gases. Interaction between the nuclear magnetic moments of the different noble gases adducted to shifts at the frequency of nuclear moments precession in external magnetic field. Effective gyromagnetic ratios of the nuclear of noble gases is defined and it different from the tabulated value. There is theoretical calculation of effective gyromagnetic ratios in this research.

  10. Volatile elements - water, carbon, nitrogen, noble gases - on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, B.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the origin and evolution of life-bearing volatile elements (water, carbon, nitrogen) on Earth is a fruitful and debated area of research. In his pioneering work, W.W. Rubey inferred that the terrestrial atmosphere and the oceans formed from degassing of the mantle through geological periods of time. Early works on noble gas isotopes were consistent with this view and proposed a catastrophic event of mantle degassing early in Earth's history. We now have evidence, mainly from noble gas isotopes, that several cosmochemical sources contributed water and other volatiles at different stages of Earth's accretion. Potential contributors include the protosolar nebula gas that equilibrated with magma oceans, inner solar system bodies now represented by chondrites, and comets. Stable isotope ratios suggest volatiles where primarily sourced by planetary bodies from the inner solar system. However, recent measurements by the European Space Agency Rosetta probe on the coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko permit to set quantitative constraints on the cometary contribution to the surface of our planet. The surface and mantle reservoirs volatile elements exchanged volatile elements through time, with rates that are still uncertain. Some mantle regions remained isolated from whole mantle convection within the first tens to hundreds million years after start of solar system formation. These regions, now sampled by some mantle plumes (e.g., Iceland, Eifel) preserved their volatile load, as indicated by extinct and extant radioactivity systems. The abundance of volatile elements in the mantle is still not well known. Different approaches, such as high pressure experimental petrology, noble gas geochemistry, modelling, resulted in somewhat contrasted estimates, varying over one order of magnitude for water. Comparative planetology, that is, the study of volatiles on the Moon, Venus, Mars, Vesta, will shed light on the sources and strengths of these elements in the

  11. Imaging with SiPMs in noble-gas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahlali, N; González, K; Fernandes, L M P; Garcia, A N C; Soriano, A

    2013-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photosensors widely used for imaging in a variety of high energy and nuclear physics experiments. In noble-gas detectors for double-beta decay and dark matter experiments, SiPMs are attractive photosensors for imaging. However they are insensitive to the VUV scintillation emitted by the noble gases (xenon and argon). This difficulty is overcome in the NEXT experiment by coating the SiPMs with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) to convert the VUV light into visible light. TPB requires stringent storage and operational conditions to prevent its degradation by environmental agents. The development of UV sensitive SiPMs is thus of utmost interest for experiments using electroluminescence of noble-gas detectors. It is in particular an important issue for a robust and background free ββ0ν experiment with xenon gas aimed by NEXT. The photon detection efficiency (PDE) of UV-enhanced SiPMs provided by Hamamatsu was determined for light in the range 250–500 nm. The PDE of standard SiPMs of the same model (S10362-33-50C), coated and non-coated with TPB, was also determined for comparison. In the UV range 250–350 nm, the PDE of the standard SiPM is shown to decrease strongly, down to about 3%. The UV-enhanced SiPM without window is shown to have the maximum PDE of 44% at 325 nm and 30% at 250 nm. The PDE of the UV-enhanced SiPM with silicon resin window has a similar trend in the UV range, although it is about 30% lower. The TPB-coated SiPM has shown to have about 6 times higher PDE than the non-coated SiPM in the range 250–315 nm. This is however below the performance of the UV-enhanced prototypes in the same wavelength range. Imaging in noble-gas detectors using UV-enhanced SiPMs is discussed.

  12. The Noble Gas Fingerprint in a UK Unconventional Gas Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKavney, Rory; Gilfillan, Stuart; Györe, Domokos; Stuart, Fin

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, there has been an unprecedented expansion in the development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Concerns have arisen about the effect of this new industry on groundwater quality, particularly focussing on hydraulic fracturing, the technique used to increase the permeability of the targeted tight shale formations. Methane contamination of groundwater has been documented in areas of gas production1 but conclusively linking this to fugitive emissions from unconventional hydrocarbon production has been controversial2. A lack of baseline measurements taken before drilling, and the equivocal interpretation of geochemical data hamper the determination of possible contamination. Common techniques for "fingerprinting" gas from discrete sources rely on gas composition and isotopic ratios of elements within hydrocarbons (e.g. δ13CCH4), but the original signatures can be masked by biological and gas transport processes. The noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are inert and controlled only by their physical properties. They exist in trace quantities in natural gases and are sourced from 3 isotopically distinct environments (atmosphere, crust and mantle)3. They are decoupled from the biosphere, and provide a separate toolbox to investigate the numerous sources and migration pathways of natural gases, and have found recent utility in the CCS4 and unconventional gas5 industries. Here we present a brief overview of noble gas data obtained from a new coal bed methane (CBM) field, Central Scotland. We show that the high concentration of helium is an ideal fingerprint for tracing fugitive gas migration to a shallow groundwater. The wells show variation in the noble gas signatures that can be attributed to differences in formation water pumping from the coal seams as the field has been explored for future commercial development. Dewatering the seams alters the gas/water ratio and the degree to which noble gases degas from the formation water. Additionally the

  13. Small angle elastic scattering of electrons by noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagenaar, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis, measurements are carried out to obtain small angle elastic differential cross sections in order to check the validity of Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations for electrons scattered by noble gas atoms. First, total cross sections are obtained for argon, krypton and xenon. Next, a parallel plate electrostatic energy analyser for the simultaneous measurement of doubly differential cross section for small angle electron scattering is described. Also absolute differential cross sections are reported. Finally the forward dispersion relation for electron-helium collisions is dealt with. (Auth.)

  14. Knowledge about genetically modified food: a study with supermarket clients situated in noble area of Fortaleza city - doi:10.5020/18061230.2004.p72

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Gondim Calvasina; Cíntia Maria Torres Rocha Silva; Gilka de Albuquerque Forte Aguiar; Milena Rebouças Aguiar; Helena Alves de Carvalho Sampaio

    2012-01-01

    The transgenic foods had appeared as result of the scientific and technological advances of genetic engineering applied to agriculture, configuring themselves in a current quarrel and sufficient controversy, about how much the benefits and curses brought to the consumers and the proper environment. In this intention, this study has as objective to verify the level of knowledge of customers of a supermarket of the noble area of the city of Fortaleza, on the thematic of the transgenic. Question...

  15. Using noble gas fingerprints at the Kerr Farm to assess CO2 leakage allegations linked to the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project

    OpenAIRE

    Gilfillan, Stuart; Sherk, George Williams; Poreda, Robert J.; Haszeldine, Robert

    2017-01-01

    For carbon capture and storage technology to successfully contribute to climate mitigation efforts, the stored CO2 must be securely isolated from the atmosphere and oceans. Hence, there is a need to establish and verify monitoring techniques that can detect unplanned migration of injected CO2 from a storage site to the near surface. Noble gases are sensitive tracers of crustal fluid input in the subsurface due to their low concentrations and unreactive nature. Several studies have identified ...

  16. Role of noble metal nanoparticles in DNA base damage and catalysis: a radiation chemical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Geeta K.

    2011-01-01

    In the emerging field of nanoscience and nanotechnology, tremendous focus has been made by researcher to explore the applications of nanomaterials for human welfare by converting the findings into technology. Some of the examples have been the use of nanoparticles in the field of opto-electronic, fuel cells, medicine and catalysis. These wide applications and significance lies in the fact that nanoparticles possess unique physical and chemical properties very different from their bulk precursors. Numerous methods for the synthesis of noble nanoparticles with tunable shape and size have been reported in literature. The goal of our group is to use different methods of synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Ag, Pt and Pd) and test their protective/damaging role towards DNA base damage induced by ionizing radiation (Au and Ag) and to test the catalytic activity of nanoparticles (Pt and Pd) in certain known organic synthesis/electron transfer reactions. Using radiation chemical techniques such as pulse radiolysis and steady state radiolysis complemented by the product analysis using HPLC/LC-MS, a detailed mechanism for the formation of transient species, kinetics leading to the formation of stable end products is studied in the DNA base damage induced by ionizing radiation in presence and absence of Au and Ag nanoparticles. Unraveling the complex interaction between catalysts and reactants under operando conditions is a key step towards gaining fundamental insight in catalysis. The catalytic activity of Pt and Pd nanoparticles in electron transfer and Suzuki coupling reactions has been determined. Investigations are currently underway to gain insight into the interaction between catalysts and reactants using time resolved spectroscopic measurements. These studies will be detailed during the presentation. (author)

  17. Reservoir Characterization using geostatistical and numerical modeling in GIS with noble gas geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, D. A.; Swift, J. N.; Tan, S.; Darrah, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The integration of precise geochemical analyses with quantitative engineering modeling into an interactive GIS system allows for a sophisticated and efficient method of reservoir engineering and characterization. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is utilized as an advanced technique for oil field reservoir analysis by combining field engineering and geological/geochemical spatial datasets with the available systematic modeling and mapping methods to integrate the information into a spatially correlated first-hand approach in defining surface and subsurface characteristics. Three key methods of analysis include: 1) Geostatistical modeling to create a static and volumetric 3-dimensional representation of the geological body, 2) Numerical modeling to develop a dynamic and interactive 2-dimensional model of fluid flow across the reservoir and 3) Noble gas geochemistry to further define the physical conditions, components and history of the geologic system. Results thus far include using engineering algorithms for interpolating electrical well log properties across the field (spontaneous potential, resistivity) yielding a highly accurate and high-resolution 3D model of rock properties. Results so far also include using numerical finite difference methods (crank-nicholson) to solve for equations describing the distribution of pressure across field yielding a 2D simulation model of fluid flow across reservoir. Ongoing noble gas geochemistry results will also include determination of the source, thermal maturity and the extent/style of fluid migration (connectivity, continuity and directionality). Future work will include developing an inverse engineering algorithm to model for permeability, porosity and water saturation.This combination of new and efficient technological and analytical capabilities is geared to provide a better understanding of the field geology and hydrocarbon dynamics system with applications to determine the presence of hydrocarbon pay zones (or

  18. Development of Non-Noble Metal Ni-Based Catalysts for Dehydrogenation of Methylcyclohexane

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam

    2016-01-01

    to TOL has only been achieved using the noble Pt-based catalysts. The aim of this study is to develop non-noble, cost-effective metal catalysts that can show excellent catalytic performance, mainly maintaining high TOL selectivity achievable by Pt based

  19. Is the thermodynamic behavior of the noble fluids consistent with the principle of corresponding states?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulinskii, V.L.; Malomuzh, N.P.; Matvejchuk, O.I.

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of the Principle of Corresponding States (PCS) for the noble fluids is discussed. We give the thermodynamic evidence for the dimerization of the liquid phase in heavy noble gases like argon, krypton etc. which manifests itself in deviations from the PCS. The behavior of the

  20. Targets Involved in Cardioprotection by the Non-Anesthetic Noble Gas Helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Nina C.; Smit, Kirsten F.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Preckel, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Research data from the past decade indicate that noble gases like xenon and helium exert profound cardioprotection when applied before, during or after organ ischemia. Of all noble gases, especially helium, has gained interest in the past years because it does not have an anesthetic "side effect"

  1. The desorption behaviour of implanted noble gases at low energy on silicon surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.H.M.; van Silfhout, Arend

    1987-01-01

    Under UHV conditions, clean crystalline Si(111) surfaces have been bombarded mass-selectively at room temperature with noble gas ions, Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, at normal incidence. By means of stepwise heating up to 1050 K the activation energies and desorbed doses of the noble gases have been straight

  2. Intentions of fast noble gas ions with clean and with oxidized monocrystalline copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wit, A.G.J. de.

    1979-01-01

    The thesis reports investigations concerning the distorted shape of the energy distribution of scattered noble gas ions, and investigations of angular distributions of these ions where a quantitative interpretation is less hampered by preferential neutralization. Low energy noble gas ion scattering is used to study the interactions between oxygen gas and Cu(110) surfaces. (Auth.)

  3. Metal-organic frameworks for adsorption and separation of noble gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Staiger, Chad

    2017-05-30

    A method including exposing a gas mixture comprising a noble gas to a metal organic framework (MOF), including an organic electron donor and an adsorbent bed operable to adsorb a noble gas from a mixture of gases, the adsorbent bed including a metal organic framework (MOF) including an organic electron donor.

  4. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Métayer, Olivier; Saurel, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOS named "Noble Abel stiffened gas," this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular "Stiffened Gas (SG)" EOS. It is a combination of the so-called "Noble-Abel" and "stiffened gas" equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.

  5. Modification of titanium electrodes by a noble metal deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devilliers, D.; Mahe, E. [Pierre et Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France). Laboratoire LI2C, UMR CNRS

    2008-07-01

    Titanium is commonly used as a substrate for dimensionally stable anodes (DSAs) because it is corrosion-resistant in acid media and because a passive titanium oxide (TiO2) film can be formed on the surface. This paper reported on a study in which titanium substrates were first covered by anodization with a TiO2 layer. The electrochemical properties of the Ti/TiO2 electrodes were investigated. The modification of the substrates by cathodic electrodeposition of a noble metal was described. The reactivity of the Ti/TiO2/Pt structures were illustrated by impedance spectroscopy experiments. The impedance studies performed with Ti/ TiO2 electrodes in the presence of a redox couple in solution (Fe3+/Fe2+ system in sulphuric acid) showed that the electronic transfer is very slow. It was concluded that the deposition of a noble metal coating on Ti/TiO2 substrates leads to modified titanium electrodes that exhibit electrocatalytic behaviour versus specific electrochemical reactions. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  6. Noble gas and carbon isotopes in Mariana Trough basalt glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, M.; Jambon, A.; Gamo, T.; Nishio, Y.; Sano, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Noble gas elemental and isotopic compositions have been measured as well as the abundance of C and its isotopic ratios in 11 glasses from submarine pillow basalts collected from the Mariana Trough. The 3 He/ 4 He ratios of 8.22 and 8.51 R atm of samples dredged from the central Mariana Trough (similar18N) agree well with that of the Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) glasses (8.4±0.3 R atm ), whereas a mean ratio of 8.06±0.35 R atm in samples from the northern Mariana Trough (similar20N) is slightly lower than those of MORB. One sample shows apparent excess of 20 Ne and 21 Ne relative to atmospheric Ne, suggesting incorporation of solar-type Ne in the magma source. There is a positive correlation between 3 He/ 4 He and 40 Ar/ 36 Ar ratios, which may be explained by mixing between MORB-type and atmospheric noble gases. Excess 129 Xe is observed in the sample which also shows 20 Ne and 21 Ne excesses. Observed δ 13 C values of similar20N samples vary from -3.76 per thousand to -2.80 per thousand, and appear higher than those of MORB, and the corresponding CO 2 / 3 He ratios are higher than those of MARA samples at similar18N, suggesting C contribution from the subducted slab. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Photoionization of the outer electrons in noble gas endohedral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, A. S.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2008-01-01

    We suggest a prominent modification of the outer shell photoionization cross section in noble gas (NG) endohedral atoms NG-C n under the action of the electron shell of fullerene C n . This shell leads to two important effects: a strong enhancement of the cross section due to fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and to prominent oscillation of this cross section due to the reflection of a photoelectron from the NG by the fullerene shell. Both factors lead to powerful maxima in the outer shell ionization cross sections of NG-C n , which we call giant endohedral resonances. The oscillator strength reaches a very large value in the atomic scale, 25. We consider atoms of all noble gases except He. The polarization of the fullerene shell is expressed in terms of the total photoabsorption cross section of the fullerene. The photoelectron reflection is taken into account in the framework of the so-called bubble potential, which is a spherical δ-type potential. It is assumed in the derivations that the NG is centrally located in the fullerene. It is also assumed, in accordance with the existing experimental data, that the fullerene radius R C is much larger than the atomic radius r A and the thickness Δ C of the fullerene shell. As was demonstrated recently, these assumptions allow us to represent the NG-C n photoionization cross section as a product of the NG cross section and two well-defined calculated factors

  8. Analysis of noble gas recycling at a fusion plasma divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    Near-surface recycling of neon and argon atoms and ions at a divertor has been studied using impurity transport and surface interaction codes. A fixed background deuterium endash tritium plasma model is used corresponding to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ITER EDA Agreement and Protocol 2, ITER EDA Documentation Series No. 5 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1994)] radiative plasma conditions (T e ≤10 eV). The noble gas transport depends critically on the divertor surface material. For low-Z materials (Be and C) both neon and argon recycle many (e.g., ∼100) times before leaving the near-surface region. This is also true for an argon on tungsten combination. For neon on tungsten, however, there is low recycling. These variations are due to differences in particle and energy reflection coefficients, mass, and ionization rates. In some cases a high flux of recycling atoms is ionized within the magnetic sheath and this can change local sheath parameters. Due to inhibited backflow, high recycling, and possibly high sputtering, noble gas seeding (for purposes of enhancing radiation) may be incompatible with Be or C surfaces, for fusion reactor conditions. On the other hand, neon use appears compatible with tungsten. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Noble gas geochemistry to monitor CO2 geological storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafortune, St.

    2007-11-01

    According to the last IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report, a probability of 90 % can be now established for the responsibility of the anthropogenic CO 2 emissions for the global climate change observed since the beginning of the 20. century. To reduce these emissions and keep producing energy from coal, oil or gas combustions, CO 2 could be stored in geological reservoirs like aquifers, coal beds, and depleted oil or gas fields. Storing CO 2 in geological formations implies to control the efficiency and to survey the integrity of the storages, in order to be able to detect the possible leaks as fast as possible. Here, we study the feasibility of a geochemical monitoring through noble gas geochemistry. We present (1) the development of a new analytical line, Garodiox, developed to extract quantitatively noble gas from water samples, (2) the testing of Garodiox on samples from a natural CO 2 storage analogue (Pavin lake, France) and (3) the results of a first field work on a natural CO 2 accumulation (Montmiral, France). The results we obtain and the conclusions we draw, highlight the interest of the geochemical monitoring we suggest. (author)

  10. Isotopic and noble gas geochemistry in geothermal research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, B.M.; DePaolo, D.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this program is to provide, through isotopic analyses of fluids, fluid inclusions, and rocks and minerals coupled with improved methods for geochemical data analysis, needed information regarding sources of geothermal heat and fluids, the spatial distribution of fluid types, subsurface flow, water-rock reaction paths and rates, and the temporal evolution of geothermal systems. Isotopic studies of geothermal fluids have previously been limited to the light stable isotopes of H, C, and O. However, other isotopic systems such as the noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) and reactive elements (e.g. B, N, S, Sr and Pb) are complementary and may even be more important in some geothermal systems. The chemistry and isotopic composition of a fluid moving through the crust will change in space and time in response to varying chemical and physical parameters or by mixing with additional fluids. The chemically inert noble gases often see through these variations, making them excellent tracers for heat and fluid sources. Whereas, the isotopic compositions of reactive elements are useful tools in characterizing water-rock interaction and modeling the movement of fluids through a geothermal reservoir.

  11. First-principles study of noble gas stability in ThO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Kuan [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Han, Han, E-mail: hanhanfudan@gmail.com [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, Wei [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wang, Hui [School of Physics and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China); Wang, Chang-Ying; Guo, Yong-Liang [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Ren, Cui-Lan [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Huai, Ping, E-mail: huaiping@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-07-15

    The stability of noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) in thorium dioxide is studied by means of density functional theory. The computations are performed considering insertion sites of ThO{sub 2}, including the interstitial sites, the thorium vacancies, the oxygen-thorium di-vacancy and three types of Schottky defects. Our results show that there is an approximately linear relation between the energies and the atomic radii. As the size of the noble gas atom increases, the noble gas atoms energetically prefer to incorporate into large vacancy defects rather than into interstitial positions. Moreover, the binding energy of Kr or Xe interstitial in a Schottky defect is larger than the formation energy of a Schottky defect, suggesting the Schottky defects are thermodynamically favorable in the presence of these noble gas atoms. The charged defects are also considered for noble gas atoms trapped in Th and O vacancies.

  12. Simulated effect of timing and Pt quantity injected on On-line NobleChem application on total fuel liftoff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, M.G.; Riddle, J.M.; Lamanna, L.S.; Gregorich, C.; Hoornik, A.

    2015-01-01

    Total liftoff is a measure of fuel performance and a risk indicator for fuel reliability. Fuel operability and license limits are directly related to the expected total lifetime liftoff. AREVA's continued commitment to zero fuel failure is expressed, among other efforts, in the continued development and improvement of its fuel cladding corrosion and crud risk assessment tools. The AREVA models used to assess and predict crud deposition on BWR cores over their lifespan have been refined by the development and incorporation of the PEZOG tool in response to the move in the industry to the On-Line NobleChem TM (OLNC) technology. PEZOG models the platinum-enhanced zirconium oxide growth of fuel cladding when exposed to platinum during operation. Depending on the local chemistry and radiation condition, noble metals act as catalysts for many reactions, including but not limited to hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction. OLNC's intention is to catalyze the hydrogen and oxygen recombination reaction for core internals protection. However, research has indicated that noble metals catalyze the oxygen reduction under the chemistry and radiation conditions as experienced in the pores of crud deposits, and hence, can increase the corrosion rate of zirconium alloy cladding. The developed PEZOG module calculates the oxide thickness as a function of platinum injection strategy. The stratified nature of oxide and crud layers formed on fuel cladding surfaces is reflected in the calculations as are the different platinum interaction in each of the layers. This paper presents examples of the evaluation of various aspects of the platinum injection strategies and their influence on the oxide growth enhancement as applied to conditions of a U.S. plant. (authors)

  13. Three-dimensional noble-metal nanostructure: A new kind of substrate for sensitive, uniform, and reproducible surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Cui-Feng; You Hong-Jun; Fang Ji-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy technique for highly sensitive structural detection of low concentration analyte. The SERS activities largely depend on the topography of the substrate. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in SERS substrate, especially focusing on the three-dimensional (3D) noble-metal substrate with hierarchical nanostructure. Firstly, we introduce the background and general mechanism of 3D hierarchical SERS nanostructures. Then, a systematic overview on the fabrication, growth mechanism, and SERS property of various noble-metal substrates with 3D hierarchical nanostructures is presented. Finally, the applications of 3D hierarchical nanostructures as SERS substrates in many fields are discussed. (invited review — international conference on nanoscience and technology, china 2013)

  14. Radioactive gases monitor system: tritium, radon, noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egey, J.Z.; Matatagui, E.

    2015-01-01

    A system for monitoring the radioactive gases tritium, radon and noble gases is described. We present the description of the sensor and the associated electronics that have been developed to monitor the presence of radioactive gases in air or other gaseous effluents. The system has a high sensitivity and a wide range of operation. The sensor is an ionization chamber, featuring the internal circulation of the gas to monitor and the associated electronics has a resolution better than 10 E-15A (fA). It allows the detection of the individual pulses that are produced during the alpha decay of radon and its daughter elements. The measurement system is made up of a commercial data acquisition system connected to a computer. The acquired data is presented on a graphical display and it is stored for later processing and analysis. We have a system that is of simple construction and versatile. Here we present the experimental results. (authors) [es

  15. Mixed noble gas effect on cut green peppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, L. V.; Zhang, M.; Karangwa, E.; Chesereka, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing attempts at using gas which leads to hydrate formation as a preservative tool in fresh-cut fruits and vegetables have been reported. In this study, changes in some physical and biochemical properties of fresh-cut green peppers under compressed noble gas treatments were examined. Mixed argonkrypton and argon treatments were performed before cold storage at 5°C for 15 days. Mass loss and cell membrane permeability were found to be the lowest in mixed argon-krypton samples. Besides, a lower CO2 concentration and vitamin C loss were detected in gastreated samples compared to untreated samples (control). While the total phenol degradation was moderately reduced, the effect of the treatment on polyphenoloxidase activity was better at the beginning of the storage period. The minimum changes in quality observed in cut peppers resulted from both mixed and gas treatment alone.

  16. Classical and quantum effects in noble metal and graphene plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics — the interaction of light with free electrons in metals — is commonly understood within classical electrodynamics using local-response constitutive laws (such as Ohm's law). However, the tight localization of plasmons to small volumes is revealing intriguing new physics such as noncla......Plasmonics — the interaction of light with free electrons in metals — is commonly understood within classical electrodynamics using local-response constitutive laws (such as Ohm's law). However, the tight localization of plasmons to small volumes is revealing intriguing new physics...... such as nonclassical electrodynamics with a nonlocal response of the plasmons. Nonlocal effects are being explored both theoretically and experimentally in different charge-conducting material systems with examples ranging from sub-10 nanometer noble metal particles to one-atom thin disks of doped graphene....

  17. Studies on PEM fuel cell noble metal catalyst dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. M.; Grahl-Madsen, L.; Skou, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical, spectroscopic and gravimetric methods was carried out on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell electrodes with the focus on platinum and ruthenium catalysts dissolution, and the membrane degradation. In cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments, the noble metals were...... found to dissolve in 1 M sulfuric acid solution and the dissolution increased exponentially with the upper potential limit (UPL) between 0.6 and 1.6 vs. RHE. 2-20% of the Pt (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved during the experiments. Under the same conditions, 30-100% of the Ru...... (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved. The faster dissolution of ruthenium compared to platinum in the alloy type catalysts was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The dissolution of the carbon supported catalyst was found one order of magnitude higher than the unsupported...

  18. Psychological insights in Shakespeare's final play, The Two Noble Kinsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, E J

    2001-01-01

    Shakespeare's final play, The Two Noble Kinsmen, contains profound psychological insights. Like all of Shakespeare's reworkings of old material, the result is not merely a variation on a theme but a psychological statement in and of itself, which respects and revisits the past even as it presents a new and original statement. In this paper I argue that the transformation of the Chaucerian into the Shakespearean has a premonition of the Freudian in it also: Shakespeare not only delivers insights on development and sexuality, he anticipates an important Freudian concept in his introduction of the theme of the jailer's daughter whose "love-sickness" requires on understanding of transference before sense can be made of it!

  19. A novel method for producing multiple ionization of noble gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Li Haiyang; Dai Dongxu; Bai Jiling; Lu Richang

    1997-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for producing multiple ionization of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe. A nanosecond pulsed electron beam with large number density, which could be energy-controlled, was produced by incidence a focused 308 nm laser beam onto a stainless steel grid. On Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer, using this electron beam, we obtained multiple ionization of noble gas He, Ne, Ar and Xe. Time of fight mass spectra of these ions were given out. These ions were supposed to be produced by step by step ionization of the gas atoms by electron beam impact. This method may be used as a ideal soft ionizing point ion source in Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer

  20. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminul Islam

    Full Text Available A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33-41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed.

  1. μ+ thermalization and muonium formation in noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, D.G.; Mikula, R.J.; Garner, D.M.; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver

    1981-01-01

    One energy loss mechanism in μ + thermalization (in gases) is that due to charge exchange, in which muonium is repeatedly formed and lost in a series of charge-exchange cycles μ + +e - reversible Mu, a process which depends on the ionization potential of the moderator gas but one in which no depolarization of the μ + is expected at approx. 1 atm. pressure. However, if the time between collisions in a given energy regime can be made sufficiently long then additional depolarization may occur, which can provide further information on the charge-exchange process itself. Extensive data showing this effect has been found in gases; results for the noble gases are presented. (orig.)

  2. Chromatographic separation of radioactive noble gases from xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Bramante, R.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Coffey, T.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, K. R.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ihm, M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Pech, K.; Phelps, P.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.

    2018-01-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment operates at the Sanford Underground Research Facility to detect nuclear recoils from the hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) on a liquid xenon target. Liquid xenon typically contains trace amounts of the noble radioactive isotopes 85Kr and 39Ar that are not removed by the in situ gas purification system. The decays of these isotopes at concentrations typical of research-grade xenon would be a dominant background for a WIMP search experiment. To remove these impurities from the liquid xenon, a chromatographic separation system based on adsorption on activated charcoal was built. 400 kg of xenon was processed, reducing the average concentration of krypton from 130 ppb to 3.5 ppt as measured by a cold-trap assisted mass spectroscopy system. A 50 kg batch spiked to 0.001 g/g of krypton was processed twice and reduced to an upper limit of 0.2 ppt.

  3. The prevalent synthesis of one-dimensional noble metal nanostructures based on sulfonated polyaniline at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Youyi

    2011-01-01

    We describe a prevalent method of synthesizing one-dimensional (1D) noble metal nanostructures (silver nanobelts and palladium nanowires) by treatment of corresponding noble metal ions only in the presence of the conductive sulfonated polyaniline without using any other reducing agents or energies. The results show that the sulfonated polyaniline provides the dual reductant and “soft template” roles to promoting noble metal ions to form shape-controlled 1D noble metal nanostructures in high yield. The employed approach may also shed some light on the preparation of other noble metal nanostructure by using conductive polymer.

  4. Noble Metal Arsenides and Gold Inclusions in Northwest Africa 8186

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P.; McCubbin, F. M.; Rahman, Z.; Keller, L. P.; Agee, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites are a highly thermally altered group of carbonaceous chondrites, experiencing temperatures ranging between approximately 576-867 degrees Centigrade. Additionally, the mineralogy of the CK chondrites record the highest overall oxygen fugacity of all chondrites, above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. Me-tallic Fe-Ni is extremely rare in CK chondrites, but magnetite and Fe,Ni sulfides are commonly observed. Noble metal-rich inclusions have previously been found in some magnetite and sulfide grains. These arsenides, tellurides, and sulfides, which contain varying amounts of Pt, Ru, Os, Te, As, Ir, and S, are thought to form either by condensation from a solar gas, or by exsolution during metamorphism on the chondritic parent body. Northwest Africa (NWA) 8186 is a highly metamorphosed CK chondrite. This meteorite is predominately composed of NiO-rich forsteritic olivine (Fo65), with lesser amounts of plagioclase (An52), augite (Fs11Wo49), magnetite (with exsolved titanomagnetite, hercynite, and titanohematite), monosulfide solid solution (with exsolved pentlandite), and the phosphate minerals Cl-apatite and merrillite. This meteorite contains coarse-grained, homogeneous silicates, and has 120-degree triple junctions between mineral phases, which indicates a high degree of thermal metamorphism. The presence of NiO-rich olivine, oxides phases all bearing Fe3 plus, and the absence of metal, are consistent with an oxygen fugacity above the FMQ buffer. We also observed noble metal-rich phases within sulfide grains in NWA 8186, which are the primary focus of the present study.

  5. Modeling of noble gas injection into tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, D.Kh.; Yurchenko, E.I.; Lukash, V.E.; Baronova, E.O.; Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.; Veselova, I.Yu.; Schneider, R.

    2005-01-01

    Noble gas injection for mitigation of the disruption in DIII-D is simulated. The simulation of the first two stages is performed: of the neutral gas jet penetration through the background plasmas, and of the thermal quench. In order to simulate the first stage the 1.5-dimensional numerical code LLP with improved radiation model for noble gas is used. It is demonstrated that the jet remains mainly neutral and thus is able to penetrate to the central region of the tokamak in accordance with experimental observations. Plasma cooling at this stage is provided by the energy exchange with the jet. The radiation is relatively small, and the plasma thermal energy is spent mainly on the jet expansion. The magnetic surfaces in contact with the jet are cooled significantly. The cooling front propagates towards the plasma center. The simulations of the plasma column dynamics in the presence of moving jet is performed by means of the free boundary transport modeling DINA code. It has been shown that the cooling front is accompanied by strongly localized 'shark fin-like' perturbation in toroidal current density profile. After few milliseconds the jet (together with the current perturbation) achieves the region where safety factor is slightly higher than unity and a new type of the non-local kink mode develops. The unstable kink perturbation is non-resonant for any magnetic surface, both inside the plasma column, and in the vacuum space. The mode disturbs mainly the core region. The growth time of the 'shark fin-like' mode is higher than the Alfven time by a factor of 100 for DIII-D parameters. Hence, the simulation describes the DIII-D experimental results, at least, qualitatively. (author)

  6. Probing the interaction of noble gases with pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene through Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Renato; Perea-López, Néstor; Elías, Ana Laura; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Carozo, Victor; Feng, Simin; Lv, Ruitao; dos Santos, Maria Cristina; Terrones, Mauricio; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2018-05-01

    The interactions of adsorbates with graphene have received increasing attention due to its importance in the development of applications involving graphene-based coatings. Here, we present a study of the adsorption of noble gases on pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene. Single-layer graphene samples were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Several noble gases were allowed to adsorb on the suspended graphene substrate at very low temperatures. Raman spectra show distinct frequency blue shifts in both the 2D and G bands, which are induced by gas adsorption onto high quality single layer graphene (1LG). These shifts, which we associate with compressive biaxial strain in the graphene layers induced by the noble gases, are negligible for nitrogen-doped graphene. Additionally, a thermal depinning transition, which is related to the desorption of a noble gas layer from the graphene surface at low temperatures (ranging from 20 to 35 K), was also observed at different transition temperatures for different noble gases. These transition temperatures were found to be 25 K for argon and 35 K for xenon. Moreover, we were able to obtain values for the compressive biaxial strain in graphene induced by the adsorbed layer of noble gases, using Raman spectroscopy. Ab initio calculations confirmed the correlation between the noble gas-induced strain and the changes in the Raman features observed.

  7. Determination of natural in vivo noble-gas concentrations in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yama Tomonaga

    Full Text Available Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry.

  8. Helium Isotopes and Noble Gas Abundances of Cave Dripping Water in Three Caves in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A. T.; Shen, C. C.; Tan, M.; Li, T.; Uemura, R.; Asami, R.

    2015-12-01

    Paleo-temperature recorded in nature archives is a critical parameter to understand climate change in the past. With advantages of unique inert chemical characteristics and sensitive solubilities with temperature, dissolved noble gases in speleothem inclusion water were recently proposed to retrieve terrestrial temperature history. In order to accurately apply this newly-developed speleothem noble gas temperature (NGT) as a reliable proxy, a fundamental issue about behaviors of noble gases in the karst should be first clarified. In this study, we measured noble gas contents in air and dripping water to evaluate any ratio deviation between noble gases. Cave dripping water samples was collected from three selected caves, Shihua Cave in northern China, Furong Cave in southwestern, and Gyukusen Cave in an island located in the western Pacific. For these caves are characterized by a thorough mixing and long-term storage of waters in a karst aquifer by the absence of seasonal oxygen isotope shifts. Ratios of dripping water noble gases are statistically insignificant from air data. Helium isotopic ratios in the dripping water samples match air value. The results indicate that elemental and isotopic signatures of noble gases from air can be frankly preserved in the epikarst and support the fidelity of NGT techniques.

  9. Noble gas signatures in the Island of Maui, Hawaii: Characterizing groundwater sources in fractured systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yi; Castro, M. Clara; Hall, Chris M.; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Scholl, Martha A.; Warrier, Rohit B.

    2017-01-01

    Uneven distribution of rainfall and freshwater scarcity in populated areas in the Island of Maui, Hawaii, renders water resources management a challenge in this complex and ill-defined hydrological system. A previous study in the Galapagos Islands suggests that noble gas temperatures (NGTs) record seasonality in that fractured, rapid infiltration groundwater system rather than the commonly observed mean annual air temperature (MAAT) in sedimentary systems where infiltration is slower thus, providing information on recharge sources and potential flow paths. Here we report noble gas results from the basal aquifer, springs, and rainwater in Maui to explore the potential for noble gases in characterizing this type of complex fractured hydrologic systems. Most samples display a mass-dependent depletion pattern with respect to surface conditions consistent with previous observations both in the Galapagos Islands and Michigan rainwater. Basal aquifer and rainwater noble gas patterns are similar and suggest direct, fast recharge from precipitation to the basal aquifer. In contrast, multiple springs, representative of perched aquifers, display highly variable noble gas concentrations suggesting recharge from a variety of sources. The distinct noble gas patterns for the basal aquifer and springs suggest that basal and perched aquifers are separate entities. Maui rainwater displays high apparent NGTs, incompatible with surface conditions, pointing either to an origin at high altitudes with the presence of ice or an ice-like source of undetermined origin. Overall, noble gas signatures in Maui reflect the source of recharge rather than the expected altitude/temperature relationship commonly observed in sedimentary systems.

  10. On the methodology of radiochemical neutron activation analysis of noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, C.F.; Ma, S.L.; Mao, X.Y.; Liao, K.N.; Liu, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Two different radiochemical procedures were developed: chelate ion resin exchange and amine solvent extraction. Two kinds of new Chinese chelate resins (NANKAI-3926 and BEI-5) and a new long-chain primary amine N 1923 were compared with Srafion NMRR and the tertiary amine N 235 in absorption performance of noble metals, respectively. Influences of various experimental conditions, e.g. sample digestion, acidity, equilibrium time, as well as elution of noble metals, on analytical sensitivity and chemical yield were discussed. Combining with neutron activation, the radiochemical separation procedures developed were used to determine the noble metal contents in the geological samples from Permina/Triassic boundary in South China. (author)

  11. Overview of the physical-chemical properties of the noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, C.

    1973-01-01

    This paper lists the concentrations of noble gases in the atmosphere and the relative abundance of the stable isotopes. Selected physical properties are tabulated; solubilities of noble gases in water and other liquids, and liquid-vapor equilibria data for binary systems containing a noble gas are presented. Adsorption data are tabulated for illustrative conventional adsorbents and are also presented by a Polanyi correlation. Clathration, biochemical effects, and chemical reactivity are highlighted. Analytical procedures are briefly described. Other relatively non-reactive gases present in the atmosphere in trace quantities are mentioned: methane, carbon tetrafluoride, and sulfur hexafluoride.

  12. Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Blanchard, W.R.; Kozub, T.; Priniski, C.; Zatz, I.; Obenschain, S.

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (∼ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a 'gas shield' may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

  13. Attosecond time delays in the photoionization of noble gas atoms studied in TDLDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Chakraborty, Himadri; Madjet, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    We perform time-dependent local density functional calculations of the quantum phase and time delays of valence photoionization of noble gas atoms. Results may be accessed by XUV-IR interferometric metrology. (paper)

  14. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, David G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gardner, William Payton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  15. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanood Ahmed Aljohi

    2016-01-01

    Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006. When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005. In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100% for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24. No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use.

  16. 77 FR 10707 - Safety Zone; NOBLE DISCOVERER, Outer Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... indigenous population; (4) the lack of any established shipping fairways, fueling and supply storage... location of the DRILLSHIP NOBLE DISCOVERER on the Outer Continental Shelf and its distance from both land...

  17. Laser microprobe for the study of noble gases and nitrogen in single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Planetary and Geosciences Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380 009, India. ∗e-mail: murty@prl.ernet.in. A laser microprobe capable of analysing nitrogen and noble gases in .... tion properties for light radiation, with some.

  18. Exploring methods for compositional and particle size analysis of noble metal nanoparticles in Daphnia manga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krystek, P.W.; Brandsma, S.H.; Leonards, P.E.G.; de Boer, J.

    2016-01-01

    The identification and quantification of the bioaccumulation of noble metal engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) by aquatic organisms is of great relevance to understand the exposure and potential toxicity mechanisms of nanoscale materials. Four analytical scenarios were investigated in relation to

  19. A general approach to mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Zhao; Xiao, Manda; Bao, Zhihong; Wang, Peng; Wang, Jianfang

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic microspheres: A general approach is demonstrated for the facile preparation of mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles (see TEM image in the picture). Among 18 oxide/noble metal catalysts, TiO 2/0.1 mol Pd microspheres showed the highest turnover frequency in NaBH 4 reduction of 4-nitrophenol (see picture). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A general approach to mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Zhao

    2012-04-26

    Catalytic microspheres: A general approach is demonstrated for the facile preparation of mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles (see TEM image in the picture). Among 18 oxide/noble metal catalysts, TiO 2/0.1 mol Pd microspheres showed the highest turnover frequency in NaBH 4 reduction of 4-nitrophenol (see picture). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Noble gases in Mars atmosphere: new precise analysis with Paloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, Ph.; Paloma Team

    2003-04-01

    The Viking mission embarked a mass spectrometer designed by Alfred O. Nier that yielded the first determination of the elemental and isotopic composition of noble gases in Mars atmosphere. For example, the 40Ar/36Ar ratio in martian air is roughly 10 fold that in terrestrial air. This extraordinary accomplishment, however, has furnished only partial results with large analytical uncertainties. For example, we do not know the isotopic composition of helium, and only very poorly that of Ne, Kr and Xe. In planetary science, it is fundamental to have a good knowledge of the atmosphere because this serves as a reference for all further studies of volatiles. In addition, part of our present knowledge of Mars atmosphere is based on the SNC meteorites, and again points to important differences between the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. For example the 129Xe/132Xe ratio of martian atmosphere would be twice that of terrestrial air and the 36Ar/38Ar ratio strongly different from the terrestrial or solar value. There is a need for confirming that the atmospheric components found in SNC meteorites actually represents the atmosphere of Mars, or to determine how different they are. Paloma is an instrument designed to generate elemental and isotopic data for He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe (and other gases) using a mass spectrometer with a purification and separation line. Gas purification and separation did not exist on the Vicking instrument. Because Paloma includes purification and separation, we expect strong improvement in precision. Ne, Ar and Xe isotope ratios should be obtained with an accuracy of better than 1%. Determination of the presently unknown ^3He/^4He ratio is also awaited from this experiment. Knowledge of noble gas isotopes in Mars atmosphere will allow some insight into major planetary processes such as degassing (^3He/^4He, 40Ar/36Ar, 129Xe/130Xe, 136Xe/130Xe), gravitational escape to space (^3He/^4He, 20Ne/22Ne), hydrodynamic escape and/or impact erosion of the

  2. Noble metal alloys for metal-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1985-10-01

    A review of the comparative characteristics and properties of noble metal alloys used for metal-ceramic restorations has been presented. Selection of an alloy for one's practice should be based on long-term clinical data, physical properties, esthetic potential, and laboratory data on metal-ceramic bond strength and thermal compatibility with commercial dental porcelains. Although gold-based alloys, such as the Au-Pt-Pd, Au-Pd-Ag, and Au-Pd classes, may appear to be costly compared with the palladium-based alloys, they have clearly established their clinical integrity and acceptability over an extended period of time. Other than the relatively low sag resistance of the high gold-low silver content alloys and the potential thermal incompatibility with some commercial porcelain products, few clinical failures have been observed. The palladium-based alloys are less costly than the gold-based alloys. Palladium-silver alloys require extra precautions to minimize porcelain discoloration. Palladium-copper and palladium-cobalt alloys may also cause porcelain discoloration, as copper and cobalt are used as colorants in glasses. The palladium-cobalt alloys are least susceptible to high-temperature creep compared with all classes of noble metals. Nevertheless, insufficient clinical data exist to advocate the general use of the palladium-copper and palladium-cobalt alloys at the present time. One should base the selection and use of these alloys in part on their ability to meet the requirements of the ADA Acceptance Program. A list of acceptable or provisionally acceptable alloys is available from the American Dental Association and is published annually in the Journal of the American Dental Association. Dentists have the legal and ethical responsibility for selection of alloys used for cast restorations. This responsibility should not be delegated to the dental laboratory technician. It is advisable to discuss the criteria for selection of an alloy with the technician and the

  3. Interactions of noble metal nanoparticles with their environment; Wechselwirkungen von Edelmetallnanopartikeln mit ihrer Umgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reismann, Maximilian

    2009-12-08

    of the described procedure is the lack of superposition of the changes in the recorded spectra by spectral contributions of shape and size of the nanoparticle. This simplifies the interpretation of the recorded spectra considerably. An essential requirement for the application of noble-metal nanoparticles in medical technology consist of their tunability into the near-infrared spectral region. In this spectral region, the human tissue is more transparent to light irradiation than in the visible region, which allows for using light irradiation to affect nanoparticles in vivo. Elongated gold nanoparticles (nanorods) are promising candidates for this task as their resonance frequency can be tuned over a wide spectral region by varying their size and their aspect ratio. Damping of the plasmon oscillation is an important physical origin for this dependency on shape and size. In this thesis, a contribution of the plasmon damping is investigated that is caused by electronic-scattering of the oscillating conduction electrons at the nanoparticle surface. For this investigation, light-scattering spectra of single gold nanorods are recorded in a systematic approach. The large enhancement of optical fields at the surface of nanoparticles can be used to excite non linear optical phenomena, for example Raman scattering. In this thesis, the construction of a setup is presented that aims at using this enhancement effect for the detection of Raman-scattering signals. This setup is tested, and the ability to enhance the detection of Raman signals is compared to different nanostructured samples. (orig.)

  4. Ab initio theory of noble gas atoms in bcc transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Zhang, Yongfeng; Gao, Yipeng; Gan, Jian

    2018-06-18

    Systematic ab initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to gain fundamental understanding of the interactions between noble gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar and Kr) and bcc transition metals in groups 5B (V, Nb and Ta), 6B (Cr, Mo and W) and 8B (Fe). Our charge density analysis indicates that the strong polarization of nearest-neighbor metal atoms by noble gas interstitials is the electronic origin of their high formation energies. Such polarization becomes more significant with an increasing gas atom size and interstitial charge density in the host bcc metal, which explains the similar trend followed by the unrelaxed formation energies of noble gas interstitials. Upon allowing for local relaxation, nearby metal atoms move farther away from gas interstitials in order to decrease polarization, albeit at the expense of increasing the elastic strain energy. Such atomic relaxation is found to play an important role in governing both the energetics and site preference of noble gas atoms in bcc metals. Our most notable finding is that the fully relaxed formation energies of noble gas interstitials are strongly correlated with the elastic shear modulus of the bcc metal, and the physical origin of this unexpected correlation has been elucidated by our theoretical analysis based on the effective-medium theory. The kinetic behavior of noble gas atoms and their interaction with pre-existing vacancies in bcc transition metals have also been discussed in this work.

  5. Steady-state ozone concentration in radiation induced noble gas-oxygen discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayed-Ali, H.E.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of steady-state ozone concentrations in continuous radiation induced noble gas-O 2 and noble gas-O 2 -SF 6 mixtures has been accomplished. The discharges were created through the bombardment of the gases with energetic particles from the boron-10 (n,α) lithium-7 nuclear reaction. Three noble gases were studied, He, Ne, and Ar at partial pressures of few hundred Torr. The dose rates studied were in the order of 10 15 eV.cm -3 .s -1 . The experimental apparatus and proceedure were previously described. The experimentally observed stead-state ozone concentrations in noble gas-O 2 discharges were about an order of magnitude lower than that observed for oxygen radiolysis at similar dose rates. These results were physically explained by an enhanced role of negative ionic reactions with ozone causing its destruction. In noble gas-O 2 -SF 6 mixtures, the steady-state ozone concentrations were found to be significantly higher (3-6 times) than that without the SF 6 addition. This observation was contrary to only a small increase observed after SF 6 addition to a few hundred Torr oxygen and is explained by an enhanced rate of electron dissociative attachment of ozone in noble gas-O 2 discharges

  6. Steady-state ozone concentrations in radiation induced noble gas-oxygen discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayed-Ali, H.E.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of steady-state ozone concentrations in continuous radiation induced noble gas-O/sub 2/ and noble gas-o/sub 2/-SF/sub 6/ mixtures has been accomplished. The discharges were created through the bombardment of the gases with energetic particles from the boron-10 (n,α) lithium-7 nuclear reaction. Three noble gases were studied, He, Ne, and Ar at partial pressures of few hundred Torr. The dose rates studied were in the order of 10/sup 15/ eV . cm/sup -3/ . s/sup -1/. The experimental apparatus and procedure were previously described. The experimentally observed steady-state ozone concentrations in noble gas-O/sub 2/ discharges were about an order of magnitude lower than that observed for oxygen radiolysis at similar dose rates. These results were physically explained by an enhanced role of negative ionic reactions with ozone causing its destruction. In noble gas-O/sub 2/-SF/sub 6/ mixtures, the steady-state ozone concentrations were found to be significantly higher (3-6 times) than that without the SF/sub 6/ addition. This observation was contrary to only a small increase observed after SF/sub 6/ addition to a few hundred Torr oxygen and is explained by an enhanced rate of electron dissociative attachment of ozone in noble gas-O/sub 2/ discharges

  7. Filamentous fungi associated with natural infection of noble rot on withered grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, M; Simonato, B; Favati, F; Bernardi, P; Sbarbati, A; Zapparoli, G

    2018-05-02

    The effects of noble rot infection of grapes on the characteristics of different types of wine, including Italian passito wine, are well known. Nevertheless, there is still little information on filamentous fungi associated with noble-rotten grapes. In this study, withered Garganega grapes for passito wine production, naturally infected by noble rot, were analyzed and compared to sound grapes. Skin morphology and fungal population on berry surfaces were analyzed. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed microcracks, germination conidia and branched hyphae on noble-rotten berries. Penicillium, Aureobasidium and Cladosporium were the most frequent genera present. Analysis of single berries displayed higher heterogeneity of epiphytic fungi in those infected by noble-rot than in sound berries. Penicillium adametzoides, Cladosporium cladospoirioides and Coniochaeta polymorpha were recovered. These, to the best of our knowledge, had never been previously isolated from withered grapes and, for C. polymorpha, from grapevine. This study provided novel data on noble rot mycobiota and suggests that fungi that co-habit with B. cinerea could have an important role on grape and wine quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  9. On the noble gas isotopic fractionation in naturally occurring gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, B.

    1984-01-01

    The isotopic composition of neon in the mantle is an important geochemical constraint on the formation of the earth and subsequent degassing. Some deviation of neon isotopic composition in natural gas and rock samples from the atmospheric value which can not be accounted for by the known nuclear process has been reported, and Nagao et al. interpreted the deviation as the result of mass fractionation in natural gas in Japan. The possible cause of such fractionation was investigated. Gaseous diffusion, such as (a) free-molecule diffusion, (b) mutual diffusion and (c) thermal diffusion, is able to cause isotopic fractionation. After the detailed consideration on these three diffusion processes, conclusion that free-molecule diffusion occurs only in very particular condition, and it is questionable that thermal diffusion occurs in nature, were obtained. (b) which means the interaction of two or more gases, is supposed to occur in nature, and is able to confirm experimentally. In mutual diffusion only, gas transfer is concerned, but other form of fractionation should not be neglected. In solid diffusion, gas is trapped by fine grained sedimentary rocks, and may be fractionated by adsorption and communication to exterior through minute channels. Underground water also works as noble gas reservoir. For example, when gas stream is in contact with water, continuous exchange is possible to take place at the interface of gas and liquid, which contributes to the fractionation. (Ishimitsu, A.)

  10. Hydrogen production during processing of radioactive sludge containing noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, B.C.; Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen was produced when radioactive sludge from Savannah River Site radioactive waste containing noble metals was reacted with formic acid. This will occur in a process tank in the Defense Waste Facility at SRS when waste is vitrified. Radioactive sludges from four tanks were tested in a lab-scale apparatus. Maximum hydrogen generation rates varied from 5 x10 -7 g H 2 /hr/g of sludge from the least reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 51) to 2 x10 -4 g H 2 /hr/g of sludge from the most reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 11). The time required for the hydrogen generation to reach a maximum varied from 4.1 to 25 hours. In addition to hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were produced and the pH of the reaction slurry increased. In all cases, the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were generated before the hydrogen. The results are in agreement with large-scale studies using simulated sludges

  11. Underground Nuclear Explosions and Release of Radioactive Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubasov, Yuri V.

    2010-05-01

    Over a period in 1961-1990 496 underground nuclear tests and explosions of different purpose and in different rocks were conducted in the Soviet Union at Semipalatinsk and anovaya Zemlya Test Sites. A total of 340 underground nuclear tests were conducted at the Semipalatinsk Test Site. One hundred seventy-nine explosions (52.6%) among them were classified as these of complete containment, 145 explosions (42.6%) as explosions with weak release of radioactive noble gases (RNG), 12 explosions (3.5%) as explosions with nonstandard radiation situation, and four excavation explosions with ground ejection (1.1%). Thirty-nine nuclear tests had been conducted at the Novaya Zemlya Test Site; six of them - in shafts. In 14 tests (36%) there were no RNG release. Twenty-three tests have been accompanied by RNG release into the atmosphere without sedimental contamination. Nonstandard radiation situation occurred in two tests. In incomplete containment explosions both early-time RNG release (up to ~1 h) and late-time release from 1 to 28 h after the explosion were observed. Sometimes gas release took place for several days, and it occurred either through tunnel portal or epicentral zone, depending on atmospheric air temperature.

  12. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak, E-mail: s1270872@sms.ed.ac.uk; Hermann, Andreas, E-mail: a.hermann@ed.ac.uk [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-21

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-I{sub h}, ice-I{sub c}, ice-II, and C{sub 0} interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C{sub 0} water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C{sub 0} hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems.

  13. Laser-assisted biosynthesis for noble nanoparticles production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhtarev, Tatiana; Edwards, Vernessa; Kukhtareva, Nickolai; Moses, Sherita

    2014-08-01

    Extracellular Biosynthesis technique (EBS) for nanoparticles production has attracted a lot of attention as an environmentally friendly and an inexpensive methodology. Our recent research was focused on the rapid approach of the green synthesis method and the reduction of the homogeneous size distribution of nanoparticles using pulse laser application. Noble nanoparticles (NNPs) were produced using various ethanol and water plant extracts. The plants were chosen based on their biomedical applications. The plants we used were Magnolia grandiflora, Geranium, Aloe `tingtinkie', Aloe barbadensis (Aloe Vera), Eucalyptus angophoroides, Sansevieria trifasciata, Impatiens scapiflora. Water and ethanol extract, were used as reducing agents to produce the nanoparticles. The reaction process was monitored using a UV-Visible spectroscopy. NNPs were characterized by Fourier Transfer Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and the Dynamic Light Scattering technique (DLS). During the pulse laser Nd-YAG illumination (λ=1064nm, 532nm, PE= 450mJ, 200mJ, 10 min) the blue shift of the surface plasmon resonance absorption peak was observed from ~424nm to 403nm for silver NP; and from ~530nm to 520 nm for gold NPs. In addition, NNPs solution after Nd-YAG illumination was characterized by the narrowing of the surface plasmon absorption resonance band, which corresponds to monodispersed NNPS distribution. FTIR, TEM, DLS, Zeta potential results demonstrated that NNPs were surrounded by biological molecules, which naturally stabilized nanosolutions for months. Cytotoxicity investigation of biosynthesized NNPs is in progress.

  14. Applications of noble gas radiation detectors to counter-terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanier, Peter E.; Forman, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Radiation detectors are essential tools in the detection, analysis and disposition of potential terrorist devices containing hazardous radioactive and/or fissionable materials. For applications where stand-off distance and source shielding are limiting factors, large detectors have advantages over small ones. The ability to distinguish between Special Nuclear Materials and false-positive signals from natural or man-made benign sources is also important. Ionization chambers containing compressed noble gases, notably xenon and helium-3, can be scaled up to very large sizes, improving the solid angle for acceptance of radiation from a distant source. Gamma spectrometers using Xe have a factor of three better energy resolution than NaI scintillators, allowing better discrimination between radioisotopes. Xenon detectors can be constructed so as to have extremely low leakage currents, enabling them to operate for long periods of time on batteries or solar cells. They are not sensitive to fluctuations in ambient temperature, and are therefore suitable for deployment in outdoor locations. Position-sensitive 3He chambers have been built as large as 3000 cm2, and with spatial resolution of less than 1 mm. Combined with coded apertures made of cadmium, they can be used to create images of thermal neutron sources. The natural background of spallation neutrons from cosmic rays generates a very low count rate, so this instrument could be quite effective at identifying a man-made source, such as a spontaneous fission source (Pu) in contact with a moderator (high explosive)

  15. HARAD, Decay Isotope Concentration from Atmospheric Noble-Gas Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: HARAD calculates concentrations of radioactive daughters in air following the atmospheric release of a parent radionuclide for a variety of release heights and meteorological conditions. It can be applied most profitably to the assessment of doses to man from the noble gases such as Rn-222, Rn-220, and Xe and Kr isotopes. These gases can produce significant quantities of short-lived particulate daughters in an airborne plume, which are the major contributors to dose. The simultaneous processes of radioactive decay, buildup and environmental loss due to wet and dry deposition on ground surfaces are calculated for a daughter chain in an airborne plume as it is dispersed downwind from a point of release of a parent. 2 - Method of solution: The code evaluates the analytic solution to the set of coupled first order differential equations describing time variation of the concentration of a chain of radionuclides. The analytic solutions assume that the coefficient describing the fractional rate of dry deposition is constant with time. To account for the variation the time coordinate is automatically divided into intervals and a set of average values are used. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: - The maximum length of decay chain is 10 nuclides; calculations can be made at a maximum of 24 downwind distances

  16. Noble gas mass spectrometry. Application to earth sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoka, Nobuo [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1983-03-01

    The method for the isotopic analysis of trace noble gas is described briefly, and the theoretical background of the application to earth science is discussed. Furthermore, the measured results of /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio in volcanic gases and hot spring gases from various areas in Japan, and /sup 3/He//sup 4/He and /sup 40/Ar//sup 36/Ar ratios in mantle-origi nated rocks and minerals are presented. The examples of the application of these results to the field of earth science are introduced. The magma activity which is specific to the considered volcano is identified from the decrease in /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio with the process of volcanic activity. The possibility of earthquake prediction by the measurement of /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio is suggested from the measured results of /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio in the gas sampled from an earthquake fault. The isotopes of He and Ar in a diamond were analyzed, and from these results, the isotope composition in mantle when the diamond had been formed was estimated. The mantle model that the mantle is constituted from upper depleted mantle and lower fertile mantle is explained, based on the results of the analysis of He and Ar isotopes in various volcanic eruptions.

  17. Ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray source: saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Charles K.; Boyer, Keith

    2004-02-17

    An apparatus and method for the generation of ultrabright multikilovolt x-rays from saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states is described. Conditions for x-ray amplification in this spectral region combine the production of cold, high-Z matter, with the direct, selective multiphoton excitation of hollow atoms from clusters using ultraviolet radiation and a nonlinear mode of confined, self-channeled propagation in plasmas. Data obtained is consistent with the presence of saturated amplification on several transition arrays of the hollow atom Xe(L) spectrum (.lambda..about.2.9 .ANG.). An estimate of the peak brightness achieved is .about.10.sup.29 .gamma..multidot.s.sup.-1.multidot.mm.sup.-2.multidot.mr.sup.-2 (0.1% Bandwidth).sup.-1, that is .about.10.sup.5 -fold higher than presently available synchotron technology.

  18. Noble Estate Self-Government in Russia: Between the State and Civil Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Yu. Morozov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to assessing the role of noble self-governance in the history of Russia. According to Boris Mironov, before the Great Reforms of the 1860s, each noble assembly was a part of civil society. This point of view has aroused objections and debate among Russian historians. Morozov analyzed the historiographical aspect of the problem and demonstrated the impact of the socio-political context of their scientific work on Russian historians. In his opinion, from a purely legal point of view, there is reason to conclude that the autonomy of noble assemblies increased in the first half of the 19th century. However, the question of the extent to which these opportunities were realized in practice has been poorly studied. In the literature, there are examples of effective methods of influencing the government at the noble assemblies despite legal restrictions, as well as examples of noble assemblies that did not restrain the arbitrariness of the crown authority, did not protect their members from its abuse, and did not serve as the expression of public opinion. Mironov’s attempt to place in doubt the fact of the widespread presence of absenteeism seems unconvincing to Morozov. However, he agrees with Mironov that after 1861, the nobility really became a part of civil society, because the activity of noble organizations increased substantially in many different directions, including the political. For almost half a century of its history, the noble corporate organization evolved from a traditional institution into a civil one, which retained many features of traditional organization.

  19. Experimental studies and model analysis of noble gas fractionation in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xin; Kennedy, B. Mack.; Evans, William C.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The noble gases, which are chemically inert under normal terrestrial conditions but vary systematically across a wide range of atomic mass and diffusivity, offer a multicomponent approach to investigating gas dynamics in unsaturated soil horizons, including transfer of gas between saturated zones, unsaturated zones, and the atmosphere. To evaluate the degree to which fractionation of noble gases in the presence of an advective–diffusive flux agrees with existing theory, a simple laboratory sand column experiment was conducted. Pure CO2 was injected at the base of the column, providing a series of constant CO2 fluxes through the column. At five fixed sampling depths within the system, samples were collected for CO2 and noble gas analyses, and ambient pressures were measured. Both the advection–diffusion and dusty gas models were used to simulate the behavior of CO2 and noble gases under the experimental conditions, and the simulations were compared with the measured depth-dependent concentration profiles of the gases. Given the relatively high permeability of the sand column (5 ´ 10−11 m2), Knudsen diffusion terms were small, and both the dusty gas model and the advection–diffusion model accurately predicted the concentration profiles of the CO2 and atmospheric noble gases across a range of CO2 flux from ?700 to 10,000 g m−2 d−1. The agreement between predicted and measured gas concentrations demonstrated that, when applied to natural systems, the multi-component capability provided by the noble gases can be exploited to constrain component and total gas fluxes of non-conserved (CO2) and conserved (noble gas) species or attributes of the soil column relevant to gas transport, such as porosity, tortuosity, and gas saturation.

  20. Noble Gas Signatures in Groundwater and Rainwater on the Island of Maui, Hawaii - Developing a New Noble Gas Application in Fractured, Volcanic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, M. C.; Niu, Y.; Warrier, R. B.; Hall, C. M.; Gingerich, S. B.; Scholl, M. A.; Bouvier, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work in the Galapagos Islands suggests that noble gas temperatures (NGTs) in fractured groundwater systems reflect the temperature of the ground surface at the time of infiltration rather than the mean annual air temperature (MAAT) value as commonly assumed in sedimentary systems where NGTs are typically used as indicators of past climate. This suggests that noble gases in fractured areas may record seasonality, and thus, provide information about timing of recharge in addition to location. Calculation of NGTs assumes that rain-derived recharge at the water table is in equilibrium with ground air. Lack of noble gas equilibration with respect to surface conditions, however, was observed in high-altitude springs in the Galapagos Islands and in a rainwater pilot study in Michigan, supporting the NGT seasonality hypothesis. Developing this new NGT application will lead to a better understanding of fractured groundwater flow systems and will contribute to improved water resource management plans. This study, carried out on Maui, Hawaii, is meant to test these hypotheses while improving knowledge of this island's groundwater flow system where limited hydrologic data are available. Here, we present the first results of noble gas analyses from samples collected in springs, groundwater wells and rainwater on northeast Maui. Results show that like most Michigan rainwater samples, rainwater from Maui is in disequilibrium with surface conditions and follows a mass-dependent pattern. Spring samples follow a similar pattern to that of rainwater and suggest that spring water originates directly from rainfall. These findings further support the hypothesis of NGT seasonality. However, while the atmospheric composition of noble gases points to direct supply from rainfall to spring aquifer systems, a direct connection between spring water and deeper aquifer levels or the mantle is apparent from He isotopic ratios which display an almost pure He mantle component in some springs.

  1. Synthesis of Hydrophilic Sulfur-Containing Adsorbents for Noble Metals Having Thiocarbonyl Group Based on a Methacrylate Bearing Dithiocarbonate Moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Kinemuchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel hydrophilic sulfur-containing adsorbents for noble metals were prepared by the radical terpolymerization of a methacrylate bearing dithiocarbonate moieties (DTCMMA, hydrophilic monomers, and a cross-linker. The resulting adsorbents efficiently and selectively adsorbed noble metals (Au, Ag, and Pd from various multielement aqueous solutions at room temperature owing to the thiocarbonyl group having high affinity toward noble metals. The metal adsorption by the adsorbents was proceeded by simple mixing followed by filtration. The noble metal selectivity of the adsorbent obtained from DTCMMA and N-isopropylacrylamide was higher than that of the adsorbent obtained from DTCMMA and N,N-dimethylacrylamide due to the lower nonspecific adsorption.

  2. Process for Making a Noble Metal on Tin Oxide Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Miller, Irvin; Upchurch, Billy

    2010-01-01

    To produce a noble metal-on-metal oxide catalyst on an inert, high-surface-area support material (that functions as a catalyst at approximately room temperature using chloride-free reagents), for use in a carbon dioxide laser, requires two steps: First, a commercially available, inert, high-surface-area support material (silica spheres) is coated with a thin layer of metal oxide, a monolayer equivalent. Very beneficial results have been obtained using nitric acid as an oxidizing agent because it leaves no residue. It is also helpful if the spheres are first deaerated by boiling in water to allow the entire surface to be coated. A metal, such as tin, is then dissolved in the oxidizing agent/support material mixture to yield, in the case of tin, metastannic acid. Although tin has proven especially beneficial for use in a closed-cycle CO2 laser, in general any metal with two valence states, such as most transition metals and antimony, may be used. The metastannic acid will be adsorbed onto the high-surface-area spheres, coating them. Any excess oxidizing agent is then evaporated, and the resulting metastannic acid-coated spheres are dried and calcined, whereby the metastannic acid becomes tin(IV) oxide. The second step is accomplished by preparing an aqueous mixture of the tin(IV) oxide-coated spheres, and a soluble, chloride-free salt of at least one catalyst metal. The catalyst metal may be selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, gold, and rhodium, or other platinum group metals. Extremely beneficial results have been obtained using chloride-free salts of platinum, palladium, or a combination thereof, such as tetraammineplatinum (II) hydroxide ([Pt(NH3)4] (OH)2), or tetraammine palladium nitrate ([Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2).

  3. Noble Gas Surface Flux Simulations And Atmospheric Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, Charles R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sun, Yunwei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    Signatures from underground nuclear explosions or UNEs are strongly influenced by the containment regime surrounding them. The degree of gas leakage from the detonation cavity to the surface obviously affects the magnitude of surface fluxes of radioxenon that might be detected during the course of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspection. In turn, the magnitude of surface fluxes will influence the downwind detectability of the radioxenon atmospheric signature from the event. Less obvious is the influence that leakage rates have on the evolution of radioxenon isotopes in the cavity or the downwind radioisotopic measurements that might be made. The objective of this letter report is to summarize our attempt to better understand how containment conditions affect both the detection and interpretation of radioxenon signatures obtained from sampling at the ground surface near an event as well as at greater distances in the atmosphere. In the discussion that follows, we make no attempt to consider other sources of radioactive noble gases such as natural backgrounds or atmospheric contamination and, for simplicity, only focus on detonation-produced radioxenon gases. Summarizing our simulations, they show that the decay of radioxenon isotopes (e.g., Xe-133, Xe-131m, Xe-133m and Xe-135) and their migration to the surface following a UNE means that the possibility of detecting these gases exists within a window of opportunity. In some cases, seeps or venting of detonation gases may allow significant quantities to reach the surface and be released into the atmosphere immediately following a UNE. In other release scenarios – the ones we consider here – hours to days may be required for gases to reach the surface at detectable levels. These release models are most likely more characteristic of “fully contained” events that lack prompt venting, but which still leak gas slowly across the surface for periods of months.

  4. Status and management of noble crayfish Astacus astacus in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paaver

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Noble crayfish Astacus astacus (L. is an indigenous and the only crayfish species in Estonia. It is potentially endangered by invasion of alien species, diseases and habitat deterioration but does not have legal protected status and is fished only for recreational purpose. Crayfish Working Group of Ministry of Environment and Department of Aquaculture of the Estonian University of Life Sciences have developed crayfish conservation and management plan. Since 1994 standardized test fishing with traps (which catch only crayfish over 7 cm TL has been carried out and database of these fishings shows, that crayfish is dwelling in more than 255 sites in the lakes, rivers, streams, artificial reservoirs. In 52% of monitored sites populations are weak, catch per trap night is below 1 specimen. Exceptionally rich is the stock on the island Saaremaa, where in 59% of populations catch per trap night is over 4 and can reach 50. Licensed recreational catch is allowed in regions, where monitoring data show good status of crayfish stock. It is not allowed to sell the crayfish caught on recreational license. Crayfishing season is limited with August, size limit in recreational fishery is 11 cm TL. There are 10 operating crayfish farms and 15 are under construction. The farms produce yearly around 1000 kg of commercial size crayfish for export to Finland. Over 200000 juveniles are produced for restocking yearly. Restocking projects e.g. restoration of populations, which have been lost because of plague have been successful. The main threat factor is crayfish plague. In 2006–2007 it destroyed the stock of crayfish farms of companies Veteko, Pähkla, Astacus and wild population of Põduste river on the island Saaremaa.

  5. Noble gas control room accident filtration system for severe accident conditions (N-CRAFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Axel; Stiepani, Cristoph; Drechsler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Severe accidents might cause the release of airborne radioactive substances to the environment of the NPP either due to containment leakages or due to intentional filtered containment venting. In the latter case aerosols and iodine are retained, however noble gases are not retainable by the FCVS or by conventional air filtration systems like HEPA filters and iodine absorbers. Radioactive noble gases nevertheless dominate the activity release depending on the venting procedure and the weather conditions. To prevent unacceptable contamination of the control room atmosphere by noble gases, AREVA GmbH has developed a noble gas control room accident filtration system (CRAFT) which can supply purified fresh air to the control room without time limitation. The retention process is based on dynamic adsorption of noble gases on activated carbon. The system consists of delay lines (carbon columns) which are operated by a continuous and simultaneous adsorption and desorption process. CRAFT allows minimization of the dose rate inside the control room and ensures low radiation exposure to the staff by maintaining the control room environment suitable for prolonged occupancy throughout the duration of the accident. CRAFT consists of a proven modular design either transportable or permanently installed. (author)

  6. Noble gas encapsulation into carbon nanotubes: Predictions from analytical model and DFT studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramani, Sree Ganesh; Singh, Devendra; Swathi, R. S., E-mail: swathi@iisertvm.ac.in [School of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Thiruvananthapuram (IISER-TVM), Kerala 695016 (India)

    2014-11-14

    The energetics for the interaction of the noble gas atoms with the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated using an analytical model and density functional theory calculations. Encapsulation of the noble gas atoms, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe into CNTs of various chiralities is studied in detail using an analytical model, developed earlier by Hill and co-workers. The constrained motion of the noble gas atoms along the axes of the CNTs as well as the off-axis motion are discussed. Analyses of the forces, interaction energies, acceptance and suction energies for the encapsulation enable us to predict the optimal CNTs that can encapsulate each of the noble gas atoms. We find that CNTs of radii 2.98 − 4.20 Å (chiral indices, (5,4), (6,4), (9,1), (6,6), and (9,3)) can efficiently encapsulate the He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms, respectively. Endohedral adsorption of all the noble gas atoms is preferred over exohedral adsorption on various CNTs. The results obtained using the analytical model are subsequently compared with the calculations performed with the dispersion-including density functional theory at the M06 − 2X level using a triple-zeta basis set and good qualitative agreement is found. The analytical model is however found to be computationally cheap as the equations can be numerically programmed and the results obtained in comparatively very less time.

  7. Growth responses of Neurospora crassa to increased partial pressures of the noble gases and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, R G; Schreiner, H R; Doebbler, G F

    1966-02-01

    Buchheit, R. G. (Union Carbide Corp., Tonawanda, N.Y.), H. R. Schreiner, and G. F. Doebbler. Growth responses of Neurospora crassa to increased partial pressures of the noble gases and nitrogen. J. Bacteriol. 91:622-627. 1966.-Growth rate of the fungus Neurospora crassa depends in part on the nature of metabolically "inert gas" present in its environment. At high partial pressures, the noble gas elements (helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) inhibit growth in the order: Xe > Kr> Ar > Ne > He. Nitrogen (N(2)) closely resembles He in inhibitory effectiveness. Partial pressures required for 50% inhibition of growth were: Xe (0.8 atm), Kr (1.6 atm), Ar (3.8 atm), Ne (35 atm), and He ( approximately 300 atm). With respect to inhibition of growth, the noble gases and N(2) differ qualitatively and quantitatively from the order of effectiveness found with other biological effects, i.e., narcosis, inhibition of insect development, depression of O(2)-dependent radiation sensitivity, and effects on tissue-slice glycolysis and respiration. Partial pressures giving 50% inhibition of N. crassa growth parallel various physical properties (i.e., solubilities, solubility ratios, etc.) of the noble gases. Linear correlation of 50% inhibition pressures to the polarizability and of the logarithm of pressure to the first and second ionization potentials suggests the involvement of weak intermolecular interactions or charge-transfer in the biological activity of the noble gases.

  8. A membrane inlet mass spectrometry system for noble gases at natural abundances in gas and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Ate; Singleton, Michael J; Hillegonds, Darren J; Velsko, Carol A; Moran, Jean E; Esser, Bradley K

    2013-11-15

    Noble gases dissolved in groundwater can reveal paleotemperatures, recharge conditions, and precise travel times. The collection and analysis of noble gas samples are cumbersome, involving noble gas purification, cryogenic separation and static mass spectrometry. A quicker and more efficient sample analysis method is required for introduced tracer studies and laboratory experiments. A Noble Gas Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry (NG-MIMS) system was developed to measure noble gases at natural abundances in gas and water samples. The NG-MIMS system consists of a membrane inlet, a dry-ice water trap, a carbon-dioxide trap, two getters, a gate valve, a turbomolecular pump and a quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an electron multiplier. Noble gases isotopes (4)He, (22)Ne, (38)Ar, (84)Kr and (132)Xe are measured every 10 s. The NG-MIMS system can reproduce measurements made on a traditional noble gas mass spectrometer system with precisions of 2%, 8%, 1%, 1% and 3% for He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, respectively. Noble gas concentrations measured in an artificial recharge pond were used to monitor an introduced xenon tracer and to reconstruct temperature variations to within 2 °C. Additional experiments demonstrated the capability to measure noble gases in gas and in water samples, in real time. The NG-MIMS system is capable of providing analyses sufficiently accurate and precise for introduced noble gas tracers at managed aquifer recharge facilities, groundwater fingerprinting based on excess air and noble gas recharge temperature, and field and laboratory studies investigating ebullition and diffusive exchange. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF VERNALIZATED SEMI-NOBLE GARLIC CULTIVARS IN WESTERN RIO GRANDE DO NORTE STATE, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAFAELLA RAYANE MACEDO DE LUCENA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Garlic is a vegetable that has economic and social relevance in Brazil. Rio Grande do Norte is among the consumer states, however, despite having regions with favorable conditions for growing garlic, it depends on imports of this product to meet its demand. The introduction of cultivars that have high yield and quality, and the adjustments in vernalization technology, which is a key issue for adaptation of new cultivars, are mechanisms that can contribute to garlic revitalization in areas previously producing this vegetable. Therefore, the objective of this work was to assess the quality characteristics of semi-noble garlic cultivars subjected to different bulb-seed pre-planting vernalization periods in two counties of the Western Mesoregion of Rio Grande do Norte State (RN, Brazil. Two experiments were simultaneously conducted in Barauna RN and Governador Dix-sept Rosado RN, from April to November, 2012. A complete randomized block experimental design was used with four replications. The treatments were arranged in split-plot design, with the plots consisted of cultivars (Gigante-do-Nucleo and BRS-Hozan and subplots consisted of bulb-seed pre-planting vernalization (4±1°C periods (0, 10, 20 and 30 days. The evaluations consisted of bulb diameter, pH, titratable acidity, soluble solids, total soluble sugars, reducing sugars, pungency, total solids and industrial index. The use of 10-day bulb-seed pre-planting vernalization increased the semi-noble garlic quality produced in Barauna and Governador Dix-sept Rosado. The cultivars Gigante-do-Nucleo and BRS-Hozan presented good prospects for industrialization, with good characteristics of flavor and aroma.

  10. Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: The first two noble metals operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, N.D.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Smith, M.E.; Miller, D.H.; Ritter, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas systems. The facility is the first pilot-scale melter system capable of processing mercury, and flowsheet levels of halides and noble metals. In order to characterize the processing of noble metals (Pd, Rh, Ru, and Ag) on a large scale, the IDMS will be operated batchstyle for at least nine feed preparation cycles. The first two of these operations are complete. The major observation to date occurred during the second run when significant amounts of hydrogen were evolved during the feed preparation cycle. The runs were conducted between June 7, 1990 and March 8, 1991. This time period included nearly six months of ''fix-up'' time when forced air purges were installed on the SRAT MFT and other feed preparation vessels to allow continued noble metals experimentation

  11. Element distribution and noble gas isotopic abundances in lunar meteorite Allan Hills A81005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraehenbuehl, U.; Eugster, O.; Niedermann, S.

    1986-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite ALLAN HILLS A81005, an anorthositic breccia, is recognized to be of lunar origin. The noble gases in this meteorite were analyzed and found to be solar-wind implanted gases, whose absolute and relative concentrations are quite similar to those in lunar regolith samples. A sample of this meteorite was obtained for the analysis of the noble gas isotopes, including Kr(81), and for the determination of the elemental abundances. In order to better determine the volume derived from the surface correlated gases, grain size fractions were prepared. The results of the instrumental measurements of the gamma radiation are listed. From the amounts of cosmic ray produced noble gases and respective production rates, the lunar surface residence times were calculated. It was concluded that the lunar surface time is about half a billion years

  12. Quality management for noble gas trace analysis; Qualitaetssicherung bei der Edelgasspurenanalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, S.; Konrad, M.; Kumberg, T.; Schlosser, C. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Freiburg (Germany); Gohla, H. [Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), Vienna International Centre, Vienna (Austria). Preparatory Commission

    2014-01-20

    The Federal Office for Radiation Protection operates measurement systems to determine the activity concentrations of Krypton-85 and Xenon-133 in air samples since the early 70s. Certified standards with stable noble gas admixtures are still missing for quality assurance (certified activity concentrations). The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is currently establishing a global noble gas monitoring network for the verification of compliance with the Treaty. In cooperation with CTBTO the BfS currently develops concepts of quality assurance for noble gas measurements. Opportunities for quality assurance without using certified standards are discussed by comparisons between individual laboratories and internal audits. The results from the first CTBTO laboratory intercomparison with synthetic radioxenon samples look very promising.

  13. Noble metal behavior during melting of simulated high-level nuclear waste glass feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Noble metals and their oxides can settle in waste glass melters and cause electrical shorting. Simulated waste feeds from Hanford, Savannah River, and Germany were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C--1000 degrees C and examined by electron microscopy to determine shapes, sizes, and distribution of noble metal particles as a function of temperature. Individual noble metal particles and agglomerates of rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (RuO 2 ), and palladium (Pd), as well as their alloys, were seen. the majority of particles and agglomerates were generally less than 10 microns; however, large agglomerations (up to 1 mm) were found in the German feed. Detailed particle distribution and characterization was performed for a Hanford waste to provide input to computer modeling of particle settling in the melter

  14. Noble metal behavior during melting of simulated high-level nuclear waste glass feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1994-01-01

    Noble metals and their oxides can settle in waste glass melters and cause electrical shorting. Simulate waste feeds from Hanford, Savannah River, and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C to 1000 degrees C and examined by electron microscopy to determine shapes, sizes, and distribution of noble metal particles as a function of temperature. Individual noble metal particles and agglomerates of rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (RuO 2 ), and palladium (Pd), as well as their alloys, were seen. The majority of particles and agglomerates were generally less than 10 μm; however, large agglomerations (up to 1 mm) were found in the German feed. 5 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Oxidation behaviour of noble-metal inclusions in used UO2 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEachern, R.

    1997-07-01

    The literature on the chemistry of the noble-metal (Mo-Rh-Ru-Pd-Tc) inclusions found in used nuclear fuel has been reviewed. The Mo-Ru-Pd phase diagram is reasonably well understood, and the pseudoternary Mo-(Tc+Ru)-Rh+Pd) system can be used to qualitatively understand the phase chemistry of the noble-metal inclusions. The kinetics of the oxidation reaction are not particularly well understood, but they are of limited applicability to understanding the properties of used fuel. In contrast, it is important to determine the thermodynamic activity of molybdenum in noble-metal inclusions, so that analysis of their molybdenum content can be used as a probe of the local oxygen potential of the used fuel. (author)

  16. Formation of noble metal nanocrystals in the presence of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Justin Lockheart

    One of the most promising, yet least studied routes for producing biocompatible nanostructures involves synthesis in the presence of biomolecules. I hypothesized that globular proteins could provide a suitable framework to regulate the formation of noble metal nanocrystals. As proof of concept, I designed two novel synthesis protocols utilizing bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein to regulate the formation of gold nanocrystals. In the first case, the standard protocol for polyol reduction was modified by replacing ethylene glycol with glycerin, replacing synthetic polymers with BSA as protecting agent, and decreasing the reaction temperature. In the second case, the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase reduction was modified by replacing alkylthiols with BSA as protecting agent, which facilitated a strictly aqueous phase synthesis. Due to superior product yield and rapid reduction at room temperature, the aqueous protocol became the foundation for subsequent studies. I extended this approach to produce well-dispersed ˜2nm silver, gold, and platinum nanocrystals. Having demonstrated the feasibility of BSA-functionalized nanocrystals, some potential uses were explored. BSA-functionalized silver nanocrystals were employed in a broader study on the interaction of silver nanocrystals with HIV. BSA-functionalized gold nanocrystals were utilized for in vivo dosage of a contrast enhancing agent to bacteria. BSA-functionalized platinum nanocrystals were studied as hydrogenation catalysts. Since many intriguing uses for protein-functionalized nanocrystals involve incorporation into biosystems, I sought to enhance biocompatibility by using ascorbic acid as reducing agent. Initial experiments revealed elongated and branched nanocrystals. Such structures were not observed in previous synthesis protocols with BSA, so I hypothesized ascorbic acid was driving their formation. To test my assertion, I reduced ionic gold in an aqueous solution of ascorbic acid, thereby discovering a new method

  17. NOBLE - Flexible concept recognition for large-scale biomedical natural language processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseytlin, Eugene; Mitchell, Kevin; Legowski, Elizabeth; Corrigan, Julia; Chavan, Girish; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2016-01-14

    Natural language processing (NLP) applications are increasingly important in biomedical data analysis, knowledge engineering, and decision support. Concept recognition is an important component task for NLP pipelines, and can be either general-purpose or domain-specific. We describe a novel, flexible, and general-purpose concept recognition component for NLP pipelines, and compare its speed and accuracy against five commonly used alternatives on both a biological and clinical corpus. NOBLE Coder implements a general algorithm for matching terms to concepts from an arbitrary vocabulary set. The system's matching options can be configured individually or in combination to yield specific system behavior for a variety of NLP tasks. The software is open source, freely available, and easily integrated into UIMA or GATE. We benchmarked speed and accuracy of the system against the CRAFT and ShARe corpora as reference standards and compared it to MMTx, MGrep, Concept Mapper, cTAKES Dictionary Lookup Annotator, and cTAKES Fast Dictionary Lookup Annotator. We describe key advantages of the NOBLE Coder system and associated tools, including its greedy algorithm, configurable matching strategies, and multiple terminology input formats. These features provide unique functionality when compared with existing alternatives, including state-of-the-art systems. On two benchmarking tasks, NOBLE's performance exceeded commonly used alternatives, performing almost as well as the most advanced systems. Error analysis revealed differences in error profiles among systems. NOBLE Coder is comparable to other widely used concept recognition systems in terms of accuracy and speed. Advantages of NOBLE Coder include its interactive terminology builder tool, ease of configuration, and adaptability to various domains and tasks. NOBLE provides a term-to-concept matching system suitable for general concept recognition in biomedical NLP pipelines.

  18. Vitrification of noble metals containing NCAW simulant with an engineering scale melter (ESM): Campaign report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, W.; Roth, G.; Tobie, W.; Weisenburger, S.; Weiss, K.; Elliott, M.; Eyler, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    ESM has been designed as a 10th-scale model of the DWPF-type melter, currently the reference melter for nitrification of Hanford double shell tankwaste. ESM and related equipment have been integrated to the existing mockup vitrification plant VA-WAK at KfK. On June 2-July 10, 1992, a shakedown test using 2.61 m{sup 3} of NCAW (neutralized current acid waste) simulant without noble metals was performed. On July 11-Aug. 30, 1992, 14.23 m{sup 3} of the same simulant with nominal concentrations of Ru, Rh, and Pd were vitrified. Objective was to investigate the behavior of such a melter with respect to discharge of noble metals with routine glass pouring via glass overflow. Results indicate an accumulation of noble metals in the bottom area of the flat-bottomed ESM. About 65 wt% of the noble metals fed to the melter could be drained out, whereas 35 wt% accumulated in the melter, based on analysis of glass samples from glass pouring stream in to the canisters. After the melter was drained at the end of the campaign through a bottom drain valve, glass samples were taken from the residual bottom layer. The samples had significantly increased noble metals content (factor of 20-45 to target loading). They showed also a significant decrease of the specific electric resistance compared to bulk glass (factor of 10). A decrease of 10- 15% of the resistance between he power electrodes could be seen at the run end, but the total amount of noble metals accumulated was not yet sufficient enough to disturb the Joule heating of the glass tank severely.

  19. Calibration of new measuring systems to detect emissions of radioactive noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelmann, I.; Kreiner, H.J.

    1977-12-01

    This report describes the calibration of different systems for the integral measurement of radioactive noble gases and the calibration of a measuring chamber for the detection of individual nuclides of radioactive noble gases in the gaseous effluent of nuclear power plants. For these measuring chambers the calibration factors for Kr-85 and Xe-133 are given as well as the detection limits to be obtained with these measuring systems for several radioactive noble gases present in the gaseous effluent at the stack of nuclear power plants. Calibration factors for Kr-85 and Xe-133 and the detection limits of this measuring method for the detections of individual nuclides of radioactive noble gases in air samples are defined taken wirh a high pressure compressor in pressure flasks an measured on a Ge(Li)-semiconductor spectrometer (pressure flask measuring method). A measuring equipment is described and calibrated which allows simultaneous measurement of activity concentration of radioactive noble gases and radioactive aerosols with a sensitivity of 2 x 10 -7 Ci/m 3 for radioactive gases and 1 x 10 -9 Ci/m 3 for radioactive particulates at a background radiation of 1 R/h. This paper is an additional report to our STH-Bericht 3/76, 'Calibration of measuring equipment for monitoring of gaseous effluents from nuclear power plants', which specifies a procedure for the calibration of measuring chambers for monitoring of gaseous radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants /1/. The calibration system used here makes it possible to simultaneously calibrate several noble gas measuring devices. (orig.) [de

  20. Rational design of binder-free noble metal/metal oxide arrays with nanocauliflower structure for wide linear range nonenzymatic glucose detection

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhenzhen; Xin, Yanmei; Zhang, Zhonghai; Wu, Hongjun; Wang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional nanocomposites of metal-oxide and noble metal were expected to present superior performance for nonenzymatic glucose detection due to its good conductivity and high catalytic activity inherited from noble metal and metal oxide

  1. Electrospun Polymer Nanofibers Decorated with Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Chemical Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Tang, Yongan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Yan, Fei

    2017-12-01

    The integration of different noble metal nanostructures, which exhibit desirable plasmonic and/or electrocatalytic properties, with electrospun polymer nanofibers, which display unique mechanical and thermodynamic properties, yields novel hybrid nanoscale systems of synergistic properties and functions. This review summarizes recent advances on how to incorporate noble metal nanoparticles into electrospun polymer nanofibers and illustrates how such integration paves the way towards chemical sensing applications with improved sensitivity, stability, flexibility, compatibility, and selectivity. It is expected that further development of this field will eventually make a wide impact on many areas of research.

  2. Properties and application of noble metal catalysts for heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, G; Frohning, C D; Cornils, B [Ruhrchemie A.G., Oberhausen (Germany, F.R.)

    1976-07-01

    The special properties of the six platinum group elements - ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum - make them useful as active metals for catalytic reactions. Especially valuable is their property of favouring a single reaction even when the possibility of a number of parallel reactions exists under certain reaction conditions. This selectivity of the noble metal catalyst may be directed or enhanced through appropriate choise of the metal, the reaction conditions, the duration of the reaction, the amount of hydrogen etc. Even the physical state of the catalyst - supported or unsupported - is of influence when using noble metal catalysts as described in this report.

  3. Noble gas control room accident filtration system for severe accident conditions N-CRAFT. System design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Severe accidents might cause the release of airborne radioactive substances to the environment of the NPP. This can either be due to leakages of the containment or due to a filtered containment venting in order to ensure the overall integrity of the containment. During the containment venting process aerosols and iodine can be retained by the FCVS which prevents long term ground contamination. Noble gases are not retainable by the FCVS. From this it follows that a large amount of radioactive noble gases (e.g. xenon, krypton) might be present in the nearby environment of the plant dominating the activity release, depending on the venting procedure and the weather conditions. Accident management measures are necessary in case of severe accidents and the prolonged stay of staff inside the main control room (MCR) or emergency response center (ERC) is essential. Therefore, the in leakage and contamination of the MRC and ERC with airborne activity has to be prevented. The radiation exposure of the crises team needs to be minimized. The entrance of noble gases cannot be sufficiently prevented by the conventional air filtration systems such as HEPA filters and iodine absorbers. With the objective to prevent an unacceptable contamination of the MCR/ERC atmosphere by noble gases AREVA GmbH has developed a noble gas retention system. The noble gas control room accident filtration system CRAFT is designed for this case and provides supply of fresh air to the MCR/ERC without time limitation. The retention process of the system is based on the dynamic adsorption of noble gases on activated carbon. The system consists of delay lines (carbon columns) which are operated by a continuous and simultaneous adsorption and desorption process. These cycles ensure a periodic load and flushing of the delay lines retaining the noble gases from entering the MCR. CRAFT allows a minimization of the dose rate inside MCR/ERC and ensures a low radiation exposure to the staff on shift maintaining

  4. Characterisation and radiolysis of modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with noble metal impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Zariņš, A.; Valtenbergs, O.

    2017-01-01

    Modified lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide (TiO2) are suggested as an alternative tritium breeding ceramic for the European solid breeder test blanket module. The noble metals – platinum (Pt), gold (Au) and rhodium (Rh), can be introduced into the modified...... Li4SiO4 pebbles during the melt-based process, due to the corrosion of Pt-Rh and Pt-Au alloy crucible components. In this study, the surface microstructure, chemical and phase composition of the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with different contents of the noble metals was analysed. The influence...

  5. Geological structure and prospects of noble metal ore mineralization of the Khayrkhan gabbroid massif (Western Mongolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurumshieva, K. R.; Gertner, I. F.; Tishin, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    An analysis of the distribution of noble metals in zones of sulfide mineralization makes it possible to justify the isolation of four ore-bearing horizons with a specific geochemical zonation. A rise in the gold content relative to palladium and platinum is observed from the bottom upwards along the section of the stratified series of gabbroids. The study of the mineral phases of sulphides and the noble minerals itself indicates the evolution of hydrothermal solutions, which determines the different activity and mobility of the fluid (mercury, tellurium, sulfur) and ore (copper, nickel, iron, platinum, gold and silver) components.

  6. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising a porous support and a solid polymer electrolyte including a dispersed reduced noble metal or noble metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Mittelsteadt, Cortney K; Norman, Timothy J; Griffith, Arthur E; LaConti, Anthony B

    2015-02-24

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a thin, rigid, dimensionally-stable, non-electrically-conducting support, the support having a plurality of cylindrical, straight-through pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores are unevenly distributed, with some or no pores located along the periphery and more pores located centrally. The pores are completely filled with a solid polymer electrolyte, the solid polymer electrolyte including a dispersed reduced noble metal or noble metal oxide. The solid polymer electrolyte may also be deposited over the top and/or bottom surfaces of the support.

  7. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  8. Non-noble metal based electro-catalyst compositions for proton exchange membrane based water electrolysis and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumta, Prashant N.; Kadakia, Karan Sandeep; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg

    2017-02-07

    The invention provides electro-catalyst compositions for an anode electrode of a proton exchange membrane-based water electrolysis system. The compositions include a noble metal component selected from the group consisting of iridium oxide, ruthenium oxide, rhenium oxide and mixtures thereof, and a non-noble metal component selected from the group consisting of tantalum oxide, tin oxide, niobium oxide, titanium oxide, tungsten oxide, molybdenum oxide, yttrium oxide, scandium oxide, cooper oxide, zirconium oxide, nickel oxide and mixtures thereof. Further, the non-noble metal component can include a dopant. The dopant can be at least one element selected from Groups III, V, VI and VII of the Periodic Table. The compositions can be prepared using a surfactant approach or a sol gel approach. Further, the compositions are prepared using noble metal and non-noble metal precursors. Furthermore, a thin film containing the compositions can be deposited onto a substrate to form the anode electrode.

  9. Preparation and Heat-Treatment of DWPF Simulants With and Without Co-Precipitated Noble Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koopman, David C.:Eibling, Russel E

    2005-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is in the process of investigating factors suspected of impacting catalytic hydrogen generation in the Chemical Process Cell of the Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation in simulation work constrains the allowable acid addition operating window in DWPF. This constraint potentially impacts washing strategies during sludge batch preparation. It can also influence decisions related to the addition of secondary waste streams to a sludge batch. Noble metals have historically been added as trim chemicals to process simulations. The present study investigated the potential conservatism that might be present from adding the catalytic species as trim chemicals to the final sludge simulant versus co-precipitating the noble metals into the insoluble sludge solids matrix. Parallel preparations of two sludge simulants targeting the composition of Sludge Batch 3 were performed in order to evaluate the impact of the form of noble metals. Identical steps were used except that one simulant had dissolved palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium present during the precipitation of the insoluble solids. Noble metals were trimmed into the other stimulant prior to process tests. Portions of both sludge simulants were held at 97 C for about eight hours to qualitatively simulate the effects of long term storage on particle morphology and speciation. The simulants were used as feeds for Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, process simulations. The following conclusions were drawn from the simulant preparation work: (1) The first preparation of a waste slurry simulant with co-precipitated noble metals was successful, based on the data obtained. It appears that 99+% of the noble metals were retained in the simulant. (2) Better control of carbonate, hydroxide, and post-wash trim chemical additions is needed before the new method of simulant preparation will be as reproducible as the old method. (3) The two new

  10. Developmental and Metabolic Plasticity of White-Skinned Grape Berries in Response to Botrytis cinerea during Noble Rot1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Thomas S.; Vicente, Ariel R.; Doyle, Carolyn L.; Ye, Zirou; Allen, Greg; Heymann, Hildegarde

    2015-01-01

    Noble rot results from exceptional infections of ripe grape (Vitis vinifera) berries by Botrytis cinerea. Unlike bunch rot, noble rot promotes favorable changes in grape berries and the accumulation of secondary metabolites that enhance wine grape composition. Noble rot-infected berries of cv Sémillon, a white-skinned variety, were collected over 3 years from a commercial vineyard at the same time that fruit were harvested for botrytized wine production. Using an integrated transcriptomics and metabolomics approach, we demonstrate that noble rot alters the metabolism of cv Sémillon berries by inducing biotic and abiotic stress responses as well as ripening processes. During noble rot, B. cinerea induced the expression of key regulators of ripening-associated pathways, some of which are distinctive to the normal ripening of red-skinned cultivars. Enhancement of phenylpropanoid metabolism, characterized by a restricted flux in white-skinned berries, was a common outcome of noble rot and red-skinned berry ripening. Transcript and metabolite analyses together with enzymatic assays determined that the biosynthesis of anthocyanins is a consistent hallmark of noble rot in cv Sémillon berries. The biosynthesis of terpenes and fatty acid aroma precursors also increased during noble rot. We finally characterized the impact of noble rot in botrytized wines. Altogether, the results of this work demonstrated that noble rot causes a major reprogramming of berry development and metabolism. This desirable interaction between a fruit and a fungus stimulates pathways otherwise inactive in white-skinned berries, leading to a greater accumulation of compounds involved in the unique flavor and aroma of botrytized wines. PMID:26450706

  11. Enriching Silver Nanocrystals with a Second Noble Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiren; Sun, Xiaojun; Yang, Yin; Li, Jumei; Zhang, Yun; Qin, Dong

    2017-07-18

    Noble-metal nanocrystals have received considerable interests owing to their fascinating properties and promising applications in areas including plasmonics, catalysis, sensing, imaging, and medicine. As demonstrated by ample examples, the performance of nanocrystals in these and related applications can be augmented by switching from monometallic to bimetallic systems. The inclusion of a second metal can enhance the properties and greatly expand the application landscape by bringing in new capabilities. Seeded growth offers a powerful route to bimetallic nanocrystals. This approach is built upon the concept that preformed nanocrystals with uniform, well-controlled size, shape, and structure can serve as seeds to template and direct the deposition of metal atoms. Seeded growth is, however, limited by galvanic replacement when the deposited metal is less reactive than the seed. The involvement of galvanic replacement not only makes it difficult to control the outcome of seeded growth but also causes degradation to some properties. We have successfully addressed this issue by reducing the salt precursor(s) into atoms with essentially no galvanic replacement. In the absence of self-nucleation, the atoms are preferentially deposited onto the seeds to generate bimetallic nanocrystals with controlled structures. In this Account, we use Ag nanocubes as an example to demonstrate the fabrication of Ag@M and Ag@Ag-M (M = Au, Pd, or Pt) nanocubes with a core-frame or core-shell structure by controlling the deposition of M atoms. A typical synthesis involves the titration of M n+ (a precursor to M) ions into an aqueous suspension containing Ag nanocubes, ascorbic acid, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) under ambient conditions. In one approach, aqueous sodium hydroxide is introduced to increase the initial pH of the reaction system. At pH = 11.9, ascorbic acid is dominated by ascorbate monoanion, a much stronger reductant, to suppress the galvanic replacement between M n+ and Ag. In

  12. Genetic characterization of Western European noble crayfish populations (Astacus astacus) for advanced conservation management strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrimpf, A.; Piscione, M.; Cammaerts, R.; Collas, M.; Herman, D.; Jung, A.; Ottburg, F.; Roessink, I.; Rollin, X.; Schulz, R.; Theissinger, K.

    2017-01-01

    One central goal of conservation biology is to conserve the genetic diversity of species in order to protect their adaptive potential. The main objective of this study was to identify management units (MUs) for the threatened noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) in Western Europe by utilizing

  13. Noble gas systematics of submarine alkalic lavas near the Hawaiian hotspot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanyu, T.; Clague, D.A.; Kaneoka, I.; Dunai, T.J.; Davies, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Noble gas isotopic ratios were determined for submarine alkalic volcanic rocks distributed around the Hawaiian islands to constrain the origin of such alkalic volcanism and hence understand the details of mantle upwelling beneath Hawaii. Samples were collected by dredging or using submersibles from

  14. Potential Energy Curves and Associated Line Shape of Alkali-Metal and Noble-Gas Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-20

    work. The ab initio calculations for M + Ng molecular combina- tions are reported and discussed in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 discusses both pedagogical ...mass of the noble-gas atom decreases. These barriers at R = rb are accompanied by shallow wells at R = rmin2 and, together with the shallow wells

  15. Electron--noble-gas spin-flip scattering at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, T.G.; Bonin, K.; Happer, W.

    1987-01-01

    The spin-exchange rates and spin-relaxation rates for thermal electrons colliding with noble-gas atoms are calculated using the orthogonalized-plane-wave approximation and via partial-wave analysis. The two techniques give similar results and are in order-of-magnitude agreement with the experimental rate in Ar

  16. 75 FR 12737 - Applications To Export Electric Energy; Noble Energy Marketing and Trade Corp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... impact on the reliability of the U.S. electric power supply system. Copies of this application will be... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [OE Docket Nos. EA-363 and EA-364] Applications To Export Electric Energy; Noble Energy Marketing and Trade Corp. AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability...

  17. Structural and plasmonic properties of noble metal doped ZnO nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Trilok K.; Swart, H. C.; Kroon, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    Noble metal doped ZnO has been synthesized by the combustion method and the effect of different metals (Ag, Au, Pd) on the structural, morphological, optical, photoluminescence and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties has been investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the ZnO had a hexagonal wurtzite structure and the crystallite sizes were affected by the doping. The formation of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectra. The LSPR of the metallic NPs was predicted using Mie theory calculations. The absorption spectra were calculated using the Kubelka-Munk function and the optical bandgap varied from 3.06 to 3.18 eV for the different doping materials. The experimental results suggest that the origin of enhanced emission was due to direct interaction between the laser photons and the noble material NPs which in turn leads to photoemission transfer of electrons from the noble metals NPs to the conduction band of ZnO.

  18. Green synthesis of noble nanometals (Au, Pt, Pd) using glycerol under microwave irradiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A newer application of glycerol in the field of nanomaterials synthesis has been developed from both the economic and environmental points of view. Glycerol can act as a reducing agent for the fabrication of noble nanometals, such as Au, Pt, and Pd, under microwave irradiation. T...

  19. Expeditious synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles using Vitamin B12 under microwave irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A greener synthesis protocol for noble nanometals is developed using vitamin B12 as a reducing and capping agent in conjunction with the use of microwaves. Successful assembly of nanoparticles or microparticles with varied shapes and sizes have been demonstrated. The synthesized ...

  20. Percutaneous coronary intervention versus coronary artery bypass grafting: where are we after NOBLE and EXCEL?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Jacqueline H; Shaw, Richard E; Glineur, David; Grau, Juan B

    2017-11-01

    The publication of the NOBLE and EXCEL trials, with seemingly conflicting results, brought into question whether percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is better for low-risk patients with left main coronary artery stenosis (LMCAS). This review appraises the methods and results of NOBLE and EXCEL, contextualizes them within the literature, and determines how they may affect clinical practice. We appraised the trials and describe differences in methodology and results. NOBLE recruited primarily isolated LMCAS, and found that CABG was superior to PCI. EXCEL's population included patients LMCAS in the context of multivessel CAD, and found PCI and CABG were comparable. Both trials enrolled young patients with few comorbidities, and there was more protocol-mandated consistency in the procedural techniques and medical therapy of patients receiving PCI. The generalizability of these trials is limited by the use of young, healthy patients at highly skilled centres that rarely reflect typical clinical practice. If these studies are to maintain relevance, trialists must address the lack of protocolization of surgical interventions and inconsistent medical therapies. Unfortunately, the limitations of NOBLE and EXCEL mean that we are no closer to answering the question of what is the optimal treatment for patients with LMCAS.

  1. Scattering of low energy noble gas ions from a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luitjens, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    Reflection of low energy (0.1-10 keV) noble gas ions can be used to analyse a solid surface. To study charge exchange processes, the ion fractions of neon and of argon, scattered from a Cu(100) surface, have been determined. (Auth.)

  2. A noble additive cum compatibilizer for dispersion of nanoclay into ethylene octene elastomer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mondal, S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a poly(ethylene-co-octene)-poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) double network hybrid as a noble additive cum compatibilizer for poly(ethylene-co-octene) (POE). The addition of only 0.5 mass% of the hybrid into POE has raised...

  3. Transparent and conductive electrodes by large-scale nanostructuring of noble metal thin-films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jes; Runge Walther, Anders; Wolff, Christian

    grid, and nano-wire thin-films [1]. The indium and carbon films do not match the chemical stability nor the electrical performance of the noble metals, and many metal films are not uniform in material distribution leading to significant surface roughness and randomized transmission haze. We demonstrate...

  4. Paleotemperatures derived from noble gases dissolved in groundwater and in relation to soil temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stute, M.; Sonntag, C.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe dissolved in groundwater at two sites (Bocholt, Germany, and the Great Hungarian Plain) were taken to prove the reliability of noble gas temperatures as indicators of paleotemperatures. Noble gas temperatures of groundwater of Holocene age were found to reflect the annual mean soil temperature in the recharge are with an accuracy close to the precision of measurement (1σ approx. ±0.5 deg. C). Noble gas temperature data demonstrate the influence of vegetation cover on the soil temperature in the infiltration area. Groundwater formed in forests at the Bocholt site shows noble gas temperatures that are 2.2 deg. C lower than the groundwater formed in fields or meadows. The temperature data obtained from groundwater of the Great Hungarian Plain for the last glaciation are ≥ 8.6 deg. C lower than data from recent groundwater for maximum glaciation (approx. 18,000 years ago) and 4.7 ± 1 deg. C lower for the preceding interstadial (approx. 28,000-35,000 years ago). These data permit independent reconstruction of paleoclimatic conditions. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  5. NOBLE MORALITY”: THE 18TH ḤADĪTH OF IMAM AN-NAWAWI'S ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    This paper proposes a strategy for change in Nigeria from an Islamic perspective. The .... the state and the populace as well as in the corporate world, it should be ..... This study discusses the idea of change by exploring the noble approach.

  6. Gravity effects on a gliding arc in four noble gases: from normal to hypergravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potocnakova, L.; Sperka, J.; Zikan, P.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Beckers, J.; Kudrle, V.

    2015-01-01

    A gliding arc in four noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr) has been studied under previously unexplored conditions of varying artificial gravity, from normal 1 g gravity up to 18 g hypergravity. Significant differences, mainly the visual thickness of the plasma channel, its maximum elongation and general

  7. Light Noble Gases and a Cosmic Ray Exposure Age for the Bunburra Rockhole Meteorite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meier, M.M.M.; Bland, P.A.; Welten, K.C.; Spurný, Pavel; Baur, H.; Wieler, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, Supplement (2009), A138-A138 ISSN 1086-9379. [Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society /72./. Nancy, 13.06.2009-18.06.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Bunburra Rockhole * light noble gas * concentration Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.253, year: 2009

  8. Backfitting of existing nuclear power plants with particulate, iodine and noble gas monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marley, M.R.; Geiger, E.L.

    1978-01-01

    A stand-alone microcomputer complete with hardware and software to measure airborne particulate iodine and noble gases is described. This system meets the need at power plants and effluent monitoring. The equipment will accommodate up to 192 channels of input

  9. EDO, Doses to Man and Organs from Reactor Operation Noble Gas and Liquid Waste Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas Diago, Jose; Serradell Garcia, Vicente

    1983-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: EDO evaluates individual and collective doses to man from atmospheric releases of noble gases and other gaseous effluents. 2 - Method of solution: The dose calculations are carried out by following the guide- lines of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109. Radiation exposure for maximum individuals and population are estimated within 30 km from the nuclear plant. This area is divided into 160 circular trapezoids, to which computations are referred. Four age groups, seven organs for internal dose and two for external dose have been considered. Dose calculations are done through 14 pathways, 7 for liquid effluents, one for noble gases, and 6 for the rest of gaseous effluents. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The following are the maximum dimension sizes preset in the code: 73 radionuclides (other than noble gases); 15 noble gases; 160 circular trapezoids; 31 chemical elements; 4 types of aquatic foods; 15 points of exposure for shorelines; 15 trapezoids influenced by each point; 4 terrestrial food pathways; 100 centres of population. Some of these limits can be varied

  10. EDO, Doses to Man and Organs from Reactor Operation Noble Gas and Liquid Waste Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenas Diago, Jose; Serradell Garcia, Vicente [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politecnica, Camino de Vera 2/n Apartado 2012, Valencia (Spain)

    1983-10-18

    1 - Description of problem or function: EDO evaluates individual and collective doses to man from atmospheric releases of noble gases and other gaseous effluents. 2 - Method of solution: The dose calculations are carried out by following the guide- lines of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109. Radiation exposure for maximum individuals and population are estimated within 30 km from the nuclear plant. This area is divided into 160 circular trapezoids, to which computations are referred. Four age groups, seven organs for internal dose and two for external dose have been considered. Dose calculations are done through 14 pathways, 7 for liquid effluents, one for noble gases, and 6 for the rest of gaseous effluents. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The following are the maximum dimension sizes preset in the code: 73 radionuclides (other than noble gases); 15 noble gases; 160 circular trapezoids; 31 chemical elements; 4 types of aquatic foods; 15 points of exposure for shorelines; 15 trapezoids influenced by each point; 4 terrestrial food pathways; 100 centres of population. Some of these limits can be varied.

  11. Binary-collision-approximation-based simulation of noble gas irradiation to tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Takayama, Arimichi; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    To reveal the possibility of fuzz formation of tungsten material under noble gas irradiation, helium, neon, and argon atom injections into tungsten materials are performed by binary-collision-approximation-based simulation. The penetration depth is strongly depends on the structure of the target material. Therefore, the penetration depth for amorphous and bcc crystalline structure is carefully investigated in this paper

  12. Long-range interactions of excited He atoms with ground-state noble-gas atoms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Qian, Ying; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Yan, Z.-C.

    2013-01-01

    The dispersion coefficients C6, C8, and C10 for long-range interactions of He(n1,3S) and He(n1,3P), 2≤n≤10, with the ground-state noble-gas atoms Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated by summing over the reduced matrix elements of multipole transition

  13. Fireworks in noble gas clusters a first experiment with the new "free-electron laser"

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    An international group of scientists has published first experiments carried out using the new soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) at the research center DESY in Hamburg, Germany. Using small clusters of noble gas atoms, for the first time, researchers studied the interaction of matter with intense X-ray radiation from an FEL on extremely short time scales (1 page).

  14. Line emissions from sonoluminescence in aqueous solutions of halide salts without noble gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jinfu, E-mail: liang.shi2007@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institution of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Physics and Electronic Science, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang 550001 (China); Chen, Weizhong, E-mail: wzchen@nju.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institution of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhou, Chao; Cui, Weicheng; Chen, Zhan [The Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institution of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Line emissions of trivalent terbium (Tb{sup 3+}) ion were observed from single-bubble sonoluminescence (SL) in an aqueous solution of terbium chloride (TbCl{sub 3}) that contained no noble gas. In addition, sodium (Na) lines were observed in multi-bubble SL in aqueous solutions of various halide salts that contained no noble gas. These observations show that the halide ions, such as Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, and I{sup −}, help for line emissions as the noble gases. The intensity of a line emission depends on both the chemical species produced by cavitation bubbles and the temperature of SL bubble that responds to the driving ultrasound pressure. With the increase of driving pressure, some line emissions attached to the continuous spectrum may become increasingly clear, while other line emissions gradually become indistinct. - Highlights: • Line emissions of Tb(III) ions were observed without the presence of noble gases. • The halide ions help to generate a line emission during sonoluminescence. • The intensity of a line emission mainly depends on the bubble's temperature. • The definition of a line emission is related to the temperature of caviation bubble and the kind of host liquid.

  15. Not so Noble-Radon in the Environment and Associated Health ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 7. Radon: Not so Noble-Radon in the Environment and Associated Health Problems. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 5 Issue 7 July 2000 pp 44-55. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  17. Studies on PEM Fuel Cell Noble Metal Catalyst Dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Shuang; Skou, Eivind Morten

    Incredibly vast advance has been achieved in fuel cell technology regarding to catalyst efficiency, improvement of electrolyte conductivity and optimization of cell system. With breathtakingly accelerating progress, Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) is the most promising and most widely...

  18. Christian Values and Noble Ideas of Rank and their Consequences on Symbolic Acts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd ALTHOFF

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Middle Ages a Christian system of values met the values of a noble warrior society. Although these two systems had completely different conceptions of norms, they adapted from each other certain values and symbolic forms to express these values.The development of this adaptation is depicted by treating the Christian values misericordia, humilitas and clementia. In which way did the noble warrior society take up these values and how did these norms possibly change?Misericordia, for example, became an essential part of noble behaviour, but the fundamental idea of Christian misericordia was changed. Helping the poor was often motivated by the nobles’ will to prove his mercy, not by personal compassion.Although the value of humilitas implied a sharp contrast to the values of honor and rank, one can find forms of expression, which revealed a noble’s or ruler’s humility. With his humble behaviour one proved one’s qualification and legitimacy. Humility was expressed with symbolic forms of expression like walking barefoot and in penitential clothes or making footfalls. Similarly, these forms were used in inner-secular communication to acknowledge the existing order of rank.The ritual of deditio combines the values humilitas and clementia. The author describes this ritual as a pre-arranged stage-play, in which the one’s humility granted the other’s clemency. These ‘stage-plays’ had only little in common with the original Christian virtues, but this way several elements of the Christian virtue system influenced the noble behaviour pattern.En la edad media el sistema de valores cristiano confluye con el de una sociedad noble guerrera. Aunque ambos sistemas tuvieron dos concepciones de normas completamente diferentes, sin embargo, cada uno de ellos adapto ciertos valores y sus expresiones simbólicas del otro.El desarrollo de esta adaptación es descrito a través de los valores cristianos de misericordia, humilitas y clementia

  19. NOBLE METAL CHEMISTRY AND HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D

    2008-06-25

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell vessels were performed with the primary purpose of producing melter feeds for the beaded frit program plus obtaining samples of simulated slurries containing high concentrations of noble metals for off-site analytical studies for the hydrogen program. Eight pairs of 22-L simulations were performed of the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. These sixteen simulations did not contain mercury. Six pairs were trimmed with a single noble metal (Ag, Pd, Rh, or Ru). One pair had all four noble metals, and one pair had no noble metals. One supporting 4-L simulation was completed with Ru and Hg. Several other 4-L supporting tests with mercury have not yet been performed. This report covers the calculations performed on SRNL analytical and process data related to the noble metals and hydrogen generation. It was originally envisioned as a supporting document for the off-site analytical studies. Significant new findings were made, and many previous hypotheses and findings were given additional support as summarized below. The timing of hydrogen generation events was reproduced very well within each of the eight pairs of runs, e.g. the onset of hydrogen, peak in hydrogen, etc. occurred at nearly identical times. Peak generation rates and total SRAT masses of CO{sub 2} and oxides of nitrogen were reproduced well. Comparable measures for hydrogen were reproduced with more variability, but still reasonably well. The extent of the reproducibility of the results validates the conclusions that were drawn from the data.

  20. Noble gases and the early history of the Earth: Inappropriate paradigms and assumptions inhibit research and communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, G. R.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The development of models as tracers of nobel gases through the Earth's evolution is discussed. A new set of paradigms embodying present knowledge was developed. Several important areas for future research are: (1) measurement of the elemental and isotopic compositions of the five noble gases in a large number of terrestrial materials, thus better defining the composition and distribution of terrestrial noble gases; (2) determinations of relative diffusive behavior, chemical behavior, and the distribution between solid and melt of noble gases under mantle conditions are urgently needed; (3) disequilibrium behavior in the nebula needs investigation, and the behavior of plasmas and possible cryotrapping on cold nebular solids are considered.

  1. Single and multiple ionization of noble gas atoms by H0 impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkadi, L.; Gulyas, L.; Herczku, P.; Kovacs, S.T.S.; Koever, A.

    2012-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The understanding of the mechanisms of collisions between energetic charged particles and neutral atoms is of fundamental significance, and it has large importance in many research fields (plasma physics, astrophysics, materials science, etc.), as well as in number of practical applications. In the present work we measured total direct ionization and electron loss cross sections for the collisions of H 0 atoms with noble gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr) in the energy range 75-300 keV. The experiment was carried out at the 1.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of Atomki by coincident detection of the recoil target ions and the charge-state analyzed scattered projectiles. With this study we wished to obtain information about the role played by the electron of the H 0 projectile in the process of the single and multiple vacancy production induced by the collision. For this purpose we repeated the measurements also with proton projectile under the same experimental conditions. For calibration of the measuring system and normalization of our data we used the cross section values of Ref. [1]. The experimental results were analysed with using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. CTMC describes well the experimental data for both projectiles for the single vacancy creation, however we observed increasing deviation between the theory and experiment with increasing number of the created vacancies, as well as with decreasing atomic number of the target atoms. Fig. 1 shows our results obtained for the single, double and triple ionization (q = 1, 2, 3) of Kr at H 0 impact for the two cases when the outgoing projectile is H 0 (a) and H + (b), i.e., for pure ionization of the target, and ionization of the target with simultaneous electron loss of the projectile. The curves in the figure were obtained by two versions of the three-body CTMC theory: a conventional model (dashed curves); and a model taking partially account of the many

  2. Hydration of the Atlantis Massif: Halogen, Noble Gas and In-Situ δ18O Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. J.; Kendrick, M. A.; Rubatto, D.

    2017-12-01

    A combination of halogen (Cl, Br, I), noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) and in situ oxygen isotope analysis have been utilized to investigate the fluid-mobile element record of hydration and alteration processes at the Atlantis Massif (30°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge). The sample suite investigated includes serpentinite, talc-amphibole ± chlorite schist and hydrated gabbro recovered by seafloor drilling undertaken at sites on a transect across the Atlantis Massif during IODP Expedition 357. Serpentine mesh and veins analysed in-situ by SHRIMP SI exhibit δ18O from 6‰ down to ≈0‰, suggesting serpentinization temperatures of 150 to >280°C and water/rock ratios >5. Differences of 1.5-2.5‰ are observed between adjacent generations of serpentine, but the δ18O range is similar at each investigated drilling site. Halogen and noble gas abundances in serpentinites, talc-amphibole schist and hydrated gabbro have been measured by noble gas mass spectrometry of both irradiated and non-irradiated samples. Serpentinites contain low abundances of halogens and noble gases (e.g. 70-430 ppm Cl, 4.7-12.2 x 10-14 mol/g 36Ar) relative to other seafloor serpentinites. The samples have systematically different Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios related to their mineralogy. Serpentinites retain mantle-like Br/Cl with a wide variation in I/Cl that stretches toward seawater values. Talc-amphibole schists exhibit depletion of Br and I relative to Cl with increasing Cl abundances, suggesting tremolite exerts strong control on halogen abundance ratios. Serpentinites show no evidence of interaction with halogen-rich sedimentary pore fluids. Iodine abundances are variable across serpentinites, and are decoupled from Br and Cl; iodine enrichment (up to 530 ppb) is observed within relatively oxidised and clay-bearing samples. Serpentinized harzburgites exhibit distinct depletion of Kr and Xe relative to atmospheric 36Ar in seawater. Oxygen isotope compositions and low abundances of both halogens

  3. Noble Gases as tracers of fluid migration in the Haynesville shale and overlying strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, D. J.; Barry, P. H.; Lawson, M.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Noble gases are ideal tracers of physical processes and fluid provenance in crustal systems. Due to their inert nature, they are unaffected by chemical alteration, redox, or biological phenomena that fractionate other geochemical tracers. Noble gas analysis has been used to quantify fluid provenance, interactions, and ages in petroleum systems [1,2], but the effects of hydrocarbon migration on noble gas signatures have not been directly observed. The Haynesville Shale (East Texas & Louisiana), is exploited commercially for unconventional shale gas, but also acts as the source-rock for overlying conventional reservoirs. We present noble gas isotope and abundance data in samples collected from 9 natural gas wells sourced from the Haynesville Shale, as well as 21 from reservoirs in the overlying Cotton Valley (n=7), Travis Peak (n=9), and James (n=5) groups. Using a stratigraphic model, we observe systematic changes in the noble gas signatures as the fluids migrate from the Haynesville source rock to the overlying conventional accumulations. Helium isotope ratios (3He/4He) are strongly radiogenic in the Haynesville and stratigraphically older conventional reservoirs, with the younger reservoirs showing evidence of a mantle helium input. Argon isotope ratios (40Ar/36Ar) are strongly correlated with high 3He/4He, suggesting a similar provenance for radiogenic 40Ar and mantle 3He. Concentrations of groundwater-derived 36Ar are consistently higher in the conventional reservoirs than in the Haynesville shale, reflecting the greater interaction with groundwater during migration. However, 20Ne/36Ar ratios are not significantly different, suggesting that solubility-dependent partitioning is not simply dependent on vertical or horizontal migration distance. Krypton and xenon abundances are higher than expected for groundwater in all samples, a phenomenon that has been observed in many other hydrocarbon accumulations [3]. The excess Xe/Kr ratio is highest in the Haynesville

  4. Noble Metal Catalysts in the Production of Biofuels

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The energy demand is increasing in the world together with the need to ensure energy security and the desire to decrease greenhouse gas emissions. While several renewable alternatives are available for the production of electricity, e.g. solar energy, wind power, and hydrogen, biomass is the only renewable source that can meet the demand for carbon-based liquid fuels and chemicals. The technology applied in the conversion of biomass depends on the type and complexity of the biomass, and the d...

  5. Noble Gases in Insoluble Organic Matter in the Very Primitive Meteorites Bells, EET 92042 and GRO 95577

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemann, H.; Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Nittler, L. R.; Wieler, R.

    2008-03-01

    Noble gas carrier phase Q in several primitive meteorites is not attacked by Pyridine, in contrast to Orgueil, as reported previously. IOM in CR chondrites does not indicate high-temperature alteration in the nebula.

  6. Flameless atomic absorption determination of noble metals after extraction by mixture of di-2-ethylhexyldithiophosphoric acid and n-octylaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukhin, Yu.M.; Udalova, T.A.; Tsimbalist, V.G.; AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Geologii i Geofiziki)

    1985-01-01

    A possibility of using the mixture of di-2-ethylhexyl dithiophosphoric acid (D2EHDTPA) and p-octylaniline (OA) (extractants of acid and basic character) for extraction atomic absorption determination of noble metals is studied. The mixture of D2EHDTPA with OA is shown to extract noble metals from hydrochloric acid solutions with distribution factors > 10 3 . An extraction atomic absorption method for determination of noble metals in copperbearing materials is suggested. The minimum determined contents of noble metals at the initial sample equal to 100 for gold, silver, platinum, palladium, rhodium and ruthenium make up (g/t) 0.0005, 0.0001, 0.015, 0.005, 0.002 and 0.015 respectively. Relative standard deviation constitutes Ssub(r)<0.2

  7. NOBLE, Thomas F. X. Images, iconoclasm, and the carolingians. Filadélfia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009, 488 p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2011-01-01

    A review and contextualization (concerning music writing in the ninth century) of Thomas F. Noble's magisterial account of the iconoclastic controversy in the eighth and ninth centuries and its impact in the Carolingian kingdom (and empire) in the same period....

  8. Effect of noble metal doping on the structural properties of lanthanum cobaltite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmadhikari, Dipti V.; Athawal, Anjali A.

    2016-01-01

    Pristine and Noble metal (Ag and Pd) doped lanthanum cobaltite samples have been synthesised by Hydrothermal method. Lanthanum in the A-Site and Co at B-site of Lanthanum cobaltite (LaCoO 3 ) perovskites were partially doped by silver and palladium (4%). Crystal structure analysis revealed that the hydrothermal synthesis led to the formation of pure nanocrystalline perovskite structure. Morphological analysis of the samples shows that the noble metal doping affects the morphology of the samples. Pristine sample shows spherical to oval shaped particles while the doping results in the formation of irregular shaped, spherical and rod shaped particles. Silver doping results in the agglomeration of particles. The particles were observed to be fused with each other to form rod shaped structures in case of palladium doped samples. (author)

  9. Josephinite. A terrestrial alloy with radiogenic xenon-129 and the noble gas imprint of iron meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, R G; Hennecke, E W; Manuel, O K [Missouri Univ., Rolla (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-12-01

    Analyses of noble gases released by stepwise heating of Josephinite reveal two radiogenic components, radiogenic /sup 129/Xe asymptotically equals 1 x 10/sup -12/ ccSTP/g and radiogenic /sup 40/Ar asymptotically equals 1 x 10/sup -6/ cc STP/g, and the following components of trapped noble gases: He with /sup 3/He//sup 4/He asymptotically equals 4 x 10/sup -5/, Ne with /sup 20/Ne//sup 22/Ne=10.5, Ar with /sup 40/Ar//sup 36/Ar=3 x 10/sup 2/, and Kr and Xe with isotopic compositions similar to those observed in iron meteorites. The excess of /sup 40/Ar and literature values of K in bulk Josephinite yield and apparent K-Ar age of asymptotically equals 4.6 x 10/sup 9/ years.

  10. Composition of lunar noble gases traped 2.5 AE and 3.5 AE ago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eugster, O.

    1986-01-01

    The times when the soils 74001 and 73261 were exposed on the lunar surface were determined by the U-235 - Xe-136 dating method. The isotopic composition of the trapped noble gases in these two soils is compared with that of the surface correlated noble gases in the young soils 12001 and in the present day solar wind. The surface correlated trapped gases are a mixture of implanted solar wind particles and retrapped lunar atmospheric gases. The observed changes are interpreted as a result of decreasing outgassing of radiogenic Ar-40 and perhaps He-4 and of fissiogenic Xe from the lunar crust. The old soils probably also contain surface correlated Kr-80 and Kr-82 produced by secondary cosmic ray neutron capture of adsorbed or retrapped bromine. To some extent the isotopic composition of the trapped gases in old lunar soil may also have been altered due to diffusion loss from material of low retentivity

  11. Attosecond Time Delay in Photoionization of Noble-Gas and Halogen Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Wen Pi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast processes are now accessible on the attosecond time scale due to the availability of ultrashort XUV laser pulses. Noble-gas and halogen atoms remain important targets due to their giant dipole resonance and Cooper minimum. Here, we calculate photoionization cross section, asymmetry parameter and Wigner time delay using the time-dependent local-density approximation (TDLDA, which includes the electron correlation effects. Our results are consistent with experimental data and other theoretical calculations. The asymmetry parameter provides an extra layer of access to the phase information of the photoionization processes. We find that halogen atoms bear a strong resemblance on cross section, asymmetry parameter and time delay to their noble-gas neighbors. Our predicted time delay should provide a guidance for future experiments on those atoms and related molecules.

  12. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodson, Boyd M.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI

  14. NOBLE and EXCEL: The debate for excellence in dealing with left main stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindi, Hamood Al; Samaan, Amir; Hosny, Hatem

    2018-03-14

    Left main coronary artery (LMCA) disease is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (CABG) has always been the standard revascularization strategy for this group of patients. However, with the recent developments in stents design and medical therapy over the past decade, several trials have been designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as an alternative to CABG surgery in patients with LMCA disease. Recently, the results of two major trials, EXCEL and NOBLE, comparing CABG versus PCI in this patient population have been released. In fact, the results of both trials might appear contradictory at first glance. While the EXCEL trial showed that PCI was non-inferior to CABG surgery, the NOBLE trial suggested that CABG surgery is a better option. In the following review, we will discuss some of the similarities and contrasts between these two trials and conclude with lessons to be learned to our daily practice.

  15. Concentration of noble metals by sublimation during the analysis of massive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuburkov, Yu.T.; Zhujkov, B.L.; Gehrbish, Sh.; Al'pert, L.K.; Chan Zuj Ty

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of concentrating noble metals from terrestrial samples of various composition by chemical sublimation in an air stream at a temperature of 1000-1200 deg C was examined. It was found that the chemical yields of Au, Pt, Ir, Ru, Os and Re for all the samples increased by introducing solid additives of FeCl 2 , TiO 2 and Nb 2 O 5 . The concentration technique provides the possibility of determining some noble metals in massive samples (up to 50 g) with widely ranging element contents. By using gamma and neutron activation on a microtron, the detection limits of 3x10 -2 ppm for Pt and Ir and 4x10 -3 ppm for Au were achieved. In the case of X-ray fluorescence analysis, the detection limit for these elements was 0.4 ppm

  16. The preparation of primary standard solutions for each of the noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, R.C.; Wall, G.J.; Jones, E.A.; Royal, S.J.

    1977-01-01

    A revised method for the preparation of primary standard solutions for each of the noble metals is described. It is now recommended that standard noble-metal solutions should be made from the pure metals and not from salts as previously described. Metals should have a certified purity of 99,95 per cent or better, and the purity should be confirmed by analysis, the techniques of emission spectography or spark-source mass spectrography being used. After the metals have been dissolved, the solutions are made up to volume and the metal content of the standard solutions is checked. For most instrumental techniques for which the standards are intended, the check analysis should be within 0,3 per cent of the certified value

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodson, Boyd McLean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  18. Origin and Evolution of Reactive and Noble Gases Dissolved in Matrix Pore Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, F. [Hydroisotop GmbH, Schweitenkirchen (Germany); Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Waber, H. N. [Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Smellie, J. A.T. [Conterra AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    Reactive and noble gases dissolved in matrix pore water of low permeable crystalline bedrock were successfully extracted and characterized for the first time based on drillcore samples from the Olkiluoto investigation site (SW Finland). Interaction between matrix pore water and fracture groundwater occurs predominately by diffusion. Changes in the chemical and isotopic composition of gases dissolved in fracture groundwater are transmitted and preserved in the pore water. Absolute concentrations, their ratios and the stable carbon isotope signature of hydrocarbon gases dissolved in pore water give valuable indications about the evolution of these gases in the nearby flowing fracture groundwaters. Inert noble gases dissolved in matrix pore water and their isotopes combined with their in situ production and accumulation rates deliver information about the residence time of pore water. (author)

  19. Noble gases, nitrogen and cosmic ray exposure age of the Sulagiri chondrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant R. Mahajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sulagiri meteorite fell in India on 12 September 2008, LL6 chondrite class is the largest among all the Indian meteorites. Isotopic compositions of noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe and nitrogen in the Sulagiri meteorite and cosmic ray exposure history are discussed. Low cosmogenic (22Ne/21Nec ratio is consistent with irradiation in a large body. Cosmogenic noble gases indicate that Sulagiri has a 4π cosmic-ray exposure (CRE age of 27.9 ± 3.4 Ma and is a member of the peak of CRE age distribution of LL chondrites. Radiogenic 4He and 40Ar concentrations in Sulagiri yields the radiogenic ages as 2.29 and 4.56 Ga, indicating the loss of He from the meteorite. Xenon and krypton are mixture of Q and spallogenic components.

  20. Noble gases, nitrogen and cosmic ray exposure age of the Sulagiri chondrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramakant R. Mahajan

    2017-01-01

    The Sulagiri meteorite fell in India on 12 September 2008, LL6 chondrite class is the largest among all the Indian meteorites. Isotopic compositions of noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) and nitrogen in the Sulagiri meteorite and cosmic ray exposure history are discussed. Low cosmogenic (22Ne/21Ne)c ratio is consistent with irradiation in a large body. Cosmogenic noble gases indicate that Sulagiri has a 4πcosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age of 27.9 ± 3.4 Ma and is a member of the peak of CRE age distribution of LL chondrites. Radiogenic 4He and 40Ar concentrations in Sulagiri yields the radiogenic ages as 2.29 and 4.56 Ga, indicating the loss of He from the meteorite. Xenon and krypton are mixture of Q and spallo-genic components.

  1. Noble Gas Inventory of Micrometeorites Collected at the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) and Indications for Their Provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, U.; Baecker, B.; Folco, L.; Cordier, C.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of processes have been considered possibly contributing the volatiles including noble gases to the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets (e.g., [1-3]). Special consideration has been given to the concept of accretion of volatile-rich materials by the forming planets. This might include infalling planetesimals and dust, and could include material from the outer asteroid belt, as well as cometary material from the outer solar system. Currently, the dominant source of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth is represented by micrometeorites (MMs) with sizes mostly in the 100-300 micron range [3, 4]). Their role has been assessed by [3], who conclude that accretion of early micrometeorites played a major role in the formation of the terrestrial atmosphere and oceans. We have therefore set out to investigate in more detail the inventory of noble gases in MMs. Here we summarize some of our results obtained on MMs collected in micrometeorite traps of the Transantarctic Mountains [5].

  2. Methane oxidation over noble metal catalysts as related to controlling natural gas vehicle exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.H.; Mitchell, P.J.; Siewert, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Natural gas has considerable potential as an alternative automotive fuel. This paper reports on methane, the principal hydrocarbon species in natural-gas engine exhaust, which has extremely low photochemical reactivity but is a powerful greenhouse gas. Therefore, exhaust emissions of unburned methane from natural-gas vehicles are of particular concern. This laboratory reactor study evaluates noble metal catalysts for their potential in the catalytic removal of methane from natural-gas vehicle exhaust. Temperature run-up experiments show that the methane oxidation activity decreases in the order Pd/Al 2 O 3 > Rh/Al 2 O 3 > Pt/Al 2 O 3 . Also, for all the noble metal catalysts studied, methane conversion can be maximized by controlling the O 2 concentration of the feedstream at a point somewhat rich (reducing) of stoichiometry

  3. Modeling impurity-assisted chain creation in noble-metal break junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Napoli, S; Thiess, A; Blügel, S; Mokrousov, Y

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present the generalization of the model for chain formation in break junctions, introduced by Thiess et al (2008 Nano Lett. 8 2144), to zigzag transition-metal chains with s and p impurities. We apply this extended model to study the producibility trends for noble-metal chains with impurities, often present in break junction experiments, namely, Cu, Ag and Au chains with H, C, O and N adatoms. Providing the material-specific parameters for our model from systematic full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave first-principles calculations, we find that the presence of such impurities crucially affects the binding properties of the noble-metal chains. We reveal that both the impurity-induced bond strengthening and the formation of zigzag bonds can lead to a significantly enhanced probability for chain formation in break junctions. (paper)

  4. Recent Advances in the Field of Bionanotechnology: An Insight into Optoelectric Bacteriorhodopsin, Quantum Dots, and Noble Metal Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Knoblauch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular sensors and molecular electronics are a major component of a recent research area known as bionanotechnology, which merges biology with nanotechnology. This new class of biosensors and bioelectronics has been a subject of intense research over the past decade and has found application in a wide variety of fields. The unique characteristics of these biomolecular transduction systems has been utilized in applications ranging from solar cells and single-electron transistors (SETs to fluorescent sensors capable of sensitive and selective detection of a wide variety of targets, both organic and inorganic. This review will discuss three major systems in the area of molecular sensors and electronics and their application in unique technological innovations. Firstly, the synthesis of optoelectric bacteriorhodopsin (bR and its application in the field of molecular sensors and electronics will be discussed. Next, this article will discuss recent advances in the synthesis and application of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs. Finally, this article will conclude with a review of the new and exciting field of noble metal nanoclusters and their application in the creation of a new class of fluorescent sensors.

  5. Noble Metal Catalysts Supported on Nanofibrous Polymeric Membranes for Environmental Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Karel; Topka, Pavel; Hejtmánek, Vladimír; Petráš, D.; Valeš, V.; Šolcová, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 236, NOV 1 (2014), s. 3-11 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP106/11/P459; GA ČR GP13-24186P Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : electrospinning * noble metals * catalytic oxidation * volatile organic compoundas Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.893, year: 2014

  6. Growth and yield of a managed 30-year-old noble fir plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall D. Murray

    1988-01-01

    A thinned and fertilized noble fir plantation produced 3,450 cubic feet per acre 30 years after it was planted in western Washington. More than half of this volume was in trees with diameter at breast height of 10 inches and larger. Current annual increment the last 6 years was 295 cubic feet per acre. Ornamental boughs have been harvested annually for about a 15-year...

  7. ANNUAL ACTIVITY OF THE NOBLE CRAYFISH (ASTACUS ASTACUS) IN THE ORLJAVA RIVER (CROATIA)

    OpenAIRE

    FALLER M.; MAGUIRE I.; KLOBUČAR G.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the annual activity of the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) at three sites along the Orljava River, in the continental part of Croatia, between August 2003 and September 2004. Each site represented the typical characteristics of the upper, middle and lower section of the river (5, 24 and 37 km from the spring, respectively). The biggest population size was recorded on the most upstream site, with greatest structural variability of bottom, high biotic index, and the lowest mean wate...

  8. Autoradiographic techniques to determine noble metal distribution in automotive catalyst substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of noble metals in the ceramic substrates of automotive catalytic converter systems is important to the functional characteristics of the systems. A radiotracer technique involving microtomy of bead substrate samples and autoradiography using the resultant thin sections was developed to produce detailed images of the metal distributions. The method is particularly valuable to determine the distribution of one metal in the presence of another to aid in the development of more efficient systems

  9. Wigner Distribution Functions as a Tool for Studying Gas Phase Alkali Metal Plus Noble Gas Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    WIGNER DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AS A TOOL FOR STUDYING GAS PHASE ALKALI METAL PLUS NOBLE GAS COLLISIONS THESIS Keith A. Wyman, Second Lieutenant, USAF...the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-14-M-39 WIGNER DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AS A TOOL FOR...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENP-14-M-39 WIGNER DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AS A TOOL FOR STUDYING GAS PHASE ALKALI METAL PLUS

  10. Noble gas separation from nuclear reactor effluents using selective adsorption with inorganic adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pence, D.T.; Paplawsky, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    A radioactive waste gas treatment system utilizing selective adsorption on inorganic adsorbents is described for application to PWRs. The system operates at near ambient pressure, does not require a hydrogen recombiner, has low radioactive gas inventories, and is cost competitive with existing treatment systems. The proposed technique is also applicable for recovery of noble gases from the containment building of a nuclear reactor after an accident. A system design for this application is also presented

  11. Measurements of the diffusion and reflection coefficients of Cd(1S0) in noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudecki, P.; Domyslawska, J.

    2003-01-01

    A new method of simultaneous determining of the diffusion coefficient and the reflection coefficient of atoms from the reservoir walls is presented. The diffusion coefficient of cadmium atoms in the ground state in buffer noble gas atoms such as Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe and reflection coefficient of Cd atoms from the quartz cell wall in the temperature range 350-550 K were determined. Experimental values diffusion coefficient are compared with theoretical ones calculated from a available potentials. (author)

  12. Determination of noble metals in geological materials by radiochemical neutron-activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Ahmad, S.; Morris, D.F.C.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the determination of platinum, palladium, gold and iridium in geological materials following activation with thermal neutrons is described. Radionuclides formed from the elements are separated by a scheme based largely on liquid-liquid extractions. The procedure has been applied to the analysis of US Geological Survey standard rocks and to studies of the distribution of the noble metals in lateritic nickel ores. (author)

  13. A fast cost-assessment method for boiler equipment made of noble materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perreard, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The method is aimed at assessing equipment costs for preliminary technical-economic studies or succinct project evaluation. Advantages and disadvantages of nobles metals such as nickel, tantalum, titanium, zirconium ... are reviewed. The economic evaluation method is based on a combination of parametric techniques and statistical results, and allows for the assessment of the various cost components as a function of mass, design and manufacturing complexity in the context of industrial specific operating constraints. 3 figs., 6 tabs., 2 refs

  14. Development of supported noble metal catalyst for U(VI) to U(IV) reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Deepak; Varma, Salil; Bhattacharyya, K.; Tripathi, A.K.; Bharadwaj, S.R.; Jain, V.K.; Sahu, Avinash; Vincent, Tessy; Jagatap, B.N.; Wattal, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium-plutonium separation is an essential step in the PUREX process employed in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. This partitioning in the PUREX process is achieved by selective reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) using uranous nitrate as reductant and hydrazine as stabilizer. Currently in our Indian reprocessing plants, the requirement of uranous nitrate is met by electrolytic reduction of uranyl nitrate. This process, however, suffers from a major drawback of incomplete reduction with a maximum conversion of ~ 60%. Catalytic reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is being considered as one of the promising alternatives to the electro-reduction process due to fast kinetics and near total conversion. Various catalysts involving noble metals like platinum (Adams catalyst, Pt/Al 2 O 3 , Pt/SiO 2 etc.) have been reported for the reduction. Sustained activity and stability of the catalyst under harsh reaction conditions are still the issues that need to be resolved. We present here the results on zirconia supported noble metal catalyst that is developed in BARC for reduction of uranyl nitrate to uranous nitrate. Supported noble metal catalysts with varying metal loadings (0.5 - 2 wt%) were prepared via support precipitation and noble metal impregnation. The green catalysts were reduced either by chemical reduction using hydrazine hydrate or by heating in hydrogen flow or combination of both the steps. These catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as, XRD, SEM, TEM, N 2 adsorption and H 2 chemisorption. Performance of these catalysts was evaluated for U(VI) to U(IV) reduction with uranyl nitrate feed using hydrazine as reductant. The results with the most active catalyst are named as 'BARC-CAT', which was developed in our lab. (author)

  15. Dispersion forces and small-angle neutron scattering from liquid noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    1988-01-01

    Maggs and Ashcroft [Phys. Rev. letts., 59,113 (1987)] have re-opened the question of the analogy between the cohesion of a molecular crystal, in which dispersion forces play a major role, and that in a metal crystal with polarizable ion cores. It is pointed out that small-angle neutron scattering from liquid noble metals could be used to test their predictions. (author)

  16. Analysis of noble metal on automotive exhaust catalysts by radioisotope-induce x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgart, M.F.

    1976-01-01

    A technique was developed for the in-situ analysis of noble metals deposited on monolithic automotive exhaust catalysts. This technique is based on radioisotope-induced x-ray fluorescence, and provides a detailed picture of the distribution of palladium and platinum on catalyst samples. The experimental results for the cross section of a monolithic exhaust catalyst, analyzed in increments of 0.2 cm 3 , are compared with analyses for palladium and platinum obtained by instrumental neutron activation analysis

  17. Oxidation of tritium in packed bed of noble metal catalyst for detritiation from system gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Masabumi; Takeishi, Toshiharu; Munakata, Kenzo; Kotoh, Kenji; Enoeda, Mikio

    1985-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation rates of tritium in the bed of the noble metal catalysts are obtained and compared with the oxidation rates observed for the packed bed of spongy copper oxide or hopcalites. Use of Pt- or Pd-aluminia catalysts is recommended in this study because they give effective oxidation rates of tritium in the ambient temperature range. The adsorption performance of tritiated water in the catalyst bed is also discussed. (orig.)

  18. Low energy (e,2e) studies of the noble gases in the perpendicular plane

    OpenAIRE

    Nixon , Kate L; Murray , Andrew James; Kaiser , Christian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Detailed (e, 2e) studies of the electron impact ionization of the noble gases helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon have been carried out from near threshold to intermediate energies, where the outgoing electrons carry equal energy from the interaction. The experiments were conducted in the perpendicular plane, where the outgoing electrons are both detected orthogonal to the incident electron beam. For electrons to emerge in this geometry they must undergo multiple scattering, in...

  19. Electrical resistivity of noble-metal alloys: Roles of pseudopotential refinements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujibar Rahman, S.M.

    1983-08-01

    The electrical resistivity of liquid noble-metal alloys i.e. CuAu and AgAu is calculated as a function of concentration. The calculations employ transition-metal-pseudopotentials that include nonlocal effects, hybridization and corrections due to orthogonalization hole and use the hard-sphere structure factors; the optimal values of the hard-sphere diameters are being determined by variational calculations. The calculated resistivities are comparable to the experimental values and to the available theoretical results. (author)

  20. Method to separate fission noble gases from gaseous wastes of a reprocessing plant for nuclear fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnez, H.

    1977-01-01

    In order to avoid the high cost expenditure in the separation of fission noble gases from waste gas of the head end, the following economical method is suggested: The fission noble gases released in the solvent - after grinding and burn-up of the nuclear fuel elements and dissolving in HNO 3 - are purified in a known method and collected in an equalizing tank. From here, the fission noble gas quantity necessary as washing gas is recycled into the solvent, so that a part of the fission noble gas quantity flows in a circuit. The quantity of fission noble gas not required for the above is separated from the circuit, compressed and put into a storage container from where it can be put into gas flashs or be recycled in the gas circuit where necessary. Furthermore, the method involves that to separate krypton, the filtered fission noble gas is compressed, cooled and rectified, whereby the krypton mixture taken from the rectification column is stored under high pressure and the gas part containing xenon, occuring as liquid, is at least partly fed back to the solvent. (HPH) [de

  1. Deposition and characterization of noble metal onto surfaces of 304l stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras R, A.; Arganis J, C. R.; Aguilar T, J. A.; Medina A, A. L.

    2010-10-01

    Noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) plus hydrogen water chemistry is an industry-wide accepted approach for potential intergranular stress corrosion cracking mitigation of BWR internals components. NMCA is a method of applying noble metal onto BWR internals surfaces using reactor water as the transport medium that causes the deposition of noble metal from the liquid onto surfaces. In this work different platinum concentration solutions were deposited onto pre-oxidized surfaces of 304l steel at 180 C during 48 hr in an autoclave. In order to simulate the zinc water conditions, deposits of Zn and Pt-Zn were also carried out. The solutions used to obtain the deposits were: sodium hexahydroxyplatinate (IV), zinc nitrate hydrate and zinc oxide. The deposits obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Finally, the electrochemical corrosion potential of pre-oxidized samples with Pt deposit were obtained and compared with the electrochemical corrosion potential of only pre-oxidized samples. (Author)

  2. Oxidation of ethoxylated fatty alcohols to alkylpolyglycol carboxylic acids using noble metals as catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagredos, Angelos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of ethoxylated fatty alcohols to the corresponding carboxylic acids through dehydrogenation/ oxidation using noble-metal catalysts has been studied. Ethoxylated primary aliphatic alcohols, ethoxylated random secondary aliphatic alcohols and ethoxylated alkylphenols have been converted to the corresponding acids in the presence of a base. The noble metal catalysts Palladium and Platinum were used without significant degradation of the ethoxyl chain in yields that exceeded 90%. On the other hand, the catalysts Rhodium and Ruthenium gave yields of about 80% and 60% respectively.La conversión de alcoholes grasos etoxilados a los correspondientes ácidos carboxílicos por deshidrogenación/ oxidación con metales nobles como catalizador ha sido estudiada. Alcoholes primarios alifáticos etoxilados, alcoholes alifáticos secundarios etoxilados al azar y alquilfenoles etoxilados han sido convertidos a los correspondientes ácidos en presencia de base. Los catalizadores paladio y platino fueron usados sin degradación significativa de las cadenas etoxiladas con un rendimiento que excedió del 90%. Por otra parte catalizadores de rodio y rutenio produjeron rendimientos del 80 y 60%, respectivamente.

  3. The role of van der Waals interactions in the adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, De-Li; Al-Saidi, W A; Johnson, J Karl

    2012-10-03

    Adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces is determined by weak interactions. We applied two versions of the nonlocal van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) to compute adsorption energies of Ar, Kr, and Xe on Pt(111), Pd(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) metal surfaces. We have compared our results with data obtained using other density functional approaches, including the semiempirical vdW corrected DFT-D2. The vdW-DF results show considerable improvements in the description of adsorption energies and equilibrium distances over other DFTbased methods, giving good agreement with experiments. We have also calculated perpendicular vibrational energies for noble gases on the metal surfaces using vdWDF data and found excellent agreement with available experimental results. Our vdW-DF calculations show that adsorption of noble gases on low-coordination sites is energetically favored over high-coordination sites, but only by a few meV. Analysis of the 2-dimensional potential energy surface shows that the high-coordination sites are local maxima on the 2-dimensional potential energy surface and therefore unlikely to be observed in experiments, which provides an explanation of the experimental observations. The DFT-D2 approach with the standard parameterization was found to overestimate the dispersion interactions, and to give the wrong adsorption site preference for four of the nine systems we studied.

  4. A comparative study of the broadening effect on rotational lines by methane and noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircz, J.G.

    1979-01-01

    Line broadening measurements for the mixtures HCl-CH 4 and HCl-CD 4 have been performed and the results of these experiments are reported. Current theoretical models for the systems studied are briefly discussed. In order to identify specific effects the authors have tried to find a generalisation for linewidth cross-sections for the HCl-noble gas systems. This is done in the spirit of the well known corresponding state treatment in statistical mechanics in an attempt to find, in terms of reduced variables, a generalised intermolecular potential for these systems. Extensive calculations on the HCl-Ar and HCl-Kr intermolecular potentials, as derived from linewidth measurements, are reported in an attempt to extract a more exact potential for these systems. The results are compared with other recent results from the literature. The use of a semi-empirical method for the evaluation of the experimental data is described. This empirical method has been used in a comparison between the HCl-noble gas experiments and the present experiments of HCl-methane. The possibility of splitting the observed data into a 'noble gas' part and a 'extra' part due to the intermolecular interactions which result from the coupling of the HCl rotations with the internal degrees of freedom of the methane molecules is discussed. (Auth.)

  5. Visible light active TiO2 films prepared by electron beam deposition of noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Xinggang; Ma Jun; Liu Andong; Li Dejun; Huang Meidong; Deng Xiangyun

    2010-01-01

    TiO 2 films prepared by sol-gel method were modified by electron beam deposition of noble metals (Pt, Pd, and Ag). Effects of noble metals on the chemical and surface characteristics of the films were studied using XPS, TEM and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques. Photocatalytic activity of modified TiO 2 films was evaluated by studying the degradation of methyl orange dye solution under visible light UV irradiation. The result of TEM reveals that most of the surface area of TiO 2 is covered by tiny particles of noble metals with diameter less than 1 nm. Broad red shift of UV-Visible absorption band of modified photocatalysts was observed. The catalytic degradation of methyl orange in aqueous solutions under visible light illumination demonstrates a significant enhancement of photocatalytic activity of these films compared with the un-loaded films. The photocatalytic efficiency of modified TiO 2 films by this method is affected by the concentration of impregnating solution.

  6. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection in Noble Gas Solids for Measurements of Rare Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep; Bailey, Kevin G.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas P.; Xu, Chen-Yu; Tang, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Optical detection of single atoms captured in solid noble gas matrices provides an alternative technique to study rare nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics. I will describe the prospects of applying this approach for cross section measurements of the ^22Ne,,),25Mg reaction, which is the crucial neutron source for the weak s process inside of massive stars. Noble gas solids are a promising medium for the capture, detection, and manipulation of atoms and nuclear spins. They provide stable and chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of guest species. Because noble gas solids are transparent at optical wavelengths, the guest atoms can be probed using lasers. We have observed that ytterbium in solid neon exhibits intersystem crossing (ISC) which results in a strong green fluorescence (546 nm) under excitation with blue light (389 nm). Several groups have observed ISC in many other guest-host pairs, notably magnesium in krypton. Because of the large wavelength separation of the excitation light and fluorescence light, optical detection of individual embedded guest atoms is feasible. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Electron shell contributions to gamma-ray spectra of positron annihilation in noble gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng; Selvam, Lalitha [Centre for Molecular Simulation, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Gribakin, Gleb F [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Surko, Clifford M, E-mail: fwang@swin.edu.a [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0319 (United States)

    2010-08-28

    Gamma-ray positron annihilation spectra of the noble gases are simulated using computational chemistry tools for the bound electron wavefunctions and plane-wave approximation for the low-energy positron. The present annihilation line shapes, i.e. the full width at half maximum, {Delta}{epsilon}, of the {gamma}-ray annihilation spectra for He and Ar (valence) agree well with available independent atomic calculations using a different algorithm. For other noble gases they achieve moderate agreement with the experimental measurements. It is found that the contributions of various atomic electron shells to the spectra depend significantly on their principal quantum number n and orbital angular momentum quantum number l. The present study further reveals that the outermost ns electrons of the noble gases exhibit spectral line shapes in close agreement with those measured, indicating (as expected) that the measurements are not due to a simple sum over the momentum densities for all atomic electrons. The robust nature of the present approach makes it possible for us to proceed to more complex molecular systems using the tools of modern computational chemistry.

  8. Biomimetic Synthesis of Gelatin Polypeptide-Assisted Noble-Metal Nanoparticles and Their Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Xiaoheng; Wang, Xin

    2011-12-01

    Herein, the generation of gold, silver, and silver-gold (Ag-Au) bimetallic nanoparticles was carried out in collagen (gelatin) solution. It first showed that the major ingredient in gelatin polypeptide, glutamic acid, acted as reducing agent to biomimetically synthesize noble metal nanoparticles at 80°C. The size of nanoparticles can be controlled not only by the mass ratio of gelatin to gold ion but also by pH of gelatin solution. Interaction between noble-metal nanoparticles and polypeptide has been investigated by TEM, UV-visible, fluorescence spectroscopy, and HNMR. This study testified that the degradation of gelatin protein could not alter the morphology of nanoparticles, but it made nanoparticles aggregated clusters array (opposing three-dimensional α-helix folding structure) into isolated nanoparticles stabilized by gelatin residues. This is a promising merit of gelatin to apply in the synthesis of nanoparticles. Therefore, gelatin protein is an excellent template for biomimetic synthesis of noble metal/bimetallic nanoparticle growth to form nanometer-sized device.

  9. Modeling the transport and fate of radioactive noble gases in very dry desert alluvium: Realistic scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Donahue, M.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    US DOE Order 5820.2A (1988) requires that a performance assessment of all new and existing low-level radioactive waste management sites be made. An integral part of every performance assessment is the mathematical modeling of the transport and fate of noble gas radionuclides in the gas phase. Current in depth site characterization of the high desert alluvium in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is showing that the alluvium is very very dry all the way to the water table (240 meters below land surface). The potential for radioactive noble gas (e.g. Rn-220 and Rn-222) transport to the atmosphere from shallow land burial of Thorium and Uranium waste is very high. Objectives of this modeling effort include: Construct a physics based sits specific noble gas transport model; Include induced advection due to barometric pressure changes at the atmospheric boundary layer (thin) - dry desert alluvium interface; User selected option for use of NOAA barometric pressure or a ''home brewed'' barometric pressure wave made up of up to 15 sinusoids and cosinusoids; Use the model to help make engineering decisions on the design of the burial pits and associated closure caps

  10. ABOUT THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF HYDROCARBON LAKES IN THE ORIGIN OF TITAN'S NOBLE GAS ATMOSPHERIC DEPLETION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, D.; Mousis, O.; Lunine, J. I.; Lebonnois, S.; Lavvas, P.; Lobo, L. Q.; Ferreira, A. G. M.

    2010-01-01

    An unexpected feature of Titan's atmosphere is the strong depletion in primordial noble gases revealed by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe during its descent on 2005 January 14. Although several plausible explanations have already been formulated, no definitive response to this issue has yet been found. Here, we investigate the possible sequestration of these noble gases in the liquid contained in lakes and wet terrains on Titan and the consequences for their atmospheric abundances. Considering the atmosphere and the liquid existing on the soil as a whole system, we compute the abundance of each noble gas relative to nitrogen. To do so, we make the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium between the liquid and the atmosphere, the abundances of the different constituents being determined via regular solution theory. We find that xenon's atmospheric depletion can be explained by its dissolution at ambient temperature in the liquid presumably present on Titan's soil. In the cases of argon and krypton, we find that the fractions incorporated in the liquid are negligible, implying that an alternative mechanism must be invoked to explain their atmospheric depletion.

  11. A review of noble gas geochemistry in relation to early Earth history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most fundamental noble gas constraints on early Earth history is derived from isotopic differences in (129)Xe/(130)Xe between various terrestrial materials. The short half life (17 m.y.) of extinct (129I, parent of (129)Xe, means that these differences must have been produced within the first 100 m.y. after terrestrial accretion. The identification of large anomalies in (129)Xe/(130)Xe in mid ocean ridge basalts (MORB), with respect to atmospheric xenon, suggests that the atmosphere and upper mantle have remained separate since that time. This alone is a very strong argument for early catastrophic degassing, which would be consistent with an early fractionation resulting in core formation. However, noble gas isotopic systematics of oceanic basalts show that the mantle cannot necessarily be regarded as a homogeneous system, since there are significant variations in (3)He/(4)He, (40)Ar/(36)Ar, and (129)Xe/(130)Xe. Therefore, the early degassing cannot be considered to have acted on the whole mantle. The specific mechanisms of degassing, in particular the thickness and growth of the early crust, is an important variable in understanding present day noble gas inventories. Another constraint can be obtained from rocks that are thought to be derived from near the lithosphere asthenosphere boundary: ultramafic xenoliths.

  12. Techniques for the quantitative analysis of fission-product noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautensleger, A.W.; Hara, F.T.

    1982-08-01

    Analytical procedures for the determination of ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium in precursor waste, solvent metal, and final glass waste forms have been developed. Two procedures for the analysis of noble metals in the calcine and glass waste forms are described in this report. The first is a fast and simple technique that combines inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP) and x-ray fluorescence techniques and can only be used on nonradioactive materials. The second procedure is based on a noble metal separation step, followed by an analysis using ICP. This second method is more complicated than the first, but it will work on radioactive materials. Also described is a procedure for the ICP analysis of noble metals in the solvent metal matrix. The only solvent metal addressed in this procedure is lead, but with minor changes the procedure could be applied to any of the solvent metals being considered in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) extraction process. A brief explanation of atomic spectroscopy and the ICP analytical process, as well as of certain aspects of ICP performance (interelement spectral line interferences and certain matrix effects) is given

  13. The role of noble metals in electric melting of nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, G.; Weisenburger, S.

    1990-01-01

    Electrical melting of nuclear waste glass in ceramic melters applies Joule heating, with the molten glass acting as the conductive medium. The local energy release inside the melt relieves from the restriction of external heat addition, allowing to scale up the melter to industrial units. Certainly, that principle makes the melter operation susceptible for changes of the electrical properties of the glass melt. Hence, the melt properties are required to be locally uniform and constant with time. Temporary fluctuations in the feed composition, however, are usually attenuated by the high retention times being in the order of a day and more. More essential for the melter operation are segregation effects occurring systematically. This behaviour can be observed in the case of the so-called noble metal elements Ruthenium, Palladium and Rhodium, belonging to the Platinum metal group. The subject of this paper is to describe the behaviour of the noble metals in electric melting and the problems they can contribute to. The discussion is based on detailed knowledge gained from PAMELA's LEWC processing and from large-scale vitrification of commercial-like waste simulate at INE/KfK. Finally, ways are indicated to solve the noble metal problem technically

  14. Spatial profiling of ion and neutral excitation in noble gas electron cyclotron resonance plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoades, R.L.; Gorbatkin, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Optical emission from neutrals and ions of several noble gases has been profiled in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma system. In argon plasmas with a net microwave power of 750 W, the neutral (696.5-nm) and ion (488-nm) emission profiles are slightly center peaked at 0.32 mTorr and gradually shift to a hollow appearance at 2.5 mTorr. Neon profiles show a similar trend from 2.5 to 10.0 mTorr. For the noble gases, transition pressure scales with the ionization potential of the gas, which is consistent with neutral depletion. Studies of noble gas mixtures, however, indicate that neutral depletion is not always dominant in the formation of hollow profiles. For Kr/Ar, Ar/Ne, and Ne/He plasmas, the majority gas tends to set the overall shape of the profile at any given pressure. For the conditions of the current system, plasma density appears to be more dominant than electron temperature in the formation of hollow profiles. The general method described is also a straightforward, inexpensive technique for measuring the spatial distribution of power deposited in plasmas, particularly where absolute scale can be calibrated by some other means

  15. Preliminary investigation of a technique to separate fission noble metals from fission-product mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, G.B.; Jensen, G.A.

    1982-08-01

    A variation of the gold-ore fire assay technique was examined as a method for recovering Pd, Rh and Ru from fission products. The mixture of fission product oxides is combined with glass-forming chemicals, a metal oxide such as PbO (scavenging agent), and a reducing agent such as charcoal. When this mixture is melted, a metal button is formed which extracts the noble metals. The remainder cools to form a glass for nuclear waste storage. Recovery depended only on reduction of the scavenger oxide to metal. When such reduction was achieved, no difference in noble metal recovery efficiency was found among the scavengers studied (PbO, SnO, CuO, Bi 2 O 3 , Sb 2 O 3 ). Not all reducing agents studied, however, were able to reduce all scavenger oxides to metal. Only graphite would reduce SnO and CuO and allow noble metal recovery. The scavenger oxides Sb 2 O 3 , Bi 2 O 3 , and PbO, however, were reduced by all of the reducing agents tested. Similar noble metal recovery was found with each. Lead oxide was found to be the most promising of the potential scavengers. It was reduced by all of the reducing agents tested, and its higher density may facilitate the separation. Use of lead oxide also appeared to have no deterimental effect on the glass quality. Charcoal was identified as the preferred reducing agent. As long as a separable metal phase was formed in the melt, noble metal recovery was not dependent on the amount of reducing agent and scavenger oxide. High glass viscosities inhibited separation of the molten scavenger, while low viscosities allowed volatile loss of RuO 4 . A viscosity of approx. 20 poise at the processing temperature offered a good compromise between scavenger separation and Ru recovery. Glasses in which PbO was used as the scavenging agent were homogeneous in appearance. Resistance to leaching was close to that of certain waste glasses reported in the literature. 12 figures. 7 tables

  16. Advancing the use of noble gases in fluid inclusions of speleothems as a palaeoclimate proxy. Method and standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, L.; Palcsu, L.; Major, Z.; Svingor, E.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Continental carbonates are essential archives of the past geological and climatological occurrences. Recently, fluid inclusions of carbonates have got into focus of palaeoclimate research. A new approach using temperature dependent gas solubilities might be a way that uses only physical laws, e.g. the Henry's law of solubility and gas partitioning models. The so-called noble gas temperature (NGT) can be calculated from the measured noble gas concentrations. This report describes how our first advancing steps towards obtaining NGT's from fluid inclusions and tiny water amounts have been preformed. To extract the water inclusions from the carbonate matrix, the most suitable treatment is to crush the carbonate under vacuum. The water released from the inclusions is then collected in a cold finger by freezing. The amount of the liberated water is measured via its vapour pressure in a certain volume (Fig. 1). The liberated dissolved noble gases which were in the fluid inclusions are separated by a cryo system, and then admitted into the static mode noble gas mass spectrometer sequentially. The calibration of the noble gas mass spectrometric measurements is performed by means of well known air aliquots. To check the reliability of the whole measurement procedure standard water samples have to be measured. As for standard samples, first we have prepared air equilibrated water (AEW) in conditioned circumstances. We fill copper capillaries with AEW. Having completed the copper capillary assemblage, the AEW is letting flow through the capillary (Fig. 2). The error of such a water determination is less than 1% in case of 1 μl of liquid water (Fig. 1) that allows us to determine accurate noble gas concentrations. The reproducibility of 40 Ar measurements is better than 0.6 %, while those of neon, krypton and xenon isotopes are 0.6-1.6 %, 0.9-2.2 % and 0.8-2.0 %, respectively. Theoretically, these precisions for noble gas concentrations

  17. High-resolution (noble) gas time series for aquatic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, A. L.; Brennwald, M. S.; Weber, U.; Kipfer, R.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a portable mass spectrometer (miniRUEDI) for on-site quantification of gas concentrations (He, Ar, Kr, N2, O2, CO2, CH4, etc.) in terrestrial gases [1,2]. Using the gas-equilibrium membrane-inlet technique (GE-MIMS), the miniRUEDI for the first time also allows accurate on-site and long-term dissolved-gas analysis in water bodies. The miniRUEDI is designed for operation in the field and at remote locations, using battery power and ambient air as a calibration gas. In contrast to conventional sampling and subsequent lab analysis, the miniRUEDI provides real-time and continuous time series of gas concentrations with a time resolution of a few seconds.Such high-resolution time series and immediate data availability open up new opportunities for research in highly dynamic and heterogeneous environmental systems. In addition the combined analysis of inert and reactive gas species provides direct information on the linkages of physical and biogoechemical processes, such as the air/water gas exchange, excess air formation, O2 turnover, or N2 production by denitrification [1,3,4].We present the miniRUEDI instrument and discuss its use for environmental research based on recent applications of tracking gas dynamics related to rapid and short-term processes in aquatic systems. [1] Brennwald, M.S., Schmidt, M., Oser, J., and Kipfer, R. (2016). Environmental Science and Technology, 50(24):13455-13463, doi: 10.1021/acs.est.6b03669[2] Gasometrix GmbH, gasometrix.com[3] Mächler, L., Peter, S., Brennwald, M.S., and Kipfer, R. (2013). Excess air formation as a mechanism for delivering oxygen to groundwater. Water Resources Research, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20547[4] Mächler, L., Brennwald, M.S., and Kipfer, R. (2013). Argon Concentration Time-Series As a Tool to Study Gas Dynamics in the Hyporheic Zone. Environmental Science and Technology, doi: 10.1021/es305309b

  18. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Blanchard, W.R.; Kozub, T.A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-01

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  19. The secondary electron yield of noble metal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gonzalez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Secondary electron yield (SEY curves in the 0-1000 eV range were measured on polycrystalline Ag, Au and Cu samples. The metals were examined as introduced in the ultra-high vacuum chamber and after having been cleaned by Ar+ ion sputtering. The comparison between the curves measured on the clean samples and in the presence of contaminants, due to the permanence in atmosphere, confirmed that the SEY behavior is strongly influenced by the chemical state of the metal surface. We show that when using very slow primary electrons the sample work function can be determined with high accuracy from the SEY curves. Moreover we prove that SEY is highly sensitive to the presence of adsorbates even at submonolayer coverage. Results showing the effect of small quantities of CO adsorbed on copper are presented. Our findings demonstrate that SEY, besides being an indispensable mean to qualify technical materials in many technological fields, can be also used as a flexible and advantageous diagnostics to probe surfaces and interfaces.

  20. Tracing enhanced oil recovery signatures in casing gases from the Lost Hills oil field using noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Peter H.; Kulongoski, Justin; Landon, Matthew K.; Tyne, R.L.; Gillespie, Janice; Stephens, Michael; Hillegonds, D.J.; Byrne, D.J.; Ballentine, C.J.

    2018-01-01

    Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and hydraulic fracturing practices are commonly used methods to improve hydrocarbon extraction efficiency; however the environmental impacts of such practices remain poorly understood. EOR is particularly prevalent in oil fields throughout California where water resources are in high demand and disposal of high volumes of produced water may affect groundwater quality. Consequently, it is essential to better understand the fate of injected (EOR) fluids in California and other subsurface petroleum systems, as well as any potential effect on nearby aquifer systems. Noble gases can be used as tracers to understand hydrocarbon generation, migration, and storage conditions, as well as the relative proportions of oil and water present in the subsurface. In addition, a noble gas signature diagnostic of injected (EOR) fluids can be readily identified. We report noble gas isotope and concentration data in casing gases from oil production wells in the Lost Hills oil field, northwest of Bakersfield, California, and injectate gas data from the Fruitvale oil field, located within the city of Bakersfield. Casing and injectate gas data are used to: 1) establish pristine hydrocarbon noble-gas signatures and the processes controlling noble gas distributions, 2) characterize the noble gas signature of injectate fluids, 3) trace injectate fluids in the subsurface, and 4) construct a model to estimate EOR efficiency. Noble gas results range from pristine to significantly modified by EOR, and can be best explained using a solubility exchange model between oil and connate/formation fluids, followed by gas exsolution upon production. This model is sensitive to oil-water interaction during hydrocarbon expulsion, migration, and storage at reservoir conditions, as well as any subsequent modification by EOR.

  1. Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

  2. Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene analysis indicates a restricted genetic background in Finnish noble crayfish (Astacus astacus stocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makkonen J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The IUCN Red List indexes the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus as vulnerable, with a declining population trend. The main threats to the species are the crayfish plague caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces astaci and the introduced North American crayfish that act as the carriers of this disease. In Finland, the noble crayfish is considered as a native species, which original distribution area covers the southern part of the country, but the species distribution has been dispersed to cover almost the whole country. The aim of this study was to survey the genetic diversity among the Finnish noble crayfish populations. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI-gene was sequenced from 742 individuals representing 59 populations from Finland and Estonia. As a result, only a single haplotype was found. Based on these results, the genetic diversity of noble crayfish in its Northern distribution range is remarkably low. The observed lack of variation can result from several mechanisms including small size of the founder population and the intense spreading of the species by manmade stockings. The restricted diversity can also be caused by eradication of the original populations due to crayfish plague epidemics and spreading of the invasive crayfish species carrying the crayfish plague. It is also possible that all contemporary Finnish noble crayfish populations originate from stockings with no variation in respect to COI-gene.

  3. Protonated ions as systemic trapping agents for noble gases: From electronic structure to radiative association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgurel, O; Pauzat, F; Pilmé, J; Ellinger, Y; Bacchus-Montabonel, M-C; Mousis, O

    2017-10-07

    The deficiencies of argon, krypton, and xenon observed in the atmosphere of Titan as well as anticipated in some comets might be related to a scenario of sequestration by H 3 + in the gas phase at the early evolution of the solar nebula. The chemical process implied is a radiative association, evaluated as rather efficient in the case of H 3 + , especially for krypton and xenon. This mechanism of chemical trapping might not be limited to H 3 + only, considering that the protonated ions produced in the destruction of H 3 + by its main competitors present in the primitive nebula, i.e., H 2 O, CO, and N 2 , might also give stable complexes with the noble gases. However the effective efficiency of such processes is still to be proven. Here, the reactivity of the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe, with all protonated ions issued from H 2 O, CO, and N 2 , expected to be present in the nebula with reasonably high abundances, has been studied with quantum simulation method dynamics included. All of them give stable complexes and the rate coefficients of their radiative associations range from 10 -16 to 10 -19 cm 3 s -1 , which is reasonable for such reactions and has to be compared to the rates of 10 -16 to 10 -18 cm 3 s -1 , obtained with H 3 + . We can consider this process as universal for all protonated ions which, if present in the primitive nebula as astrophysical models predict, should act as sequestration agents for all three noble gases with increasing efficiency from Ar to Xe.

  4. Noble Cantor sets acting as partial internal transport barriers in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.; Reuss, J.D.; Constantinescu, D.; Steinbrecher, G.; Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.; Weyssow, B.; Balescu, R.

    2002-03-01

    In hot laboratory plasmas, Internal Transport Barriers (ITB) have recently been observed, localized in the radial profile 'around' rational values of the winding number ω(r)=1/q(r). Such barriers are obviously related to the perturbed magnetic structure, described by a 1+1/2 Hamiltonian in presence of a perturbation. From the point of view of non-linear Hamiltonian dynamical systems this experimental result appears highly paradoxical since rational q-values generally correspond to the less robust tori. We have studied the appearance of chaos of toroidal magnetic lines by a discrete area-preserving map named 'tokamap'. By increasing the perturbation, we have observed in a wide chaotic sea the destruction of the last confining Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) surfaces, broken and transformed into permeable Cantor sets (Cantori). The flux across a Cantorus has been computed by using refined mathematical techniques due to MacKay, Mather and Aubry. We have proved that the ITB observed in the tokamap is actually composed of two permeable Cantori with 'noble' values of ω (in the definition of Percival). More generally, between the dominant chains of rational islands q = m/m-1, the most resistant barriers between q = m+2/m+1 and m+1/m have been checked (Green, MacKay and Stark) to be localized on the 'most irrational' numbers in these Farey intervals, i.e. on the noble numbers N(1,m)≡ 1+[1/(m+1/G)] (where G is the Golden number) defined by their continuous fraction expansion N(i,m) = [i,m,(1) ∞ ]. In conclusion, the study of the tokamap mapping allowed us to predict on mathematical basis that ITB can occur in tokamak plasmas not only 'around' rational magnetic surfaces but more precisely on noble q-values of irrational surfaces, and to localize them by the Fibonacci series of their convergent. (authors)

  5. Properties of noble gases and binary mixtures for closed Brayton Cycle applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournier, Jean-Michel P.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2008-01-01

    A review is conducted of the properties of the noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon, and their binary mixtures at pressures from 0.1 to 20 MPa and temperatures up to 1400 K. An extensive database of experimental measurements is compiled and used to develop semi-empirical properties correlations. The correlations accurately account for the effects of pressure and temperature on the thermodynamic and transport properties of these gases for potential uses in space (∼2 MPa and up to 1400 K) and terrestrial (∼7.0 MPa and up to 1200 K) applications of Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC). The developed correlations are based on the Chapman-Enskog kinetic theory for dilute gases, and on the application of the law of corresponding states to account for the dependence of properties on pressure. The correlations use the critical temperature and density of the gases as scaling parameters, and their predictions are compared with the compiled database. At temperatures ≥400 K and pressures ≤2 MPa in CBC space power systems, He and Ne, and the binary mixtures of He-Xe and He-Kr with molecular weights ≤40 g/mole behave essentially like a perfect gas, and the error of neglecting the effect of pressure on their compressibility factor, specific heats and transport properties is ≤1%. At a typical operating pressure of 7.0 MPa and up to 1200 K in terrestrial CBC power plants, neglecting the effect of pressure can result in ∼4% error in the properties of noble gases and the binary mixtures of He-Xe and He-Kr with molecular weights ≤40 g/mole, and as much as 20% error for pure argon. Therefore, when operating at pressures >2.0 MPa and/or using noble gases or binary mixtures with molecular weights > 40 g/mole, the present correlations should be used to accurately predict the thermodynamic and transport properties

  6. The failures in the noble virtus of the Calderonian wife-murderers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Tobar Quintanar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The author of this article defends that the dramatic character of the three Calderonian wife-murderers (don Gutierre Alfonso de Solís, don Lope de Almeida and don Juan Roca doesn´t fit to the noble decorum they should have. First the study presents the virtues ideally associated with the nobility in the Golden Age. Afterwards, the detailed analysis of the behaviour of those husbands reveals some failures in their supposed design as perfect heroes: they don´t dominate their violent passions, they judge precipitately the available data and make some mistakes in the application of the honour code. In consequence, they are imperfect nobles who help in a decisive way —but unnoticed for them— to the tragedies they take the chief role in. Resumen:En este trabajo se defiende que el carácter dramático de los tres uxoricidas calderonianos (don Gutierre Alfonso de Solís, don Lope de Almeida y don Juan Roca no se ajusta en diversas ocasiones al decoro nobiliario que cabría esperar en ellos. Primeramente se establece la nómina de virtudes que se asociaba con la nobleza de manera ideal en la época áurea. Posteriormente, el análisis detallado de la conducta de esos maridos revela fallos en su supuesto diseño como héroes intachables: no dominan sus violentas pasiones, juzgan precipitadamente los datos disponibles y cometen errores en la aplicación del código del honor. Se trata, por tanto, de nobles imperfectos que contribuyen de manera decisiva -aunque inadvertida para ellos- a las tragedias que protagonizan.

  7. Optical and structural properties of noble-metal nanoparticles; Optische und strukturelle Eigenschaften von Edelmetallnanopartikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahmen, C

    2006-06-23

    Noble-metal nanoparticles exhibit rich optical behavior, such as resonant light scattering and absorption and non-linear signal enhancement. This makes them attractive for a multitude of physical, chemical, and biophysical applications. For instance, recent biomedical experiments demonstrate the suitability of noble-metal nanoparticles for selective photothermal apoptosis by heat transport by laser irradiation. The applications of nanoparticles largely exploit that plasmons, i. e. collective oscillations of the conduction electrons, can be optically excited in these nanoparticles. In optical spectroscopy, these are seen as pronounced resonances. In the first part of this work, model calculations are employed to elucidate how radiation damping in noble-metal nanoparticles, i. e. the transformation of plasmons into photons, depends on particle size, particle shape, and on electromagnetic coupling between individual particles. Exact electrodynamic calculations are carried out for individual spheroidal particles and for pairs of spherical particles. These calculations for spheroidal particles demonstrate for the first time that radiative plasmon decay is determined by both the particle volume and the particle shape. Model calculations for pairs of large spherical particles reveal that the electromagnetic fields radiated by the particles mediate electromagnetic coupling at interparticle distances in the micrometer range. This coupling can lead to immense modulations of the plasmonic linewidth. The question whether this coupling is sufficiently strong to mediate extended, propagating, plasmon modes in nanoparticle arrays is addressed next. Detailed analysis reveals that this is not the case; instead, for the particle spacings regarded here, a non-resonant, purely diffractive coupling is observed, which is identified by steplike signatures in reflection spectra of the particle arrays. In the second part of this work, structural and optical properties of noble

  8. The atmospheric inventory of Xenon and noble cases in shales The plastic bag experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Honda, M.; Kramer, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    A novel trapped gas analysis protocol is applied to five shales in which the samples are sealed in air to eliminate the possibility of gas loss in the preanalysis laboratory vacuum exposure of a conventional protocol. The test is aimed at a determination concerning the hypothesis that atmospheric noble gases occur in the same proportion as planetary gases in meteorites, and that the factor-of-23 deficiency of air Xe relative to planetary Xe is made up by Xe stored in shales or other sedimentary rocks. The results obtained do not support the shale hypothesis.

  9. Modeling the cathode region of noble gas mixture discharges using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donko, Z.; Janossy, M.

    1992-10-01

    A model of the cathode dark space of DC glow discharges was developed in order to study the effects caused by mixing small amounts (≤2%) of other noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) to He. The motion of charged particles was described by Monte Carlo simulation. Several discharge parameters (electron and ion energy distribution functions, electron and ion current densities, reduced ionization coefficients, and current density-voltage characteristics) were obtained. Small amounts of admixtures were found to modify significantly the discharge parameters. Current density-voltage characteristics obtained from the model showed good agreement with experimental data. (author) 40 refs.; 14 figs

  10. Silicon PIN diode based electron-gamma coincidence detector system for Noble Gases monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrustalev, K; Popov, V Yu; Popov, Yu S

    2017-08-01

    We present a new second generation SiPIN based electron-photon coincidence detector system developed by Lares Ltd. for use in the Noble Gas measurement systems of the International Monitoring System and the On-site Inspection verification regimes of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The SiPIN provide superior energy resolution for electrons. Our work describes the improvements made in the second generation detector cells and the potential use of such detector systems for other applications such as In-Situ Kr-85 measurements for non-proliferation purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of the noble gas transport and fate model: CASCADR9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Barker, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    CASCADR9 is a desert alluvial soil site-specific noble gas transport and fate model. Input parameters for CASCADR9 are: man-made source term, background concentration of radionuclides, radon half-life, soil porosity, period of barometric pressure wave, amplitude of barometric pressure wave, and effective eddy diffusivity. Using average flux, total flow, and radon concentration at the 40 day mark as output parameters, a sensitivity analysis for CASCADR9 is carried out, under a variety of scenarios. For each scenario, the parameter to which output parameters are most sensitive are identified

  12. Binary-collision-approximation simulation for noble gas irradiation onto plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Takayama, Arimichi; Ito, Atsushi M

    2014-01-01

    A number of experiments show that helium plasma constructs filament (fuzz) structures whose diameter is in nanometer-scale on the tungsten material under the suitable experimental condition. In this paper, binary-collision-approximation-based simulation is performed to reveal the mechanism and the conditions of fuzz formation of tungsten material under plasma irradiation. The irradiation of the plasma of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium, and also the plasma of noble gas such as helium, neon, and argon atoms are investigated. The possibility of fuzz formation is discussed on the simulation result of penetration depth of the incident atoms

  13. Relativistic effects in photoionization time delay near the Cooper minimum of noble-gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Soumyajit; Mandal, Ankur; Jose, Jobin; Varma, Hari R.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Kheifets, A. S.; Dolmatov, V. K.; Manson, S. T.

    2014-11-01

    Time delay of photoemission from valence n s , n p3 /2 , and n p1 /2 subshells of noble-gas atoms is theoretically scrutinized within the framework of the dipole relativistic random phase approximation. The focus is on the variation of time delay in the vicinity of the Cooper minima in photoionization of the outer subshells of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, where the corresponding dipole matrix element changes its sign while passing through a node. It is revealed that the presence of the Cooper minimum in one photoionization channel has a strong effect on time delay in other channels. This is shown to be due to interchannel coupling.

  14. Evaluation of thermodynamic properties of solubility of noble gases in nitrogen tetroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drugachenok, M.A.; Baklaj, A.A.; Basharina, L.P.

    1986-01-01

    The Henry constants and Gibbs energies of dissolution of noble gases in nitrogen tetroxide have been calculated on the basis of the theory of infinitely dilute solutions. A satisfactory agreement between the calculated and experimental results has been obtained. With the increase of the gas atomic mass, enthalpy of solubility decreases monotonously, so that the process of krypton and xenon slubility in nitrogen tetroxide occurs with heat release. Xenon solubility rises with the increase of temperature. Argon solubility in the condition of operation of the loop plant condenser involves investigation of kinetic behaviour of this process

  15. Expeditious Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanoparticles Using Vitamin B12 under Microwave Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changseok Han

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A greener synthesis protocol for noble nanometals is developed using vitamin B12 as a reducing and capping agent in conjunction with the use of microwaves. Successful assembly of nanoparticles or microparticles with varied shapes and sizes have been demonstrated. The synthesized Ag, Au, and Pd samples were thoroughly characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission microscopy, and UV-visible spectrophotometry, confirming that metallic Ag, Au, and Pd were synthesized by the green chemistry method.

  16. A noble circle. The vogue for collecting Italian paintings in Denmark 1690-1730

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a closer look at an important moment in the history of art collecting in Denmark when Italian art first began to be admired by noble virtuosi. During the last decade of the 17th and first quarter of the 18th century, a number of art collections were formed by young Danish...... noblemen, most of whom had travelled in the company of Crown Prince Frederik. Due to the very incomplete level of documentation we are now often frustratingly unable to gauge the exact size and contents of these collections. Yet the sources presented in the article do suggest a strong bias towards Italian...

  17. Bare and protected sputtered-noble-metal films for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaga, David; Bonhommeau, Sébastien

    2014-11-01

    Sputtered silver and gold films with different surface morphologies have been prepared and coated with a benzenethiol self-assembled monolayer. Rough noble metal films showed strong Raman features assigned to adsorbed benzenethiol molecules upon irradiation over a wide energy range in the visible spectrum, which disclosed the occurrence of a significant surface-enhanced Raman scattering with maximal enhancement factors as high as 6 × 106. In addition, the adsorption of ethanethiol onto silver surfaces hinders their corrosion over days while preserving mostly intact enhancement properties of naked silver. This study may be applied to develop stable and efficient metalized probes for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Effects of halogens on interactions between a reduced TiO{sub 2} (110) surface and noble metal atoms: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Kohei, E-mail: k-tada@aist.go.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Research Institute of Electrochemical Energy, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31, Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka, 563-8577 (Japan); Koga, Hiroaki [Element Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, 1-30 Goryo Ohara, Nishikyo, Kyoto, 615-8245 (Japan); Hayashi, Akihide; Kondo, Yudai; Kawakami, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shusuke [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Okumura, Mitsutaka [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Element Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, 1-30 Goryo Ohara, Nishikyo, Kyoto, 615-8245 (Japan)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • We investigated the halogen effect on the interactions of noble metals with TiO{sub 2}. • Halogen atoms inhibit electron transfer from TiO{sub 2} to noble metals. • Iodine stabilizes the adsorption of noble metals especially for Ag and Cu. • Electron transfer from the TiO{sub 2} is effective in anchoring Au and Pt atoms. • Covalent interaction with the support is effective in anchoring Ag and Cu atoms. - Abstract: Using DFT calculation, we investigate the effects of halogens on the interactions between rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) and noble metal atoms (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and Pd). Fluorine, chlorine, and bromine atoms occupy the oxygen defect sites of TiO{sub 2}, decreasing the stability of noble metal atoms on the surface. This decrease occurs because the halogens inhibit electron transfer from TiO{sub 2} to the noble metal atoms; the electron transfer from reduced TiO{sub 2} to the noble metal atom stabilizes the noble metal atom adsorption. In contrast, iodine strengthens the interactions between TiO{sub 2} and some noble metal atoms, namely Ag and Cu. This stabilization occurs because of the covalent interaction between iodine-doped TiO{sub 2} and the noble metal atom. Therefore, the stabilization is explained well by chemical hardness. This result suggests that iodine-doping of a TiO{sub 2} surface would be an effective method for the preparation of highly stabilized noble metal clusters.

  19. Noble metals-compatible melter features development Phase 1: Establishing functional and design criteria and design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, M.R.; Siemens, D.H.; Chapman, C.C.

    1996-03-01

    Premature failures have occurred in melters at Japan's Tokai Mockup Facility and at the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) PAMELA plant during processing of feeds with high levels of noble metals. Melter failure was due to the accumulation of an electrically conductive, noble metals-containing precipitates in the glass, that then resulted in short circuiting of the electrodes. A comparison was made of the anticipated Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) feed with the feeds processed in the FRG and Japanese melters. The evaluation showed that comparable levels of noble metals and other potential precipitate-forming components (e.g. Cr/Fe/Ni-spinels) exist in the HWVP feed. As a result, the HWVP project made a decision to modify the present reference melter design to include features to prevent the precipitation and accumulation or otherwise accommodate precipitated phases on a routine basis without loss of production capacity

  20. The effect of noble metals on catalytic methanation reaction over supported Mn/Ni oxide based catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Azelee Wan Abu Bakar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 in sour natural gas can be removed using green technology via catalytic methanation reaction by converting CO2 to methane (CH4 gas. Using waste to wealth concept, production of CH4 would increase as well as creating environmental friendly approach for the purification of natural gas. In this research, a series of alumina supported manganese–nickel oxide based catalysts doped with noble metals such as ruthenium and palladium were prepared by wetness impregnation method. The prepared catalysts were run catalytic screening process using in-house built micro reactor coupled with Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectroscopy to study the percentage CO2 conversion and CH4 formation analyzed by GC. Ru/Mn/Ni(5:35:60/Al2O3 calcined at 1000 °C was found to be the potential catalyst which gave 99.74% of CO2 conversion and 72.36% of CH4 formation at 400 °C reaction temperature. XRD diffractogram illustrated that the supported catalyst was in polycrystalline with some amorphous state at 1000 °C calcination temperature with the presence of NiO as active site. According to FESEM micrographs, both fresh and used catalysts displayed spherical shape with small particle sizes in agglomerated and aggregated mixture. Nitrogen Adsorption analysis revealed that both catalysts were in mesoporous structures with BET surface area in the range of 46–60 m2/g. All the impurities have been removed at 1000 °C calcination temperature as presented by FTIR, TGA–DTA and EDX data.

  1. Light-controlled relaxation of the rat penile corpus cavernosum using NOBL-1, a novel nitric oxide releaser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Hotta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate whether relaxation of the rat penile corpus cavernosum could be controlled with NOBL-1, a novel, lightcontrollable nitric oxide (NO releaser. Materials and Methods: Fifteen-week-old male Wistar-ST rats were used. The penile corpus cavernosum was prepared and used in an isometric tension study. After noradrenaline (10−5 M achieved precontraction, the penile corpus cavernosum was irradiated by light (470–500 nm with and without NOBL-1 (10−6 M. In addition, we noted rats’ responses to light with vardenafil (10−6 M, a phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5 inhibitor. Next, responses to light in the presence of a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10−5 M, were measured. All measurements were performed in pretreated L-NAME (10−4 M conditions to inhibit endogenous NO production. Results: Corpus cavernosal smooth muscle, precontracted with noradrenaline, was unchanged by light irradiation in the absence of NOBL-1. However, in the presence of NOBL-1, corpus cavernosal smooth muscle, precontracted with noradrenaline, relaxed in response to light irradiation. After blue light irradiation ceased, tension returned. In addition, the light response was obviously enhanced in the presence of a PDE-5 inhibitor. Conclusions: This study showed that rat corpus cavernosal smooth muscle relaxation can be light-controlled using NOBL-1, a novel, light sensitive NO releaser. Though further in vivo studies are needed to investigate possible usefulness, NOBL-1 may be prove to be a useful tool for erectile dysfunction therapy, specifically in the field of penile rehabilitation.

  2. TiO2 structures doped with noble metals and/or graphene oxide to improve the photocatalytic degradation of dichloroacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribao, Paula; Rivero, Maria J; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2017-05-01

    Noble metals have been used to improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO 2 . Noble metal nanoparticles prevent charge recombination, facilitating electron transport due to the equilibration of the Fermi levels. Furthermore, noble metal nanoparticles show an absorption band in the visible region due to a high localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect, which contributes to additional electron movements. Moreover, systems based on graphene, titanium dioxide, and noble metals have been used, considering that graphene sheets can carry charges, thereby reducing electron-hole recombination, and can be used as substrates of atomic thickness. In this work, TiO 2 -based nanocomposites were prepared by blending TiO 2 with noble metals (Pt and Ag) and/or graphene oxide (GO). The nanocomposites were mainly characterized via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and photocurrent analysis. Here, the photocatalytic performance of the composites was analyzed via oxidizing dichloroacetic acid (DCA) model solutions. The influence of the noble metal load on the composite and the ability of the graphene sheets to improve the photocatalytic activity were studied, and the composites doped with different noble metals were compared. The results indicated that the platinum structures show the best photocatalytic degradation, and, although the presence of graphene oxide in the composites is supposed to enhance their photocatalytic performance, graphene oxide does not always improve the photocatalytic process. Graphical abstract It is a schematic diagram. Where NM is Noble Metal and LSPR means Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance.

  3. On the difference in oscillator strengths of inner shell excitations in noble gases and their alkali neighbors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Baltenkov, A.S.; Zhuravleva, G.I.

    1995-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the oscillator strength of resonant inner-shell excitation in a noble gas atom is considerably smaller than that in its alkali neighbor because in the latter case the effective charge acting upon excited electron is much bigger. With increase of the excitation's principal quantum number the difference between line intensities in noble gases and their alkali neighbors rapidly disappears. The calculations are performed in the Hartree-Fock approximation and with inclusion of rearrangement effects due to inner vacancy creation and its Auger decay. A paper has been submitted for publication

  4. Noble gas bond and the behaviour of XeO3 under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chunju; Wang, Xianlong; Botana, Jorge; Miao, Maosheng

    2017-10-18

    Over the past few decades, the concept of hydrogen bonds, in which hydrogen is electrophilic, has been extended to halogen bonds, chalcogen bonds and pnicogen bonds. Herein, we show that such a non-covalent bonding also exists in noble gas compounds. Using first principles calculations, we illustrate the OXe-O bond in molecular crystal XeO 3 and its effect on the behavior of this compound under pressure. Our calculations show that the covalent Xe-O bond lengths were elongated with increasing pressure and correspondingly the Xe-O stretching vibration frequencies were red shifted, which is similar to the change of H-bonds under pressure. The OXe-O bond and related hopping of O between neighboring Xe sites also correspond to the structural changes in the XeO 3 compounds at about 2 GPa. Our study extends the concept of hydrogen bonding to include all p-block elements and show a new bonding type for Noble gas elements in which it acts as an electrophilic species.

  5. Understanding the superior photocatalytic activity of noble metals modified titania under UV and visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumajdad, Ali; Madkour, Metwally

    2014-04-28

    Although TiO2 is one of the most efficient photocatalysts, with the highest stability and the lowest cost, there are drawbacks that hinder its practical applications like its wide band gap and high recombination rate of the charge carriers. Consequently, many efforts were directed toward enhancing the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 and extending its response to the visible region. To head off these attempts, modification of TiO2 with noble metal nanoparticles (NMNPs) received considerable attention due to their role in accelerating the transfer of photoexcited electrons from TiO2 and also due to the surface plasmon resonance which induces the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 under visible light irradiation. This insightful perspective is devoted to the vital role of TiO2 photocatalysis and its drawbacks that urged researchers to find solutions such as modification with NMNPs. In a coherent context, we discussed here the characteristics which qualify NMNPs to possess a great enhancement effect for TiO2 photocatalysis. Also we tried to understand the reasons behind this effect by means of photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. Then the mechanism of action of NMNPs upon deposition on TiO2 is presented. Finally we introduced a survey of the behaviour of these noble metal NPs on TiO2 based on the particle size and the loading amount.

  6. Defense by-products production and utilization program: noble metal recovery screening experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazelton, R.F.; Jensen, G.A.; Raney, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Isotopes of the platinum metals (rutheium, rhodium, and palladium) are produced during uranium fuel fission in nuclear reactors. The strategic values of these noble metals warrant considering their recovery from spent fuel should the spent fuel be processed after reactor discharge. A program to evaluate methods for ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium recovery from spent fuel reprocessing liquids was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The purpose of the work reported in this docuent was to evaluate several recovery processes revealed in the patent and technical literature. Beaker-scale screening tests were initiated for three potential recovery processes: precipitation during sugar denitration of nitric acid reprocessing solutions after plutonium-uranium solvent extraction, adsorption using nobe metal selective chelates on active carbon, and reduction forming solid noble metal deposits on an amine-borane reductive resin. Simulated reprocessing plant solutions representing typical nitric acid liquids from defense (PUREX) or commercial fuel reprocessing facilities were formulated and used for evaluation of the three processes. 9 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs

  7. Noble gases from solar energetic particles revealed by closed system stepwise etching of lunar soil minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieler, R.; Baur, H.; Signer, P.

    1986-01-01

    He, Ne, and Ar abundances and isotopic ratios in plagioclase and pyroxene separates from lunar soils were determined using a closed system stepwise etching technique. This method of noble gas release allows one to separate solar wind (SW) noble gases from those implanted as solar energetic particles (SEP). SEP-Ne with 20 Ne/ 22 Ne = 11.3 +- 0.3 is present in all samples studied. The abundances of SEP-Ne are 2-4 orders of magnitude too high to be explained exclusively as implanted solar flare gas. The major part of SEP-Ne possibly originates from solar 'suprathermal ions' with energies < 0.1 MeV/amu. The isotopic composition of Ne in these lower energy SEP is, however, probably identical to that of real flare Ne. The suggestion that SEP-Ne might have the same isotopic composition as planetary Ne and thus possibly represent an unfractionated sample of solar Ne is not tenable. SW-Ne retained in plagioclase and pyroxene is less fractionated than has been deduced by total fusion analyses. Ne-B is a mixture of SW-Ne and SEP-Ne rather than fractionated SW-Ne. In contrast to SEP-Ne, SEP-Ar has probably a very similar composition as SW-Ar. (author)

  8. Examining changes in cellular communication in neuroendocrine cells after noble metal nanoparticle exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A; Liu, Zhen; Haynes, Christy L

    2012-07-07

    As nanoparticles enjoy increasingly widespread use in commercial applications, the potential for unintentional exposure has become much more likely during any given day. Researchers in the field of nanotoxicity are working to determine the physicochemical nanoparticle properties that lead to toxicity in an effort to establish safe design rules. This work explores the effects of noble metal nanoparticle exposure in murine chromaffin cells, focusing on examining the effects of size and surface functionality (coating) in silver and gold, respectively. Carbon-fibre microelectrode amperometry was utilized to examine the effect of exposure on exocytosis function, at the single cell level, and provided new insights into the compromised functions of cells. Silver nanoparticles of varied size, between 15 and 60 nm diameter, were exposed to cells and found to alter the release kinetics of exocytosis for those cells exposed to the smallest examined size. Effects of gold were examined after modification with two commonly used 'bio-friendly' polymers, either heparin or poly (ethylene glycol), and gold nanoparticles were found to induce altered cellular adhesion or the number of chemical messenger molecules released, respectively. These results support the body of work suggesting that noble metal nanoparticles perturb exocytosis, typically altering the number of molecules and kinetics of release, and supports a direct disruption of the vesicle matrix by the nanoparticle. Overall, it is clear that various nanoparticle physicochemical properties, including size and surface coating, do modulate changes in cellular communication via exocytosis.

  9. Testing of a prototype of calibration facility for noble gas monitoring using 41Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibathulham, Holnisar; Wurdiyanto, Gatot; Marsum, Pujadi

    2012-01-01

    A prototype of a calibration facility for noble gas monitoring using 41 Ar in the PTKMR-BATAN has been tested. The facility was designed in such a way that the standard source of gas can be reused. The radioactive 41 Ar source was obtained by thermal neutron reaction of 40 Ar(n, γ) 41 Ar using a thermal neutron flux of 4.8×10 13 neutrons per cm 2 per second in two minutes on the multipurpose G.A. Siwabessy Reactor (Batan, Serpong, Indonesia). Gamma spectrometry was used to measure the radioactivity and purity of 41 Ar. The spectrum of the 41 Ar observed yields an energy of 1294 keV because of the highest intensity (99.2%). The activity of 41 Ar was 2821 kBq and 4% of the expanded uncertainty. The time required for 41 Ar to reach homogeneity was 7 min, and the effectiveness of resuse was 53%. - Highlights: ► Testing of a calibration facility prototype for noble gas monitor using 41 Ar in PTKMR-BATAN. ► This facility was designed such that a standard radioactive gas source can be used repeatedly. ► Standardization of the 41 Ar is performed using gamma spectrometry. ► The time required for the 41 Ar gas to be distributed evenly throughout the cavity of the facility was 7 min. ► The effectiveness of repeated use was 53%.

  10. Automated ion-exchange system for the radiochemical separation of the noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parry, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-exchange separation is particularly suitable for mechanisation and automated ion exchange has been applied to the activation analysis of biological and environmental samples. In this work a system has been designed for experimental studies, which can be adapted for different modes of operation. The equipment is based on a large-volume sampler for the automatic presentation of 500 ml of liquid to a sampling probe. The sample is delivered to the ion-exchange column by means of a peristaltic pump. The purpose of this work was to automate a procedure for separating the noble metals from irradiated geological samples, for neutron-activation analysis. The process of digesting the rock sample is carried out manually in 30 min and is not suited to unattended operation. The volume of the resulting liquid sample may be 100 ml and so the manual separation step may take as long as 1.25 h per sample. The reason for automating this part of the procedure is to reduce the separation time for a group of five samples and consequently to improve the sensitivity of the analysis for radionuclides with short half-lives. This paper describes the automatic ion-exchange system and the ways in which it can be used. The mode of operation for the separation of the noble metals is given in detail. The reproducibility of the system has been assessed by repeated measurements on a standard reference matte. (author)

  11. Tailoring the supercapacitive performances of noble metal oxides, porous carbons and their composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panić Vladimir V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous electrochemical supercapacitive materials, as an important type of new-generation energy storage devices, require a detailed analysis and knowledge of their capacitive performances upon different charging/discharging regimes. The investigation of the responses to dynamic perturbations of typical representatives, noble metal oxides, carbonaceous materials and RuO2-impregnated carbon blacks, by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS is presented. This presentation follows a brief description of supercapacitive behavior and origin of pseudocapacitive response of noble metal oxides. For all investigated materials, the electrical charging/discharging equivalent of the EIS response was found to obey the transmission line model envisaged as so-called „resistor/capacitor (RC ladder“. The ladder features are correlated to material physicochemical properties, its composition and the composition of the electrolyte. Fitting of the EIS data of different supercapacitive materials to appropriate RC ladders enables the in-depth profiling of the capacitance and pore resistance of their porous thin-layers and finally the complete revelation of capacitive energy storage issues. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172060

  12. Stimulated forces demonstrated: Why the trouton-noble experiment failed and how to make it succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornille, Patrick; Naudin, Jean-Louis; Szames, Alexandre

    1999-01-01

    At the turn of the 20th century, Frederick T. Trouton and Henry R. Noble (TN) performed a little known æther drift experiment which came to be known as the electrostatic analogue of Michelson-Morley's famous experiment. If the æther were real, they said, a capacitor charged with ``high'' voltage should exhibit a ``jerk'' and a subsequent ``spontaneous'' torque, thus demonstrating the existence of an æther wind. Trouton and Noble failed to observe the torque and paved the way to the special theory of relativity. We have replicated the TN experiment. We obtained positive results: the principle of relativity is disproved. Other TN-like experiments allowed us to observe the stimulated rotational motions (TN's long-sought effect), the stimulated translational motions (Biefeld-Brown effect), and the sustained rotation of charged, suspended capacitors. Video movies are presented at the conference. TN's failure is analyzed. The concept of stimulated forces is explained in light of its relevance to the future of space locomotion.

  13. Noble gas, binary mixtures for commercial gas-cooled reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M. S.; Tournier, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial gas cooled reactors employ helium as a coolant and working fluid for the Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turbo-machines. Helium has the highest thermal conductivity and lowest dynamic viscosity of all noble gases. This paper compares the relative performance of pure helium to binary mixtures of helium and other noble gases of higher molecular weights. The comparison is for the same molecular flow rate, and same operating temperatures and geometry. Results show that although helium is a good working fluid because of its high heat transfer coefficient and significantly lower pumping requirement, a binary gas mixture of He-Xe with M = 15 gm/mole has a heat transfer coefficient that is ∼7% higher than that of helium and requires only 25% of the number stages of the turbo-machines. The binary mixture, however, requires 3.5 times the pumping requirement with helium. The second best working fluid is He-Kr binary mixture with M = 10 gm/mole. It has 4% higher heat transfer coefficient than He and requires 30% of the number of stages in the turbo-machines, but requires twice the pumping power

  14. Linear and nonlinear instability theory of a noble gas MHD generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesland, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis deals with the stability of the working medium of a seeded noble gas magnetohydrodynamic generator. The aim of the study is to determine the instability mechanism which is most likely to occur in experimental MHD generators and to describe its behaviour with linear and nonlinear theories. In chapter I a general introduction is given. The pertinent macroscopic basic equations are derived in chapter II, viz. the continuity, the momentum and the energy equation for the electrons and the heavy gas particles, consisting of the seed particles and the noble gas atoms. Chapter III deals with the linear plane wave analysis of small disturbances of a homogeneous steady state. The steady state is discussed in chapter IV. The values for the steady state parameters used for the calculations both for the linear analysis as for the nonlinear analysis are made plausible with the experimental values. Based on the results of the linear plane wave theory a nonlinear plane wave model of the electrothermal instability is introduced in chapter V. (Auth.)

  15. Mechanisms of disruptions caused by noble gas injection into tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, D.Kh.; Yurchenko, E.I.; Lukash, V.E.; Baronova, E.O.; Pozdnyakov, Yu.I.; Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.; Veselova, I.Yu.; Schneider, R.

    2005-01-01

    Noble gas injection for disruption mitigation in DIII-D is simulated. The simulation of the first two stages of the disruption is performed: the first one is the neutral gas jet penetration through the background plasmas, and the second one is the instability growth. In order to simulate the first stage, the MHD pellet code LLP with improved radiation model for noble gas is used. Plasma cooling at this stage is provided by the energy exchange with the jet. The opacity effects in radiation losses are found to be important in the energy balance calculations. The magnetic surfaces in contact with the jet are cooled significantly; however, the temperature as well as the electric conductivity, remains high. The cooling front propagates towards the plasma centre. It has been shown that the cooling front is accompanied by strongly localized 'shark fin-like' perturbation in toroidal current density profile. The simplified cylindrical model shows that the cooling front is able to produce the internal kink-like mode with growth rate significantly higher than the tearing mode. The unstable kink perturbation obtained is non-resonant for any magnetic surface, both inside the plasma column, and in the vacuum space outside the separatrix. The mode disturbs mainly the core region. The growth time of the 'shark fin-like' mode is higher than the Alfven time by a factor of 10-100 for DIII-D parameters

  16. Photoionization of the subvalent subshells of noble gas endohedrals: interference of three resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M Ya; Baltenkov, A S; Chernysheva, L V

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate strong interference patterns in the photoionization cross-section of the subvalent subshells of noble gas (NG) endohedral atoms NG at F. This interference is a result of common action of three factors: the effect of neighbouring atomic subshells, reflection of photoelectron waves by the fullerene F shell and resonance modification of the incoming photon beam by the complex effect under the action of the F electrons. We have considered the outer ns-subshells for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe noble gas atoms. The polarization of the fullerene shell is expressed via the F total photoabsorption cross-section. The photoelectron reflection from the static F potential is taken into account in the frame of the so-called bubble potential which is a spherical δ-type potential. It is assumed that the NG atom is centrally located in the fullerene. It is also assumed in accordance with the available experimental data that the fullerene radius is much bigger than the atomic radius and the thickness of the fullerene shell. These assumptions permit the NG at F photoionization cross-section to be presented as a product of the NG atomic cross-section and two calculated factors that account for polarization of the F electron shell and reflection of photoelectrons by the fullerene static potential

  17. Photoionization of the subvalent subshells of noble gas endohedrals: interference of three resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M Ya [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Baltenkov, A S [Arifov Institute of Electronics, Tashkent 100125 (Uzbekistan); Chernysheva, L V [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St.-Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: amusia@vms.huji.ac.il

    2008-08-28

    We demonstrate strong interference patterns in the photoionization cross-section of the subvalent subshells of noble gas (NG) endohedral atoms NG at F. This interference is a result of common action of three factors: the effect of neighbouring atomic subshells, reflection of photoelectron waves by the fullerene F shell and resonance modification of the incoming photon beam by the complex effect under the action of the F electrons. We have considered the outer ns-subshells for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe noble gas atoms. The polarization of the fullerene shell is expressed via the F total photoabsorption cross-section. The photoelectron reflection from the static F potential is taken into account in the frame of the so-called bubble potential which is a spherical {delta}-type potential. It is assumed that the NG atom is centrally located in the fullerene. It is also assumed in accordance with the available experimental data that the fullerene radius is much bigger than the atomic radius and the thickness of the fullerene shell. These assumptions permit the NG at F photoionization cross-section to be presented as a product of the NG atomic cross-section and two calculated factors that account for polarization of the F electron shell and reflection of photoelectrons by the fullerene static potential.

  18. Noble gas binary mixtures for gas-cooled reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of using noble gases and binary mixtures as reactor coolants and direct closed Brayton cycle (CBC) working fluids on the performance of terrestrial nuclear power plants and the size of the turbo-machines. While pure helium has the best transport properties and lowest pumping power requirement of all noble gases and binary mixtures, its low molecular weight increases the number of stages of the turbo-machines. The heat transfer coefficient for a He-Xe binary mixture having a molecular weight of 15 g/mole is 7% higher than that of helium, and the number of stages in the turbo-machines is 24-30% of those for He working fluid. However, for the same piping and heat exchange components design, the loop pressure losses with He-Xe are ∼3 times those with He. Consequently, for the same reactor exit temperature and pressure losses in piping and heat exchange components, the higher pressure losses in the nuclear reactor decrease the net peak efficiency of the plant with He-Xe working fluid (15 g/mole) by a little more than ∼2% points, at higher cycle compression ratio than with He working fluid

  19. Potential energy surfaces for alkali plus noble gas pairs: a systematic comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, L. Aaron; Kedziora, Gary S.; Weeks, David E.

    2010-02-01

    Optically Pumped Alkali Lasers (OPAL) involve interactions of alkali atoms with a buffer gas typically consisting of a noble gas together with C2H4. Line broadening mechanisms are of particular interest because they can be used to match a broad optical pumping source with relatively narrow alkali absorption spectra. To better understand the line broadening processes at work in OPAL systems we focus on the noble gas collisional partners. A matrix of potential energy surfaces (PES) has been generated at the multi-configurational self consistent field (MCSCF) level for M + Ng, where M=Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs and Ng=He, Ne, Ar. The PES include the X2Σ ground state surface and the A2II, B2Σ excited state surfaces. In addition to the MCSCF surfaces, PES for Li+He have been calculated at the multi-reference singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) level with spin-orbit splitting effects included. These surfaces provide a way to check the qualitative applicability of the MCSCF calculations. They also exhibit the avoided crossing between the B2Σ and A2II1/2 surfaces that is partially responsible for collision induced relaxation from the 2P3/2 to the 2P1/2 atomic levels.

  20. Graphene–Noble Metal Nano-Composites and Applications for Hydrogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukumar Basu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Graphene based nano-composites are relatively new materials with excellent mechanical, electrical, electronic and chemical properties for applications in the fields of electrical and electronic devices, mechanical appliances and chemical gadgets. For all these applications, the structural features associated with chemical bonding that involve other components at the interface need in-depth investigation. Metals, polymers, inorganic fibers and other components improve the properties of graphene when they form a kind of composite structure in the nano-dimensions. Intensive investigations have been carried out globally in this area of research and development. In this article, some salient features of graphene–noble metal interactions and composite formation which improve hydrogen gas sensing properties—like higher and fast response, quick recovery, cross sensitivity, repeatability and long term stability of the sensor devices—are presented. Mostly noble metals are effective for enhancing the sensing performance of the graphene–metal hybrid sensors, due to their superior catalytic activities. The experimental evidence for atomic bonding between metal nano-structures and graphene has been reported in the literature and it is theoretically verified by density functional theory (DFT. Multilayer graphene influences gas sensing performance via intercalation of metal and non-metal atoms through atomic bonding.

  1. Discharges in the inlet region of a noble gas MHD generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghi, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    In this work the onset of the development of the non-equilibrium conductivity in the entrance region of a noble gas MHD generator is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. At low electron densities the discharge seems to be affected by a non-Maxwellian electron distribution. In Chapter II a self-consistent model of a stationary discharge in an Ar-Cs mixture at atmospheric pressure, is set up. It includes the possibility of deviations from a Maxwellian electron energy distribution. The model allows to calculate at what discharge parameters deviations from the Maxwellian electron distribution will become important. In Chapter III the relaxation of the plasma to a new equilibrium situation following a sudden change in the electron thermal energy is calculated by a model which can take radiation and a non-Maxwellian distribution into account. In Chapter IV an Ar-Cs discharge experiment is described with plasma parameters similar to those present in the entrance region of the generator. The ionization relaxation process in a noble gas MHD generator is experimentally studied and described in Chapter V. In this chapter the relaxation ionization region with and without pre-ionization is investigated. Current voltage characteristics are obtained by varying the applied voltage or the external load. The results are confronted with the theoretical results of the non-Maxwellian model developed in Chapter II. Conclusions of this work are drawn in Chapter VI. (Auth.)

  2. The role of helium and other noble gases in the modelling of geothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulston, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the geothermal system in which deep circulating groundwater containing noble gases at air saturated water concentrations mixes with hot fluids of mantle origin at depth is described. It is proposed that the 3 He/heat ratio should be similar to that observed in mid-ocean ridge systems, in which case the 3 He to atmospheric argon ratio in geothermal discharges would be an indicator o the likely heat content of a system. As a first test of this hypothesis the noble gas results of Mazor et al. (1990) have been presented as the 3 He/heat ratios for Wairakei and early Mokai wells and fumaroles. Their simplified boiling model has been used to correct for the effects of gas-water separation which occurs in underground boiling. At Wairakei, the resultant range of 3 He/heat values is 140-8500 atoms 3 He mW -1 s -1 , similar (except for the lowest values) to the range measured in mid ocean ridges. Further work is needed, but the available data show that the technique has promise for the modelling of deep geothermal systems and providing input to simulation models currently being used in reservoir engineering. The technique has potential to distinguish between stored heat systems and renewing systems. (author). 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. Optimizing detection of noble gas emission at a former UNE site: sample strategy, collection, and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, R.; Olsen, K.; Hayes, J. C.; Emer, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    Underground nuclear tests may be first detected by seismic or air samplers operated by the CTBTO (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization). After initial detection of a suspicious event, member nations may call for an On-Site Inspection (OSI) that in part, will sample for localized releases of radioactive noble gases and particles. Although much of the commercially available equipment and methods used for surface and subsurface environmental sampling of gases can be used for an OSI scenario, on-site sampling conditions, required sampling volumes and establishment of background concentrations of noble gases require development of specialized methodologies. To facilitate development of sampling equipment and methodologies that address OSI sampling volume and detection objectives, and to collect information required for model development, a field test site was created at a former underground nuclear explosion site located in welded volcanic tuff. A mixture of SF-6, Xe127 and Ar37 was metered into 4400 m3 of air as it was injected into the top region of the UNE cavity. These tracers were expected to move towards the surface primarily in response to barometric pumping or through delayed cavity pressurization (accelerated transport to minimize source decay time). Sampling approaches compared during the field exercise included sampling at the soil surface, inside surface fractures, and at soil vapor extraction points at depths down to 2 m. Effectiveness of various sampling approaches and the results of tracer gas measurements will be presented.

  4. A radioactive noble gas quantitative analysis of gaseous effluents from NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y.; Georgiev, K.; Mavrodiev, V.; Kikarin, B.

    1993-01-01

    The radioactive isotopes of argon, krypton and xenon comprise a substantial part of the gaseous emission of a NPP. A quantitative determination of their specific activity in the controlled area and the gaseous effluents requires a special sampling technique, as well as measurement method. The zeolites and the activated charcoals have a differentiated behaviour towards radioisotopes of argon, krypton and xenon. The isotope fractionation is often a problem, especially with argon and xenon. Some additional difficulties arise due to the irreproductibility of temperature and atmospheric moisture. The present paper describes a method for a spectrometric determination of radioactive noble gases after the cryogenic sampling developed at the Radiochemical laboratory of the Sofia University. The quality control of the method, as well as some special difficulties in its performing are discussed. The estimated minimum detectable activity is 5-10 Bq/m 3 for radioactive noble gases with half-life > 1 hour and sampling time for (resp. gamma-spectrometry) 1 hour. (author)

  5. Catalytic Activities of Noble Metal Phosphides for Hydrogenation and Hydrodesulfurization Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuharu Kanda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of a highly active noble metal phosphide (NMXPY-based hydrodesulfurization (HDS catalyst with a high hydrogenating ability for heavy oils was studied. NMXPY catalysts were obtained by reduction of P-added noble metals (NM-P, NM: Rh, Pd, Ru supported on SiO2. The order of activities for the hydrogenation of biphenyl was Rh-P > NiMoS > Pd-P > Ru-P. This order was almost the same as that of the catalytic activities for the HDS of dibenzothiophene. In the HDS of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT, the HDS activity of the Rh-P catalyst increased with increasing reaction temperature, but the maximum HDS activity for the NiMoS catalyst was observed at 270 °C. The Rh-P catalyst yielded fully hydrogenated products with high selectivity compared with the NiMoS catalyst. Furthermore, XRD analysis of the spent Rh-P catalysts revealed that the Rh2P phase possessed high sulfur tolerance and resistance to sintering.

  6. Migration of noble gas atoms in interaction with vacancies in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzagalli, L; Charaf-Eddin, A

    2015-01-01

    First principles calculations in combination with the nudged elastic band method have been performed in order to determine the mobility properties of various noble gas species (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) in silicon, a model semiconducting material. We focussed on single impurity, in interstitial configuration or forming a complex with a mono- or a di-vacancy, since the latter are known to be present and to play a key role in the formation of extended defects like bubbles or platelets. We determined several migration mechanisms and associated activation energies and have discussed these results in relation to available experiments. In particular, conflicting measured values of the migration energy of helium are explained by the present calculations. We also predict that helium diffuses solely as an interstitial, while an opposite behaviour is found for heavier species such as Ar, Kr, and Xe, with the prevailing role of complexes in that case. Finally, our calculations indicate that extended defects evolution by Ostwald ripening is possible for helium and maybe neon, but is rather unlikely for heavier noble gas species. (paper)

  7. Noble gas composition of subcontinental lithospheric mantle: An extensively degassed reservoir beneath Southern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalowitzki, Tiago; Sumino, Hirochika; Conceição, Rommulo V.; Orihashi, Yuji; Nagao, Keisuke; Bertotto, Gustavo W.; Balbinot, Eduardo; Schilling, Manuel E.; Gervasoni, Fernanda

    2016-09-01

    Patagonia, in the Southern Andes, is one of the few locations where interactions between the oceanic and continental lithosphere can be studied due to subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath the continent. In order to characterize the noble gas composition of Patagonian subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), we present the first noble gas data alongside new lithophile (Sr-Nd-Pb) isotopic data for mantle xenoliths from Pali-Aike Volcanic Field and Gobernador Gregores, Southern Patagonia. Based on noble gas isotopic compositions, Pali-Aike mantle xenoliths represent intrinsic SCLM with higher (U + Th + K)/(3He, 22Ne, 36Ar) ratios than the mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) source. This reservoir shows slightly radiogenic helium (3He/4He = 6.84-6.90 RA), coupled with a strongly nucleogenic neon signature (mantle source 21Ne/22Ne = 0.085-0.094). The 40Ar/36Ar ratios vary from a near-atmospheric ratio of 510 up to 17700, with mantle source 40Ar/36Ar between 31100-6800+9400 and 54000-9600+14200. In addition, the 3He/22Ne ratios for the local SCLM endmember, at 12.03 ± 0.15 to 13.66 ± 0.37, are higher than depleted MORBs, at 3He/22Ne = 8.31-9.75. Although asthenospheric mantle upwelling through the Patagonian slab window would result in a MORB-like metasomatism after collision of the South Chile Ridge with the Chile trench ca. 14 Ma, this mantle reservoir could have remained unhomogenized after rapid passage and northward migration of the Chile Triple Junction. The mantle endmember xenon isotopic ratios of Pali-Aike mantle xenoliths, which is first defined for any SCLM-derived samples, show values indistinguishable from the MORB source (129Xe/132Xe =1.0833-0.0053+0.0216 and 136Xe/132Xe =0.3761-0.0034+0.0246). The noble gas component observed in Gobernador Gregores mantle xenoliths is characterized by isotopic compositions in the MORB range in terms of helium (3He/4He = 7.17-7.37 RA), but with slightly nucleogenic neon (mantle source 21Ne/22Ne = 0.065-0.079). We

  8. Synthesis, fabrication, and spectroscopy of nano-scale photonic noble metal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Shunji

    Nanometer is an interesting scale for physicists, chemists, and materials scientists, in a sense that it lies between the macroscopic and the atomic scales. In this regime, materials exhibit distinct physical and chemical properties that are clearly different from those of atoms or macroscopic bulk. This thesis is concerned about both physics and chemistry of noble metal nano-structures. Novel chemical syntheses and physical fabrications of various noble metal nano-structures, and the development of spectroscopic techniques for nano-structures are presented. Scanning microscopy/spectroscopy techniques inherently perturbs the true optical responses of the nano-structures. However, by using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as the nanometer-confined excitation source of surface plasmons in the samples, and subsequently collecting the signals in the Fourier space, it is shown that the tip-perturbed part of the signals can be deconvoluted. As a result, the collected signal in this approach is the pure response of the sample. Coherent light is employed to study the optical response of nano-structures, in order to avoid complication from tip-perturbation as discussed above. White-light super-continuum excites the nano-structure, the monolayer of Au nanoparticles self-assembled on silicon nitride membrane substrates. The coherent excitation reveals asymmetric surface plasmon resonance in the nano-structures. One of the most important issues in nano-scale science is to gain control over the shape, size, and assembly of nanoparticles. A novel method is developed to chemically synthesize ligand-passivated atomic noble metal clusters in solution phase. The method, named thermal decomposition method, enables facile yet robust synthesis of fluorescent atomic clusters. Thus synthesized atomic clusters are very stable, and show behaviors of quantum dots. A novel and versatile approach for creation of nanoparticle arrays is developed. This method is different from the

  9. Atmospheric noble gases in Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts: Identification of atmospheric contamination processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, Claire; Moreira, Manuel A.

    2018-02-01

    Noble gases in oceanic basalts always show the presence in variable proportions of a component having elemental and isotopic compositions that are similar to those of the atmosphere and distinct from the mantle composition. Although this component could be mantle-derived (e.g. subduction of air or seawater-derived noble gases trapped in altered oceanic crust and sediments), it is most often suggested that this air component is added after sample collection and probably during storage at ambient air, although the mechanism remains unknown. In an attempt to reduce this atmospheric component observed in MORBs, four experimental protocols have been followed in this study. These protocols are based on the hypothesis that air can be removed from the samples, as it appears to be sheltered in distinct vesicles compared to those filled with mantle gases. All of the protocols involve a glove box filled with nitrogen, and in certain cases, the samples are stored under primary vacuum (lower than 10-2 mbar) to pump air out or, alternatively, under high pressure of N2 to expel atmospheric noble gases. In all protocols, three components are observed: atmospheric, fractionated atmospheric and magmatic. The fractionated air component seems to be derived from the non-vitreous part of the pillow-lava, which has cooled more slowly. This component is enriched in Ne relative to Ar, reflecting a diffusive process. This contaminant has already been observed in other studies and thus seems to be relatively common. Although it is less visible, unfractionated air has also been detected in some crushing steps, which tends to indicate that despite the experiments, air is still present in the vesicles. This result is surprising, since studies have demonstrated that atmospheric contamination could be limited if samples were stored under nitrogen quickly after their recovery from the seafloor. Thus, the failure of the protocols could be explained by the insufficient duration of these protocols or

  10. Primordial domains in the depleted upper mantle identified by noble gases in MORBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, J.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Langmuir, C. H.; Hamelin, C.; Fuentes, J.

    2017-12-01

    The distribution of noble gas isotopic compositions in the mantle provides important constraints on the large-scale mantle evolution, as noble gases can trace the interaction between degassed, or processed, mantle domains and undegassed, or primitive, mantle domains. Data from the radiogenic He, Ne, Ar and Xe isotopic systems have shown that plume-related lavas sample relatively undegassed mantle domains, and the recent identification of isotopic anomalies in the short-lived I-Xe and Hf-W isotopic systems in plume-related lavas further suggests that these domains may be ancient, dating back to Earth's accretion. However, little is known about the potential variability of the heavy noble gas systems and the distribution of undegassed domains in the ambient upper mantle not influenced by plumes. Here, we present new high-precision He, Ne, Ar, and Xe isotopic data for a series of MORBs from a depleted section of the subtropical north Mid-Atlantic Ridge, distant from any known plume influence. Some samples have extremely low (unradiogenic) 4He/3He, 21Ne/22Ne, 40Ar/36Ar, and 129Xe/130Xe ratios, including some of the lowest values ever determined for MORBs. Such unradiogenic compositions are reminiscent of OIBs and plume-influenced E-MORBs, suggesting the presence of a relatively undegassed or primitive reservoir in the source of these depleted MORBs. The He, Ne, and Ar isotopic systems are sensitive to the long-term degassing history, suggesting that this domain in the MORB source is ancient. The 129Xe/130Xe ratio is sensitive to degassing only during the first 100 Ma of Earth history, suggesting that some of the isotopic character of these samples has been preserved since Earth's accretion. Together, these observations suggest that primordial or undegassed material is not only sampled in plumes-related lavas, but also normal, depleted MORBs. Along with data from E-MORBs in the southern EPR (Kurz et al., 2005), southern MAR (Sarda et al., 2000), and equatorial MAR

  11. Some remarks on the use of the effective medium approximation for the resistivity calculations in liquid noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.

    1982-09-01

    The application of the effective medium approximation (EMA) to the muffin-tin model of liquid metal is considered. The triple correlation function is included in the expression for electrical resistivity. Good agreement with experimental data can be expected for liquid noble metals. (author)

  12. Non-noble metal graphene oxide-copper (II) ions hybrid electrodes for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Muralikrishna, S.; Ravishankar, T.N.; Ramakrishnappa, T.; Nagaraju, Doddahalli H.; Krishna Pai, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    Non-noble metal and inexpensive graphene oxide-copper (II) ions (GO-Cu2+) hybrid catalysts have been explored for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We were able to tune the binding abilities of GO toward the Cu2+ ions and hence their catalytic

  13. The influence of noble-gas ion bombardment on the electrical and optical properties of clean silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, J.W.D.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the effect of argon and helium ion bombardment on the electrical and optical properties of the clean silicon (211) surface is described. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of noble gas ions on the density of surface states at the clean silicon surface. (Auth.)

  14. Experimental/Computational Approach to Accommodation Coefficients and its Application to Noble Gases on Aluminum Surface (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-03

    computational approach to accommodation coefficients and its application to noble gases on aluminum surface Nathaniel Selden Uruversity of Southern Cahfornia, Los ...8217 ,. 0.’ a~ .......,..,P. • " ,,-0, "p"’U".. ,Po"D.’ 0.’P.... uro . P." FIG. 5: Experimental and computed radiometri~ force for argon (left), xenon

  15. Theoretical study of noble gases diffraction from Ru(0001) using van der Waals DFT-based potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Cueto, M; Muzas, A S; Martín, F; Díaz, C

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the role of van der Waals forces in the diffraction process of noble gases from a metal surface. We made use of different vdW implementations to rationalize the effect of dispersion forces on the corrugation of the system, the resulting scattering patterns and on the eventual diffraction results. (paper)

  16. Transparent and conductive electrodes by large-scale nano-structuring of noble metal thin-films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jes; Runge Walther, Anders; Wolff, Christian

    2018-01-01

    grid, and nano-wire thin-films. The indium and carbon films do not match the chemical stability nor the electrical performance of the noble metals, and many metal films are not uniform in material distribution leading to significant surface roughness and randomized transmission haze. We demonstrate...

  17. 75 FR 5782 - Noble Energy Marketing and Trade Corporation; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... Marketing and Trade Corporation; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...-referenced proceeding of Noble Energy Marketing and Trade Corporation's application for market- based rate... electronic submission of protests and interventions in lieu of paper, using the FERC Online links at http...

  18. Surface noble metal modified PdM/C (M = Ru, Pt, Au) as anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Han; Huang, Tao; Yu, Aishui

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we studied the surface noble metal modification on Pd nanoparticles, other than the homogeneous or core-shell structure. The surface modification will lead to the uneven constitution within the nanoparticles and thus more obvious optimization effect toward the catalyst brought by the lattice deformation. The surface of the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles was modified with Ru, Pt or Au by a moderate and green approach, respectively. XPS results confirm the interactive electron effects between Pd and the modified noble metal. Electrochemical measurements show that the surface noble metal modified catalysts not only show higher catalytic activity, but also better stability and durability. The PdM/C catalysts all exhibit good dispersion and very little agglomeration after long-term potential cycles toward ethanol oxidation. With only 10% metallic atomic ratio of Au, PdAu/C catalyst shows extraordinary catalytic activity and stability, the peak current reaches 1700 mA mg"−"1 Pd, about 2.5 times that of Pd/C. Moreover, the PdAu/C maintains 40% of the catalytic activity after 4500 potential cycles. - Highlights: • Pd-based catalysts with complicated exposed facets. • Much enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability with about 10% noble metal M (M = Ru, Pt, Au) on Pd nanoparticles. • The outstanding electrocatalytic performance of PdAu/C towards ethanol oxidation after the Au modification.

  19. Surface noble metal modified PdM/C (M = Ru, Pt, Au) as anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Han; Huang, Tao, E-mail: huangt@fudan.edu.cn; Yu, Aishui, E-mail: asyu@fudan.edu.cn

    2016-08-15

    In this article, we studied the surface noble metal modification on Pd nanoparticles, other than the homogeneous or core-shell structure. The surface modification will lead to the uneven constitution within the nanoparticles and thus more obvious optimization effect toward the catalyst brought by the lattice deformation. The surface of the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles was modified with Ru, Pt or Au by a moderate and green approach, respectively. XPS results confirm the interactive electron effects between Pd and the modified noble metal. Electrochemical measurements show that the surface noble metal modified catalysts not only show higher catalytic activity, but also better stability and durability. The PdM/C catalysts all exhibit good dispersion and very little agglomeration after long-term potential cycles toward ethanol oxidation. With only 10% metallic atomic ratio of Au, PdAu/C catalyst shows extraordinary catalytic activity and stability, the peak current reaches 1700 mA mg{sup −1} Pd, about 2.5 times that of Pd/C. Moreover, the PdAu/C maintains 40% of the catalytic activity after 4500 potential cycles. - Highlights: • Pd-based catalysts with complicated exposed facets. • Much enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability with about 10% noble metal M (M = Ru, Pt, Au) on Pd nanoparticles. • The outstanding electrocatalytic performance of PdAu/C towards ethanol oxidation after the Au modification.

  20. On the effect of oxygen flooding on the detection of noble gas ions in a SIMS instrument

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Williams, P.; Franzreb, K.; Sobers Jr., R. C.; Lorinčík, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 268, 17-18 (2010), s. 2758-2765 ISSN 0168-583X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : SIMS * noble gases * uranium Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.042, year: 2010

  1. Update on the use of dissolved oxygen addition to monitor the effectiveness of noble metal applications in external manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, J.A.; Huie, H.H.; Seeman, R.A.; Bourne, C.M.; Odell, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements in a Mitigation Monitoring System (MMS) ECP manifold have historically been a primary indicator of the effectiveness of an On-Line NobleChem™ (OLNC) application, with the MMS ECP intended to measure the catalytic effect of noble metal deposited on the ECP manifold surface. In some plants ECP measurements made on untreated surfaces prior to an OLNC application were significantly lower than what would be expected for stainless steel under reactor bulk chemistry conditions. This is due to the consumption and depletion of bulk liquid dissolved oxygen (DO) in the lines supplying reactor water to these external ECP measurement locations. This phenomenon degrades the ability to use these external manifolds to confirm noble metal deposition. Previous papers have described how the injection of an oxygen-rich stream to the MMS supply stream (DO Addition) can be used to re-establish the capability of external ECP measurements to monitor the catalytic behavior of platinum deposited during an OLNC injection. This paper will provide an update of how this method is being successfully used in operating BWRs to monitor OLNC injections. The paper will outline the overall approach used to characterize the catalytic behavior of external ECP manifolds before and after the noble metal application and present plant data collected during DO Additions performed under various conditions. (author)

  2. Fabrication and magnetic-induced aggregation of Fe3O4–noble metal composites for superior SERS performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Zibao; Zhao, Aiwu; Zhang, Maofeng; Wang, Dapeng; Guo, Hongyan; Tao, Wenyu; Gao, Qian; Mao, Ranran; Liu, Erhu

    2013-01-01

    Fe 3 O 4 –noble metal composites were obtained by combining Au, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane-functionalized Fe 3 O 4 NPs. UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy demonstrates the obtained Fe 3 O 4 –noble metal composites inherit the typical surface plasmon resonance bands of Au, Ag at 533 and 453 nm, respectively. Magnetic measurements also indicated that the superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 –noble metal composites have excellent magnetic response behavior. A magnetic-induced idea was introduced to change their aggregated states and take full advantage of their surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) performances. Under the induction of an external magnetic field, the bifunctional Fe 3 O 4 –noble metal aggregates exhibit the unique superiority in SERS detection of Rhodamine 6G (R6G), compared with the naturally dispersed Au, Ag NPs. Especially, the detection limit of the Fe 3 O 4 –Ag aggregates for R6G is as low as 10 −14  M, and the calculated EF reaches up to 1.2 × 10 6 , which meets the requirements for trace detection of analytes. Furthermore, the superiority could be extended to sensitive detection of other organic molecules, such as 4-mercaptopyridine. This work provides a new insight for active adjustment of the aggregated states of SERS substrates and the optimization of SERS performances

  3. Aroma compounds and characteristics of noble-rot wines of Chardonnay grapes artificially botrytized in the vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-Jie; Tao, Yong-Sheng; Wu, Yun; An, Rong-Yan; Yue, Zhuo-Ya

    2017-07-01

    Aroma characteristics and their impact volatile components of noble-rot wines elaborated from artificial botrytized Chardonnay grapes, obtained by spraying Botrytis cinerea suspension in Yuquan vineyard, Ningxia, China, were explored in this work. Dry white wine made from normal-harvested grapes and sweet wine produced from delay-harvested grapes were compared. Wine aromas were analysed by trained sensory panelists, and aroma compounds were determined by SPME-GC-MS. Results indicated that esters, fatty acids, thiols, lactones, volatile phenols and 2-nonanone increased markedly in noble-rot wines. In addition to typical aromas of noble-rot wines, artificial noble-rot wines were found to contain significant cream and dry apricot attributes. Partial Least-Squares Regression models of aroma characteristics against aroma components revealed that non-fermentative odorants were the primary contributor to dry apricot attribute, especially, thiols, C13-norisoprenoids, lactones, terpenols and phenolic acid derivatives, while cream attribute was dependent on both fermentative and non-fermentative volatile components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Self-consistent meta-generalized gradient approximation study of adsorption of aromatic molecules on noble metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrighi, Lara; Madsen, Georg Kent Hellerup; Hammer, Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    aromatic molecules considered. The adsorption of pentacene is studied on Au, Ag, and Cu surfaces. In agreement with experiment, the adsorption energies are found to increase with decreasing nobleness, but the dependency is underestimated. We point out how the kinetic energy density can discriminate between...

  5. Generalizability of EXCEL and NOBLE results to a large registry population with unprotected left main coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pil Hyung; Kang, Se Hun; Han, Seungbong; Ahn, Jung-Min; Bae, Jae Seok; Lee, Cheol Hyun; Kang, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seung-Whan; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Seong-Wook; Park, Duk-Woo; Park, Seung-Jung

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how trial-based findings of EXCEL and NOBLE might be interpreted and generalizable in 'real-world' settings with comparison of data from the large-scaled, all-comer Interventional Research Incorporation Society-Left MAIN Revascularization (IRIS-MAIN) registry. We compared baseline clinical and procedural characteristics and also determined how the relative treatment effect of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) was different in EXCEL and NOBLE, compared with those of the multicenter, IRIS-MAIN registry (n=2481). The primary outcome for between-study comparison was a composite of death, myocardial infarction (MI), or stroke. There were between-study differences in patient risk profiles (age, BMI, diabetes, and clinical presentation), lesion complexities, and procedural characteristics (stent type, the use of off-pump surgery, and radial artery); the proportion of diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was particularly lower in NOBLE than in other studies. Although there was interstudy heterogeneity for the protocol definition of MI, the risks for serious composite outcome of death, MI, or stroke were similar between PCI and CABG in EXCEL [hazard ratio (HR): 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79-1.26; P=0.98] and in the matched cohort of IRIS-MAIN (HR: 1.08; 95%CI: 0.85-1.38; P=0.53), whereas it was significantly higher after PCI than after CABG in NOBLE (HR: 1.47; 95%CI: 1.06-2.05; P=0.02), which was driven by more common MI and stroke after PCI. In the comparison of a large-sized, all-comer registry, the EXCEL trial might represent better generalizability with respect to baseline characteristics and observed clinical outcomes compared with the NOBLE trial.

  6. Characterisation of an ion source on the Helix MC Plus noble gas mass spectrometer - pressure dependent mass discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Characterisation of an ion source on the Helix MC Plusnoble gas mass spectrometer - pressure dependent mass discrimination Xiaodong Zhang* dong.zhang@anu.edu.au Masahiko Honda Masahiko.honda@anu.edu.au Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia To obtain reliable measurements of noble gas elemental and isotopic abundances in a geological sample it is essential that the mass discrimination (instrument-induced isotope fractionation) of the mass spectrometer remain constant over the working range of noble gas partial pressures. It is known, however, that there are pressure-dependent variations in sensitivity and mass discrimination in conventional noble gas mass spectrometers [1, 2, 3]. In this study, we discuss a practical approach to ensuring that the pressure effect in the Helix MC Plus high resolution, multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometer is minimised. The isotopic composition of atmospheric Ar was measured under a range of operating conditions to test the effects of different parameters on Ar mass discrimination. It was found that the optimised ion source conditions for pressure independent mass discrimination for Ar were different from those for maximised Ar sensitivity. The optimisation can be achieved by mainly adjusting the repeller voltage. It is likely that different ion source settings will be required to minimise pressure-dependent mass discrimination for different noble gases. A recommended procedure for tuning an ion source to reduce pressure dependent mass discrimination will be presented. References: Honda M., et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 57, 859 -874, 1993. Burnard P. G., and Farley K. A., Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, Volume 1, 2000GC00038, 2000. Mabry J., et al., Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 27, 1012 - 1017, 2012.

  7. Simulated optical properties of noble metallic nanopolyhedra with different shapes and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, An-Qi; Qian, Dong-Jin; Chen, Meng

    2013-11-01

    The optical properties of nanostructured architectures are highly sensitive to their compositions, structures, dimensions, geometries and embedding mediums. Nanopolyhedra, including homogeneous metal nanoparticles and core-shell structures, have unique optical properties. In the beginning of this study, Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) method has been introduced. Then the simulated extinction spectra of single-component metal nanoparticles and Au@Ag polyhedra were calculated using both Mie and DDA methods. The influence of morphology and components on the optical response is discussed and well-supported by previously published experimental results. It is observed that the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance peaks are mainly decided by sharp vertexes and symmetry of noble metallic polyhedra, as well as the structure of the Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles.

  8. Detection of a noble gas molecular ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, M J; Swinyard, B M; Owen, P J; Cernicharo, J; Gomez, H L; Ivison, R J; Krause, O; Lim, T L; Matsuura, M; Miller, S; Olofsson, G; Polehampton, E T

    2013-12-13

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of (36)ArH(+) at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed (36)ArH(+) emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  9. Emitter depletion studies on electrodes of 50 Hz mercury/noble gas discharge lamps during ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoek, W.J. van den; Thijssen, T.L.G.; Heijden, A.J.H. van der; Buijsse, B.; Haverlag, M.

    2002-01-01

    The depletion of emitter from the oxide cathodes during the glow switch starting of the discharge in 50 Hz operated low-pressure mercury/noble gas discharge lamps (fluorescent lamps) has been studied. It follows from pulse ignition studies and computer-controlled ignition experiments that two plasma modes exist during ignition: a glow discharge and a vapour-arc discharge. The occurrence of these modes depends on the point of interruption with respect to the phase of the 50 Hz preheat current. The vapour arc appears to be the dominant mechanism of emitter depletion. The average emitter loss per vapour-arc pulse has been quantified by radioactive Ba tracer experiments. The nature of the vapour arc has been studied by fast photography and SEM. The vapour arc involves dielectric breakdown over the non-conducting oxide mass and gives rise to explosive emitter vapourization. (author)

  10. Pressure effect in the X-ray intrinsic position resolution in noble gases and mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Azevedo, C.D.R.

    2016-12-13

    A study of the gas pressure effect in the position resolution of an interacting X- or gamma-ray photon in a gas medium is performed. The intrinsic position resolution for pure noble gases (Argon and Xenon) and their mixtures with CO2 and CH4 were calculated for several gas pressures (1-10bar) and for photon energies between 5.4 and 60.0 keV, being possible to establish a linear match between the intrinsic position resolution and the inverse of the gas pressure in that energy range. In order to evaluate the quality of the method here described, a comparison between the available experimental data and the calculated one in this work, is done and discussed. In the majority of the cases, a strong agreement is observed.

  11. Tracing ancient hydrogeological fracture network age and compartmentalisation using noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Oliver; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; Fellowes, Jonathan; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; McDermott, Jill M.; Holland, Greg; Mabry, Jennifer C.; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2018-02-01

    We show that fluid volumes residing within the Precambrian crystalline basement account for ca 30% of the total groundwater inventory of the Earth (> 30 million km3). The residence times and scientific importance of this groundwater are only now receiving attention with ancient fracture fluids identified in Canada and South Africa showing: (1) microbial life which has existed in isolation for millions of years; (2) significant hydrogen and hydrocarbon production via water-rock reactions; and (3) preserving noble gas components from the early atmosphere. Noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) abundance and isotopic compositions provide the primary evidence for fluid mean residence time (MRT). Here we extend the noble gas data from the Kidd Creek Mine in Timmins Ontario Canada, a volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit formed at 2.7 Ga, in which fracture fluids with MRTs of 1.1-1.7 Ga were identified at 2.4 km depth (Holland et al., 2013); to fracture fluids at 2.9 km depth. We compare here the Kidd Creek Mine study with noble gas compositions determined in fracture fluids taken from two mines (Mine 1 & Mine 2) at 1.7 and 1.4 km depth below surface in the Sudbury Basin formed by a meteorite impact at 1.849 Ga. The 2.9 km samples at Kidd Creek Mine show the highest radiogenic isotopic ratios observed to date in free fluids (e.g. 21Ne/22Ne = 0.6 and 40Ar/36Ar = 102,000) and have MRTs of 1.0-2.2 Ga. In contrast, resampled 2.4 km fluids indicated a less ancient MRT (0.2-0.6 Ga) compared with the previous study (1.1-1.7 Ga). This is consistent with a change in the age distribution of fluids feeding the fractures as they drain, with a decreasing proportion of the most ancient end-member fluids. 129Xe/136Xe ratios for these fluids confirm that boreholes at 2.4 km versus 2.9 km are sourced from hydrogeologically distinct systems. In contrast, results for the Sudbury mines have MRTs of 0.2-0.6 and 0.2-0.9 Ga for Mines 1 and 2 respectively. While still old compared to almost all

  12. Photo-Ionization of Noble Gases: A Demonstration of Hybrid Coupled Channels Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Pramod Majety

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here an application of the recently developed hybrid coupled channels approach to study photo-ionization of noble gas atoms: Neon and Argon. We first compute multi-photon ionization rates and cross-sections for these inert gas atoms with our approach and compare them with reliable data available from R-matrix Floquet theory. The good agreement between coupled channels and R-matrix Floquet theory show that our method treats multi-electron systems on par with the well established R-matrix theory. We then apply the time dependent surface flux (tSURFF method with our approach to compute total and angle resolved photo-electron spectra from Argon with linearly and circularly polarized 12 nm wavelength laser fields, a typical wavelength available from Free Electron Lasers (FELs.

  13. Unprotected Left Main Coronary Artery Disease: Management in the Post NOBLE and EXCEL Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nyal; Kapadia, Samir R; Ellis, Stephen G

    2017-09-01

    The optimal management of unprotected left main coronary artery (ULMCA) disease is currently a debated topic. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has seen an increased adoption for the management of ULMCA disease after numerous small-scale randomised trials and cohort studies showed equipoise with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for low complexity lesions. The recently published NOBLE and EXCEL trials are two of the largest international randomised clinical trials comparing PCI and CABG in patients with ULMCA disease. In lieu of all the available evidence, PCI appears to be equivalent to CABG in regard to mortality in patients with ULMCA disease. In non-diabetic patients with low complexity coronary disease (SYNTAX score ≤32), PCI appears to be a reasonable alternative to CABG, especially for ostial and midshaft left main coronary lesions. CABG is preferable in the presence of diabetes, multivessel coronary disease in addition to ULMCA or complex coronary lesions (SYNTAX score >33) including distal left main lesions.

  14. Tantalum oxide-based compounds as new non-noble cathodes for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Akimitsu; Tamura, Motoko; Matsuzawa, Koichi; Mitsushima, Shigenori; Ota, Ken-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum oxide-based compounds were examined as new non-noble cathodes for polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Tantalum carbonitride powder was partially oxidized under a trace amount of oxygen gas at 900 o C for 4 or 8 h. Onset potential for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of the specimen heat-treated for 8 h was 0.94 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode in 0.1 mol dm -3 sulfuric acid at 30 o C. The partial oxidation of tantalum carboniride was effective to enhance the catalytic activity for the ORR. The partially oxidized specimen with highest catalytic activity had ca. 5.25 eV of ionization potential, indicating that there was most suitable strength of the interaction of oxygen and tantalum on the catalyst surface.

  15. An effective hydrothermal route for the synthesis of multiple PDDA-protected noble-metal nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongjun; Wang, Yuling; Dong, Shaojun

    2007-12-10

    In this article, we demonstrate an effective hydrothermal route for the synthesis of multiple PDDA-protected (PDDA = poly(diallyl dimethylammonium) chloride) noble-metal (including silver, platinum, palladium, and gold) nanostructures in the absence of any seeds and surfactants, in which PDDA, an ordinary and water-soluble polyelectrolyte, acts as both a reducing and a stabilizing agent. Under optimal experimental conditions, Ag nanocubes, Pt and Pd nanopolyhedrons, and Au nanoplates can be obtained, which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy , scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. More importantly, the nanostructures synthesized show potential applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering and electrocatalysis, in which Ag nanocubes and Pt nanopolyhedrons were chosen as the examples, respectively.

  16. Pressure disequilibria induced by rapid valve closure in noble gas extraction lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Leah; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Pressure disequilibria during rapid valve closures can affect calculated molar quantities for a range of gas abundance measurements (e.g., K-Ar geochronology, (U-Th)/He geochronology, noble gas cosmogenic chronology). Modeling indicates this effect in a system with a 10 L reservoir reaches a bias of 1% before 1000 pipette aliquants have been removed from the system, and a bias of 10% before 10,000 aliquants. Herein we explore the causes and effects of this problem, which is the result of volume changes during valve closure. We also present a solution in the form of an electropneumatic pressure regulator that can precisely control valve motion. This solution reduces the effect to ∼0.3% even after 10,000 aliquants have been removed from a 10 L reservoir.

  17. Interaction of noble-metal fission products with pyrolytic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauf, R.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    Fuel particles for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contain layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which act as a miniature pressure vessel and form the primary fission product barrier. Of the many fission products formed during irradiation, the noble metals are of particular interest because they interact significantly with the SiC layer and their concentrations are somewhat higher in the low-enriched uranium fuels currently under consideration. To study fission product-SiC interactions, particles of UO 2 or UC 2 are doped with fission product elements before coating and are then held in a thermal gradient up to several thousand hours. Examination of the SiC coatings by TEM-AEM after annealing shows that silver behaves differently from the palladium group

  18. Porous Silicon Hydrogen Sensor at Room Temperature: The Effect of Surface Modification and Noble Metal Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayita KANUNGO

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon (PS was fabricated by anodization of p-type crystalline silicon of resistivity 2-5 Ω cm. After formation, the PS surface was modified by the solution containing noble metal like Pd. Pd-Ag catalytic contact electrodes were deposited on porous silicon and on p-Silicon to fabricate Pd-Ag/PS/p-Si/Pd-Ag sensor structure to carry out the hydrogen sensing experiments. The Sensor was exposed to 1% hydrogen in nitrogen as carrier gas at room temperature (270C. Pd modified sensor showed minimum fluctuations and consistent performance with 86% response, response time and recovery time of 24 sec and 264 sec respectively. The stability experiments were studied for both unmodified and Pd modified sensor structures for a period of about 24 hours and the modified sensors showed excellent durability with no drift in response behavior.

  19. Pressure disequilibria induced by rapid valve closure in noble gas extraction lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Leah E.; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett

    2015-06-01

    Pressure disequilibria during rapid valve closures can affect calculated molar quantities for a range of gas abundance measurements (e.g., K-Ar geochronology, (U-Th)/He geochronology, noble gas cosmogenic chronology). Modeling indicates this effect in a system with a 10 L reservoir reaches a bias of 1% before 1000 pipette aliquants have been removed from the system, and a bias of 10% before 10,000 aliquants. Herein we explore the causes and effects of this problem, which is the result of volume changes during valve closure. We also present a solution in the form of an electropneumatic pressure regulator that can precisely control valve motion. This solution reduces the effect to ˜0.3% even after 10,000 aliquants have been removed from a 10 L reservoir.

  20. Long-range interactions of excited He atoms with ground-state noble-gas atoms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.

    2013-10-09

    The dispersion coefficients C6, C8, and C10 for long-range interactions of He(n1,3S) and He(n1,3P), 2≤n≤10, with the ground-state noble-gas atoms Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated by summing over the reduced matrix elements of multipole transition operators. The large-n expansions for the sums over the He oscillator strength divided by the corresponding transition energy are presented for these series. Using the expansions, the C6 coefficients for the systems involving He(131,3S) and He(131,3P) are calculated and found to be in good agreement with directly calculated values.

  1. A method for calibrating coil constants by using the free induction decay of noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a precise method to calibrate the coil constants of spin-precession gyroscopes and optical atomic magnetometers. This method is based on measuring the initial amplitude of Free Induction Decay (FID of noble gases, from which the π/2 pulse duration can be calculated, since it is inversely proportional to the amplitude of the π/2 pulse. Therefore, the coil constants can be calibrated by measuring the π/2 pulse duration. Compared with the method based on the Larmor precession frequency of atoms, our method can avoid the effect of the pump and probe powers. We experimentally validated the method in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG, and the experimental results show that the coil constants are 436.63±0.04 nT/mA and 428.94±0.02 nT/mA in the x and y directions, respectively.

  2. Hot-Electron Intraband Luminescence from Single Hot Spots in Noble-Metal Nanoparticle Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Tobias; Klemm, Philippe; Bange, Sebastian; Lupton, John M.

    2015-08-01

    Disordered noble-metal nanoparticle films exhibit highly localized and stable nonlinear light emission from subdiffraction regions upon illumination by near-infrared femtosecond pulses. Such hot spot emission spans a continuum in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. Strong plasmonic enhancement of light-matter interaction and the resulting complexity of experimental observations have prevented the development of a universal understanding of the origin of light emission. Here, we study the dependence of emission spectra on excitation irradiance and provide the most direct evidence yet that the continuum emission observed from both silver and gold nanoparticle aggregate surfaces is caused by recombination of hot electrons within the conduction band. The electron gas in the emitting particles, which is effectively decoupled from the lattice temperature for the duration of emission, reaches temperatures of several thousand Kelvin and acts as a subdiffraction incandescent light source on subpicosecond time scales.

  3. Spatial dynamics of the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus, L. in the Paklenica National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.I.V. Klobucar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to analyse the spatial dynamics of a noble crayfish population inhabiting the Velika Paklenica Stream (Paklenica National Park, Croatia. The study was conducted in July 2000, and between March and September 2002. Crayfish were trapped by baited LiNi traps and hand-made traps at two localities over 25 nights. We recorded the precise position of the captured crayfish, their sex, and total length. Crayfish were individually marked and then released back into the stream at the same spot where they were caught. Spatial analyses included determination of movement direction, distribution type, home range, total distance travelled, and mean daily movement. A mean home range of approximately 19 m was calculated. No difference in home range between the sexes was found. There was a large individual variation in the extent of movement without any effect of sex or size.

  4. Dithiocarbamate Self-Assembled Monolayers as Efficient Surface Modifiers for Low Work Function Noble Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Dominik; Schäfer, Tobias; Schulz, Philip; Jung, Sebastian; Rittich, Julia; Mokros, Daniel; Segger, Ingolf; Maercks, Franziska; Effertz, Christian; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Wuttig, Matthias

    2016-09-06

    Tuning the work function of the electrode is one of the crucial steps to improve charge extraction in organic electronic devices. Here, we show that N,N-dialkyl dithiocarbamates (DTC) can be effectively employed to produce low work function noble metal electrodes. Work functions between 3.1 and 3.5 eV are observed for all metals investigated (Cu, Ag, and Au). Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) reveals a maximum decrease in work function by 2.1 eV as compared to the bare metal surface. Electronic structure calculations elucidate how the complex interplay between intrinsic dipoles and dipoles induced by bond formation generates such large work function shifts. Subsequently, we quantify the improvement in contact resistance of organic thin film transistor devices with DTC coated source and drain electrodes. These findings demonstrate that DTC molecules can be employed as universal surface modifiers to produce stable electrodes for electron injection in high performance hybrid organic optoelectronics.

  5. Theoretical prediction of the noble gas complexes HeAuF and NeAuF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Ab initio calculations were carried out to investigate the structures and the stability of the noble gas complexes HeAuF and NeAuF through MP2 and CCSD(T) methods.The HeAuF was predicted to have a linear structure with weak He-Au covalent bonding,the distance of which is closer to the covalent limit in comparison with the corresponding van der Waals limit.The dissociation energy with respect to He + AuF was found to be 24 and 26 kJ·mol-1 at the CCSD(T)/basis set B and B’ levels,respectively.However,similar calculations for NeAuF indicate that NeAuF is not a stable species.

  6. Synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles and their superstructures; Darstellung von Edelmetallnanopartikeln und deren Ueberstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigall, Nadja-Carola

    2009-08-18

    A modified synthesis procedure for citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution is transferred under application of equal concentrations to the systems silver, platinum, and palladium. The nanoparticles are analyzed by means of absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Ordered superstructures of the noble-metal nanoparticles can be synthesized by infiltration of templates of block-copolymer films with aqueous nanoparticle solution. In dependence on the pre-treatment of the polymer films either two-dimensional periodical arrangements with a periodicity of less than 30 nm or fingerprint-like arrangements with a groove distance in the same order of magnitude. By removal of the polymer one- respectively two-dimensional arrangements of platinum nanowires respectively nanoparticles on a silicon waver arise.

  7. Geochemical monitoring using noble gases and carbon isotopes: study of a natural reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeandel, E.

    2008-12-01

    To limit emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, CO 2 geological sequestration appears as a solution in the fight against climate change. The development of reliable monitoring tools to ensure the sustainability and the safety of geological storage is a prerequisite for the implementation of such sites. In this framework, a geochemical method using noble gas and carbon isotopes geochemistry has been tested on natural and industrial analogues. The study of natural analogues from different geological settings showed systematic behaviours of the geochemical parameters, depending on the containment sites, and proving the effectiveness of these tools in terms of leak detection and as tracers of the behaviour of CO 2 . Moreover, an experience of geochemical tracing on a natural gas storage has demonstrated that it is possible to identify the physical-chemical processes taking place in the reservoir to a human time scale, increasing interest in the proposed tool and providing general information on its use. (author)

  8. A systematic chemical separation for thermal neutron activation analysis of seven noble metals in rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayabe, Muneo

    1980-01-01

    A method for the systematic activation analysis of seven noble metals - ruthenium, silver, rhenium, osmium, iridium, platinum and gold - in rocks were developed and examined with radiotracers and irradiated rock samples. After the fusion of the irradiated rock sample with sodium hydroxide and sodium peroxide, 10% sodium sulfide solution is added and rhenium is extracted with pyridine-benzene mixture from 6N sodium hydroxide solution. From the hydroxide-sulfide precipitate fraction, ruthenium and osmium are distilled as tetroxides, silver is precipitated as chloride, gold is extracted with ethyl acetate, and iridium and platinum are extracted with diantipyrylmethane. Each fraction is purified and subjected to the γ-ray spectrometry. Chemical yields for the elements are more than 60%. Determination limits are given for the seven elements. (author)

  9. Using Noble Gas Measurements to Derive Air-Sea Process Information and Predict Physical Gas Saturations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamme, Roberta C.; Emerson, Steven R.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Long, Matthew C.; Yashayaev, Igor

    2017-10-01

    Dissolved gas distributions are important because they influence oceanic habitats and Earth's climate, yet competing controls by biology and physics make gas distributions challenging to predict. Bubble-mediated gas exchange, temperature change, and varying atmospheric pressure all push gases away from equilibrium. Here we use new noble gas measurements from the Labrador Sea to demonstrate a technique to quantify physical processes. Our analysis shows that water-mass formation can be represented by a quasi steady state in which bubble fluxes and cooling push gases away from equilibrium balanced by diffusive gas exchange forcing gases toward equilibrium. We quantify the rates of these physical processes from our measurements, allowing direct comparison to gas exchange parameterizations, and predict the physically driven saturation of other gases. This technique produces predictions that reasonably match N2/Ar observations and demonstrates that physical processes should force SF6 to be ˜6% more supersaturated than CFC-11 and CFC-12, impacting ventilation age calculations.

  10. Facilitating breakdown in noble gases at near-atmospheric pressure using antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobota, A; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Haverlag, M [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Postbus 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gendre, M F; Manders, F, E-mail: a.sobota@tue.nl [Philips Lighting, Mathildelaan 1, 5600JM Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-04-20

    Electrical breakdown in near-atmospheric pressure noble gases requires voltages that are quite high, which is undesirable for a large number of possible applications. Metallic structures (antennas) were used on the outer side of the lamp burner to enhance the electric field locally while keeping the same potential difference across the electrodes. Optical and electrical measurements were performed in an argon or xenon atmosphere at 0.3 or 0.7 bar, with 4 or 7 mm between the electrode tips. We used rod-shaped tungsten electrodes of 0.6 mm in diameter. We found that both active and passive antennas facilitate breakdown, and we demonstrated the differences between the two types and their effects on the breakdown process.

  11. Facilitating breakdown in noble gases at near-atmospheric pressure using antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobota, A; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Haverlag, M; Gendre, M F; Manders, F

    2011-01-01

    Electrical breakdown in near-atmospheric pressure noble gases requires voltages that are quite high, which is undesirable for a large number of possible applications. Metallic structures (antennas) were used on the outer side of the lamp burner to enhance the electric field locally while keeping the same potential difference across the electrodes. Optical and electrical measurements were performed in an argon or xenon atmosphere at 0.3 or 0.7 bar, with 4 or 7 mm between the electrode tips. We used rod-shaped tungsten electrodes of 0.6 mm in diameter. We found that both active and passive antennas facilitate breakdown, and we demonstrated the differences between the two types and their effects on the breakdown process.

  12. Dissolved stable noble gas measurements from primary water of Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palcsu, L.; Molnar, M.; Szanto, Zs.; Svingor, E.; Futo, I.; Pinter, T.

    2001-01-01

    A sampling and measuring method of noble gases from the primary water circuit of a VVER type NPP was developed to provide relevant information about the kilter of heating rods and detailed additional information about some working parameters. The helium concentrations and 3 He/ 4 He ratios was used to estimate the content of tritium and alpha emitting isotopes of the primary water. By argon content measurements the air penetration and the required hydrazine amount for the oxygen absorption could be estimated with high accuracy. Continuous monitoring of the concentration and isotope ratios of Xe and Kr in the dissolved gas is proved to be a good tool for high sensitivity detection of small leakage of fuel elements. In case of block-3 xenon surplus was detected. The results indicate possible leakage of fuel rods.(author)

  13. TANGR2015 Heidelberg. Second international workshop on tracer applications of noble gas radionuclides in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    TANGR2015 is a workshop on the progress in the technique and application of Atom Trap Trace Analyis (ATTA). It is a follow-up to the first TANGR workshop, TANGR2012, which was held at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, USA, in June 2012. It is organized in response to recent technical advances and new applications of Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA), an analytical method for measuring the isotopes {sup 81}Kr, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 39}Ar. The primary aim of the workshop is to discuss the technical progress of ATTA and thereby enable innovative and timely applications of the noble gas radionuclides to important scientific problems in earth and environmental sciences, e.g. in the fields of groundwater hydrology, glaciology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology.

  14. Noble metal abundances in komatiite suites from Alexo, Ontario and Gorgona Island, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brügmann, G. E.; Arndt, N. T.; Hofmann, A. W.; Tobschall, H. J.

    1987-08-01

    The distribution of the chalcophile and siderophile metals Cu, Ni, Au, Pd, Ir, Os and Ru in an Archaean komatiite flow from Alexo, Ontario and in a Phanerozoic komatiitic suite of Gorgona Island, Colombia, provides new information about the geochemical behaviour of these elements. Copper, Au and Pd behave as incompatible elements during the crystallization of these ultramafic magmas. In contrast, Ni, Ir, Os and Ru concentrations systematically decrease with decreasing MgO contents, a pattern characteristic of compatible elements. These trends are most probably controlled by olivine crystallization, which implies that Ir, Os and Ru are compatible in olivine. Calculated partition coefficients for Ir, Os and Ru between olivine and the melt are about 1.8. Compared to primitive mantle, parental komatiitic liquids are enriched in (incompatible) Cu, Au and Pd and depleted in (compatible) Ir, Os and Ru. Within both Archaean and Phanerozoic komatiites, noble metal ratios such as Au/Pd, Ir/Os, Os/Ru and Ru/Ir and ratios of lithophile and siderophile elements such as Ti/Pd, Ti/Au are constant and similar to primitive mantle values. This implies that Au and Pd are moderately incompatible elements and that there has been no significant fractionation of siderophile and lithophile elements since the Archaean. Platinum-group element abundances of normal MORB are highly variable and always much lower than in komatiites, because MORB magma is saturated with sulfur and a variable but minor amount of sulfide segregated during mantle melting or during the ascent of magma to the surface. Sulfide deposits associated with komatiites display similar chalcophile element patterns to those of komatiites. Noble metal ratios such as Pd/Ir, Au/Ir, Pd/Os and Pd/Ru can be used to determine the composition of the host komatiite at the time of sulfide segregation.

  15. New technique for the determination of trace noble metal content in geological and process materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitkin, V.N. E-mail: mit@che.nsk.su; Zayakina, S.B.; Anoshin, G.N

    2003-02-03

    A new two-step sample preparation technique is proposed for the instrumental determination of trace quantities of noble metals (NM) in refractory geological and process materials. The decomposition procedure is based on the oxidizing fluorination of samples with subsequent sulfatization (OFS) of the sample melt or cake. Fluorination of samples is accomplished using a mixture of KHF{sub 2}+KBrF{sub 4} or KHF{sub 2}+BrF{sub 3} depending on the ratio of sample mass to oxidizing mixture. Both cakes and melts can result using this procedure. Sulfatization of resulting fluorides is completed using concentrated sulfuric acid heated to 550 deg. C. Validation studies using certified geostandard reference materials (GSO VP-2, ZH-3, Matte RTP, HO-1, SARM-7) have shown that the proposed method is fast, convenient and most often produces non-hygroscopic homogeneous residues suitable for analysis by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). Results obtained for NM concentrations in reference materials agreed with certified concentration ranges and results obtained using other methods of analysis. The OFS procedure combined with direct current plasma d.c. plasma AES achieved the following limits of detection (LOD) for the noble metals: Ag, Au, Pd, 1-2x10{sup -6}; Pt, 5x10{sup -6}; and Ru, Rh, Ir, Os, 1-3x10{sup -7} wt.%. Using graphite furnace AAS (GFAAS) combined extraction pre-concentration the following LODs for NMs were achieved: Pt, Ru, 1x10{sup -6}; Pd, Rh, 1x10{sup -7}; and Au, Ag, 1-2x10{sup -8} wt.%. The relative standard deviation for NM determinations (S{sub r}) was dependent on NM concentration and sample type, but commonly was in the range of 3-15% for d.c. plasma AES and 5-30% for GFAAS.

  16. Shock Compression of Liquid Noble Gases to Multi-Mbar Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth

    2011-10-01

    The high pressure - high temperature behavior of noble gases is of considerable interest because of their use in z-pinch liners for fusion studies and for understanding astrophysical and planetary evolution. However, our understanding of the equation of state (EOS) of the noble gases at extreme conditions is limited. A prime example of this is the liquid xenon Hugoniot. Previous EOS models rapidly diverged on the Hugoniot above 1 Mbar because of differences in the treatment of the electronic contribution to the free energy. Similar divergences are observed for krypton EOS. Combining shock compression experiments and density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we can determine the thermo-physical behavior of matter under extreme conditions. The experimental and DFT results have been instrumental to recent developments in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Shock compression experiments are performed using Sandia's Z-Accelerator to determine the Hugoniot of liquid xenon and krypton in the Mbar regime. Under strong pressure, krypton and xenon undergo an insulator to metal transition. In the metallic state, the shock front becomes reflective allowing for a direct measurement of the sample's shock velocity using laser interferometry. The Hugoniot state is determined using a Monte Carlo analysis method that accounts for systematic error in the standards and for correlations. DFT simulations at these extreme conditions show good agreement with the experimental data - demonstrating the attention to detail required for dealing with elements with relativistic core states and d-state electrons. The results from shock compression experiments and DFT simulations are presented for liquid xenon to 840 GPa and for liquid krypton to 800 GPa, decidedly increasing the range of known behavior of both gases. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company

  17. Noble gas and hydrocarbon tracers in multiphase unconventional hydrocarbon systems: Toward integrated advanced reservoir simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, T.; Moortgat, J.; Poreda, R. J.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Whyte, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional energy resources has increased dramatically in the last decade, total unconventional oil and gas recovery from black shales is still less than 25% and 9% of the totals in place, respectively. Further, the majority of increased hydrocarbon production results from increasing the lengths of laterals, the number of hydraulic fracturing stages, and the volume of consumptive water usage. These strategies all reduce the economic efficiency of hydrocarbon extraction. The poor recovery statistics result from an insufficient understanding of some of the key physical processes in complex, organic-rich, low porosity formations (e.g., phase behavior, fluid-rock interactions, and flow mechanisms at nano-scale confinement and the role of natural fractures and faults as conduits for flow). Noble gases and other hydrocarbon tracers are capably of recording subsurface fluid-rock interactions on a variety of geological scales (micro-, meso-, to macro-scale) and provide analogs for the movement of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. As such geochemical data enrich the input for the numerical modeling of multi-phase (e.g., oil, gas, and brine) fluid flow in highly heterogeneous, low permeability formations Herein we will present a combination of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe abundances and isotope ratios) and molecular and isotopic hydrocarbon data from a geographically and geologically diverse set of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs in North America. Specifically, we will include data from the Marcellus, Utica, Barnett, Eagle Ford, formations and the Illinois basin. Our presentation will include geochemical and geological interpretation and our perspective on the first steps toward building an advanced reservoir simulator for tracer transport in multicomponent multiphase compositional flow (presented separately, in Moortgat et al., 2015).

  18. Integrated environmental modeling system for noble gas releases at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.E.

    1973-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant (SRP) is a large nuclear complex engaged in varied activities and is the AEC's major site for the production of weapons material. As a result of these activities, there are continuous and intermittent releases of radioactive gases to the atmosphere. Of these releases, the noble gases constitute about 11 percent of the total man-rem exposure to the population out to a distance of 100 km. Although SRP has an extensive radiological monitoring program, an environmental modeling system is necessary for adequately estimating effects on the environment. The integrated environmental modeling system in use at SRP consists of a series of computer programs that generate and use a library of environmental effects data as a function of azimuth and distance. Annual average atmospheric dispersion and azimuthal distribution of material assumed to be released as unit sources is estimated from a 2-year meteorological data base--assuming an arbitrary point of origin. The basic library of data consists of: ground-level concentrations according to isotope, and whole body gamma dose calculations that account for the total spatial distribution at discrete energy levels. These data are normalized to tritium measurements, and are subsequently used to generate similar library data that pertain to specific source locations, but always with respect to the same population grid. Thus, the total additive effects from all source points, both on- and off-site, can be estimated. The final program uses the library data to estimate population exposures for specified releases and source points for the nuclides of interest (including noble gases). Multiple source points are considered within a single pass to obtain the integrated effects from all sources

  19. The Induction of Noble Rot (Botrytis cinerea Infection during Postharvest Withering Changes the Metabolome of Grapevine Berries (Vitis vinifera L., cv. Garganega

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Negri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The natural or induced development of noble rot caused by the fungus Botrytis cinerea during the late stages of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. berry ripening is used in some traditional viticulture areas to produce high-quality wines such as Sauternes and Tokaji. In this research, we wanted to verify if by changing the environmental conditions during post-harvest withering we could induce the noble rot development on harvested berries in order to positively change the wine produced from withered Garganega berries. Therefore, we exposed the berries to postharvest withering under normal or artificially humid conditions, the latter to induce noble rot. The presence of noble rot symptoms was associated with the development of B. cinerea in the berries maintained under humid conditions. The composition of infected and non-infected berries was investigated by untargeted metabolomics using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We also explored the effects of the two withering methods on the abundance of volatile organic compounds in wine by yeast-inoculated micro-fermentation followed by targeted gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These experiments revealed significant metabolic differences between berries withered under normal and humid conditions, indicating that noble rot affects berry metabolism and composition. As well as well-known botrytization markers, we detected two novel lipids that have not been observed before in berries infected with noble rot. Unraveling the specific metabolic profile of berries infected with noble rot may help to determine the compounds responsible for the organoleptic quality traits of botrytized Garganega wines.

  20. Noble metal based plasmonic nanomaterials and their application for bio-imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dewei

    During the past two decades, researchers have gained more and more insight into the manipulation of nanomaterials to create useful technologies. Numerous classes of nanomaterials have been produced and studied based upon their intriguing chemical and physical properties and their potential applications in diverse fields, ranging from electronics to renewable energy and biomedicine. In this dissertation, we describe the synthesis and potential biomedical applications of several types of noble metal-based nanomaterials in which we control size, shape, and coupling to other materials to tune their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) interaction with light. We demonstrate the application of these novel nanostructures as contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging and as photosensitizers for photothermal therapy. Chapter one first presents protocols for producing monodisperse spherical nanoparticles of gold and silver. The diameter of the nanospheres can be adjusted from less than 2 nm to greater than 10 nm by controlling the reaction conditions, including ligands that cap the nanosphere surfaces, reaction time, and reaction temperature. Next, we describe the synthesis of multi-branched Au nanocrystals with predominantly tripodal, tetrapodal and star-shaped morphologies. We demonstrate tuning of the LSPR energy in these materials by changing the branch length. In the third part of this chapter, we present a novel method for coupling heavily-doped p-type copper selenide (Cu2-xSe) NPs with Au NPs by seeded nanocrystal growth to form a new type of semiconductor-metal heterogeneous nanostructure. This new class of plasmonic nanomaterials can simultaneously exhibit two types of LSPR in a single system, producing a broad optical absorbance that is nearly flat across the near infrared (NIR) spectral region (750-1150nm), along with a small shoulder at 566 nm that originates from the Au NP. We conclude this first chapter by demonstrating the use of self-doped copper sulfide

  1. Contributions to the determination of the noble metals gold, iridium, palladium, platinum, rhodium and application to environmentally relevant samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zischka, M.

    1998-11-01

    The concentrations of noble metals in the environment are still very low (low ng/g and sub ng/g range), although they are emitted to an increasing extent as components of catalytic exhaust emission converters into the environment. The determination of these elements can be error prone even when the determinations are carried out by use of highly sensitive methods in combination with high performance sample preparation techniques. Accurate data with smallest possible measurement uncertainties are a prerequisite for the interpretation of the distribution of noble metals in the environment and their possible toxicological effects. Difficulties related to the determination of the noble metals could be the incomplete recovery after sample preparation, sample digestion and interferences arising in subsequent instrumental determination methods. For this reason two different sample decomposition methods in combination with powerful instrumental techniques are checked for suitability for the determination of the noble metals in environmentally relevant samples. Digestion methods under evaluation are the NiS fire assay and the leaching with aqua regia in closed vessels under high pressure and high temperature. The NiS fire assay provides pre-concentration of the noble-metals and matrix separation of most of the remaining matrix elements. Disadvantages of this method are the need for experienced analysts, the awkward handling and the time-consuming procedure. On the other hand leaching with aqua regia under high pressure at high temperatures is easy to handle and not time-consuming with the crucial disadvantage that neither a pre-concentration of the noble metals nor a matrix separation can be achieved. Investigated instrumental techniques are the ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry) with an axially arranged plasma either with a cross-flow or with an ultrasonic nebulizer, the quadrupole ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and the

  2. Size versus polarizability in protein-ligand interactions: binding of noble gases within engineered cavities in phage T4 lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillin, M L; Breyer, W A; Griswold, I J; Matthews, B W

    2000-09-29

    To investigate the relative importance of size and polarizability in ligand binding within proteins, we have determined the crystal structures of pseudo wild-type and cavity-containing mutant phage T4 lysozymes in the presence of argon, krypton, and xenon. These proteins provide a representative sample of predominantly apolar cavities of varying size and shape. Even though the volumes of these cavities range up to the equivalent of five xenon atoms, the noble gases bind preferentially at highly localized sites that appear to be defined by constrictions in the walls of the cavities, coupled with the relatively large radii of the noble gases. The cavities within pseudo wild-type and L121A lysozymes each bind only a single atom of noble gas, while the cavities within mutants L133A and F153A have two independent binding sites, and the L99A cavity has three interacting sites. The binding of noble gases within two double mutants was studied to characterize the additivity of binding at such sites. In general, when a cavity in a protein is created by a "large-to-small" substitution, the surrounding residues relax somewhat to reduce the volume of the cavity. The binding of xenon and, to a lesser degree, krypton and argon, tend to expand the volume of the cavity and to return it closer to what it would have been had no relaxation occurred. In nearly all cases, the extent of binding of the noble gases follows the trend xenon>krypton>argon. Pressure titrations of the L99A mutant have confirmed that the crystallographic occupancies accurately reflect fractional saturation of the binding sites. The trend in noble gas affinity can be understood in terms of the effects of size and polarizability on the intermolecular potential. The plasticity of the protein matrix permits repulsion due to increased ligand size to be more than compensated for by attraction due to increased ligand polarizability. These results have implications for the mechanism of general anesthesia, the migration

  3. Noble gases, nitrogen, and methane from the deep interior to the atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glein, Christopher R.

    2015-04-01

    Titan's thick N2-CH4 atmosphere is unlike any in the Solar System, and its origin has been shrouded in mystery for over half a century. Here, I perform a detailed analysis of chemical and isotopic data from the Cassini-Huygens mission to develop the hypothesis that Titan's (non-photochemical) atmospheric gases came from deep within. It is suggested that Titan's CH4, N2, and noble gases originated in a rocky core buried inside the giant satellite, and hydrothermal and cryovolcanic processes were critical to the creation of Titan's atmosphere. Mass balance and chemical equilibrium calculations demonstrate that all aspects of this hypothesis can be considered geochemically plausible with respect to contemporary observational, experimental, and theoretical knowledge. Specifically, I show that a rocky core with a bulk noble gas content similar to that in CI carbonaceous meteorites would contain sufficient 36Ar and 22Ne to explain their reported abundances. I also show that Henry's law constants for noble gases in relevant condensed phases can be correlated with the size of their atoms, which leads to expected mixing ratios for 84Kr (∼0.2 ppbv) and 132Xe (∼0.01 ppbv) that can explain why these species have yet to be detected (Huygens upper limit serpentinization). I show that sufficient CH4 can be produced to replenish Titan's atmosphere many times over in the face of irreversible photolysis and escape of CH4, which is consistent with the favored model of episodic cryovolcanic outgassing. There should also have been enough NH3 inside Titan so that its thermal decomposition in a hot rocky core can generate the observed atmospheric N2, and if correct this model would imply that Titan's interior has experienced vigorous hydrothermal processing. The similarity in 14N/15N between cometary NH3 and Titan's N2 is consistent with this picture. As for the isotopes in CH4, I show that their observed relative abundances can be explained by low-temperature (∼20 °C) equilibria

  4. Cross-Calibration of Secondary Electron Multiplier in Noble Gas Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santato, Alessandro; Hamilton, Doug; Deerberg, Michael; Wijbrans, Jan; Kuiper, Klaudia; Bouman, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    The latest generation of multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometers has decisively improved the precision in isotopic ratio analysis [1, 2] and helped the scientific community to address new questions [3]. Measuring numerous isotopes simultaneously has two significant advantages: firstly, any fluctuations in signal intensity have no effect on the isotope ratio and secondly, the analysis time is reduced. This particular point becomes very important in static vacuum mass spectrometry where during the analysis, the signal intensity decays and at the same time the background increases. However, when multi-collector analysis is utilized, it is necessary to pay special attention to the cross calibration of the detectors. This is a key point in order to have accurate and reproducible isotopic ratios. In isotope ratio mass spectrometry, with regard to the type of detector (i.e. Faraday or Secondary Electron Multiplier, SEM), analytical technique (TIMS, MC-ICP-MS or IRMS) and isotope system of interest, several techniques are currently applied to cross-calibrate the detectors. Specifically, the gain of the Faraday cups is generally stable and only the associated amplifier must be calibrated. For example, on the Thermo Scientific instrument control systems, the 1011 and 1012 ohm amplifiers can easily be calibrated through a fully software controlled procedure by inputting a constant electric signal to each amplifier sequentially [4]. On the other hand, the yield of the SEMs can drift up to 0.2% / hour and other techniques such as peak hopping, standard-sample bracketing and multi-dynamic measurement must be used. Peak hopping allows the detectors to be calibrated by measuring an ion beam of constant intensity across the detectors whereas standard-sample bracketing corrects the drift of the detectors through the analysis of a reference standard of a known isotopic ratio. If at least one isotopic pair of the sample is known, multi-dynamic measurement can be used; in this

  5. H3(+) as a trap for noble gases-3: multiple trapping of neon, argon, and krypton in X(n)H3(+) (n = 1-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzat, F; Ellinger, Y; Pilmé, J; Mousis, O

    2009-05-07

    Recent studies on the formation of XH(3)(+) noble gas complexes have shown strategic implications for the composition of the atmospheres of the giant planets as well as for the composition of comets. One crucial factor in the astrophysical process is the relative abundances of the noble gases versus H(3)(+). It is the context in which the possibility for clustering with more than one noble gas (X(n)H(3)(+) up to n = 3) has been investigated for noble gases X ranging from neon to krypton. In order to assert our results, a variety of methods have been used including ab initio coupled cluster CCSD and CCSD(T), MP2, and density functional BH&HLYP levels of theory. All complexes with one, two, and three noble gases are found to be stable in the Ne, Ar, and Kr families. These stable structures are planar with the noble gases attached to the apices of the H(3)(+) triangle. The binding energy of the nth atom, defined as the X(n)H(3)(+) --> X(n-1)H(3)(+) + X reaction energy, increases slightly with n varying from 1 to 3 in the neon series, while it decreases in the argon series and shows a minimum for n = 2 in the krypton series. The origin of this phenomenon is to be found in the variations in the respective vibrational energies. A topological analysis of the electron localization function shows the importance of the charge transfer from the noble gases toward H(3)(+) as a driving force in the bonding along the series. It is also consistent with the increase in the atomic polarizabilities from neon to krypton. Rotational constants and harmonic frequencies are reported in order to provide a body of data to be used for the detection in laboratory prior to space observations. This study strongly suggests that the noble gases could be sequestered even in an environment where the H(3)(+) abundance is small.

  6. Conversion of ion-exchange resins, catalysts and sludges to glass with optional noble metal recovery using the GMODS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical processing and cleanup of waste streams (air and water) typically result in products, clean air, clean water, and concentrated hazardous residues (ion exchange resins, catalysts, sludges, etc.). Typically, these streams contain significant quantities of complex organics. For disposal, it is desirable to destroy the organics and immobilize any heavy metals or radioactive components into stable waste forms. If there are noble metals in the residues, it is desirable to recover these for reuse. The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) is a new process that directly converts radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes to borosilicate glass. GMODS oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; converts halides (eg chlorides) to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium halide stream; and recovers noble metals. GMODS has been demonstrated on a small laboratory scale (hundreds of grams), and the equipment needed for larger masses has been identified

  7. Yeast strains role on the sulphur dioxyde combinations of wines obtained from noble rot and raisining grapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Masneuf-Pomarède

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of four industrial and indigenous yeast strains on the sulphur dioxide combinations of wines obtained from noble rot and raisining grapes is studied in different growth of the Sauternes area and one growth in the Jurançon area. The analysis of ketonic compounds (pyruvic acid and 2-oxo-glutaric acid, acetaldehyde and PC50 on the wines clearly showed significant statistical difference between the yeast strains for the sulphur dioxide combination. By adding the same dosage of sulphiting, the free SO2 levels are variable depending on the yeast strain used. One strain (Zymaflore ST, isolated from a spontaneous fermentation of a botrytised must, giving wines with low PC50 values, is well adapted for the noble rot must vinification. The choice of the yeast strain is a parameter of importance to limit the sulphur dioxide amount in the wines.

  8. Use of state-dependent pair potentials in describing the structural and thermodynamic properties of noble gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakse, Noel; Bretonnet, Jean-Louis [Laboratoire de Theorie de la Matiere Condensee, Universite de Metz, 1 Boulevard FD Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France)

    2003-12-08

    Understanding the interatomic interactions in noble gases remains one of the fundamental problems not completely solved to date. From small-angle neutron scattering experiments it is well-known that three-body forces exist and cannot be neglected. On the theoretical side, semi-analytic and simulation methods have been used to reveal the nature of these many-body interactions. The purpose of the present work is to provide an overview of the different three-body contributions to the interactions and their relative importance in describing the structural and thermodynamic properties for noble gases by means of the integral equation theory and molecular dynamics simulations. We examine the relevance of the effective state-dependent pair potential in this framework, as well as the self-consistency problem that we are faced with in the integral equation theory.

  9. Transparent and conductive electrodes by large-scale nano-structuring of noble metal thin-films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jes; Runge Walther, Anders; Wolff, Christian

    2018-01-01

    grid, and nano-wire thin-films. The indium and carbon films do not match the chemical stability nor the electrical performance of the noble metals, and many metal films are not uniform in material distribution leading to significant surface roughness and randomized transmission haze. We demonstrate...... solution-processed masks for physical vapor-deposited metal electrodes consisting of hexagonally ordered aperture arrays with scalable aperture-size and spacing in an otherwise homogeneous noble metal thin-film that may exhibit better electrical performance than carbon nanotube-based thin-films...... for equivalent optical transparency. The fabricated electrodes are characterized optically and electrically by measuring transmittance and sheet resistance. The presented methods yield large-scale reproducible results. Experimentally realized thin-films with very low sheet resistance, Rsh = 2.01 ± 0.14 Ω...

  10. Effects of the pulse-driven magnetic field detuning on the calibration of coil constants while using noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the calibration of coil constants using the Free Induction Decay (FID signal of noble gases, we analyse the effects of the pulse-driven magnetic field detuning on the calibration results. This method is based on the inverse relation between the π/2 pulse duration and its amplitude. We confirmed that obtaining a precise frequency is a prerequisite for ensuring the accuracy of research using the initial amplitude of the FID signal. In this paper, the spin dynamics of noble gases and its time-domain solution under the driving pulse have been discussed with regard to different detuning ranges. Experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical predictions, which indicate the correctness of our theoretical deduction. Therefore, the frequency of the pulse-driven magnetic field is an important factor to the calibration of coil constants, it should be determined with a high degree of accuracy.

  11. Development of Non-Noble Metal Ni-Based Catalysts for Dehydrogenation of Methylcyclohexane

    KAUST Repository

    Al-ShaikhAli, Anaam H.

    2016-11-30

    Liquid organic chemical hydride is a promising candidate for hydrogen storage and transport. Methylcyclohexane (MCH) to toluene (TOL) cycle has been considered as one of the feasible hydrogen carrier systems, but selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL has only been achieved using the noble Pt-based catalysts. The aim of this study is to develop non-noble, cost-effective metal catalysts that can show excellent catalytic performance, mainly maintaining high TOL selectivity achievable by Pt based catalysts. Mono-metallic Ni based catalyst is a well-known dehydrogenation catalyst, but the major drawback with Ni is its hydrogenolysis activity to cleave C-C bonds, which leads to inferior selectivity towards dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL. This study elucidate addition of the second metal to Ni based catalyst to improve the TOL selectivity. Herein, ubiquitous bi-metallic nanoparticles catalysts were investigated including (Ni–M, M: Ag, Zn, Sn or In) based catalysts. Among the catalysts investigated, the high TOL selectivity (> 99%) at low conversions was achieved effectively using the supported NiZn catalyst under flow of excess H2. In this work, a combined study of experimental and computational approaches was conducted to determine the main role of Zn over Ni based catalyst in promoting the TOL selectivity. A kinetic study using mono- and bimetallic Ni based catalysts was conducted to elucidate reaction mechanism and site requirement for MCH dehydrogenation reaction. The impact of different reaction conditions (feed compositions, temperature, space velocity and stability) and catalyst properties were evaluated. This study elucidates a distinctive mechanism of MCH dehydrogenation to TOL reaction over the Ni-based catalysts. Distinctive from Pt catalyst, a nearly positive half order with respect to H2 pressure was obtained for mono- and bi-metallic Ni based catalysts. This kinetic data was consistent with rate determining step as (somewhat paradoxically) hydrogenation

  12. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid in nitrite-containing simulated nuclear waste media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Wiemers, K.D.

    1994-08-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) feed containing the major non-radioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO 3 2- , NO 3 -, and NO 2 - were used as media to evaluate the stability of formic acid towards hydrogen evolution by the reaction HCO 2 H → H 2 + CO 2 catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Small scale experiments using 40-50 mL of feed simulant in closed glass reactors (250-550 mL total volume) at 80-100 degree C were used to study the effect of nitrite and nitrate ion on the catalytic activities of the noble metals for formic acid decomposition. Reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO 2 , H 2 , NO, and N 2 O in the gas phase as a function of time. Rhodium, which was introduced as soluble RhCl 3 ·3H 2 O, was found to be the most active catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid above ∼80 degree C in the presence of nitrite ion in accord with earlier observations. The inherent homogeneous nature of the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed formic acid decomposition is suggested by the approximate pseudo first-order dependence of the hydrogen production rate on Rh concentration. Titration of the typical feed simulants containing carbonate and nitrite with formic acid in the presence of rhodium at the reaction temperature (∼90 degree C) indicates that the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid occurs only after formic acid has reacted with all of the carbonate and nitrite present to form CO 2 and NO/N 2 O, respectively. The catalytic activities of Ru and Pd towards hydrogen generation from formic acid are quite different than those of Rh in that they are inhibited rather than promoted by the presence of nitrite ion

  13. The Emblems of the Album of the Ljubljana Noble Society of St Dismas: Context, Sources, Originality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Germ

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the sources for the iconography of emblems in the Album of the Ljubljana Noble Society of St Dismas (Archive of the Republic of Slovenia, ref. AS 1073, I/1 that has not yet been systematically addressed. The Album is a kind of memorial book of the Ljubljana Noble Society of St Dismas or Academia Unitorum, displaying the coats of arms, emblems and important data of their members. The book with exquisite full page illuminations is the most important illuminated manuscript of the Baroque era that survives in Slovenia. Recent research shows, that the idea of the academic memorial book and its concept are modelled on the Memorie, imprese, e ritratti de’ signori Accademici Gelati de Bologna published in Bologna in 1672. Due to the specific context of the Album as a memorial book of St Dismas Society and a clearly articulated ambition of the patrons to create original individualized emblems, it is not easy to identify the possible sources let alone detect the direct influence. There are several emblem books to be taken into consideration and Alciati’s Emblematum liber appears to be a valuable source of inspiration. However, the research in Renaissance and Baroque books of emblems shows that it is actually Mundus Symbolicus by Filippo Picinelli (first published as Mondo simbolico, Milan 1653 which seems to be of vital importance for the creators of the Album. Since the proud members desired original and personalized emblems, it was only natural to rely upon a popular encyclopaedic work with a huge collection of systematically arranged descriptions of emblems. Picinelli’s book is actually a treasure-trove of ideas instigating new designs both in the sense of symbolic message and visual solutions, while the almost complete absence of illustrations prevents a simple reproduction of emblems. Due to their commitment to originality and the respect of the principles of St Dismas Society the members obviously found the traditional

  14. NG09 And CTBT On-Site Inspection Noble Gas Sampling and Analysis Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Tanaka, Junichi

    2010-05-01

    A provision of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) allows on-site inspections (OSIs) of suspect nuclear sites to determine if the occurrence of a detected event is nuclear in origin. For an underground nuclear explosion (UNE), the potential success of an OSI depends significantly on the containment scenario of the alleged event as well as the application of air and soil-gas radionuclide sampling techniques in a manner that takes into account both the suspect site geology and the gas transport physics. UNE scenarios may be broadly divided into categories involving the level of containment. The simplest to detect is a UNE that vents a significant portion of its radionuclide inventory and is readily detectable at distance by the International Monitoring System (IMS). The most well contained subsurface events will only be detectable during an OSI. In such cases, 37 Ar and radioactive xenon cavity gases may reach the surface through either "micro-seepage" or the barometric pumping process and only the careful siting of sampling locations, timing of sampling and application of the most site-appropriate atmospheric and soil-gas capturing methods will result in a confirmatory signal. The OSI noble gas field tests NG09 was recently held in Stupava, Slovakia to consider, in addition to other field sampling and analysis techniques, drilling and subsurface noble gas extraction methods that might be applied during an OSI. One of the experiments focused on challenges to soil-gas sampling near the soil-atmosphere interface. During withdrawal of soil gas from shallow, subsurface sample points, atmospheric dilution of the sample and the potential for introduction of unwanted atmospheric gases were considered. Tests were designed to evaluate surface infiltration and the ability of inflatable well-packers to seal out atmospheric gases during sample acquisition. We discuss these tests along with some model-based predictions regarding infiltration under different near

  15. Microstructures, mineral chemistry, noble gases and nitrogen in the recent fall, Bhuka iron (IAB) meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, S. V. S.; Ranjith, P. M.; Ray, Dwijesh; Ghosh, S.; Chattopadhyay, Basab; Shrivastava, K. L.

    2016-10-01

    We report some chemical, petrological and isotopic studies of the Bhuka iron meteorite that fell in Rajasthan, India in 2005. Numerous silicate and graphite inclusions are visible on the surface of the hand specimen. In the polished and etched surface studied, irregular patches of graphite are found as the most dominant inclusion and commonly associated with pure corundum (95 wt% Al2O3), spinel, feldspar and Si-rich phases. Apart from typical lamellar intergrowth with kamacite (i.e. the Widmänstatten pattern), taenites are also commonly found to occur as a rim of the graphite inclusions. P-rich (up to 10 wt%) taenites are also found locally within the recrystallised kamacite matrix. Based on mineralogy, texture and bulk composition, Bhuka resembles the low-Ni IAB subgroup (ungrouped). Noble gas isotope studies suggest He, Ne and Ar are mostly of cosmogenic origin, while Kr and Xe are a mixture of cosmogenic, radiogenic and trapped components. A pre-atmospheric radius of 10±1 cm and a cosmic ray exposure age of 346±52 Ma are derived based on depth dependant (3He/4He)c and 38Arc respectively, as per the production systematics of cosmogenic noble gas isotopes (Ammon et al., 2009). Cosmogenic 83Kr and 126Xe yield production rates of 12 and 0.335 (in 10-15ccSTP/g Ma) for 83Kr and 126Xe respectively. Presence of trapped Kr and Xe, with (84Kr/132Xe)t=2 and radiogenic 129Xe=120×10-12 ccSTP/g are due to presence of graphite/silicate inclusions in the analysed sample. Over 150% excess 131Xec than expected from spallation suggests contribution from (n,ɤ) reactions from Ba from inclusions and suggests irradiation of pre-atmospheric object in a larger body, indicative of complex irradiation. Trapped N of 24 ppm, with δ15N=-10.7±0.8‰ observed in Bhuka, is heavier than the range observed hither to in IAB irons.

  16. Knowledge about genetically modified food: a study with supermarket clients situated in noble area of Fortaleza city - doi:10.5020/18061230.2004.p72

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Gondim Calvasina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transgenic foods had appeared as result of the scientific and technological advances of genetic engineering applied to agriculture, configuring themselves in a current quarrel and sufficient controversy, about how much the benefits and curses brought to the consumers and the proper environment. In this intention, this study has as objective to verify the level of knowledge of customers of a supermarket of the noble area of the city of Fortaleza, on the thematic of the transgenic. Questionnaires structuralized with questions on transgenic foods with consumers of a situated supermarket in noble area of the city of Fortaleza in the period of March of 2003 had been applied. Sixty consumers had participated of the study who at the moment were making purchases in the supermarket. It was presented the end of the interview, to each consumer, a list of products, removed of the guide of the transgenic food consumer and not transgenic, available on the Greenpeace. In each list, people would have to recognize or not products of its habitual consumption. It was verified that 50% of the interviewed people had higher level of school knowledge, with 63,3% answering that they knew what transgenic foods are; 53,3% always look at the label during the purchase, being that the majority (76,7% never saw, in the label, mention if the product is or not transgenic. It was evidenced, when interrogating on the possible risks to the health, that 33.3% find that they cause illnesses, however 51.7% would not be imported in consuming them. The opinion of the people regarding the release of these products is major (73,3% in agreeing that the Federal Government must wait more research. From the list of products presented to the interviewed, 60% had told that they consume enter 5 to 9 products. It was evidenced that still a lack knowledge exists on the presence of transgenic in industrialized products, as well as how much to the risks consuming it. It has necessity of

  17. The determination, by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry, of noble and base metals in matte-leach residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austen, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    An accurate and precise method is described for the determination of noble and base metals in matte-leach residues. Preparation of the samples essentially involves fusion with sodium peroxide in a zirconium crucible and leaching with hydrochloric and nitric acids. Matrix correction and calibration are achieved by use of the single-standard calibration method with reference solutions prepared from pure metals or from compounds of the element to be determined

  18. The degassing history of the Earth: Noble gas studies of Archaean cherts and zero age glassy submarine basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, R.; Hogan, L.

    1985-01-01

    Recent noble gas studies suggests the Earth's atmosphere outgassed from the Earth's upper mantle synchronous with sea floor spreading, ocean ridge hydrothermal activity and the formation of continents by partial melting in subduction zones. The evidence for formation of the atmosphere by outgassing of the mantle is the presence of radionuclides H3.-4, Ar-040 and 136 Xe-136 in the atmosphere that were produced from K-40, U and Th in the mantle. How these radionuclides were formed is reviewed.

  19. Catalytic activity of polypyrrole nanotubes decorated with noble-metal nanoparticles and their conversion to carbonized analogues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sapurina, Irina; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Šeděnková, Ivana; Trchová, Miroslava; Kovářová, Jana; Hromádková, Jiřina; Kopecká, J.; Cieslar, M.; Abu El-Nasr, A.; Ayad, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 214, April (2016), s. 14-22 ISSN 0379-6779 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00270S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14199; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : conducting polymer * polypyrrole nanotubes * noble metals Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.435, year: 2016

  20. Detection of low-level environmental exposure rates due to noble gas releases from the Muehleberg nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarnecki, J.; Volkle, H.; Pretre, S.

    1980-01-01

    The increase of radiation doses in the vicinity of the Swiss Nuclear Power Stations due to airborne releases is generally expected to be below one mrem/year (about one percent of the natural radiation dose). To prove this expected rate, long term measurements with pressure ionization chambers in the vicinity of the Muhleberg plant (BWR) were conducted. Two of these chambers were installed at places where the greatest dose rates from the noble gas plumes were expected in the two prevailing wind directions. The local dose rates were continuously registered on magnetic tape to allow minicomputer evaluation. After the fuel change in the summer of 1976 the noble gas releases from Muhleberg dropped considerably. From that time the noble gas releases consisted of a very low continuous component and some rare short-time spike compoments resulting from turbine and reactor trips. The dose due to the low continuous component was determined by correlating the dose rates at the measuring points with the release measure--ments at the stack and with weather conditions, and by subtracting the natural background. The short noble gas spikes lasted from minutes to some hours and caused small dose rate increases which were easily measured with the ionization chambers, and usually amounted to doses of some microroentgens. By further correlating these dose peaks with wind direction and stack emission measurements, determination of short time atmospheric dilution factors for existing weather situations became possible. By this process, the very low annual environmental doses in the range of 1 mrem per year were determined. (author)

  1. Submarine Alkalic Lavas Around the Hawaiian Hotspot; Plume and Non-Plume Signatures Determined by Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyu, T.; Clague, D. A.; Kaneoka, I.; Dunai, T. J.; Davies, G. R.

    2004-12-01

    Noble gas isotopic ratios were determined for submarine alkalic volcanic rocks distributed around the Hawaiian islands to constrain the origin of such alkalic volcanism. Samples were collected by dredging or using submersibles from the Kauai Channel between Oahu and Kauai, north of Molokai, northwest of Niihau, Southwest Oahu, South Arch and North Arch volcanic fields. Sites located downstream from the center of the hotspot have 3He/4He ratios close to MORB at about 8 Ra, demonstrating that the magmas erupted at these sites had minimum contribution of volatiles from a mantle plume. In contrast, the South Arch, located upstream of the hotspot on the Hawaiian Arch, has 3He/4He ratios between 17 and 21 Ra, indicating a strong plume influence. Differences in noble gas isotopic characteristics between alkalic volcanism downstream and upstream of the hotspot imply that upstream volcanism contains incipient melts from an upwelling mantle plume, having primitive 3He/4He. In combination with lithophile element isotopic data, we conclude that the most likely source of the upstream magmatism is depleted asthenospheric mantle that has been metasomatised by incipient melt from a mantle plume. After major melt extraction from the mantle plume during production of magmas for the shield stage, the plume material is highly depleted in noble gases and moderately depleted in lithophile elements. Partial melting of the depleted mantle impregnated by melts derived from this volatile depleted plume source may explain the isotopic characteristics of the downstream alkalic magmatism.

  2. Screening metal-organic frameworks for selective noble gas adsorption in air: effect of pore size and framework topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Marie V; Staiger, Chad L; Perry, John J; Allendorf, Mark D; Greathouse, Jeffery A

    2013-06-21

    The adsorption of noble gases and nitrogen by sixteen metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) was investigated using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. The MOFs were chosen to represent a variety of net topologies, pore dimensions, and metal centers. Three commercially available MOFs (HKUST-1, AlMIL-53, and ZIF-8) and PCN-14 were also included for comparison. Experimental adsorption isotherms, obtained from volumetric and gravimetric methods, were used to compare krypton, argon, and nitrogen uptake with the simulation results. Simulated trends in gas adsorption and predicted selectivities among the commercially available MOFs are in good agreement with experiment. In the low pressure regime, the expected trend of increasing adsorption with increasing noble gas polarizabilty is seen. For each noble gas, low pressure adsorption correlates with several MOF properties, including free volume, topology, and metal center. Additionally, a strong correlation exists between the Henry's constant and the isosteric heat of adsorption for all gases and MOFs considered. Finally, we note that the simulated and experimental gas selectivities demonstrated by this small set of MOFs show improved performance compared to similar values reported for zeolites.

  3. Noble gases in basalt glasses from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge topographic high at 14deg N - geodynamic consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudacher, T.; Sarda, P.; Richardson, S.H.; Allegre, C.J.; Sagna, I.; Dmitriev, L.V.

    1989-01-01

    We present a complete noble gas study of mid-oceanic ridge basalt glasses (MORB) from a small ridge segment, centered on an along-strike topographic elevation of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at about 14deg N. We have found the highest 40 Ar/ 36 Ar ratio ever observed for a MORB glass, i.e. 28,150±330 for sample 2ΠD40, correlated with high 129 Xe/ 130 Xe ratios and the highest noble gas concentrations in a so-called popping-rock, labeled 2ΠD43. The latter sample displays a 4 He/ 40 Ar * ratio of 2.0-2.7, which is close to the production ratio in the mantle due to the radioactive decay of U, Th and K. Hence, this sample probably best represents the elemental noble gas ratios in the mantle, from which we have computed the 4 He concentration in the mantle source of MORB to be 1.5x10 -5 cm 3 STP g -1 . High 4 He/ 3 He ratios in two of the samples from the summit of the topographic high indicate the presence of a U, Th-rich component in the mantle source, possibly old subducted oceanic crust and/or sediments, which could originate in the so-called mesosphere boundary layer. (orig.)

  4. Visible light active TiO{sub 2} films prepared by electron beam deposition of noble metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Xinggang, E-mail: hou226@163.co [Department of Physics, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Ma Jun [Department of Physics, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Liu Andong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li Dejun; Huang Meidong; Deng Xiangyun [Department of Physics, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2010-03-15

    TiO{sub 2} films prepared by sol-gel method were modified by electron beam deposition of noble metals (Pt, Pd, and Ag). Effects of noble metals on the chemical and surface characteristics of the films were studied using XPS, TEM and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques. Photocatalytic activity of modified TiO{sub 2} films was evaluated by studying the degradation of methyl orange dye solution under visible light UV irradiation. The result of TEM reveals that most of the surface area of TiO{sub 2} is covered by tiny particles of noble metals with diameter less than 1 nm. Broad red shift of UV-Visible absorption band of modified photocatalysts was observed. The catalytic degradation of methyl orange in aqueous solutions under visible light illumination demonstrates a significant enhancement of photocatalytic activity of these films compared with the un-loaded films. The photocatalytic efficiency of modified TiO{sub 2} films by this method is affected by the concentration of impregnating solution.

  5. Santa Lucia (2008) (L6) Chondrite, a Recent Fall: Composition, Noble Gases, Nitrogen and Cosmic Ray Exposure Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ramakant R.; Varela, Maria Eugenia; Joron, Jean Louis

    2016-04-01

    The Santa Lucia (2008)—one the most recent Argentine meteorite fall, fell in San Juan province, Argentina, on 23 January 2008. Several masses (total ~6 kg) were recovered. Most are totally covered by fusion crust. The exposed interior is of light-grey colour. Chemical data [olivine (Fa24.4) and low-Ca pyroxene (En77.8 Fs20.7 Wo1.6)] indicate that Santa Luica (2008) is a member of the low iron L chondrite group, corresponding to the equilibrated petrologic type 6. The meteorite name was approved by the Nomenclature Committee (NomCom) of the Meteoritical Society (Meteoritic Bulletin, no. 97). We report about the chemical composition of the major mineral phases, its bulk trace element abundance, its noble gas and nitrogen data. The cosmic ray exposure age based on cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar around 20 Ma is comparable to one peak of L chondrites. The radiogenic K-Ar age of 2.96 Ga, while the young U, Th-He are of 1.2 Ga indicates that Santa Lucia (2008) lost radiogenic 4He more recently. Low cosmogenic (22Ne/21Ne)c and absence of solar wind noble gases are consistent with irradiation in a large body. Heavy noble gases (Ar/Kr/Xe) indicated trapped gases similar to ordinary chondrites. Krypton and neon indicates irradiation in large body, implying large pre-atmospheric meteoroid.

  6. Estimation of groundwater residence time and evaluation of geomorphological processes using cosmogenic and terrigenic radionuclides and isotopes of noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahara, Yasunori; Ohta, Tomoko; Igarashi, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the estimation of groundwater residence time and geomorphological changing processes are discussed by focusing on isotopes of noble gases and radionuclides with a long half-life as an environmental tracer. Noble gases and radionuclides are produced in the atmospheric air and terrestrial rocks by spallation and various muon reactions during cosmic rays irradiation. Groundwater dating and geomorphological changing are estimated from changes in the number of atoms of cosmogenic and terrigenic nuclides in groundwater and terrestrial rock. The main tools of groundwater dating are combination of the dissolved helium and tritium (half-life T 1/2 =12.3 y) for younger groundwater less than 60 years of residence time, and of the dissolved helium and 36 Cl (T 1/2 =3.01 x 10 5 y) for older groundwater over million years. On the other hand, the main tools on the geomorphological changes are the estimation of exposure time using cosmogenic radionuclides ( 10 Be(half-life T 1/2 =1.6 x 10 6 y), 14 C (T 1/2 =5730 y), 26 Al (T 1/2 =7.16 x 10 5 y) and 36 Cl) and cosmogenic stable noble gases ( 3 He and 21 Ne) produced in rock. (author)

  7. Detection of Noble Gas Radionuclides from an Underground Nuclear Explosion During a CTBT On-Site Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Sun, Yunwei

    2014-03-01

    The development of a technically sound approach to detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is a critical component of the on-site inspection (OSI) protocol under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. In this context, we are investigating a variety of technical challenges that have a significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments—a lesson we learned previously from the non-proliferation experiment (NPE). Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied by field experiments, making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated and complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that addresses some of the sampling challenges discussed here.

  8. Noble metal (NM) behavior during simulated HLLW vitrification in induction melter with cold crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demin, A.V.; Matyunin, Y.I.; Fedorova, M.I.

    1995-01-01

    The investigation of noble metal (Ru, Rh, Pd) properties in, glass melts are connected with their specific behaviors during HLLW vitrification. Ruthenium, rhodium and palladium volatilities and heterogeneous platinoid phases forming on melts are investigated in reasonable details conformably to Joule's heating ceramic melters. The vitrification conditions in melters with induction heating of melts are differ from the vitrification ones in ceramic melters on some numbers of parameters (the availability of significant temperature gradients and convection flows in melts, short time of molten mass updating in melter and probability of definite interaction between high-frequency field and melt inhomogeneities). The results of simulated HLLW solidification modelling of the vitrification process in induction melter with cold crucible to produce phosphate and boron-silicate materials are presented. The properties of received glasses and behavior of platinoids are shown to have analogies and distinctions in comparison with compounds, synthesized in ceramic melter. The structures of dispersed particles of NM heterogeneous phases forming in glass melts prepared in induction melter with cold crucible are identified. The results of investigations show, that the marked distinctions between two processes can influence (in definite degree) as on property of synthesized materials, as on behavior of platinoid during vitrifications

  9. Shock Compression Response of the Light Noble Gases: Neon and Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth; Shulenburger, Luke; Cochrane, Kyle; Lopez, Andrew; Shelton, Keegan; Villalva, Jose; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Understanding material behavior at extreme conditions is important to a wide range of processes in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Modeling the high pressure - high temperature processes requires robust equations of state (EOS). For many materials, EOS models have been developed using low-pressure Hugoniot data. Assumptions are made to extrapolate the EOS models to Mbar pressure regimes, leading to different model behavior at extreme conditions. In this work, we examine the high pressure response of the light noble gases: neon and helium in the multi-Mbar regime. We perform a series of shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine on cryogenically cooled liquids of Ne (26 K) and He (2.2 K) to measure the Hugoniot and reshock states. In parallel, we use density functional theory methods to calculate the Hugoniot and reshock states. The experiments validated the DFT simulations and the combined experimental and simulation results are used to assess the EOS models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Production yields of noble-gas isotopes from ISOLDE UC$_{x}$/graphite targets

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, U C; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Diget, C A; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Gausemel, H; Georg, U; Giles, T; Hagebø, E; Jeppesen, H B; Jonsson, O C; Köster, U; Lettry, Jacques; Nilsson, T; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Riisager, K; Weissman, L; Äystö, J

    2003-01-01

    Yields of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe isotopic chains were measured from UC$_{x}$/graphite and ThC$_{x}$/graphite targets at the PSB-ISOLDE facility at CERN using isobaric selectivity achieved by the combination of a plasma-discharge ion source with a water-cooled transfer line. %The measured half-lives allowed %to calculate the decay losses of neutron-rich isotopes in the %target and ion-source system, and thus to obtain information on the in-target %productions from the measured yields. The delay times measured for a UC$_x$/graphite target allow for an extrapolation to the expected yields of very neutron-rich noble gas isotopes, in particular for the ``NuPECC reference elements'' Ar and Kr, at the next-generation radioactive ion-beam facility EURISOL. \\end{abstract} \\begin{keyword} % keywords here, in the form: keyword \\sep keyword radioactive ion beams \\sep release \\sep ion yields \\sep ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) \\sep uranium and thorium carbide targets. % PACS codes here, in the form: \\PACS code \\sep code...

  11. An Amorphous Noble-Metal-Free Electrocatalyst that Enables Nitrogen Fixation under Ambient Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chade; Yan, Chunshuang; Chen, Gang; Ding, Yu; Sun, Jingxue; Zhou, Yansong; Yu, Guihua

    2018-02-23

    N 2 fixation by the electrocatalytic nitrogen reduction reaction (NRR) under ambient conditions is regarded as a potential approach to achieve NH 3 production, which still heavily relies on the Haber-Bosch process at the cost of huge energy and massive production of CO 2 . A noble-metal-free Bi 4 V 2 O 11 /CeO 2 hybrid with an amorphous phase (BVC-A) is used as the cathode for electrocatalytic NRR. The amorphous Bi 4 V 2 O 11 contains significant defects, which play a role as active sites. The CeO 2 not only serves as a trigger to induce the amorphous structure, but also establishes band alignment with Bi 4 V 2 O 11 for rapid interfacial charge transfer. Remarkably, BVC-A shows outstanding electrocatalytic NRR performance with high average yield (NH 3 : 23.21 μg h -1  mg -1 cat. , Faradaic efficiency: 10.16 %) under ambient conditions, which is superior to the Bi 4 V 2 O 11 /CeO 2 hybrid with crystalline phase (BVC-C) counterpart. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Characterisation and behaviour of Ti/TiO2/noble metal anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueneau de Mussy, Jean-Paul; Macpherson, Julie V.; Delplancke, Jean-Luc

    2003-01-01

    The morphology, composition and the electrical and electrochemical behaviour of the anodic microporous layer, prepared by the galvanostatic anodisation of Ti after sparking, followed by galvanostatic deposition of Pt or Ir have been investigated. These electrodes are proposed to function as dimensionally stable anodes (DSAs). For Ti/TiO 2 /Pt electrodes, Pt is deposited within some of the micropores of the oxide film. In contrast, for Ti/TiO 2 /Ir, the metal is deposited preferentially on the top surface. This difference is thought to result from the position of the metal deposition potential with respect to the flat band potential of n-TiO 2 . Optical imaging of both types of DSA suggests that only a few sites on the surface are responsible for electron exchange at the DSA-electrolyte interface. C-AFM measurements of Ti/TiO 2 /Pt samples subjected to long-term anodic polarisation, suggest that the Ti-noble metal contact is progressively insulated by thickening of the TiO 2 barrier layer, promoting passivation of the DSA. For Ir coated anodes, catalytic activity is directly related to the presence of Ir and to the stability of the catalytic oxide layer. Under Cu electrowinning conditions, the electrochemically formed hydrated Ir oxide was found to be catalytically less stable, than the iridium oxide film subjected to a heat treatment

  13. ANNUAL ACTIVITY OF THE NOBLE CRAYFISH (ASTACUS ASTACUS IN THE ORLJAVA RIVER (CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FALLER M.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the annual activity of the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus at three sites along the Orljava River, in the continental part of Croatia, between August 2003 and September 2004. Each site represented the typical characteristics of the upper, middle and lower section of the river (5, 24 and 37 km from the spring, respectively. The biggest population size was recorded on the most upstream site, with greatest structural variability of bottom, high biotic index, and the lowest mean water temperature. Males dominated in catch during the whole research period (total sex ratio was 1.77 males: 1 female. The number of caught crayfish fluctuated during the year and their activity was positively correlated with the water temperature. The crayfish catch within the two downstream sites was dramatically lower in the autumn 2004 then the year before. No obvious reason could be found; therefore we concluded that this was probably result of natural fluctuations in population. Males were significantly longer than females on all three sites. Males and females had similar percentages of injuries, mainly on claws and antennae. Crayfish were active during the whole year, even when water temperature was just 1°C. Phases of life cycle (moulting, active cement glands, mating, hatchlings occurred a month later in our population than in the Northern Europe populations, probably as a consequence of differences in the climate.

  14. Study of Thermodynamics of Liquid Noble-Metals Alloys Through a Pseudopotential Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    2010-01-01

    The Gibbs-Bogoliubov (GB) inequality is applied to investigate the thermodynamic properties of some equiatomic noble metal alloys in liquid phase such as Au-Cu, Ag-Cu, and Ag-Au using well recognized pseudopotential formalism. For description of the structure, well known Percus-Yevick (PY) hard sphere model is used as a reference system. By applying a variation method the best hard core diameters have been found which correspond to minimum free energy. With this procedure the thermodynamic properties such as entropy and heat of mixing have been computed. The influence of local field correction function viz; Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F), and Sarkar et al. (S) is also investigated. The computed results of the excess entropy compares favourably in the case of liquid alloys while the agreement with experiment is poor in the case of heats of mixing. This may be due to the sensitivity of the heats of mixing with the potential parameters and the dielectric function. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. Titanium-Niobium Oxides as Non-Noble Metal Cathodes for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akimitsu Ishihara

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop noble-metal- and carbon-free cathodes, titanium-niobium oxides were prepared as active materials for oxide-based cathodes and the factors affecting the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR activity were evaluated. The high concentration sol-gel method was employed to prepare the precursor. Heat treatment in Ar containing 4% H2 at 700–900 °C was effective for conferring ORR activity to the oxide. Notably, the onset potential for the ORR of the catalyst prepared at 700 °C was approximately 1.0 V vs. RHE, resulting in high quality active sites for the ORR. X-ray (diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopic analyses and ionization potential measurements suggested that localized electronic energy levels were produced via heat treatment under reductive atmosphere. Adsorption of oxygen molecules on the oxide may be governed by the localized electronic energy levels produced by the valence changes induced by substitutional metal ions and/or oxygen vacancies.

  16. EXTERNAL PHOTOEVAPORATION OF THE SOLAR NEBULA: JUPITER's NOBLE GAS ENRICHMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monga, Nikhil; Desch, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We present a model explaining the elemental enrichments in Jupiter's atmosphere, particularly the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe. While He, Ne, and O are depleted, seven other elements show similar enrichments (∼3 times solar, relative to H). Being volatile, Ar is difficult to fractionate from H 2 . We argue that external photoevaporation by far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from nearby massive stars removed H 2 , He, and Ne from the solar nebula, but Ar and other species were retained because photoevaporation occurred at large heliocentric distances where temperatures were cold enough (≲ 30 K) to trap them in amorphous water ice. As the solar nebula lost H, it became relatively and uniformly enriched in other species. Our model improves on the similar model of Guillot and Hueso. We recognize that cold temperatures alone do not trap volatiles; continuous water vapor production is also necessary. We demonstrate that FUV fluxes that photoevaporated the disk generated sufficient water vapor in regions ≲ 30 K to trap gas-phase species in amorphous water ice in solar proportions. We find more efficient chemical fractionation in the outer disk: whereas the model of Guillot and Hueso predicts a factor of three enrichment when only <2% of the disk mass remains, we find the same enrichments when 30% of the disk mass remains. Finally, we predict the presence of ∼0.1 M ⊕ of water vapor in the outer solar nebula and protoplanetary disks in H II regions

  17. Ab initio study of the trapping of polonium on noble metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijpstra, Kim; Van Yperen-De Deyne, Andy; Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Neuhausen, Jörg; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Cottenier, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    In the future MYRRHA reactor, lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) will be used both as coolant and as spallation target. Due to the high neutron flux a small fraction of the bismuth will transmute to radiotoxic 210Po. Part of this radiotoxic element will evaporate into the gas above the coolant. Extracting it from the gas phase is necessary to ensure a safe handling of the reactor. An issue in the development of suitable filters is the lack of accurate knowledge on the chemical interaction between a candidate filter material and either elemental polonium or polonium containing molecules. Experimental work on this topic is complicated by the high radiotoxicity of polonium. Therefore, we present in this paper a first-principles study on the adsorption of polonium on noble metals as filter materials. The adsorption of monoatomic Po is considered on the candidate filter materials palladium, platinum, silver and gold. The case of the gold filter is looked upon in more detail by examining how bismuth pollution affects its capability to capture polonium and by studying the adsorption of the heavy diatomic molecules Po2, PoBi and PoPb on this gold filter.

  18. Energy and resolution calibration of detectors for noble gas β-γ coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Huaimao; Wang Shilian; Li Qi; Wang Jun; Zhao Yungang; Zhang Xinjun; Fan Yuanqing

    2010-01-01

    The β-γ coincidence technique is a kind of important method to detect radioactive xenon isotopes for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty(CTBT). The energy and resolution calibration of detectors is the first key technique. This paper describes in detail the energy and resolution calibration methods of NaI (Tl) and plastic scintillator detectors for the noble gas β-γ coincidence system SAUNA II-Lab. NaI (Tl) detector's energy and resolution for γ-ray were calibrated with γ radioactive point sources. Plastic scintillator detector's energy and resolution for β-ray were calibrated by Compton scattering electrons of 137 Cs 661.66 keV γ-ray. And the results of β-ray energy resolution calibrated by Compton scattering electrons of 137 Cs were compared with the results of conversion electron of 131 Xe m . In conclusion,it is an easy and feasible method of calibrating plastic scintillator detector's energy by Compton scattering electrons of 137 Cs,but detector's resolution calibrated by Compton scattering electrons is higher than factual result. (authors)

  19. Assessing the importance of food for improving noble crayfish culture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusch J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Captive breeding and crayfish culture are considered important measures in species protection activities. Thus, knowledge on optimal feeding of crayfish in captivity is needed in order to secure minimal mortality and prevent detrimental effects to health. To optimize conditions of crayfish prior to subsequent stocking, feeding trials were conducted with the aim of investigating the connection between food intake, food preference and temperature under near natural conditions. During a five-month period, noble crayfish were fed on fish, carrots, algae and chironomid-larvae according to a pre-defined rotation system, whereby the ambient water temperature ranged from 5 °C to 13 °C, following the natural temperature regime. The results of these feeding trials demonstrate a direct correlation between rising temperature and increasing food intake for water temperatures exceeding 8 °C. Food intake is further influenced by the variety of food items available at any one time. The results also confirm that Astacus astacus has a strong preference for fish and that alternation of food types has an impact on consumption. Our results prompt the following recommendations for optimized feeding conditions of crayfish in captivity prior to their release: (1 a balanced diet containing not only plant tissue but also a significant proportion of animal tissue and (2 the amount of available food must be adjusted according to the carapace length of the crayfish.

  20. Laser heating of large noble gas clusters: from the resonant to the relativistic interaction regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumbrell, E T; Moore, A S; Clark, E L; Garbett, W J; Comley, A J; Edwards, R D; Eagleton, R E [Plasma Physics Division, AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Lazarus, J A; Nilson, P M; Robinson, J S; Hohenberger, M; Symes, D R; Smith, R A [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Clarke, R J [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: edward.gumbrell@awe.co.uk, E-mail: r.a.smith@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-12-15

    Wide-ranging measurements of sub-picosecond laser interactions with large noble gas cluster targets have been conducted in order to help clarify the nature and extent of the underlying laser-plasma heating. Within the sub-relativistic vacuum irradiance range of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} W cm{sup -2}, we find that electron temperatures measured with continuum x-ray spectroscopy exhibit a pronounced multi-keV enhancement. Analysis indicates this behaviour to be consistent with collisional or collisionless resonant heating mechanisms. We also present the first measurements of laser-to-cluster energy deposition at relativistic vacuum irradiances, our data demonstrating absorption fractions of 90% or more. Optical probing was used to resolve the onset of a supersonic ionization front resulting from this very high absorption, and shows that despite significant pre-focus heating, the greatest plasma energy densities can be generated about the vacuum focus position. Electron energy spectra measurements confirm that laser-plasma super-heating occurs, and together with ion data establish that relativistic laser-plasma coupling in atomic clusters can take place without significant MeV particle beam production. In conjunction with optical self-emission data, the optical probing also indicates laser pre-pulse effects at peak vacuum irradiance of 5 x 10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}. Laser absorption, plasma heating and energy transport data are supported throughout with analytical and numerical modelling.

  1. Ab initio study of the trapping of polonium on noble metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijpstra, Kim; Van Yperen-De Deyne, Andy [Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM), Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Ghent (Belgium); Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Neuhausen, Jörg [Laboratory for Radiochemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique [Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM), Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Ghent (Belgium); Cottenier, Stefaan, E-mail: stefaan.cottenier@ugent.be [Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM), Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Ghent (Belgium); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-04-15

    In the future MYRRHA reactor, lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) will be used both as coolant and as spallation target. Due to the high neutron flux a small fraction of the bismuth will transmute to radiotoxic {sup 210}Po. Part of this radiotoxic element will evaporate into the gas above the coolant. Extracting it from the gas phase is necessary to ensure a safe handling of the reactor. An issue in the development of suitable filters is the lack of accurate knowledge on the chemical interaction between a candidate filter material and either elemental polonium or polonium containing molecules. Experimental work on this topic is complicated by the high radiotoxicity of polonium. Therefore, we present in this paper a first-principles study on the adsorption of polonium on noble metals as filter materials. The adsorption of monoatomic Po is considered on the candidate filter materials palladium, platinum, silver and gold. The case of the gold filter is looked upon in more detail by examining how bismuth pollution affects its capability to capture polonium and by studying the adsorption of the heavy diatomic molecules Po{sub 2}, PoBi and PoPb on this gold filter.

  2. REINTRODUCTION OF NOBLE CRAYFISH ASTACUS ASTACUS AFTER CRAYFISH PLAGUE IN NORWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAUGBØL T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Glomma and Halden watercourses in Norway were hit by crayfish plague in 1987 and 1989. Reintroduction of the noble crayfish started in 1989 in the Glomma and in 1995 in the Halden watercourse. Norway has especially good conditions for reintroduction of the native crayfish after crayfish plague, as there is no alien plague-carrying crayfish species in the country. In the Glomma watercourse, approx. 15 000 adult crayfish and 10 000 juveniles have been stocked while in the Halden watercourse the figures are 19 000 adults and 26 500 juveniles. All stocking sites were previously regarded as very good crayfish localities. Four years after stocking, natural recruitment was recorded at all adult crayfish stocking sites in the Glomma watercourse and at most sites in the Halden watercourse. Current crayfish density is, however, much lower than pre-plague densities even at the sites where population development has been in progress for more than 10 years. Extensive post-stocking movements were recorded among adult crayfish. Some sites seemed more suitable for settling, resulting in a great variation in CPUE between the different test-fishing sites. Juveniles seem more appropriate as stocking material if the goal is to re-establish a population in a particular area, due to their stationary behaviour, which seems to remain as they grow larger.

  3. A Noble Approach of Process Automation in Galvanized Nut, Bolt Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Samanta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion costs money”, The Columbus battle institute estimates that corrosion costs Americans more than $ 220 billion annually, about 4.3% of the gross natural product [1].Now a days due to increase of pollution, the rate of corrosion is also increasing day-by-day mainly in India, so, to save the steel structures, galvanizing is the best and the simplest solution. Due to this reason galvanizing industries are increasing day-by-day since mid of 1700s.Galvanizing is a controlled metallurgical combination of zinc and steel that can provide a corrosion resistance in a wide variety of environment. In fact, the galvanized metal corrosion resistance factor can be some 70 to 80 times greater that the base metal material. Keeping in mind the importance of this industry, a noble approach of process automation in galvanized nut-bolt  manufacturing plant is presented here as nuts and bolts are the prime ingredient of any structure. In this paper the main objectives of any industry like survival, profit maximization, profit satisfying and sales growth are fulfilled. Furthermore the environmental aspects i.e. pollution control and energy saving are also considered in this paper. The whole automation process is done using programmable logic controller (PLC which has number of unique advantages like being faster, reliable, requires less maintenance and reprogrammable. The whole system has been designed and tested using GE, FANUC PLC.

  4. Effect of noble metals on the corrosion of AISI 316L stainless steel in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, R.; Andreoletti, G.; Fauvet, P.; Terlain, A.

    2004-01-01

    In the spent fuel treatment, the solutions of fission products contain dissolution fines, in particular platinoids. These solutions are stored into AISI 316L stainless steel tanks, and the contact of noble metallic particles such as platinoids with austenitic stainless steels may induce a shift of the steel corrosion potential towards the trans-passive domain by galvanic coupling. In that case, the steel may be polarized up to a potential value above the range of passive domain, that induces an increase of the corrosion current. The galvanic corrosion of AISI 316L stainless steel in contact with different platinoids has been investigated by electrochemical and gravimetric techniques. Two types of tests were conducted in 1 mol/L nitric acid media at 80 deg C: (1) polarization curves and (2) immersion tests with either platinoid powders (Ru, Rh, Pd) or true insoluble dissolution fines (radioactive laboratory test). The results of the study have shown that even if galvanic coupling enhances the corrosion rate by about a factor 10 in these conditions, the corrosion behavior of AISI 316L remains low (a corrosion rate below 6 μm/year, few small intergranular indentations). No specific effect of irradiation and of elements contained in radioactive fines (other than Ru, Rh and Pd) was observed on corrosion behavior. A platinoids-ranking has also been established according to their coupling potential: Ru > Pd > Rh. (authors)

  5. The Role of Boron Chloride and noble gas isotope ratios in Taupo Volcanic Zone geothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulston, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The model of the geothermal system in which deep circulating groundwater con noble gases, at air saturated water concentrations, mixes with hot fluids of man origin at depth, is extended to include the effect of interaction of the ascending fluid with both solid and gaseous phases of basement (or other) rocks 'en route' the surface. It is demonstrated that this interaction is responsible for most of CO/sub 2/ in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) geothermal systems. It is proposed th the modelling of this interaction might be accomplished by techniques similar to those used for the understanding of the oxygen isotope shift found in geothermal systems. The water rock interaction experiments of Ellis and Mahon (1964, 1967) provides some data on the kinetic rates for B and Cl dissolution from rocks like to be encountered in the geothermal system, but further information on the behaviour of B may be needed. If these problems can be overcome this modelling technique has promise for the estimation of the recharge of geothermal systems a hence the sustainability of these systems. (author). 17 refs., 4 figs

  6. Analytical equation of state with three-body forces: Application to noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Río, Fernando del; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Guzmán, Orlando; Moreno-Razo, José Antonio; Ramos, J. Eloy

    2013-01-01

    We developed an explicit equation of state (EOS) for small non polar molecules by means of an effective two-body potential. The average effect of three-body forces was incorporated as a perturbation, which results in rescaled values for the parameters of the two-body potential. These values replace the original ones in the EOS corresponding to the two-body interaction. We applied this procedure to the heavier noble gases and used a modified Kihara function with an effective Axilrod-Teller-Muto (ATM) term to represent the two- and three-body forces. We also performed molecular dynamics simulations with two- and three-body forces. There was good agreement between predicted, simulated, and experimental thermodynamic properties of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, up to twice the critical density and up to five times the critical temperature. In order to achieve 1% accuracy of the pressure at liquid densities, the EOS must incorporate the effect of ATM forces. The ATM factor in the rescaled two-body energy is most important at temperatures around and lower than the critical one. Nonetheless, the rescaling of two-body diameter cannot be neglected at liquid-like densities even at high temperature. This methodology can be extended straightforwardly to deal with other two- and three-body potentials. It could also be used for other nonpolar substances where a spherical two-body potential is still a reasonable coarse-grain approximation

  7. The role of boron-chloride and noble gas isotope ratios in TVZ geothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulston, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The model of the geothermal system in which deep circulating groundwater containing noble gases, at air saturated water concentrations, mixes with hot fluids of mantle origin at depth, is extended to include the effect of interaction of the ascending fluid with both solid and gaseous phases of basement (or other) rocks en route to the surface. It is demonstrated that this interaction is responsible for most of the CO 2 in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) geothermal systems. It is proposed that the modelling of this interaction might be accomplished by techniques similar to those used for the understanding of the oxygen isotope shift found in geothermal systems. The water rock interaction experiments of Ellis and Mahon (1964, 1967) provides some data on the kinetic rates for B and Cl dissolution from rocks likely to be encountered in the geothermal system, but further information on the behaviour of B may be needed. If these problems can be overcome this modelling technique has promise for the estimation of the recharge of geothermal systems and hence the sustainability of these systems. (author). 17 refs., 4 figs

  8. The determination of accurate dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma for the noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Julia E.; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.; Almloef, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The static dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma for the noble gases helium through xenon were determined using large flexible one-particle basis sets in conjunction with high-level treatments of electron correlation. The electron correlation methods include single and double excitation coupled-cluster theory (CCSD), an extension of CCSD that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), and second order perturbation theory (MP2). The computed alpha and gamma values are estimated to be accurate to within a few percent. Agreement with experimental data for the static hyperpolarizability gamma is good for neon and xenon, but for argon and krypton the differences are larger than the combined theoretical and experimental uncertainties. Based on our calculations, we suggest that the experimental value of gamma for argon is too low; adjusting this value would bring the experimental value of gamma for krypton into better agreement with our computed result. The MP2 values for the polarizabilities of neon, argon, krypton and zenon are in reasonabe agreement with the CCSD and CCSD(T) values, suggesting that this less expensive method may be useful in studies of polarizabilities for larger systems.

  9. Non-enzymatic electrochemical immunoassay using noble metal nanoparticles: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Juan; Tang, Dianping

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical immunodetection has attracted considerable attention due to its high sensitivity, low cost and simplicity. Large efforts have recently made in order to design ultrasensitive assays. Noble metal nanoparticles (NM-NPs) offer advantages such as high conductivity and large surface-to-volume ratio. NM-NPs therefore are excellent candidates for developing electrochemical platforms for immunodetection and as signal tags. The use of biofunctionalized NM-NPs often results in amplified recognition via stronger loading of signal tags, and also in enhanced signal. This review (with 87 references) gives an overview on the current state in the use of NM-NPs in Non-enzymatic electrochemical immunosensing. We discuss the application of NM-NPs as electrode matrices and as electroactive labels (either as a carrier or as electrocatalytic labels), and compare the materials (mainly nanoparticles of gold, platinum, or of bimetallic materials) in terms of performance (for example by increasing sensitivity via label amplification or via high densities of capture molecules). A conclusion covers current challenges and gives an outlook. Rather than being exhaustive, the review focuses on representative examples that illustrate novel concepts and promising applications. NM-NPs based immunosensing opens a series of concepts for basic research and offers new tools for determination of trace amounts of protein-related analytes in environment and clinical applications. (author)

  10. Regularities And Irregularities Of The Stark Parameters For Single Ionized Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, R. J.; Djurovic, S.; Cirišan, M.; Aparicio, J. A.; Mar S.

    2010-07-01

    Spectroscopy of ionized noble gases has a great importance for the laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Generally, spectra of inert gases are important for many physics areas, for example laser physics, fusion diagnostics, photoelectron spectroscopy, collision physics, astrophysics etc. Stark halfwidths as well as shifts of spectral lines are usually employed for plasma diagnostic purposes. For example atomic data of argon krypton and xenon will be useful for the spectral diagnostic of ITER. In addition, the software used for stellar atmosphere simulation like TMAP, and SMART require a large amount of atomic and spectroscopic data. Availability of these parameters will be useful for a further development of stellar atmosphere and evolution models. Stark parameters data of spectral lines can also be useful for verification of theoretical calculations and investigation of regularities and systematic trends of these parameters within a multiplet, supermultiplet or transition array. In the last years, different trends and regularities of Stark parameters (halwidths and shifts of spectral lines) have been analyzed. The conditions related with atomic structure of the element as well as plasma conditions are responsible for regular or irregular behaviors of the Stark parameters. The absence of very close perturbing levels makes Ne II as a good candidate for analysis of the regularities. Other two considered elements Kr II and Xe II with complex spectra present strong perturbations and in some cases an irregularities in Stark parameters appear. In this work we analyze the influence of the perturbations to Stark parameters within the multiplets.

  11. Structural Stability and Performance of Noble Metal-Free SnO2-Based Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Tricoli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The structural stability of pure SnO2 nanoparticles and highly sensitive SnO2-SiO2 nanocomposites (0–15 SiO2 wt% has been investigated for conditions relevant to their utilization as chemoresistive gas sensors. Thermal stabilization by SiO2 co-synthesis has been investigated at up to 600 °C determining regimes of crystal size stability as a function of SiO2-content. For operation up to 400 °C, thermally stable crystal sizes of ca. 24 and 11 nm were identified for SnO2 nanoparticles and 1.4 wt% SnO2-SiO2 nanocomposites, respectively. The effect of crystal growth during operation (TO = 320 °C on the sensor response to ethanol has been reported, revealing possible long-term destabilization mechanisms. In particular, crystal growth and sintering-neck formation were discussed with respect to their potential to change the sensor response and calibration. Furthermore, the effect of SiO2 cosynthesis on the cross-sensitivity to humidity of these noble metal-free SnO2-based gas sensors was assessed.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of noble metal–titania core–shell nanostructures with tunable shell thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Bartosewicz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Core–shell nanostructures have found applications in many fields, including surface enhanced spectroscopy, catalysis and solar cells. Titania-coated noble metal nanoparticles, which combine the surface plasmon resonance properties of the core and the photoactivity of the shell, have great potential for these applications. However, the controllable synthesis of such nanostructures remains a challenge due to the high reactivity of titania precursors. Hence, a simple titania coating method that would allow better control over the shell formation is desired. A sol–gel based titania coating method, which allows control over the shell thickness, was developed and applied to the synthesis of Ag@TiO2 and Au@TiO2 with various shell thicknesses. The morphology of the synthesized structures was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Their sizes and shell thicknesses were determined using tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS technique. The optical properties of the synthesized structures were characterized using UV–vis spectroscopy. Ag@TiO2 and Au@TiO2 structures with shell thickness in the range of ≈40–70 nm and 90 nm, for the Ag and Au nanostructures respectively, were prepared using a method we developed and adapted, consisting of a change in the titania precursor concentration. The synthesized nanostructures exhibited significant absorption in the UV–vis range. The TRPS technique was shown to be a very useful tool for the characterization of metal–metal oxide core–shell nanostructures.

  13. Geostatistical analysis of tritium, groundwater age and other noble gas derived parameters in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, A; Moran, J E; Hillegonds, Darren; Singleton, M J; Kulongoski, Justin T; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, B K

    2016-03-15

    Key characteristics of California groundwater systems related to aquifer vulnerability, sustainability, recharge locations and mechanisms, and anthropogenic impact on recharge are revealed in a spatial geostatistical analysis of a unique data set of tritium, noble gases and other isotopic analyses unprecedented in size at nearly 4000 samples. The correlation length of key groundwater residence time parameters varies between tens of kilometers ((3)H; age) to the order of a hundred kilometers ((4)Heter; (14)C; (3)Hetrit). The correlation length of parameters related to climate, topography and atmospheric processes is on the order of several hundred kilometers (recharge temperature; δ(18)O). Young groundwater ages that highlight regional recharge areas are located in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, in the southern Santa Clara Valley Basin, in the upper LA basin and along unlined canals carrying Colorado River water, showing that much of the recent recharge in central and southern California is dominated by river recharge and managed aquifer recharge. Modern groundwater is found in wells with the top open intervals below 60 m depth in the southeastern San Joaquin Valley, Santa Clara Valley and Los Angeles basin, as the result of intensive pumping and/or managed aquifer recharge operations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The influence of collisions with noble gases on spectral lines of hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermans, P.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis measurements on the collisional broadening of the depolarized Rayleigh line and the broadening and shift of the rotational Raman lines (radiative transitions 0→2, 1→3 and 2→4) are presented. The experiments were carried out as a function of temperature from 23 K to 311 K for three systems, viz. H 2 -He, H 2 -Ne and H 2 -Ar. Also results of close coupled calculations on the broadening and shift are presented as a function of temperature for the four spectral lines mentioned. The calculations were performed for two systems, viz H 2 -He and H 2 -Ne. For the system H 2 -He two interaction potentials were used as a starting point, and a comparison between these potentials was made. Now that it is possible to do computations on effects related to the non-spherical interaction of the pure hydrogen isotopes, the availability of experimental data is of great importance. Many experiments on these effects have been performed over the last two decades, but their results are scattered throughout the literature. Therefore, in the last chapter of this thesis the experimental results for the pure hydrogen isotopes and in mixtures with noble gases are compiled to serve as comparing material for the calculations. The presentation is such that a direct comparison with calculations is facilitated. (Auth.)

  15. Iridium concentration and noble gas composition of Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary clay from Stevens Klint, Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Takahito; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Nagao, Keisuke; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Oshima, Masumi; Toh, Yosuke; Kimura, Atsushi; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary about 65 million years ago records a mass extinction event caused by a bolide impact. K-T boundary clay collected from Stevns Klint, Denmark was investigated in this work. Iridium concentrations of eight clays across the K-T boundary were determined using a multiple gamma-ray analysis system after neutron activation. Anomalously high Ir concentrations were detected in five marl samples, with the highest concentration being 29.9 ppb. Four samples were analyzed for all noble gases. NO extraterrestrial Ar, Kr, and Xe were discovered in any of the samples, although most of the 3 He which was detected was extraterrestrial. Solar-like Ne was observed only in the sample SK4, which had an Ir concentration of 14.3 ppb, indicating the presence of micrometeorites. The solar-like Ne clearly did not originate from an asteroid/comet associated with the bolide impact, as that asteroid is thought to have been extremely large. Also, because there was no sign of a high accretion rate of micrometeorites at the boundary it could not be ascertained whether the solar-like Ne was related to a catastrophic event that led to the extinction of the dinosaurs. (author)

  16. Utilization of the noble gases in studies of underground nuclear detonations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.F.

    1973-01-01

    The Livermore Gas Diagnostics Program employs a number of rare gas isotopes, both stable and radioactive, in its investigations of the phenomenology of underground nuclear detonations. Radioactive gases in a sample are radiochemically purified by elution chromatography, and the separated gases are radioassayed by gamma-ray spectrometry and by internal or thin-window beta proportional counting. Concentrations of the stable gases are determined by mass-spectrometry, following chemical removal of the reactive gases in the sample. The most general application of the noble gases is as device fraction indicators to provide a basis for estimating totals of chimney-gas components. All of the stable rare gases, except argon, have been used as tracers, as have xenon-127 and krypton-85. Argon-37 and krypton-85 have proven to be of particular value in the absence of a good tracer material as reference species for studies of chimney-gas chemistry. The rate of mixing of chimney gases, and the degree to which the sampled gas truly represents the underground gas mixture, can be studied with the aid of the fission-product gases. Radon-222 and helium are released to the cavity from the surrounding rock, and are, therefore, useful in studies of the interaction of the detonation with the surrounding medium

  17. Radiative response on massive noble gas injection for Runaway suppression in disruptive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    The most direct way to avoid the formation of a relativistic electron beam under the influence of an electric field in a highly conducting plasma, is to increase the electron density to a value, where the retarding collisional force balances the accelerating one. In a disruptive tokamak plasma, rapid cooling induces a high electric field, which could easily violate the force balance and push electrons into the relativistic regime. Such relativistic electrons, the so-called runaways, accumulate many MeV's and can cause substantial damage when they hit the wall. This thesis is based on the principle of rapidly fueling the plasma for holding the force balance even under the influence of high electric fields typical for disruptions. The method of injecting high amounts of noble gas particles into the plasma from a close distance is put into practice in the ASDEX Upgrade fusion test facility. In the framework of this thesis, a multi-channel photometer system based on 144 AXUV detectors in a toroidal stereo measurement setup was built. It kept its promise to provide new insights into the transport mechanisms in a disruptive plasma under the influence of strong radiative interaction dynamics between injected matter and the hot plasma.

  18. Experience of iodine, caesium and noble gas release from AGR failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, C.J.; Harris, A.M.; Phillips, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    In the event of a fuel failure in an Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR), the quantity of fission products available for release to the environment is determined by the transport of fission products in the UO 2 fuel, by the possible retention of fission products in the fuel can interspace and by the deposition of fission products on gas circuit surfaces ('plate-out'). The fission products of principal radiological concern are radioactive caesium (Cs-137 and Cs-134) and iodine (principally I-131). Results are summarised of a number of experiments which were designed to study the release of these fission products from individual fuel failures in the prototype AGR at Windscale. Results are also presented of fission product release from failures in commercial AGRs. Comparisons of measured releases of caesium and iodine relative to the release of the noble gas fission products show that, for some fuel failures, there is a significant retention of caesium and iodine within the fuel can interspace. Under normal conditions circuit deposition reduces caesium and iodine gas concentrations by several orders of magnitude. Differing release behaviour of caesium and iodine from the failures is examined together with subsequent deposition within the sampling equipment. These observations are important factors which must be considered in developing an understanding of the mechanisms involved in circuit deposition. (author)

  19. Making channeling visible: keV noble gas ion trails on Pt(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redinger, A; Standop, S; Michely, T [II Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Rosandi, Y; Urbassek, H M, E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Fachbereich Physik und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    The impact of argon and xenon noble gas ions on Pt(111) in grazing incidence geometry are studied through direct comparison of scanning tunneling microscopy images and molecular dynamics simulations. The energy range investigated is 1-15 keV and the angles of incidence with respect to the surface normal are between 78.5{sup 0} and 88{sup 0}. The focus of the paper is on events where ions gently enter the crystal at steps and are guided in channels between the top most layers of the crystal. The trajectories of the subsurface channeled ions are visible as trails of surface damage. The mechanism of trail formation is analyzed using simulations and analytical theory. Significant differences between Xe{sup +} and Ar{sup +} projectiles in damage, in the onset energy of subsurface channeling as well as in ion energy dependence of trail length and appearance are traced back to the projectile and ion energy dependence of the stopping force. The asymmetry of damage production with respect to the ion trajectory direction is explained through the details of the channel shape and subchannel structure as calculated from the continuum approximation of the channel potential. Measured and simulated channel switching in directions normal and parallel to the surface as well as an increase of ions entering into channels from the perfect surface with increasing angles of incidence are discussed.

  20. Determining the source and genetic fingerprint of natural gases using noble gas geochemistry: a northern Appalachian Basin case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Silurian and Devonian natural gas reservoirs present within New York state represent an example of unconventional gas accumulations within the northern Appalachian Basin. These unconventional energy resources, previously thought to be noneconomically viable, have come into play following advances in drilling (i.e., horizontal drilling) and extraction (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) capabilities. Therefore, efforts to understand these and other domestic and global natural gas reserves have recently increased. The suspicion of fugitive mass migration issues within current Appalachian production fields has catalyzed the need to develop a greater understanding of the genetic grouping (source) and migrational history of natural gases in this area. We introduce new noble gas data in the context of published hydrocarbon carbon (C1,C2+) (13C) data to explore the genesis of thermogenic gases in the Appalachian Basin. This study includes natural gases from two distinct genetic groups: group 1, Upper Devonian (Marcellus shale and Canadaway Group) gases generated in situ, characterized by early mature (13C[C1  C2][13C113C2]: –9), isotopically light methane, with low (4He) (average, 1  103 cc/cc) elevated 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar (where the asterisk denotes excess radiogenic or nucleogenic production beyond the atmospheric ratio), and a variable, atmospherically (air-saturated–water) derived noble gas component; and group 2, a migratory natural gas that emanated from Lower Ordovician source rocks (i.e., most likely, Middle Ordovician Trenton or Black River group) that is currently hosted primarily in Lower Silurian sands (i.e., Medina or Clinton group) characterized by isotopically heavy, mature methane (13C[C1 – C2] [13C113C2]: 3), with high (4He) (average, 1.85  103 cc/cc) 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar near crustal production levels and elevated crustal noble gas content (enriched 4He,21Ne, 40Ar). Because the release of each crustal noble gas (i.e., He, Ne, Ar

  1. Volatiles (H, C, N, O, noble gases) in comets as tracers of early solar system events (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, B.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles (H, C, N, O, noble gases) present the largest variations in their relative abundances and, importantly, in their isotopic ratios, among solar system elements. The original composition of the protosolar nebula has been investigated through the measurements of primitive meteorites and of in-situ (e.g. Galileo probe analysis of the Jupiter's atmosphere) and sample-return (Genesis, recovery and analysis of solar wind) missions. The protosolar gas was poor in deuterium, in 15N and in 17,18O. Variations among solar system reservoir reach several hundreds of percents for the D/H and 15N/14N ratios. These variations are possibly : (i) due to interactions between XUV photons of the proto-Sun and the-dust, (ii) result from low temperature ion-molecule reactions, or (iii) constitute an heritage on interstellar volatiles trapped in dust (e.g., organics). Likewise, noble gases are elementally and isotopically (1% per amu for xenon) fractionated with respect to the composition of the solar wind (our best proxy for the protosolar nebula composition). Cometary matter directly measured on coma, or in Stardust material, or in IDPs, seems to present among the largest heterogeneities in their stable isotope compositions but knowledge on their precise compositions of the different phases and species is partial and mosty lacking. Among the several important issues requiring a better knowledge of cometary volatiles are the origin(s) of volatile elements on Earth and Moon, on Mars and on Venus, understanding large scale circulation of matter between hot and frozen zones, and the possibility of interstellar heritage for organics. Critical measurements to be made by the next cometary missions include the value of the D/H ratio in water ice, in NH3 and organics. Nitrogen is particularly interesting as cometary HCN and CN are rich in 15N, but an isotoppe mass balance will require to measure the main host species (N2 ?). Noble gases are excellent tracers of physical processes

  2. Noble gas studies in vapor-growth diamonds: Comparison with shock-produced diamonds and the origin of diamonds in ureilites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Junichi; Fukunaga, Kazuya; Ito, Keisuke (Kobe Univ. (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    The authors synthesized vapor-trowth diamonds by two kinds of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using microwave (MWCVD) and hot filament (HFCVD) ionization of gases, and examined elemental abundances and isotopic compositions of the noble gases trapped in the diamonds. It is remarkable that strong differences existed in the noble gas concentrations in the two kinds of CVD diamonds: large amounts of noble gases were trapped in the MWCVD diamonds, but not in the HFCVD diamonds. The heavy noble gases (Ar to Xe) in the MWCVD diamonds were highly fractionated compared with those in the ambient atmosphere, and are in good agreement with the calculated fractionation patterns for plasma at an electron temperature of 7,000-9,000 K. These results strongly suggest that the trapping mechanism of noble gases in CVD diamonds is ion implantation during diamond growth. The degrees of fractionation of heavy noble gases were also in good agreement with those in ureilites. The vapor-growth hypothesis is discussed in comparison with the impact-shock hypothesis as a better model for the origin of diamonds in ureilites. The diamond (and graphite, amorphous carbon, too) may have been deposited on early condensates such as Re, Ir, W, etc. This model explains the chemical features of vein material in ureilites; the refractory siderophile elements are enriched in carbon and noble gases and low in normal siderophiles. The vapor-growth model is also compatible with the oxygen isotopic data of ureilites which suggests that nebular processes are primarily responsible for the composition of ureilites.

  3. Attosecond pulse generation in noble gases in the presence of extreme high intensity THz pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, E.; Varju, K.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The shortest - attosecond - light pulses available today are produced by high harmonic generation (HHG) of near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses in noble gas jets, providing a broad spectral plateau of XUV radiation ending in a cutoff. The minimum pulse duration is determined by the achievable bandwidth (i.e. the position of the cutoff), and the chirp of the produced pulses. The extension of the cutoff by increasing the laser intensity is limited by the depletion and phase matching problems of the medium. An alternative method demonstrated to produce higher harmonic orders is by using longer pump pulse wavelength, with the disadvantage of decreased efficiency. Recently it was shown that application of a quasi-DC high strength electric field results in an increase of more than a factor of two in the order of efficiently generated high harmonics. However, the possibility to implement the method proposed in [3] of using a CO 2 laser to create a quasi-DC field for assisting HHG of the NIR laser is questionable, because it's technically very challenging to synchronize pulses from different laser sources. Alternatively, synchronous production of THz pulses with the NIR laser pulse offers a more promising route. The first numerical test of this idea has been reported in [4]. In this contribution we further investigate the method for realistic THz field strengths and short driving pulses, exploring the effect of longer pump laser wavelength on the process. We assume the presence of high intensity THz pulses for supplying the high-strength quasi-DC electric field. The spectrum as well as the chirp of the produced radiation is calculated. We use the non-adiabatic saddle point method to determine the generated radiation described in [6]. We simulate harmonic generation in noble gas atoms, with few cycle NIR pulses of peak intensity at and above 2 x 10 14 W/cm 2 (388 MV/cm) and wavelengths 800 nm and 1560 nm. The THz field strength is varied

  4. Minimisation of noble gas discharge from 99Mo production at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blagojevic, N.; Izard, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Molybdenum-99 is one of the most important radionuclides in modem medicine. When loaded on a chromatographic column it forms a generator that produces high specific activity 99m Tc, a radionuclide widely used in nuclear medical imaging. ANSTO has been a main producer of 99 Mo in the Australasian region since the late 1960's and currently ranks as one of the major suppliers of 99m Tc/ 99 Mo generators. At ANSTO 99 Mo is produced from enriched uranium oxide (2.2% 235 U) after a nominal seven day irradiation period in HIFAR, Australia's high flux research reactor. Between four and six targets are processed, four to five times each week depending on the reactor operation timetable. After irradiation the targets are allowed to decay for approximately 6 hours before the uranium dioxide pellets are removed and dissolved in a fully enclosed heated vessel equipped with a reflux column. The dissolver off-gas containing noble gases and iodine isotopes released during this process are vented through a caustic scrubber, a number of iodine traps and finally through a charcoal based Noble Gas Trap (NGT). The uranium solution is passed through an alumina column to separate molybdenum from other elements. The 99 Mo product is eluted from the column with relatively concentrated ammonium hydroxide solution. The product recovery process consists of a volume reduction procedure followed by a recovery step designed to retrieve the product in a minimum volume of dilute nitric acid. The radioactive Xe and Kr discharge was monitored using a Nal(TI) detector based gamma-ray spectrometer system that was interfaced to the internal computer network. The data was collected and sent to the network server at 15-minute intervals using locally written programs that process and database the information. The discharge data is displayed in real time by the use of web browsers found on all networked workstations. The network program is also capable of interrogating the database so that the

  5. Noble Gases in the Lunar Meteorites Calcalong Creek and QUE 93069

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, T. D.; Burkland, M. K.; Grier, J. A.

    1995-09-01

    Although the world's collections contain comparable numbers of martian and lunar meteorites (about 10 each), their ejection histories seem to be quite different [1]. We have sampled no more than four martian craters, but almost every one of the lunar meteorites apparently represents a separate cratering event. Furthermore, most lunar meteorites were apparently ejected from the top meter of the surface, unlike any of the martian meteorites. We have measured noble gases in two bulk samples of the lunar meteorite QUE93069 and three of Calcalong Creek, ranging in size from 7 to 15 mg. Averaged results are given in Table 1. Both meteorites contain solar-wind-implanted noble gas. QUE 93069, which is a mature anorthositic regolith breccia [2], contains amounts comparable to the most gas-rich lunar meteorites. The relatively low 40Ar/36Ar ratios of both meteorites suggest surface exposures no more than 2.5 Ga ago [3]. Calcalong Creek has readily observable spallogenic gas. The 131Xe/126Xe ratio of 4.8+/-0.3 corresponds to an average shielding depth of slightly more than 40 gm/cm^2 [4]. In common with many lunar breccias, Calcalong Creek has been exposed to cosmic rays for several hundred Ma (calculations based on [4] and [5]). The 3He apparent exposure age is much shorter, suggesting diffusive loss of He. To determine the detailed exposure history, it is necessary to have measurements of cosmogenic radionuclides. Our samples were too small to measure 81Kr, but [6] have measured 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl. Their data are consistent with either extended exposure at data, requiring several hundred Ma of exposure at an average depth of 40-50 gm/cm^2, are clearly more consistent with the first scenario. The only other lunar meteorite which could have been ejected at the same time is MAC 88104/5 [1], but the chemical differences between the two make it highly unlikely that they come from the same event. It is difficult to determine the amount of spallogenic gas in QUE 93069 because of

  6. In search of the noble gas 3.52 Ga atmospheric signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, M.; Marty, B.; Philippot, P.

    2008-12-01

    The isotopic signatures of noble gases in the Present-day mantle and in the atmosphere permit exceptional insight into the evolution of these reservoirs through time ([1]). However, related exchange models are under- constrained and would require direct measurements of the atmospheric composition long ago, e.g., in the Archaean. Drilling in the the 3.52 Ga chert-barite ([2]) of the Dresser formation(Pilbara Drilling Project) , North Pole, Pilbara craton (Western Australia), led to recovery of exceptionally fresh samples preserving primary fluid inclusions unaffected by surface weathering. The whole formation is considered to be an already established basin when hydrothermal processes started. The chemical composition of primary fluid inclusions trapped in hydrothermal quartz from vacuolar komatiitic basalt from 110 m depth were determined by synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence (ESRF, Grenoble,France). Data show that fluids are relatively homogenous, consisting of a Ba-rich fluid and a Fe (+Ba)-rich fluid of hydrothermal origin as concluded by Foriel et al.([3]). The isotopic compositions of xenon and argon trapped in these fluids were measured by mass spectrometry following vacuum crushing. The three argon isotopes show a homogeneous signature quite different from present-day Earth atmosphere but we cannot exclude the possibility that secondary nuclear reactions produced these anomalies. Despite this, the Xe isotopic trends indicate a less radiogenic signature than the Present-day atmosphere, and probably represent a remnant of the Archaean atmosphere. If this xenon composition is primitive then it implies that there is no cosmogenic production through time. However, argon ratios could be explained by cosmogenic production which implies significant surface exposure times. Cosmogenic production will produce correlated argon and xenon isotope signatures. Therefore it is necessary to differentiate primary from secondary composition. To investigate the effects of these

  7. Carbon and Noble Gas Isotopes in the Tengchong Volcanic Geothermal Area, Yunnan, Southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Sheng; Shun'ich NAKAI; Hiroshi WAKITA; WANG Xianbin

    2004-01-01

    Carbon and noble gas isotope analyses are reported for bubbling gas samples from the Tengchong volcanic geothermal area near the Indo-Eurasian suture zone. All samples contain a resolvable component of mantle-derived 3He.Occurrence of mantle-derived 3He coincides with surface volcanism. However, 3He occurs over a larger geographic area than do surface volcanics. δ13C values for CO2 and CH4 vary from -33.4 ‰ to 1.6 ‰ and from -52.8 ‰ to -2.8 ‰,respectively. He and C isotope systematics indicate that CO2 and CH4 in the CO2-rich gases originated predominantly from magmatic component mixed with crustal CO2 produced from carbonate. However, breakdown of organic matter and nearsurface processes accounts for the CH4 and CO2 in N2-rich gases. 3He/4He ratio distribution pattern suggests that mantlederived He and heat sources of high-temperature system in central Tengchong originate from a hidden magma reservoir at subsurface. CO2-rich gases with the highest 3He/4He ratio (5.2 Ra) may be representative of the Tengchong magmatic component. Compared with MORB, this relative low 3He/4He ratio could be fully attributed to either deep crustal contamination, or radioactive aging, or past contamination of the local mantle by U- and Th-rich subducted crustal material.However, a combination of low 3He/4He, high radiogenic 4He/40Ar ratio and identical CO2/3He and δ13Cco2 relative to MORB may suggest addition of prior subductedd crsustal material (ca 1%-2%) to the MORB reservoir around 1.3 Ga ago,which is essentially compatible with the LIL-elements, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes of volcanic rocks.

  8. Extraction of Solar Wind Nitrogen and Noble Gases From the Genesis Gold Foil Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlutter, D. J.; Pepin, R. O.

    2005-12-01

    The Genesis gold foil is a bulk solar wind collector, integrating fluences from all three of the wind regimes. Pyrolytic extraction of small foil samples at Minnesota yielded He fluences, corrected for backscatter, in good agreement with measurements by on-board spacecraft instruments, and He/Ne elemental ratios close to those implanted in collector foils deployed on the lunar surface during the Apollo missions. Isotopic distributions of He, Ne and Ar are under study. Pyrolysis to temperatures above the gold melting point generates nitrogen blanks large enough to obscure the solar-wind nitrogen component. An alternative technique for nitrogen and noble gas extraction, by room-temperature amalgamation of the gold foil surface, will be discussed. Ne and Ar releases in preliminary tests of this technique on small foil samples were close to 100% of the amounts expected from the high-temperature pyrolysis yields, indicating that amalgamation quantitatively liberates gases from several hundred angstroms deep in the gold, beyond the implantation depth of most of the solar wind. Present work is focused on two problems currently interfering with accurate nitrogen measurements at the required picogram to sub-picogram levels: a higher than expected blank likely due to tiny air bubbles rolled into the gold sheet during fabrication, and the presence of a refractory hydrocarbon film on Genesis collector surfaces (the "brown stain") that, if left in place on the foil, shields the underlying gold from mercury attack. We have found, however, that the film is efficiently removed within tens of seconds by oxygen plasma ashing. Potential nitrogen contaminants introduced during the crash of the sample return canister are inert in amalgamation, and so are not hazards to the measurements.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO nanostructures on noble-metal coated substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikovska, A.Og. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Chaussee, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Atanasova, G.B. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str., bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Avdeev, G.V. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str., bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Nedyalkov, N.N. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Chaussee, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • ZnO nanostructures were fabricated on Au–Ag alloy coated silicon substrates by applying pulsed laser deposition. • Morphology of the ZnO nanostructures was related to the Au–Ag alloy content in the catalyst layer. • Increasing the Ag content in Au–Ag catalyst layer changes the morphology of the ZnO nanostructures from nanorods to nanobelts. - Abstract: In this work, ZnO nanostructures were fabricated on noble-metal (Au, Ag and Au–Ag alloys) coated silicon substrates by applying pulsed laser deposition. The samples were prepared at a substrate temperature of 550 °C, an oxygen pressure of 5 Pa, and a laser fluence of 2 J cm{sup −2} – process parameters usually used for deposition of smooth and dense thin films. The metal layer's role is substantial for the preparation of nanostructures. Heating of the substrate changed the morphology of the metal layer and, subsequently, nanoparticles were formed. The use of different metal particles resulted in different morphologies and properties of the ZnO nanostructures synthesized. The morphology of the ZnO nanostructures was related to the Au–Ag alloy's content of the catalyst layer. It was found that the morphology of the ZnO nanostructures evolved from nanorods to nanobelts as the ratio of Au/Ag in the alloy catalyst was varied. The use of a small quantity of Ag in the Au–Ag catalyst (Au{sub 3}Ag) layer resulted predominantly in the deposition of ZnO nanorods. A higher Ag content in the catalyst alloy (AuAg{sub 2}) layer resulted in the growth of a dense structure of ZnO nanobelts.

  10. A fence line noble gas monitoring system for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasty, R.L.; Hovgaard, J.; LaMarre, J.R

    2001-07-01

    A noble gas monitoring system has been installed at Ontario Power Generations' Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) near Toronto, Canada. This monitoring system allows a direct measure of air kerma from external radiation instead of calculating this based on plant emission data and meteorological models. This has resulted in a reduction in the reported effective dose from external radiation by a factor of at least ten. The system consists of nine self-contained units, each with a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm (3 inch x 3 inch) NaI(Tl) detector that is calibrated for air kerma. The 512-channel gamma ray spectral information is downloaded daily from each unit to a central computer where the data are stored and processed. A spectral stripping procedure is used to remove natural background variations from the spectral windows used to monitor xenon-133 ({sup 133}Xe), xenon-135 ({sup 135}Xe), argon-41 ({sup 41}Ar), and skyshine radiation from the use of radiography sources. Typical monthly minimum detection limits in air kerma are 0.3 nGy for {sup 133}Xe, 0.7 nGy for {sup 135}Xe, 3 nGy for {sup 41}Ar and 2 nGy for skyshine radiation. Based on 9 months of continuous operation, the annualised air kerma due to {sup 133}Xe, {sup 135}Xe and {sup 41}Ar and skyshine radiation were 7 nGy, 8 nGy, 26 nGy and 107 nGy respectively. (author)

  11. Wire gauze and cordierite supported noble metal catalysts for passive autocatalytic recombiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanap, Kiran K.; Varma, S.; Waghmode, S.B.; Bharadwaj, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis by electroless deposition method and chemical reduction route. • Particle size of 0.1–0.5 μm & 3.5–5 nm for Pt–Pd/Wg & Pt–Pd/Cord catalysts. • Active for H_2 and O_2 reaction with initial H_2 concentration of 1.5 to 7% in air. • Active in presence of different contaminants like CO_2, CH_4, CO & relative humidity. • Enhanced resistance of Pt–Pd/Cord catalyst towards the poisoning of CO. - Abstract: Hydrogen released in nuclear reactor containment under severe accident scenario poses a threat to containment and hence needs to be regulated by catalytic recombination. Mixed noble metal catalysts with platinum–palladium supported on stainless steel wire gauze and cordierite support have been developed for this purpose. The developed catalysts have been found to be highly efficient for removal of hydrogen concentration in the range of 1.5 to 7.0% v/v in air. Though both the catalysts exhibit similar kinetics for lower hydrogen concentration, cordierite supported catalysts exhibits better kinetic rate at higher hydrogen concentration. The performances of these catalysts in presence of various probable catalytic poison like carbon monoxide and catalytic inhibitors like moisture, carbon dioxide, and hydrocarbons provide data for use of these catalysts under the actual scenario. Compared to stainless steel wire gauze supported catalyst, the cordierite based catalyst are found to exhibit enhanced resistance towards carbon monoxide and limited temperature rise for safer application at higher hydrogen concentrations.

  12. Intermetallic nickel silicide nanocatalyst-A non-noble metal-based general hydrogenation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchuk, Pavel; Agostini, Giovanni; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Lund, Henrik; Agapova, Anastasiya; Junge, Henrik; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    Hydrogenation reactions are essential processes in the chemical industry, giving access to a variety of valuable compounds including fine chemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmachemicals. On an industrial scale, hydrogenations are typically performed with precious metal catalysts or with base metal catalysts, such as Raney nickel, which requires special handling due to its pyrophoric nature. We report a stable and highly active intermetallic nickel silicide catalyst that can be used for hydrogenations of a wide range of unsaturated compounds. The catalyst is prepared via a straightforward procedure using SiO 2 as the silicon atom source. The process involves thermal reduction of Si-O bonds in the presence of Ni nanoparticles at temperatures below 1000°C. The presence of silicon as a secondary component in the nickel metal lattice plays the key role in its properties and is of crucial importance for improved catalytic activity. This novel catalyst allows for efficient reduction of nitroarenes, carbonyls, nitriles, N-containing heterocycles, and unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds. Moreover, the reported catalyst can be used for oxidation reactions in the presence of molecular oxygen and is capable of promoting acceptorless dehydrogenation of unsaturated N-containing heterocycles, opening avenues for H 2 storage in organic compounds. The generality of the nickel silicide catalyst is demonstrated in the hydrogenation of over a hundred of structurally diverse unsaturated compounds. The wide application scope and high catalytic activity of this novel catalyst make it a nice alternative to known general hydrogenation catalysts, such as Raney nickel and noble metal-based catalysts.

  13. Calibration of a Noble Gas Mass Spectrometer with an Atmospheric Argon Standard (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, V.; Grove, M.

    2009-12-01

    Like other mass spectrometers, gas source instruments are very good at precisely measuring isotopic ratios but need to be calibrated with a standard to be accurate. The need for calibration arises due to the complicated ionization process which inefficiently and differentially creates ions from the various isotopes that make up the elemental gas. Calibration of the ionization process requires materials with well understood isotopic compositions as standards. Our project goal was to calibrate a noble gas (Noblesse) mass spectrometer with a purified air sample. Our sample obtained from Ocean Beach in San Francisco was under known temperature, pressure, volume, humidity. We corrected the pressure for humidity and used the ideal gas law to calculate the number of moles of argon gas. We then removed all active gasses using specialized equipment designed for this purpose at the United States Geological Survey. At the same time, we measured the volume ratios of various parts of the gas extraction line system associated with the Noblesse mass spectrometer. Using this data, we calculated how much Ar was transferred to the reservoir from the vacuum-sealed vial that contained the purified gas standard. Using similar measurements, we also calculated how much Ar was introduced into the extraction line from a pipette system and how much of this Ar was ultimately expanded into the Noblesse mass spectrometer. Based upon this information, it was possible to calibrate the argon sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. From a knowledge of the isotopic composition of air, it was also possible to characterize how ionized argon isotopes were fractionated during analysis. By repeatedly analyzing our standard we measured a 40Ar Sensitivity of 2.05 amps/bar and a 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 309.2 on the Faraday detector. In contrast, measurements carried out by ion counting using electron multipliers yield a value (296.8) which is much closer to the actual atmospheric 40Ar/36Ar value of 295.5.

  14. MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES, YIELD AND POPULATION DEVELOPMENT OF THE NOBLE CRAYFISH ASTACUS ASTACUS IN LAKE STEINSFJORDEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SKURDAL J.

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Lake Steinsfjorden is the most important noble crayfish locality in Norway. The crayfish population has been monitored annually since 1979 including data on total trapping effort, yield and population composition before and after the catching season. The harvest has ranged from 0.7-4.7 kg.ha-1. The catch per trap night decreased prior to 1991 and the yield was reduced by some 50% over the years 1987-1992 as compared to 1979-1986. This was due to removal of small crayfish, high exploitation and the establishment of dense stands of Canadian pondweed (Elodea canadensis. Baited traps catch a large fraction of crayfish < 95 mm total length minimum size. These should according to the regulations immediately be released into the lake. However, it is apparent from the size composition that release of these small crayfish was rather incomplete. In 1983, trap mesh size was increased from 17.5 mm to 21 mm to reduce the fraction of undersized crayfish in the trap catches, yet no effects of this increased mesh size on crayfish size distribution were observed. The legal season has been reduced three times during the study period. In 1983, the closing date was changed from 31 December to 15 September. In 1989 the legal season was further reduced to two weeks and finally in 1995 to 10 days. This reduced total trap effort by 45%. The shorter season allow many crayfish to moult twice instead of once between seasons and the fraction of large crayfish has thus increased and so has the catch per trap night. Canadian pondweed has established dense annual stands and thus has made large parts of the shallow areas unsuitable for crayfish, causing an overall decrease in crayfish population size and production.

  15. A grave of a Cuman noble woman in the Kislyakovsky 13 kurgan cemetery (Krasnodar kray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Raev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kislyakovskiy 13 kurgan cemetery was excavated in 2008 by an expedition of the Southern Scientific Center, RAS. Kurgan 2 contained two graves – one dated to the first centuries AD, the other to the Middle Ages, when the North Black Sea steppes were inhabited by the nomadic Polovеts tribes. This article discusses grave 2. The burial was made in a chamber in the form of a niche. Robbers destroyed one of the grave’s walls but the burial remained undisturbed. The buried woman of 35-40 years old was laying extended on back, head to west. Decayed wood from the funerary stretchers preserved under the skeleton. The rich grave goods included a bronze cauldron, an iron knife, two silver torques, hair rings, and a mirror. Fragments of the wooden frame, felt, textile, and gilded silver foil from a headdress preserved in area of the woman’s chest. The kurgan was encircled by a ditch; its northern part had two ledged niches made in the outer wall. Animal bones and ceramic shards with remains of the funerary feast were unearthed on the ditch bottom. The ditch was thoroughly made and has unique construction features. Judging by its lower layers, the dug-out soil was stacked not only on the kurgan’s surface but also round the ditch’s outer perimeter. The ditch remained opened for a long time and was gradually filled with flooded soil. Grave goods are typical for the Cuman graves of the 12th - early 13th centuries. The assemblage suggests a high social status of the buried woman. It is possible that for some time the area surrounded by the ditch was used as a sanctuary; afterwards the burial of a noble woman was performed, the kurgan was covered with a layer of soil.

  16. Noble Gas Sampling and Detection Methods for On-Site Inspections in Support of CTBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieslander, J.S.E.

    2015-01-01

    The On-Site Inspections (OSI) constitutes the final verification measure under the CTBT, and are conducted to verify States Parties' compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). An on-site inspection is launched to establish whether or not a nuclear explosion has been carried out and during such an inspection, facts might also be gathered to identify a possible violator of the Treaty. The Treaty lists all activities and techniques that are permitted and one of these is the environmental sampling of noble gases (NG) in the air and underground, which can be deployed at any time during an OSI. The CTBT relevant isotopes are Xe-133, 133m, 131m, 135 and Ar-37. The samples are primarily to be analyzed on-site, although the treaty also allows off-site analysis in designated laboratories if necessary. Stringent procedures ensure the security, integrity and confidentiality of the samples throughout the sampling and analysis process — all taking place in the field. Over the past decade the techniques for NG sampling, processing and analysis of both atmospheric and subsoil NG samples have been developed further in order to fit to the conditions and requirements during an OSI. This has been a major international effort with a global set of collaborators. Especially during the past three years the efforts intensified in order to finalize the scientific and technical developments for the Integrated Field Exercise, November 2014 (IFE14). This presentation will provide an overview of the current status of the OSI NG sampling regime and the OSI NG Field Laboratory to be deployed in IFE14, together with more technical descriptions of methods and equipment as well as a short discussion on potential future developments and alternative applications as applicable. (author)

  17. Khan Krum - ʺThe Fearsomeʺ: A Noble Bulgarian with Iris-Fibroma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi Tchernev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old Caucasian, the otherwise healthy male patient, presented with 3-years history of a prominent tumor-like formation, located on his back, without subjective complaints. Initially, the lesion was 1-2 cm in size but gradually increased to a visible-pronounced tumor-like formation. No other dermatologic diseases, neither other known abnormalities were reported for the medical and family history.  Softly-elastic on palpation tumor-like formation was established in the left infrascapular area of the back, measuring 8/9 cm in diameter. The lesion was clinically suspected for lipoma or another soft-tissue tumour with benign nature, so the patient underwent planned surgical excision under local anaesthesia. A tumour was excited with deep elliptical excision and furthered for histological evaluation, while the wound edges were sutured with single cutaneous stitches. Additionally, a large black-colored tattoo of the Bulgarian historical noble Khan Krum was also observed within the clinical examination, covering almost the whole upper 1/3 part of the patient’s back Within the careful clinical observation of the tattoo, we noticed a fibroma-like lesion, affecting the noble’s right iris. Fibromas are common benign tumours in Caucasians, composed of fibrous or connective tissue. They can be seen in all organs from mesenchymal tissue, in varies size. Eyelids are often commonly affected in elderly. Although very commonly seen in every day dermatological practice, fibromas have been never reported, located in the iris. In the presented case, a small ʺiris-fibromaʺ, hidden within a black-colored tattoo was diagnosed in a patient with lipoma, as a sporadic clinical finding.

  18. Mitigation of hydrogen by oxidation using nitrous oxide and noble metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    This test studied the ability of a blend of nuclear-grade, noble-metal catalysts to catalyze a hydrogen/nitrous oxide reaction in an effort to mitigate a potential hydrogen (H 2 ) gas buildup in the Hanford Site Grout Disposal Facility. For gases having H 2 and a stoichiometric excess of either nitrous oxide or oxygen, the catalyst blend can effectively catalyze the H 2 oxidation reaction at a rate exceeding 380 μmoles of H 2 per hour per gram of catalyst (μmol/h/g) and leave the gas with less than a 0.15 residual H 2 Concentration. This holds true in gases with up to 2.25% water vapor and 0.1% methane. This should also hold true for gases with up to 0.1% carbon monoxide (CO) but only until the catalyst is exposed to enough CO to block the catalytic sites and stop the reaction. Gases with ammonia up to 1% may be slightly inhibited but can have reaction rates greater than 250 μmol/h/g with less than a 0.20% residual H 2 concentration. The mechanism for CO poisoning of the catalyst is the chemisorption of CO to the active catalyst sites. The CO sorption capacity (SC) of the catalyst is the total amount of CO that the catalyst will chemisorb. The average SC for virgin catalyst was determined to be 19.3 ± 2.0 μmoles of CO chemisorbed to each gram of catalyst (μmol/g). The average SC for catalyst regenerated with air was 17.3 ± 1.9 μmol/g

  19. Characterization of the electrochemical behavior of coating by steel welding 308l and in presence of noble metals deposits; Caracterizacion del comportamiento electroquimico de recubrimiento por soldadura de acero 308L y en presencia de depositos de metales nobles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piedras, P.; Arganis J, C. R., E-mail: pedro.piedras@hotmail.es [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work the oxide deposits and noble metals deposit were characterized (Ag and Pt) on a coating of stainless steel 308l that were deposited by the shield metal arc welding (SMAW) on steel A36 by means of scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The extrapolation of Tafel technique was also used to obtain the corrosion potential (Ec) for the pre-rusty steel and for the samples with deposits of Pt and Ag under conditions of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), demonstrating that this parameter diminishes with the presence of this deposits. (Author)

  20. Performance evaluation of a biodiesel fuelled transportation engine retrofitted with a non-noble metal catalysed diesel oxidation catalyst for controlling unregulated emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pravesh Chandra; Gupta, Tarun; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2018-02-15

    In present study, engine exhaust was sampled for measurement and analysis of unregulated emissions from a four cylinder transportation diesel engine using a state-of-the-art FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) emission analyzer. Test fuels used were Karanja biodiesel blend (B20) and baseline mineral diesel. Real-time emission measurements were performed for raw exhaust as well as exhaust sampled downstream of the two in-house prepared non-noble metal based diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) and a baseline commercial DOC based on noble metals. Two prepared non-noble metal based DOCs were based on Co-Ce mixed oxide and Lanthanum based perovskite catalysts. Perovskite based DOC performed superior compared to Co-Ce mixed oxide catalyst based DOC. Commercial noble metal based DOC was found to be the most effective in reducing unregulated hydrocarbon emissions in the engine exhaust, followed by the two in-house prepared non-noble metal based DOCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.