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Sample records for maupertuis f-38240 meylan

  1. Jacobi-Maupertuis metric and Kepler equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Sumanto; Gibbons, Gary William; Guha, Partha

    This paper studies the application of the Jacobi-Eisenhart lift, Jacobi metric and Maupertuis transformation to the Kepler system. We start by reviewing fundamentals and the Jacobi metric. Then we study various ways to apply the lift to Kepler-related systems: first as conformal description and Bohlin transformation of Hooke’s oscillator, second in contact geometry and third in Houri’s transformation [T. Houri, Liouville integrability of Hamiltonian systems and spacetime symmetry (2016), www.geocities.jp/football_physician/publication.html], coupled with Milnor’s construction [J. Milnor, On the geometry of the Kepler problem, Am. Math. Mon. 90 (1983) 353-365] with eccentric anomaly.

  2. Maupertuis, Leibniz, Least Action and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, James K.

    2006-12-01

    In current controversies regarding Intelligent Design (ID), critics of ID often claim that naturalisitc science (i.e., science that attempts to explain natural phenomena in terms of strictly non-supernatural processes) has such a good track record that there is no need to introduce supernatural design hypotheses into our thinking. Since ID is not a new idea, we can search through the history of science and look also at ID's track record. In this talk, we focus on the ID thinking of Maupertuis and Leibniz when the former developed the Principle of Least Action and when both of them applied the principle to Snell's law of refraction. In this case, we find that ID did no harm and made no lasting contribution.

  3. Maupertuis: the 'Old Synthesis'

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vortices, he devoted his scientific attention to living beings. In an epoch ... particles' present in the seminal fluids of both parents. ... Elisabeth Ruhen transmitted it to four children .... Received 26 November 2013, accepted 10 January 2014.

  4. Representing the Earth's shape: the polemics surrounding Maupertuis's expedition to Lapland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrall, M.

    1992-06-01

    Historical accounts of quantification in the physical sciences in the eighteenth century have often been described as a straightforward series of steps in a process of maturation, as instruments and standards advanced in precision. This paper calls into question the self-evidence nature of precision by investigating the production and uses of measurements. In the case of the dispute over the shape of the Earth, centered in Paris in the 1730s, the precision of measurements was a matter to be interpreted, attacked, defended, and represented. The whole messy business, undertaken by the participants to win consensus from their contemporaries, took place in the context of academic politics and the intellectual fashions of the salons and the court. All parties to the dispute claimed to be drawing on precision measurements; evaluating precision turned out to require the use of a range of intellectual, mathematical, instrumental, political, and textual resources. The alleged precision was then used to construct and defend rival scientific programs and practices.

  5. Progress in classical and quantum variational principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, C G; Karl, G; Novikov, V A

    2004-01-01

    We review the development and practical uses of a generalized Maupertuis least action principle in classical mechanics in which the action is varied under the constraint of fixed mean energy for the trial trajectory. The original Maupertuis (Euler-Lagrange) principle constrains the energy at every point along the trajectory. The generalized Maupertuis principle is equivalent to Hamilton's principle. Reciprocal principles are also derived for both the generalized Maupertuis and the Hamilton principles. The reciprocal Maupertuis principle is the classical limit of Schroedinger's variational principle of wave mechanics and is also very useful to solve practical problems in both classical and semiclassical mechanics, in complete analogy with the quantum Rayleigh-Ritz method. Classical, semiclassical and quantum variational calculations are carried out for a number of systems, and the results are compared. Pedagogical as well as research problems are used as examples, which include nonconservative as well as relativistic systems. '... the most beautiful and important discovery of Mechanics.' Lagrange to Maupertuis (November 1756)

  6. The three-body problem and equivariant Riemannian geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ramírez, M.; García, A.; Meléndez, J.; Reyes-Victoria, J. G.

    2017-08-01

    We study the planar three-body problem with 1/r2 potential using the Jacobi-Maupertuis metric, making appropriate reductions by Riemannian submersions. We give a different proof of the Gaussian curvature's sign and the completeness of the space reported by Montgomery [Ergodic Theory Dyn. Syst. 25, 921-947 (2005)]. Moreover, we characterize the geodesics contained in great circles.

  7. Relationship between morphology and composition of manganese nodules from the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jauhari, P.

    Lyspherotdal EUIpsotdal Tabular a Other forms ,o" ~4 ............. ' ....... \\[l \\[T~ s-s J ~ r-r '~~'~l' .... ~' : U ........ I 2 l ScaLe - I : 5tO00,O00 3 7'~" 8'o" as" c Fig.2. The distribution of size (long axis) (A), shape (B) and surface texture (C... reported by Calvert and Price (1984). Meylan (1974) and Raab and Meylan (1977) have also established a correlation between nodule type and chemical composition. Heye (1975) attrib- uted the different shapes of nodules to the supply of metals from...

  8. Orbits and variational principles for conservative Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres del Castillo, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that for any Hamiltonian system whose Hamiltonian is time-independent the equations that determine the orbits followed by the system, without making reference to time, have the form of Hamilton's equations in a phase space of dimension two units smaller than that of the original phase space. By considering the cases of classical mechanics and of geometrical optics, it is shown that this result amounts, respectively, to Maupertuis' least action principle and to Fermat's principle. (Author)

  9. Maximum Path Information and Fokker Planck Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang A., Q.; LeMehaute, A.

    2008-04-01

    We present a rigorous method to derive the nonlinear Fokker-Planck (FP) equation of anomalous diffusion directly from a generalization of the principle of least action of Maupertuis proposed by Wang [Chaos, Solitons & Fractals 23 (2005) 1253] for smooth or quasi-smooth irregular dynamics evolving in Markovian process. The FP equation obtained may take two different but equivalent forms. It was also found that the diffusion constant may depend on both q (the index of Tsallis entropy [J. Stat. Phys. 52 (1988) 479] and the time t.

  10. The four variational principles of mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, C.G.; Karl, G.; Novikov, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    We argue that there are four basic forms of the variational principles of mechanics: Hamilton close-quote s least action principle (HP), the generalized Maupertuis principle (MP), and their two reciprocal principles, RHP and RMP. This set is invariant under reciprocity and Legendre transformations. One of these forms (HP) is in the literature: only special cases of the other three are known. The generalized MP has a weaker constraint compared to the traditional formulation, only the mean energy bar E is kept fixed between virtual paths. This reformulation of MP alleviates several weaknesses of the old version. The reciprocal Maupertuis principle (RMP) is the classical limit of Schroedinger close-quote s variational principle of quantum mechanics, and this connection emphasizes the importance of the reciprocity transformation for variational principles. Two unconstrained formulations (UHP and UMP) of these four principles are also proposed, with completely specified Lagrange multipliers Percival close-quote s variational principle for invariant tori and variational principles for scattering orbits are derived from the RMP. The RMP is very convenient for approximate variational solutions to problems in mechanics using Ritz type methods Examples are provided. Copyright copyright 1996 Academic Press, Inc

  11. Principle of least action; some possible generalizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broucke, R.

    1982-01-01

    In this article we draw the attention to an important variational principle in dynamics: the Maupertuis-Jacobi Least Action Principle (MJLAP). This principle compares varied paths with the same energy h. We give two new proofs of the MJLAP (Sections 3 and 8) as well as a new unified variational principle which contains both Hamilton's Principle (HP) and the MJLAP as particular cases (Sections 4 and 9). The article also shows several new methods for the construction of a Lagrangian for a conservative dynamical system. As an example, we illustrate the theory with the classical Harmonic Oscillator Problem (Section 10). Our method is based on the theory of changes of independent variables in a dynamical system. It indirectly shows how a change of independent variable affects the self-adjointness of a dynamical system (Sections 5, 6, 7). Our new Lagrangians contain an arbitrary constant α, whose meaning needs to be studied, eventually in relation to the concepts of quantification or gauge transformations. The two important values of the constant α are 1 (Hamilton's principle) and 1/2 (Maupertuis-Jacobi Least Action Principle)

  12. Big Bang pour le grand public - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Pour commémorer les 50 ans du CERN et l'année de la physique en 2005, la section de physique de l'Université de Genève ouvre une fois de plus ses portes aux non initiés et organise une série de conférences de vulgarisation scientifique. La première conférence, le 7 décembre prochain aura pour thème le Big-Bang et les observations qui corroborent cette théorie. Le Professeur Georges Meylan, Directeur du Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de l'EPFL, donnera cette conférence destinée à tous les publics. Chacune des conférences débutera par une démonstration de détection de rayons cosmiques dans l'auditoire et l'utilisation de ces signaux venus du fond de l'univers pour créer une ?musique cosmique', en collaboration avec le Professeur Ellberger et Nikolai Mihailov du conservatoire de musique de Genève. Ces processus cosmiques étant aléatoires, chacun de ces concerts sera unique. Les preuves observationnelles du Big Bang par le Professeur Georges Meylan Directeur du Laboratoire d'Astrophysique ...

  13. Completely integrable 2D Lagrangian systems and related integrable geodesic flows on various manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yehia, Hamad M

    2013-01-01

    In this study we have formulated a theorem that generates deformations of the natural integrable conservative systems in the plane into integrable systems on Riemannian and other manifolds by introducing additional parameters into their structures. The relation of explicit solutions of the new and the original dynamics to the corresponding Jacobi (Maupertuis) geodesic flow is clarified. For illustration, we apply the result to three concrete examples of the many available integrable systems in the literature. Complementary integrals in those systems are polynomial in velocity with degrees 3, 4 and 6, respectively. As a special case of the first deformed system, a new several-parameter family of integrable mechanical systems (and geodesic flows) on S 2 is constructed. (paper)

  14. Geneva University - Events in March

    CERN Multimedia

    Geneva University

    2010-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVA 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 8 March 2010 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Gravitational lensing: an astrophysical tool Prof. Georges Meylan École Polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) - Observatoire de Sauverny The total solar eclipse of 1919 unveiled the gravitational lens nature of our Sun. The next example of another gravitational lens was discovered in 1979. Originally considered as a mere curiosity, gravitational lensing has matured, during the last two decades, into a genuine astrophysical tool, used in a large variety of problems, from planet search to the quest for the most distant galaxies. We shall present cosmological results obtained at EPFL about (i) strong lensing and time delays, related to the measurements of the Hubble constant ; (ii) micro lensing...

  15. Integration of QSAR models for bioconcentration suitable for REACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gissi, Andrea; Nicolotti, Orazio; Carotti, Angelo; Gadaleta, Domenico; Lombardo, Anna; Benfenati, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    QSAR (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) models can be a valuable alternative method to replace or reduce animal test required by REACH. In particular, some endpoints such as bioconcentration factor (BCF) are easier to predict and many useful models have been already developed. In this paper we describe how to integrate two popular BCF models to obtain more reliable predictions. In particular, the herein presented integrated model relies on the predictions of two among the most used BCF models (CAESAR and Meylan), together with the Applicability Domain Index (ADI) provided by the software VEGA. Using a set of simple rules, the integrated model selects the most reliable and conservative predictions and discards possible outliers. In this way, for the prediction of the 851 compounds included in the ANTARES BCF dataset, the integrated model discloses a R 2 (coefficient of determination) of 0.80, a RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) of 0.61 log units and a sensitivity of 76%, with a considerable improvement in respect to the CAESAR (R 2 = 0.63; RMSE = 0.84 log units; sensitivity 55%) and Meylan (R 2 = 0.66; RMSE = 0.77 log units; sensitivity 65%) without discarding too many predictions (118 out of 851). Importantly, considering solely the compounds within the new integrated ADI, the R 2 increased to 0.92, and the sensitivity to 85%, with a RMSE of 0.44 log units. Finally, the use of properly set safety thresholds applied for monitoring the so called “suspicious” compounds, which are those chemicals predicted in proximity of the border normally accepted to discern non-bioaccumulative from bioaccumulative substances, permitted to obtain an integrated model with sensitivity equal to 100%. - Highlights: • Applying two independent QSAR models for bioconcentration factor increases the prediction. • The concordance of the models is an important component of the integration. • The measurement of the applicability domain improves the prediction. • The use of a

  16. Thermodynamics based on the principle of least abbreviated action: Entropy production in a network of coupled oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Morales, Vladimir; Pellicer, Julio; Manzanares, Jose A.

    2008-01-01

    We present some novel thermodynamic ideas based on the Maupertuis principle. By considering Hamiltonians written in terms of appropriate action-angle variables we show that thermal states can be characterized by the action variables and by their evolution in time when the system is nonintegrable. We propose dynamical definitions for the equilibrium temperature and entropy as well as an expression for the nonequilibrium entropy valid for isolated systems with many degrees of freedom. This entropy is shown to increase in the relaxation to equilibrium of macroscopic systems with short-range interactions, which constitutes a dynamical justification of the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Several examples are worked out to show that this formalism yields the right microcanonical (equilibrium) quantities. The relevance of this approach to nonequilibrium situations is illustrated with an application to a network of coupled oscillators (Kuramoto model). We provide an expression for the entropy production in this system finding that its positive value is directly related to dissipation at the steady state in attaining order through synchronization

  17. Dalla “scala” al “piano”. Appunti per un’indagine interpretativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Mazzocut-Mis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During the Eighteenth Century – from Bonnet to Robinet, from Maupertuis to Diderot, and up to Buffon – several new topics of discussion were developed concerning materialism, the critique to finalism, the idea of nature as continuous metamorphosis (as apposed to the static, fixist and discontinuist theories of nature, the advocacy of providentialism, or, to the contrary, of the role of chaos. As a result, scales, prototypes and types have been employed as interpretative hypotheses influencing the main choices and lines of research. In this regard, however, Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire's work deeply modified the morphological metaphors. The teratologist's eye combined to the mineralogist's perspective established the priority of the material visibility of the living, based on the analysis of its structure rather than of its physiology. The single framework of organistion (unity of composition, on which base every being is formed is thus taken as the condition as well as the limit within which every possible variation in shape is fully justified.

  18. Diverses questions de mecanique et de thermodynamique classiques et relativistes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Broglie, Louis; Lochak, Georges; Karatchentzeff, Michel; Fargue, Daniel

    Ce livre reproduit un cours inédit de Louis de Broglie, de 1948, dans lequel il réexamine, gráce à la relativité, les analogies entre la mécanique et la thermodynamique étudiés par Helmholtz, Boltzmann et Planck avant le succès de la mécanique statistique. C'est le premier d'une série de travaux de de Broglie en vue de prolonger sa découverte de 1924 vers une mécanique ondulatoire des processus irréversibles, en unifiant les principes de Fermat, de Maupertuis et de Carnot-Clausius. L'intérêt du livre est triple: 1. une généralisation de la mécanique quantique qui décrirait les transitions quantiques en tant que processus dynamiques; 2. revisiter la physique classique en compagnie de l'un des plus grands physiciens du siècle 3. découvrir quelques grands idées oubliées de la physique classique.

  19. Integration of QSAR models for bioconcentration suitable for REACH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gissi, Andrea [Laboratory of Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”, via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Dipartimento di Farmacia — Scienze del Farmaco, Università degli Studi di Bari “Aldo Moro”, via Orabona 4, I-70125 Bari (Italy); Nicolotti, Orazio; Carotti, Angelo; Gadaleta, Domenico [Dipartimento di Farmacia — Scienze del Farmaco, Università degli Studi di Bari “Aldo Moro”, via Orabona 4, I-70125 Bari (Italy); Lombardo, Anna [Laboratory of Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”, via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Benfenati, Emilio, E-mail: benfenati@marionegri.it [Laboratory of Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”, via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    QSAR (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) models can be a valuable alternative method to replace or reduce animal test required by REACH. In particular, some endpoints such as bioconcentration factor (BCF) are easier to predict and many useful models have been already developed. In this paper we describe how to integrate two popular BCF models to obtain more reliable predictions. In particular, the herein presented integrated model relies on the predictions of two among the most used BCF models (CAESAR and Meylan), together with the Applicability Domain Index (ADI) provided by the software VEGA. Using a set of simple rules, the integrated model selects the most reliable and conservative predictions and discards possible outliers. In this way, for the prediction of the 851 compounds included in the ANTARES BCF dataset, the integrated model discloses a R{sup 2} (coefficient of determination) of 0.80, a RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) of 0.61 log units and a sensitivity of 76%, with a considerable improvement in respect to the CAESAR (R{sup 2} = 0.63; RMSE = 0.84 log units; sensitivity 55%) and Meylan (R{sup 2} = 0.66; RMSE = 0.77 log units; sensitivity 65%) without discarding too many predictions (118 out of 851). Importantly, considering solely the compounds within the new integrated ADI, the R{sup 2} increased to 0.92, and the sensitivity to 85%, with a RMSE of 0.44 log units. Finally, the use of properly set safety thresholds applied for monitoring the so called “suspicious” compounds, which are those chemicals predicted in proximity of the border normally accepted to discern non-bioaccumulative from bioaccumulative substances, permitted to obtain an integrated model with sensitivity equal to 100%. - Highlights: • Applying two independent QSAR models for bioconcentration factor increases the prediction. • The concordance of the models is an important component of the integration. • The measurement of the applicability domain improves the

  20. On the estimation of ice thickness from scattering observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. D.; Squire, V. A.

    2010-04-01

    This paper is inspired by the proposition that it may be possible to extract descriptive physical parameters - in particular the ice thickness, of a sea-ice field from ocean wave information. The motivation is that mathematical theory describing wave propagation in such media has reached a point where the inherent heterogeneity, expressed as pressure ridge keels and sails, leads, thickness variations and changes of material property and draught, can be fully assimilated exactly or through approximations whose limitations are understood. On the basis that leads have the major wave scattering effect for most sea-ice [Williams, T.D., Squire, V.A., 2004. Oblique scattering of plane flexural-gravity waves by heterogeneities in sea ice. Proc. R. Soc. Lon. Ser.-A 460 (2052), 3469-3497], a model two dimensional sea-ice sheet composed of a large number of such features, randomly dispersed, is constructed. The wide spacing approximation is used to predict how wave trains of different period will be affected, after first establishing that this produces results that are very close to the exact solution. Like Kohout and Meylan [Kohout, A.L., Meylan, M.H., 2008. An elastic plate model for wave attenuation and ice floe breaking in the marginal ice zone. J. Geophys. Res. 113, C09016, doi:10.1029/2007JC004434], we find that on average the magnitude of a wave transmitted by a field of leads decays exponentially with the number of leads. Then, by fitting a curve based on this assumption to the data, the thickness of the ice sheet is obtained. The attenuation coefficient can always be calculated numerically by ensemble averaging but in some cases more rapidly computed approximations work extremely well. Moreover, it is found that the underlying thickness can be determined to good accuracy by the method as long as Archimedean draught is correctly provided for, suggesting that waves can indeed be effective as a remote sensing agent to measure ice thickness in areas where pressure ridges

  1. CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC! MAGNE-03 : Magnétisme pour l'Electrotechnique Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    MAGNE-03 est un nouveau cours dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement Technique 2003, qui s'adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Recommandé par l'ancienne division LHC, le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France, 38). La participation est ouverte à l'ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. En ayant organisé des sessions au CERN, une économie d'environ 800.- CHF par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur leur site en Isère. MAGNE-03 s'intéresse, entre autres, au développement de la compréhension des phénomènes magnétiques et le "sens physique" appliqués à des produits industriels. Programme : Notions de base en électromagnétisme. Les aspects électrique et mécanique du magnétisme. Les ...

  2. Technical Training: MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'Electrotechnique

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications MAGNE-04 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement Technique qui s'adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l'ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. En ayant organisé des sessions au CERN, une importante économie par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur leur site en Isère. MAGNE-04 s'intéresse, entre autres, au développement de la compréhension des phénomènes magnétiques et le « sens physique » appliqués à des produits industriels. Programme : Notions de base en électromagnétisme. Les aspects électrique et mécanique du magnétisme. Les régi...

  3. CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC! MAGNE-03 : Magnétisme pour l'Electrotechnique
    Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications. - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    MAGNE-03 est un nouveau cours dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement Technique 2003, qui s'adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Recommandé par l'ancienne division LHC, le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France, 38). La participation est ouverte à l'ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. En ayant organisé des sessions au CERN, une économie d'environ 800.- CHF par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur leur site en Isère. MAGNE-03 s'intéresse, entre autres, au développement de la compréhension des phénomènes magnétiques et le "sens physique" appliqués à des produits industriels. Programme : Notions de base en électromagnétisme. Les aspects électrique et mécanique du magnétisme. Les ...

  4. CERN Technical Training 2005: MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l’électrotechnique

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. Learning for the LHC ! Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications MAGNE-05 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l’Enseignement Technique qui s’adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l’ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. Une importante économie p...

  5. CERN Technical Training 2005: MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l’électrotechnique

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    Learning for the LHC ! Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications MAGNE-05 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l’Enseignement Technique qui s’adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l’ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. Une importante économie par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur le site de CEDRAT en France. MAGNE-05 s’intéresse, entre autres, au développement de la compréhension des phénomènes magnétiques et au « sens physique », appliqués à des produits industriels. Programme : Notions de base en électromagnétisme. Les aspects électrique et mécanique du magnétisme. Les régim...

  6. CERN Technical Training 2005: MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    Learning for the LHC ! Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications MAGNE-05 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement technique qui s'adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l'ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. Une importante économie par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur le site de CEDRAT en France. MAGNE-05 s'intéresse, entre autres, au développement de la compréhension des phénomènes magnétiques et au « sens physique », appliqués à des produits industriels. Programme : Notions de base en électromagnétisme. Les aspects électrique et mécanique du magnétisme. Les régimes variab...

  7. CERN enseignement technique 2005: MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l’électrotechnique

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    Learning for the LHC ! Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications MAGNE-05 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l’Enseignement Technique qui s’adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l’ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. Une importante économie par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur le site de CEDRAT en France. MAGNE-05 s’intéresse, entre autres, au développement de la compréhension des phénomènes magnétiques et au « sens physique », appliqués à des produits industriels. Programme : Notions de base en électromagnétisme. Les aspects électrique et mécanique du magnétisme. Les régi...

  8. CERN Technical Training 2005: MAGNE-05 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005: Learning for the LHC ! MAGNE-05 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications. MAGNE-05 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement technique qui s'adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l'ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. Une importante économie par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur le site de...

  9. CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC !
    MAGNE-03 : MagnEtisme pour l'Electrotechnique
    Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    MAGNE-03 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement technique 2003 qui s'adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l'ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. En ayant organisé des sessions au CERN, une importante économie par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur leur site en Isère. MAGNE-03 s'intéresse, entre autres, au développement de la compréhension des phénomènes magnétiques et le «&...

  10. CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC ! MAGNE-03 : MAGNETISME POUR L'ELECTROTECHNIQUE - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2003-01-01

    Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications MAGNE-03 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement technique 2003 qui s'adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l'ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. En ayant organisé des sessions au CERN, une importante économie par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur leur site en Isère. MAGNE-03 s'intéresse, entre autres, au développement de la compr&am...

  11. CERN Technical Training 2005: MAGNE-05 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005: Learning for the LHC ! Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications. MAGNE-05 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement Technique qui s'adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l'ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique nécessitant une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles, courantes ou futures. Une importante économie par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur le site de CEDRAT en France. MAGNE-05 s'intéresse, entre autres, au...

  12. CERN Technical Training 2005: MAGNE-05 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005: Learning for the LHC ! MAGNE-05 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique Phénomènes magnétiques, matériaux et applications. MAGNE-05 est un cours dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement technique qui s'adresse aux personnes souhaitant découvrir, améliorer ou remettre à niveau leurs connaissances en magnétisme. Le cours est donné au CERN par la société CEDRAT Technologies basée à Meylan (France). La participation est ouverte à l'ensemble du personnel technique et scientifique ayant besoin d'une formation en magnétisme dans le cadre de leurs activités professionnelles actuelles ou futures. Une importante économie par participant est réalisée par rapport aux frais nécessaires pour suivre la même formation sur le site de CEDRAT e...

  13. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-05-20

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D(®) software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink(®) in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system.

  14. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D® software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink® in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system. PMID:27213398

  15. Pourquoi les étoiles brillent-elles ? - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Quelles réalités se cachent derrière des mots mystérieux comme pulsars ou trous noirs ? Les 8 et 9 juin, l'Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) et l'Université de Genève (UniGE) organisent des conférences sur l'astrophysique destinées au grand public. L'entrée est libre. Chaque soir, trois exposés successifs : L'homme qui a compris pourquoi brillent les étoiles... par le Professeur André Maeder, Observatoire de Genève, UniGE. Pulsars et trous noirs par le Professeur Thierry Courvoisier, Observatoire de Genève,UniGE. Preuves du Big-Bang par le Professeur Georges Meylan, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique, EPFL . Le 8 juin 2005, de 18h à 20h, Auditoire CO1, EPFL, Ecublens Le 9 juin 2005, de 18h à 20h, Auditoire Rouiller, Uni-Dufour, Genève Renseignements : 022 379 22 00 Impression artistique d'un pulsar et de son étoile compagnon. Crédit : ESA/Francesco Ferraro (Bologna Astronomical Observatory)

  16. Aspectos Tafonômicos de Testudines da Formação Santana (Cretáceo Inferior,Bacia do Araripe, Nordeste do Brasil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ribeiro de Oliveira

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Araripe Basin is worldwide famous by diverse and exquisitely well preserved fossil assemblages in antana Formation. This lithostratigraphic unit is subdivided into three members: Crato, Ipubi and Romualdo. Up to date six species of turtles are known: Araripemys barretoi Price, 1973; Santanachelys gaffneyi, Hirayama,1998; Brasilemys josai Lapparent de Broin, 2000; Cearachelys placidoi Gaffney, Campos & Hirayama, 2001, Euraxemys essweini Gaffney, Tong & Meylan, 2006 and Caririemys violetae Oliveira & Kellner, 2007.Taphonomical features of turtles from Crato and Romualdo members are presents here. One specimen was examined in the Crato lagerstätte, (MN 4893-V Araripemys sp. (partial skull, axial and apendicular skeleton. This exemplar is preserved in light-beige colored laminated limestone from the Crato Member. Three specimenswere analized (MN 6743-V, MN 6744-V and MN 6760-V in the Romualdo lagerstätte, the two first are Araripemys barretoi specimens (shell and cervical vertebrae and the later is a Cearachelys placidoi specimen (fragmented shell. They are preserved in calcareous nodules. No data of collection of these specimens areavailable, however are possible to infer on aspects of preservation of these exemplares, since that these are preserved in the original sedimentary matrix. All specimens have shown the surface of bones without abrasion, what it allows to infer these turtles as autocthonous.

  17. The History of Variable Stars: A Fresh Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, R. A.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) For historians of astronomy, variable stars are important for a simple reason - stars change. But good evidence suggests this is a very modern idea. Over the millennia, our species has viewed stars as eternal and unchanging, forever fixed in time and space - indeed, the Celestial Dance was a celebration of order, reason, and stability. But everything changed in the period between Copernicus and Newton. According to tradition, two New Stars announced the birth of the New Science. Blazing across the celestial stage, Tycho's Star (1572) and Kepler's Star (1604) appeared dramatically - and just as unexpectedly - disappeared forever. But variable stars were different. Mira Ceti, the oldest, brightest, and most controversial variable star, was important because it appeared and disappeared again and again. Mira was important because it did not go away. The purpose of this essay is to take a fresh look at the history of variable stars. In re-thinking the traditional narrative, I begin with the first sightings of David Fabricius (1596) and his contemporaries - particularly Hevelius (1662) and Boulliau (1667) - to new traditions that unfolded from Newton and Maupertuis to Herschel (1780) and Pigott (1805). The essay concludes with important 19th-century developments, particularly by Argelander (1838), Pickering (1888), and Lockyer (1890). Across three centuries, variable stars prompted astronomers to re-think all the ways that stars were no longer "fixed." New strategies were needed. Astronomers needed to organize, to make continuous observations, to track changing magnitudes, and to explain stellar phases. Importantly - as Mira suggested from the outset - these challenges called for an army of observers with the discipline of Spartans. But recruiting that army required a strategy, a set of theories with shared expectations. Observation and theory worked hand-in-hand. In presenting new historical evidence from neglected printed sources and unpublished

  18. The Problem of Longitude in the 18th Century: Jorge Juan, Antonio de Ulloa and the Expedition of the Paris Academy of Sciences to the Kingdom of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Manuel Pérez

    2015-05-01

    Jorge Juan and Antonio de Ulloa, naval officers of the Spanish Navy in the Midshipmen's Royal Academy were appointed to take part in one of the most important scientific expeditions of the 18th century. The question of the shape of the Earth, of vital importance for navigation, was solved by the Paris Academy of Sciences by request of Louis XV of France in 1735. The aim was to determine the form of the ellipsoid that Newton had described in the 17th century for any spherical and homogeneous body in rotation about an axis. Two expeditions were prepared for the geodetic measures of meridian arc both in high latitudes (Lapland, Finland) and in the equatorial zone (the Kingdom of Peru); Pierre Louis Maupertuis took charge of the northern expedition whereas the second one was charged to La Condamine, along with Jorge Juan and Antonio de Ulloa. The results obtained by the Spaniards were gathered in a publication: Observaciones astronómicas y físicas hechas en los Reinos del Perú. In it, they dedicate a chapter to the determination of astronomic longitude with the only technology that was providing certain precision at the moment: the simultaneous observation of the same astronomic phenomenon in two different places. Specifically, they explain in detail in Book III: Las Observaciones de la Inmersiones y Emersiones de los satélites de Júpiter, como asimismo de los eclipses de Luna; de las cuales de deduce la Longitud de los Lugares, incluyendo las correcciones a efectuar por la variación de la declinación diaria del Sol.

  19. Age-Related Variation in Male Youth Athletes' Countermovement Jump After Plyometric Training: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jason J; Sandercock, Gavin R H; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Meylan, César M P; Collison, Jay A; Parry, Dave A

    2017-02-01

    Moran, J, Sandercock, GRH, Ramírez-Campillo, R, Meylan, CMP, Collison, J, and Parry, DA. Age-related variation in male youth athletes' countermovement jump after plyometric training: A meta-analysis of controlled trials. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 552-565, 2017-Recent debate on the trainability of youths has focused on the existence of periods of accelerated adaptation to training. Accordingly, the purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify the age- and maturation-related pattern of adaptive responses to plyometric training in youth athletes. Thirty effect sizes were calculated from the data of 21 sources with studies qualifying based on the following criteria: (a) healthy male athletes who were engaged in organized sport; (b) groups of participants with a mean age between 10 and 18 years; and (c) plyometric-training intervention duration between 4 and 16 weeks. Standardized mean differences showed plyometric training to be moderately effective in increasing countermovement jump (CMJ) height (Effect size = 0.73 95% confidence interval: 0.47-0.99) across PRE-, MID-, and POST-peak height velocity groups. Adaptive responses were of greater magnitude between the mean ages of 10 and 12.99 years (PRE) (ES = 0.91 95% confidence interval: 0.47-1.36) and 16 and 18 years (POST) (ES = 1.02 [0.52-1.53]). The magnitude of adaptation to plyometric training between the mean ages of 13 and 15.99 years (MID) was lower (ES = 0.47 [0.16-0.77]), despite greater training exposure. Power performance as measured by CMJ may be mediated by biological maturation. Coaches could manipulate training volume and modality during periods of lowered response to maximize performance.

  20. CO2calc: A User-Friendly Seawater Carbon Calculator for Windows, Mac OS X, and iOS (iPhone)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, L.L.; Hansen, M.E.; Kleypas, J.A.; Meylan, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    A user-friendly, stand-alone application for the calculation of carbonate system parameters was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey Florida Shelf Ecosystems Response to Climate Change Project in response to its Ocean Acidification Task. The application, by Mark Hansen and Lisa Robbins, USGS St. Petersburg, FL, Joanie Kleypas, NCAR, Boulder, CO, and Stephan Meylan, Jacobs Technology, St. Petersburg, FL, is intended as a follow-on to CO2SYS, originally developed by Lewis and Wallace (1998) and later modified for Microsoft Excel? by Denis Pierrot (Pierrot and others, 2006). Besides eliminating the need for using Microsoft Excel on the host system, CO2calc offers several improvements on CO2SYS, including: An improved graphical user interface for data entry and results Additional calculations of air-sea CO2 fluxes (for surface water calculations) The ability to tag data with sample name, comments, date, time, and latitude/longitude The ability to use the system time and date and latitude/ longitude (automatic retrieval of latitude and longitude available on iPhone? 3, 3GS, 4, and Windows? hosts with an attached National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA)-enabled GPS) The ability to process multiple files in a batch processing mode An option to save sample information, data input, and calculated results as a comma-separated value (CSV) file for use with Microsoft Excel, ArcGIS,? or other applications An option to export points with geographic coordinates as a KMZ file for viewing and editing in Google EarthTM

  1. Comparison of LUMIPULSE(®) G1200 With Kryptor and Modular E170 for the Measurement of Seven Tumor Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlet, Julien; Bernard, Maguy

    2016-01-01

    Tumor marker measurements are becoming essential for prognosis and follow-up of patients in oncology. In this context, we aimed to compare a new analyzer, Lumipulse(®) G1200 (Fujirebio group, distributed in Europe by the Innogenetics group) with Kryptor(®) (Thermo Fisher Scientific B.R.A.H.M.S, Asnières, France) and Modular(®) Elecsys E170 (Roche Diagnostics, Meylan, France) for the measurement of seven tumor markers: PSA, AFP, CEA, CA 15-3, CA 125, CA 19-9, and Cyfra 21-1. A total of 471 serum samples from patients with elevated tumor markers and 100 serum from healthy patients were analyzed with Lumipulse(®) G1200 and either Kryptor(®) (for AFP) or Modular(®) (for the six other markers). The good precision of Lumipulse(®) G1200 assays was confirmed with CVs Lumipulse results were well correlated with Modular or Kryptor results (r ≥ 0.94). Concordance of results interpretation was > 95% and tumor marker kinetics were all similar. We confirmed the analytical performances of Lumipulse(®) tumor marker assays except for the CYFRA 21-1 assay for which performances were poor in this study. We noticed a few discrepancies for the CEA assay. Besides, values obtained for CA 19-9 were higher with Lumipulse leading to a bias (slope = 1.5). But for the four other tumor markers assays (PSA, AFP, CA 125, CA 15-3), the results were directly transferable between Lumipulse and Kryptor or Modular, thus facilitating an eventual substitution of one system by another. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Natural gas seeps in the French Alps: Sources and pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Blessing, Michaela; Proust, Eric; Gal, Frédéric; Bentivegna, Gaetan; Henry, Benoit; Defossez, Pierrick; Catherine, Lerouge; Humez, Pauline; Mayer, Bernhard; Millot, Romain; Gaucher, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas emanations are part of the geochemical baseline to take into account when assessing global greenhouse gas emissions and potential impacts of conventional and unconventional gas exploration and exploitation on groundwater. Examples of such natural gas macro-seeps are known in several parts of the world (Etiope et al., 2009). Only a limited number of them have been characterized for their gas and isotopic compositions. Such analyses can provide essential information for baseline studies, providing insight in the sources (biogenic vs. thermogenic or modified thermogenic) and pathways of such seeps and may allow for distinction of natural seeps from stray gas leakage associated with human activities. Here, we report gas concentrations and multi-isotope data (δ13C and δ2H of methane and ethane, δ13C and δ18O of CO2, 3He/4He ratio) of two gas seeps in the French subalpine chains, both in a similar geological and structural position within Middle Jurassic claystones along the eastern border of the large synclinal structures of the Vercors and the Chartreuse massifs (Moss, 1992). The "ardent fountain" (fontaine ardente) of Le Gua, 30 km south of Grenoble has most likely the longest continuous written record of existence of any individual natural gas seep, mentioned explicitly as early as the first quarter of the 5th century (Augustin of Hippo (St. Augustin), approx. 426) This natural seep was described in the past as a "wet seep" associated with a spring, whereas the second investigated seep, Rochasson near Meylan north of Grenoble, is a dry seep. Both seeps contain methane and ethane with thermogenic C and H isotope signatures, comparable with a seep in the Northern Swiss Alps at Giswil (Etiope et al., 2010) but with a higher dryness (C1/(C2+C3)>1000) for the Le Gua seep, possibly due to molecular fractionation upon advective fluid+gas migration (Etiope et al., 2009). Maturity (R0) of the reservoir rocks deduced from δ13C(CH4), δ13C(C2H6) is similar to

  3. Evaluation and comparison of benchmark QSAR models to predict a relevant REACH endpoint: The bioconcentration factor (BCF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissi, Andrea; Lombardo, Anna; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Gadaleta, Domenico; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Nicolotti, Orazio; Benfenati, Emilio

    2015-02-01

    The bioconcentration factor (BCF) is an important bioaccumulation hazard assessment metric in many regulatory contexts. Its assessment is required by the REACH regulation (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) and by CLP (Classification, Labeling and Packaging). We challenged nine well-known and widely used BCF QSAR models against 851 compounds stored in an ad-hoc created database. The goodness of the regression analysis was assessed by considering the determination coefficient (R(2)) and the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE); Cooper's statistics and Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC) were calculated for all the thresholds relevant for regulatory purposes (i.e. 100L/kg for Chemical Safety Assessment; 500L/kg for Classification and Labeling; 2000 and 5000L/kg for Persistent, Bioaccumulative and Toxic (PBT) and very Persistent, very Bioaccumulative (vPvB) assessment) to assess the classification, with particular attention to the models' ability to control the occurrence of false negatives. As a first step, statistical analysis was performed for the predictions of the entire dataset; R(2)>0.70 was obtained using CORAL, T.E.S.T. and EPISuite Arnot-Gobas models. As classifiers, ACD and logP-based equations were the best in terms of sensitivity, ranging from 0.75 to 0.94. External compound predictions were carried out for the models that had their own training sets. CORAL model returned the best performance (R(2)ext=0.59), followed by the EPISuite Meylan model (R(2)ext=0.58). The latter gave also the highest sensitivity on external compounds with values from 0.55 to 0.85, depending on the thresholds. Statistics were also compiled for compounds falling into the models Applicability Domain (AD), giving better performances. In this respect, VEGA CAESAR was the best model in terms of regression (R(2)=0.94) and classification (average sensitivity>0.80). This model also showed the best regression (R(2)=0.85) and sensitivity (average>0.70) for

  4. Evaluating fossil calibrations for dating phylogenies in light of rates of molecular evolution: a comparison of three approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoschek, Vimoksalehi; Scott Keogh, J; Avise, John C

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary and biogeographic studies increasingly rely on calibrated molecular clocks to date key events. Although there has been significant recent progress in development of the techniques used for molecular dating, many issues remain. In particular, controversies abound over the appropriate use and placement of fossils for calibrating molecular clocks. Several methods have been proposed for evaluating candidate fossils; however, few studies have compared the results obtained by different approaches. Moreover, no previous study has incorporated the effects of nucleotide saturation from different data types in the evaluation of candidate fossils. In order to address these issues, we compared three approaches for evaluating fossil calibrations: the single-fossil cross-validation method of Near, Meylan, and Shaffer (2005. Assessing concordance of fossil calibration points in molecular clock studies: an example using turtles. Am. Nat. 165:137-146), the empirical fossil coverage method of Marshall (2008. A simple method for bracketing absolute divergence times on molecular phylogenies using multiple fossil calibration points. Am. Nat. 171:726-742), and the Bayesian multicalibration method of Sanders and Lee (2007. Evaluating molecular clock calibrations using Bayesian analyses with soft and hard bounds. Biol. Lett. 3:275-279) and explicitly incorporate the effects of data type (nuclear vs. mitochondrial DNA) for identifying the most reliable or congruent fossil calibrations. We used advanced (Caenophidian) snakes as a case study; however, our results are applicable to any taxonomic group with multiple candidate fossils, provided appropriate taxon sampling and sufficient molecular sequence data are available. We found that data type strongly influenced which fossil calibrations were identified as outliers, regardless of which method was used. Despite the use of complex partitioned models of sequence evolution and multiple calibrations throughout the tree, saturation

  5. Evaluation and comparison of benchmark QSAR models to predict a relevant REACH endpoint: The bioconcentration factor (BCF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gissi, Andrea [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Farmacia – Scienze del Farmaco, Università degli Studi di Bari “Aldo Moro”, Via E. Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); Lombardo, Anna; Roncaglioni, Alessandra [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Gadaleta, Domenico [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Farmacia – Scienze del Farmaco, Università degli Studi di Bari “Aldo Moro”, Via E. Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Nicolotti, Orazio [Dipartimento di Farmacia – Scienze del Farmaco, Università degli Studi di Bari “Aldo Moro”, Via E. Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); Benfenati, Emilio, E-mail: emilio.benfenati@marionegri.it [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    The bioconcentration factor (BCF) is an important bioaccumulation hazard assessment metric in many regulatory contexts. Its assessment is required by the REACH regulation (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) and by CLP (Classification, Labeling and Packaging). We challenged nine well-known and widely used BCF QSAR models against 851 compounds stored in an ad-hoc created database. The goodness of the regression analysis was assessed by considering the determination coefficient (R{sup 2}) and the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE); Cooper's statistics and Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC) were calculated for all the thresholds relevant for regulatory purposes (i.e. 100 L/kg for Chemical Safety Assessment; 500 L/kg for Classification and Labeling; 2000 and 5000 L/kg for Persistent, Bioaccumulative and Toxic (PBT) and very Persistent, very Bioaccumulative (vPvB) assessment) to assess the classification, with particular attention to the models' ability to control the occurrence of false negatives. As a first step, statistical analysis was performed for the predictions of the entire dataset; R{sup 2}>0.70 was obtained using CORAL, T.E.S.T. and EPISuite Arnot–Gobas models. As classifiers, ACD and log P-based equations were the best in terms of sensitivity, ranging from 0.75 to 0.94. External compound predictions were carried out for the models that had their own training sets. CORAL model returned the best performance (R{sup 2}{sub ext}=0.59), followed by the EPISuite Meylan model (R{sup 2}{sub ext}=0.58). The latter gave also the highest sensitivity on external compounds with values from 0.55 to 0.85, depending on the thresholds. Statistics were also compiled for compounds falling into the models Applicability Domain (AD), giving better performances. In this respect, VEGA CAESAR was the best model in terms of regression (R{sup 2}=0.94) and classification (average sensitivity>0.80). This model also showed the best

  6. The Dynamics of M15: Observations of the Velocity Dispersion Profile and Fokker-Planck Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dull, J. D.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Murphy, B. W.; Seitzer, P. O.; Callanan, P. J.; Rutten, R. G. M.; Charles, P. A.

    1997-05-01

    We report a new measurement of the velocity dispersion profile within 1' (3 pc) of the center of the globular cluster M15 (NGC 7078), using long-slit spectra from the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope at La Palma Observatory. We obtained spatially resolved spectra for a total of 23 slit positions during two observing runs. During each run, a set of parallel slit positions was used to map out the central region of the cluster; the position angle used during the second run was orthogonal to that used for the first. The spectra are centered in wavelength near the Ca II infrared triplet at 8650 Å, with a spectral range of about 450 Å. We determined radial velocities by cross-correlation techniques for 131 cluster members. A total of 32 stars were observed more than once. Internal and external comparisons indicate a velocity accuracy of about 4 km s-1. The velocity dispersion profile rises from about σ = 7.2 +/- 1.4 km s-1 near 1' from the center of the cluster to σ = 13.9 +/- 1.8 km s-1 at 20". Inside of 20", the dispersion remains approximately constant at about 10.2 +/- 1.4 km s-1 with no evidence for a sharp rise near the center. This last result stands in contrast with that of Peterson, Seitzer, & Cudworth who found a central velocity dispersion of 25 +/- 7 km s-1, based on a line-broadening measurement. Our velocity dispersion profile is in good agreement with those determined in the recent studies of Gebhardt et al. and Dubath & Meylan. We have developed a new set of Fokker-Planck models and have fitted these to the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of M15. We also use the two measured millisecond pulsar accelerations as constraints. The best-fitting model has a mass function slope of x = 0.9 (where 1.35 is the slope of the Salpeter mass function) and a total mass of 4.9 × 105 M⊙. This model contains approximately 104 neutron stars (3% of the total mass), the majority of which lie within 6" (0.2 pc) of the cluster center. Since the

  7. Evaluation and comparison of benchmark QSAR models to predict a relevant REACH endpoint: The bioconcentration factor (BCF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gissi, Andrea; Lombardo, Anna; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Gadaleta, Domenico; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Nicolotti, Orazio; Benfenati, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The bioconcentration factor (BCF) is an important bioaccumulation hazard assessment metric in many regulatory contexts. Its assessment is required by the REACH regulation (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) and by CLP (Classification, Labeling and Packaging). We challenged nine well-known and widely used BCF QSAR models against 851 compounds stored in an ad-hoc created database. The goodness of the regression analysis was assessed by considering the determination coefficient (R 2 ) and the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE); Cooper's statistics and Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC) were calculated for all the thresholds relevant for regulatory purposes (i.e. 100 L/kg for Chemical Safety Assessment; 500 L/kg for Classification and Labeling; 2000 and 5000 L/kg for Persistent, Bioaccumulative and Toxic (PBT) and very Persistent, very Bioaccumulative (vPvB) assessment) to assess the classification, with particular attention to the models' ability to control the occurrence of false negatives. As a first step, statistical analysis was performed for the predictions of the entire dataset; R 2 >0.70 was obtained using CORAL, T.E.S.T. and EPISuite Arnot–Gobas models. As classifiers, ACD and log P-based equations were the best in terms of sensitivity, ranging from 0.75 to 0.94. External compound predictions were carried out for the models that had their own training sets. CORAL model returned the best performance (R 2 ext =0.59), followed by the EPISuite Meylan model (R 2 ext =0.58). The latter gave also the highest sensitivity on external compounds with values from 0.55 to 0.85, depending on the thresholds. Statistics were also compiled for compounds falling into the models Applicability Domain (AD), giving better performances. In this respect, VEGA CAESAR was the best model in terms of regression (R 2 =0.94) and classification (average sensitivity>0.80). This model also showed the best regression (R 2 =0.85) and

  8. Nomenclatural notes on living and fossil amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín, C.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of extinct and living amphibians known from fossils (Allocaudata, Anura and Caudata has revealed several cases that require nomenclatural changes in order to stabilize the taxonomy of the group. Nomenclatural changes include homonym replacements, corrections of spelling variants and authorships, name availabilities, and in particular, the proposal of new combinations. These changes will allow the incorporation of some palaeontological taxa to the current evolutionary models of relationship of modern forms based on molecular phylogenies. Rana cadurcorum for Rana plicata Filhol, 1877, Rana auscitana for Rana pygmaea Lartet, 1851, and Rana sendoa for Rana robusta Brunner, 1956. Anchylorana Taylor, 1942 is considered a new synonym of Lithobates Fitzinger, 1843. New combinations proposed are: Anaxyrus defensor for Bufo defensor Meylan, 2005; Anaxyrus hibbardi for Bufo hibbardi Taylor, 1937; Anaxyrus pliocompactilis for Bufo pliocompactilis Wilson, 1968; Anaxyrus repentinus for Bufo repentinus Tihen, 1962; Anaxyrus rexroadensis for Bufo rexroadensis Tihen, 1962; Anaxyrus spongifrons for Bufo spongifrons Tihen, 1962; Anaxyrus suspectus for Bufo suspectus Tihen, 1962; Anaxyrus tiheni for Bufo tiheni Auffenberg, 1957; Anaxyrus valentinensis for Bufo valentinensis Estes et Tihen, 1964; Ichthyosaura wintershofi for Triturus wintershofi Lunau, 1950; Incilius praevius for Bufo praevius Tihen, 1951; Lithobates bucella for Rana bucella Holman, 1965; Lithobates dubitus for Anchylorana dubita Taylor, 1942; Lithobates fayeae for Rana fayeae Taylor, 1942; Lithobates miocenicus for Rana miocenica Holman, 1965; Lithobates moorei for Anchylorana moorei Taylor, 1942; Lithobates parvissimus for Rana parvissima

  9. Most Massive Globular Cluster in Our Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    measurements were made of 483 giant and sub-giant stars in Omega Centauri, located between 10 arcsec and 1350 arcsec from its centre. The mean velocities could be determined for 469 of them and the astronomers were then able to estimate the spread of stellar velocities at various locations in the cluster. The technical term for this quantity is "velocity dispersion". It increases with the strength of the gravitational field in which the stars move, and is therefore an indicator of the total mass of the entire cluster. The new observations show that the velocity dispersion is about 22 km/sec at the centre of Omega Centauri. The dispersion decreases outwards, but the central value is the largest ever measured in any globular cluster. When taken together with accurate measurements of the distribution of the stars in the cluster, this leads to an estimate of the total mass of Omega Centauri at about 5 million solar masses (1 solar mass = 2 10^30 kg). This is to be compared with the masses of other globular clusters in our Galaxy which in most cases have been found to be of the order of 100,000 solar masses only. In fact, because of its great size and mass, Omega Centauri now appears to be an object that is intermediate between the ordinary globular clusters in the Milky Way and the much larger dwarf spheroidal galaxies which move around our galaxy. This great mass obviously contributes to its long-term stability. 1 This Press Release is accompanied by a photograph, ESO PR Photo 11/94-1. 2 The group consists of Georges Meylan (ESO), Michel Mayor and Antoine Duquennoy (Geneva Observatory, Switzerland) and Pierre Dubath (formerly ESO, now Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, California). They are reporting their new results today at the semi-annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A. 3 The light from the star in Omega Centauri is dispersed into a spectrum. It then passes through a metal mask with holes that correspond to about 1500 absorption