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Sample records for matured macrophages obtained

  1. The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine controls macrophage maturation and functions: protective role during inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Cristiana; Buldorini, Marcella; Assi, Emma; Cazzato, Denise; De Palma, Clara; Clementi, Emilio; Cervia, Davide

    2014-01-01

    The endocrine system participates in regulating macrophage maturation, although little is known about the modulating role of the thyroid hormones. In vitro results demonstrate a negative role of one such hormone, triiodothyronine (T3), in triggering the differentiation of bone marrow-derived monocytes into unpolarized macrophages. T3-induced macrophages displayed a classically activated (M1) signature. A T3-induced M1-priming effect was also observed on polarized macrophages because T3 reverses alternatively activated (M2) activation, whereas it enhances that of M1 cells. In vivo, circulating T3 increased the content of the resident macrophages in the peritoneal cavity, whereas it reduced the content of the recruited monocyte-derived cells. Of interest, T3 significantly protected mice against endotoxemia induced by lipopolysaccharide i.p. injection; in these damaged animals, decreased T3 levels increased the recruited (potentially damaging) cells, whereas restoring T3 levels decreased recruited and increased resident (potentially beneficial) cells. These data suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of T3 is coupled to the modulation of peritoneal macrophage content, in a context not fully explained by the M1/M2 framework. Thyroid hormone receptor expression analysis and the use of different thyroid hormone receptor antagonists suggest thyroid hormone receptor β1 as the major player mediating T3 effects on macrophages. The novel homeostatic link between thyroid hormones and the pathophysiological role of macrophages opens new perspectives on the interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A fragment of alpha-actinin promotes monocyte/macrophage maturation in vitro.

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    Luikart, S; Wahl, D; Hinkel, T; Masri, M; Oegema, T

    1999-02-01

    Conditioned media (CM) from cultures of HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells grown on extracellular bone marrow matrix contains a factor that induces macrophage-like maturation of HL-60 cells. This factor was purified from the CM of HL-60 cells grown on bone marrow stroma by ammonium sulfate precipitation, then sequential chromatography on DEAE, affi-gel blue affinity, gel exclusion, and wheat germ affinity columns, followed by C-4 reverse phase HPLC, and SDS-PAGE. The maturation promoting activity of the CM was identified in a single 31 kD protein. Amino acid sequence analysis of four internal tryptic peptides of this protein confirmed significant homology with amino acid residues 48-60, 138-147, 215-220, and 221-236 of human cytoskeletal alpha-actinin. An immunoaffinity purified rabbit polyclonal anti-chicken alpha-actinin inhibited the activity of HL-60 conditioned media. A 27 kD amino-terminal fragment of alpha-actinin produced by thermolysin digestion of chicken gizzard alpha-actinin, but not intact alpha-actinin, had maturation promoting activity on several cell types, including blood monocytes, as measured by lysozyme secretion and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. We conclude that an extracellular alpha-actinin fragment can promote monocyte/macrophage maturation. This represents the first example of a fragment of a cytoskeletal component, which may be released during tissue remodeling and repair, playing a role in phagocyte maturation.

  3. SHIP-1 Increases Early Oxidative Burst and Regulates Phagosome Maturation in Macrophages1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Lynn A.; Levinsohn, Jonathan; Cadwallader, Amy; Tridandapani, Susheela; Swanson, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the inositol phosphatase SHIP-1 is generally thought to inhibit signaling for Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis, the product of its activity, phosphatidylinositol 3,4 bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P2) has been implicated in activation of the NADPH oxidase. This suggests that SHIP-1 positively regulates generation of reactive oxygen species after phagocytosis. To examine how SHIP-1 activity contributes to Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis, we measured and compared phospholipid dynamics, membrane trafficking and the oxidative burst in macrophages from SHIP-1-deficient and wild-type mice. SHIP-1-deficient macrophages showed significantly elevated ratios of PI(3,4,5) P3 to PI(3,4)P2 on phagosomal membranes. Imaging reactive oxygen intermediate activities in phagosomes revealed decreased early NADPH oxidase activity in SHIP-1-deficient macrophages. SHIP-1-deficiency also altered later stages of phagosome maturation, as indicated by the persistent elevation of PI(3)P and the early localization of Rab5a to phagosomes. These direct measurements of individual organelles indicate that phagosomal SHIP-1 enhances the early oxidative burst through localized alteration of the membrane 3′ phosphoinositide composition. PMID:18490750

  4. Rab20 regulates phagosome maturation in RAW264 macrophages during Fc gamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis.

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    Youhei Egami

    Full Text Available Rab20, a member of the Rab GTPase family, is known to be involved in membrane trafficking, however its implication in FcγR-mediated phagocytosis is unclear. We examined the spatiotemporal localization of Rab20 during phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes (IgG-Es in RAW264 macrophages. By the live-cell imaging of fluorescent protein-fused Rab20, it was shown that Rab20 was transiently associated with the phagosomal membranes. During the early stage of phagosome formation, Rab20 was not localized on the membranes of phagocytic cups, but was gradually recruited to the newly formed phagosomes. Although Rab20 was colocalized with Rab5 to some extent, the association of Rab20 with the phagosomes persisted even after the loss of Rab5 from the phagosomal membranes. Then, Rab20 was colocalized with Rab7 and Lamp1, late endosomal/lysosomal markers, on the internalized phagosomes. Moreover, our analysis of Rab20 mutant expression revealed that the maturation of phagosomes was significantly delayed in cells expressing the GDP-bound mutant Rab20-T19N. These data suggest that Rab20 is an important component of phagosome and regulates the phagosome maturation during FcγR-mediated phagocytosis.

  5. Dog cloning with in vivo matured oocytes obtained using electric chemiluminescence immunoassay-predicted ovulation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghoon; Zhao, Minghui; No, Jingu; Nam, Yoonseok; Im, Gi-Sun; Hur, Tai-Young

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive immunoassay (RIA) is a traditional serum hormone assay method, but the application of the method in reproductive studies is limited by the associated radioactivity. The aim of present study was to evaluate the reliability of RIA and to compare its canine serum progesterone concentration determination accuracy to that of the electric chemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLI). In vivo matured oocytes were utilized for canine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and serum progesterone levels were assessed to accurately determine ovulation and oocyte maturation. Canine serum progesterone concentrations during both proestrus and estrus were analyzed by RIA and ECLI to determine the ovulation day. Although both methods detected similar progesterone levels before ovulation, the mean progesterone concentration determined using ECLI was significantly higher than of RIA three days before ovulation. Following ovulation, oocytes were collected by surgery, and a lower percentage of mature oocytes were observed using ECLI (39%) as compared to RIA (67%) if 4-8ng/ml of progesterone were used for determination of ovulation. A high percentage of mature oocytes was observed using ECLI when 6-15 ng/mL of progesterone was used for ovulation determination. To determine whether ECLI could be used for canine cloning, six canines were selected as oocyte donors, and two puppies were obtained after SCNT and embryo transfer. In conclusion, compared to the traditional RIA method, the ECLI method is a safe and reliable method for canine cloning.

  6. Chemical Compositions and Macrophage Activation of Polysaccharides from Leon's Mane Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom Hericium erinaceus (Higher Basidiomycetes) in Different Maturation Stages.

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    Li, Qiao-Zhen; Wu, Di; Chen, Xia; Zhou, Shuai; Liu, Yanfang; Yang, Yan; Cui, Fengjie

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of the maturation stage on the chemical compositions and macrophage activation activity of polysaccharides from the culinary-medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus. Results showed that total polysaccharides increased, whereas protein content decreased with the maturation stage development of fruiting body. Nine polysaccharide fractions, 3 from each of the maturity stages IV (small fungal spine stage), V (mid-fungal spine stage) and VI (mature), were prepared using the gradient ethanol precipitation method. The polysaccharide fraction HP4A isolated from the maturating-stage (stage IV) fruiting body had a significant difference from the fractions HP5A (stage V) and HP6A (stage VI) in the molecular weight distribution and monosaccharide compositions. Immunostimulating tests revealed that the polysaccharide fraction HP6 isolated from the mature stage (stage VI) fruiting body presented higher macrophage activation activity. Our findings provided important information for the harvest and use of H. erinaceus with higher qualities and functional benefits.

  7. A mature macrophage is a principal HIV-1 cellular reservoir in humanized mice after treatment with long acting antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araínga, Mariluz; Edagwa, Benson; Mosley, R Lee; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E

    2017-03-09

    Despite improved clinical outcomes seen following antiretroviral therapy (ART), resting CD4+ T cells continue to harbor latent human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1). However, such cells are not likely the solitary viral reservoir and as such defining where and how others harbor virus is imperative for eradication measures. To such ends, we used HIV-1 ADA -infected NOD.Cg-Prkdc scid Il2rg tm1Wjl /SzJ mice reconstituted with a human immune system to explore two long-acting ART regimens investigating their abilities to affect viral cell infection and latency. At 6 weeks of infection animals were divided into four groups. One received long-acting (LA) cabotegravir (CAB) and rilpivirine (RVP) (2ART), a second received LA CAB, lamivudine, abacavir and RVP (4ART), a third were left untreated and a fourth served as an uninfected control. After 4 weeks of LA ART treatment, blood, spleen and bone marrow (BM) cells were collected then phenotypically characterized. CD4+ T cell subsets, macrophages and hematopoietic progenitor cells were analyzed for HIV-1 nucleic acids by droplet digital PCR. Plasma viral loads were reduced by two log 10 or to undetectable levels in the 2 and 4ART regimens, respectively. Numbers and distributions of CD4+ memory and regulatory T cells, macrophages and hematopoietic progenitor cells were significantly altered by HIV-1 infection and by both ART regimens. ART reduced viral DNA and RNA in all cell and tissue compartments. While memory cells were the dominant T cell reservoir, integrated HIV-1 DNA was also detected in the BM and spleen macrophages in both regimen-treated mice. Despite vigorous ART regimens, HIV-1 DNA and RNA were easily detected in mature macrophages supporting their potential role as an infectious viral reservoir.

  8. Cord blood-derived macrophage-lineage cells rapidly stimulate osteoblastic maturation in mesenchymal stem cells in a glycoprotein-130 dependent manner.

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    Tania J Fernandes

    Full Text Available In bone, depletion of osteoclasts reduces bone formation in vivo, as does osteal macrophage depletion. How osteoclasts and macrophages promote the action of bone forming osteoblasts is, however, unclear. Since recruitment and differentiation of multi-potential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSC generates new active osteoblasts, we investigated whether human osteoclasts and macrophages (generated from cord blood-derived hematopoietic progenitors induce osteoblastic maturation in adipose tissue-derived MSC. When treated with an osteogenic stimulus (ascorbate, dexamethasone and β-glycerophosphate these MSC form matrix-mineralising, alkaline phosphatase-expressing osteoblastic cells. Cord blood-derived progenitors were treated with macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF to form immature proliferating macrophages, or with M-CSF plus receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL to form osteoclasts; culture medium was conditioned for 3 days by these cells to study their production of osteoblastic factors. Both osteoclast- and macrophage-conditioned medium (CM greatly enhanced MSC osteoblastic differentiation in both the presence and absence of osteogenic medium, evident by increased alkaline phosphatase levels within 4 days and increased mineralisation within 14 days. These CM effects were completely ablated by antibodies blocking gp130 or oncostatin M (OSM, and OSM was detectable in both CM. Recombinant OSM very potently stimulated osteoblastic maturation of these MSC and enhanced bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 actions on MSC. To determine the influence of macrophage activation on this OSM-dependent activity, CM was collected from macrophage populations treated with M-CSF plus IL-4 (to induce alternative activation or with GM-CSF, IFNγ and LPS to cause classical activation. CM from IL-4 treated macrophages stimulated osteoblastic maturation in MSC, while CM from classically-activated macrophages did not. Thus, macrophage-lineage cells

  9. Maturation of the viral core enhances the fusion of HIV-1 particles with primary human T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jiyang; Aiken, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 infection requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes in a reaction catalyzed by the viral envelope proteins gp120 and gp41. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 particle fusion with target cells is linked to maturation of the viral core by an activity of the gp41 cytoplasmic domain. Here, we show that maturation enhances the fusion of a variety of recombinant viruses bearing primary and laboratory-adapted Env proteins with primary human CD4 + T cells. Overall, HIV-1 fusion was more dependent on maturation for viruses bearing X4-tropic envelope proteins than for R5-tropic viruses. Fusion of HIV-1 with monocyte-derived macrophages was also dependent on particle maturation. We conclude that the ability to couple fusion to particle maturation is a common feature of HIV-1 Env proteins and may play an important role during HIV-1 replication in vivo

  10. Nutritional compositions and antioxidative capacity of the silk obtained from immature and mature corn

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    Nurhanan Abdul Rahman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The silks of immature and mature corn were evaluated for their variations in nutritional compositions, mineral content and antioxidant capacity. Both immature and mature silks were good source of nutritional compositions. Immature silks contained significantly higher moisture (89.31% (fresh basis, lipid (1.27% and protein (12.96% content than the mature silk. Mature silks contained higher composition of ash (5.51%, carbohydrate (29.74% and total dietary fiber (51.25 g/100 g, than the immature silk, but the difference was not significant. In mineral determination, immature silk was rich source of Ca (1087.08 μg/g, Mg (1219.17 μg/g, Cu (5.60 μg/g and Zn (46.37 μg/g than the mature silks. In contrast, other minerals such as K (35671.67 μg/g, Na (266.67 μg/g, Fe (4.50 μg/g and Mn (35.57 μg/g were found higher in the mature silk. The silks were extracted with ethyl acetate, ethanol and water using the Soxhlet extraction method to determine the polyphenol and ABTS radical scavenging capacity. From this study, the highest content of total polyphenol of immature silks was exhibited by ethanol extract (92.21 mg GAE/g while water extract (64.22 mg GAE/g had the highest polyphenol content among mature silk extracts. Total flavonoid content of both immature and mature silks was higher in the water extract at 8.40 mg CAE/g and 2.31 mg CAE/g, respectively. In the ABTS free radical assay method, all immature silk extracts had higher percentage of inhibition compared to the mature silks. Among all three crude extracts, the ethanol extract of immature (EC50 = 0.478 mg/ml and mature silk (EC50 = 0.799 mg/ml exhibited the strongest antioxidant capacity followed by the water and ethyl acetate extract.

  11. Effect of Hyaluronan on Developmental Competence and Quality of Oocytes and Obtained Blastocysts from In Vitro Maturation of Bovine Oocytes

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    Jolanta Opiela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of hyaluronan (HA during IVM on meiotic maturation, embryonic development, and the quality of oocytes, granulosa cells (GC, and obtained blastocysts. COCs were matured in vitro in control medium and medium with additional 0.035% or 0.07% of exogenous HA. The meiotic maturity did not differ between the analysed groups. The best rate and the highest quality of obtained blastocysts were observed when 0.07% HA was used. A highly significant difference (P<0.001 was noted in the mean number of apoptotic nuclei per blastocyst and in the DCI between the 0.07% HA and the control blastocysts (P<0.01. Our results suggest that addition of 0.035% HA and 0.07% HA to oocyte maturation media does not affect oocyte nuclear maturation and DNA fragmentation. However, the addition of 0.07% HA during IVM decreases the level of blastocysts DNA fragmentation. Finally, our results suggest that it may be risky to increase the HA concentration during IVM above 0.07% as we found significantly higher Bax mRNA expression levels in GC cultured with 0.07% HA. The final concentration of HA being supplemented to oocyte maturation media is critical for the success of the IVP procedure.

  12. Genetic characterization of early maturing maize hybrids (Zea mays L. obtained by protein and RAPD markers

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    Bauer Iva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of maize germplasm genetic diversity is important for planning breeding programmes, germplasm conservation per se etc. Genetic variability of maize hybrids grown in the fields is also very important because genetic uniformity implies risks of genetic vulnerability to stress factors and can cause great losts in yield. Early maturing maize hybrids are characterized by shorter vegetation period and they are grown in areas with shorter vegetation season. Because of different climatic conditions in these areas lines and hybrids are developed with different features in respect to drought resistance and disease resistance. The objective of our study was to characterize set of early maturing maize hybrids with protein and RAPD markers and to compare this clasification with their pedigree information. RAPD markers gave significantly higher rate of polymorphism than protein markers. Better corelation was found among pedigree information and protein markers.

  13. Endometrial aspiration biopsy: a non-invasive method of obtaining functional lymphoid progenitor cells and mature natural killer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMenamin, Moya

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of endometrial aspiration biopsy (EAB) with the more traditional dilatation and curettage (D&C) for the procurement of lymphoid progenitor cells and uterine natural killer (NK) populations in endometrial tissue. This prospective observational study conducted in a tertiary referral university hospital examined endometrium obtained from 32 women admitted for laparoscopic gynaecological procedures. Each participant had endometrium sampled using both EAB and D&C. Both methods were assessed as a source of uterine NK and lymphoid progenitor cells. Similar proportions of mature CD45+CD56+ NK cells (range 25.4-36.2%) and CD45+CD34+ lymphoid progenitors (range 1.2-2.0%) were found in tissue obtained using both EAB and D&C. These cells were adequate for flow cytometric analysis, magnetic bead separation and culture. Colony formation by the CD34+ population demonstrated maturational potential. Tissues obtained via endometrial biopsy and D&C are equivalent, by analysis of uterine NK and lymphoid progenitor cells. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of endometrial sampling - endometrial aspiration biopsy and traditional dilatation and curettage - for the procurement of haematopoietic stem cells and uterine natural killer (NK) populations in endometrial tissue. Thirty-two women who had gynaecological procedures in a tertiary referral hospital participated in this study and had endometrial tissue collected via both methods. Similar populations of mature NK cells and haematopoietic stem cells were found in tissue obtained using both endometrial aspiration biopsy and dilatation and curettage. Tissue obtained via endometrial aspiration biopsy was adequate for the culture and growth of haematopoietic stem cells. We conclude that tissue obtained via endometrial biopsy and dilatation and curettage is equivalent, by analysis of uterine NK and haematopoietic stem cells using flow cytometry. This has implications for further

  14. Composition, physicochemical properties and thermal inactivation kinetics of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase from coconut (Cocos nucifera) water obtained from immature, mature and overly-mature coconut.

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    Tan, Thuan-Chew; Cheng, Lai-Hoong; Bhat, Rajeev; Rusul, Gulam; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2014-01-01

    Composition, physicochemical properties and enzyme inactivation kinetics of coconut water were compared between immature (IMC), mature (MC) and overly-mature coconuts (OMC). Among the samples studied, pH, turbidity and mineral contents for OMC water was the highest, whereas water volume, titratable acidity, total soluble solids and total phenolics content for OMC water were the lowest. Maturity was found to affect sugar contents. Sucrose content was found to increase with maturity, and the reverse trend was observed for fructose and glucose. Enzyme activity assessment showed that polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in all samples was more heat resistant than peroxidase (POD). Compared to IMC and MC, PPO and POD from OMC water showed the lowest thermal resistance, with D83.3°C=243.9s (z=27.9°C), and D83.3°C=129.9s (z=19.5°C), respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lysophosphatidylcholine Promotes Phagosome Maturation and Regulates Inflammatory Mediator Production Through the Protein Kinase A–Phosphatidylinositol 3 Kinase–p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway During Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Mouse Macrophages

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    Hyo-Ji Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is caused by the infectious agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Mtb has various survival strategies, including blockade of phagosome maturation and inhibition of antigen presentation. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC is a major phospholipid component of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and is involved in various cellular responses, such as activation of second messengers and bactericidal activity in neutrophils. In this study, macrophages were infected with a low infectious dose of Mtb and treated with LPC to investigate the bactericidal activity of LPC against Mtb. In macrophages infected with Mtb strain, H37Ra or H37Rv, LPC suppressed bacterial growth; however, this effect was suppressed in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs isolated from G2A (a G protein-coupled receptor involved in some LPC actions knockout mice. LPC also promoted phagosome maturation via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K–p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-mediated reactive oxygen species production and intracellular Ca2+ release during Mtb infection. In addition, LPC induced increased levels of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β in Mtb-infected macrophages. Protein kinase A (PKA-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β suppressed activation of NF-κB in LPC-treated macrophages during Mtb infection, leading to decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that LPC can effectively control Mtb growth by promoting phagosome maturation via cAMP-induced activation of the PKA–PI3K–p38 MAPK pathway. Moreover, LPC can regulate excessive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with bacterial infection of macrophages.

  16. Effect of Enzymatic Digestion of Protein Derivatives Obtained from Mucuna pruriens L. on Production of Proinflammatory Mediators by BALB/c Mouse Macrophages.

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    Martínez Leo, Edwin E; Arana Argáez, Victor E; Acevedo Fernández, Juan J; Puc, Rosa Moo; Segura Campos, Maira R

    2018-04-25

    Inflammation is considered to be a major risk factor for the pathogenesis of chronic non-communicable diseases. Macrophages are important immune cells, which regulate inflammation and host defense by secretion of proinflammatory mediators. Obtaining biopeptides by enzymatic hydrolysis adds value to proteins of vegetative origin, such as Mucuna pruriens L. The present study evaluated the effect of enzymatic digestion of protein derivatives obtained from M. pruriens L. on the production of proinflammatory mediators by BALB/c mouse macrophages. Five different molecular weight peptide fractions were obtained (F > 10, 5-10, 3-5, 1-3, and < 1 kDa, respectively). At 300 μg/mL, F5-10 kDa inhibited 50.26 and 61.00% NO and H 2 O 2 production, respectively. Moreover, F5-10 kDa reduced the IL-6 and TNFα levels to 60.25 and 69.54%, respectively. After enzymatic digestive simulation, F5-10 kDa decreased the inflammatory mediators.

  17. Ovarian morphometric characterization and in vitro maturation of oocytes obtained from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis ovaries – partial results

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    F.C. Landim-Alvarenga

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Buffalo ovaries were collected from a slaughterhouse (Frigol, Brazil and transported to the laboratory in saline solution at 36º C. The ovaries were dissected to realize the evaluations (weight, length, width and height of the ovary; corpus luteum and dominant follicle diameters. The Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs were recovered by aspiration of 2-8 mm follicles. Selected COCs were matured in TCM 199 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, sodium pyruvate, LH, FSH, estradiol and gentamicin. In vitro maturation was carried out at 38.5° C for 22-24 h and 34-36 h. For the evaluation of the nuclear maturation the oocytes were placed in TCM 199 medium added with type v hialuronidase where the granulosa cells were extracted. The denuded oocytes were transferred to 10 μl of Hoescht 33342 and the chromosomic configuration was evaluated. The oocytes were classified according to meiosis stage in: Germinal Vesicle, Germinal Vesicle Breakdown, Metaphase I, Metaphase II and Degenerated. The means of weight, length, width and height of the ovary were 3.83 g, 2.27 cm, 1.08 cm and 1.56 cm, respectively. The means of corpus luteum and dominant follicle diameters were 1.40 cm and 7.77 mm. The proportion of oocytes that reached metaphase II stage was: 36.68%.

  18. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Maturation Process of β-Cell-Like Cells Obtained from an Optimized Differentiation Protocol of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

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    Pezzolla, Daniela; López-Beas, Javier; Lachaud, Christian C.; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Smani, Tarik; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Soria, Bernat

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) retain the extraordinary capacity to differentiate into different cell types of an adult organism, including pancreatic β-cells. For this particular lineage, although a lot of effort has been made in the last ten years to achieve an efficient and reproducible differentiation protocol, it was not until recently that this aim was roughly accomplished. Besides, several studies evidenced the impact of resveratrol (RSV) on insulin secretion, even though the mechanism by which this polyphenol potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) is still not clear. The aim of this study was to optimize an efficient differentiation protocol that mimics in vivo pancreatic organogenesis and to investigate whether RSV may improve the final maturation step to obtain functional insulin-secreting cells. Our results indicate that treatment of hESCs (HS-181) with activin-A induced definitive endoderm differentiation as detected by the expression of SOX17 and FOXA2. Addition of retinoic acid (RA), Noggin and Cyclopamine promoted pancreatic differentiation as indicated by the expression of the early pancreatic progenitor markers ISL1, NGN3 and PDX1. Moreover, during maturation in suspension culture, differentiating cells assembled in islet-like clusters, which expressed specific endocrine markers such as PDX1, SST, GCG and INS. Similar results were confirmed with the human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hiPSC) line MSUH-001. Finally, differentiation protocols incorporating RSV treatment yielded numerous insulin-positive cells, induced significantly higher PDX1 expression and were able to transiently normalize glycaemia when transplanted in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice thus promoting its survival. In conclusion, our strategy allows the efficient differentiation of hESCs into pancreatic endoderm capable of generating β-cell-like cells and demonstrates that RSV improves the maturation process. PMID:25774684

  19. Progastrin represses the alternative activation of human macrophages and modulates their influence on colon cancer epithelial cells.

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    Carlos Hernández

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration is a negative prognostic factor for most cancers but gastrointestinal tumors seem to be an exception. The effect of macrophages on cancer progression depends on their phenotype, which may vary between M1 (pro-inflammatory, defensive to M2 (tolerogenic, pro-tumoral. Gastrointestinal cancers often become an ectopic source of gastrins and macrophages present receptors for these peptides. The aim of the present study is to analyze whether gastrins can affect the pattern of macrophage infiltration in colorectal tumors. We have evaluated the relationship between gastrin expression and the pattern of macrophage infiltration in samples from colorectal cancer and the influence of these peptides on the phenotype of macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in vitro. The total number of macrophages (CD68+ cells was similar in tumoral and normal surrounding tissue, but the number of M2 macrophages (CD206+ cells was significantly higher in the tumor. However, the number of these tumor-associated M2 macrophages correlated negatively with the immunoreactivity for gastrin peptides in tumor epithelial cells. Macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in the presence of progastrin showed lower levels of M2-markers (CD206, IL10 with normal amounts of M1-markers (CD86, IL12. Progastrin induced similar effects in mature macrophages treated with IL4 to obtain a M2-phenotype or with LPS plus IFNγ to generate M1-macrophages. Macrophages differentiated in the presence of progastrin presented a reduced expression of Wnt ligands and decreased the number and increased cell death of co-cultured colorectal cancer epithelial cells. Our results suggest that progastrin inhibits the acquisition of a M2-phenotype in human macrophages. This effect exerted on tumor associated macrophages may modulate cancer progression and should be taken into account when analyzing the therapeutic value of gastrin immunoneutralization.

  20. A feasibility study of prepubertal and over mature aged local goat in relation to results of In Vitro growth culture to obtain additional M-II oocyte resources

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    Ciptadi, Gatot; Ihsan, M. Nur; Rahayu, Sri; Widjaja, D. H. K.; Mudawamah, Mudawamah

    2017-11-01

    The aims of this research are to study the potential source of mature (M-II) oocytes of domestic animals using follicles isolated from prepubertal and over mature aged Indonesian local goats, resulting from an in vitro growth (IVG) method. This method of IVG could provide a new source of M-II oocytes for embryo production. In Indonesia, a very limited number of a good quality oocytes are available for research purposes, as there is a limited number of reproductive females slaughtered, which is dominated by prepubertal and old mature aged animals. IVG culture systems could be improved as an alternative method to provide a new source of a good quality oocytes for in vitro maturation of M-II oocytes. From a number of prepubertal and mature aged goats slaughtered in a local abattoir, the small oocytes in the preantral follicles were cultured in vitro to normal oocyte growth. The methods used in this research are experimental. Follicles were isolated, cultured in vitro for 14 days individually using a sticky medium containing 4% (w/v) polyvinylpyrrolidone in TCM 199 10% Fetal Bovine Serum supplemented with Follicle Stimulating Hormone, which was then evaluated for their follicle development and oocyte quality. The research results showed that a minimum follicle size and oocyte diameter is needed (>100 um) for early evaluation of maturation to be achieved, meanwhile oocytes recovered from IVG after being cultured in vitro for maturation resulted in a very low rate of maturation. However, in the future, IVG of the preantral follicles of Indonesian local goat could be considered as an alternative source of oocytes for both research purposes and embryo production in vitro.

  1. Evaluation of in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of crude ginger and rosemary extracts obtained through supercritical CO2 extraction on macrophage and tumor cell line: the influence of vehicle type.

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    Justo, Oselys Rodriguez; Simioni, Patricia Ucelli; Gabriel, Dirce Lima; Tamashiro, Wirla Maria da Silva Cunha; Rosa, Paulo de Tarso Vieira; Moraes, Ângela Maria

    2015-10-29

    Numerous plants from have been investigated due to their anti-inflammatory activity and, among then, extracts or components of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sources of polyphenolic compounds. 6-gingerol from ginger rhizome and carnosic acid and carnosol from rosemary leaves present anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. However, the evaluation of the mechanisms of action of these and other plant extracts is limited due to their high hydrophobicity. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is commonly used as a vehicle of liposoluble materials to mammalian cells in vitro, presenting enhanced cell penetration. Liposomes are also able to efficiently deliver agents to mammalian cells, being capable to incorporate in their structure not only hydrophobic molecules, but also hydrophilic and amphiphilic compounds. Another strategy is based on the use of Pluronic F-68, a biocompatible low-foaming, non-ionic surfactant, to disperse hydrophobic components. Here, these three delivery approaches were compared to analyze their influence on the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of ginger and rosemary extracts, at different concentrations, on primary mammalian cells and on a tumor cell line. Ginger and rosemary extracts free of organic solvents were obtained by supercritical fluid extraction and dispersed in DMSO, Pluronic F-68 or liposomes, in variable concentrations. Cell viability, production of inflammatory mediators and nitric oxide (NO) release were measured in vitro on J774 cell line and murine macrophages primary culture stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ after being exposed or not to these extracts. Ginger and rosemary extracts obtained by supercritical CO2 extraction inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the release of NO by peritoneal macrophages and J774 cells. The delivery vehicles influenced the anti-inflammatory effects. Comparatively, the ginger extract showed the

  2. Characterization of monocyte-derived dendritic cells maturated with IFN-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, I M; Nikolajsen, K; Walter, M R

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy. These cells can be generated from peripheral blood monocytes cultured with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). In order to obtain full functional capacity, maturation is required......, maturation with IFN-alpha has only a small effect on induction of autologous T-cell stimulatory capacity of the DC. However, an increase in DC allogeneic T-cell stimulatory capacity was observed. These data suggest that IFN-alpha has a potential as a maturation agent used in DC-based cancer vaccine trials...

  3. The macrophage-histiocytic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, A

    1971-04-01

    The macrophage-histiocytic system is primarily concerned with the phagocytosis and degradation either of foreign material that enters the organism or of senile and damaged cells belonging to the organism itself. The system includes various kinds of cells with the common ability to process and eventually degrade and digest the ingested material. Two morphological characteristics of these cells are linked to their phagocytic functions: intra-cytoplasmic vacuoles and lysosomes. Although endothelial and fibroblastic cells can ingest particles, it seems that most cells of the macrophage-histiocytic system belong to the monocyte series. The stem cell of the system is still a matter for discussion and the mature cells have attracted a large and confusing array of names. Most of the experimental work with irradiation has involved macrophages of the peritoneal cavity and lymph nodes. It is likely that the other cells of the macrophage-histiocytic system are affected in the same way by irradiation, but this is not certain.

  4. MONOCYTES AND MACROPHAGES IN PREGNANCY AND PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke M Faas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is an important complication in pregnancy, characterized byhypertension and proteinuria in the second half of pregnancy. Generalizedactivation of the inflammatory response is thought to play a role in thepathogenesis of preeclampsia. Monocytes may play a central role in thisinflammatory response. Monocytes are short lived cells, that mature in thecirculation and invade into tissues upon an inflammatory stimulus anddevelop into macrophages. Macrophages are abundantly present in theendometrium and play a role in implantation and placentation in normalpregnancy. In preeclampsia, these macrophages appear to be present in largernumbers and are also activated. In the present review we focused on the roleof monocytes and macrophages in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia.

  5. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, Babs O.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2005-01-01

    Mature tissue macrophages form a first line of defense to recognize and eliminate potential pathogens; these specialized cells are capable of phagocytosis, degradation of self and foreign materials, establishment of cell-cell interactions, and the production of inflammatory mediators. Mature tissue

  6. Purinergic signaling during macrophage differentiation results in M2 alternative activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages represent a highly heterogenic cell population of the innate immune system, with important roles in the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. Purinergic signaling regulates both M1 and M2 macrophage function at different levels by controlling the secretion of cytokines, phagocytosis, and the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that extracellular nucleotides arrest macrophage differentiation from bone marrow precursors via adenosine and P2 receptors. This results in a mature macrophage with increased expression of M2, but not M1, genes. Similar to adenosine and ATP, macrophage growth arrested with LPS treatment resulted in an increase of the M2-related marker Ym1. Recombinant Ym1 was able to affect macrophage proliferation and could, potentially, be involved in the arrest of macrophage growth during hematopoiesis. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  7. Dexamethasone targeted directly to macrophages induces macrophage niches that promote erythroid expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falchi, Mario; Varricchio, Lilian; Martelli, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Cultures of human CD34(pos) cells stimulated with erythroid growth factors plus dexamethasone, a model for stress erythropoiesis, generate numerous erythroid cells plus a few macrophages (approx. 3%; 3:1 positive and negative for CD169). Interactions occurring between erythroblasts and macrophages...... in these cultures and the biological effects associated with these interactions were documented by live phase-contrast videomicroscopy. Macrophages expressed high motility interacting with hundreds/thousands of erythroblasts per hour. CD169(pos) macrophages established multiple rapid 'loose' interactions...... with proerythroblasts leading to formation of transient erythroblastic island-like structures. By contrast, CD169(neg) macrophages established 'tight' interactions with mature erythroblasts and phagocytosed these cells. 'Loose' interactions of CD169(pos) macrophages were associated with proerythroblast cytokinesis (the...

  8. Adipose tissue macrophages impair preadipocyte differentiation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fen Liu

    Full Text Available The physiologic mechanisms underlying the relationship between obesity and insulin resistance are not fully understood. Impaired adipocyte differentiation and localized inflammation characterize adipose tissue from obese, insulin-resistant humans. The directionality of this relationship is not known, however. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether adipose tissue inflammation is causally-related to impaired adipocyte differentiation.Abdominal subcutaneous(SAT and visceral(VAT adipose tissue was obtained from 20 human participants undergoing bariatric surgery. Preadipocytes were isolated, and cultured in the presence or absence of CD14+ macrophages obtained from the same adipose tissue sample. Adipocyte differentiation was quantified after 14 days via immunofluorescence, Oil-Red O, and adipogenic gene expression. Cytokine secretion by mature adipocytes cultured with or without CD14+macrophages was quantified.Adipocyte differentiation was significantly lower in VAT than SAT by all measures (p<0.001. With macrophage removal, SAT preadipocyte differentiation increased significantly as measured by immunofluorescence and gene expression, whereas VAT preadipocyte differentiation was unchanged. Adipocyte-secreted proinflammatory cytokines were higher and adiponectin lower in media from VAT vs SAT: macrophage removal reduced inflammatory cytokine and increased adiponectin secretion from both SAT and VAT adipocytes. Differentiation of preadipocytes from SAT but not VAT correlated inversely with systemic insulin resistance.The current results reveal that proinflammatory immune cells in human SAT are causally-related to impaired preadipocyte differentiation, which in turn is associated with systemic insulin resistance. In VAT, preadipocyte differentiation is poor even in the absence of tissue macrophages, pointing to inherent differences in fat storage potential between the two depots.

  9. Niacin and its metabolites as master regulators of macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio; Naranjo, M Carmen; Lopez, Sergio; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J Garcia; Bermudez, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Niacin is a broad-spectrum lipid-regulating drug used for clinical therapy of chronic high-grade inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which either niacin or the byproducts of its catabolism ameliorate these inflammatory diseases are not clear yet. Human circulating monocytes and mature macrophages were used to analyze the effects of niacin and its metabolites (NAM, NUA and 2-Pyr) on oxidative stress, plasticity and inflammatory response by using biochemical, flow cytometry, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot technologies. Niacin, NAM and 2-Pyr significantly decreased ROS, NO and NOS2 expression in LPS-treated human mature macrophages. Niacin and NAM skewed macrophage polarization toward antiinflammatory M2 macrophage whereas a trend toward proinflammatory M1 macrophage was noted following treatment with NUA. Niacin and NAM also reduced the inflammatory competence of LPS-treated human mature macrophages and promoted bias toward antiinflammatory CD14 + CD16 ++ nonclassical human primary monocytes. This study reveals for the first time that niacin and its metabolites possess antioxidant, reprogramming and antiinflammatory properties on human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. Our findings imply a new understanding of the mechanisms by which niacin and its metabolites favor a continuous and gradual plasticity process in the human monocyte/macrophage system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Unraveling Macrophage Heterogeneity in Erythroblastic Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Giger Seu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian erythropoiesis occurs within erythroblastic islands (EBIs, niches where maturing erythroblasts interact closely with a central macrophage. While it is generally accepted that EBI macrophages play an important role in erythropoiesis, thorough investigation of the mechanisms by which they support erythropoiesis is limited largely by inability to identify and isolate the specific macrophage sub-population that constitute the EBI. Early studies utilized immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence to study EBI morphology and structure, while more recent efforts have used flow cytometry for high-throughput quantitative characterization of EBIs and their central macrophages. However, these approaches based on the expectation that EBI macrophages are a homogeneous population (F4/80+/CD169+/VCAM-1+ for example provide an incomplete picture and potentially overlook critical information about the nature and biology of the islands and their central macrophages. Here, we present a novel method for analysis of EBI macrophages from hematopoietic tissues of mice and rats using multispectral imaging flow cytometry (IFC, which combines the high-throughput advantage of flow cytometry with the morphological and fluorescence features derived from microscopy. This method provides both quantitative analysis of EBIs, as well as structural and morphological details of the central macrophages and associated cells. Importantly, the images, combined with quantitative software features, can be used to evaluate co-expression of phenotypic markers which is crucial since some antigens used to identify macrophages (e.g., F4/80 and CD11b can be expressed on non-erythroid cells associated with the islands instead of, or in addition to the central macrophage itself. We have used this method to analyze native EBIs from different hematopoietic tissues and evaluated the expression of several markers that have been previously reported to be expressed on EBI macrophages. We

  11. Leucine supplementation attenuates macrophage foam-cell formation: Studies in humans, mice, and cultured macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajeda-Iglesias, Claudia; Rom, Oren; Hamoud, Shadi; Volkova, Nina; Hayek, Tony; Abu-Saleh, Niroz; Aviram, Michael

    2018-02-05

    Whereas atherogenicity of dietary lipids has been largely studied, relatively little is known about the possible contribution of dietary amino acids to macrophage foam-cell formation, a hallmark of early atherogenesis. Recently, we showed that leucine has antiatherogenic properties in the macrophage model system. In this study, an in-depth investigation of the role of leucine in macrophage lipid metabolism was conducted by supplementing humans, mice, or cultured macrophages with leucine. Macrophage incubation with serum obtained from healthy adults supplemented with leucine (5 g/d, 3 weeks) significantly decreased cellular cholesterol mass by inhibiting the rate of cholesterol biosynthesis and increasing cholesterol efflux from macrophages. Similarly, leucine supplementation to C57BL/6 mice (8 weeks) resulted in decreased cholesterol content in their harvested peritoneal macrophages (MPM) in relation with reduced cholesterol biosynthesis rate. Studies in J774A.1 murine macrophages revealed that leucine dose-dependently decreased cellular cholesterol and triglyceride mass. Macrophages treated with leucine (0.2 mM) showed attenuated uptake of very low-density lipoproteins and triglyceride biosynthesis rate, with a concurrent down-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1, a key enzyme catalyzing triglyceride biosynthesis in macrophages. Similar effects were observed when macrophages were treated with α-ketoisocaproate, a key leucine metabolite. Finally, both in vivo and in vitro leucine supplementation significantly improved macrophage mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. The above studies, conducted in human, mice, and cultured macrophages, highlight a protective role for leucine attenuating macrophage foam-cell formation by mechanisms related to the metabolism of cholesterol, triglycerides, and energy production. © 2018 BioFactors, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Lactoferricin Peptides Increase Macrophages' Capacity To Kill Mycobacterium avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tânia; Moreira, Ana C; Nazmi, Kamran; Moniz, Tânia; Vale, Nuno; Rangel, Maria; Gomes, Paula; Bolscher, Jan G M; Rodrigues, Pedro N; Bastos, Margarida; Gomes, Maria Salomé

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections cause a significant burden of disease and death worldwide. Their treatment is long, toxic, costly, and increasingly prone to failure due to bacterial resistance to currently available antibiotics. New therapeutic options are thus clearly needed. Antimicrobial peptides represent an important source of new antimicrobial molecules, both for their direct activity and for their immunomodulatory potential. We have previously reported that a short version of the bovine antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin with amino acids 17 to 30 (LFcin17-30), along with its variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, killed Mycobacterium avium in broth culture. In the present work, those peptides were tested against M. avium living inside its natural host cell, the macrophage. We found that the peptides increased the antimicrobial action of the conventional antibiotic ethambutol inside macrophages. Moreover, the d-enantiomer of the lactoferricin peptide (d-LFcin17-30) was more stable and induced significant killing of intracellular mycobacteria by itself. Interestingly, d-LFcin17-30 did not localize to M. avium -harboring phagosomes but induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and increased the formation of lysosomes and autophagosome-like vesicles. These results lead us to conclude that d-LFcin17-30 primes macrophages for intracellular microbial digestion through phagosomal maturation and/or autophagy, culminating in mycobacterial killing. IMPORTANCE The genus Mycobacterium comprises several pathogenic species, including M. tuberculosis , M. leprae , M. avium , etc. Infections caused by these bacteria are particularly difficult to treat due to their intrinsic impermeability, low growth rate, and intracellular localization. Antimicrobial peptides are increasingly acknowledged as potential treatment tools, as they have a high spectrum of activity, low tendency to induce bacterial resistance, and immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we

  13. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-01-01

    for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting...... of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs...... to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches....

  14. Maturity Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in set theory and readily available software have enabled social science researchers to bridge the variable-centered quantitative and case-based qualitative methodological paradigms in order to analyze multi-dimensional associations beyond the linearity assumptions, aggregate...... effects, unicausal reduction, and case specificity. Based on the developments in set theoretical thinking in social sciences and employing methods like Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA), Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA), and set visualization techniques, in this position paper, we propose...... and demonstrate a new approach to maturity models in the domain of Information Systems. This position paper describes the set-theoretical approach to maturity models, presents current results and outlines future research work....

  15. Clonorchis sinensis antigens alter hepatic macrophage polarization in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Min; Kwak, You Shine; Yi, Myung-Hee; Kim, Ju Yeong; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2017-05-01

    Clonorchis sinensis infection elicits hepatic inflammation, which can lead to cholangitis, periductal hepatic fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and even cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic macrophages are an intrinsic element of both innate and acquired immunity. This study was conducted to demonstrate the dynamics of hepatic macrophage polarization during C. sinensis infection in mice and to identify factors regulating this polarization. Treatment of hepatic macrophages isolated from normal mice with C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (ESPs) resulted in the preferential generation of classically activated hepatic macrophages (M1 macrophages) and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, cells stimulated with C. sinensis ESPs exhibited changes in cellular morphology. During the early stages of C. sinensis infection, hepatic macrophages preferentially differentiated into M1 macrophages; however, during the C. sinensis mature worm stage, when eggs are released, there were significant increases in the abundance of both M1 macrophages and alternatively activated hepatic macrophages (M2 macrophages). Moreover, there was a further increase in the M2 macrophage count during the fibrotic and cirrhotic stage of infection. Notably, this fibrotic and cirrhotic stage promoted a strong increase in the proportion of Arg-1-producing macrophages (M2 phenotype), which were associated with fibrosis and tissue repair in the liver. Our results suggest that the dynamic polarization of hepatic macrophages as C. sinensis infection progresses is related to the histological lesions present in liver tissue. Hepatic macrophages thus play an important role in local immunity during C. sinensis infection.

  16. Clonorchis sinensis antigens alter hepatic macrophage polarization in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Min Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Clonorchis sinensis infection elicits hepatic inflammation, which can lead to cholangitis, periductal hepatic fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and even cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic macrophages are an intrinsic element of both innate and acquired immunity. This study was conducted to demonstrate the dynamics of hepatic macrophage polarization during C. sinensis infection in mice and to identify factors regulating this polarization. Treatment of hepatic macrophages isolated from normal mice with C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (ESPs resulted in the preferential generation of classically activated hepatic macrophages (M1 macrophages and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, cells stimulated with C. sinensis ESPs exhibited changes in cellular morphology. During the early stages of C. sinensis infection, hepatic macrophages preferentially differentiated into M1 macrophages; however, during the C. sinensis mature worm stage, when eggs are released, there were significant increases in the abundance of both M1 macrophages and alternatively activated hepatic macrophages (M2 macrophages. Moreover, there was a further increase in the M2 macrophage count during the fibrotic and cirrhotic stage of infection. Notably, this fibrotic and cirrhotic stage promoted a strong increase in the proportion of Arg-1-producing macrophages (M2 phenotype, which were associated with fibrosis and tissue repair in the liver. Our results suggest that the dynamic polarization of hepatic macrophages as C. sinensis infection progresses is related to the histological lesions present in liver tissue. Hepatic macrophages thus play an important role in local immunity during C. sinensis infection.

  17. Role of Alveolar Macrophages in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vlahos, Ross; Bozinovski, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) represent a unique leukocyte population that responds to airborne irritants and microbes. This distinct microenvironment coordinates the maturation of long-lived AMs, which originate from fetal blood monocytes and self-renew through mechanisms dependent on GM-CSF and CSF-1 signaling. Peripheral blood monocytes can also replenish lung macrophages; however, this appears to occur in a stimuli specific manner. In addition to mounting an appropriate immune response durin...

  18. Beyond maturity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessmer, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Simulator Industry has undergone to decades of evolution in experience, technology and business practices. Link-Miles Simulation Corporation (LMSC) has been contracted to build 68 Full Scope Nuclear Simulators during the 1970's and 1980's. Traditional approaches to design, development and testing have been used to satisfy specifications for initial customer requirements. However, the Industry has matured. All U.S. Nuclear Utilities own, or have under contract, at least one simulator. Other industrial nations have centralized training facilities to satisfy the simulator training needs. The customer of the future is knowledgeable and experienced in the development and service of nuclear simulators. The role of the simulator vendor is changing in order to alter the traditional approach for development. Covenants between the vendors and their customers solidify new complementary roles. This paper presents examples of current simulator project development with recommendations for future endeavors

  19. Therapeutic potential of regulatory macrophages generated from peritoneal dialysate in adriamycin nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Changqi; Wang, Xin M; Lee, Vincent W S; Zheng, Guoping; Zhao, Ye; Alexander, Stephen I; Harris, David C H

    2018-04-01

    Cell therapy using macrophages requires large amounts of cells, which are difficult to collect from patients. Patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) discard huge numbers of peritoneal macrophages in dialysate daily. Macrophages can be modulated to become regulatory macrophages, which have shown great promise as a therapeutic strategy in experimental kidney disease and human kidney transplantation. This study aimed to examine the potential of using peritoneal macrophages (PMs) from peritoneal dialysate to treat kidney disease. Monocytes/macrophages accounted for >40% of total peritoneal leukocytes in both patients and mice undergoing PD. PMs from patients and mice undergoing PD were more mature than peripheral monocytes/macrophages, as shown by low expression of C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) and morphological changes during in vitro culture. PMs from patients and mice undergoing PD displayed normal macrophage function and could be modulated into a regulatory (M2) phenotype. In vivo, adoptive transfer of peritoneal M2 macrophages derived from PD mice effectively protected against kidney injury in mice with adriamycin nephropathy (AN). Importantly, the transfused peritoneal M2 macrophages maintained their M2 phenotype in kidney of AN mice. In conclusion, PMs derived from patients and mice undergoing PD exhibited conventional macrophage features. Peritoneal M2 macrophages derived from PD mice are able to reduce kidney injury in AN, suggesting that peritoneal macrophages from patients undergoing PD may have the potential for clinical therapeutic application.

  20. Macrophage phenotype is associated with disease severity in preterm infants with chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Lynne R; Maxwell, Nicola C; Gill, Sharonjit K; Dockrell, David H; Sabroe, Ian; McGreal, Eamon P; Kotecha, Sailesh; Whyte, Moira K

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of persistent lung inflammation in preterm infants with chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD) is poorly characterized, hampering efforts to stratify prognosis and treatment. Airway macrophages are important innate immune cells with roles in both the induction and resolution of tissue inflammation. To investigate airway innate immune cellular phenotypes in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or CLD. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was obtained from term and preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation. BAL cells were phenotyped by flow cytometry. Preterm birth was associated with an increase in the proportion of non-classical CD14(+)/CD16(+) monocytes on the day of delivery (58.9 ± 5.8% of total mononuclear cells in preterm vs 33.0 ± 6.1% in term infants, p = 0.02). Infants with RDS were born with significantly more CD36(+) macrophages compared with the CLD group (70.3 ± 5.3% in RDS vs 37.6 ± 8.9% in control, p = 0.02). At day 3, infants born at a low gestational age are more likely to have greater numbers of CD14(+) mononuclear phagocytes in the airway (p = 0.03), but fewer of these cells are functionally polarized as assessed by HLA-DR (p = 0.05) or CD36 (p = 0.05) positivity, suggesting increased recruitment of monocytes or a failure to mature these cells in the lung. These findings suggest that macrophage polarization may be affected by gestational maturity, that more immature macrophage phenotypes may be associated with the progression of RDS to CLD and that phenotyping mononuclear cells in BAL could predict disease outcome.

  1. Macrophage phenotype is associated with disease severity in preterm infants with chronic lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne R Prince

    Full Text Available The etiology of persistent lung inflammation in preterm infants with chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD is poorly characterized, hampering efforts to stratify prognosis and treatment. Airway macrophages are important innate immune cells with roles in both the induction and resolution of tissue inflammation.To investigate airway innate immune cellular phenotypes in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS or CLD.Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was obtained from term and preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation. BAL cells were phenotyped by flow cytometry.Preterm birth was associated with an increase in the proportion of non-classical CD14(+/CD16(+ monocytes on the day of delivery (58.9 ± 5.8% of total mononuclear cells in preterm vs 33.0 ± 6.1% in term infants, p = 0.02. Infants with RDS were born with significantly more CD36(+ macrophages compared with the CLD group (70.3 ± 5.3% in RDS vs 37.6 ± 8.9% in control, p = 0.02. At day 3, infants born at a low gestational age are more likely to have greater numbers of CD14(+ mononuclear phagocytes in the airway (p = 0.03, but fewer of these cells are functionally polarized as assessed by HLA-DR (p = 0.05 or CD36 (p = 0.05 positivity, suggesting increased recruitment of monocytes or a failure to mature these cells in the lung.These findings suggest that macrophage polarization may be affected by gestational maturity, that more immature macrophage phenotypes may be associated with the progression of RDS to CLD and that phenotyping mononuclear cells in BAL could predict disease outcome.

  2. Macrophages in synovial inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling eKennedy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSynovial macrophages are one of the resident cell types in synovial tissue and while they remain relatively quiescent in the healthy joint, they become activated in the inflamed joint and, along with infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, regulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes involved in driving the inflammatory response and joint destruction. Synovial macrophages are positioned throughout the sub-lining layer and lining layer at the cartilage-pannus junction and mediate articular destruction. Sub-lining macrophages are now also considered as the most reliable biomarker for disease severity and response to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of inflammation and an appreciation that the resolution of inflammation is an active process rather than a passive return to homeostasis, and this has implications for our understanding of the role of macrophages in inflammation. Macrophage phenotype determines the cytokine secretion profile and tissue destruction capabilities of these cells. Whereas inflammatory synovial macrophages have not yet been classified into one phenotype or another it is widely known that TNFα and IL-l, characteristically released by M1 macrophages, are abundant in RA while IL-10 activity, characteristic of M2 macrophages, is somewhat diminished.Here we will briefly review our current understanding of macrophages and macrophage polarisation in RA as well as the elements implicated in controlling polarisation, such as cytokines and transcription factors like NFκB, IRFs and NR4A, and pro-resolving factors, such as LXA4 and other lipid mediators which may promote a non-inflammatory, pro-resolving phenotype and may represent a novel therapeutic paradigm.

  3. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuna Zoe de Back

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC. During steady state haematopoiesis, approximately 1010 red blood cells are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages.

  4. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Back, Djuna Z; Kostova, Elena B; van Kraaij, Marian; van den Berg, Timo K; van Bruggen, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC). During steady state hematopoiesis, approximately 10(10) RBC are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages.

  5. Mycobacteria, Metals, and the Macrophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies. PMID:25703564

  6. Accumulation of M1-like macrophages in type 2 diabetic islets is followed by a systemic shift in macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucak, Helena; Grunnet, Lars Groth; Rosendahl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Human T2D is characterized by a low-grade systemic inflammation, loss of β-cells, and diminished insulin production. Local islet immunity is still poorly understood, and hence, we evaluated macrophage subpopulations in pancreatic islets in the well-established murine model of T2D, the db/db mouse. Already at 8 weeks of disease, on average, 12 macrophages were observed in the diabetic islets, whereas only two were recorded in the nondiabetic littermates. On a detailed level, the islet resident macrophages increased fourfold compared with nondiabetic littermates, whereas a pronounced recruitment (eightfold) of a novel subset of macrophages (CD68+F4/80-) was observed. The majority of the CD68+F4/80+ but only 40% of the CD68+F4/80- islet macrophages expressed CD11b. Both islet-derived macrophage subsets expressed moderate MHC-II, high galectin-3, and low CD80/CD86 levels, suggesting the cells to be macrophages rather than DCs. On a functional level, the vast majority of the macrophages in the diabetic islets was of the proinflammatory, M1-like phenotype. The systemic immunity in diabetic animals was characterized by a low-grade inflammation with elevated cytokine levels and increase of splenic cytokine, producing CD68+F4/80- macrophages. In late-stage diabetes, the cytokine signature changed toward a TGF-β-dominated profile, coinciding with a significant increase of galectin-3-positive macrophages in the spleen. In summary, our results show that proinflammatory M1-like galectin-3+ CD80/CD86(low) macrophages invade diabetic islets. Moreover, the innate immunity matures in a diabetes-dependent manner from an initial proinflammatory toward a profibrotic phenotype, supporting the concept that T2D is an inflammatory disease.

  7. [Macrophages in human semen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Beatriz Reina; Brufman, Adriana Silvia; Paparella, Cecilia Vicenta; Feldman, Rodolfo Nestor; Gatti, Vanda Nora; Solis, Edita Amalia

    2003-11-01

    To investigate the presence of macrophages in human semen samples and the function they carry out in the seminal fluid. Their presence was studied in relation to spermatic morphology, percentage of spermatozoids with native DNA, and presence of antispermatic antibodies. The work was performed with semen samples from 31 unfertile males from 63 couples in which the "female factor" was ruled out as the cause of infertility. Sperm study according to WHO (1992) was carried out in all samples, in addition to: DNA study with acridine orange as fluorocrom, macrophage concentration by neutral red in a Neubauer camera, and detection of antispermatic antibodies with a mixed agglutination test (TAC II) (validated with Mar Screen-Fertility technologies). Sperm morphology was evaluated by Papanicolaou test. 19/31 selected sperm samples (61.3%) showed increased concentration of macrophages, 13 of them (41.9%) with denaturalized DNA, and 8 (25.8%) abnormal morphology. Six samples showed increased macrophage concentration and predominance of native DNA, whereas 11 samples showed increased macrophages and abnormal morphology. Among 18 (58.1%) samples showing antispermatic antibodies 14 (77.7%) had an increased concentration of macrophages. Statistical analysis resulted in a high correlation between macrophage concentration and increased percentage of spermatozoids with denaturalized DNA (p < 0.05). An increased concentration of macrophages is associated with the presence of antispermatic antibodies (p < 0.05). There was not evidence of significant association between concentration of macrophages and percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoids (p < 0.05). We can conclude that macrophages are present in human semen and participate in immunovigilance contributing to improve the seminal quality.

  8. M2 polarization enhances silica nanoparticle uptake by macrophages

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    Jessica eHoppstädter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While silica nanoparticles have enabled numerous industrial and medical applications, their toxicological safety requires further evaluation. Macrophages are the major cell population responsible for nanoparticle clearance in vivo. The prevailing macrophage phenotype largely depends on the local immune status of the host. Whereas M1-polarized macrophages are considered as pro-inflammatory macrophages involved in host defense, M2 macrophages exhibit anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties, but also promote tumor growth.We employed different models of M1 and M2 polarization: GM-CSF/LPS/IFN-gamma was used to generate primary human M1 cells and M-CSF/IL-10 to differentiate M2 monocyte-derived macrophages. PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were polarized towards an M1 type by LPS/IFN-gamma and towards M2 by IL-10. Uptake of fluorescent silica nanoparticles (Ø 26 and 41 nm and microparticles (Ø 1.75 µm was quantified. At the concentration used (50 µg/ml, silica nanoparticles did not influence cell viability as assessed by MTT assay. Nanoparticle uptake was enhanced in M2-polarized primary human monocyte-derived macrophages compared with M1 cells, as shown by flow cytometric and microscopic approaches. In contrast, the uptake of microparticles did not differ between M1 and M2 phenotypes. M2 polarization was also associated with increased nanoparticle uptake in the macrophage-like THP-1 cell line. In accordance, in vivo polarized M2-like primary human tumor-associated macrophages (TAM obtained from lung tumors took up more nanoparticles than M1-like alveolar macrophages isolated from the surrounding lung tissue.In summary, our data indicate that the M2 polarization of macrophages promotes nanoparticle internalization. Therefore, the phenotypical differences between macrophage subsets should be taken into consideration in future investigations on nanosafety, but might also open up therapeutic perspectives allowing to specifically target M2

  9. Leishmania hijacking of the macrophage intracellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Loiseau, Philippe M

    2016-02-01

    Leishmania spp., transmitted to humans by the bite of the sandfly vector, are responsible for the three major forms of leishmaniasis, cutaneous, diffuse mucocutaneous and visceral. Leishmania spp. interact with membrane receptors of neutrophils and macrophages. In macrophages, the parasite is internalized within a parasitophorous vacuole and engages in a particular intracellular lifestyle in which the flagellated, motile Leishmania promastigote metacyclic form differentiates into non-motile, metacyclic amastigote form. This phenomenon is induced by Leishmania-triggered events leading to the fusion of the parasitophorous vacuole with vesicular members of the host cell endocytic pathway including recycling endosomes, late endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum. Maturation of the parasitophorous vacuole leads to the intracellular proliferation of the Leishmania amastigote forms by acquisition of host cell nutrients while escaping host defense responses. © 2015 FEBS.

  10. Mechanisms of macrophage accumulation in the lungs of asbestos-exposed subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurzem, J.R.; Saltini, C.; Rom, W.; Winchester, R.J.; Crystal, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic asbestos exposure is associated with the accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes in the lower respiratory tract. This process can be both protective and injurious, since macrophages can aid in asbestos clearance yet also modulate structural derangements of the alveolar walls. To understand why macrophages accumulate in the lungs of asbestos-exposed persons, 2 possible mechanisms were evaluated using alveolar macrophages from subjects with histories of chronic high exposure to airborne asbestos: enhanced recruitment of blood monocytes to the lung, and an increased rate of replication of macrophages in situ. Monoclonal antibody analysis with antibodies that detect surface antigens on the majority of circulating blood monocytes but only on a minority of mature alveolar macrophages demonstrated that an increased proportion of alveolar macrophages of asbestos workers expressed monocyte lineage antigens, suggesting the presence of young newly recruited macrophages and thus enhanced recruitment. Culture of the alveolar macrophages from these subjects with [ 3 H]thymidine followed by autoradiography demonstrated an increased proportion of alveolar macrophages synthesizing DNA, suggesting the macrophages are replicating at an increased rate in situ. These observations are consistent with the concept that both enhanced recruitment of blood monocytes and increased local proliferation of alveolar macrophages contribute to the accumulation mononuclear phagocytes in the lung of persons with chronic asbestos exposure

  11. The elusive antifibrotic macrophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhyatmika eAdhyatmika

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e. antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behaviour stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behaviour in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behaviour.

  12. Cell Elasticity Determines Macrophage Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Naimish R.; Bole, Medhavi; Chen, Cheng; Hardin, Charles C.; Kho, Alvin T.; Mih, Justin; Deng, Linhong; Butler, James; Tschumperlin, Daniel; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Koziel, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function. PMID:23028423

  13. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  14. A Drosophila Model to Image Phagosome Maturation

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    Douglas A. Brooks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis involves the internalization of extracellular material by invagination of the plasma membrane to form intracellular vesicles called phagosomes, which have functions that include pathogen degradation. The degradative properties of phagosomes are thought to be conferred by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes; however, this maturation process has not been studied in vivo. We employed Drosophila hemocytes, which are similar to mammalian professional macrophages, to establish a model of phagosome maturation. Adult Drosophila females, carrying transgenic Rab7-GFP endosome and Lamp1-GFP lysosome markers, were injected with E. coli DH5α and the hemocytes were collected at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after infection. In wild-type females, E. coli were detected within enlarged Rab7-GFP positive phagosomes at 15 to 45 minutes after infection; and were also observed in enlarged Lamp1-GFP positive phagolysosomes at 45 minutes. Two-photon imaging of hemocytes in vivo confirmed this vesicle morphology, including enlargement of Rab7-GFP and Lamp1-GFP structures that often appeared to protrude from hemocytes. The interaction of endosomes and lysosomes with E. coli phagosomes observed in Drosophila hemocytes was consistent with that previously described for phagosome maturation in human ex vivo macrophages. We also tested our model as a tool for genetic analysis using 14-3-3e mutants, and demonstrated altered phagosome maturation with delayed E. coli internalization, trafficking and/or degradation. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila hemocytes provide an appropriate, genetically amenable, model for analyzing phagosome maturation ex vivo and in vivo.

  15. Maturity and maturity models in lean construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Nesensohn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing interest in maturity models in management-related disciplines; which reflects a growing recognition that becoming more mature and having a model to guide the route to maturity can help organisations in managing major transformational change. Lean Construction (LC is an increasingly important improvement approach that organisations seek to embed. This study explores how to apply the maturity models to LC. Hence the attitudes, opinions and experiences of key industry informants with high levels of knowledge of LC were investigated. To achieve this, a review of maturity models was conducted, and data for the analysis was collected through a sequential process involving three methods. First a group interview with seven key informants. Second a follow up discussion with the same individuals to investigate some of the issues raised in more depth. Third an online discussion held via LinkedIn in which members shared their views on some of the results. Overall, we found that there is a lack of common understanding as to what maturity means in LC, though there is general agreement that the concept of maturity is a suitable one to reflect the path of evolution for LC within organisations.

  16. Alternatively Activated (M2) Macrophage Phenotype Is Inducible by Endothelin-1 in Cultured Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldano, Stefano; Pizzorni, Carmen; Paolino, Sabrina; Trombetta, Amelia Chiara; Montagna, Paola; Brizzolara, Renata; Ruaro, Barbara; Sulli, Alberto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Alternatively activated (M2) macrophages are phenotypically characterized by the expression of specific markers, mainly macrophage scavenger receptors (CD204 and CD163) and mannose receptor-1 (CD206), and participate in the fibrotic process by over-producing pro-fibrotic molecules, such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta1) and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is implicated in the fibrotic process, exerting its pro-fibrotic effects through the interaction with its receptors (ETA and ETB). The study investigated the possible role of ET-1 in inducing the transition from cultured human macrophages into M2 cells. Cultured human monocytes (THP-1 cell line) were activated into macrophages (M0 macrophages) with phorbol myristate acetate and subsequently maintained in growth medium (M0-controls) or treated with either ET-1 (100nM) or interleukin-4 (IL-4, 10ng/mL, M2 inducer) for 72 hours. Similarly, primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocyte (PBM)-derived macrophages obtained from healthy subjects, were maintained in growth medium (untreated cells) or treated with ET-1 or IL-4 for 6 days. Both M0 and PBM-derived macrophages were pre-treated with ET receptor antagonist (ETA/BRA, bosentan 10-5M) for 1 hour before ET-1 stimulation. Protein and gene expression of CD204, CD206, CD163, TGFbeta1 were analysed by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Gene expression of interleukin(IL)-10 and macrophage derived chemokine (CCL-22) was evaluated by qRT-PCR. MMP-9 production was investigated by gel zymography. ET-1 significantly increased the expression of M2 phenotype markers CD204, CD206, CD163, IL-10 and CCL-22, and the production of MMP-9 in both cultures of M0 and PBM-derived macrophages compared to M0-controls and untreated cells. In cultured PBM-derived macrophages, ET-1 increased TGFbeta1 protein and gene expression compared to untreated cells. The ET-1-mediated effects were

  17. Slab replacement maturity guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the use of maturity method to determine early age strength of concrete in slab : replacement application. Specific objectives were (1) to evaluate effects of various factors on the compressive : maturity-strength relationship ...

  18. Proliferating macrophages prevail in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J

    2013-09-01

    Macrophages accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions during the inflammation that is part of atherosclerosis development and progression. A new study in mice indicates that the accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques depends on local macrophage proliferation rather than the recruitment of circulating monocytes.

  19. Dynamic activation of basilar membrane macrophages in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration in aging mouse cochleae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mitchell D; Yang, Weiping; Zhang, Celia; Xiong, Binbin; Hu, Bo Hua

    2017-02-01

    In the sensory epithelium, macrophages have been identified on the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. These basilar membrane macrophages are the spatially closest immune cells to sensory cells and are able to directly respond to and influence sensory cell pathogenesis. While basilar membrane macrophages have been studied in acute cochlear stresses, their behavior in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration is largely unknown. Here we report a systematic observation of the variance in phenotypes, the changes in morphology and distribution of basilar membrane tissue macrophages in different age groups of C57BL/6J mice, a mouse model of age-related sensory cell degeneration. This study reveals that mature, fully differentiated tissue macrophages, not recently infiltrated monocytes, are the major macrophage population for immune responses to chronic sensory cell death. These macrophages display dynamic changes in their numbers and morphologies as age increases, and the changes are related to the phases of sensory cell degeneration. Notably, macrophage activation precedes sensory cell pathogenesis, and strong macrophage activity is maintained until sensory cell degradation is complete. Collectively, these findings suggest that mature tissue macrophages on the basilar membrane are a dynamic group of cells that are capable of vigorous adaptation to changes in the local sensory epithelium environment influenced by sensory cell status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Low Levels of IGF-1 Contribute to Alveolar Macrophage Dysfunction in Cystic Fibrosis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessich, Jamie L.; Nymon, Amanda B.; Moulton, Lisa A; Dorman, Dana; Ashare, Alix

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages are major contributors to lung innate immunity. Although alveolar macrophages from CFTR−/− mice have impaired function, no study has investigated primary alveolar macrophages in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). CF patients have low levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and our prior studies demonstrate a relationship between IGF-1 and macrophage function. We hypothesize that reduced IGF-1 in CF leads to impaired alveolar macrophage function and chronic infections. Serum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples were obtained from 8 CF subjects and 8 healthy subjects. Macrophages were isolated from BAL fluid. We measured the ability of alveolar macrophages to kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Subsequently, macrophages were incubated with IGF-1 prior to inoculation with bacteria to determine the effect of IGF-1 on bacterial killing. We found a significant decrease in bacterial killing by CF alveolar macrophages compared to controls. CF subjects had lower serum and BAL IGF-1 levels compared to healthy controls. Exposure to IGF-1 enhanced alveolar macrophage macrophages in both groups. Finally, exposing healthy alveolar macrophages to CF BAL fluid decreased bacterial killing, and this was reversed by the addition of IGF-1, while IGF-1 blockade worsened bacterial killing. Our studies demonstrate that alveolar macrophage function is impaired in patients with CF. Reductions in IGF-1 levels in CF contribute to the impaired alveolar macrophage function. Exposure to IGF-1 ex vivo, results in improved function of CF alveolar macrophages. Further studies are needed to determine whether alveolar macrophage function can be enhanced in vivo with IGF-1 treatment. PMID:23698746

  1. MicroRNAs Control Macrophage Formation and Activation: The Inflammatory Link between Obesity and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cheng-An Chang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation and recruitment of resident macrophages in tissues in response to physiological stress are crucial regulatory processes in promoting the development of obesity-associated metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that microRNAs play important roles in modulating monocyte formation, macrophage maturation, infiltration into tissues and activation. Macrophage-dependent systemic physiological and tissue-specific responses also involve cell-cell interactions between macrophages and host tissue niche cell components, including other tissue-resident immune cell lineages, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle and others. In this review, we highlight the roles of microRNAs in regulating the development and function of macrophages in the context of obesity, which could provide insights into the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Yersinia pestis Requires Host Rab1b for Survival in Macrophages.

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    Michael G Connor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease known as plague. During infection of macrophages Y. pestis actively evades the normal phagosomal maturation pathway to establish a replicative niche within the cell. However, the mechanisms used by Y. pestis to subvert killing by the macrophage are unknown. Host Rab GTPases are central mediators of vesicular trafficking and are commonly targeted by bacterial pathogens to alter phagosome maturation and killing by macrophages. Here we demonstrate for the first time that host Rab1b is required for Y. pestis to effectively evade killing by macrophages. We also show that Rab1b is specifically recruited to the Yersinia containing vacuole (YCV and that Y. pestis is unable to subvert YCV acidification when Rab1b expression is knocked down in macrophages. Furthermore, Rab1b knockdown also altered the frequency of association between the YCV with the lysosomal marker Lamp1, suggesting that Rab1b recruitment to the YCV directly inhibits phagosome maturation. Finally, we show that Rab1b knockdown also impacts the pH of the Legionella pneumophila containing vacuole, another pathogen that recruits Rab1b to its vacuole. Together these data identify a novel role for Rab1b in the subversion of phagosome maturation by intracellular pathogens and suggest that recruitment of Rab1b to the pathogen containing vacuole may be a conserved mechanism to control vacuole pH.

  3. ORGANIZATIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT MATURITY

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    Yana Derenskaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present article is aimed at developing a set of recommendations for achieving a higher level of organizational project maturity at a given enterprise. Methodology. For the purposes of the current research, the available information sources on the components of project management system are analysed; the essence of “organizational maturity” and the existing models of organizational maturity are studied. The method of systemic and structural analysis, as well as the method of logical generalization, are employed in order to study the existing models of organizational maturity, to describe levels of organizational maturity, and finally to develop a set of methodological recommendations for achieving a higher level of organizational project maturity at a given enterprise. The results of the research showed that the core elements of project management system are methodological, organizational, programtechnical, and motivational components. Project management encompasses a wide range of issues connected with organizational structure, project team, communication management, project participants, etc. However, the fundamental basis for developing project management concept within a given enterprise starts with defining its level of organizational maturity. The present paper describes various models of organizational maturity (staged, continuous, petal-shaped and their common types (H. Кеrzner Organizational Maturity Model, Berkeley PM Maturity Model, Organizational Project Management Maturity Model, Portfolio, Program & Project Management Maturity Model. The analysis of available theoretic works showed that the notion “organizational project maturity” refers to the capability of an enterprise to select projects and manage them with the intention of achieving its strategic goals in the most effective way. Importantly, the level of maturity can be improved by means of formalizing the acquired knowledge, regulating project-related activities

  4. Macrophage immunoregulatory pathways in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Ni, Bin; Dodd, Claire E; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2014-12-01

    Macrophages, the major host cells harboring Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), are a heterogeneous cell type depending on their tissue of origin and host they are derived from. Significant discord in macrophage responses to M.tb exists due to differences in M.tb strains and the various types of macrophages used to study tuberculosis (TB). This review will summarize current concepts regarding macrophage responses to M.tb infection, while pointing out relevant differences in experimental outcomes due to the use of divergent model systems. A brief description of the lung environment is included since there is increasing evidence that the alveolar macrophage (AM) has immunoregulatory properties that can delay optimal protective host immune responses. In this context, this review focuses on selected macrophage immunoregulatory pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), cytokines, negative regulators of inflammation, lipid mediators and microRNAs (miRNAs). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgkinson, Jordan W.; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type), and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type). The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and ...

  6. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of macrophage function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disorder with a key role for macrophages in all disease stages. Macrophages are involved as scavengers of lipids, regulate inflammation, attract other immune cells and contribute to the resolution of inflammation, fibrosis and plaque stability.

  8. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan W. Hodgkinson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type, and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type. The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation.

  9. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Jordan W; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-11-30

    Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type), and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type). The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation.

  10. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of 59 Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of 59 Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in 59 Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models

  11. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Studies on the pathogenesis of fever. XV. The production of endogenous pyrogen by peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, H H; Char, D C; Postel, W B; Wood, W B

    1967-08-01

    Macrophages from oil-induced peritoneal exudates in rabbits produce endogenous pyrogen when first activated by incubation in 4 hr exudate fluid and then stimulated by incubation in potassium-free isotonic sodium chloride solution. The failure of earlier investigators to obtain pyrogen from macrophages is explained, and the relevance of macrophage pyrogen to fevers of agranulocytosis and other diseases, in which mononuclear rather than granulocytic exudates predominate, is discussed.

  13. Macrophages under pressure: the role of macrophage polarization in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwani, Sailesh C

    2018-01-01

    Hypertension is a multifactorial disease involving the nervous, renal, and cardiovascular systems. Macrophages are the most abundant and ubiquitous immune cells, placing them in a unique position to serve as key mediators between these components. The polarization of macrophages confers vast phenotypic and functional plasticity, allowing them to act as proinflammatory, homeostatic, and anti-inflammatory agents. Key differences between the M1 and M2 phenotypes, the 2 subsets at the extremes of this polarization spectrum, place macrophages at a juncture to mediate many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Neuronal and non-neuronal regulation of the immune system, that is, the "neuroimmuno" axis, plays an integral role in the polarization of macrophages. In hypertension, the neuroimmuno axis results in synchronization of macrophage mobilization from immune cell reservoirs and their chemotaxis, via increased expression of chemoattractants, to end organs critical in the development of hypertension. This complicated system is largely coordinated by the dichotomous actions of the autonomic neuronal and non-neuronal activation of cholinergic, adrenergic, and neurohormonal receptors on macrophages, leading to their ability to "switch" between phenotypes at sites of active inflammation. Data from experimental models and human studies are in concordance with each other and support a central role for macrophage polarization in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure elucidation of a bioactive polysaccharide from fruiting bodies of Hericium erinaceus in different maturation stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiao-Zhen; Wu, Di; Zhou, Shuai; Liu, Yan-Fang; Li, Zheng-Peng; Feng, Jie; Yang, Yan

    2016-06-25

    HPB-3, a heteropolysaccharide, with a mean molecular weight of 1.5×10(4)Da, was obtained from the maturating-stage IV, V and VI fruiting body of Hericium erinaceus, exhibited higher macrophages stimulation activities, was able to upregulate the functional events mediated by activated macrophages, such as production of nitric oxide (NO). Monosaccharide composition analysis showed that HPB-3 comprised l-fucose, d-galactose and d-glucose in the ratio of 5.2:23.9:1. Its chemical structure was characterized by sugar and methylation analysis, along with (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, HMQC and HMBC experiments. The results indicated that HPB-3 contained a-(1/6)-linked galactopyranosyl backbone, partially with a side chain composed of α-l-fucopyranose at the O-2 position. The predicted primary structure of the polysaccharide was established as below. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiation induced early maturing mutants in barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Chauhan, S.V.S.; Sharma, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    In M 2 generation, two early maturing plants were screened from a single spike progeny of a plant obtained from 20 kR of gamma-ray irradiation of a six-rowed barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. Jyoti). Their true breeding nature was confirmed in M 3 generation. These mutants flower and mature 38 and 22 days earlier than those of control. (auth.)

  16. Maturity of the PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.; Rapin, M.; Aboudarham, L.; Bitsch, D.

    1983-03-01

    Figures illustrating the predominant position of the PWR system are presented. The question is whether on the basis of these figures the PWR can be considered to have reached maturity. The following analysis, based on the French program experience, is an attempt to pinpoint those areas in which industrial maturity of the PWR has been attained, and in which areas a certain evolution can still be expected to take place

  17. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:...le Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflam

  18. Role of Alveolar Macrophages in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Ross; Bozinovski, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) represent a unique leukocyte population that responds to airborne irritants and microbes. This distinct microenvironment coordinates the maturation of long-lived AMs, which originate from fetal blood monocytes and self-renew through mechanisms dependent on GM-CSF and CSF-1 signaling. Peripheral blood monocytes can also replenish lung macrophages; however, this appears to occur in a stimuli specific manner. In addition to mounting an appropriate immune response during infection and injury, AMs actively coordinate the resolution of inflammation through efferocytosis of apoptotic cells. Any perturbation of this process can lead to deleterious responses. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there is an accumulation of airway macrophages that do not conform to the classic M1/M2 dichotomy. There is also a skewed transcriptome profile that favors expression of wound-healing M2 markers, which is reflective of a deficiency to resolve inflammation. Endogenous mediators that can promote an imbalance in inhibitory M1 vs. healing M2 macrophages are discussed, as they are the plausible mechanisms underlying why AMs fail to effectively resolve inflammation and restore normal lung homeostasis in COPD. PMID:25309536

  19. Ingestion and digestion of erythrocytes by non-irradiated and irradiated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorbrodt, A; Grabska, A; Krzyzowska-Gruca, S; Gruca, S

    1975-01-01

    The effect of x rays (1300 R) and gamma irradiation (3000 R) on phagocytic activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages cultivated in vitro was studied using human glutaraldehyde-fixed red blood cells. The peroxidative activity of haemoglobin was cytochemically detected by the DAB method. The obtained results indicate that the applied dose of x irradiation does not affect the phagocytic activity of macrophages. On the contrary, the gamma irradiation (3000 R) causes acceleration of phagocytic activity of macrophages with concomitant impairment of intracellular digestion of ingested material. Weakened cytochemical reaction for acid phosphatase suggests that sufficiently high doses of irradiation cause some disturbances in the biosynthesis of lysosomal enzymes in exposed macrophages.

  20. Leishmania carbon metabolism in the macrophage phagolysosome- feast or famine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConville, Malcolm J; Saunders, Eleanor C; Kloehn, Joachim; Dagley, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A number of medically important microbial pathogens target and proliferate within macrophages and other phagocytic cells in their mammalian hosts. While the majority of these pathogens replicate within the host cell cytosol or non-hydrolytic vacuolar compartments, a few, including protists belonging to the genus Leishmania, proliferate long-term within mature lysosome compartments.  How these parasites achieve this feat remains poorly defined. In this review, we highlight recent studies that suggest that Leishmania virulence is intimately linked to programmed changes in the growth rate and carbon metabolism of the obligate intra-macrophage stages. We propose that activation of a slow growth and a stringent metabolic response confers resistance to multiple stresses (oxidative, temperature, pH), as well as both nutrient limitation and nutrient excess within this niche. These studies highlight the importance of metabolic processes as key virulence determinants in Leishmania.

  1. Exposure of Monocytes to Lipoarabinomannan Promotes Their Differentiation into Functionally and Phenotypically Immature Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Chávez-Galán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoarabinomannan (LAM is a lipid virulence factor secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis. LAM can be measured in the urine or serum of tuberculosis patients (TB-patients. Circulating monocytes are the precursor cells of alveolar macrophages and might be exposed to LAM in patients with active TB. We speculated that exposing monocytes to LAM could produce phenotypically and functionally immature macrophages. To test our hypothesis, human monocytes were stimulated with LAM (24–120 hours and various readouts were measured. The study showed that when monocytes were exposed to LAM, the frequency of CD68+, CD33+, and CD86+ macrophages decreased, suggesting that monocyte differentiation into mature macrophages was affected. Regarding functionality markers, TLR2+ and TLR4+ macrophages also decreased, but the percentage of MMR+ expression did not change. LAM-exposed monocytes generated macrophages that were less efficient in producing proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IFN-γ; however, their phagocytic capacity was not modified. Taken together, these data indicate that LAM exposure influenced monocyte differentiation and produced poorly functional macrophages with a different phenotype. These results may help us understand how mycobacteria can limit the quality of the innate and adaptive immune responses.

  2. Unexpected macrophage-independent dyserythropoiesis in Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihani, Nelly; Arlet, Jean-Benoit; Dussiot, Michael; de Villemeur, Thierry Billette; Belmatoug, Nadia; Rose, Christian; Colin-Aronovicz, Yves; Hermine, Olivier; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Franco, Melanie

    2016-12-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare inherited disease caused by a deficiency in glucocerebrosidase leading to lipid accumulation in cells of mononuclear-macrophage lineage known as Gaucher cells. Visceral enlargement, bone involvement, mild anemia and thrombocytopenia are the major manifestations of Gaucher disease. We have previously demonstrated that the red blood cells from patients exhibit abnormal properties, which indicates a new role in Gaucher disease pathophysiology. To investigate whether erythroid progenitors are affected, we examined the in vitro erythropoiesis from the peripheral CD34 + cells of patients and controls. CD34- cells were differentiated into macrophages and co-cultivated with erythroblasts. We showed an accelerated differentiation of erythroid progenitors without maturation arrest from patients compared to controls. This abnormal differentiation persisted in the patients when the same experiments were performed without macrophages, which strongly suggested that dyserythropoiesis in Gaucher disease is secondary to an inherent defect in the erythroid progenitors. The accelerated differentiation was associated with reduced cell proliferation. As a result, less mature erythroid cells were generated in vitro in the Gaucher disease cultures compared to the control. We then compared the biological characteristics of untreated patients according to their anemic status. Compared to the non-anemic group, the anemic patients exhibit higher plasma levels of growth differentiation factor-15, a marker of ineffective erythropoiesis, but they had no indicators of hemolysis and similar reticulocyte counts. Taken together, these results demonstrated an unsuspected dyserythropoiesis that was independent of the macrophages and could participate, at least in part, to the basis of anemia in Gaucher disease. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. Impaired response of mature adipocytes of diabetic mice to hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seok Jong, E-mail: seok-hong@northwestern.edu; Jin, Da P.; Buck, Donald W.; Galiano, Robert D.; Mustoe, Thomas A., E-mail: tmustoe@nmh.org

    2011-10-01

    Adipose tissue contains various cells such as infiltrated monocytes/macrophages, endothelial cells, preadipocytes, and adipocytes. Adipocytes have an endocrine function by secreting adipokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, leptin, and adiponectin. Dysregulation of adipokines in adipose tissues leads to a chronic low-grade inflammation which could result in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. A sustained inflammatory state, which is characterized by prolonged persistence of macrophages and neutrophils, is found in diabetic wounds. In addition, subcutaneous adipocytes are enormously increased in amount clinically in type 2 diabetes. However, the function of subcutaneous adipocytes, which play an important role in injured tissue subjected to hypoxia, has not been well characterized in vitro due to the difficulty of maintaining mature adipocytes in culture using conventional methods because of their buoyancy. In this study, we established a novel in vitro culture method of mature adipocytes by enclosing them in a hyaluronan (HA) based hydrogel to study their role in response to stress such as hypoxia. BrdU labeling and Ki67 immunostaining experiments showed that hydrogel enclosed mature adipocytes proliferate in vitro. Both mRNA and protein expression analyses for hypoxia regulated genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), showed that mature adipocytes of wild type mice respond to hypoxia. In contrast, mature adipocytes of diabetic db/db and TallyHo mice did not efficiently respond to hypoxia. Our studies suggest that mature adipocytes are functionally active cells, and their abnormal function to hypoxia can be one of underlining mechanisms in type 2 diabetes.

  4. Long Maturity Forward Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2001-01-01

    The paper aims to improve the knowledge of the empirical properties of the long maturity region of the forward rate curve. Firstly, the theoretical negative correlation between the slope at the long end of the forward rate curve and the term structure variance is recovered empirically and found...... to be statistically significant. Secondly, the expectations hypothesis is analyzed for the long maturity region of the forward rate curve using "forward rate" regressions. The expectations hypothesis is numerically close to being accepted but is statistically rejected. The findings provide mixed support...... for the affine term structure model....

  5. DMPD: The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534106 The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. Sester DP, Stacey KJ, ... Show The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. PubmedID 10534106 Title The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophage

  6. Grammar Maturity Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaytsev, V.; Pierantonio, A.; Schätz, B.; Tamzalit, D.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a software language (whether modelled by a grammar or a schema or a metamodel) is not limited to development of new versions and dialects. An important dimension of a software language evolution is maturing in the sense of improving the quality of its definition. In this paper, we

  7. Maturing interorganisational information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, M.G.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313946809

    2012-01-01

    This thesis consists of nine chapters, divided over five parts. PART I is an introduction and the last part contains the conclusions. The remaining, intermediate parts are: PART II: Developing a maturity model for chain digitisation. This part contains two related studies concerning the development

  8. Jealousy and Moral Maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, Eugene W.; Deuger, Donna J.

    Jealousy may be perceived as either good or bad depending upon the moral maturity of the individual. To investigate this conclusion, a study was conducted testing two hypothesis: a positive relationship exists between conventional moral reasoning (reference to norms and laws) and the endorsement and level of jealousy; and a negative relationship…

  9. M1 and M2 macrophages derived from THP-1 cells differentially modulate the response of cancer cells to etoposide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genin, Marie; Clement, Francois; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Raes, Martine; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are present in high density in solid tumors. TAMs share many characteristics with alternatively activated macrophages, also called M2. They have been shown to favor tumor development and a role in chemoresistance has also been suggested. Here, we investigated the effects of M2 in comparison to M1 macrophages on cancer cell sensitivity to etoposide. We set up a model of macrophage polarization, starting from THP-1 monocytes differentiated into macrophages using PMA (Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate). Once differentiated (M0 macrophages), they were incubated with IL-4 and IL-13 in order to obtain M2 polarized macrophages or with IFN-gamma and LPS for classical macrophage activation (M1). To mimic the communication between cancer cells and TAMs, M0, M1 or M2 macrophages and HepG2 or A549 cancer cells were co-cultured during respectively 16 (HepG2) or 24 (A549) hours, before etoposide exposure for 24 (HepG2) or 16 (A549) hours. After the incubation, the impact of etoposide on macrophage polarization was studied and cancer cell apoptosis was assessed by western-blot for cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1 protein, caspase activity assay and FACS analysis of Annexin V and PI staining. mRNA and protein expression of M1 and M2 markers confirmed the polarization of THP-1-derived macrophages, which provide a new, easy and well-characterized model of polarized human macrophages. Etoposide-induced cancer cell apoptosis was markedly reduced in the presence of THP-1 M2 macrophages, while apoptosis was increased in cells co-cultured with M1 macrophages. On the other hand, etoposide did not influence M1 or M2 polarization. These results evidence for the first time a clear protective effect of M2 on the contrary to M1 macrophages on etoposide-induced cancer cell apoptosis

  10. Induction of different activated phenotypes of mouse peritoneal macrophages grown in different tissue culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Tomoya; Koike, Atsushi; Amano, Fumio

    2017-08-01

    The role of activated macrophages in the host defense against pathogens or tumor cells has been investigated extensively. Many researchers have been using various culture media in in vitro experiments using macrophages. We previously reported that J774.1/JA-4 macrophage-like cells showed great differences in their activated macrophage phenotypes, such as production of reactive oxygen, nitric oxide (NO) or cytokines depending on the culture medium used, either F-12 (Ham's F-12 nutrient mixture) or Dulbecco modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). To examine whether a difference in the culture medium would influence the functions of primary macrophages, we used BALB/c mouse peritoneal macrophages in this study. Among the activated macrophage phenotypes, the expression of inducible NO synthase in LPS- and/or IFN-γ-treated peritoneal macrophages showed the most remarkable differences between F-12 and DMEM; i.e., NO production by LPS- and/or IFN-γ-treated cells was far lower in DMEM than in F-12. Similar results were obtained with C57BL mouse peritoneal macrophages. Besides, dilution of F-12 medium with saline resulted in a slight decrease in NO production, whereas that of DMEM with saline resulted in a significant increase, suggesting the possibility that DMEM contained some inhibitory factor(s) for NO production. However, such a difference in NO production was not observed when macrophage-like cell lines were examined. These results suggest that phenotypes of primary macrophages could be changed significantly with respect to host inflammatory responses by the surrounding environment including nutritional factors and that these altered macrophage phenotypes might influence the biological host defense.

  11. Interleukin-6 Contributes to Age-Related Alteration of Cytokine Production by Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Christian R.; Karavitis, John; Palmer, Jessica L.; Faunce, Douglas E.; Ramirez, Luis; Nomellini, Vanessa; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we studied in vitro cytokine production by splenic macrophages obtained from young and aged BALB/c wild type (WT) and IL-6 knockout (IL-6 KO) mice. Relative to macrophages obtained from young WT mice given lipopolysaccharide (LPS), those from aged WT mice had decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, when compared to macrophages from young IL-6 KO mice, LPS stimulation yielded higher levels of these cytokines by cells from aged IL-6 KO mice. Aging or IL-6 deficiency did not affected the percentage of F4/80+ macrophages, or the surface expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and components of the IL-6 receptor. Overall, our results indicate that IL-6 plays a role in regulating the age-related defects in macrophages through alteration of proinflammatory cytokines, adding to the complexity of IL-6-mediated impairment of immune cell function with increasing age. PMID:20671912

  12. Color back projection for fruit maturity evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    In general, fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes and dates are harvested before they fully ripen. After harvesting, they continue to ripen and their color changes. Color is a good indicator of fruit maturity. For example, tomatoes change color from dark green to light green and then pink, light red, and dark red. Assessing tomato maturity helps maximize its shelf life. Color is used to determine the length of time the tomatoes can be transported. Medjool dates change color from green to yellow, and the orange, light red and dark red. Assessing date maturity helps determine the length of drying process to help ripen the dates. Color evaluation is an important step in the processing and inventory control of fruits and vegetables that directly affects profitability. This paper presents an efficient color back projection and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time maturity evaluation of fruits. This color processing method requires very simple training procedure to obtain the frequencies of colors that appear in each maturity stage. This color statistics is used to back project colors to predefined color indexes. Fruit maturity is then evaluated by analyzing the reprojected color indexes. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production.

  13. Gene expression in IFN-g-activated murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are critical for natural immunity and play a central role in specific acquired immunity. The IFN-gamma activation of macrophages derived from A/J or BALB/c mice yielded two different patterns of antiviral state in murine hepatitis virus 3 infection, which were related to a down-regulation of the main virus receptor. Using cDNA hybridization to evaluate mRNA accumulation in the cells, we were able to identify several genes that are differently up- or down-regulated by IFN-gamma in A/J (267 and 266 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated or BALB/c (297 and 58 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated mouse macrophages. Macrophages from mice with different genetic backgrounds behave differently at the molecular level and comparison of the patterns of non-activated and IFN-gamma-activated A/J or BALB/c mouse macrophages revealed, for instance, an up-regulation and a down-regulation of genes coding for biological functions such as enzymatic reactions, nucleic acid synthesis and transport, protein synthesis, transport and metabolism, cytoskeleton arrangement and extracellular matrix, phagocytosis, resistance and susceptibility to infection and tumors, inflammation, and cell differentiation or activation. The present data are reported in order to facilitate future correlation of proteomic/transcriptomic findings as well as of results obtained from a classical approach for the understanding of biological phenomena. The possible implication of the role of some of the gene products relevant to macrophage biology can now be further scrutinized. In this respect, a down-regulation of the main murine hepatitis virus 3 receptor gene was detected only in IFN-gamma-activated macrophages of resistant mice.

  14. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  15. Downregulation of host tryptophan-aspartate containing coat (TACO gene restricts the entry and survival of Leishmania donovani in human macrophage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara Reddy Gogulamudi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites of mammalian hosts. Promastigotes of Leishmania are internalized by macrophages and transformed into amastigotes in phagosomes, and replicate in phagolysosomes. Phagosomal maturation arrest is known to play a central role in the survival of pathogenic Leishmania within activated macrophages. Recently, tryptophan-aspartate containing coat (TACO gene has been recognized as playing a crucial role in the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within human macrophages by arresting the phagosome maturation process. We postulated that a similar association of TACO gene with phagosomes would prevent the vacuole from maturation in the case of Leishmania. In this study we attempted to define the effect of TACO gene downregulation on the uptake/survival of Leishmania donovani intracellularly, by treatment with Vitamin D3/Retinoic acid (RA & Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA/Retinoic acid (RA combinations in human THP-1 macrophages (in vitro. Treatment with these molecules downregulated the TACO gene in macrophages, resulting in reduced parasite load and marked reduction of disease progression in L. donovani infected macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that TACO gene downregulation may play a role in subverting macrophage machinery in establishing the L.donovani replicative niche inside the host. Our study is the first to highlight the importantrole of the TACO gene in Leishmania entry, and to identify TACO gene downregulation as potential drug target against leishmaniasis.

  16. Preparation of guinea pig macrophage for electrophoretic experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Methods of storage and cultivation of macrophage cells in preparation for space experiments were investigated. Results show that freezing and thawing immediately after extraction did not cause any change in viability or electrophoretic mobility of the cells. A prolonged storage at -80 C did cause cell damage as indicated by a 95% reduction in variable cells. Cell damage was decreased when Glycerol or Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) was added as a cryogenic protective agent. A 100% viability was observed in cultivation experiments after two weeks due to the additional serum. Results from gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase study showed a zero activity rate. It is suggested that a flat stationary field be used for the collection and use of macrophage. It was found that a 24-hour delay in obtaining macrophage cells helps to maintain a pure culture.

  17. Incorporation of bacterial peptidoglycan constituents into macrophage lipids during phagocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polanski, M.

    1987-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis radiolabeled cell walls were incubated with the macrophage cell line RAW264 in order to determine whether a peptidoglycan fragment were subsequently maintained on a macrophage lipid. Specifically, cell walls were radiolabeled in their glucosamine, muramic acid and alanine residues with D-[1- 3 H] glucosamine and L[U- 14 C]alanine. Following encounter with these radiolabeled cell walls, macrophages were collected and subjected to lipid extraction procedures. Further fractionation produced a phosphatidylethanolamine co-migrating lipid which upon hydrolysis and amino acid analysis revealed radiolabeled muramic acid, glucosamine, and alanine residues. These residues were shown to form a common fragment since the aqueous soluble material obtained after saponification of the crude lipid extract eluted as a single peak following gel permeation chromatography. Saponification destroyed the TLC mobility of the lipid showing that the fragment was covalently attached to the lipid

  18. IAP survivin regulates atherosclerotic macrophage survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P.; Teissier, Elisabeth; Castier, Yves; Lesèche, Guy; Bijnens, Ann-Pascal; Daemen, Mat; Staels, Bart; Mallat, Ziad; Tedgui, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory macrophage apoptosis is critical to atherosclerotic plaque formation, but its mechanisms remain enigmatic. We hypothesized that inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) survivin regulates macrophage death in atherosclerosis. Western blot analysis revealed discrete survivin expression in

  19. People Capability Maturity Model. SM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    tailored so it consumes less time and resources than a traditional software process assessment or CMU/SEI-95-MM-02 People Capability Maturity Model...improved reputation or customer loyalty. CMU/SEI-95-MM-02 People Capability Maturity Model ■ L5-17 Coaching Level 5: Optimizing Activity 1...Maturity Model CMU/SEI-95-MM-62 Carnegie-Mellon University Software Engineering Institute DTIC ELECTE OCT 2 7 1995 People Capability Maturity

  20. Role of Osteal Macrophages in Bone Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wook Cho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages have been shown to have pleiotropic functions in various pathophysiologies, especially in terms of anti-inflammatory and regenerative activity. Recently, the novel functions of bone marrow resident macrophages (called osteal macrophages were intensively studied in bone development, remodeling and tissue repair processes. This review discusses the current evidence for a role of osteal macrophages in bone modeling, remodeling, and fracture healing processes.

  1. Maturity effects in energy futures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, Apostolos (Calgary Univ., AB (CA). Dept. of Economics)

    1992-04-01

    This paper examines the effects of maturity on future price volatility and trading volume for 129 energy futures contracts recently traded in the NYMEX. The results provide support for the maturity effect hypothesis, that is, energy futures prices to become more volatile and trading volume increases as futures contracts approach maturity. (author).

  2. Tsc1 is a Critical Regulator of Macrophage Survival and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmin Fang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (Tsc1 has been shown to regulate M1/M2 polarization of macrophages, but the precise roles of Tsc1 in the function and stability of macrophages are not fully understood. Here we show that Tsc1 is required for regulating the survival, migration and phagocytosis of macrophages. Methods: Mice with Tsc1 homozygous deletion in myeloid cells (LysMCreTsc1flox/flox; Tsc1 KO were obtained by crossing Tsc1flox/flox mice with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of Lysozyme promoter (LysMCre. The apoptosis and growth of macrophages were determined by flow cytometry and Real-time PCR (RT-PCR. The phagocytosis was determined using a Vybrant™ phagocytosis assay kit. The migration of macrophages was determined using transwell migration assay. Results: Peritoneal macrophages of Tsc1 KO mice exhibited increased apoptosis and enlarged cell size. Both M1 and M2 phenotypes in Tsc1-deficient macrophages were elevated in steady-state as well as in inflammatory conditions. Tsc1-deficient macrophages demonstrated impaired migration and reduced expression of chemokine receptors including CCR2 and CCR5. Phagocytosis activity and ROS production were enhanced in Tsc1-deficient macrophages. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 partially reversed the aberrance of Tsc1-deficient macrophages. Conclusion: Tsc1 plays a critical role in regulating macrophage survival, function and polarization via inhibition of mTORC1 activity.

  3. HIV-1 and the macrophage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Sebastiaan M.; Cobos-Jimenez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; van 't Wout, Angelique B.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages and CD4(+) T cells are natural target cells for HIV-1, and both cell types contribute to the establishment of the viral reservoir that is responsible for continuous residual virus replication during antiretroviral therapy and viral load rebound upon treatment interruption. Scientific

  4. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    Yeast surface display is an effective tool for antibody affinity maturation because yeast can be used as an all-in-one workhorse to assemble, display and screen diversified antibody libraries. By employing the natural ability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently recombine multiple DNA...... laboratory conditions. A particular emphasis was put on using molecular techniques in conjunction with microenvironmental measurements (O2, pH, irradiance), a combination that is rarely found but provides a much more detailed understanding of “cause and effect” in complex natural systems...

  5. Key Role of the Scavenger Receptor MARCO in Mediating Adenovirus Infection and Subsequent Innate Responses of Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maler, Mareike D; Nielsen, Peter J; Stichling, Nicole; Cohen, Idan; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Wood, Connor; Engelhard, Peggy; Suomalainen, Maarit; Gyory, Ildiko; Huber, Michael; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Gordon, Siamon; Jakob, Thilo; Martin, Stefan F; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Greber, Urs F; Freudenberg, Marina A; Fejer, György

    2017-08-01

    The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed in several subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages and has been shown to participate in the recognition of various bacterial pathogens. However, the role of MARCO in antiviral defense is largely unexplored. Here, we investigated whether MARCO might be involved in the innate sensing of infection with adenovirus and recombinant adenoviral vectors by macrophages, which elicit vigorous immune responses in vivo Using cells derived from mice, we show that adenovirus infection is significantly more efficient in MARCO-positive alveolar macrophages (AMs) and in AM-like primary macrophage lines (Max Planck Institute cells) than in MARCO-negative bone marrow-derived macrophages. Using antibodies blocking ligand binding to MARCO, as well as gene-deficient and MARCO-transfected cells, we show that MARCO mediates the rapid adenovirus transduction of macrophages. By enhancing adenovirus infection, MARCO contributes to efficient innate virus recognition through the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS. This leads to strong proinflammatory responses, including the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), alpha/beta interferon, and mature IL-1α. These findings contribute to the understanding of viral pathogenesis in macrophages and may open new possibilities for the development of tools to influence the outcome of infection with adenovirus or adenovirus vectors. IMPORTANCE Macrophages play crucial roles in inflammation and defense against infection. Several macrophage subtypes have been identified with differing abilities to respond to infection with both natural adenoviruses and recombinant adenoviral vectors. Adenoviruses are important respiratory pathogens that elicit vigorous innate responses in vitro and in vivo The cell surface receptors mediating macrophage type-specific adenovirus sensing are largely unknown. The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed on some subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages, including lung alveolar macrophages

  6. 5-Lipoxygenase contributes to PPARγ activation in macrophages in response to apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knethen, Andreas; Sha, Lisa K; Kuchler, Laura; Heeg, Annika K; Fuhrmann, Dominik; Heide, Heinrich; Wittig, Ilka; Maier, Thorsten J; Steinhilber, Dieter; Brüne, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    Macrophage polarization to an anti-inflammatory phenotype upon contact with apoptotic cells is a contributing hallmark to immune suppression during the late phase of sepsis. Although the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) supports this macrophage phenotype switch, it remains elusive how apoptotic cells activate PPARγ. Assuming that a molecule causing PPARγ activation in macrophages originates in the cell membrane of apoptotic cells we analyzed lipid rafts from apoptotic, necrotic, and living human Jurkat T cells which showed the presence of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) in lipid rafts of apoptotic cells only. Incubating macrophages with lipid rafts of apoptotic, but not necrotic or living cells, induced PPAR responsive element (PPRE)-driven mRuby reporter gene expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages stably transduced with a 4xPPRE containing vector. Experiments with lipid rafts of apoptotic murine EL4 T cells revealed similar results. To verify the involvement of 5-LO in activating PPARγ in macrophages, Jurkat T cells were incubated with the 5-LO inhibitor MK-866 prior to induction of apoptosis, which failed to induce mRuby expression. Similar results were obtained with lipid rafts of apoptotic EL4 T cells preexposed to the 5-LO inhibitors zileuton and CJ-13610. Interestingly, Jurkat T cells overexpressing 5-LO failed to activate PPARγ in macrophages, while their 5-LO overexpressing apoptotic counterparts did. Our results suggest that during apoptosis 5-LO gets associated with lipid rafts and synthesizes ligands that in turn stimulate PPARγ in macrophages. © 2013.

  7. Lineage-specific enhancers activate self-renewal genes in macrophages and embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucie, Erinn L; Weng, Ziming; Geirsdóttir, Laufey; Molawi, Kaaweh; Maurizio, Julien; Fenouil, Romain; Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine; Gimenez, Gregory; VanHille, Laurent; Beniazza, Meryam; Favret, Jeremy; Berruyer, Carole; Perrin, Pierre; Hacohen, Nir; Andrau, J-C; Ferrier, Pierre; Dubreuil, Patrice; Sidow, Arend; Sieweke, Michael H

    2016-02-12

    Differentiated macrophages can self-renew in tissues and expand long term in culture, but the gene regulatory mechanisms that accomplish self-renewal in the differentiated state have remained unknown. Here we show that in mice, the transcription factors MafB and c-Maf repress a macrophage-specific enhancer repertoire associated with a gene network that controls self-renewal. Single-cell analysis revealed that, in vivo, proliferating resident macrophages can access this network by transient down-regulation of Maf transcription factors. The network also controls embryonic stem cell self-renewal but is associated with distinct embryonic stem cell-specific enhancers. This indicates that distinct lineage-specific enhancer platforms regulate a shared network of genes that control self-renewal potential in both stem and mature cells. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Gossypol induces pyroptosis in mouse macrophages via a non-canonical inflammasome pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Qiu-Ru; Li, Chen-Guang; Zha, Qing-Bing; Xu, Li-Hui; Pan, Hao; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Gossypol, a polyphenolic compound isolated from cottonseeds, has been reported to possess many pharmacological activities, but whether it can influence inflammasome activation remains unclear. In this study, we found that in mouse macrophages, gossypol induced cell death characterized by rapid membrane rupture and robust release of HMGB1 and pro-caspase-11 comparable to ATP treatment, suggesting an induction of pyroptotic cell death. Unlike ATP, gossypol induced much low levels of mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion from mouse peritoneal macrophages primed with LPS, although it caused pro-IL-1β release similar to that of ATP. Consistent with this, activated caspase-1 responsible for pro-IL-1β maturation was undetectable in gossypol-treated peritoneal macrophages. Besides, RAW 264.7 cells lacking ASC expression and caspase-1 activation also underwent pyroptotic cell death upon gossypol treatment. In further support of pyroptosis induction, both pan-caspase inhibitor and caspase-1 subfamily inhibitor, but not caspase-3 inhibitor, could sharply suppress gossypol-induced cell death. Other canonical pyroptotic inhibitors, including potassium chloride and N-acetyl-L-cysteine, could suppress ATP-induced pyroptosis but failed to inhibit or even enhanced gossypol-induced cell death, whereas nonspecific pore-formation inhibitor glycine could attenuate this process, suggesting involvement of a non-canonical pathway. Of note, gossypol treatment eliminated thioglycollate-induced macrophages in the peritoneal cavity with recruitment of other leukocytes. Moreover, gossypol administration markedly decreased the survival of mice in a bacterial sepsis model. Collectively, these results suggested that gossypol induced pyroptosis in mouse macrophages via a non-canonical inflammasome pathway, which raises a concern for its in vivo cytotoxicity to macrophages. - Highlights: • Gossypol induces pyroptosis in mouse peritoneal and RAW 264.7 macrophages. • In LPS

  9. Gossypol induces pyroptosis in mouse macrophages via a non-canonical inflammasome pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Qiu-Ru; Li, Chen-Guang [Department of Immunobiology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zha, Qing-Bing [Department of Fetal Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Xu, Li-Hui [Department of Cell Biology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Pan, Hao; Zhao, Gao-Xiang [Department of Immunobiology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ouyang, Dong-Yun, E-mail: dongyun1967@aliyun.com [Department of Immunobiology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); He, Xian-Hui, E-mail: thexh@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Immunobiology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2016-02-01

    Gossypol, a polyphenolic compound isolated from cottonseeds, has been reported to possess many pharmacological activities, but whether it can influence inflammasome activation remains unclear. In this study, we found that in mouse macrophages, gossypol induced cell death characterized by rapid membrane rupture and robust release of HMGB1 and pro-caspase-11 comparable to ATP treatment, suggesting an induction of pyroptotic cell death. Unlike ATP, gossypol induced much low levels of mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion from mouse peritoneal macrophages primed with LPS, although it caused pro-IL-1β release similar to that of ATP. Consistent with this, activated caspase-1 responsible for pro-IL-1β maturation was undetectable in gossypol-treated peritoneal macrophages. Besides, RAW 264.7 cells lacking ASC expression and caspase-1 activation also underwent pyroptotic cell death upon gossypol treatment. In further support of pyroptosis induction, both pan-caspase inhibitor and caspase-1 subfamily inhibitor, but not caspase-3 inhibitor, could sharply suppress gossypol-induced cell death. Other canonical pyroptotic inhibitors, including potassium chloride and N-acetyl-L-cysteine, could suppress ATP-induced pyroptosis but failed to inhibit or even enhanced gossypol-induced cell death, whereas nonspecific pore-formation inhibitor glycine could attenuate this process, suggesting involvement of a non-canonical pathway. Of note, gossypol treatment eliminated thioglycollate-induced macrophages in the peritoneal cavity with recruitment of other leukocytes. Moreover, gossypol administration markedly decreased the survival of mice in a bacterial sepsis model. Collectively, these results suggested that gossypol induced pyroptosis in mouse macrophages via a non-canonical inflammasome pathway, which raises a concern for its in vivo cytotoxicity to macrophages. - Highlights: • Gossypol induces pyroptosis in mouse peritoneal and RAW 264.7 macrophages. • In LPS

  10. A novel hydrogel of poloxamer 407 and chitosan obtained by gamma irradiation exhibits physicochemical properties for wound management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyva-Gómez, Gerardo, E-mail: gerardoleyva@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Connective Tissue, Centro Nacional de Investigación y Atención de Quemados, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación Luis Guillermo Ibarra Ibarra, Mexico City (Mexico); Santillan-Reyes, Erika, E-mail: kikita5410@gmail.com [Laboratory of Connective Tissue, Centro Nacional de Investigación y Atención de Quemados, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación Luis Guillermo Ibarra Ibarra, Mexico City (Mexico); Lima, E, E-mail: lima@iim.unam.mx [Departamento de Materiales Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City (Mexico); Madrid-Martínez, Abigail, E-mail: abitzy@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Connective Tissue, Centro Nacional de Investigación y Atención de Quemados, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación Luis Guillermo Ibarra Ibarra, Mexico City (Mexico); Krötzsch, E, E-mail: kroted@yahoo.com.mx [Laboratory of Connective Tissue, Centro Nacional de Investigación y Atención de Quemados, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación Luis Guillermo Ibarra Ibarra, Mexico City (Mexico); and others

    2017-05-01

    Application of polymers cross-linked by gamma irradiation on cutaneous wounds has resulted in the improvement of healing. Chitosan (CH) and poloxamer 407 (P407)-based hydrogels confer different advantages in wound management. To combine the properties of both compounds, a gamma-irradiated mixture of 0.75/25% (w/w) CH and P407, respectively, was obtained (CH-P), and several physical, chemical, and biological analyses were performed. Notably, gamma radiation induced changes in the mixture's thermal behavior, viscosity, and swelling, and exhibited stability at neutral pH. The thermal reversibility provided by P407 and the bacteriostatic effect of CH were maintained. Mice full-thickness wounds treated with CH-P diminished the wound area during the first days. Consequently, with this treatment, increased levels of macrophages, α-SMA, and collagen deposition in wounds were observed, indicating a more mature scar tissue. In conclusion, the new hydrogel CH-P, at physiologic pH, combined the beneficial characteristics of both polymers and produced new properties for wound management. - Highlights: • ϒ-irradiation of chitosan + poloxamer 407 produced a hydrogel (CH-P) to wound care. • ϒ-irradiation allows chitosan (CH) solubility at physiological pH (CH-P 7). • CH-P 7 copolymer exhibits antimicrobial/antifungal features. • CH-P 7 hydrogel stimulates early wound-closure rate. • CH-P 7 increases collagen deposition and macrophage/fibroblasts recruitment.

  11. T3 Regulates a Human Macrophage-Derived TSH-β Splice Variant: Implications for Human Bone Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliram, R; Latif, R; Morshed, S A; Zaidi, M; Davies, T F

    2016-09-01

    TSH and thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) are intimately involved in bone biology. We have previously reported the presence of a murine TSH-β splice variant (TSH-βv) expressed specifically in bone marrow-derived macrophages and that exerted an osteoprotective effect by inducing osteoblastogenesis. To extend this observation and its relevance to human bone biology, we set out to identify and characterize a TSH-β variant in human macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses using human TSH-β-specific primers identified a 364-bp product in macrophages, bone marrow, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells that was sequence verified and was homologous to a human TSH-βv previously reported. We then examined TSH-βv regulation using the THP-1 human monocyte cell line matured into macrophages. After 4 days, 46.1% of the THP-1 cells expressed the macrophage markers CD-14 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor and exhibited typical morphological characteristics of macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses of these cells treated in a dose-dependent manner with T3 showed a 14-fold induction of human TSH-βv mRNA and variant protein. Furthermore, these human TSH-βv-positive cells, induced by T3 exposure, had categorized into both M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes as evidenced by the expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor for M1 and CCL-22 for M2. These data indicate that in hyperthyroidism, bone marrow resident macrophages have the potential to exert enhanced osteoprotective effects by oversecreting human TSH-βv, which may exert its local osteoprotective role via osteoblast and osteoclast TSH receptors.

  12. Correlation between dental maturity and cervical vertebral maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwei; Hu, Haikun; Guo, Jing; Liu, Zeping; Liu, Renkai; Li, Fan; Zou, Shujuan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dental and skeletal maturity. Digital panoramic radiographs and lateral skull cephalograms of 302 patients (134 boys and 168 girls, ranging from 8 to 16 years of age) were examined. Dental maturity was assessed by calcification stages of the mandibular canines, first and second premolars, and second molars, whereas skeletal maturity was estimated by the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stages. The Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient was used to measure the association between CVM stage and dental calcification stage of individual teeth. The mean chronologic age of girls was significantly lower than that of boys in each CVM stage. The Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients between dental maturity and cervical vertebral maturity ranged from 0.391 to 0.582 for girls and from 0.464 to 0.496 for boys (P cervical vertebral maturation stage. The development of the mandibular second molar in females and that of the mandibular canine in males had the strongest correlations with cervical vertebral maturity. Therefore, it is practical to consider the relationship between dental and skeletal maturity when planning orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mature Cystic Renal Teratoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, Alpaslan; Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Akkaya, Bahar

    2014-01-01

    Teratomas are rare germline tumors that originate from one or more embryonic germ cell layers. Teratoma of the kidney is extremely rare, and less than 30 cases of primary intrarenal teratomas have been published to date. We report the main radiologic features of an unusual case of mature cystic teratoma arising from the left kidney in a two-year-old boy. A left-sided abdominal mass was detected on physical examination and B-Mod Ultrasound (US) examination revealed a heterogeneous mass with central cystic component. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a lobulated, heterogeneous, hypodense mass extending craniocaudally from the splenic hilum to the level of the left iliac fossa. Nephrectomy was performed and a large, fatty mass arising from the left kidney was excised. The final pathologic diagnosis was confirmed as cystic renal teratoma

  14. THE GOAL OF MATURITY IN EPHESIANS 4:13-16

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I interpret Ephesians 4:13 to obtain the meaning of maturity. I critique the ...... divine powers and attributes as eternal, infinite, unchangeable in existence, in knowledge .... sea and its storms, false teachings are described as having the potential.

  15. [Macrophage activation in atherosclerosis. Message 1: Activation of macrophages normally and in atherosclerotic lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, N G; Kornienko, V Y; Karagodin, V P; Orekhov, A N

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play important role in initiation and progression of inflammation in atherosclerosis. Plaque macrophages were shown to exhibit a phenotypic range that is intermediate between two extremes, M1 (proinflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory). Indeed, in atherosclerosis, macrophages demonstrate phenotypic plasticity to rapidly adjust to changing microenvironmental conditions. In plaque macrophages demonstrate different phenotypes, and besides macrophage phenotypes could be changed. Phenotypes M1, M2, M4, Mhem, HA-mac, M(Hb) u Mox are described in the article. Ability of macrophages change their phenotype also considered.

  16. Growth indicators in orthodontic patients. Part 1: comparison of cervical vertebral maturation and hand-wrist skeletal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsas, G; Ari-Demirkaya, A

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict the skeletal maturation status based on the assessment of cervical vertebrae from lateral cephalometric radiographs and to compare these findings with the skeletal maturity of the same individuals judged from the hand-wrist radiographs. Lateral cephalometric and left hand-wrist radiographs of 393 Caucasian children from 8 to 18 years old were evaluated. On the hand-wrist radiographs the classification of Bjork [1972] and Grave and Brown [1976] was used to assess skeletal maturity (HWSS). Cervical vertebral maturation was also evaluated on lateral cephalometric radiographs using the improved CVMS method described by Baccetti, Franchi, and McNamara [2002]. These methods were correlated using the chi-square test. The chi-square test showed that skeletal maturational values obtained by the CVMS method were significantly correlated with the skeletal values obtained from the hand-wrist analysis for both genders (pmaturity.

  17. Development of ostrich thrombocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in culture and the control of Toxoplasma gondii reproduction after macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Farlen J B; Damasceno-Sá, João Cláudio; DaMatta, Renato A

    2016-01-01

    Raising ostriches became an important economic activity after their products became commodities. The health of farm animals is of paramount importance, so assessing basic immunological responses is necessary to better understand health problems. We developed a method to obtain ostrich thrombocytes and macrophages. The thrombocytes died by apoptosis after 48 h in culture, and the macrophages expanded in size and increased the number of acidic compartments. Macrophages were activated by chicken interferon-γ, producing high levels of nitric oxide. Toxoplasma gondii was able to infect these macrophages, and activation controlled parasitic reproduction. T. gondii, however, persisted in these cells, and infection reduced the production of nitric oxide. These results are important for the future assessment of the basic cellular and immunobiology of ostriches and demonstrate T. gondii suppression of nitric oxide production. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  18. Developing maturity grids for assessing organisational capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Anja; Moultrie, James; Clarkson, P John

    2009-01-01

    Keyword: Maturity Model,Maturity Grid,Maturity Matrix,Organisational Capabilities,Benchmarking,New Product Development,Perfirmance Assessment......Keyword: Maturity Model,Maturity Grid,Maturity Matrix,Organisational Capabilities,Benchmarking,New Product Development,Perfirmance Assessment...

  19. Modeling non-maturing liabilities

    OpenAIRE

    von Feilitzen, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Non‐maturing liabilities, such as savings accounts, lack both predetermined maturity and reset dates due to the fact that the depositor is free to withdraw funds at any time and that the depository institution is free to change the rate. These attributes complicate the risk management of such products and no standardized solution exists. The problem is important however since non‐maturing liabilities typically make up a considerable part of the funding of a bank. In this report different mode...

  20. Detection of femtomole quantities of mature cathepsin K with zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei A; Barry, Zachary T; Cohen, Joshua D; Wilder, Catera L; Deeds, Rebecca J; Keegan, Philip M; Platt, Manu O

    2010-06-01

    Cathepsin K, the most potent mammalian collagenase, has been implicated in osteoporosis, cancer metastasis, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. Although procathepsin K is stable and readily detected, the active mature cathepsin K eludes detection by in vitro methods due to its shorter half-life and inactivation at neutral pH. We describe, for the first time, reliable detection, visualization, and quantification of mature cathepsin K to femtomole resolution using gelatin zymography. The specificity of the method was validated with cathepsin K knockdown using small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection of human monocyte-derived macrophages, and enzymatic activity confirmed with benzyloxycarbonyl-glycine-proline-arginine-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (Z-GPR-AMC) substrate hydrolysis was fit to a computational model of enzyme kinetics. Furthermore, cathepsin K zymography was used to show that murine osteoclasts secrete more cathepsin K than is stored intracellularly, and this was opposite to the behavior of the macrophages from which they were differentiated. In summary, this inexpensive, species-independent, antibody-free protocol describes a sensitive method with broad potential to elucidate previously undetectable cathepsin K activity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Antenatal assessment of fetal maturity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner, G.; Reinold, E.; Wolf, G.

    1979-01-01

    334 ultrasound-cephalometries and 231 X-ray fetographies were performed for antenatal assessment of fetal maturity as well as for exact estimation of gestational age in women with unknown date of confinement. The accuracy of the predictions was compared. Ultrasound-cephalometry gave best results when performed until the 20th week of gestation. A correct prediction was obtained in 80.4% of cases. After the 20th week of gestation, the accuracy of prediction decreased. Radiology on the contrary gave optimal results at the end of pregnancy. A correct prediction of the date of confinement was obtained in 73.8% of cases, when the X-ray fetography was performed between the 37th and 40th week of gestation. At the end of gestation radiography should be performed, if there is a discrepancy between ultrasound and clinical estimation or if ultrasound-cephalometry was not carried out in early pregnancy - especially if induction of labour is necessary. (author)

  2. Impaired Hematopoiesis and Disrupted Monocyte/Macrophage Homeostasis in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Gustavo Monteiro; Buri, Marcus Vinícius; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Martins, Ana Maria; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2016-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by alpha-L-iduronidase deficiency in which heparan and dermatan sulfate degradation is compromised. Besides primary lysosomal glycosaminoglycan accumulation, further changes in cellular functions have also been described in several murine MPS models. Herein, we evaluated alterations in hematopoiesis and its implications on the production of mature progeny in a MPS I murine model. Despite the significant increase in hematopoietic stem cells, a reduction in common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells was observed in Idua -/- mice bone marrow. Furthermore, no alterations in number, viability nor activation of cell death mechanisms were observed in Idua -/- mice mature macrophages but they presented higher sensitivity to apoptotic induction after staurosporine treatment. In addition, changes in Ca(2+) signaling and a reduction in phagocytosis ability were also found. In summary, our results revealed significant intracellular changes in mature Idua -/- macrophages related to alterations in Idua -/- mice hematopoiesis, revealing a disruption in cell homeostasis. These results provide new insights into physiopathology of MPS I. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The influence of aging and estradiol to progesterone ratio on rat macrophage phenotypic profile and NO and TNF-α production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Stanojević, Stanislava; Kuštrimović, Nataša; Mitić, Katarina; Vujić, Vesna; Aleksić, Iva; Radojević, Katarina; Leposavić, Gordana

    2013-11-01

    The phenotype and function of tissue macrophages substantially depend on the cellular milieu and biological effector molecules, such as steroid hormones, to which they are exposed. Furthermore, in female rats, aging is associated with the altered macrophage functioning and the increased estrogen level is followed by a decrease in that of progesterone. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the influence of estradiol/progesterone balance on rat macrophage function and phenotype throughout whole adult lifespan. We ovariectomized rats at the late prepubertal age or at the very end of reproductive lifespan, and examined the expression of ED2 (CD163, a marker of mature resident macrophages related to secretion of inflammatory mediators) on peritoneal macrophages and their ability to produce TNF-α and NO upon LPS-stimulation at different age points. In addition, to delineate direct and indirect effects of estrogen, we assessed the in vitro influence of different concentrations of 17β-estradiol on LPS-induced macrophage TNF-α and NO production. Results showed that: (a) the low frequency of ED2(high) cells amongst peritoneal macrophages of aged rats was accompanied with the reduced TNF-α, but not NO production; (b) estradiol level gradually increased following ovariectomy; (c) macrophage ED2 expression and TNF-α production were dependent on estradiol/progesterone balance and they changed in the same direction; (d) changes in estradiol/progesterone balance differentially affected macrophages TNF-α and NO production; and (e) estradiol exerted pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects on macrophages in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Overall, our study discloses that estradiol/progesterone balance contributes to the fine-tuning of rat macrophage secretory capacity, and adds to a better understanding of the ovarian steroid hormone role in the regulation of macrophage function, and its significance for the age-associated changes in innate immunity.

  4. Immune Evasion Strategies of Pathogens in Macrophages: the Potential for Limiting Pathogen Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuwei; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Pandupuspitasari, Nuruliarizki Shinta; Zhang, Shujun

    2017-01-01

    Preventing pathogen transmission to a new host is of major interest to the immunologist and could benefit from a detailed investigation of pathogen immune evasion strategies. The first line of defense against pathogen invasion is provided by macrophages. When they sense pathogens, macrophages initiate signals to inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) subsequently mediating phagocytosis and inflammation. The macrophage immune machinery classically includes two subsets: the activated M1 and the activated M2 that respond accordingly in diverse immune challenges. The lipid and glycogen metabolic pathways work together with the lysosome to help the mature phagosome to degrade and eliminate intracellular pathogens in macrophages. The viral evasion strategies are even more complex due to the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis. However, pathogens evolve several strategies to camouflage themselves against immune responses in order to ensure their survival, replication and transmission. These strategies include the muting of PRRs initiated inflammatory responses, attenuation of M1 and/or induction of M2 macrophages, suppression of autophago-lysosomal formation, interference with lipid and glycogen metabolism, and viral mediation of autophagy and apoptosis cross-talk to enhance viral replication. This review focuses on pathogen immune evasion methods and on the strategies used by the host against camouflaged pathogens.

  5. Human Cord Blood and Bone Marrow CD34+ Cells Generate Macrophages That Support Erythroid Islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyayu Belay

    Full Text Available Recently, we developed a small molecule responsive hyperactive Mpl-based Cell Growth Switch (CGS that drives erythropoiesis associated with macrophages in the absence of exogenous cytokines. Here, we compare the physical, cellular and molecular interaction between the macrophages and erythroid cells in CGS expanded CD34+ cells harvested from cord blood, marrow or G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood. Results indicated that macrophage based erythroid islands could be generated from cord blood and marrow CD34+ cells but not from G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ cells. Additional studies suggest that the deficiency resides with the G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ derived monocytes. Gene expression and proteomics studies of the in vitro generated erythroid islands detected the expression of erythroblast macrophage protein (EMP, intercellular adhesion molecule 4 (ICAM-4, CD163 and DNASE2. 78% of the erythroblasts in contact with macrophages reached the pre reticulocyte orthochromatic stage of differentiation within 14 days of culture. The addition of conditioned medium from cultures of CD146+ marrow fibroblasts resulted in a 700-fold increase in total cell number and a 90-fold increase in erythroid cell number. This novel CD34+ cell derived erythroid island may serve as a platform to explore the molecular basis of red cell maturation and production under normal, stress and pathological conditions.

  6. Macrophage-Mediated Glial Cell Elimination in the Postnatal Mouse Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaShardai N. Brown

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing relies on the transmission of auditory information from sensory hair cells (HCs to the brain through the auditory nerve. This relay of information requires HCs to be innervated by spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs in an exclusive manner and SGNs to be ensheathed by myelinating and non-myelinating glial cells. In the developing auditory nerve, mistargeted SGN axons are retracted or pruned and excessive cells are cleared in a process referred to as nerve refinement. Whether auditory glial cells are eliminated during auditory nerve refinement is unknown. Using early postnatal mice of either sex, we show that glial cell numbers decrease after the first postnatal week, corresponding temporally with nerve refinement in the developing auditory nerve. Additionally, expression of immune-related genes was upregulated and macrophage numbers increase in a manner coinciding with the reduction of glial cell numbers. Transient depletion of macrophages during early auditory nerve development, using transgenic CD11bDTR/EGFP mice, resulted in the appearance of excessive glial cells. Macrophage depletion caused abnormalities in myelin formation and transient edema of the stria vascularis. Macrophage-depleted mice also showed auditory function impairment that partially recovered in adulthood. These findings demonstrate that macrophages contribute to the regulation of glial cell number during postnatal development of the cochlea and that glial cells play a critical role in hearing onset and auditory nerve maturation.

  7. Dexamethasone palmitate ameliorates macrophages-rich graft-versus-host disease by inhibiting macrophage functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takayuki; Murata, Makoto; Nishida, Tetsuya; Terakura, Seitaro; Saito, Shigeki; Kato, Tomonori; Mizuno, Hiroki; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Seto, Aika; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Miyamura, Koichi; Ito, Masafumi; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Kato, Hidefumi; Toyokuni, Shinya; Nagao, Keisuke; Ueda, Ryuzo; Naoe, Tomoki

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration of skin GVHD lesions correlates directly with disease severity, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear and GVHD with many macrophages is a therapeutic challenge. Here, we characterize the macrophages involved in GVHD and report that dexamethasone palmitate (DP), a liposteroid, can ameliorate such GVHD by inhibiting macrophage functions. We found that host-derived macrophages could exacerbate GVHD in a mouse model through expression of higher levels of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IFN-γ, and lower levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10 than resident macrophages in mice without GVHD. DP significantly decreased the viability and migration capacity of primary mouse macrophages compared to conventional dexamethasone in vitro. DP treatment on day 7 and day 14 decreased macrophage number, and attenuated GVHD score and subsequent mortality in a murine model. This is the first study to provide evidence that therapy for GVHD should be changed on the basis of infiltrating cell type.

  8. DMPD: Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in health and disease. PubmedID 18251777 Title Macrophage differentiation and function in health and disease...thol Int. 2008 Mar;58(3):143-55. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage differentiation and function

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell-educated macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Eggenhofer Elke; Hoogduijn Martin J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) mediate their immunosuppressive effects via a variety of mechanisms. One of these mechanisms involves the induction of macrophages with immunomodulatory capacities. This effect of MSC may be exploited when MSC are used as a cell therapeutic product. Furthermore, MSC are resident in tissues where they may locally target infiltrating macrophages to adapt more regulatory properties. The present review discusses the interaction between MSC and macrophages, th...

  10. Whose Maturity is it Anyway?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results from an ongoing empirical study that seeks to understand the influence of different quantitative methods on the design and assessment of maturity models. Although there have been many academic publications on maturity models, there exists a significant lack of understa...

  11. Quantitative GPCR and ion channel transcriptomics in primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groot-Kormelink Paul J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are one of the first lines of defence against invading pathogens and play a central role in modulating both the innate and acquired immune systems. By responding to endogenous stimuli within the lung, alveolar macrophages contribute towards the regulation of the local inflammatory microenvironment, the initiation of wound healing and the pathogenesis of viral and bacterial infections. Despite the availability of protocols for isolating primary alveolar macrophages from the lung these cells remain recalcitrant to expansion in-vitro and therefore surrogate cell types, such as monocyte derived macrophages and phorbol ester-differentiated cell lines (e.g. U937, THP-1, HL60 are frequently used to model macrophage function. Methods The availability of high throughput gene expression technologies for accurate quantification of transcript levels enables the re-evaluation of these surrogate cell types for use as cellular models of the alveolar macrophage. Utilising high-throughput TaqMan arrays and focussing on dynamically regulated families of integral membrane proteins, we explore the similarities and differences in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR and ion channel expression in alveolar macrophages and their widely used surrogates. Results The complete non-sensory GPCR and ion channel transcriptome is described for primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates. The expression of numerous GPCRs and ion channels whose expression were hitherto not described in human alveolar macrophages are compared across primary macrophages and commonly used macrophage cell models. Several membrane proteins known to have critical roles in regulating macrophage function, including CXCR6, CCR8 and TRPV4, were found to be highly expressed in macrophages but not expressed in PMA-differentiated surrogates. Conclusions The data described in this report provides insight into the appropriate choice of cell models for

  12. Radionuclide study of the liver macrophage system in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavnov, V.M.; Savich, O.A.; Markov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    The functional state of the liver macrophage system (MS) in diabetes mellitus (DM) and to analyze the functional disturbances depending of the type of DM, presence of complications, duration of the disease and the age of the patients was studied. The obtained data suggest the necessity of radionuclide study of the liver MS with the purpose to reveal pre-clinical disturbances and administer timely treatment

  13. Imaging and measuring the biophysical properties of Fc gamma receptors on single macrophages using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Nanoscale cellular ultra-structures of macrophages were observed. •The binding affinities of FcγRs were measured directly on macrophages. •The nanoscale distributions of FcγRs were mapped on macrophages. -- Abstract: Fc gamma receptors (FcγR), widely expressed on effector cells (e.g., NK cells, macrophages), play an important role in clinical cancer immunotherapy. The binding of FcγRs to the Fc portions of antibodies that are attached to the target cells can activate the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) killing mechanism which leads to the lysis of target cells. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe the cellular ultra-structures and measure the biophysical properties (affinity and distribution) of FcγRs on single macrophages in aqueous environments. AFM imaging was used to obtain the topographies of macrophages, revealing the nanoscale cellular fine structures. For molecular interaction recognition, antibody molecules were attached onto AFM tips via a heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) crosslinker. With AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the binding affinities of FcγRs were quantitatively measured on single macrophages. Adhesion force mapping method was used to localize the FcγRs, revealing the nanoscale distribution of FcγRs on local areas of macrophages. The experimental results can improve our understanding of FcγRs on macrophages; the established approach will facilitate further research on physiological activities involved in antibody-based immunotherapy.

  14. Macrophage antioxidant protection within atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseg, Steven P; Leake, David S; Flavall, Elizabeth M; Amit, Zunika; Reid, Linzi; Yang, Ya-Ting

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage cells within inflammatory lesions are exposed to a wide range of degrading and cytotoxic molecules including reactive oxygen species. Unlike neutrophils, macrophages do not normally die in this environment but continue to generate oxidants, phagocytose cellular remains, and release a range of cyto-active agents which modulate the immune response. It is this potential of the macrophage cell to survive in an oxidative environment that allows the growth and complexity of advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This review will examine the oxidants encountered by macrophages within an atherosclerotic plaque and describe some of the potential antioxidant mechanisms which enable macrophages to function within inflammatory lesions. Ascorbate, a-tocopherol, and glutathione appear to be central to the protection of macrophages yet additional antioxidant mechanisms appear to be involved. Gamma-Interferon causes macrophages to generate 7,8-dihydroneopterin, neopterin and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid both of which have antioxidant properties. Manganese superoxide dismutase is also upregulated in macrophages. The evidence that these antioxidants provide further protection, so allowing the macrophage cells to survive within sites of chronic inflammation such as atherosclerotic plaques, will be described.

  15. Macrophage Plasticity in Skeletal Muscle Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rigamonti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one of the first barriers of host defence against pathogens. Beyond their role in innate immunity, macrophages play increasingly defined roles in orchestrating the healing of various injured tissues. Perturbations of macrophage function and/or activation may result in impaired regeneration and fibrosis deposition as described in several chronic pathological diseases. Heterogeneity and plasticity have been demonstrated to be hallmarks of macrophages. In response to environmental cues they display a proinflammatory (M1 or an alternative anti-inflammatory (M2 phenotype. A lot of evidence demonstrated that after acute injury M1 macrophages infiltrate early to promote the clearance of necrotic debris, whereas M2 macrophages appear later to sustain tissue healing. Whether the sequential presence of two different macrophage populations results from a dynamic shift in macrophage polarization or from the recruitment of new circulating monocytes is a subject of ongoing debate. In this paper, we discuss the current available information about the role that different phenotypes of macrophages plays after injury and during the remodelling phase in different tissue types, with particular attention to the skeletal muscle.

  16. DMPD: Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17056121 Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Hasko ...tml) (.csml) Show Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. PubmedID 17056121 Titl...e Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Authors Has

  17. DMPD: Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18161744 Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Zhang X, Mosser DM. J ...Pathol. 2008 Jan;214(2):161-78. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation by endogenous dange...r signals. PubmedID 18161744 Title Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Authors Zhang X, Moss

  18. DMPD: Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18388328 Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Kockx ...svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. PubmedID 18388...328 Title Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Aut

  19. DMPD: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14620137 Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses to...microbes. Calandra T. Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(9):573-6. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage migration... inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. PubmedID 14620137 Title Macrophage migration

  20. DMPD: Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11073096 Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. Jones GE. J Leu...koc Biol. 2000 Nov;68(5):593-602. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Cellular signaling in macrophage migration... and chemotaxis. PubmedID 11073096 Title Cellular signaling in macrophage migration and chemotaxis. Autho

  1. DMPD: Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960230 Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. Kim WK, Corey S, ...Alvarez X, Williams K. J Leukoc Biol. 2003 Nov;74(5):650-6. Epub 2003 Aug 11. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Monocyte/macrophage... traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. PubmedID 12960230 Title Monocyte/macrophage tr

  2. DMPD: CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8981359 CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. Hamilton JA. Mol Reprod Dev. 1...997 Jan;46(1):19-23. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. PubmedI...D 8981359 Title CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. Authors Hamilton JA. Publication Mol Reprod Dev

  3. DMPD: Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18226603 Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar macrophages. Hamilton RF Jr, Thaku...l) Show Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar macrophages. PubmedID 18226603 Title Silica binding and toxicity in alveolar macropha...ges. Authors Hamilton RF Jr, Thakur SA, Holian A. Public

  4. DMPD: Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11841920 Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expression. Tsukamoto H. Fr...ee Radic Biol Med. 2002 Feb 15;32(4):309-13. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage... TNFalpha expression. PubmedID 11841920 Title Iron regulation of hepatic macrophage TNFalpha expres

  5. Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) induces Fc receptor expression on macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, D.M.; Wing, E.J.; Waheed, A.; Shadduck, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    M-CSF is a glycoprotein that stimulates bone marrow progenitor cells to proliferate and differentiate into macrophages (M theta). In addition, M-CSF can modulate the function of mature M theta. In this study, the authors determined the effect of M-CSF on expression of receptors for IgG (Fc receptors). Murine resident peritoneal M theta monolayers were incubated with either M-CSF, recombinant gamma interferon (IFN), or left untreated for 48 hrs. Expression of Fc receptors was assessed by microscopy using an antibody coated sheet erythrocytes (EA) rosette assay. The results indicated that M-CSF treated M theta had significantly higher numbers of bound EA (7.1 erythrocytes/M theta), than IFN M theta (4.4), or untreated M theta (2.5) (p 51 Cr labelled EA assay, CSF M theta (16,411 cpm), IFN M theta (10,887), untreated M theta (6897) (p < 0.001). Additionally, the maximal response was noted between 10 and 500 units M-CSF. Purified anti-M-CSF IgG, when included in the cultures, ablated the enhancement of EA binding, whereas normal rabbit IgG did not. These findings indicate that M-CSF is a potent inducer of Fc receptor expression on M theta and supports other data concerning the role of M-CSF as a biological response modifier

  6. Mechanism of interleukin-13 production by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes classically activated M1 macrophages. GM-CSF upregulates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) protein expression and activation of PAR-2 by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) regulates cytokine production. This study investigated the mechanism of PAR-2-mediated interleukin (IL)-13 production by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. After stimulation with HNE to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway, IL-13 mRNA and protein levels were assessed by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. PAR-2 protein was detected in GM-CSF-dependent macrophages by Western blotting. Unexpectedly, PD98059 (an ERK1 inhibitor) increased IL-13 production, even at higher concentrations. Interestingly, U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) reduced IL-13 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Neither SB203580 (a p38alpha/p38beta inhibitor) nor BIRB796 (a p38gamma/p38delta inhibitor) affected IL-13 production, while TMB-8 (a calcium chelator) diminished IL-13 production. Stimulation with HNE promoted the production of IL-13 (a Th2 cytokine) by GM-CSF-dependent M1 macrophages. PAR-2-mediated IL-13 production may be dependent on the Ca(2+)/ERK2 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nicotine Impairs Macrophage Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiyuan; Stitzel, Jerry A; Bai, An; Zambrano, Cristian A; Phillips, Matthew; Marrack, Philippa; Chan, Edward D

    2017-09-01

    Pure nicotine impairs macrophage killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), but it is not known whether the nicotine component in cigarette smoke (CS) plays a role. Moreover, the mechanisms by which nicotine impairs macrophage immunity against MTB have not been explored. To neutralize the effects of nicotine in CS extract, we used a competitive inhibitor to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mecamylamine-as well as macrophages derived from mice with genetic disruption of specific subunits of nAChR. We also determined whether nicotine impaired macrophage autophagy and whether nicotine-exposed T regulatory cells (Tregs) could subvert macrophage anti-MTB immunity. Mecamylamine reduced the CS extract increase in MTB burden by 43%. CS extract increase in MTB was also significantly attenuated in macrophages from mice with genetic disruption of either the α7, β2, or β4 subunit of nAChR. Nicotine inhibited autophagosome formation in MTB-infected THP-1 cells and primary murine alveolar macrophages, as well as increased the intracellular MTB burden. Nicotine increased migration of THP-1 cells, consistent with the increased number of macrophages found in the lungs of smokers. Nicotine induced Tregs to produce transforming growth factor-β. Naive mouse macrophages co-cultured with nicotine-exposed Tregs had significantly greater numbers of viable MTB recovered with increased IL-10 production and urea production, but no difference in secreted nitric oxide as compared with macrophages cocultured with unexposed Tregs. We conclude that nicotine in CS plays an important role in subverting macrophage control of MTB infection.

  8. The SecA2 pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exports effectors that work in concert to arrest phagosome and autophagosome maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulauf, Katelyn E; Sullivan, Jonathan Tabb; Braunstein, Miriam

    2018-04-30

    To subvert host defenses, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) avoids being delivered to degradative phagolysosomes in macrophages by arresting the normal host process of phagosome maturation. Phagosome maturation arrest by Mtb involves multiple effectors and much remains unknown about this important aspect of Mtb pathogenesis. The SecA2 dependent protein export system is required for phagosome maturation arrest and consequently growth of Mtb in macrophages. To better understand the role of the SecA2 pathway in phagosome maturation arrest, we identified two effectors exported by SecA2 that contribute to this process: the phosphatase SapM and the kinase PknG. Then, utilizing the secA2 mutant of Mtb as a platform to study effector functions, we identified specific steps in phagosome maturation inhibited by SapM and/or PknG. By identifying a histidine residue that is essential for SapM phosphatase activity, we confirmed for the first time that the phosphatase activity of SapM is required for its effects on phagosome maturation in macrophages. We further demonstrated that SecA2 export of SapM and PknG contributes to the ability of Mtb to replicate in macrophages. Finally, we extended our understanding of the SecA2 pathway, SapM, and PknG by revealing that their contribution goes beyond preventing Mtb delivery to mature phagolysosomes and includes inhibiting Mtb delivery to autophagolysosomes. Together, our results revealed SapM and PknG to be two effectors exported by the SecA2 pathway of Mtb with distinct as well as cumulative effects on phagosome and autophagosome maturation. Our results further reveal that Mtb must have additional mechanisms of limiting acidification of the phagosome, beyond inhibiting recruitment of the V-ATPase proton pump to the phagosome, and they indicate differences between effects of Mtb on phagosome and autophagosome maturation.

  9. Maturation of human oocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Čižek-Sajko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immature oocyte retrieval followed by in vitro maturation is a promising infertility treatment option. In patients with morphologically normal ovaries and regular menstrual cycles and in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS we attempted to assess the success of oocyte in vitro maturation in in vitro fertilization (IVF procedures.Methods: Retrospectively we analyzed 87 IVF procedures with in vitro maturation of oocytes carried out in 73 infertile couples treated at the Maribor Teaching Hospital. We compared the success following three different hormone priming protocols: regular cycling patients with normal ovaries and without hormone priming (Group A, n = 27; patients with PCOS and hormone priming with follitropin (follicle stimulating hormone, FSH (Group B, n = 22; patients with PCOS and hormone priming with human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG (Group C, n = 38. Success of the procedure was evaluated on the basis of the ability of oocytes to mature, fertilize and develop into embryos, and on the basis of the quality of embryos and their ability to implant in the uterus.Results: In regular cycling patients with normal ovaries (n = 27 we obtained a significantly lower number of immature oocytes (3.2 ± 2.5 compared with patients with PCOS and FSH priming (11.7 ± 7.2 or those with PCOS and hCG priming (10.4 ± 7.2. The oocyte maturation rate, the fertilization rate and the embryo cleavage rate were as follows: in Group A 57.7 %, 63.2 % and 91.7 %, in Group B 57.6 %, 66.2 % and 90.0 %, and in Group C 58.0 %, 66.2 % and 91.0 % (the differences between groups were not statistically significant. Six pregnancies were recorded only in patients with PCOS. The pregnancy rate per embryo transfer was 1/20 (5.0 % in patients with FSH priming, and 5/33 (15.2 % in patients with hCG priming.Conclusions: Oocyte in vitro maturation is successful in patients with normal ovaries and regular menstrual cycle as well as in those with polycystic

  10. Macrophage activation induced by the polysaccharides isolated from the roots of Sanguisorba officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Haibin; Mao, Dirui; Zhai, Mingyue; Zhang, Zhuorui; Sun, Guangren; Jiang, Guiquan

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage, involved at all stages of immune response, is an important component of the host defense system. Polysaccharides exist almost ubiquitously in medical plants and most of them possess immunomodulation and macrophage activation properties. This study elucidates the effects on macrophage activation and molecular mechanism induced by the polysaccharides (SOPs) from the roots of Sanguisorba officinalis Linne (Rosaceae). Polysaccharides (SOPs) from the roots of S. officinalis were obtained by water extraction and ethanol precipitation. Physicochemical characterization of SOPs was analyzed by phenol-sulfuric acid, m-hydroxydiphenyl, Bradford method, and gas chromatography. Phagocytic capacity of RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with SOPs (25 and 100 μg/ml) was determined by the aseptic neutral red method. Macrophages were incubated with SOPs (25 and 100 μg/ml), and the TNF-α and NO the secretion were measured using ELISA kit and Griess reagent, respectively. In addition, TNF-α and iNOS transcripts were evaluated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and NF-κB signaling activation was detected by Western blot assay. SOPs enhanced the phagocytosis capacity of macrophages to aseptic neutral red solution and increased TNF-α and NO secretion. The amounts of TNF-α and iNOS transcript were increased significantly at the mRNA level when macrophages were exposed to SOPs. Meanwhile, the stimulation of macrophages by SOPs induced phosphorylation of p65 at serine 536 and a marked decrease of IκB expression. These results suggested that SOPs exhibited significant macrophage activation properties through NF-κB signaling pathway and could be considered as a new immunopotentiator.

  11. Proprotein convertase 1/3 inhibited macrophages: A novel therapeutic based on drone macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, Marie; Rodet, Franck; Murgoci, Adriana; Wisztorski, Maxence; Day, Robert; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrated here thanks to proteomic, that proprotein convertase 1/3 knockdown macrophages present all the characteristic of activated pro-inflammatory macrophages. TLR4 and TLR9 signaling pathways can be enhanced leading to the secretion of pro-inflammatory factors and antitumor factors. We can control their activation by controlling one enzyme, PC1/3. In a tumor context, PC1/3 inhibition in macrophages may reactivate them and lead to a cytokine storm after stimulation "at distance" with a TLR ligand. Therefore, we name these proprotein convertase inhibited macrophages the "drone macrophages". They constitute an innovative cell therapy to treat efficiently tumors.

  12. Obtaining of inulin acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Khusenov, Arslonnazar; Rakhmanberdiev, Gappar; Rakhimov, Dilshod; Khalikov, Muzaffar

    2014-01-01

    In the article first obtained inulin ester inulin acetate, by etherification of inulin with acetic anhydride has been exposed. Obtained product has been studied using elementary analysis and IR spectroscopy.

  13. Immunomodulatory effects of hydroxyethylated Hericium erinaceus polysaccharide on macrophages RAW264.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhe; Qin, Tao; Qiu, Fuan; Song, Yulong; Lin, Dandan; Ma, Yufang; Li, Jian; Huang, Yifan

    2017-12-01

    Hericium erinaceus polysaccharide (HEP) has been shown to possess a variety of biological activities. In present study, HEP was successfully modified to obtain its hydroxyethylated derivative hHEP. Its potential immunomodulatory activities on RAW264.7 macrophages were investigated. Results showed that the hHEP were significantly stronger than that of the corresponding unmodified polysaccharide, HEP. Meanwhile, the NO, IL-6 and TNF-α production activities of macrophages were enhanced in the RAW264.7 macrophages by stimulation of hHEP. In addition, the hHEP increase significantly higher iNOS expression than HEP. These results indicated that the hydroxyethylated derivative hHEP could enhance the activation of peritoneal macrophages, and hydroxyethylation modification can enhance the immunomodulation function of HEP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ameloginins promote an alternatively activated macrophage phenotype in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almqvist, S; Werthen, M; Lyngstadas, SP

    2011-01-01

    aggregates were visualised by transmission electron microscopy. The amelogenin treatment of macrophages increased several pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including alternative macrophage activation marker AMAC-1 (p

  15. Macrophage diversity in renal injury and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricardo, Sharon D.; van Goor, Harry; Eddy, Allison A.

    Monocyte-derived macrophages can determine the outcome of the immune response and whether this response contributes to tissue repair or mediates tissue destruction. In addition to their important role in immune-mediated renal disease and host defense, macrophages play a fundamental role in tissue

  16. Macrophage polarization: the epigenetic point of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bossche, Jan; Neele, Annette E.; Hoeksema, Marten A.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The first functions of macrophages to be identified by Metchnikoff were phagocytosis and microbial killing. Although these are important features, macrophages are functionally very complex and involved in virtually all aspects of life, from immunity and host defense, to homeostasis, tissue repair

  17. Macrophages Promote Axon Regeneration with Concurrent Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gensel, J.C.; Nakamura, S.; Guan, Z.; Rooijen, van N.; Ankeny, D.P.; Popovich, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    Activated macrophages can promote regeneration of CNS axons. However, macrophages also release factors that kill neurons. These opposing functions are likely induced simultaneously but are rarely considered together in the same experimental preparation. A goal of this study was to unequivocally

  18. Genesis and kinetics of peritoneal macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, H.H.

    1982-01-01

    The author intended to develop an experimental model for investigations of the proliferation kinetics of tissue macrophages, using the example of peritoneal macrophages. To get a suitable cell population, a blood cell population was labelled with 3 H-thymidine and transferred in a parabiotic test. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Macrophage Activation Mechanisms in Human Monocytic Cell Line-derived Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, Yu; Ishikawa, Mami; Inoue, Takahiro; Inui, Toshio; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Kubo, Kentaro; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nishikata, Takahito

    2015-08-01

    Although the mechanisms of macrophage activation are important for cancer immunotherapy, they are poorly understood. Recently, easy and robust assay systems for assessing the macrophage-activating factor (MAF) using monocytic cell line-derived macrophages were established. Gene-expression profiles of U937- and THP-1-derived macrophages were compared using gene expression microarray analysis and their responses against several MAFs were examined by in vitro experiments. Activated states of these macrophages could not be assigned to a specific sub-type but showed, however, different unique characteristics. The unique of monocytic cell line-derived macrophages could provide clues to understand the activation mechanism of macrophages and, therefore, help to develop effective cancer immunotherapy with MAFs. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) in the skin of patient with localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi-Kuwata, Nobuyo; Makino, Takamitsu; Inoue, Yuji; Takeya, Motohiro; Ihn, Hironobu

    2009-08-01

    Localized scleroderma is a connective tissue disorder that is limited to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Macrophages have been reported to be particularly activated in patients with skin disease including systemic sclerosis and are potentially important sources for fibrosis-inducing cytokines, such as transforming growth factor beta. To clarify the features of immunohistochemical characterization of the immune cell infiltrates in localized scleroderma focusing on macrophages, skin biopsy specimens were analysed by immunohistochemistry. The number of cells stained with monoclonal antibodies, CD68, CD163 and CD204, was calculated. An evident macrophage infiltrate and increased number of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) in their fibrotic areas were observed along with their severity of inflammation. This study revealed that alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) may be a potential source of fibrosis-inducing cytokines in localized scleroderma, and may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of localized scleroderma.

  1. Adrenomedullin Regulates IL-1β Gene Expression in F4/80+ Macrophages during Synovial Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Shotaro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory processes; however, the role and expression of AM in synovial inflammation have not been determined. To investigate the expression and role of AM in inflamed synovial tissue (ST), the gene expression profiles of AM in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of a murine patellar surgical dislocation model were characterized. In addition, the effects of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and AM in cultured synovial cells were also examined. CD11c+ macrophages were found to be elevated in ST of the surgically dislocated patella. Higher gene expression of CD11c, IL-1β, AM, receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 (RAMP2), and 3 (RAMP3) was also observed in ST obtained from the dislocated side. AM expression was also significantly increased in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages in response to IL-1β treatment. Synovial macrophages also highly expressed RAMP3 compared to fibroblasts and this expression was further stimulated by exogenously added IL-1β. Further, the treatment of the F4/80-positive cell fraction obtained from ST with AM inhibited IL-1β expression. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that AM was produced by synovial fibroblasts and macrophages in inflamed ST and that increased levels of AM may exert anti-inflammatory effects on synovial macrophages. PMID:28299347

  2. Construction of genetic markers for the study of Salmonella typhimurium infection of murine macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    in combination with available host markers it will be possible to estimate the time-point at which a specific gene is required for progression of SCV maturation. These developmentally regulated reporter fusions constitute a set of novel developmental markers for the study of Salmonella Typhimurium infection...... with the host cell, (2) Formation of early SCV, (3) Maturation into late SCV, (4) Initiation of bacterial replication, (5) Formation of Sifs. In this project, we have constructed a set of reporter fusions which are temporally and spatially regulated during the progression of SCV maturation. The reporter fusions...... were constructed using Red-mediated recombination (1) and the promoters were selected from the recently published expressional data of Salmonella infection of murine macrophages (2). As reporter proteins we both use a stable GFPmut3 variant as well as an unstable GFP variant (3). Using these fusions...

  3. Slab replacement maturity guidelines : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Concrete sets in hours at moderate temperatures, : but the bonds that make concrete strong continue : to mature over days to years. However, for : replacement concrete slabs on highways, it is : crucial that concrete develop enough strength : within ...

  4. SOUL System Maturation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Co. Inc. proposes to advance the maturity of an innovative Spacecraft on Umbilical Line (SOUL) System suitable for a wide variety of applications of interest...

  5. SOUL System Maturation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Co. Inc. proposes to advance the maturity of an innovative Spacecraft on Umbilical Line (SOUL) System suitable for a wide variety of applications of interest...

  6. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Yi; Chen, T.-L.; Sheu, J.-R.; Chen, R.-M.

    2005-01-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 μM ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 μM, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 μM, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 μM ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-α, IL-1β, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 μM) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity

  7. Naturally Engineered Maturation of Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano J. Scuderi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic heart disease remains one of the most prominent causes of mortalities worldwide with heart transplantation being the gold-standard treatment option. However, due to the major limitations associated with heart transplants, such as an inadequate supply and heart rejection, there remains a significant clinical need for a viable cardiac regenerative therapy to restore native myocardial function. Over the course of the previous several decades, researchers have made prominent advances in the field of cardiac regeneration with the creation of in vitro human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte tissue engineered constructs. However, these engineered constructs exhibit a functionally immature, disorganized, fetal-like phenotype that is not equivalent physiologically to native adult cardiac tissue. Due to this major limitation, many recent studies have investigated approaches to improve pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte maturation to close this large functionality gap between engineered and native cardiac tissue. This review integrates the natural developmental mechanisms of cardiomyocyte structural and functional maturation. The variety of ways researchers have attempted to improve cardiomyocyte maturation in vitro by mimicking natural development, known as natural engineering, is readily discussed. The main focus of this review involves the synergistic role of electrical and mechanical stimulation, extracellular matrix interactions, and non-cardiomyocyte interactions in facilitating cardiomyocyte maturation. Overall, even with these current natural engineering approaches, pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes within three-dimensional engineered heart tissue still remain mostly within the early to late fetal stages of cardiomyocyte maturity. Therefore, although the end goal is to achieve adult phenotypic maturity, more emphasis must be placed on elucidating how the in vivo fetal microenvironment drives cardiomyocyte

  8. Maturation of sugar maple seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton M., Jr. Carl; Albert G., Jr. Snow; Albert G. Snow

    1971-01-01

    The seeds of a sugar maple tree (Acer saccharum Marsh.) do not mature at the same time every year. And different trees mature their seeds at different times. So time of year is not a reliable measure of when seeds are ripe. Better criteria are needed. In recent studies we have found that moisture content and color are the best criteria for judging when sugar maple...

  9. The influence of protein malnutrition on the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF by macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Cunha de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is well established that protein malnutrition (PM impairs immune defenses and increases susceptibility to infection. Macrophages are cells that play a central role in innate immunity, constituting one of the first barriers against infections. Macrophages produce several soluble factors, including cytokines and growth factors, important to the immune response. Among those growth factors, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. GM-CSF and M-CSF are important to monocyte and macrophage development and stimulation of the immune response process. Knowing the importance of GM-CSF and M-CSF, we sought to investigate the influence of PM on macrophage production of these growth factors. Two-month-old male BALB/c mice were subjected to PM with a low-protein diet (2% and compared to a control diet (12% mouse group. Nutritional status, hemogram and the number of peritoneal cells were evaluated. Additionally, peritoneal macrophages were cultured and the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF and mRNA expression were evaluated. To determine if PM altered macrophage production of GM-CSF and M-CSF, they were stimulated with TNF-α. The PM animals had anemia, leukopenia and a reduced number of peritoneal cells. The production of M-CSF was not different between groups; however, cells from PM animals, stimulated with or without TNF-α, presented reduced capability to produce GM-CSF. These data imply that PM interferes with the production of GM-CSF, and consequently would affect the production and maturation of hematopoietic cells and the immune response.

  10. The Cytokine TGF-β Promotes the Development and Homeostasis of Alveolar Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xueyang; Buttgereit, Anne; Lelios, Iva; Utz, Sebastian G; Cansever, Dilay; Becher, Burkhard; Greter, Melanie

    2017-11-21

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) derive from fetal liver monocytes, which colonize the lung during embryonic development and give rise to fully mature AMs perinatally. AM differentiation requires granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but whether additional factors are involved in AM regulation is not known. Here we report that AMs, in contrast to most other tissue macrophages, were also dependent on transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGF-βR) signaling. Conditional deletion of TGF-βR in mice at different time points halted the development and differentiation of AMs. In adult mice, TGF-β was also critical for AM homeostasis. The source of TGF-β was AMs themselves, indicative of an autocrine loop that promotes AM self-maintenance. Mechanistically, TGF-βR signaling resulted in upregulation of PPAR-γ, a signature transcription factor essential for the development of AMs. These findings reveal an additional layer of complexity regarding the guidance cues, which govern the genesis, maturation, and survival of AMs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Gillian M; Nicol, Marlynne Q; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J; Nash, Anthony A; Dutia, Bernadette M

    2015-10-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α, and TNF-α expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-α was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection.

  12. REGULATION OF TLR/RLR GENE ACTIVITY AND SYNTHESIS OF CYTOKINES DURING PHORBOL MYRISTATE ACETATE (PMA-INDUCED DIFFERENTIATION OF THP-1 MONOCYTES INTO MACROPHAGE-LIKE CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Sokolova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of TLR/RLR gene expression and production of some cytokines were studied in monocytic THP-1 cell line during its differentiation to mature macrophage-like forms induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA treatment for 1 and 5 days in vitro. For the first time, we have shown high induction levels for the genes that encode signaling immune receptors and transcription factors in response to PMA, as well as inhibitory effects of TLR3, TLR7/TLR8, TLR9-agonists in mature macrophages. The PMAactivated THP-1 macrophage-like cells secreted large quantitities of inflammatory IL-1β and TNFα cytokines into culture medium.

  13. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  14. Inflammatory Macrophages Promotes Development of Diabetic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beiyun; Miao, Ya; Zhao, Zhe; Zhong, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are often associated with each other, whereas the relationship between two diseases is ill-defined. Although hyperglycemia during diabetes is a major cause of encephalopathy, diabetes may also cause chronic inflammatory complications including peripheral neuropathy. Hence the role and the characteristics of inflammatory macrophages in the development of diabetic encephalopathy need to be clarified. Diabetes were induced in mice by i.p. injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Two weeks after STZ injection and confirmation of development of diabetes, inflammatory macrophages were eliminated by i.p. injection of 20µg saporin-conjugated antibody against a macrophage surface marker CD11b (saporin-CD11b) twice per week, while a STZ-treated group received injection of rat IgG of same frequency as a control. The effects of macrophage depletion on brain degradation markers, brain malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase, superoxidase anion-positive cells and nitric oxide (NO) were measured. Saporin-CD11b significantly reduced inflammatory macrophages in brain, without affecting mouse blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose responses and beta cell mass. However, reduced brain macrophages significantly inhibited the STZ-induced decreases in brain MDA, catalase and superoxidase anion-positive cells, and the STZ-induced decreases in brain NO. Inflammatory macrophages may promote development of diabetic encephalopathy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The role of substrate morphology for the cytokine release profile of immature human primary macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartneck, Matthias [Department of Medicine III, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Heffels, Karl-Heinz [Department and Chair of Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Bovi, Manfred [Electron Microscopic Facility, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Groll, Jürgen [Department and Chair of Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele [Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research and Dept. of Dermatology, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that the physicochemical nature of any given material is a dominant factor for the release of cytokines by innate immune cells, specifically of macrophages, and thus majorly influences their interaction with other cell types. Recently, we could show that the 3D structure of star shaped polytheylene oxide–polypropylene oxide co-polymers (sP(EO-stat-PO))-hydrogel coated substrates has a stronger influence on the release pattern of cytokines after 7 days of culture than surface chemistry. Here, we focused on the analysis of cytokine release over time and a more detailed analysis of cell morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Therefore, we compared different strategies for SEM sample preparation and found that using osmium tetroxide combined with aqua bidest led to best preparation results. For cytokine release we show significant changes from day 3 to day 7 of cell culture. After 3 days, the sP(EO-stat-PO)-coated substrates led to an induction of pro-angiogenic CCL3 and CCL4, and of low amounts of the anti-inflammatory IL10, which declined at day 7. In contrast, pleiotropic IL6 and the pro-inflammatory TNFα and IL1β were expressed stronger at day 7 than at day 3. - Highlights: • Strategies for the preparation of macrophages on hydrogel materials (Fig. 1) • Cytokine release of immature macrophages on the substrates (Fig. 2 and Table 1) • Changes in cytokine release during macrophage maturation (Table 2)

  16. Dynamics of HIV-containing compartments in macrophages reveal sequestration of virions and transient surface connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Gaudin

    Full Text Available During HIV pathogenesis, infected macrophages behave as "viral reservoirs" that accumulate and retain virions within dedicated internal Virus-Containing Compartments (VCCs. The nature of VCCs remains ill characterized and controversial. Using wild-type HIV-1 and a replication-competent HIV-1 carrying GFP internal to the Gag precursor, we analyzed the biogenesis and evolution of VCCs in primary human macrophages. VCCs appear roughly 14 hours after viral protein synthesis is detected, initially contain few motile viral particles, and then mature to fill up with virions that become packed and immobile. The amount of intracellular Gag, the proportion of dense VCCs, and the density of viral particles in their lumen increased with time post-infection. In contrast, the secretion of virions, their infectivity and their transmission to T cells decreased overtime, suggesting that HIV-infected macrophages tend to pack and retain newly formed virions into dense compartments. A minor proportion of VCCs remains connected to the plasma membrane overtime. Surprisingly, live cell imaging combined with correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that such connections can be transient, highlighting their dynamic nature. Together, our results shed light on the late phases of the HIV-1 cycle and reveal some of its macrophage specific features.

  17. The role of substrate morphology for the cytokine release profile of immature human primary macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartneck, Matthias; Heffels, Karl-Heinz; Bovi, Manfred; Groll, Jürgen; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the physicochemical nature of any given material is a dominant factor for the release of cytokines by innate immune cells, specifically of macrophages, and thus majorly influences their interaction with other cell types. Recently, we could show that the 3D structure of star shaped polytheylene oxide–polypropylene oxide co-polymers (sP(EO-stat-PO))-hydrogel coated substrates has a stronger influence on the release pattern of cytokines after 7 days of culture than surface chemistry. Here, we focused on the analysis of cytokine release over time and a more detailed analysis of cell morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Therefore, we compared different strategies for SEM sample preparation and found that using osmium tetroxide combined with aqua bidest led to best preparation results. For cytokine release we show significant changes from day 3 to day 7 of cell culture. After 3 days, the sP(EO-stat-PO)-coated substrates led to an induction of pro-angiogenic CCL3 and CCL4, and of low amounts of the anti-inflammatory IL10, which declined at day 7. In contrast, pleiotropic IL6 and the pro-inflammatory TNFα and IL1β were expressed stronger at day 7 than at day 3. - Highlights: • Strategies for the preparation of macrophages on hydrogel materials (Fig. 1) • Cytokine release of immature macrophages on the substrates (Fig. 2 and Table 1) • Changes in cytokine release during macrophage maturation (Table 2)

  18. Enhanced alveolar monocytic phagocyte (macrophage) proliferation in tobacco and marijuana smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbers, R.G.; Evans, M.J.; Gong, H. Jr.; Tashkin, D.P. (Univ. of California-Los Angeles School of Medicine (USA))

    1991-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that enhanced cell division accounted for the augmented numbers of monocytic phagocytes with characteristics attributed to alveolar macrophages (AM) found in the lungs of habitual tobacco (T) and marijuana (M) smokers. The monocytic phagocytes, that is, alveolar macrophages, were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 12 nonsmoking subjects; 10 subjects who smoked T only (TS); 13 subjects who smoked M only (MS); and 6 smokers of both T and M (MTS). The replication of these cells was determined by measuring the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into the DNA of dividing cells and visually counting 2,000 cells on autoradiographically prepared cytocentrifuge cell preparations. This study demonstrated that the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled monocytic phagocytes with characteristics of alveolar macrophages from either TS or MS have a higher proliferative index compared to cells (macrophages) from nonsmokers, p less than 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. The total number of BAL macrophages that are in mitosis in TS (17.90 +/- 4.50 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) or MTS (10.50 +/- 4.20 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are 18- and 10-fold greater, respectively, than the number obtained from nonsmokers (1.01 +/- 0.18 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml). Interestingly, the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled macrophages from MS (2.90 +/- 0.66 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are also greater than the number obtained from nonsmokers, although this is not statistically significant. The stimulus augmenting alveolar macrophage replication is as yet unknown but may likely be found in the T or M smoke.

  19. Enhanced alveolar monocytic phagocyte (macrophage) proliferation in tobacco and marijuana smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbers, R.G.; Evans, M.J.; Gong, H. Jr.; Tashkin, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that enhanced cell division accounted for the augmented numbers of monocytic phagocytes with characteristics attributed to alveolar macrophages (AM) found in the lungs of habitual tobacco (T) and marijuana (M) smokers. The monocytic phagocytes, that is, alveolar macrophages, were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 12 nonsmoking subjects; 10 subjects who smoked T only (TS); 13 subjects who smoked M only (MS); and 6 smokers of both T and M (MTS). The replication of these cells was determined by measuring the incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into the DNA of dividing cells and visually counting 2,000 cells on autoradiographically prepared cytocentrifuge cell preparations. This study demonstrated that the number of [ 3 H]thymidine-labeled monocytic phagocytes with characteristics of alveolar macrophages from either TS or MS have a higher proliferative index compared to cells (macrophages) from nonsmokers, p less than 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. The total number of BAL macrophages that are in mitosis in TS (17.90 +/- 4.50 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) or MTS (10.50 +/- 4.20 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are 18- and 10-fold greater, respectively, than the number obtained from nonsmokers (1.01 +/- 0.18 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml). Interestingly, the number of [ 3 H]thymidine-labeled macrophages from MS (2.90 +/- 0.66 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are also greater than the number obtained from nonsmokers, although this is not statistically significant. The stimulus augmenting alveolar macrophage replication is as yet unknown but may likely be found in the T or M smoke

  20. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Mérida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution.

  1. Sustaining Exploration in Mature Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayo, A.

    2002-01-01

    Exploration is a business like any other business driven by opportunity, resources and expectation of profit. Therefore, exploration will thrive anywhere the opportunities are significant, the resources are available and the outlook for profit (or value creation) is good. To sustain exploration activities anywhere, irrespective of the environment, there must be good understanding of the drivers of these key investment criteria. This paper will examine these investment criteria as they relate to exploration business and address the peculiarity of exploration in mature basin. Mature basins are unique environment that lends themselves a mix of fears, paradigms and realities, particularly with respect to the perception of value. To sustain exploration activities in a mature basin, we need to understand these perceptions relative to the true drivers of profitability. Exploration in the mature basins can be as profitable as exploration in emerging basins if the dynamics of value definition-strategic and fiscal values are understood by operators, regulators and co ventures alike. Some suggestions are made in this presentation on what needs to be done in addressing these dynamic investment parameters and sustaining exploration activities in mature basins

  2. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Madera

    Full Text Available Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression.

  3. Atherogenicity of amino acids in the lipid-laden macrophage model system in vitro and in atherosclerotic mice: a key role for triglyceride metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Grajeda-Iglesias, Claudia; Najjar, Mahmoud; Abu-Saleh, Niroz; Volkova, Nina; Dar, Dalit Esther; Hayek, Tony; Aviram, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Atherosclerosis-related research has focused mainly on the effects of lipids on macrophage foam cell formation and atherogenesis, whereas the role of amino acids (AAs) was understudied. The current study aimed to identify anti- or pro-atherogenic AA in the macrophage model system and to elucidate the underlying metabolic and molecular mechanisms. J774A.1 cultured macrophages were treated with increasing concentrations of each 1 of the 20 AAs. Macrophage atherogenicity was assessed in terms of cellular toxicity, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular cholesterol or triglyceride content. At nontoxic concentrations (up to 1 mM), modest effects on ROS generation or cholesterol content were noted, but six specific AAs significantly affected macrophage triglyceride content. Glycine, cysteine, alanine and leucine significantly decreased macrophage triglyceride content (by 24%-38%), through attenuated uptake of triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) by macrophages. In contrast, glutamate and glutamine caused a marked triglyceride accumulation in macrophages (by 107% and 129%, respectively), via a diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 (DGAT1)-dependent increase in triglyceride biosynthesis rate with a concurrent maturation of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1). Supplementation of apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE -/- ) mice with glycine for 40 days significantly decreased the triglyceride levels in serum and in peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) isolated from the mice (by 19%). In contrast, glutamine supplementation significantly increased MPM ROS generation and the accumulation of cholesterol and that of triglycerides (by 48%), via enhanced uptake of LDL and VLDL. Altogether, the present findings reveal some novel roles for specific AA in macrophage atherogenicity, mainly through modulation of cellular triglyceride metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SP-A binding sites on bovine alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaga, S; Plattner, H; Schlepper-Schaefer, J

    1998-11-25

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) binding to bovine alveolar macrophages was examined in order to characterize SP-A binding proteins on the cell surface and to isolate putative receptors from these cells that could be obtained in large amounts. Human SP-A, unlabeled or labeled with gold particles, was bound to freshly isolated macrophages and analyzed with ELISA or the transmission electron microscope. Binding of SP-A was inhibited by Ca2+ chelation, by an excess of unlabeled SP-A, or by the presence of 20 mg/ml mannan. We conclude that bovine alveolar macrophages expose binding sites for SP-A that are specific and that depend on Ca2+ and on mannose residues. For isolation of SP-A receptors with homologous SP-A as ligand we isolated SP-A from bovine lung lavage. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified SP-A showed a protein of 32-36 kDa. Functional integrity of the protein was demonstrated. Bovine SP-A bound to Dynabeads was used to isolate SP-A binding proteins. From the fractionated and blotted proteins of the receptor preparation two proteins bound SP-A in a Ca2+-dependent manner, a 40-kDa protein showing mannose dependency and a 210-kDa protein, showing no mannose sensitivity. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  5. Maturity Gonad Sea Cucumber Holothuria scabra Under The Month Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penina Tua Rahantoknam, Santi

    2017-10-01

    Gonad maturity level of the sea cucumber Holothuria scabra is important to note for selection of parent ready spawn. Sea cucumbers are giving a reaction to the treatment of excitatory spawn mature individuals only. For the determination of the level of maturity of gonads of sea cucumbers, the necessary observation of the gonads are microscopic, macroscopic and gonad maturity gonado somatic indeks (GSI). GSI value is important to know the changes that occur in the gonads quantitatively, so that time can be presumed spawning (Effendie, 1997). Reproductive cycle can be determined by observing the evolution of GSI. The study of sea cucumbers Holothuria scabra gonad maturity conducted in Langgur, Southeast Maluku. Observations were made at every cycle of the moon is the full moon phase (BP) and new moon (BB) in the period January 29, 2017 until July 23, 2017. Observations H. scabra gonad maturity level is done with surgery, observation and calculation GSI gonad histology. GSI highest value obtained in May that full moon cycle at 90% of individuals that are in the spawning stage (phase 5), then 70% of the individuals that are in the spawning stage (phase 5) in March that the full moon cycle. The results obtained show that the peak spawning H. scabra period January 2017 to July 2017 occurred on the full moon cycle in May.

  6. Determinants of loan maturity in small business lending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiqur Rahman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the determinants of loan maturity of small and medium enterprises (SMEs in the context of Visegrad countries: Czech Republic, Slovak Republic, Poland, and Hungary. The data of instead of for this paper was obtained from the Business Environment and Enterprise Performance Survey (BEEPS, which is a joint project of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the World Bank. By using a binary logistic model, we have found that loan maturity is shorter for older and mature firms, firms owned by female and firms experiencing a shortage of liquidity. At the same time, we have also found that firms having concentrated ownership structure and more tangible assets can borrow for a longer period. In addition to that, we have found evidence that loan maturity is longer for the firms located closer to a bank branch. We also provide empirical support for the assumption that bank low competition is associated with longer maturity. From the obtained results, we may recommend SMEs to borrow from banks that are within their vicinity since this may increase the maturity of loans. Policy makers are recommended to implement policies so that to alleviate gender-related discrimination and take initiatives to moderate the level of competition at this market.

  7. DMPD: Linking inflammasome activation and phagosome maturation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ml file with CIOPlayer Open .csml file with CIOPlayer - ※CIO Playerのご利用上の注意 Open .csml file with CIO Open .csml file with CIO - ※CIOのご利用上の注意 ...

  8. Public Sector IS Maturity Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner Henriksen, Helle; Andersen, Kim Normann; Medaglia, Rony

    2011-01-01

    Online applications and processing of tax forms, driver licenses, and construction permits are examples of where policy attention and research have been united in efforts aiming to categorize the maturity level of e-services. Less attention has been attributed to policy areas with continuous online...... citizenpublic interaction, such as in public education. In this paper we use a revised version of the Public Sector Process Rebuilding (PPR) maturity model for mapping 200 websites of public primary schools in Denmark. Findings reveal a much less favorable picture of the digitization of the Danish public sector...... compared to the high ranking it has received in the international benchmark studies. This paper aims at closing the gap between the predominant scope of maturity models and the frequency of citizen-public sector interaction, and calls for increased attention to the activities of government where the scale...

  9. Global Dynamics of HIV Infection of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Elaiw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the global dynamics of an HIV infection model describing the interaction of the HIV with CD4+ T cells and macrophages. The incidence rate of virus infection and the growth rate of the uninfected CD4+ T cells and macrophages are given by general functions. We have incorporated two types of distributed delays into the model to account for the time delay between the time the uninfected cells are contacted by the virus particle and the time for the emission of infectious (matures virus particles. We have established a set of conditions which are sufficient for the global stability of the steady states of the model. Using Lyapunov functionals and LaSalle's invariant principle, we have proven that if the basic reproduction number R0 is less than or equal to unity, then the uninfected steady state is globally asymptotically stable (GAS, and if the infected steady state exists, then it is GAS.

  10. Bicarbonate Transport During Enamel Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kaifeng; Paine, Michael L

    2017-11-01

    Amelogenesis (tooth enamel formation) is a biomineralization process consisting primarily of two stages (secretory stage and maturation stage) with unique features. During the secretory stage, the inner epithelium of the enamel organ (i.e., the ameloblast cells) synthesizes and secretes enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) into the enamel space. The protein-rich enamel matrix forms a highly organized architecture in a pH-neutral microenvironment. As amelogenesis transitions to maturation stage, EMPs are degraded and internalized by ameloblasts through endosomal-lysosomal pathways. Enamel crystallite formation is initiated early in the secretory stage, however, during maturation stage the more rapid deposition of calcium and phosphate into the enamel space results in a rapid expansion of crystallite length and mineral volume. During maturation-stage amelogenesis, the pH value of enamel varies considerably from slightly above neutral to acidic. Extracellular acid-base balance during enamel maturation is tightly controlled by ameloblast-mediated regulatory networks, which include significant synthesis and movement of bicarbonate ions from both the enamel papillary layer cells and ameloblasts. In this review we summarize the carbonic anhydrases and the carbonate transporters/exchangers involved in pH regulation in maturation-stage amelogenesis. Proteins that have been shown to be instrumental in this process include CA2, CA6, CFTR, AE2, NBCe1, SLC26A1/SAT1, SLC26A3/DRA, SLC26A4/PDS, SLC26A6/PAT1, and SLC26A7/SUT2. In addition, we discuss the association of miRNA regulation with bicarbonate transport in tooth enamel formation.

  11. Normal macrophage function in copper deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukasewycz, O.A.; Kolquist, K.L.; Prohaska, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Copper deficiency (-Cu) was produced in C57 BL and C58 mice by feeding a low copper diet (modified AIN-76A) from birth. Mice given supplemental copper in the drinking water (+Cu) served as controls. Copper status was monitored by assay of ceruloplasmin (CP) activity. Macrophages (M0) were obtained from matched +Cu and -Cu male 7 week-old mice by peritoneal lavage 3 days after thioglycollate stimulation. M0 were assayed in terms of lipopolysaccharide-induced hexose monophosphate shunt activity by monitoring 14 CO 2 production from [1- 14 C]-glucose and by the determination of phagocytic index using fluorescein labelled latex bead ingestion. M0 from -Cu mice were equivalent to those of +Cu mice in both these parameters. However, superoxide dismutase and cytochrome oxidase activities were both significantly lower in -Cu M0, confirming a functional copper deficiency. Previous results from this laboratory have shown that -Cu mice have a decreased antibody response to sheep erythrocyte antigens and a diminished reactivity to B and T cell mitogens. These immunological insufficiencies appear to be proportional to the severity of copper depletion as determined by CP levels. Furthermore, -Cu lymphocytes exhibit depressed mixed lymphocyte reactivity consistent with alterations at the membrane surface. The present results suggest that M0/monocytes are less severely affected than lymphocytes in copper deficiency states

  12. The response of macrophages to titanium particles is determined by macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajarinen, Jukka; Kouri, Vesa-Petteri; Jämsen, Eemeli; Li, Tian-Fang; Mandelin, Jami; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2013-11-01

    Aseptic loosening of total joint replacements is driven by the reaction of macrophages to foreign body particles released from the implant. It was hypothesized that the macrophages' response to these particles is dependent, in addition to particle characteristics and contaminating biomolecules, on the state of macrophage polarization as determined by the local cytokine microenvironment. To test this hypothesis we differentiated M1 and M2 macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes and compared their responses to titanium particles using genome-wide microarray analysis and a multiplex cytokine assay. In comparison to non-activated M0 macrophages, the overall chemotactic and inflammatory responses to titanium particles were greatly enhanced in M1 macrophages and effectively suppressed in M2 macrophages. In addition, the genome-wide approach revealed several novel, potentially osteolytic, particle-induced mediators, and signaling pathway analysis suggested the involvement of toll-like and nod-like receptor signaling in particle recognition. It is concluded that the magnitude of foreign body reaction caused by titanium particles is dependent on the state of macrophage polarization. Thus, by limiting the action of M1 polarizing factors, e.g. bacterial biofilm formation, in peri-implant tissues and promoting M2 macrophage polarization by biomaterial solutions or pharmacologically, it might be possible to restrict wear-particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of macrophages in age-related oxidative stress and lipofuscin accumulation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Carmen; de Toda, Irene Martínez; Cruces, Julia; Garrido, Antonio; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Mónica; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2017-08-01

    The age-related changes in the immune functions (immunosenescence) may be mediated by an increase of oxidative stress and damage affecting leukocytes. Although the "oxidation-inflammation" theory of aging proposes that phagocytes are the main immune cells contributing to "oxi-inflamm-aging", this idea has not been corroborated. The aim of this work was to characterize the age-related changes in several parameters of oxidative stress and immune function, as well as in lipofuscin accumulation ("a hallmark of aging"), in both total peritoneal leukocyte population and isolated peritoneal macrophages. Adult, mature, old and long-lived mice (7, 13, 18 and 30 months of age, respectively) were used. The xanthine oxidase (XO) activity-expression, basal levels of superoxide anion and ROS, catalase activity, oxidized (GSSG) and reduced (GSH) glutathione content and lipofuscin levels, as well as both phagocytosis and digestion capacity were evaluated. The results showed an age-related increase of oxidative stress and lipofuscin accumulation in murine peritoneal leukocytes, but especially in macrophages. Macrophages from old mice showed lower antioxidant defenses (catalase activity and GSH levels), higher oxidizing compounds (XO activity/expression and superoxide, ROS and GSSG levels) and lipofuscin levels, together with an impaired macrophage functions, in comparison to adults. In contrast, long-lived mice showed in their peritoneal leukocytes, and especially in macrophages, a well-preserved redox state and maintenance of their immune functions, all which could account for their high longevity. Interestingly, macrophages showed higher XO activity and lipofuscin accumulation than lymphocytes in all the ages analyzed. Our results support that macrophages play a central role in the chronic oxidative stress associated with aging, and the fact that phagocytes are key cells contributing to immunosenescence and "oxi-inflamm-aging". Moreover, the determination of oxidative stress and

  14. Phagocytosis-induced 51Cr release from activated macrophages and blood mononuclears. Effect of colchicine and antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGee, M.P.; Hale, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    The chromium-release test was adapted to the measurement of the cellular injury induced when activated macrophages phagocytose particulates. Macrophages obtained from rabbit lungs undergoing BCG-induced chronic inflammation released more chromium when incubated in the presence of phagocytosable particles than when incubated under resting conditions. Blood mononuclear cells, 40-60% monocytes, procured from the same BCG-injected animals, were less susceptible to phagocytosis-induced injury than the macrophages obtained from the lungs. The amount of chromium released by the activated macrophages was proportional to the number of particles present during incubation. In the presence of catalase, the amounts of chromium released by phagocytosing and resting macrophages were similar; in the presence of superoxide dismutase and cytochrome c, the amount of chromium released by phagocytosing macrophages was 13-35% less than the amount of chromium released by macrophages incubated without the antioxidants. In addition, colchicine, an inhibitor of degranulation also exerted partial inhibition of the chromium release. These results suggest that oxygen radicals and lysosomal contents contribute to the cellular injury that results from phagocytosis

  15. Botanical polysaccharides: macrophage immunomodulation and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Quinn, Mark T

    2006-03-01

    Botanical polysaccharides exhibit a number of beneficial therapeutic properties, and it is thought that the mechanisms involved in these effects are due to the modulation of innate immunity and, more specifically, macrophage function. In this review, we summarize our current state of understanding of the macrophage modulatory effects of botanical polysaccharides isolated from a wide array of different species of flora, including higher plants, mushrooms, lichens and algae. Overall, the primary effect of botanical polysaccharides is to enhance and/or activate macrophage immune responses, leading to immunomodulation, anti-tumor activity, wound-healing and other therapeutic effects. Furthermore, botanical and microbial polysaccharides bind to common surface receptors and induce similar immunomodulatory responses in macrophages, suggesting that evolutionarily conserved polysaccharide structural features are shared between these organisms. Thus, the evaluation of botanical polysaccharides provides a unique opportunity for the discovery of novel therapeutic agents and adjuvants that exhibit beneficial immunomodulatory properties.

  16. Epigenetic Regulation of Monocyte and Macrophage Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Marten A.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key players in tissue homeostasis and immune responses. Epigenetic processes tightly regulate cellular functioning in health and disease. Recent Advances: Recent technical developments have allowed detailed characterizations of the transcriptional circuitry underlying

  17. Lack of RNase L attenuates macrophage functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yi

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one of the major cell types in innate immunity against microbial infection. It is believed that the expression of proinflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 by macrophages is also crucial for activation of both innate and adaptive immunities. RNase L is an interferon (IFN inducible enzyme which is highly expressed in macrophages. It has been demonstrated that RNase L regulates the expression of certain inflammatory genes. However, its role in macrophage function is largely unknown.Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs were generated from RNase L(+/+and (-/- mice. The migration of BMMs was analyzed by using Transwell migration assays. Endocytosis and phagocytosis of macrophages were assessed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-Dextran 40,000 and FITC-E. coli bacteria, respectively. The expression of inflammatory genes was determined by Western Blot and ELISA. The promoter activity of Cox-2 was measured by luciferase reporter assays.Lack of RNase L significantly decreased the migration of BMMs induced by M-CSF, but at a less extent by GM-CSF and chemokine C-C motif ligand-2 (CCL2. Interestingly, RNase L deficient BMMs showed a significant reduction of endocytic activity to FITC-Dextran 40,000, but no any obvious effect on their phagocytic activity to FITC-bacteria under the same condition. RNase L impacts the expression of certain genes related to cell migration and inflammation such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β, IL-1β, IL-10, CCL2 and Cox-2. Furthermore, the functional analysis of the Cox-2 promoter revealed that RNase L regulated the expression of Cox-2 in macrophages at its transcriptional level. Taken together, our findings provide direct evidence showing that RNase L contributes to innate immunity through regulating macrophage functions.

  18. Macrophages in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Calum C; Mowat, Allan McI

    2014-01-01

    The intestine contains the largest pool of macrophages in the body which are essential for maintaining mucosal homeostasis in the face of the microbiota and the constant need for epithelial renewal but are also important components of protective immunity and are involved in the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, defining the biological roles of intestinal macrophages has been impeded by problems in defining the phenotype and origins of different populations of myeloid cells in the mucosa. Here, we discuss how multiple parameters can be used in combination to discriminate between functionally distinct myeloid cells and discuss the roles of macrophages during homeostasis and how these may change when inflammation ensues. We also discuss the evidence that intestinal macrophages do not fit the current paradigm that tissue-resident macrophages are derived from embryonic precursors that self-renew in situ, but require constant replenishment by blood monocytes. We describe our recent work demonstrating that classical monocytes constantly enter the intestinal mucosa and how the environment dictates their subsequent fate. We believe that understanding the factors that drive intestinal macrophage development in the steady state and how these may change in response to pathogens or inflammation could provide important insights into the treatment of IBD. PMID:24942685

  19. Endometriosis, a disease of the macrophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa eCapobianco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis, a common cause of pelvic pain and female infertility, depends on the growth of vascularised endometrial tissue at ectopic sites. Endometrial fragments reach the peritoneal cavity during the fertile years: local cues decide whether they yield endometriotic lesions. Macrophages are recruited at sites of hypoxia and tissue stress, where they clear cell debris and heme-iron and generate pro-life and pro-angiogenesis signals. Macrophages are abundant in endometriotic lesions, where are recruited and undergo alternative activation. In rodents macrophages are required for lesions to establish and to grow; bone-marrow derived Tie-2 expressing macrophages specifically contribute to lesions neovasculature, possibly because they concur to the recruitment of circulating endothelial progenitors, and sustain their survival and the integrity of the vessel wall. Macrophages sense cues (hypoxia, cell death, iron overload in the lesions and react delivering signals to restore the local homeostasis: their action represents a necessary, non-redundant step in the natural history of the disease. Endometriosis may be due to a misperception of macrophages about ectopic endometrial tissue. They perceive it as a wound, they activate programs leading to ectopic cell survival and tissue vascularization. Clearing this misperception is a critical area for the development of novel medical treatments of endometriosis, an urgent and unmet medical need.

  20. Macrophages and nerve fibres in peritoneal endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lu Vinh Phuc; Tokushige, Natsuko; Berbic, Marina; Markham, Robert; Fraser, Ian S

    2009-04-01

    Endometriosis is considered to be an inflammatory disease, and macrophages are the most numerous immune cells in endometriotic lesions. However, the mechanisms underlying the elevation of macrophages and their role in the pathogenesis and manifestations of endometriosis still remain unclear. The number of macrophages stained for CD68 in endometriotic lesions (n = 24) and in peritoneum distant from the lesions (n = 14) from women with endometriosis was compared with the number of macrophages in normal peritoneum from women without endometriosis (n = 18). Peritoneal lesions were also double-stained for CD68 and protein gene product 9.5 to study the relationship between macrophages and nerve fibres. The densities of macrophages in peritoneal endometriotic lesions and unaffected peritoneum from women with endometriosis were both significantly higher than that in normal peritoneum from women without endometriosis (P peritoneal lesions from women with endometriosis compared with normal peritoneum from women without endometriosis. These cells may well play roles in the growth and development of endometriotic lesions and in the generation of pain through interaction with nerve fibres.

  1. Motivational Maturity and Helping Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymes, Michael; Green, Logan

    1977-01-01

    Maturity in conative development (type of motivation included in Maslow's needs hierarchy) was found to be predictive of helping behavior in middle class white male college students. The effects of safety and esteem needs were compared, and the acceptance of responsibility was also investigated. (GDC)

  2. Regulators of growth plate maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emons, Joyce Adriana Mathilde

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen is known to play an important role in longitudinal bone growth and growth plate maturation, but the mechanism by which estrogens exert their effect is not fully understood. In this thesis this role is further explored. Chapter 1 contains a general introduction to longitudinal bone growth

  3. The FGL2/fibroleukin prothrombinase is involved in alveolar macrophage activation in COPD through the MAPK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanling; Xu, Sanpeng; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sui; Yan, Weiming; Ning, Qin

    2010-01-01

    Fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2)/fibroleukin has been reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of some critical inflammatory diseases by possessing immunomodulatory activity through the mediation of 'immune coagulation' and the regulation of maturation and proliferation of immune cells. We observed upregulated FGL2 expression in alveolar macrophages from peripheral lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and found a correlation between FGL2 expression and increased macrophage activation markers (CD11b and CD14). The role of FGL2 in the activation of macrophages was confirmed by the detection of significantly decreased macrophage activation marker (CD11b, CD11c, and CD71) expression as well as the inhibition of cell migration and inflammatory cytokine (IL-8 and MMP-9) production in an LPS-induced FGL2 knockdown human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Increased FGL2 expression co-localized with upregulated phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) in the lung tissues from COPD patients. Moreover, FGL2 knockdown in THP-1 cells significantly downregulated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK while upregulating phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Thus, we demonstrate that FGL2 plays an important role in macrophage activation in the lungs of COPD patients through MAPK pathway modulation.

  4. The first trimester human placenta is a site for terminal maturation of primitive erythroid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Handel, Ben; Prashad, Sacha L; Hassanzadeh-Kiabi, Nargess; Huang, Andy; Magnusson, Mattias; Atanassova, Boriana; Chen, Angela; Hamalainen, Eija I; Mikkola, Hanna K A

    2010-10-28

    Embryonic hematopoiesis starts via the generation of primitive red blood cells (RBCs) that satisfy the embryo's immediate oxygen needs. Although primitive RBCs were thought to retain their nuclei, recent studies have shown that primitive RBCs in mice enucleate in the fetal liver. It has been unknown whether human primitive RBCs enucleate, and what hematopoietic site might support this process. Our data indicate that the terminal maturation and enucleation of human primitive RBCs occurs in first trimester placental villi. Extravascular ζ-globin(+) primitive erythroid cells were found in placental villi between 5-7 weeks of development, at which time the frequency of enucleated RBCs was higher in the villous stroma than in circulation. RBC enucleation was further evidenced by the presence of primitive reticulocytes and pyrenocytes (ejected RBC nuclei) in the placenta. Extravascular RBCs were found to associate with placental macrophages, which contained ingested nuclei. Clonogenic macrophage progenitors of fetal origin were present in the chorionic plate of the placenta before the onset of fetoplacental circulation, after which macrophages had migrated to the villi. These findings indicate that placental macrophages may assist the enucleation process of primitive RBCs in placental villi, implying an unexpectedly broad role for the placenta in embryonic hematopoiesis.

  5. DMPD: Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18022390 Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammati...on. Szanto A, Roszer T. FEBS Lett. 2008 Jan 9;582(1):106-16. Epub 2007 Nov 20. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nuclear... receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. PubmedID 18022390 Title Nuclear

  6. DMPD: Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14726496 Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Cor...osine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. PubmedID 14726496 Title Receptor tyrosine...rell PH, Morrison AC, Lutz MA. J Leukoc Biol. 2004 May;75(5):731-7. Epub 2004 Jan 14. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Receptor tyr

  7. CD16+ Monocytes and Skewed Macrophage Polarization toward M2 Type Hallmark Heart Transplant Acute Cellular Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    van den Bosch, Thierry P. P.; Caliskan, Kadir; Kraaij, Marina D.; Constantinescu, Alina A.; Manintveld, Olivier C.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.; von der Th?sen, Jan H.; Clahsen-van Groningen, Marian C.; Baan, Carla C.; Rowshani, Ajda T.

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: During acute heart transplant rejection, infiltration of lymphocytes and monocytes is followed by endothelial injury and eventually myocardial fibrosis. To date, no information is available on monocyte-macrophage-related cellular shifts and their polarization status during rejection. Here, we aimed to define and correlate monocyte-macrophage endomyocardial tissue profiles obtained at rejection and time points prior to rejection, with corresponding serial blood samples ...

  8. Colonic macrophage polarization in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleyard, Caroline B.

    2016-01-01

    Our review focuses on the colonic macrophage, a monocyte-derived, tissue-resident macrophage, and the role it plays in health and disease, specifically in inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and cancer of the colon and rectum. We give special emphasis to macrophage polarization, or phenotype, in these different states. We focus on macrophages because they are one of the most numerous leukocytes in the colon, and because they normally contribute to homeostasis through an anti-inflammatory phenotype. However, in conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, proinflammatory macrophages are increased in the colon and have been linked to disease severity and progression. In colorectal cancer, tumor cells may employ anti-inflammatory macrophages to promote tumor growth and dissemination, whereas proinflammatory macrophages may antagonize tumor growth. Given the key roles that this cell type plays in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer, the colonic macrophage is an intriguing therapeutic target. As such, potential macrophage-targeting strategies are discussed. PMID:27229123

  9. Assessment of skeletal maturation using mandibular second molar maturation stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, S; Goyal, S; Gugnani, N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between cervical vertebrae maturation and mandibular second molar calcification stages. The study was designed as a retrospective, descriptive and crosssectional research project. Pre-treatment lateral cephalograms and panoramic radiographs of 99 males and 110 females in the age range of 7 to 18 years 7 months were evaluated with Demirjian Index (DI) and cervical vertebrae maturation indicators (CVMI) of Hassel and Farman. A null hypothesis was proposed that there is no relation between CVMI and DI. A highly significant association (Pearson's contingency coefficient 0.713 for males and 0.863 for females) was found between DI and CVMI. In males, the DI stage E corresponded to stage 2 of CVMI (pre-peak of pubertal growth spurt) and DI stages F and G corresponded to stages 3 and 4 of CVMI (peak of pubertal growth spurt). DI stage H was associated with stages 5 and 6 of CVMI (end of pubertal growth spurt). In females, the DI stages C, D corresponded to CVMI stages 1, 2; DI stages E, F with CVMI stages 3, 4; DI stages G, H with CVMI stages 5, 6. Mandibular second molar calcification stages can be used as indicators for assessment of skeletal maturity.

  10. Cervical vertebral maturation as a biologic indicator of skeletal maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Rodrigo César; de Miranda Costa, Luiz Felipe; Vitral, Robert Willer Farinazzo; Fraga, Marcelo Reis; Bolognese, Ana Maria; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2012-11-01

    To identify and review the literature regarding the reliability of cervical vertebrae maturation (CVM) staging to predict the pubertal spurt. The selection criteria included cross-sectional and longitudinal descriptive studies in humans that evaluated qualitatively or quantitatively the accuracy and reproducibility of the CVM method on lateral cephalometric radiographs, as well as the correlation with a standard method established by hand-wrist radiographs. The searches retrieved 343 unique citations. Twenty-three studies met the inclusion criteria. Six articles had moderate to high scores, while 17 of 23 had low scores. Analysis also showed a moderate to high statistically significant correlation between CVM and hand-wrist maturation methods. There was a moderate to high reproducibility of the CVM method, and only one specific study investigated the accuracy of the CVM index in detecting peak pubertal growth. This systematic review has shown that the studies on CVM method for radiographic assessment of skeletal maturation stages suffer from serious methodological failures. Better-designed studies with adequate accuracy, reproducibility, and correlation analysis, including studies with appropriate sensitivity-specificity analysis, should be performed.

  11. Macrophage polarisation: an immunohistochemical approach for identifying M1 and M2 macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Henrique M Barros

    Full Text Available Macrophage polarization is increasingly recognised as an important pathogenetic factor in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages promote T helper (Th 1 responses and show tumoricidal activity. M2 macrophages contribute to tissue repair and promote Th2 responses. CD68 and CD163 are used to identify macrophages in tissue sections. However, characterisation of polarised macrophages in situ has remained difficult. Macrophage polarisation is regulated by transcription factors, pSTAT1 and RBP-J for M1, and CMAF for M2. We reasoned that double-labelling immunohistochemistry for the detection of macrophage markers together with transcription factors may be suitable to characterise macrophage polarisation in situ. To test this hypothesis, we have studied conditions associated with Th1- and Th2-predominant immune responses: infectious mononucleosis and Crohn's disease for Th1 and allergic nasal polyps, oxyuriasis, wound healing and foreign body granulomas for predominant Th2 response. In all situations, CD163+ cells usually outnumbered CD68+ cells. Moreover, CD163+ cells, usually considered as M2 macrophages, co-expressing pSTAT1 and RBP-J were found in all conditions examined. The numbers of putative M1 macrophages were higher in Th1- than in Th2-associated diseases, while more M2 macrophages were seen in Th2- than in Th1 related disorders. In most Th1-related diseases, the balance of M1 over M2 cells was shifted towards M1 cells, while the reverse was observed for Th2-related conditions. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed two distinct clusters: cluster I included Th1 diseases together with cases with high numbers of CD163+pSTAT1+, CD68+pSTAT1+, CD163+RBP-J+ and CD68+RBP-J+ macrophages; cluster II comprised Th2 conditions together with cases displaying high numbers of CD163+CMAF+ and CD68+CMAF+ macrophages. These results suggest that the detection of pSTAT1, RBP-J, and CMAF in the context of CD68 or CD163 expression is a

  12. Macrophage polarisation: an immunohistochemical approach for identifying M1 and M2 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Mário Henrique M; Hauck, Franziska; Dreyer, Johannes H; Kempkes, Bettina; Niedobitek, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage polarization is increasingly recognised as an important pathogenetic factor in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages promote T helper (Th) 1 responses and show tumoricidal activity. M2 macrophages contribute to tissue repair and promote Th2 responses. CD68 and CD163 are used to identify macrophages in tissue sections. However, characterisation of polarised macrophages in situ has remained difficult. Macrophage polarisation is regulated by transcription factors, pSTAT1 and RBP-J for M1, and CMAF for M2. We reasoned that double-labelling immunohistochemistry for the detection of macrophage markers together with transcription factors may be suitable to characterise macrophage polarisation in situ. To test this hypothesis, we have studied conditions associated with Th1- and Th2-predominant immune responses: infectious mononucleosis and Crohn's disease for Th1 and allergic nasal polyps, oxyuriasis, wound healing and foreign body granulomas for predominant Th2 response. In all situations, CD163+ cells usually outnumbered CD68+ cells. Moreover, CD163+ cells, usually considered as M2 macrophages, co-expressing pSTAT1 and RBP-J were found in all conditions examined. The numbers of putative M1 macrophages were higher in Th1- than in Th2-associated diseases, while more M2 macrophages were seen in Th2- than in Th1 related disorders. In most Th1-related diseases, the balance of M1 over M2 cells was shifted towards M1 cells, while the reverse was observed for Th2-related conditions. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed two distinct clusters: cluster I included Th1 diseases together with cases with high numbers of CD163+pSTAT1+, CD68+pSTAT1+, CD163+RBP-J+ and CD68+RBP-J+ macrophages; cluster II comprised Th2 conditions together with cases displaying high numbers of CD163+CMAF+ and CD68+CMAF+ macrophages. These results suggest that the detection of pSTAT1, RBP-J, and CMAF in the context of CD68 or CD163 expression is a suitable tool for

  13. BMP pathway regulation of and by macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Talati

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a disease of progressively increasing pulmonary vascular resistance, associated with mutations of the type 2 receptor for the BMP pathway, BMPR2. The canonical signaling pathway for BMPR2 is through the SMAD family of transcription factors. BMPR2 is expressed in every cell type, but the impact of BMPR2 mutations affecting SMAD signaling, such as Bmpr2delx4+, had only previously been investigated in smooth muscle and endothelium. In the present study, we created a mouse with universal doxycycline-inducible expression of Bmpr2delx4+ in order to determine if broader expression had an impact relevant to the development of PAH. We found that the most obvious phenotype was a dramatic, but patchy, increase in pulmonary inflammation. We crossed these double transgenic mice onto an NF-κB reporter strain, and by luciferase assays on live mice, individual organs and isolated macrophages, we narrowed down the origin of the inflammatory phenotype to constitutive activation of tissue macrophages. Study of bone marrow-derived macrophages from mutant and wild-type mice suggested a baseline difference in differentiation state in Bmpr2 mutants. When activated with LPS, both mutant and wild-type macrophages secrete BMP pathway inhibitors sufficient to suppress BMP pathway activity in smooth muscle cells (SMC treated with conditioned media. Functionally, co-culture with macrophages results in a BMP signaling-dependent increase in scratch closure in cultured SMC. We conclude that SMAD signaling through BMP is responsible, in part, for preventing macrophage activation in both live animals and in cells in culture, and that activated macrophages secrete BMP inhibitors in sufficient quantity to cause paracrine effect on vascular smooth muscle.

  14. A macrophage activation switch (MAcS)-index for assessment of monocyte/macrophage activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Lauridsen, Mette; Knudsen, Troels Bygum

    2008-01-01

    , simplified by the M1-M2 dichotomy of classically activated (M1), pro-inflammatory cells and alternatively activated (M2), anti-inflammatory cells. Macrophages, however, display a large degree of flexibility and are able to switch between activation states (1). The hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163...... is expressed exclusively on monocytes and macrophages, and its expression is strongly induced by anti-inflammatory stimuli like IL10 and glucocorticoid, making CD163 an ideal M2 macrophage marker (2). Furthermore a soluble variant of CD163 (sCD163) is shed from the cell surface to plasma by protease mediated.......058-5139) (panti-inflammatory state.   CONCLUSION: We present a CD163-derived macrophage activation switch (MAcS)-index, which seems able to differentiate between (predominantly) pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory macrophage activation. The index needs...

  15. Lewis Lung Cancer Cells Promote SIGNR1(CD209b)-Mediated Macrophages Polarization Induced by IL-4 to Facilitate Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaolong; Li, Wenhai; Pan, Lei; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong; Chen, Min; Mu, Deguang

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are a prominent component of lung cancer and contribute to tumor progression by facilitating the immune evasion of cancer cells. DC-SIGN (CD209) assists in the immune evasion of a broad spectrum of pathogens and neoplasms by inhibiting the maturation of DCs and subsequent cytokines production. However, the expression of DC-SIGN in macrophages and its role in mediating immune evasion in lung cancer and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. Our study aimed to identify the immunosuppressive role of SIGNR1 in murine macrophage differentiation and lung cancer progression. We found that SIGNR1-positive RAW264.7 macrophages were enriched in mixed cultures with Lewis lung cancer cells (LLC) (ratio of RAW 264.7 to LLC being 1:1) after stimulation with IL-4. Moreover, LLC-educated macrophages exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-10 but lower IL-12 in response to IL-4 treatment as determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. However, inhibition of SIGNR1 markedly hampered the production of IL-10, indicating that SIGNR1 was indispensable for IL-4+LLC induced macrophage polarization towards the M2 subtype. Furthermore, polarized M2 cells immersed in a tumor microenvironment promoted the migration of LLCs, as measured by transwell assays, but migration was suppressed after blockade of SIGNR1 using CD209b antibody. In addition, IL-4+LLC-educated macrophages reduced the proliferation of the activated T cells and reduced IFN-γ-mediated Th1 response in T cells, while SIGNR1 inhibition rescued Th1 cell functions. In conclusion, murine SIGNR1 expressed in LLC-educated macrophages appears to mediate IL-4-induced RAW264.7 macrophage polarization and thus facilitate lung cancer evasion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Isolation of human monocytes by double gradient centrifugation and their differentiation to macrophages in teflon-coated cell culture bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menck, Kerstin; Behme, Daniel; Pantke, Mathias; Reiling, Norbert; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias; Klemm, Florian

    2014-09-09

    Human macrophages are involved in a plethora of pathologic processes ranging from infectious diseases to cancer. Thus they pose a valuable tool to understand the underlying mechanisms of these diseases. We therefore present a straightforward protocol for the isolation of human monocytes from buffy coats, followed by a differentiation procedure which results in high macrophage yields. The technique relies mostly on commonly available lab equipment and thus provides a cost and time effective way to obtain large quantities of human macrophages. Briefly, buffy coats from healthy blood donors are subjected to a double density gradient centrifugation to harvest monocytes from the peripheral blood. These monocytes are then cultured in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon-coated cell culture bags in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The differentiated macrophages can be easily harvested and used for subsequent studies and functional assays. Important methods for quality control and validation of the isolation and differentiation steps will be highlighted within the protocol. In summary, the protocol described here enables scientists to routinely and reproducibly isolate human macrophages without the need for cost intensive tools. Furthermore, disease models can be studied in a syngeneic human system circumventing the use of murine macrophages.

  17. LL-37 directs macrophage differentiation toward macrophages with a proinflammatory signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Does, Anne M; Beekhuizen, Henry; Ravensbergen, Bep; Vos, Tim; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; van Dissel, Jaap T; Drijfhout, Jan W; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Nibbering, Peter H

    2010-08-01

    The human cathelicidin LL-37 has broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. It also participates at the interface of innate and adaptive immunity by chemoattracting immune effector cells, modulating the production of a variety of inflammatory mediators by different cell types, and regulating the differentiation of monocytes into dendritic cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of LL-37 on the differentiation of human monocytes into anti-inflammatory macrophages (MPhi-2; driven by M-CSF) versus proinflammatory macrophages (MPhi-1; driven by GM-CSF) as well as on fully differentiated MPhi-1 and MPhi-2. Results revealed that monocytes cultured with M-CSF in the presence of LL-37 resulted in macrophages displaying a proinflammatory signature, namely, low expression of CD163 and little IL-10 and profound IL-12p40 production on LPS stimulation. The effects of LL-37 on M-CSF-driven macrophage differentiation were dose- and time-dependent with maximal effects observed at 10 microg/ml when the peptide was present from the start of the cultures. The peptide enhanced the GM-CSF-driven macrophage differentiation. Exposure of fully differentiated MPhi-2 to LL-37 for 6 d resulted in macrophages that produced less IL-10 and more IL-12p40 on LPS stimulation than control MPhi-2. In contrast, LL-37 had no effect on fully differentiated MPhi-1. Peptide mapping using a set of 16 overlapping 22-mer peptides covering the complete LL-37 sequence revealed that the C-terminal portion of LL-37 is responsible for directing macrophage differentiation. Our results furthermore indicate that the effects of LL-37 on macrophage differentiation required internalization of the peptide. Together, we conclude that LL-37 directs macrophage differentiation toward macrophages with a proinflammatory signature.

  18. Carbon black nanoparticles induce type II epithelial cells to release chemotaxins for alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson Ken

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are a key cell in dealing with particles deposited in the lungs and in determining the subsequent response to that particle exposure. Nanoparticles are considered a potential threat to the lungs and the mechanism of pulmonary response to nanoparticles is currently under intense scrutiny. The type II alveolar epithelial cell has previously been shown to release chemoattractants which can recruit alveolar macrophages to sites of particle deposition. The aim of this study was to assess the responses of a type II epithelial cell line (L-2 to both fine and nanoparticle exposure in terms of secretion of chemotactic substances capable of inducing macrophage migration. Results Exposure of type II cells to carbon black nanoparticles resulted in significant release of macrophage chemoattractant compared to the negative control and to other dusts tested (fine carbon black and TiO2 and nanoparticle TiO2 as measured by macrophage migration towards type II cell conditioned medium. SDS-PAGE analysis of the conditioned medium from particle treated type II cells revealed that a higher number of protein bands were present in the conditioned medium obtained from type II cells treated with nanoparticle carbon black compared to other dusts tested. Size-fractionation of the chemotaxin-rich supernatant determined that the chemoattractants released from the epithelial cells were between 5 and 30 kDa in size. Conclusion The highly toxic nature and reactive surface chemistry of the carbon black nanoparticles has very likely induced the type II cell line to release pro-inflammatory mediators that can potentially induce migration of macrophages. This could aid in the rapid recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of particle deposition and the subsequent removal of the particles by phagocytic cells such as macrophages and neutrophils. Future studies in this area could focus on the exact identity of the substance(s released by the

  19. Effect of Tityus serrulatus venom on cytokine production and the activity of murine macrophages

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    Vera L. Petricevich

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Tityus serrulatus venom (TSV on murine peritoneal macrophages evaluated in terms of activation. The effects of crude TSV were analysed by detection of cytokines, oxygen intermediate metabolites (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO in supernatants of peritoneal macrophages. Several functional bioassays were employed including an in vitro model for envenomating: cytotoxicity of TSV was assessed using the lyses percentage. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF activity was assayed by measuring its cytotoxic activity on L-929 cells, and interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas NO levels were detected by Griess colorimetric reactions in culture supernatant of macrophages incubated with TSV and subsequently exposed to either lipopolysaccharide or IFN-γ. Incubation of macrophages with TSV increased production of IL-6 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. TNF production was not detected in supernatants treated with TSV at any concentration. The increase in IL-6 secretion was not associated with concentration-dependent cytoxicity of TSV on these cells. These data suggest that the cytotoxicity does not appear to be the main cause of an increased cytokine production by these cells. Although NO is an important effector molecule in macrophage microbicidal activity, the inducing potential of the test compounds for its release was found to be very moderate, ranging from 125 to 800 mM. Interestingly, NO levels of peritoneal macrophages were increased after IFN-γ. Moreover, NO production had an apparent effect on macrophage activity. The results obtained here also shown that the TSV induces an important elevation in H2O2 release. These results combined with NO production suggest that TSV possesses significant immunomodulatory activities capable of stimulating immune functions in vitro.

  20. Full Spectrum of LPS Activation in Alveolar Macrophages of Healthy Volunteers by Whole Transcriptomic Profiling.

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    Miguel Pinilla-Vera

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in understanding macrophage activation, little is known regarding how human alveolar macrophages in health calibrate its transcriptional response to canonical TLR4 activation. In this study, we examined the full spectrum of LPS activation and determined whether the transcriptomic profile of human alveolar macrophages is distinguished by a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF-dominant type I interferon signature. Bronchoalveolar lavage macrophages were obtained from healthy volunteers, stimulated in the presence or absence of ultrapure LPS in vitro, and whole transcriptomic profiling was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. LPS induced a robust type I interferon transcriptional response and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted interferon regulatory factor (IRF7 as the top upstream regulator of 89 known gene targets. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase (USP-18, a negative regulator of interferon α/β responses, was among the top up-regulated genes in addition to IL10 and USP41, a novel gene with no known biological function but with high sequence homology to USP18. We determined whether IRF-7 and USP-18 can influence downstream macrophage effector cytokine production such as IL-10. We show that IRF-7 siRNA knockdown enhanced LPS-induced IL-10 production in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and USP-18 overexpression attenuated LPS-induced production of IL-10 in RAW264.7 cells. Quantitative PCR confirmed upregulation of USP18, USP41, IL10, and IRF7. An independent cohort confirmed LPS induction of USP41 and IL10 genes. These results suggest that IRF-7 and predicted downstream target USP18, both elements of a type I interferon gene signature identified by RNA-Seq, may serve to fine-tune early cytokine response by calibrating IL-10 production in human alveolar macrophages.

  1. Bilirubin Decreases Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongdong; Tosevska, Anela; Heiß, Elke H; Ladurner, Angela; Mölzer, Christine; Wallner, Marlies; Bulmer, Andrew; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Dirsch, Verena M; Atanasov, Atanas G

    2017-04-28

    Mild but chronically elevated circulating unconjugated bilirubin is associated with reduced total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, which is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. We aimed to investigate whether unconjugated bilirubin influences macrophage cholesterol efflux, as a potential mechanism for the altered circulating lipoprotein concentrations observed in hyperbilirubinemic individuals. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages was assessed using plasma obtained from normo- and hyperbilirubinemic (Gilbert syndrome) humans (n=60 per group) or (heterozygote/homozygote Gunn) rats (n=20 per group) as an acceptor. Hyperbilirubinemic plasma from patients with Gilbert syndrome and Gunn rats induced significantly reduced cholesterol efflux compared with normobilirubinemic plasma. Unconjugated bilirubin (3-17.1 μmol/L) exogenously added to plasma- or apolipoprotein A1-supplemented media also decreased macrophage cholesterol efflux in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. We also showed reduced protein expression of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), a transmembrane cholesterol transporter involved in apolipoprotein A1-mediated cholesterol efflux, in THP-1 macrophages treated with unconjugated bilirubin and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from hyperbilirubinemic individuals. Furthermore, we demonstrated that bilirubin accelerates the degradation rate of the ABCA1 protein in THP-1 macrophages. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is decreased in the presence of plasma obtained from humans and rats with mild hyperbilirubinemia. A direct effect of unconjugated bilirubin on cholesterol efflux was demonstrated and is associated with decreased ABCA1 protein expression. These data improve our knowledge concerning bilirubin's impact on cholesterol transport and represent an important advancement in our understanding of bilirubin's role in cardiovascular disease. © 2017 The Authors. Published on

  2. Peak height velocity as an alternative for maturational classification associated with motor performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Trevizan Costa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a phase characterized by important physical and maturational alterations, with individuals of the same chronological age, but who are more mature, may present sportive advantages because of greater force gain and additional muscle mass. Thus, in studies evaluating motor skills of children and adolescents, maturational classification should be an efficient and easily applicable tool in order to facilitate the interpretation of the true relationship between maturation and motor performance. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the relationship between motor performance and different types of classification of biological maturation in 209 boys aged to 17 years (11.59 ± 2.57 practicing soccer. Anthropometric variables were obtained according to the ISAK criteria. Biological maturation was determined based on age at peak height velocity (PHV and also by self-assessment of sexual maturation (genitalia and pubic hair. Motor performance was evaluated by sit-and-reach tests, horizontal jump, modified push-ups, 50-m run, and 9/12-min run/walk. The results showed progression in the variables analyzed as the subjects reached maturity. Correlation analysis and the egression values indicated higher consistency for the PHV classification, which better explained motor performance according to maturational status, exceeding the values obtained by comparison according to age or sexual maturation. Thus, the use of PHV as a classification instrument is preferably recommended for youngsters with haracteristics similar to those of the present sample.

  3. Suppression of dendritic cells' maturation and functions by daidzein, a phytoestrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yum, Min Kyu; Jung, Mi Young; Cho, Daeho; Kim, Tae Sung

    2011-01-01

    Isoflavones are ubiquitous compounds in foods and in the environment in general. Daidzein and genistein, the best known of isoflavones, are structurally similar to 17β-estradiol and known to exert estrogenic effects. They also evidence a broad variety of biological properties, including antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-atherogenic and anti-osteoporotic activities. Previously, daidzein was reported to increase the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages and splenocyte proliferation, and to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages. However, its potential impacts on immune response in dendritic cells (DCs), antigen-presenting cells that link innate and adaptive immunity, have yet to be clearly elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of isoflavones on the maturation and activation of DCs. Isoflavones (formononetin, daidzein, equol, biochanin A, genistein) were found to differentially affect the expression of CD86, a costimulatory molecule, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated DCs. In particular, daidzein significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the expression levels of maturation-associated cell surface markers including CD40, costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86), and major histocompatibility complex class II (I-A b ) molecule on LPS-stimulated DCs. Daidzein also suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production such as IL-12p40, IL-6 and TNF-α, whereas it didn't affect IL-10 and IL-1β expression. Furthermore, daidzein enhanced endocytosis and inhibited the allo-stimulatory ability of LPS-stimulated DCs on T cells, indicating that daidzein treatment can inhibit the functional maturation of DCs. These results demonstrate that daidzein may exhibit immunosuppressive activity by inhibiting the maturation and activation of DCs. -- Highlights: ► Daidzein inhibited expression of maturation-associated cell surface markers in DCs. ► Daidzein suppressed expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated DCs. ► Daidzein

  4. Maturation of the adolescent brain

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    Arain M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Arain, Maliha Haque, Lina Johal, Puja Mathur, Wynand Nel, Afsha Rais, Ranbir Sandhu, Sushil Sharma Saint James School of Medicine, Kralendijk, Bonaire, The Netherlands Abstract: Adolescence is the developmental epoch during which children become adults – intellectually, physically, hormonally, and socially. Adolescence is a tumultuous time, full of changes and transformations. The pubertal transition to adulthood involves both gonadal and behavioral maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have discovered that myelinogenesis, required for proper insulation and efficient neurocybernetics, continues from childhood and the brain's region-specific neurocircuitry remains structurally and functionally vulnerable to impulsive sex, food, and sleep habits. The maturation of the adolescent brain is also influenced by heredity, environment, and sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone, which play a crucial role in myelination. Furthermore, glutamatergic neurotransmission predominates, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission remains under construction, and this might be responsible for immature and impulsive behavior and neurobehavioral excitement during adolescent life. The adolescent population is highly vulnerable to driving under the influence of alcohol and social maladjustments due to an immature limbic system and prefrontal cortex. Synaptic plasticity and the release of neurotransmitters may also be influenced by environmental neurotoxins and drugs of abuse including cigarettes, caffeine, and alcohol during adolescence. Adolescents may become involved with offensive crimes, irresponsible behavior, unprotected sex, juvenile courts, or even prison. According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the major cause of death among the teenage population is due to injury and violence related to sex and substance abuse. Prenatal neglect, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption may also

  5. Role of Rab5 in the formation of macrophage-derived foam cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lokwern; Hong, Jin; Pan, Junjie; Li, Jian; Wen, Zhichao; Shi, Haiming; Ding, Jianping; Luo, Xinping

    2017-09-12

    Foam cells play a key role in the occurrence and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Its formation starts with the ingestion of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The process is associated with Ras related protein in brain 5 (Rab5) which plays a critical role in regulating endocytosis and early endosomal trafficking. Base on this, we presumed that Rab5 might participate in the maturation of foam cell. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Rab5 on macrophage cholesterol during the evolvement of macrophage when induced by oxLDL to the formation of foam cell. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze the distribution of macrophages and Rab5 in atherosclerotic plaque. RNA inteference study and transfection of inactive mutant (GFP-Rab5-S34N) and active mutant (GFP-Rab5-Q79L) in U937-derived macrophage were utilized to investigate the impact of Rab5 on the process of macrophage cholesterol, which could be detected by oil red O staining, determination of intracellular lipid content, filipin staining, nile red staining and the costaining of early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1) and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylin dicarbocyanine (Dil)-labelled oxLDL (Dil-oxLDL). Rab5 was found abundantly localized in macrophage rich areas of human atherosclerotic lesions. On the foam cell study, the expression of Rab5 was increased after the incubation of oxLDL. The inteference study indicated the depletion of Rab5 led to the decreases of oil red O staining areas, total cholesterol and cholesterol esters in U937-derived marophages. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity of filipin and nile red staining were lower in GFP-Rab5-S34N as compared with GFP-Rab5-Q79L. The confocal study demonstrated less Dil-oxLDL was internalized in GFP-Rab5-S34N as compared with GFP-Rab5-Q79L; the result showed also the decrease in colocalization of internalized Dil-oxLDL and EEA-1 for GFP-Rab5-S34N as compared with GFP-Rab5-Q79L. Rab5 plays an important role in modulating the

  6. Cervical Vertebral Body's Volume as a New Parameter for Predicting the Skeletal Maturation Stages

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Jinmi; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Maki, Koutaro; Ko, Ching-Chang; Kim, Yong-Il

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the correlation between the volumetric parameters derived from the images of the second, third, and fourth cervical vertebrae by using cone beam computed tomography with skeletal maturation stages and to propose a new formula for predicting skeletal maturation by using regression analysis. We obtained the estimation of skeletal maturation levels from hand-wrist radiographs and volume parameters derived from the second, third, and fourth cervical vertebrae bodies ...

  7. Quantitative Assessment of Cervical Vertebral Maturation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Korean Girls

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Bo-Ram; Kim, Yong-Il; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Maki, Koutaro; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6?18 years of age). CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation ...

  8. Carp macrophages and neutrophilic granulocytes secrete an interleukin-1-like factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.; Weyts, F.A.A.; Debets, R.; Flik, G.

    1995-01-01

    Carp, Cyprinus carpio L, macrophages and neutrophilic granulocytes obtained from pronephros were cultured. Supernatant was harvested after 48 h and tested for interleukin-1 (IL-1) bioactivity. A concentration-dependent stimulation of proliferation was found of carp Ig− lymphocytes as well as of the

  9. The science behind the proposed maturity standard change

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current maturity standard for navel oranges in California has been in place for nearly 100 years yet does not always do a good job of ensuring that consumers obtain good-tasting fruit during the early season. Early work that was performed which supported adoption of the standard may have been ad...

  10. Adipocyte-Macrophage Cross-Talk in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Ayse Basak

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by the chronic low-grade activation of the innate immune system. In this respect, macrophage-elicited metabolic inflammation and adipocyte-macrophage interaction has a primary importance in obesity. Large amounts of macrophages are accumulated by different mechanisms in obese adipose tissue. Hypertrophic adipocyte-derived chemotactic monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) pathway also promotes more macrophage accumulation into the obese adipose tissue. However, increased local extracellular lipid concentrations is a final mechanism for adipose tissue macrophage accumulation. A paracrine loop involving free fatty acids and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) between adipocytes and macrophages establishes a vicious cycle that aggravates inflammatory changes in the adipose tissue. Adipocyte-specific caspase-1 and production of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) by macrophages; both adipocyte and macrophage induction by toll like receptor-4 (TLR4) through nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation; free fatty acid-induced and TLR-mediated activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-related pro-inflammatory pathways in CD11c+ immune cells; are effective in macrophage accumulation and in the development of adipose tissue inflammation. Old adipocytes are removed by macrophages through trogocytosis or sending an "eat me" signal. The obesity-induced changes in adipose tissue macrophage numbers are mainly due to increases in the triple-positive CD11b+ F4/80+ CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophage subpopulation. The ratio of M1-to-M2 macrophages is increased in obesity. Furthermore, hypoxia along with higher concentrations of free fatty acids exacerbates macrophage-mediated inflammation in obesity. The metabolic status of adipocytes is a major determinant of macrophage inflammatory output. Macrophage/adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins act at the interface of metabolic and inflammatory pathways. Both macrophages and

  11. Burkholderia cenocepacia type VI secretion system mediates escape of type II secreted proteins into the cytoplasm of infected macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rosales-Reyes

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that survives intracellularly in macrophages and causes serious respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. We have previously shown that bacterial survival occurs in bacteria-containing membrane vacuoles (BcCVs resembling arrested autophagosomes. Intracellular bacteria stimulate IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1-dependent manner and induce dramatic changes to the actin cytoskeleton and the assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex onto the BcCV membrane. A Type 6 secretion system (T6SS is required for these phenotypes but surprisingly it is not required for the maturation arrest of the BcCV. Here, we show that macrophages infected with B. cenocepacia employ the NLRP3 inflammasome to induce IL-1β secretion and pyroptosis. Moreover, IL-1β secretion by B. cenocepacia-infected macrophages is suppressed in deletion mutants unable to produce functional Type VI, Type IV, and Type 2 secretion systems (SS. We provide evidence that the T6SS mediates the disruption of the BcCV membrane, which allows the escape of proteins secreted by the T2SS into the macrophage cytoplasm. This was demonstrated by the activity of fusion derivatives of the T2SS-secreted metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB with adenylcyclase. Supporting this notion, ZmpA and ZmpB are required for efficient IL-1β secretion in a T6SS dependent manner. ZmpA and ZmpB are also required for the maturation arrest of the BcCVs and bacterial intra-macrophage survival in a T6SS-independent fashion. Our results uncover a novel mechanism for inflammasome activation that involves cooperation between two bacterial secretory pathways, and an unanticipated role for T2SS-secreted proteins in intracellular bacterial survival.

  12. A method for multiple sequential analyses of macrophage functions using a small single cell sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.R.F. Nascimento

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial pathogens such as bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG induce the activation of macrophages. Activated macrophages can be characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites, generated via NADPH oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively, and by the increased expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC II. Multiple microassays have been developed to measure these parameters. Usually each assay requires 2-5 x 10(5 cells per well. In some experimental conditions the number of cells is the limiting factor for the phenotypic characterization of macrophages. Here we describe a method whereby this limitation can be circumvented. Using a single 96-well microassay and a very small number of peritoneal cells obtained from C3H/HePas mice, containing as little as <=2 x 10(5 macrophages per well, we determined sequentially the oxidative burst (H2O2, nitric oxide production and MHC II (IAk expression of BCG-activated macrophages. More specifically, with 100 µl of cell suspension it was possible to quantify H2O2 release and nitric oxide production after 1 and 48 h, respectively, and IAk expression after 48 h of cell culture. In addition, this microassay is easy to perform, highly reproducible and more economical.

  13. Identification of Candida glabrata genes involved in pH modulation and modification of the phagosomal environment in macrophages.

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    Lydia Kasper

    Full Text Available Candida glabrata currently ranks as the second most frequent cause of invasive candidiasis. Our previous work has shown that C. glabrata is adapted to intracellular survival in macrophages and replicates within non-acidified late endosomal-stage phagosomes. In contrast, heat killed yeasts are found in acidified matured phagosomes. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the processes leading to inhibition of phagosome acidification and maturation. We show that phagosomes containing viable C. glabrata cells do not fuse with pre-labeled lysosomes and possess low phagosomal hydrolase activity. Inhibition of acidification occurs independent of macrophage type (human/murine, differentiation (M1-/M2-type or activation status (vitamin D3 stimulation. We observed no differential activation of macrophage MAPK or NFκB signaling cascades downstream of pattern recognition receptors after internalization of viable compared to heat killed yeasts, but Syk activation decayed faster in macrophages containing viable yeasts. Thus, delivery of viable yeasts to non-matured phagosomes is likely not triggered by initial recognition events via MAPK or NFκB signaling, but Syk activation may be involved. Although V-ATPase is abundant in C. glabrata phagosomes, the influence of this proton pump on intracellular survival is low since blocking V-ATPase activity with bafilomycin A1 has no influence on fungal viability. Active pH modulation is one possible fungal strategy to change phagosome pH. In fact, C. glabrata is able to alkalinize its extracellular environment, when growing on amino acids as the sole carbon source in vitro. By screening a C. glabrata mutant library we identified genes important for environmental alkalinization that were further tested for their impact on phagosome pH. We found that the lack of fungal mannosyltransferases resulted in severely reduced alkalinization in vitro and in the delivery of C. glabrata to acidified phagosomes. Therefore

  14. Splenic red pulp macrophages are intrinsically superparamagnetic and contaminate magnetic cell isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Lars; Klein, Marika; Spasova, Marina; Elsukova, Anna; Wiedwald, Ulf; Welz, Meike; Knolle, Percy; Farle, Michael; Limmer, Andreas; Kurts, Christian

    2015-08-11

    A main function of splenic red pulp macrophages is the degradation of damaged or aged erythrocytes. Here we show that these macrophages accumulate ferrimagnetic iron oxides that render them intrinsically superparamagnetic. Consequently, these cells routinely contaminate splenic cell isolates obtained with the use of MCS, a technique that has been widely used in immunological research for decades. These contaminations can profoundly alter experimental results. In mice deficient for the transcription factor SpiC, which lack red pulp macrophages, liver Kupffer cells take over the task of erythrocyte degradation and become superparamagnetic. We describe a simple additional magnetic separation step that avoids this problem and substantially improves purity of magnetic cell isolates from the spleen.

  15. Efferocytosis is impaired in Gaucher macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Borger, Daniel K; Grey, Richard J; Kirby, Martha; Anderson, Stacie; Lopez, Grisel; Sidransky, Ellen

    2017-04-01

    Gaucher disease, the inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, is characterized by the presence of glucosylceramide-laden macrophages resulting from impaired digestion of aged erythrocytes or apoptotic leukocytes. Studies of macrophages from patients with type 1 Gaucher disease with genotypes N370S/N370S, N370S/L444P or N370S/c.84dupG revealed that Gaucher macrophages have impaired efferocytosis resulting from reduced levels of p67 phox and Rab7. The decreased Rab7 expression leads to impaired fusion of phagosomes with lysosomes. Moreover, there is defective translocation of p67 phox to phagosomes, resulting in reduced intracellular production of reactive oxygen species. These factors contribute to defective deposition and clearance of apoptotic cells in phagolysosomes, which may have an impact on the inflammatory response and contribute to the organomegaly and inflammation seen in patients with Gaucher disease. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  16. Lysine Deacetylases and Regulated Glycolysis in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespear, Melanie R; Iyer, Abishek; Cheng, Catherine Youting; Das Gupta, Kaustav; Singhal, Amit; Fairlie, David P; Sweet, Matthew J

    2018-06-01

    Regulated cellular metabolism has emerged as a fundamental process controlling macrophage functions, but there is still much to uncover about the precise signaling mechanisms involved. Lysine acetylation regulates the activity, stability, and/or localization of metabolic enzymes, as well as inflammatory responses, in macrophages. Two protein families, the classical zinc-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) and the NAD-dependent HDACs (sirtuins, SIRTs), mediate lysine deacetylation. We describe here mechanisms by which classical HDACs and SIRTs directly regulate specific glycolytic enzymes, as well as evidence that links these protein deacetylases to the regulation of glycolysis-related genes. In these contexts, we discuss HDACs and SIRTs as key control points for regulating immunometabolism and inflammatory outputs from macrophages. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Adipocyte fetuin-A contributes to macrophage migration into adipose tissue and polarization of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Priyajit; Seal, Soma; Mukherjee, Sandip; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Ray, Sukanta; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Majumdar, Subeer S; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2013-09-27

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue during obesity and their phenotypic conversion from anti-inflammatory M2 to proinflammatory M1 subtype significantly contributes to develop a link between inflammation and insulin resistance; signaling molecule(s) for these events, however, remains poorly understood. We demonstrate here that excess lipid in the adipose tissue environment may trigger one such signal. Adipose tissue from obese diabetic db/db mice, high fat diet-fed mice, and obese diabetic patients showed significantly elevated fetuin-A (FetA) levels in respect to their controls; partially hepatectomized high fat diet mice did not show noticeable alteration, indicating adipose tissue to be the source of this alteration. In adipocytes, fatty acid induces FetA gene and protein expressions, resulting in its copious release. We found that FetA could act as a chemoattractant for macrophages. To simulate lipid-induced inflammatory conditions when proinflammatory adipose tissue and macrophages create a niche of an altered microenvironment, we set up a transculture system of macrophages and adipocytes; the addition of fatty acid to adipocytes released FetA into the medium, which polarized M2 macrophages to M1. This was further confirmed by direct FetA addition to macrophages. Taken together, lipid-induced FetA from adipocytes is an efficient chemokine for macrophage migration and polarization. These findings open a new dimension for understanding obesity-induced inflammation.

  18. 7 CFR 51.1904 - Maturity classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity classification. 51.1904 Section 51.1904... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Size and Maturity Classification § 51.1904 Maturity classification. Tomatoes which are characteristically red when ripe, but are not overripe or soft...

  19. A Disposable Sensor For Assessing Artocarpus heterophyllus L. (Jackfruit Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chew Cheen

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was an attempt to monitor the ripeness process and to investigate the different maturity stages of jackfruit by chemometric treatment of the data obtained from the disposable sensor. Response of the sensor strip fabricated using screenprinting technology was analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and the classification model constructed by means of Canonical Discriminant Analysis (CDA enable unknown maturity stages of jackfruit to be identified. Results generated from the combination of the two classification principles show the capability and the performance of the sensor strip towards jackfruit analysis.

  20. Wip1-dependent modulation of macrophage migration and phagocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yiting; Pan, Bing; Zhou, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Macrophage accumulation within the vascular wall is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. Controlling macrophage conversion into foam cells remains a major challenge for treatment of atherosclerotic diseases. Here, we show that Wip1, a member of the PP2C family of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases, modulates...... macrophage migration and phagocytosis associated with atherosclerotic plaque formation. Wip1 deficiency increases migratory and phagocytic activities of the macrophage under stress conditions. Enhanced migration of Wip1-/- macrophages is mediated by Rac1-GTPase and PI3K/AKT signalling pathways. Elevated...... phagocytic ability of Wip1-/- macrophages is linked to CD36 plasma membrane recruitment that is regulated by AMPK activity. Our study identifies Wip1 as an intrinsic negative regulator of macrophage chemotaxis. We propose that Wip1-dependent control of macrophage function may provide avenues for preventing...

  1. Macrophages and Their Role in Atherosclerosis: Pathophysiology and Transcriptome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri V. Bobryshev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis can be regarded as a chronic inflammatory state, in which macrophages play different and important roles. Phagocytic proinflammatory cells populate growing atherosclerotic lesions, where they actively participate in cholesterol accumulation. Moreover, macrophages promote formation of complicated and unstable plaques by maintaining proinflammatory microenvironment. At the same time, anti-inflammatory macrophages contribute to tissue repair and remodelling and plaque stabilization. Macrophages therefore represent attractive targets for development of antiatherosclerotic therapy, which can aim to reduce monocyte recruitment to the lesion site, inhibit proinflammatory macrophages, or stimulate anti-inflammatory responses and cholesterol efflux. More studies are needed, however, to create a comprehensive classification of different macrophage phenotypes and to define their roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on macrophage diversity, activation, and plasticity in atherosclerosis and describe macrophage-based cellular tests for evaluation of potential antiatherosclerotic substances.

  2. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J

    2006-01-01

    CD163 is the monocyte/macrophage-specific receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) complexes. The cytoplasmic tail of human CD163 exists as a short tail variant and two long tail variants. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that all three CD163 variants are subs......CD163 is the monocyte/macrophage-specific receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) complexes. The cytoplasmic tail of human CD163 exists as a short tail variant and two long tail variants. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that all three CD163 variants...

  3. Activation of murine macrophages by lipoprotein and lipooligosaccharide of Treponema denticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, G; Sela, M N; Naor, R; Halabi, A; Barak, V; Shapira, L

    1999-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the periodontopathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola possesses membrane-associated lipoproteins in addition to lipooligosaccharide (LOS). The aim of the present study was to test the potential of these oral spirochetal components to induce the production of inflammatory mediators by human macrophages, which in turn may stimulate tissue breakdown as observed in periodontal diseases. An enriched lipoprotein fraction (dLPP) from T. denticola ATCC 35404 obtained upon extraction of the treponemes with Triton X-114 was found to stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-1 (IL-1) by mouse macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Induction of NO by dLPP was at 25% of the levels obtained by Salmonella typhosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at similar concentrations, while IL-1 was produced at similar levels by both inducers. dLPP-mediated macrophage activation was unaffected by amounts of polymyxin B that neutralized the induction produced by S. typhosa LPS. dLPP also induced NO and TNF-alpha secretion from macrophages isolated from endotoxin-unresponsive C3H/HeJ mice to an extent similar to the stimulation produced in endotoxin-responsive mice. Purified T. denticola LOS also produced a concentration-dependent activation of NO and TNF-alpha in LPS-responsive and -nonresponsive mouse macrophages. However, macrophage activation by LOS was inhibited by polymyxin B. These results suggest that T. denticola lipoproteins and LOS may play a role in the inflammatory processes that characterize periodontal diseases.

  4. Activation of Murine Macrophages by Lipoprotein and Lipooligosaccharide of Treponema denticola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Graciela; Sela, Michael N.; Naor, Ronit; Halabi, Amal; Barak, Vivian; Shapira, Lior

    1999-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the periodontopathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola possesses membrane-associated lipoproteins in addition to lipooligosaccharide (LOS). The aim of the present study was to test the potential of these oral spirochetal components to induce the production of inflammatory mediators by human macrophages, which in turn may stimulate tissue breakdown as observed in periodontal diseases. An enriched lipoprotein fraction (dLPP) from T. denticola ATCC 35404 obtained upon extraction of the treponemes with Triton X-114 was found to stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 (IL-1) by mouse macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Induction of NO by dLPP was at 25% of the levels obtained by Salmonella typhosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at similar concentrations, while IL-1 was produced at similar levels by both inducers. dLPP-mediated macrophage activation was unaffected by amounts of polymyxin B that neutralized the induction produced by S. typhosa LPS. dLPP also induced NO and TNF-α secretion from macrophages isolated from endotoxin-unresponsive C3H/HeJ mice to an extent similar to the stimulation produced in endotoxin-responsive mice. Purified T. denticola LOS also produced a concentration-dependent activation of NO and TNF-α in LPS-responsive and -nonresponsive mouse macrophages. However, macrophage activation by LOS was inhibited by polymyxin B. These results suggest that T. denticola lipoproteins and LOS may play a role in the inflammatory processes that characterize periodontal diseases. PMID:10024558

  5. B-1 cells modulate the murine macrophage response to Leishmania major infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcanjo, Angelica F; Nunes, Marise P; Silva-Junior, Elias B; Leandro, Monique; da Rocha, Juliana Dutra Barbosa; Morrot, Alexandre; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Freire-de-Lima, Celio Geraldo

    2017-05-26

    To investigate the modulatory effect of B-1 cells on murine peritoneal macrophages infected with Leishmania major ( L. major ) in vitro . Peritoneal macrophages obtained from BALB/c and BALB/c XID mice were infected with L. major and cultured in the presence or absence of B-1 cells obtained from wild-type BALB/c mice. Intracellular amastigotes were counted, and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production was quantified in the cellular supernatants using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of the lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2 ) were determined using a PGE 2 enzyme immunoassay kit (Cayman Chemical, Ann Arbor, MI), and the number of lipid bodies was quantified in the cytoplasm of infected macrophages in the presence and absence of B-1 cells. Culturing the cells with selective PGE 2 -neutralizing drugs inhibited PGE 2 production and confirmed the role of this lipid mediator in IL-10 production. In contrast, we demonstrated that B-1 cells derived from IL-10 KO mice did not favor the intracellular growth of L. major . We report that B-1 cells promote the growth of L. major amastigotes inside peritoneal murine macrophages. We demonstrated that the modulatory effect was independent of physical contact between the cells, suggesting that soluble factor(s) were released into the cultures. We demonstrated in our co-culture system that B-1 cells trigger IL-10 production by L. major -infected macrophages. Furthermore, the increased secretion of IL-10 was attributed to the presence of the lipid mediator PGE 2 in supernatants of L. major -infected macrophages. The presence of B-1 cells also favors the production of lipid bodies by infected macrophages. In contrast, we failed to obtain the same effect on parasite replication inside L. major -infected macrophages when the B-1 cells were isolated from IL-10 knockout mice. Our results show that elevated levels of PGE 2 and IL-10 produced by B-1 cells increase L. major growth, as indicated by the number of parasites in cell

  6. Multiple Pseudomonas species secrete exolysin-like toxins and provoke Caspase-1-dependent macrophage death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Pauline; Wallet, Pierre; Elsen, Sylvie; Soleilhac, Emmanuelle; Henry, Thomas; Faudry, Eric; Attrée, Ina

    2017-10-01

    Pathogenic bacteria secrete protein toxins that provoke apoptosis or necrosis of eukaryotic cells. Here, we developed a live-imaging method, based on incorporation of a DNA-intercalating dye into membrane-damaged host cells, to study the kinetics of primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) mortality induced by opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa expressing either Type III Secretion System (T3SS) toxins or the pore-forming toxin, Exolysin (ExlA). We found that ExlA promotes the activation of Caspase-1 and maturation of interleukin-1β. BMDMs deficient for Caspase-1 and Caspase-11 were resistant to ExlA-induced death. Furthermore, by using KO BMDMs, we determined that the upstream NLRP3/ASC complex leads to the Caspase-1 activation. We also demonstrated that Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas protegens and the Drosophila pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila, which naturally express ExlA-like toxins, are cytotoxic toward macrophages and provoke the same type of pro-inflammatory death as does ExlA + P. aeruginosa. These results demonstrate that ExlA-like toxins of two-partner secretion systems from diverse Pseudomonas species activate the NLRP3 inflammasome and provoke inflammatory pyroptotic death of macrophages. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Delivery of CSF-1R to the lumen of macropinosomes promotes its destruction in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jieqiong; Low-Nam, Shalini T.; Kerkvliet, Jason G.; Hoppe, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activation of the macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) by CSF-1 stimulates pronounced macropinocytosis and drives proliferation of macrophages. Although the role of macropinocytosis in CSF-1R signaling remains unknown, we show here that, despite internalizing large quantities of plasma membrane, macropinosomes contribute little to the internalization of the CSF-1–CSF-1R complex. Rather, internalization of the CSF-1R in small endocytic vesicles that are sensitive to clathrin disruption, outcompetes macropinosomes for CSF-1R endocytosis. Following internalization, small vesicles carrying the CSF-1R underwent homotypic fusion and then trafficked to newly formed macropinosomes bearing Rab5. As these macropinosomes matured, acquiring Rab7, the CSF-1R was transported into their lumen and degraded. Inhibition of macropinocytosis delayed receptor degradation despite no disruption to CSF-1R endocytosis. These data indicate that CSF-1-stimulated macropinosomes are sites of multivesicular body formation and accelerate CSF-1R degradation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that macropinocytosis and cell growth have a matching dose dependence on CSF-1, suggesting that macropinosomes might be a central mechanism coupling CSF-1R signaling and macrophage growth. PMID:25335894

  8. Tfe3 expression is closely associated to macrophage terminal differentiation of human hematopoietic myeloid precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanocco-Marani, Tommaso; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Gemelli, Claudia; Pirondi, Sara; Testa, Anna; Montanari, Monica; Parenti, Sandra; Tenedini, Elena; Grande, Alexis; Ferrari, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    The MItf-Tfe family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors encodes four family members: MItf, Tfe3, TfeB and TfeC. In vitro, each protein of the family binds DNA in a homo- or heterodimeric form with other family members. Tfe3 is involved in chromosomal translocations recurrent in different tumors and it has been demonstrated, by in vivo studies, that it plays, redundantly with MItf, an important role in the process of osteoclast formation, in particular during the transition from mono-nucleated to multi-nucleated osteoclasts. Since mono-nucleated osteoclasts derive from macrophages we investigated whether Tfe3 might play a role upstream during hematopoietic differentiation. Here we show that Tfe3 is able to induce mono-macrophagic differentiation of U937 cells, in association with a decrease of cell proliferation and an increase of apoptosis. We also show that Tfe3 does not act physiologically during commitment of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), since it is not able to direct HSCs toward a specific lineage as observed by clonogenic assay, but is a strong actor of terminal differentiation since it allows human primary myeloblasts' maturation toward the macrophage lineage

  9. RNA sequencing provides exquisite insight into the manipulation of the alveolar macrophage by tubercle bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalpas, Nicolas C; Magee, David A; Conlon, Kevin M; Browne, John A; Healy, Claire; McLoughlin, Kirsten E; Rue-Albrecht, Kévin; McGettigan, Paul A; Killick, Kate E; Gormley, Eamonn; Gordon, Stephen V; MacHugh, David E

    2015-09-08

    Mycobacterium bovis, the agent of bovine tuberculosis, causes an estimated $3 billion annual losses to global agriculture due, in part, to the limitations of current diagnostics. Development of next-generation diagnostics requires a greater understanding of the interaction between the pathogen and the bovine host. Therefore, to explore the early response of the alveolar macrophage to infection, we report the first application of RNA-sequencing to define, in exquisite detail, the transcriptomes of M. bovis-infected and non-infected alveolar macrophages from ten calves at 2, 6, 24 and 48 hours post-infection. Differentially expressed sense genes were detected at these time points that revealed enrichment of innate immune signalling functions, and transcriptional suppression of host defence mechanisms (e.g., lysosome maturation). We also detected differentially expressed natural antisense transcripts, which may play a role in subverting innate immune mechanisms following infection. Furthermore, we report differential expression of novel bovine genes, some of which have immune-related functions based on orthology with human proteins. This is the first in-depth transcriptomics investigation of the alveolar macrophage response to the early stages of M. bovis infection and reveals complex patterns of gene expression and regulation that underlie the immunomodulatory mechanisms used by M. bovis to evade host defence mechanisms.

  10. Vitamin D Is Required for IFN-γ–Mediated Antimicrobial Activity of Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Mario; Stenger, Steffen; Shin, Dong-Min; Yuk, Jae-Min; Liu, Philip T.; Realegeno, Susan; Lee, Hye-Mi; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Schenk, Mirjam; Sieling, Peter A.; Teles, Rosane; Montoya, Dennis; Iyer, Shankar S.; Bruns, Heiko; Lewinsohn, David M.; Hollis, Bruce W.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Steinmeyer, Andreas; Zügel, Ulrich; Cheng, Genhong; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Control of tuberculosis worldwide depends on our understanding of human immune mechanisms, which combat the infection. Acquired T cell responses are critical for host defense against microbial pathogens, yet the mechanisms by which they act in humans remain unclear. We report that T cells, by the release of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), induce autophagy, phagosomal maturation, the production of antimicrobial peptides such as cathelicidin, and antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages via a vitamin D–dependent pathway. IFN-γ induced the antimicrobial pathway in human macrophages cultured in vitamin D–sufficient sera, but not in sera from African-Americans that have lower amounts of vitamin D and who are more susceptible to tuberculosis. In vitro supplementation of vitamin D–deficient serum with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 restored IFN-γ–induced antimicrobial peptide expression, autophagy, phagosome-lysosome fusion, and antimicrobial activity. These results suggest a mechanism in which vitamin D is required for acquired immunity to overcome the ability of intracellular pathogens to evade macrophage-mediated antimicrobial responses. The present findings underscore the importance of adequate amounts of vitamin D in all human populations for sustaining both innate and acquired immunity against infection. PMID:21998409

  11. The pricing of firm bonds with extendable maturity by the reduced form approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REN Xuemin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We associate credit events with market rates to price firm bonds with extendable maturity.We deal with the credit risk by the reduced form approach and obtain the pricing formula for firm bonds with extendable maturity by the PDE approach under the assumption of stochastic interest rate and compare its return rate with that of ordinary firm bonds.

  12. Regulation of alternative macrophage activation in the liver following acetaminophen intoxication by stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Carol R., E-mail: cgardner@pharmacy.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Hankey, Pamela [Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mishin, Vladimir; Francis, Mary [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Yu, Shan [Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase (STK) is a transmembrane receptor reported to play a role in macrophage switching from a classically activated/proinflammatory phenotype to an alternatively activated/wound repair phenotype. In the present studies, STK{sup −/−} mice were used to assess the role of STK in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity as evidence suggests that the pathogenic process involves both of these macrophage subpopulations. In wild type mice, centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminase levels were observed within 6 h of acetaminophen administration (300 mg/kg, i.p.). Loss of STK resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity of mice to the hepatotoxic effects of acetaminophen and increased mortality, effects independent of its metabolism. This was associated with reduced levels of hepatic glutathione, rapid upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and prolonged induction of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting excessive oxidative stress in STK{sup −/−} mice. F4/80, a marker of mature macrophages, was highly expressed on subpopulations of Kupffer cells in livers of wild type, but not STK{sup −/−} mice. Whereas F4/80{sup +} macrophages rapidly declined in the livers of wild type mice following acetaminophen intoxication, they increased in STK{sup −/−} mice. In wild type mice hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12, products of classically activated macrophages, increased after acetaminophen administration. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor, CCR2, as well as IL-10, mediators involved in recruiting and activating anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages, also increased in wild type mice after acetaminophen. Loss of STK blunted the effects of acetaminophen on expression of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, MCP-1 and CCR2, while expression of IL-10 increased. Hepatic expression of CX3CL1, and its receptor, CX3CR1 also increased in STK{sup −/−} mice

  13. Bentonite maturation with 'Águas de Lindóia' water (SP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrecilha, Jefferson K.; Silva, Paulo S.C., E-mail: jeffkoy@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to characterize the artificial peloid obtained by maturing bentonite with Águas de Lindóia water for periods of three, six and nine months. The pH, moisture, organic matter content, loss on ignition and swelling power of matured and non-matured samples were measured for physicochemical characterization. The elemental concentration was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Results showed that water adsorption capacity, organic matter and swelling power is related to the maturation time and no significant differences occurs in the elemental concentration except for Na. (author)

  14. Academic Achievement of High School Students in Relation to Their Anxiety, Emotional Maturity and Social Maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puar, Surjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the non-cognitive variables like anxiety, emotional maturity and social maturity and their relationship with academic achievement and also to see the locale-wise differences on the basis of their anxiety, emotional maturity and social maturity. The study was conducted over a sample of 400 (200…

  15. Maturity models in supply chain sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Correia, Elisabete; Carvalho, Helena; Azevedo, Susana G.

    2017-01-01

    A systematic literature review of supply chain maturity models with sustainability concerns is presented. The objective is to give insights into methodological issues related to maturity models, namely the research objectives; the research methods used to develop, validate and test them; the scope...... of maturity levels. The comprehensive review, analysis, and synthesis of the maturity model literature represent an important contribution to the organization of this research area, making possible to clarify some confusion that exists about concepts, approaches and components of maturity models...

  16. Dynamic interactions between dermal macrophages and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Reinhild; Kolter, Julia; Henneke, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    The dermis, a major reservoir of immune cells in immediate vicinity to the colonizing skin microflora, serves as an important site of host-pathogen interactions. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the most frequent resident immune cell type in the dermis. They protect the host from invasive infections by highly adapted bacteria, such as staphylococci via pattern recognition of bacterial effectors, phagocytosis, and recruitment of other myeloid cells from the blood. Already under homeostatic conditions, the dermal Mϕ population receives a dynamic input of monocytes invading from the bloodstream. This quantitative renewal is promoted further at the beginning of life, when prenatally seeded cells are rapidly replaced and in healing phases after injuries or infections. Here, we discuss the potential implications of the dynamic dermal Mϕ biology on the establishment and maintenance of immunity against Staphylococcus aureus, which can either be a harmless colonizer or an invasive pathogen. The understanding of the heterogeneity of the "mature" dermal Mϕ compartment driven both by the influx of differentiating monocytes and by a bone marrow-independent Mϕ persistence and expansion may help to explain failing immunity and immunopathology originating from the skin, the important interface between host and environment. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  17. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Milena; Mirabile Gattia, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2013-06-01

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  18. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nicola, Milena, E-mail: milena.de.nicola@uniroma2.it [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Biology (Italy); Mirabile Gattia, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.mirabile@enea.it [UTTMAT, ENEA-C.R. Casaccia (Italy); Traversa, Enrico, E-mail: Enrico.Traversa@kaust.edu.sa [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Division of Physical Science and Engineering (Saudi Arabia); Ghibelli, Lina, E-mail: ghibelli@uniroma2.it [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Biology (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 {mu}m) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  19. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Nicola, Milena; Mirabile Gattia, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10–50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  20. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    De Nicola, Milena D.

    2013-05-17

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  1. A lack of cerebral lateralization in schizophrenia is within the normal variation in brain maturation but indicates late, slow maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, L F

    1999-10-19

    The planum temporale (PT) bias, PT leftward, PT symmetry, and PT rightward reversal and sidedness preference, consistent right-handedness, ambilaterality, and consistent left-handedness are placed on a continuum mirroring the normal variation in rate of brain maturation. Maturational rate declines as we pass from PT leftward bias and consistent right-handedness to PT reversal and consistent left-handedness. Concomitantly, we expect an increased prevalence of males due to their pubertal age being about 2 years later than that of females, and a shift in cognitive profile from higher verbal scores than performance scores on the WAIS to higher performance than verbal scores. Three disorders fulfilling the criteria of late CNS maturation apart from the corresponding cognitive profile were studied: infantile autism (IA), schizophrenia (S), and developmental dyslexia (DD). These disorders have in common deficits in cognition, perception, and somatomotor function. The deficits range from an arrest in brain development (which is evident in infancy superimposed on late maturation in IA) to overall delayed brain and somatic development in S (culminating in postpubertal psychotic episodes and persistent and generalized residual deficits). Finally, reading inability, problems in perception (vision and hearing) and in motor coordination, particularly between the two hemispheres, characterize DD. Enhancing brain maturation and the prevalence of 'normal' cerebral asymmetry--laterality is preferable if we want to reduce the risk of developing the above-mentioned disorders. It is suggested that in the past environmental challenges have favored early maturation, with its abundant neuronal population, arborization and excessive density of synapses and cerebral excitability which has powered evolution through the mechanism of natural selection. Early maturation is obtainable through optimal nutrition, including a satisfactory amount of marine fat (PUFA), before and during pregnancy and

  2. Maturity Models Development in IS Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi; Andersen, Kim Normann

    2015-01-01

    Maturity models are widespread in IS research and in particular, IT practitioner communities. However, theoretically sound, methodologically rigorous and empirically validated maturity models are quite rare. This literature review paper focuses on the challenges faced during the development...... literature reveals that researchers have primarily focused on developing new maturity models pertaining to domain-specific problems and/or new enterprise technologies. We find rampant re-use of the design structure of widely adopted models such as Nolan’s Stage of Growth Model, Crosby’s Grid, and Capability...... Maturity Model (CMM). Only recently have there been some research efforts to standardize maturity model development. We also identify three dominant views of maturity models and provide guidelines for various approaches of constructing maturity models with a standard vocabulary. We finally propose using...

  3. Changes in polyphenolics during maturation of Java plum (Syzygium cumini Lam.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestario, Lydia Ninan; Howard, Luke R; Brownmiller, Cindi; Stebbins, Nathan B; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O

    2017-10-01

    Java plum (Syzygium cumini Lam.) is a rich source of polyphenolics with many purported health benefits, but the effect of maturation on polyphenolic content is unknown. Freeze-dried samples of Java plum from seven different maturity stages were analyzed for anthocyanin, flavonol, flavanonol and hydrolysable tannin composition by HPLC. Anthocyanins were first detected at the green-pink stage of maturity and increased throughout maturation with the largest increase occurring from the dark purple to black stages of maturation. Levels of gallotannins, ellagitannins, flavonols, gallic acid and ellagic acid were highest at early stages of maturation and decreased as the fruit ripened. For production of antioxidant-rich nutraceutical ingredients, fruit should be harvested immature to obtain extracts rich in hydrolysable tannins and flavonols. The exceptional anthocyanin content of black fruit may prove useful as a source of a natural colorant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Proprotein convertase 1/3 inhibited macrophages: A novel therapeutic based on drone macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Duhamel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated here thanks to proteomic, that proprotein convertase 1/3 knockdown macrophages present all the characteristic of activated pro-inflammatory macrophages. TLR4 and TLR9 signaling pathways can be enhanced leading to the secretion of pro-inflammatory factors and antitumor factors. We can control their activation by controlling one enzyme, PC1/3. In a tumor context, PC1/3 inhibition in macrophages may reactivate them and lead to a cytokine storm after stimulation “at distance” with a TLR ligand. Therefore, we name these proprotein convertase inhibited macrophages the “drone macrophages”. They constitute an innovative cell therapy to treat efficiently tumors.

  5. Misbehaving macrophages in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rachael A; Kupper, Thomas S

    2006-08-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease unique to humans. In this issue of the JCI, 2 studies of very different mouse models of psoriasis both report that macrophages play a key role in inducing psoriasis-like skin disease. Psoriasis is clearly a polygenic, inherited disease of uncontrolled cutaneous inflammation. The debate that currently rages in the field is whether psoriasis is a disease of autoreactive T cells or whether it reflects an intrinsic defect within the skin--or both. However, these questions have proven difficult to dissect using molecular genetic tools. In the current studies, the authors have used 2 different animal models to address the role of macrophages in disease pathogenesis: Wang et al. use a mouse model in which inflammation is T cell dependent, whereas the model used by Stratis et al. is T cell independent (see the related articles beginning on pages 2105 and 2094, respectively). Strikingly, both groups report an important contribution by macrophages, implying that macrophages can contribute to both epithelial-based and T cell-mediated pathways of inflammation.

  6. Metabolic-epigenetic crosstalk in macrophage activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baardman, Jeroen; Licht, Iris; de Winther, Menno P. J.; van den Bossche, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic enzymes are emerging as crucial controllers of macrophages, innate immune cells that determine the outcome of many inflammatory diseases. Recent studies demonstrate that the activity of particular chromatin-modifying enzymes is regulated by the availability of specific metabolites like

  7. Mouse adenovirus type 1 infection of macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashley, S.L.; Welton, A.R.; Harwood, K.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Spindler, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus.

  8. NFAT5-Regulated Macrophage Polarization Supports the Proinflammatory Function of Macrophages and T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, Mónica; Buxadé, Maria; Tejedor, Sonia; Aramburu, Jose; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Macrophages are exquisite sensors of tissue homeostasis that can rapidly switch between pro- and anti-inflammatory or regulatory modes to respond to perturbations in their microenvironment. This functional plasticity involves a precise orchestration of gene expression patterns whose transcriptional regulators have not been fully characterized. We had previously identified the transcription factor NFAT5 as an activator of TLR-induced responses, and in this study we explore its contribution to macrophage functions in different polarization settings. We found that both in classically and alternatively polarized macrophages, NFAT5 enhanced functions associated with a proinflammatory profile such as bactericidal capacity and the ability to promote Th1 polarization over Th2 responses. In this regard, NFAT5 upregulated the Th1-stimulatory cytokine IL-12 in classically activated macrophages, whereas in alternatively polarized ones it enhanced the expression of the pro-Th1 mediators Fizz-1 and arginase 1, indicating that it could promote proinflammatory readiness by regulating independent genes in differently polarized macrophages. Finally, adoptive transfer assays in vivo revealed a reduced antitumor capacity in NFAT5-deficient macrophages against syngeneic Lewis lung carcinoma and ID8 ovarian carcinoma cells, a defect that in the ID8 model was associated with a reduced accumulation of effector CD8 T cells at the tumor site. Altogether, detailed analysis of the effect of NFAT5 in pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages uncovered its ability to regulate distinct genes under both polarization modes and revealed its predominant role in promoting proinflammatory macrophage functions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. DMPD: The oxidation of lipoproteins by monocytes-macrophages. Biochemical andbiological mechanisms. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10473535 The oxidation of lipoproteins by monocytes-macrophages. Biochemical andbio.... (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The oxidation of lipoproteins by monocytes-macrophages. Biochemical and...onocytes-macrophages. Biochemical andbiological mechanisms. Authors Chisolm GM 3rd, Hazen SL, Fox PL, Cathca

  10. DMPD: Pathogen-induced apoptosis of macrophages: a common end for different pathogenicstrategies. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11207583 Pathogen-induced apoptosis of macrophages: a common end for different path...ml) Show Pathogen-induced apoptosis of macrophages: a common end for different pathogenicstrategies. PubmedI...D 11207583 Title Pathogen-induced apoptosis of macrophages: a common end for diff

  11. DMPD: Mechanism of age-associated up-regulation in macrophage PGE2 synthesis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15331118 Mechanism of age-associated up-regulation in macrophage PGE2 synthesis. Wu...e-associated up-regulation in macrophage PGE2 synthesis. PubmedID 15331118 Title Mechanism of age-associated... up-regulation in macrophage PGE2 synthesis. Authors Wu D, Meydani SN. Publicatio

  12. MiR-146a modulates macrophage polarization by inhibiting Notch1 pathway in RAW264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Liu, Xue-Jiao; QunZhou; Xie, Juan; Ma, Tao-Tao; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Li, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and plastic cells which are able to undergo dynamic transition between M1 and M2 polarized phenotypes in response to the microenvironment signals. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization are still obscure. In the current study, it was revealed that miR-146a might play a pivotal role in macrophage polarization. As our results indicated, miR-146a was highly expressed in M2 macrophages rather than M1 macrophages. Over-expression of miR-146a resulted in significantly decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including iNOS and TNF-α in M1 macrophages, while increased production of M2 marker genes such as Arg1 and CD206 in M2 macrophages. In contrast, knockdown of miR-146a promoted M1 macrophage polarization but diminished M2 macrophage polarization. Mechanistically, it was revealed that miR-146a modulated macrophage polarization by targeting Notch1. Of note, PPARγ was responsible as another target for miR-146a-mediated macrophage polarization. Taken together, it was suggested that miR-146a might serve as a molecular regulator in macrophage polarization and is a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14609719 Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolys...acol Ther. 2003 Nov;100(2):171-94. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Molecular mechanisms of macrophage act...medID 14609719 Title Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: ro

  14. DMPD: Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1757110 Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Bl... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Pubmed...ID 1757110 Title Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gen

  15. Yersinia pestis and host macrophages: immunodeficiency of mouse macrophages induced by YscW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yujing; Du, Zongmin; Han, Yanping; Guo, Zhaobiao; Tan, Yafang; Zhu, Ziwen; Yang, Ruifu

    2009-09-01

    The virulence of the pathogenic Yersinia species depends on a plasmid-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) that transfers six Yersinia outer protein (Yop) effector proteins into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, leading to disruption of host defence mechanisms. It is shown in this study that Yersinia pestis YscW, a protein of the T3SS injectisome, contributes to the induction of a deficiency in phagocytosis in host macrophages and a reduction in their antigen-presenting capacity. A Y. pestis strain lacking yscW had no effect on uptake by host macrophages. In mice infected with wild-type Y. pestis, the yscW mutant or a complement strain, immunodeficiency was observed in host macrophages compared with those from uninfected mice. However, the phagocytosis and antigen presenting capacities of macrophages infected by yscW mutant strain both in vivo and in vitro were significantly higher than those by wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, when YscW was expressed in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line, phagocytosis and antigen-presenting capacities were significantly lower than those of the control groups. These results indicate that Y. pestis YscW may directly induce immunodeficiency in murine macrophages by crippling their phagocytosis and antigen-presenting capacities. These data provide evidences to Y. pestis pathogenesis that some proteins in T3SS injectisome, such as YscW protein, might play independent roles in disrupting host defense apart from their known functions.

  16. Macrophage-Mediated Lymphangiogenesis: The Emerging Role of Macrophages as Lymphatic Endothelial Progenitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran, Sophia; Montgomery, Kyle E.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that macrophages and other inflammatory cells support tumor progression and metastasis. During early stages of neoplastic development, tumor-infiltrating macrophages (TAMs) mount an immune response against transformed cells. Frequently, however, cancer cells escape the immune surveillance, an event that is accompanied by macrophage transition from an anti-tumor to a pro-tumorigenic type. The latter is characterized by high expression of factors that activate endothelial cells, suppress immune response, degrade extracellular matrix, and promote tumor growth. Cumulatively, these products of TAMs promote tumor expansion and growth of both blood and lymphatic vessels that facilitate metastatic spread. Breast cancers and other epithelial malignancies induce the formation of new lymphatic vessels (i.e., lymphangiogenesis) that leads to lymphatic and subsequently, to distant metastasis. Both experimental and clinical studies have shown that TAMs significantly promote tumor lymphangiogenesis through paracrine and cell autonomous modes. The paracrine effect consists of the expression of a variety of pro-lymphangiogenic factors that activate the preexisting lymphatic vessels. The evidence for cell-autonomous contribution is based on the observed tumor mobilization of macrophage-derived lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECP) that integrate into lymphatic vessels prior to sprouting. This review will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage-dependent growth of new lymphatic vessels with specific emphasis on an emerging role of macrophages as lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECP)

  17. Metformin affects macrophages' phenotype and improves the activity of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and decreases malondialdehyde concentration in a partially AMPK-independent manner in LPS-stimulated human monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bułdak, Łukasz; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Bułdak, Rafał Jakub; Kozłowski, Michał; Machnik, Grzegorz; Liber, Sebastian; Suchy, Dariusz; Duława-Bułdak, Anna; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-06-01

    Diabetic patients experience accelerated atherosclerosis. Metformin is a cornerstone of the current therapy of type 2 diabetes. Macrophages are the key cells associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, our aim was to assess the in vitro effects of metformin on macrophages and its influence on the mechanisms involved in the development of atherosclerosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from the group including 16 age-matched healthy non-smoking volunteers aged 18-40 years. Monocytes were further incubated with metformin, LPS and compound C--a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK. The impact of metformin on oxidative stress markers, antioxidative properties, inflammatory cytokines and phenotypical markers of macrophages was studied. We showed that macrophages treated with metformin expressed less reactive oxygen species (ROS), which resulted from increased antioxidative potential. Furthermore, a reduction in inflammatory cytokines was observed. We also observed a phenotypic shift toward the alternative activation of macrophages that was induced by metformin. All the aforementioned results resulted from AMPK activation, but a residual activity of metformin after AMPK blockade was still noticeable even after inhibition of AMPK by compound C. Authors believe that metformin-based therapy, a cornerstone in diabetes therapy, not only improves the prognosis of diabetics by reducing blood glucose but also by reducing oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine production and the shift toward alternative activation of macrophages. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Lysosomal storage and impaired autophagy lead to inflammasome activation in Gaucher macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Moaven, Nima; Borger, Daniel K; Lopez, Grisel; Westbroek, Wendy; Chae, Jae Jin; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Maniwang, Emerson; Gonzalez, Ashley N; Sidransky, Ellen

    2016-02-01

    Gaucher disease, the inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, is characterized by the presence of glucosylcer-amide macrophages, the accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. However, the connection between this lysosomal storage and inflammation is not clear. Studying macrophages derived from peripheral monocytes from patients with type 1 Gaucher disease with genotype N370S/N370S, we confirmed an increased secretion of interleukins IL-1β and IL-6. In addition, we found that activation of the inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that activates caspase-1, led to the maturation of IL-1β in Gaucher macrophages. We show that inflammasome activation in these cells is the result of impaired autophagy. Treatment with the small-molecule glucocerebrosidase chaperone NCGC758 reversed these defects, inducing autophagy and reducing IL-1β secretion, confirming the role of the deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase in these processes. We found that in Gaucher macrophages elevated levels of the autophagic adaptor p62 prevented the delivery of inflammasomes to autophagosomes. This increase in p62 led to activation of p65-NF-kB in the nucleus, promoting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the secretion of IL-1β. This newly elucidated mechanism ties lysosomal dysfunction to inflammasome activation, and may contribute to the massive organomegaly, bone involvement and increased susceptibility to certain malignancies seen in Gaucher disease. Moreover, this link between lysosomal storage, impaired autophagy, and inflammation may have implications relevant to both Parkinson disease and the aging process. Defects in these basic cellular processes may also provide new therapeutic targets. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Scutellarin Suppresses NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Macrophages and Protects Mice against Bacterial Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Jing, Yan-Yun; Zeng, Chen-Ying; Li, Chen-Guang; Xu, Li-Hui; Yan, Liang; Bai, Wen-Jing; Zha, Qing-Bing; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2017-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in mediating the innate immune defense against pathogenic infections, but aberrant activation of NLRP3 inflammasome has been linked to a variety of inflammatory diseases. Thus targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome represents a promising therapeutic for the treatment of such diseases. Scutellarin is a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. and has been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory activities, but the underlying mechanism is only partly understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether scutellarin could affect the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages. The results showed that scutellarin dose-dependently reduced caspase-1 activation and decreased mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed macrophages upon ATP or nigericin stimulation, indicating that scutellarin inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages. Consistent with this, scutellarin also suppressed pyroptotic cell death in LPS-primed macrophages treated with ATP or nigericin. ATP or nigericin-induced ASC speck formation and its oligomerization were blocked by scutellarin pre-treatment. Intriguingly, scutellarin augmented PKA-specific phosphorylation of NLRP3 in LPS-primed macrophages, which was completely blocked by selective PKA inhibitor H89, suggesting that PKA signaling had been involved in the action of scutellarin to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Supporting this, the inhibitory effect of scutellarin on NLRP3 inflammasome activation was completely counteracted by H89 or adenyl cyclase inhibitor MDL12330A. As NLRP3-dependent release of IL-1β has a critical role in sepsis, the in vivo activity of scutellarin was assayed in a mouse model of bacterial sepsis, which was established by intraperitoneally injection of a lethal dose of viable Escherichia coli . Oral administration of scutellarin significantly improved the survival of mice with bacterial sepsis

  20. Scutellarin Suppresses NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Macrophages and Protects Mice against Bacterial Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in mediating the innate immune defense against pathogenic infections, but aberrant activation of NLRP3 inflammasome has been linked to a variety of inflammatory diseases. Thus targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome represents a promising therapeutic for the treatment of such diseases. Scutellarin is a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant. Hand.-Mazz. and has been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory activities, but the underlying mechanism is only partly understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether scutellarin could affect the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages. The results showed that scutellarin dose-dependently reduced caspase-1 activation and decreased mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β release in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-primed macrophages upon ATP or nigericin stimulation, indicating that scutellarin inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages. Consistent with this, scutellarin also suppressed pyroptotic cell death in LPS-primed macrophages treated with ATP or nigericin. ATP or nigericin-induced ASC speck formation and its oligomerization were blocked by scutellarin pre-treatment. Intriguingly, scutellarin augmented PKA-specific phosphorylation of NLRP3 in LPS-primed macrophages, which was completely blocked by selective PKA inhibitor H89, suggesting that PKA signaling had been involved in the action of scutellarin to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Supporting this, the inhibitory effect of scutellarin on NLRP3 inflammasome activation was completely counteracted by H89 or adenyl cyclase inhibitor MDL12330A. As NLRP3-dependent release of IL-1β has a critical role in sepsis, the in vivo activity of scutellarin was assayed in a mouse model of bacterial sepsis, which was established by intraperitoneally injection of a lethal dose of viable Escherichia coli. Oral administration of scutellarin significantly improved the survival of mice with

  1. Biological properties in vitro of a combination of recombinant murine interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklis, I; Kletter, Y; Bleiberg, I; Fabian, I

    1989-04-01

    The effect of recombinant murine interleukin-3 (rIL-3) and recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) on in vitro murine myeloid progenitor cell (CFU-C) growth and on the function of murine resident peritoneal macrophages was investigated. Both rIL-3 and rGM-CSF are known to support the growth of CFU-C and, when combined, were found to act synergistically to induce the development of an increased number of CFU-C. The distribution pattern of myeloid colonies in the presence of these two growth factors was in general similar to that in the presence of rGM-CSF alone. Both rGM-CSF and rIL-3 enhanced the phagocytosis of Candida albicans (CA) by mature macrophages producing an increase in the percentage of phagocytosing cells as well as an increase in the number of yeast particles ingested per cell. No additive effect on the phagocytosis was observed when the two growth factors were added concurrently. rGM-CSF, but not rIL-3, enhanced the killing of CA by macrophages. This killing was inhibited by scavengers of oxygen radicals.

  2. RESULTS OF IN VITRO MATURATION OF MEIOTICALLY IMMATURE HUMAN OOCYTES IN A SIMPLE MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Kovačič

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Among oocytes obtained during aspiration of preovulatory ovarian follicles in hormonally stimulated cycles, we ascertained the percentage of immature oocytes with the nucleus in the metaphase (M I oocytes or even in the prophase (GV oocytes of the first meiotic division and their capacity to mature in vitro in a simple medium without hormonal supplements.Methods. In 818 women, stimulated by gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa and gonadotropins, aspiration of preovulatory size follicles yielded 4972 oocytes. From these we denuded cells of cumulus oophorus and corona, meiotic maturity was evaluated under a microscope. Cells in the metaphase of the second meiotic division (M II oocytes and those maturing after 5 hours were used clinically in the intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI procedure. Immature cells were left in the simple medium. The degree of their nuclear maturity was evaluated after one and after two days of culture. In vitro maturation was clinically used also in 14 cycles with no mature oocytes.Results. Among 4731 oocytes with denuded corona and cumulus, 4199 (88.8% were mature M II oocytes, 295 (6.2% immature M I oocytes and 237 (5% immature GV oocytes. Under in vitro conditions, 68.7% (90/131 GV oocytes attained maturity. Among M I oocytes, 63.6% (136/214 cells matured already after 5 hours and 26.6% (57/214 until the next day. In all 14 women with only immature oocytes, the embryos for embryotransfer were obtained after in vitro maturation and ICSI procedure. The result was four pregnancies and two deliveries.Conclusions. Immature oocytes, obtained in hormonally stimulated cycles, may become clinically applicable if left to mature in vitro in a simple medium without supplementation of growth factors and hormones.

  3. Neutrophils reduce the parasite burden in Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis-infected macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erico Vinícius de Souza Carmo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the role of neutrophils in Leishmania infection were mainly performed with L. (L major, whereas less information is available for L. (L amazonensis. Previous results from our laboratory showed a large infiltrate of neutrophils in the site of infection in a mouse strain resistant to L. (L. amazonensis (C3H/HePas. In contrast, the susceptible strain (BALB/c displayed a predominance of macrophages harboring a high number of amastigotes and very few neutrophils. These findings led us to investigate the interaction of inflammatory neutrophils with L. (L. amazonensis-infected macrophages in vitro.Mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with L. (L. amazonensis were co-cultured with inflammatory neutrophils, and after four days, the infection was quantified microscopically. Data are representative of three experiments with similar results. The main findings were 1 intracellular parasites were efficiently destroyed in the co-cultures; 2 the leishmanicidal effect was similar when cells were obtained from mouse strains resistant (C3H/HePas or susceptible (BALB/c to L. (L. amazonensis; 3 parasite destruction did not require contact between infected macrophages and neutrophils; 4 tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, neutrophil elastase and platelet activating factor (PAF were involved with the leishmanicidal activity, and 5 destruction of the parasites did not depend on generation of oxygen or nitrogen radicals, indicating that parasite clearance did not involve the classical pathway of macrophage activation by TNF-α, as reported for other Leishmania species.The present results provide evidence that neutrophils in concert with macrophages play a previously unrecognized leishmanicidal effect on L. (L. amazonensis. We believe these findings may help to understand the mechanisms involved in innate immunity in cutaneous infection by this Leishmania species.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms Modulating the Phenotype of Macrophages and Microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Amici

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and microglia play crucial roles during central nervous system development, homeostasis and acute events such as infection or injury. The diverse functions of tissue macrophages and microglia are mirrored by equally diverse phenotypes. A model of inflammatory/M1 versus a resolution phase/M2 macrophages has been widely used. However, the complexity of macrophage function can only be achieved by the existence of varied, plastic and tridimensional macrophage phenotypes. Understanding how tissue macrophages integrate environmental signals via molecular programs to define pathogen/injury inflammatory responses provides an opportunity to better understand the multilayered nature of macrophages, as well as target and modulate cellular programs to control excessive inflammation. This is particularly important in MS and other neuroinflammatory diseases, where chronic inflammatory macrophage and microglial responses may contribute to pathology. Here, we perform a comprehensive review of our current understanding of how molecular pathways modulate tissue macrophage phenotype, covering both classic pathways and the emerging role of microRNAs, receptor-tyrosine kinases and metabolism in macrophage phenotype. In addition, we discuss pathway parallels in microglia, novel markers helpful in the identification of peripheral macrophages versus microglia and markers linked to their phenotype.

  5. Macrophage Polarization in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Killers or Builders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baci, Denisa; Tremolati, Marco; Fanuli, Matteo; Farronato, Giampietro; Mortara, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    Macrophages are key cellular components of the innate immunity, acting as the main player in the first-line defence against the pathogens and modulating homeostatic and inflammatory responses. Plasticity is a major feature of macrophages resulting in extreme heterogeneity both in normal and in pathological conditions. Macrophages are not homogenous, and they are generally categorized into two broad but distinct subsets as either classically activated (M1) or alternatively activated (M2). However, macrophages represent a continuum of highly plastic effector cells, resembling a spectrum of diverse phenotype states. Induction of specific macrophage functions is closely related to the surrounding environment that acts as a relevant orchestrator of macrophage functions. This phenomenon, termed polarization, results from cell/cell, cell/molecule interaction, governing macrophage functionality within the hosting tissues. Here, we summarized relevant cellular and molecular mechanisms driving macrophage polarization in “distant” pathological conditions, such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and periodontitis that share macrophage-driven inflammation as a key feature, playing their dual role as killers (M1-like) and/or builders (M2-like). We also dissect the physio/pathological consequences related to macrophage polarization within selected chronic inflammatory diseases, placing polarized macrophages as a relevant hallmark, putative biomarkers, and possible target for prevention/therapy. PMID:29507865

  6. Macrophage Polarization in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Killers or Builders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Parisi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key cellular components of the innate immunity, acting as the main player in the first-line defence against the pathogens and modulating homeostatic and inflammatory responses. Plasticity is a major feature of macrophages resulting in extreme heterogeneity both in normal and in pathological conditions. Macrophages are not homogenous, and they are generally categorized into two broad but distinct subsets as either classically activated (M1 or alternatively activated (M2. However, macrophages represent a continuum of highly plastic effector cells, resembling a spectrum of diverse phenotype states. Induction of specific macrophage functions is closely related to the surrounding environment that acts as a relevant orchestrator of macrophage functions. This phenomenon, termed polarization, results from cell/cell, cell/molecule interaction, governing macrophage functionality within the hosting tissues. Here, we summarized relevant cellular and molecular mechanisms driving macrophage polarization in “distant” pathological conditions, such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and periodontitis that share macrophage-driven inflammation as a key feature, playing their dual role as killers (M1-like and/or builders (M2-like. We also dissect the physio/pathological consequences related to macrophage polarization within selected chronic inflammatory diseases, placing polarized macrophages as a relevant hallmark, putative biomarkers, and possible target for prevention/therapy.

  7. Maturity group classification and maturity locus genotyping of early-maturing soybean varieties from high-latitude cold regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongchang; Jiang, Bingjun; Wu, Cunxiang; Lu, Wencheng; Hou, Wensheng; Sun, Shi; Yan, Hongrui; Han, Tianfu

    2014-01-01

    With the migration of human beings, advances of agricultural sciences, evolution of planting patterns and global warming, soybeans have expanded to both tropical and high-latitude cold regions (HCRs). Unlike other regions, HCRs have much more significant and diverse photoperiods and temperature conditions over seasons or across latitudes, and HCR soybeans released there show rich diversity in maturity traits. However, HCR soybeans have not been as well classified into maturity groups (MGs) as other places. Therefore, it is necessary to identify MGs in HCRs and to genotype the maturity loci. Local varieties were collected from the northern part of Northeast China and the far-eastern region of Russia. Maturity group reference (MGR) soybeans of MGs MG000, MG00, and MG0 were used as references during field experiments. Both local varieties and MGR soybeans were planted for two years (2010-2011) in Heihe (N 50°15', E 127°27', H 168.5 m), China. The days to VE (emergence), R1 (beginning bloom) and R7 (beginning maturity) were recorded and statistically analyzed. Furthermore, some varieties were further genotyped at four molecularly-identified maturity loci E1, E2, E3 and E4. The HCR varieties were classified into MG0 or even more early-maturing. In Heihe, some varieties matured much earlier than MG000, which is the most early-maturing known MG, and clustered into a separate group. We designated the group as MG0000, following the convention of MGs. HCR soybeans had relatively stable days to beginning bloom from emergence. The HCR varieties diversified into genotypes of E1, E2, E3 and E4. These loci had different effects on maturity. HCRs diversify early-maturing MGs of soybean. MG0000, a new MG that matures much earlier than known MGs, was developed. HCR soybean breeding should focus more on shortening post-flowering reproductive growth. E1, E2, E3, and E4 function differentially.

  8. HIV Infection of Macrophages: Implications for Pathogenesis and Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiera Leigh Clayton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although CD4+ T cells represent the major reservoir of persistent HIV and SIV infection, accumulating evidence suggests that macrophages also contribute. However, investigations of the role of macrophages are often underrepresented at HIV pathogenesis and cure meetings. This was the impetus for a scientific workshop dedicated to this area of study, held in Cambridge, MA in January 2017. The workshop brought together experts in the fields of HIV/SIV immunology/virology, macrophage biology and immunology, and animal models of HIV/SIV infection to facilitate discussions regarding the role of macrophages as a physiologically relevant viral reservoir, and the implications of macrophage infection for HIV pathogenesis and cure strategies. An emerging consensus that infected macrophages likely persist in the setting of combination antiretroviral therapy, driving persistent inflammation and contributing to the viral reservoir, indicate the importance of addressing macrophages as well as CD4+ T cells with future therapeutic strategies.

  9. Lysosomal Disorders Drive Susceptibility to Tuberculosis by Compromising Macrophage Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Russell D.; Levitte, Steven; O’Sullivan, Mary P.; O’Leary, Seónadh M.; Cambier, C.J.; Cameron, James; Takaki, Kevin K.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Tobin, David M.; Keane, Joseph; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    Summary A zebrafish genetic screen for determinants of susceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum identified a hypersusceptible mutant deficient in lysosomal cysteine cathepsins that manifests hallmarks of human lysosomal storage diseases. Under homeostatic conditions, mutant macrophages accumulate undigested lysosomal material, which disrupts endocytic recycling and impairs their migration to, and thus engulfment of, dying cells. This causes a buildup of unengulfed cell debris. During mycobacterial infection, macrophages with lysosomal storage cannot migrate toward infected macrophages undergoing apoptosis in the tuberculous granuloma. The unengulfed apoptotic macrophages undergo secondary necrosis, causing granuloma breakdown and increased mycobacterial growth. Macrophage lysosomal storage similarly impairs migration to newly infecting mycobacteria. This phenotype is recapitulated in human smokers, who are at increased risk for tuberculosis. A majority of their alveolar macrophages exhibit lysosomal accumulations of tobacco smoke particulates and do not migrate to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The incapacitation of highly microbicidal first-responding macrophages may contribute to smokers’ susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:27015311

  10. The maturity of Nuclear Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Favini, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The ever-increasing use of atomic energy since 1950 has generated a set of rules called for practical reasons Nuclear Law. This branch of law covers a wide scope of related activities and, specialized studies have apparently foreseen all conceivable hypotheses. The international character of Nuclear Law explains the basic harmony of international legislation. The methods of comparative Law and International Private Law as well as the joint, indepth work of scientists and jurists will bring about steady progress towards legislative unity and prompt solution to conflicts. The expectable revitalization of nuclear-electric programs early in the 21st. century will give rise to a Nuclear juridical community which can already be perceived through the maturity Nuclear Law has reached. (Author) [es

  11. The effect of CSF-1 administration on lung maturation in a mouse model of neonatal hyperoxia exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christina V; Alikhan, Maliha A; O'Reilly, Megan; Sozo, Foula; Williams, Timothy M; Harding, Richard; Jenkin, Graham; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-09-06

    exacerbation of lung injury. The trophic functions of macrophages in lung development requires further elucidation in order to explore macrophage modulation as a strategy for promoting lung maturation.

  12. In vitro cytotoxicity of Manville Code 100 glass fibers: Effect of fiber length on human alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones William

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs are inorganic noncrystalline materials widely used in residential and industrial settings for insulation, filtration, and reinforcement purposes. SVFs conventionally include three major categories: fibrous glass, rock/slag/stone (mineral wool, and ceramic fibers. Previous in vitro studies from our laboratory demonstrated length-dependent cytotoxic effects of glass fibers on rat alveolar macrophages which were possibly associated with incomplete phagocytosis of fibers ≥ 17 μm in length. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of fiber length on primary human alveolar macrophages, which are larger in diameter than rat macrophages, using length-classified Manville Code 100 glass fibers (8, 10, 16, and 20 μm. It was hypothesized that complete engulfment of fibers by human alveolar macrophages could decrease fiber cytotoxicity; i.e. shorter fibers that can be completely engulfed might not be as cytotoxic as longer fibers. Human alveolar macrophages, obtained by segmental bronchoalveolar lavage of healthy, non-smoking volunteers, were treated with three different concentrations (determined by fiber number of the sized fibers in vitro. Cytotoxicity was assessed by monitoring cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase release and loss of function as indicated by a decrease in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence. Results Microscopic analysis indicated that human alveolar macrophages completely engulfed glass fibers of the 20 μm length. All fiber length fractions tested exhibited equal cytotoxicity on a per fiber basis, i.e. increasing lactate dehydrogenase and decreasing chemiluminescence in the same concentration-dependent fashion. Conclusion The data suggest that due to the larger diameter of human alveolar macrophages, compared to rat alveolar macrophages, complete phagocytosis of longer fibers can occur with the human cells. Neither incomplete phagocytosis nor length-dependent toxicity was

  13. Macrophage mitochondrial oxidative stress promotes atherosclerosis and nuclear factor-κB-mediated inflammation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Gary Z; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Tabas, Ira

    2014-01-31

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress (mitoOS) has been shown to correlate with the progression of human atherosclerosis. However, definitive cell type-specific causation studies in vivo are lacking, and the molecular mechanisms of potential proatherogenic effects remain to be determined. Our aims were to assess the importance of macrophage mitoOS in atherogenesis and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. We first validated Western diet-fed Ldlr(-/-) mice as a model of human mitoOS-atherosclerosis association by showing that non-nuclear oxidative DNA damage, a marker of mitoOS in lesional macrophages, correlates with aortic root lesion development. To investigate the importance of macrophage mitoOS, we used a genetic engineering strategy in which the OS suppressor catalase was ectopically expressed in mitochondria (mCAT) in macrophages. MitoOS in lesional macrophages was successfully suppressed in these mice, and this led to a significant reduction in aortic root lesional area. The mCAT lesions had less monocyte-derived cells, less Ly6c(hi) monocyte infiltration into lesions, and lower levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1. The decrease in lesional monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was associated with the suppression of other markers of inflammation and with decreased phosphorylation of RelA (NF-κB p65), indicating decreased activation of the proinflammatory NF-κB pathway. Using models of mitoOS in cultured macrophages, we showed that mCAT suppressed monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression by decreasing the activation of the IκB-kinase β-RelA NF-κB pathway. MitoOS in lesional macrophages amplifies atherosclerotic lesion development by promoting NF-κB-mediated entry of monocytes and other inflammatory processes. In view of the mitoOS-atherosclerosis link in human atheromata, these findings reveal a potentially new therapeutic target to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis.

  14. A maturity model for blockchain adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huaiqing; Chen, Kun; Xu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rapid development of the blockchain technology and its various applications has rendered it important to understand the guidelines for adopting it. Methods: The comparative analysis method is used to analyze different dimensions of the maturity model, which is mainly based on the commonly used capability maturity model. Results: The blockchain maturity model and its adoption process have been discussed and presented. Conclusions: This study serves as a guide to institutions to...

  15. Functional characterization and phenotypic monitoring of human hematopoietic stem cell expansion and differentiation of monocytes and macrophages by whole-cell mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Vogel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The different facets of macrophages allow them to play distinct roles in tissue homeostasis, tissue repair and in response to infections. Individuals displaying dysregulated macrophage functions are proposed to be prone to inflammatory disorders or infections. However, this being a cause or a consequence of the pathology remains often unclear. In this context, we isolated and expanded CD34+ HSCs from healthy blood donors and derived them into CD14+ myeloid progenitors which were further enriched and differentiated into macrophages. Aiming for a comprehensive phenotypic profiling, we generated whole-cell mass spectrometry (WCMS fingerprints of cell samples collected along the different stages of the differentiation process to build a predictive model using a linear discriminant analysis based on principal components. Through the capacity of the model to accurately predict sample's identity of a validation set, we demonstrate that WCMS profiles obtained from bona fide blood monocytes and respectively derived macrophages mirror profiles obtained from equivalent HSC derivatives. Finally, HSC-derived macrophage functionalities were assessed by quantifying cytokine and chemokine responses to a TLR agonist in a 34-plex luminex assay and by measuring their capacity to phagocytise mycobacteria. These functional read-outs could not discriminate blood monocytes-derived from HSC-derived macrophages. To conclude, we propose that this method opens new avenues to distinguish the impact of human genetics on the dysregulated biological properties of macrophages in pathological conditions.

  16. Non-matured arteriovenous fistulae for haemodialysis: diagnosis, endovascular and surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Malovrh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-maturation is a feature of autologous vascular access. The autologous arteriovenous fistula needs time to mature and for the vein to enlarge to a size where it can be needled for dialysis. A fistula that fails early is one that either never develops adequately to support dialysis or fails within the first three months of its use. Two variables are required for fistula maturation. Firstly, the fistula should have adequate blood flow to support dialysis and secondly, it should have enough size to allow for successful repetitive cannulation. Three main reasons for maturation failure are: arterial and venous problems and the presence of accessory veins. Early diagnostics and intervention for fistula maturation minimizes catheter use and its associated complications. The identification of immature fistulae is relatively simple. Physical examination has been highlighted to be a valuable tool in assessing fistula. Any fistula that fails to mature adequately and demonstrates abnormal physical findings should be studied aggressively. Ultrasonography can successfully identify candidates who fail to meet the recently developed criteria for immature fistulae. In recent years, digital subtraction angiography and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has been introduced for assessment of dysfunctional haemodialysis conduits, including immature fistulae. A great majority of non-matured fistulae can be successfully salvaged using percutaneous techniques. In addition to endovascular techniques, surgical intervention can also be an option. This paper reviews the process of fistula maturation and presents information regarding how to obtain a mature fistula.

  17. A Set Theoretical Approach to Maturity Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester; Vatrapu, Ravi; Andersen, Kim Normann

    2016-01-01

    characterized by equifinality, multiple conjunctural causation, and case diversity. We prescribe methodological guidelines consisting of a six-step procedure to systematically apply set theoretic methods to conceptualize, develop, and empirically derive maturity models and provide a demonstration......Maturity Model research in IS has been criticized for the lack of theoretical grounding, methodological rigor, empirical validations, and ignorance of multiple and non-linear paths to maturity. To address these criticisms, this paper proposes a novel set-theoretical approach to maturity models...

  18. Molecular Characterization of Macrophage-Biomaterial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laura Beth; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of biomaterials in vascularized tissues elicits the sequential engagement of molecular and cellular elements that constitute the foreign body response. Initial events include the non-specific adsorption of proteins to the biomaterial surface that render it adhesive for cells such as neutrophils and macrophages. The latter undergo unique activation and in some cases undergo cell-cell fusion to form foreign body giant cells that contribute to implant damage and fibrotic encapsulation. In this review, we discuss the molecular events that contribute to macrophage activation and fusion with a focus on the role of the inflammasome, signaling pathways such as JAK/STAT and NF-κB, and the putative involvement of micro RNAs in the regulation of these processes.

  19. Purinergic signaling to terminate TLR responses in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal eHamidzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages undergo profound physiological alterations when they encounter pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. These alterations can result in the elaboration of cytokines and mediators that promote immune responses and contribute to the clearance of pathogens. These innate immune responses by myeloid cells are transient. The termination of these secretory responses is not due to the dilution of stimuli, but rather to the active down-regulation of innate responses induced by the very PAMPs that initiated them. Here we describe a purinergic autoregulatory program whereby TLR-stimulated macrophages control their activation state. In this program, TLR stimulated macrophages undergo metabolic alterations that result in the production of ATP and its release through membrane pannexin channels. This purine nucleotide is rapidly hydrolyzed to adenosine by ectoenzymes on the macrophage surface, CD39 and CD73. Adenosine then signals through the P1 class of seven transmembrane receptors to induce a regulatory state that is characterized by the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. This purinergic autoregulatory system mitigates the collateral damage that would be caused by the prolonged activation of macrophages, and rather allows the macrophage to maintain homeostasis. The transient activation of macrophages can be prolonged by treating macrophages with IFN-γ. IFN-γ treated macrophages become less sensitive to the regulatory effects of adenosine, allowing them to sustain macrophage activation for the duration of an adaptive immune response.

  20. Macrophage Phenotype and Function in Different Stages of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabas, Ira; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable plasticity and plethora of biological functions performed by macrophages have enticed scientists to study these cells in relation to atherosclerosis for more than 50 years, and major discoveries continue to be made today. It is now understood that macrophages play important roles in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initiation of lesions and lesion expansion, to necrosis leading to rupture and the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, to resolution and regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Lesional macrophages are derived primarily from blood monocytes, although recent research has shown that lesional macrophage-like cells can also be derived from smooth muscle cells. Lesional macrophages take on different phenotypes depending on their environment and which intracellular signaling pathways are activated. Rather than a few distinct populations of macrophages, the phenotype of the lesional macrophage is more complex and likely changes during the different phases of atherosclerosis and with the extent of lipid and cholesterol loading, activation by a plethora of receptors, and metabolic state of the cells. These different phenotypes allow the macrophage to engulf lipids, dead cells, and other substances perceived as danger signals; efflux cholesterol to HDL; proliferate and migrate; undergo apoptosis and death; and secrete a large number of inflammatory and pro-resolving molecules. This review article, part of the Compendium on Atherosclerosis, discusses recent advances in our understanding of lesional macrophage phenotype and function in different stages of atherosclerosis. With the increasing understanding of the roles of lesional macrophages, new research areas and treatment strategies are beginning to emerge. PMID:26892964

  1. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Macrophages for Unraveling Human Macrophage Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanrui; Reilly, Muredach P

    2017-11-01

    Despite a substantial appreciation for the critical role of macrophages in cardiometabolic diseases, understanding of human macrophage biology has been hampered by the lack of reliable and scalable models for cellular and genetic studies. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophages (IPSDM), as an unlimited source of subject genotype-specific cells, will undoubtedly play an important role in advancing our understanding of the role of macrophages in human diseases. In this review, we summarize current literature in the differentiation and characterization of IPSDM at phenotypic, functional, and transcriptomic levels. We emphasize the progress in differentiating iPSC to tissue resident macrophages, and in understanding the ontogeny of in vitro differentiated IPSDM that resembles primitive hematopoiesis, rather than adult definitive hematopoiesis. We review the application of IPSDM in modeling both Mendelian genetic disorders and host-pathogen interactions. Finally, we highlighted the potential areas of research using IPSDM in functional validation of coronary artery disease loci in genome-wide association studies, functional genomic analyses, drug testing, and cell therapeutics in cardiovascular diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Misbehaving macrophages in the pathogenesis of psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Rachael A.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease unique to humans. In this issue of the JCI, 2 studies of very different mouse models of psoriasis both report that macrophages play a key role in inducing psoriasis-like skin disease. Psoriasis is clearly a polygenic, inherited disease of uncontrolled cutaneous inflammation. The debate that currently rages in the field is whether psoriasis is a disease of autoreactive T cells or whether it reflects an intrinsic defect within the skin — or both....

  3. Molecular Characterization of Macrophage-Biomaterial Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Laura Beth; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of biomaterials in vascularized tissues elicits the sequential engagement of molecular and cellular elements that constitute the foreign body response. Initial events include the non-specific adsorption of proteins to the biomaterial surface that render it adhesive for cells such as neutrophils and macrophages. The latter undergo unique activation and in some cases undergo cell-cell fusion to form foreign body giant cells that contribute to implant damage and fibrotic encapsulati...

  4. Macrophage specific drug delivery in experimental leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Mukul Kumar; Lala, Sanchaita

    2004-09-01

    Macrophage-specific delivery systems are the subject of much interest nowadays, because of the fact that macrophages act as host cells for many parasites and bacteria, which give rise to outbreak of so many deadly diseases(eg. leishmaniasis, tuberculosis etc.) in humans. To combat these deadly diseases initially macrophage specific liposomal delivery system were thought of and tested in vivo against experimental leishmaniasis in hamsters using a series of indigenous or synthetic antileishmanial compounds and the results were critically discussed. In vitro testing was also done against macrophages infected with Leishmania donovani, the causative agent for visceral leishmaniasis. The common problem of liposome therapy being their larger size, stability and storage, non-ionic surfactant vesicles, niosomes were prepared, for their different drug distribution and release characteristics compared to liposomes. When tested in vivo, the retention capacity of niosomes was found to be higher than that of liposomes due to the absence of lipid molecules and their smaller size. Thus the therapeutic efficacy of certain antileishmanial compounds was found to be better than that in the liposomal form. The niosomes, being cheaper, less toxic, biodegradable and non-immunogenic, were considered for sometime as suitable alternatives to liposomes as drug carriers. Besides the advent of other classical drugs carriers(e.g. neoglycoproteins), the biggest challenge came from polymeric delivery vehicles, specially the polymeric nanoparticles which were made of cost effective biodegradable polymers and different natural polymers. Because of very small size and highly stable nature, use of nanoparticles as effective drug carriers has been explored in experimental leishmaniasis using a series of antileishmanial compounds, both of indigenous and synthetic origin. The feasibility of application in vivo, when tested for biological as well as for other physicochemical parameters, the polymeric

  5. Evaluation of the alveolar macrophage role in the pulmonary distribution of actinide oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guezingar-Liebard, Florence

    1999-01-01

    Actinide oxide inhalation is potentially a risk during the fuel fabrication process in the electronuclear industry. These particles can induce pulmonary lesions. The alveolar macrophage play an important role in the particle sequestration and transport but the actinide toxicity towards these cells is not well known. The aim of this work was to characterize the evolution of particle localisation in lungs after inhalation and to evaluate the role of macrophages in the lesion histo-genesis. We have used of a solid track detector to visualise alpha dose distribution within lung tissue. After 237 NpO 2 , MOX or PuO 2 inhalation by rats, different kinetics of clearance were observed for the sub-pleural and peri-bronchial areas compared to the others alveolar areas. For initial lung burdens that alter the lung clearance, particle aggregates were observed. Their kinetic and localisation vary depending on the aerosol, for a same global dose delivered to the lungs. This could be due to the different specific alpha activities of the particles and to the particle number deposited in the lung to obtain a similar burden but it could be also due to a chemical toxicity of neptunium higher than that of the others actinides. The flow cytometry methods developed allow us to measure apoptosis, phagocytosis and free radicals generation. After addition of soluble uranium to the culture medium, similar results were obtained using either alveolar macrophages extracted from rats or a macrophage cell line. This work confirms that alveolar macrophages are involved in the aggregate formation which induces heterogeneous dose distribution within the different lung tissues. (author) [fr

  6. Murine iPSC-Derived Macrophages as a Tool for Disease Modeling of Hereditary Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis due to Csf2rb Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Mucci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs represent an innovative source for the standardized in vitro generation of macrophages (Mφ. We here describe a robust and efficient protocol to obtain mature and functional Mφ from healthy as well as disease-specific murine iPSCs. With regard to morphology, surface phenotype, and function, our iPSC-derived Mφ (iPSC-Mφ closely resemble their counterparts generated in vitro from bone marrow cells. Moreover, when we investigated the feasibility of our differentiation system to serve as a model for rare congenital diseases associated with Mφ malfunction, we were able to faithfully recapitulate the pathognomonic defects in GM-CSF signaling and Mφ function present in hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (herPAP. Thus, our studies may help to overcome the limitations placed on research into certain rare disease entities by the lack of an adequate supply of disease-specific primary cells, and may aid the development of novel therapeutic approaches for herPAP patients.

  7. Legumain is activated in macrophages during pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartmann, Thomas; Fleming, Alicia K.; Gocheva, Vasilena; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Withana, Nimali P.; Verdoes, Martijn; Aurelio, Luigi; Edgington-Mitchell, Daniel; Lieu, TinaMarie; Parker, Belinda S.; Graham, Bim; Reinheckel, Thomas; Furness, John B.; Joyce, Johanna A.; Storz, Peter; Halangk, Walter; Bogyo, Matthew; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by dysregulated activity of digestive enzymes, necrosis, immune infiltration, and pain. Repeated incidence of pancreatitis is an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Legumain, a lysosomal cysteine protease, has been linked to inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, stroke, and cancer. Until now, legumain activation has not been studied during pancreatitis. We used a fluorescently quenched activity-based probe to assess legumain activation during caerulein-induced pancreatitis in mice. We detected activated legumain by ex vivo imaging, confocal microscopy, and gel electrophoresis. Compared with healthy controls, legumain activity in the pancreas of caerulein-treated mice was increased in a time-dependent manner. Legumain was localized to CD68+ macrophages and was not active in pancreatic acinar cells. Using a small-molecule inhibitor of legumain, we found that this protease is not essential for the initiation of pancreatitis. However, it may serve as a biomarker of disease, since patients with chronic pancreatitis show strongly increased legumain expression in macrophages. Moreover, the occurrence of legumain-expressing macrophages in regions of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia suggests that this protease may influence reprogramming events that lead to inflammation-induced pancreatic cancer. PMID:27514475

  8. Pegylated silica nanoparticles: cytotoxicity and macrophage uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorani, Giulia; Marin, Riccardo; Canton, Patrizia; Pinto, Marcella; Conti, Giamaica; Fracasso, Giulio; Riello, Pietro

    2017-08-01

    Here, we present a thorough study of pegylated silica nanoparticle (SNP) interaction with different biological environments. The SNPs have a mean diameter of about 40 nm and are coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) of different molecular weights. The physicochemical characterization of SNPs allowed the confirmation of the binding of PEG chains to the silica surface, the reproducibility of the synthesis and the narrow size-dispersion. In view of clarifying the SNP interaction with biological environments, we first assessed the SNP reactivity after the incubation with two cell lines (macrophages RAW 264.7 and primary human fibroblasts), observing a reduced toxicity of pegylated SNPs compared to the bare ones. Then, we investigated the effect of the protein adsorption on the SNP surface using the model serum protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). We found that the protein adsorption takes place more heavily on poorly pegylated SNPs, promoting the uptake of the latter by macrophages and leading to an increased mortality of these cells. To better understand this mechanism by means of flow cytometry, the dye Ru(bpy)3Cl2 was incorporated in the SNPs. The overall results highlight the SNP potentialities as a drug delivery system, thanks to the low interactions with the macrophages.

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei transcriptional adaptation in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieng Sylvia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen of phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. How the bacterium interacts with host macrophage cells is still not well understood and is critical to appreciate the strategies used by this bacterium to survive and how intracellular survival leads to disease manifestation. Results Here we report the expression profile of intracellular B. pseudomallei following infection of human macrophage-like U937 cells. During intracellular growth over the 6 h infection period, approximately 22 % of the B. pseudomallei genome showed significant transcriptional adaptation. B. pseudomallei adapted rapidly to the intracellular environment by down-regulating numerous genes involved in metabolism, cell envelope, motility, replication, amino acid and ion transport system and regulatory function pathways. Reduced expression in catabolic and housekeeping genes suggested lower energy requirement and growth arrest during macrophage infection, while expression of genes encoding anaerobic metabolism functions were up regulated. However, whilst the type VI secretion system was up regulated, expression of many known virulence factors was not significantly modulated over the 6hours of infection. Conclusions The transcriptome profile described here provides the first comprehensive view of how B. pseudomallei survives within host cells and will help identify potential virulence factors and proteins that are important for the survival and growth of B. pseudomallei within human cells.

  10. Certain biochemical specificities of alveolar macrophages from gamma-irradiated guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najdenski, H.M.; Velyanov, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    The changes in the metabolism of alveolar macrophages (aMas) from 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy gamma-irradiated guinea pigs have been studied. In view of predominantly aerobic metabolism of the aMas the investigations include oxygen uptake in the presence of substrate glucose as well as the activity of cytochrome oxidase and acid phosphatase. The results show that in the macrophages obtained from 2 Gy exposed guinea pigs there is simultaneous intensification of the oxygen uptake in the presence of glucose and of cytochrome oxidase activity by the 3rd day after irradiation. In the macrophages from the 0.5 Gy exposed guinea pigs there is also parallelism in the intensification of the respiration and cytochrome oxidase activity but on the 7th day of the investigation. In both doses applied the activity of the acid phosphatase of macrophages sharply increases to reach the maximum values between the 3rd and 7th days after irradiation. This discrepancy between the intracellular bactericidal effect and the respiration activity and the acid phosphatase of the aMas give grounds to support the view of Pavillard and Rowlei that the total metabolism of the aMas is not a limiting factor in relation to their intracellular killing effect on the absorbed bacteria. 3 figs., 6 refs

  11. Carbon Particles in Airway Macrophage as a Surrogate Marker in the Early Detection of Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NK Kalappanavar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown that inhalation of carbonaceous particulate matter may impair lung function in children. Objective: Using the carbon content of airway macrophages as a marker of individual exposure to particulate matter derived from fossil fuel, we sought direct evidence for this association. Methods: 300 children from puffed rice industrial areas and 300 children from population living in green zone were selected randomly. Airway macrophages were obtained from healthy children through sputum induction, and the grading of ultrafine carbon particles in airway macrophages was measured. Pulmonary function was also measured by spirometry. Results: Pulmonary function tests showed that in industrial area 42.6% and 20.3% of children had moderate obstructive airway disease and restrictive airway disease, respectively. In the green zone area, 7% of children had obstructive airway disease and 6% had restrictive airway disease. Evaluation of airway macrophages for ultrafine carbon particles revealed that in industrial area there were ultrafine carbon particles of grade 2 in 23% of subjects and grade 3 in 8.33% of individuals with obstructive airway disease. In the green zone area, the rates were 1.67% and 0.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The study provides a first evidence of the strong association between air pollution and development of airway diseases. Carbon particles in the sputum can be used as a marker for air pollution.

  12. Controlled release of sphingosine-1-phosphate agonist with gelatin hydrogels for macrophage recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masahiro; Saito, Takashi; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to design a drug delivery system (DDS) for the in vivo promotion of macrophage recruitment. As the drug, a water-insoluble agonist of sphingosine-1-phosphate type 1 receptor (SEW2871) was selected. SEW2871 (SEW) was water-solubilized by micelle formation with gelatin grafted by L-lactic acid oligomer. SEW micelles were mixed with gelatin, followed by dehydrothermal crosslinking of gelatin to obtain gelatin hydrogels incorporating SEW micelles. SEW was released from the hydrogels incorporating SEW micelles in vitro and in vivo. The water-solubilized SEW showed in vitro macrophage migration activity. When implanted into the back subcutis or the skin wound defect of mice, the hydrogel incorporating SEW micelles promoted macrophage migration toward the tissue around the implanted site to a significantly great extent compared with SEW-free hydrogel and that mixed with SEW micelles. The hydrogel is a promising DDS to enhance macrophage recruitment in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spheno-Occipital Synchondrosis Fusion Correlates with Cervical Vertebrae Maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Fernández-Pérez

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the closure stage of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis and the maturational stage of the cervical vertebrae (CVM in growing and young adult subjects using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. CBCT images with an extended field of view obtained from 315 participants (148 females and 167 males; mean age 15.6 ±7.3 years; range 6 to 23 years were analyzed. The fusion status of the synchondrosis was determined using a five-stage scoring system; the vertebral maturational status was evaluated using a six-stage stratification (CVM method. Ordinal regression was used to study the ability of the synchondrosis stage to predict the vertebral maturation stage. Vertebrae and synchondrosis had a strong significant correlation (r = 0.89 that essential was similar for females (r = 0.88 and males (r = 0.89. CVM stage could be accurately predicted from synchondrosis stage by ordinal regression models. Prediction equations of the vertebral stage using synchondrosis stage, sex and biological age as predictors were developed. Thus this investigation demonstrated that the stage of spheno-occipital synchondrosis, as determined in CBCT images, is a reasonable indicator of growth maturation.

  14. Spheno-Occipital Synchondrosis Fusion Correlates with Cervical Vertebrae Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pérez, María José; Alarcón, José Antonio; McNamara, James A; Velasco-Torres, Miguel; Benavides, Erika; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the closure stage of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis and the maturational stage of the cervical vertebrae (CVM) in growing and young adult subjects using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT images with an extended field of view obtained from 315 participants (148 females and 167 males; mean age 15.6 ±7.3 years; range 6 to 23 years) were analyzed. The fusion status of the synchondrosis was determined using a five-stage scoring system; the vertebral maturational status was evaluated using a six-stage stratification (CVM method). Ordinal regression was used to study the ability of the synchondrosis stage to predict the vertebral maturation stage. Vertebrae and synchondrosis had a strong significant correlation (r = 0.89) that essential was similar for females (r = 0.88) and males (r = 0.89). CVM stage could be accurately predicted from synchondrosis stage by ordinal regression models. Prediction equations of the vertebral stage using synchondrosis stage, sex and biological age as predictors were developed. Thus this investigation demonstrated that the stage of spheno-occipital synchondrosis, as determined in CBCT images, is a reasonable indicator of growth maturation.

  15. The maturing of microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas M

    2006-09-01

    A.J. Kluyver and C.B. van Niel introduced many scientists to the exceptional metabolic capacity of microbes and their remarkable ability to adapt to changing environments in The Microbe's Contribution to Biology. Beyond providing an overview of the physiology and adaptability of microbes, the book outlined many of the basic principles for the emerging discipline of microbial ecology. While the study of pure cultures was highlighted, provided a unifying framework for understanding the vast metabolic potential of microbes and their roles in the global cycling of elements, extrapolation from pure cultures to natural environments has often been overshadowed by microbiologists inability to culture many of the microbes seen in natural environments. A combination of genomic approaches is now providing a culture-independent view of the microbial world, revealing a more diverse and dynamic community of microbes than originally anticipated. As methods for determining the diversity of microbial communities become increasingly accessible, a major challenge to microbial ecologists is to link the structure of natural microbial communities with their functions. This article presents several examples from studies of aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities in which culture and culture-independent methods are providing an enhanced appreciation for the microbe's contribution to the evolution and maintenance of life on Earth, and offers some thoughts about the graduate-level educational programs needed to enhance the maturing field of microbial ecology.

  16. Motivational maturity and helping behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymes, M; Green, L

    1977-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the independent influences of conative development (the Maslow needs hierarchy) upon behavioral aspects of prosocial orientations. It provides a behavioral demonstration of conative effects in a helping paradigm, among college-age men. A comparison of the conative data across the ages of 15-22 provided a cross-sectional view of conative development itself. Conative maturity was found to be predictive of greater helping among college-age men. Situational demands were demonstrated which tended to mask, but not override, these predispositional influences on helping. The cross-sectional data on conative development point to probable movement to early esteem concerns among high school men who have reached the conative level of love and belonging. On the other hand, the stability across the years of 15-22 of proportion of safety concerns suggests fixation of such concerns in those exhibiting them in high school. Results are discussed in terms of conative growth for development of prosocial orientations.

  17. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Levinson, Alex; Mater, J.; Drummond, R.

    2010-04-28

    The integration of automation associated with electricity resources (including transmission and distribution automation and demand-side resources operated by end-users) is key to supporting greater efficiencies and incorporating variable renewable resources and electric vehicles into the power system. The integration problems faced by this community are analogous to those faced in the health industry, emergency services, and other complex communities with many stakeholders. To highlight this issue and encourage communication and the development of a smart grid interoperability community, the GridWise Architecture Council (GWAC) created an Interoperability Context-Setting Framework. This "conceptual model" has been helpful to explain the importance of organizational alignment in addition to technical and informational interface specifications for "smart grid" devices and systems. As a next step to building a community sensitive to interoperability, the GWAC is investigating an interoperability maturity model (IMM) based on work done by others to address similar circumstances. The objective is to create a tool or set of tools that encourages a culture of interoperability in this emerging community. The tools would measure status and progress, analyze gaps, and prioritize efforts to improve the situation.

  18. Digital Maturity of the Firm's Business Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groskovs, Sergejs; Vemula, Sreekanth

    We propose a digital maturity assessment model as an instrument for researchers and a strategic tool for managers. Existing literature lacks a conceptually clear way to measure the construct of digital maturity at the level of the firms business model. Our proposed instrument thus opens avenues f...

  19. A maturity model for industrial supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hameri, A.P.; McKay, K.N.; Wiers, V.C.S.

    2013-01-01

    This article takes an evolutionary view of supply chains to suggest a series of distinct, contextual phases for supply chain execution and what maturity might mean at each phase. For example, what is best practice in a mature industry might not be best practice in a pioneering situation.Three

  20. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... filed and disbursed except, for transferred marketing assistance loan collateral. The maturity date for transferred marketing assistance loan collateral will be the maturity date applicable to the original loan... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS GRAINS AND SIMILARLY HANDLED COMMODITIES-MARKETING...

  1. Cone and Seed Maturation of Southern Pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Barnett

    1976-01-01

    If slightly reduced yields and viability are acceptable, loblolly and slash cone collections can begin 2 to 3 weeks before maturity if the cones are stored before processing. Longleaf(P. palestris Mill.) pine cones should be collected only when mature, as storage decreased germination of seeds from immature cones. Biochemical analyses to determine reducing sugar...

  2. POSTTREATMENT NEUROBLASTOMA MATURATION TO GANGLIONIC CELL TUMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Ryzhova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells can differentiate into more mature forms in undifferentiated or poorly differentiated tumors, such as medulloblastomas with increased nodularity, as well as neuroblastomas. The authors describe 2 cases of neuroblastoma maturation into ganglioneuroblastoma 5 months after chemotherapy in a 2-year-old girl and 3 years after radiotherapy in a 16-year-old girl.

  3. Moving towards maturity in business model definitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Lund, Morten; Bukh, Per Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    The field of business models has, as is the case with all emerging fields of practice, slowly matured through the development of frameworks, models, concepts and ideas over the last 15 years. New concepts, theories and models typically transcend a series of maturity phases. For the concept of Bus...

  4. Assessing the Harvest Maturity of Brazilian Mangoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, T.; Tijskens, L.M.M.; Vanoli, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Eccher Zerbini, P.C.; Torricelli, A.; Filgueiras, H.; Spinelli, L.

    2010-01-01

    No clear criterion exists to determine the optimum time to harvest mango. Some empirical relations are used to assess maturity, such as shoulder development. Moreover, as a result of the typical growing conditions in tropical climates, a huge variation in maturity and ripeness exists, seriously

  5. Decision-Making Style and Vocational Maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Susan D.; Strohmer, Douglas C.

    1982-01-01

    Examined the relationship between decision-making style, scholastic achievement, and vocational maturity for college students (N=64). Results did not support the hypothesized relationship between rationality and attitudinal and cognitive maturity. Scholastic achievement and lack of dependent decision style were found to be moderately predictive of…

  6. Correlation of Improved Version of Cervical Vertebral Maturation Indicator with Other Growth Maturity Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Tikku

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The correlation between middle phalanx of 3rd finger (MP3 and cervical vertebral maturation method (CVMI and CVMS was higher as compared to the correlation of either of the cervical vertebral maturation method or MP3 with dental maturation indicator.

  7. Assessing healthcare process maturity: challenges of using a business process maturity model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarhan, A.; Turetken, O.; van den Biggelaar, F.J.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Doi: 10.4108/icst.pervasivehealth.2015.259105 The quality of healthcare services is influenced by the maturity of healthcare processes used to develop it. A maturity model is an instrument to assess and continually improve organizational processes. In the last decade, a number of maturity models

  8. G-CSF regulates macrophage phenotype and associates with poor overall survival in human triple-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmén, Maija; Karaman, Sinem; Schwager, Simon; Lisibach, Angela; Christiansen, Ailsa J.; Maksimow, Mikael; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in the promotion of breast cancer growth and metastasis, and a strong infiltration by TAMs has been associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We investigated macrophage activation in response to co-culture with several breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF-7, BT-474, SKBR-3, Cal-51 and MDA-MB-231) and found that high granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secretion by the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line MDA-MB-231 gave rise to immunosuppressive HLA-DRlo macrophages that promoted migration of breast cancer cells via secretion of TGF-α. In human breast cancer samples (n = 548), G-CSF was highly expressed in TNBC (p CSF blockade in the 4T1 mammary tumor model promoted maturation of MHCIIhi blood monocytes and TAMs and significantly reduced lung metastasis, anti-CSF-1R treatment promoted MHCIIloF4/80hiMRhi anti-inflammatory TAMs and enhanced lung metastasis in the presence of high G-CSF levels. Combined anti-G-CSF and anti-CSF-1R therapy significantly increased lymph node metastases, possibly via depletion of the so-called “gate-keeper” subcapsular sinus macrophages. These results indicate that G-CSF promotes the anti-inflammatory phenotype of tumor-induced macrophages when CSF-1R is inhibited and therefore caution against the use of M-CSF/CSF-1R targeting agents in tumors with high G-CSF expression. PMID:27141367

  9. Origins and Hallmarks of Macrophages: Development, Homeostasis, and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Chawla, Ajay; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Preface Macrophages the most plastic cells of the hematopoietic system are found in all tissues and exhibit great functional diversity. They have roles in development, homeostasis, tissue repair, and immunity. While anatomically distinct, resident tissue macrophages exhibit different transcriptional profiles, and functional capabilities, they are all required for the maintenance of homeostasis. However, these reparative and homeostatic functions can be subverted by chronic insults, resulting in a causal association of macrophages with disease states. In this review, we discuss how macrophages regulate normal physiology and development and provide several examples of their pathophysiologic roles in disease. We define the “hallmarks” of macrophages performing particular functions, taking into account novel insights into the diversity of their lineages, identity, and regulation. This diversity is essential to understand because macrophages have emerged as important therapeutic targets in many important human diseases. PMID:23619691

  10. Regulation of macrophage development and function in peripheral tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Yonit; Mortha, Arthur; Rahman, Adeeb; Merad, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are immune cells of haematopoietic origin that provide crucial innate immune defence and have tissue-specific functions in the regulation and maintenance of organ homeostasis. Recent studies of macrophage ontogeny, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic identity, have started to reveal the decisive role of the tissue stroma in the regulation of macrophage function. These findings suggest that most macrophages seed the tissues during embryonic development and functionally specialize in response to cytokines and metabolites that are released by the stroma and drive the expression of unique transcription factors. In this Review, we discuss how recent insights into macrophage ontogeny and macrophage–stroma interactions contribute to our understanding of the crosstalk that shapes macrophage function and the maintenance of organ integrity. PMID:26603899

  11. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oncolytic Virotherapy: Friend or Foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. Denton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy remains a challenge due to toxicity limitations of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oncolytic viruses that selectively replicate and destroy cancer cells are of increasing interest. In addition to direct cell lysis, these vectors stimulate an anti-tumor immune response. A key regulator of tumor immunity is the tumor-associated macrophage population. Macrophages can either support oncolytic virus therapy through pro-inflammatory stimulation of the anti-tumor response at the cost of hindering direct oncolysis or through immunosuppressive protection of virus replication at the cost of hindering the anti-tumor immune response. Despite similarities in macrophage interaction between adult and pediatric tumors and the abundance of research supporting macrophage modulation in adult tumors, there are few studies investigating macrophage modulation in pediatric cancers or modulation of immunotherapy. We review the current state of knowledge regarding macrophages in cancers and their influence on oncolytic virotherapy.

  12. Set-Theoretic Approach to Maturity Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan

    Despite being widely accepted and applied, maturity models in Information Systems (IS) have been criticized for the lack of theoretical grounding, methodological rigor, empirical validations, and ignorance of multiple and non-linear paths to maturity. This PhD thesis focuses on addressing...... these criticisms by incorporating recent developments in configuration theory, in particular application of set-theoretic approaches. The aim is to show the potential of employing a set-theoretic approach for maturity model research and empirically demonstrating equifinal paths to maturity. Specifically...... methodological guidelines consisting of detailed procedures to systematically apply set theoretic approaches for maturity model research and provides demonstrations of it application on three datasets. The thesis is a collection of six research papers that are written in a sequential manner. The first paper...

  13. Role of Macrophage-Induced Inflammation in Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    macrophages). Normal pleura becomes available intermittently , serving to slow the completion of this task. All is set in place for us to complete the...GFP) regulated by a Csf1r-promoter (Sasmono et al. 2003) show that macrophages travel up and down these fibers at a fast rate and also “jump” between...2010). Macrophages have also recently been shown to be important in adipogenesis at least during obesity , through their secretion of adipocyte growth

  14. A comparison of skeletal maturation in patients with tooth agenesis and unaffected controls assessed by the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Christine; Gill, Daljit S; Jones, Steven P

    2013-12-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) investigate if there is a difference in skeletal maturation between tooth agenesis and control patients and (2) whether skeletal maturation is affected by the severity of tooth agenesis. The cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) index can be used to assess skeletal maturation. A retrospective cross-sectional study. Eastman Dental Hospital, London, UK. A total of 360 cephalograms of patients aged 9-17 years (164 males and 196 females) allocated to four subgroups (mild, moderate and severe tooth agenesis patients, and controls) were assessed retrospectively. There were 90 patients in each of the four subgroups. The skeletal maturation of each subject was assessed both quantitatively and qualitatively using the CVM index. All patients in the study were either currently receiving treatment or had been discharged from the hospital. There was no statistically significant relationship between skeletal maturation and the presence of tooth agenesis. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant relationship between the skeletal maturity of patients and different severities of tooth agenesis. The data obtained from this group of patients and using this measurement tool alone does not supply sufficient reason to reject the null hypothesis. However, it suggests that it is possible that no difference exists between the groups.

  15. Improved survival of mesenchymal stem cells by macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Wenzheng; Xie, Congying; Jiang, Miaomiao; Hou, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a critical inflammatory cytokine that was recently associated with progenitor cell survival and potently inhibits apoptosis. We examined the protective effect of MIF on hypoxia/serum deprivation (SD)-induced apoptosis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), as well as the possible mechanisms. MSCs were obtained from rat bone marrow and cultured in vitro. Apoptosis was induced by culturing MSCs under hypoxia/SD conditions for up to 24?h and assessed by...

  16. Macrophages: contributors to allograft dysfunction, repair, or innocent bystanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannon, Roslyn B

    2012-02-01

    Macrophages are members of the innate immune response. However, their role in the adaptive immune response is not known. The purpose of this review is to highlight our current understanding of macrophage structure and function and how they may participate in allograft injury. Studies in acute kidney injury models identify macrophages as key mediators of inflammatory injury, while more recent studies indicate that they may play a reparative role, depending on phenotype - M1 or M2 type macrophages. Mregs, generated in vitro, appear to have immune suppressive abilities and a unique phenotype. In solid-organ transplant, the emphasis of studies has been on acute or chronic injury. These data are derived from animal models using depletion of macrophages or antagonizing their activation and inflammatory responses. The relative contribution of macrophage phenotype in transplantation has not been explored. These studies suggest that macrophages play an injurious role in acute cellular allograft rejection, as well as in chronic injury. Infiltration of an allograft with macrophages is also associated with worse graft function and poor prognosis. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of macrophage-mediated injury, explore their potential reparative role, and determine if they or their functional products are biomarkers of poor graft outcomes.

  17. L-Plastin promotes podosome longevity and supports macrophage motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Julie Y.; Szasz, Taylor P.; Stewart-Hutchinson, Phillip J.; Sivapalan, Janardan; Todd, Elizabeth M.; Deady, Lauren E.; Cooper, John A.; Onken, Michael D.; Morley, S. Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular regulation of macrophage migration is essential for understanding the patho-physiology of multiple human diseases, including host responses to infection and autoimmune disorders. Macrophage migration is supported by dynamic rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, with formation of actin-based structures such as podosomes and lamellipodia. Here we provide novel insights into the function of the actin-bundling protein l-plastin (LPL) in primary macrophages. We found that podosome stability is disrupted in primary resident peritoneal macrophages from LPL−/− mice. Live-cell imaging of F-actin using resident peritoneal macrophages from LifeACT-RFP+ mice demonstrated that loss of LPL led to decreased longevity of podosomes, without reducing the number of podosomes initiated. Additionally, macrophages from LPL−/− mice failed to elongate in response to chemotactic stimulation. These deficiencies in podosome stabilization and in macrophage elongation correlated with impaired macrophage transmigration in culture and decreased monocyte migration into murine peritoneum. Thus, we have identified a role for LPL in stabilizing long-lived podosomes and in enabling macrophage motility. PMID:27614263

  18. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin

  19. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is associated with aneurysmal expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Jie-Hong; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Sukhova, Galina K

    2003-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine released mainly from macrophages and activated lymphocytes. Both atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are inflammatory diseases tightly linked to the function of these cells. The correlation and contribution o...... of MIF to these human diseases remain unknown, although a recent rabbit study showed expression of this cytokine in atherosclerotic lesions.......Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine released mainly from macrophages and activated lymphocytes. Both atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are inflammatory diseases tightly linked to the function of these cells. The correlation and contribution...

  20. Effects of vitamin D supplementation on alveolar macrophage gene expression: preliminary results of a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Alicia K; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Tang, Fan; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Bair, Thomas B; Phillips, Emily; Powers, Linda S; Monick, Martha M

    2014-03-26

    Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated as a factor in a number of infectious and inflammatory lung diseases. In the lung, alveolar macrophages play a key role in inflammation and defense of infection, but there are little data exploring the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D on innate lung immunity in humans. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of vitamin D supplementation on gene expression of alveolar macrophages. We performed a parallel, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial to determine the effects of vitamin D on alveolar macrophage gene expression. Vitamin D3 (1000 international units/day) or placebo was administered to adults for three months. Bronchoscopy was performed pre- and post-intervention to obtain alveolar macrophages. Messenger RNA was isolated from the macrophages and subjected to whole genome exon array analysis. The primary outcome was differential gene expression of the alveolar macrophage in response to vitamin D supplementation. Specific genes underwent validation by polymerase chain reaction methods. Fifty-eight subjects were randomized to vitamin D (n = 28) or placebo (n = 30). There was a marginal overall difference between treatment group and placebo group in the change of 25-hydroxyvitaminD levels (4.43 ng/ml vs. 0.2 ng/ml, p = 0.10). Whole genome exon array analysis revealed differential gene expression associated with change in serum vitamin D levels in the treated group. CCL8/MCP-2 was the top-regulated cytokine gene and was further validated. Although only a non-significant increased trend was seen in serum vitamin D levels, subjects treated with vitamin D supplementation had immune-related differential gene expression in alveolar macrophages. ClinicalTrials.org: NCT01967628.

  1. Synergy of anti-CD40, CpG and MPL in activation of mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongyu; Felder, Mildred A R; Sondel, Paul M; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L

    2015-08-01

    Activation of macrophages is a prerequisite for their antitumor effects. Several reagents, including agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD40), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), can stimulate activation of macrophages. Our previous studies showed synergy between anti-CD40 and CpG and between anti-CD40 and MPL in macrophage activation and antitumor efficacy in mice. In the present study, we asked whether there was synergy among these three reagents. The activation of adherent peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) obtained from mice injected with anti-CD40 and then treated with CpG and/or MPL in vitro was determined by their ability to suppress proliferation of tumor cells and to produce various cytokines and chemokines in vitro. Cell sorting and histology followed by functional testing showed that macrophages were the main cell population in PEC activated by CD40 ligation in vivo. A combination of anti-CD40, CpG or MPL activated PEC to suppress proliferation of B16 cells and produce nitric oxide far greater than the single reagents or any of the double combinations of these reagents. In addition, the combination of all three reagents activated PEC to secrete IL-12, IFN-γ and MCP-1 to a greater degree than any single reagent or any two combined reagents. These results demonstrate that macrophages can be synergistically activated by anti-CD40, CpG and MPL, suggesting that this novel combined approach might be further investigated as potential cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Distribution of mast cells and macrophages and expression of interleukin-6 in periapical cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracks, Igor Vieira; Armada, Luciana; Gonçalves, Lúcio Souza; Pires, Fábio Ramôa

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells and macrophages are important components of the inflammatory infiltrate found in inflammatory periapical diseases. Several cytokines participate in the mechanisms of inflammation, tissue repair, and bone resorption associated with periapical cysts. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the distribution of mast cells and macrophages and the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in periapical cysts. Thirty periapical cysts were selected for the study, and clinical, demographic, and gross information from the cases was obtained from the laboratory records. Five-micrometer sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin were reviewed for analysis of the microscopic features of the cysts, and 3-μm sections on silanized slides were used for immunohistochemical reactions with anti-tryptase, anti-CD68, and anti-IL-6. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean number of mast cells and macrophages when comparing superficial and deep regions of the fibrous capsule of the cysts. Mean number of mast cells on the superficial region of the fibrous capsule was higher in cysts showing intense superficial inflammation and exocytosis. Macrophages were more commonly found in areas showing IL-6 expression, and IL-6 was less expressed in deep regions of the fibrous capsule in cysts showing greater gross volume. The results reinforced the participation of mast cells and macrophages in the pathogenesis of periapical cysts and suggested that IL-6 is not the major bone resorption mediator in larger periapical cysts. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Synergy of anti-CD40, CpG and MPL in activation of mouse macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongyu; Felder, Mildred A.R.; Sondel, Paul M.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages is a prerequisite for their antitumor effects. Several reagents, including agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD40), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), can stimulate activation of macrophages. Our previous studies showed synergy between anti-CD40 and CpG and between anti-CD40 and MPL in macrophage activation and antitumor efficacy in mice. In the present study, we asked whether there was synergy among these three reagents. The activation of adherent peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) obtained from mice injected with anti-CD40 and then treated with CpG and/or MPL in vitro was determined by their ability to suppress proliferation of tumor cells and to produce various cytokines and chemokines in vitro. Cell sorting and histology followed by functional testing showed that macrophages were the main cell population in PEC activated by CD40 ligation in vivo. A combination of anti-CD40, CpG or MPL activated PEC to suppress proliferation of B16 cells and produce nitric oxide far greater than the single reagents or any of the double combinations of these reagents. In addition, the combination of all three reagents activated PEC to secrete IL-12, IFN-γ and MCP-1 to a greater degree than any single reagent or any two combined reagents. These results demonstrate that macrophages can be synergistically activated by anti-CD40, CpG and MPL, suggesting that this novel combined approach might be further investigated as potential cancer therapy. PMID:25829245

  4. Cracking and thermal maturity of Ordovician oils from Tahe Oilfield, Tarim Basin, NW China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anlai Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermal maturity of the Ordovician oils from the Tahe oilfield of Tarim Basin, NW China was assessed through various maturity parameters, such as biomarkers, aromatic parameters, and diamondoid parameters. Both Ts/(Ts+Tm and C29Ts/(C29H+C29Ts values indicate that the maturity of oils has not reached the condensates stage, which is consistent with the maturity obtained by MPI1. However, the diamondoid maturity suggests that the oil maturity ranges 1.1%–1.6% Ro, which is apparently higher than that of the maturity obtained by the biomarker and MPI1. This discrepancy in maturity may indicate that the Ordovician reservoir has multiple filling history. The 4-MD+3-MD concentration of oils disperses and increases slowly when the Ts/(Ts+Tm value is lower than 0.55. Meanwhile, the value increases rapidly when the Ts/(Ts+Tm value is higher than 0.55. It is proposed that the diamondoid baseline is about 15 μg/goil for marine oils in the Tahe oilfield based on the diamondoid concentration of marine oils from reservoirs of various age. The concentration of 4-MD+3-MD of most Ordovician oils generally ranges from 4.5 to 35 μg/goil, suggesting that the degree of oil-cracking is lower than 50% and the deep Ordovician have potential of oil exploration. The distribution of the concentration of 4-MD+3-MD is characterized by being high in the east and south, low in the west and north, proposing that the two migration pathways exit in the oilfield, which are from east to west and from south to north, respectively. The migration directions are consistent with the results obtained from the oil density and the maturity parameters such as Ts/(Ts+Tm. Thus, suggesting the concentration of 4-MD+3-MD can be used as migration index in oilfield scale.

  5. Rebamipide delivered by brushite cement enhances osteoblast and macrophage proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pujari-Palmer

    Full Text Available Many of the bioactive agents capable of stimulating osseous regeneration, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, are limited by rapid degradation, a short bioactive half-life at the target site in vivo, or are prohibitively expensive to obtain in large quantities. Rebamipide, an amino acid modified hydroxylquinoline, can alter the expression of key mediators of bone anabolism, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2, BMP-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, in diverse cell types such as mucosal and endothelial cells or chondrocytes. The present study investigates whether Rebamipide enhances proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts when delivered from brushite cement. The reactive oxygen species (ROS quenching ability of Rebampide was tested in macrophages as a measure of bioactivity following drug release incubation times, up to 14 days. Rebamipide release from brushite occurs via non-fickian diffusion, with a rapid linear release of 9.70% ± 0.37% of drug per day for the first 5 days, and an average of 0.5%-1% per day thereafter for 30 days. Rebamipide slows the initial and final cement setting time by up to 3 and 1 minute, respectively, but does not significantly reduce the mechanical strength below 4% (weight percentage. Pre-osteoblast proliferation increases by 24% upon exposure to 0.4 uM Rebamipide, and by up to 73% when Rebamipide is delivered via brushite cement. Low doses of Rebamipide do not adversely affect peak alkaline phosphatase activity in differentiating pre-osteoblasts. Rebamipide weakly stimulates proliferation in macrophages at low concentrations (118 ± 7.4% at 1 uM, and quenches ROS by 40-60%. This is the first investigation of Rebamipide in osteoblasts.

  6. In vitro studies of interaction of rickettsia and macrophages: effect of ultraviolet light on Coxiella burnetti inactivation and macrophage enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.S.; Kishimoto, R.A.; Canonico, P.G.

    1980-03-01

    The inactivation of Coxiella burnetii in suspension or in cultures of guinea pig peritoneal macrophages by ultraviolet (uv) light was studied. The effect of uv treatment on the activity of macrophage organelle marker enzymes and their subsequent equilibration in linear sucrose gradients was also determined. It was shown that uv treatment for 15 s at a distance of 10 cm inactivated C. burnetti, either in suspension or within guinea pig peritoneal macrophages. Similar uv treatment had little effect on the activity or equilibration of macrophage organelle marker enzymes in linear sucrose gradients.

  7. Moderate restriction of macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by SAMHD1 in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taya, Kahoru; Nakayama, Emi E; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains are able to grow to high titers in human monocyte-derived macrophages. However, it was recently reported that cellular protein SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication in human cells of the myeloid lineage, including monocyte-derived macrophages. Here we show that degradation of SAMHD1 in monocyte-derived macrophages was associated with moderately enhanced growth of the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain. SAMHD1 degradation was induced by treating target macrophages with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) particles containing viral protein X. For undifferentiated monocytes, HIV-2 particle treatment allowed undifferentiated monocytes to be fully permissive for productive infection by the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain. In contrast, untreated monocytes were totally resistant to HIV-1 replication. These results indicated that SAMHD1 moderately restricts even a macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain in monocyte-derived macrophages, whereas the protein potently restricts HIV-1 replication in undifferentiated monocytes.

  8. Macrophage heterogeneity and cholesterol homeostasis: classically-activated macrophages are associated with reduced cholesterol accumulation following treatment with oxidized LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Eugene M; Tai, Daven C; Beer, Jennifer L; Hill, John S

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages are centrally involved during atherosclerosis development and are the predominant cell type that accumulates cholesterol in the plaque. Macrophages however, are heterogeneous in nature reflecting a variety of microenvironments and different phenotypes may be more prone to contribute towards atherosclerosis progression. Using primary human monocyte-derived macrophages, we sought to evaluate one aspect of atherogenic potential of different macrophage phenotypes by determining their propensity to associate with and accumulate oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL). Classically-activated macrophages treated simultaneously with interferon γ (IFNγ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) associated with less oxLDL and accumulated less cholesterol compared to untreated controls. The combined treatment of IFNγ and TNFα reduced the mRNA expression of CD36 and the expression of both cell surface CD36 and macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1) protein. Under oxLDL loaded conditions, IFNγ and TNFα did not reduce macrophage protein expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-actived receptor γ (PPARγ) which is known to positively regulate CD36 expression. However, macrophages treated with IFNγ attenuated the ability of the PPARγ-specific agonist rosiglitazone from upregulating cell surface CD36 protein expression. Our results demonstrate that the observed reduction of cholesterol accumulation in macrophages treated with IFNγ and TNFα following oxLDL treatment was due at least in part to reduced cell surface CD36 and MSR1 protein expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro studies of interaction of rickettsia and macrophages: effect of ultraviolet light on Coxiella burnetti inactivation and macrophage enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.S.; Kishimoto, R.A.; Canonico, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    The inactivation of Coxiella burnetii in suspension or in cultures of guinea pig peritoneal macrophages by ultraviolet (uv) light was studied. The effect of uv treatment on the activity of macrophage organelle marker enzymes and their subsequent equilibration in linear sucrose gradients was also determined. It was shown that uv treatment for 15 s at a distance of 10 cm inactivated C. burnetti, either in suspension or within guinea pig peritoneal macrophages. Similar uv treatment had little effect on the activity or equilibration of macrophage organelle marker enzymes in linear sucrose gradients

  10. DMPD: Signal integration between IFNgamma and TLR signalling pathways in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16920490 Signal integration between IFNgamma and TLR signalling pathways in macroph...tml) (.csml) Show Signal integration between IFNgamma and TLR signalling pathways in macrophages. PubmedID 16920490 Title Signal inte...gration between IFNgamma and TLR signalling pathways in

  11. Modulation of human macrophage activity by Ascaris antigens is dependent on macrophage polarization state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Sara; Nejsum, Peter; Williams, Andrew R.

    2018-01-01

    Parasitic worms (helminths) are known to actively modulate host immune responses and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate if adult body fluid (ABF) from the helminth Ascaris suum has immunomodulatory effects on different subtypes of human monocyte-derived macrophages (Mɸ) in vitro...

  12. Nicotinamide: a vitamin able to shift macrophage differentiation toward macrophages with restricted inflammatory features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ronald; Schilling, Erik; Grahnert, Anja; Kölling, Valeen; Dorow, Juliane; Ceglarek, Uta; Sack, Ulrich; Hauschildt, Sunna

    2015-11-01

    The differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages is influenced by environmental signals. Here we asked in how far nicotinamide (NAM), a vitamin B3 derivative known to play a major role in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-mediated signaling events, is able to modulate monocyte differentiation into macrophages developed in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-MØ) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-MØ). We found that GM-MØ undergo biochemical, morphological and functional modifications in response to NAM, whereas M-MØ were hardly affected. GM-MØ exposed to NAM acquired an M-MØ-like structure while the LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and COX-derived eicosanoids were down-regulated. In contrast, NAM had no effect on the production of IL-10 or the cytochrome P450-derived eicosanoids. Administration of NAM enhanced intracellular NAD concentrations; however, it did not prevent the LPS-mediated drain on NAD pools. In search of intracellular molecular targets of NAM known to be involved in LPS-induced cytokine and eicosanoid synthesis, we found NF-κB activity to be diminished. In conclusion, our data show that vitamin B3, when present during the differentiation of monocytes into GM-MØ, interferes with biochemical pathways resulting in strongly reduced pro-inflammatory features. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Immunomodulatory Molecule IRAK-M Balances Macrophage Polarization and Determines Macrophage Responses during Renal Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Stefanie; Kumar, Santhosh V; Honarpisheh, Mohsen; Lorenz, Georg; Günthner, Roman; Romoli, Simone; Gröbmayr, Regina; Susanti, Heni-Eka; Potempa, Jan; Koziel, Joanna; Lech, Maciej

    2017-08-15

    Activation of various innate immune receptors results in IL-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-1/IRAK-4-mediated signaling and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-12, IL-6, or TNF-α, all of which are implicated in tissue injury and elevated during tissue remodeling processes. IRAK-M, also known as IRAK-3, is an inhibitor of proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in intrarenal macrophages. Innate immune activation contributes to both acute kidney injury and tissue remodeling that is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our study assessed the contribution of macrophages in CKD and the role of IRAK-M in modulating disease progression. To evaluate the effect of IRAK-M in chronic renal injury in vivo, a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) was employed. The expression of IRAK-M increased within 2 d after UUO in obstructed compared with unobstructed kidneys. Mice deficient in IRAK-M were protected from fibrosis and displayed a diminished number of alternatively activated macrophages. Compared to wild-type mice, IRAK-M-deficient mice showed reduced tubular injury, leukocyte infiltration, and inflammation following renal injury as determined by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and intrarenal mRNA expression of proinflammatory and profibrotic mediators. Taken together, these results strongly support a role for IRAK-M in renal injury and identify IRAK-M as a possible modulator in driving an alternatively activated profibrotic macrophage phenotype in UUO-induced CKD. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Polyglucose nanoparticles with renal elimination and macrophage avidity facilitate PET imaging in ischaemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keliher, Edmund J.; Ye, Yu-Xiang; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tricot, Benoit; Senders, Max L.; Groenen, Hannah; Fay, Francois; Perez-Medina, Carlos; Calcagno, Claudia; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Reiner, Thomas; Sun, Yuan; Courties, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Wang, Cuihua; Chen, John W.; Swirski, Filip K.; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Hooker, Jacob; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Tissue macrophage numbers vary during health versus disease. Abundant inflammatory macrophages destruct tissues, leading to atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction and heart failure. Emerging therapeutic options create interest in monitoring macrophages in patients. Here we describe positron emission

  15. Game Maturity Model for Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jan C; Adriani, Paul; van Houwelingen, Jan Willem; Geerts, A

    2016-04-01

    This article introduces the Game Maturity Model for the healthcare industry as an extension to the general Game Maturity Model and describes the usage by two case studies of applied health games. The Game Maturity Model for healthcare provides a practical and value-adding method to assess existing games and to determine strategic considerations for application of applied health games. Our forecast is that within 5 years the use and development of applied games will have a role in our daily lives and the way we organize health care that will be similar to the role social media has today.

  16. Service Quality and Process Maturity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serek Radomir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with service quality and the methods for its measurement and improvements to reach the so called service excellence. Besides older methods such as SERVQUAL and SERPERF, there are also shortly described capability maturity models based on which the own methodology is developed and used for process maturity assessment in organizations providing technical services. This method is equally described and accompanied by examples on pictures. The verification of method functionality is explored on finding a correlation between service employee satisfaction and average process maturity in a service organization. The results seem to be quite promising and open an arena for further studies.

  17. Maturity grids as tools for change management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Anja; Moultrie, James; Clarkson, P John

    2011-01-01

    A maturity grid is a change management tool. Levels of maturity are assigned against aspects of an area under study, thus creating a grid. Text descriptions at the resulting intersections describe the typical behaviour exhibited by a firm for each area under study and from the basis...... for the assessment scale. It is a flexible assessment technique that is used by practitioners in industry, consultants and researchers in academia for diagnostic, reflective and improvement purposes. A large number of maturity grids have been proposed to assess a range of capabilities including quality management...

  18. Macrophage Efferocytosis and Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    E) ELISA for total CXCL1 and CXCL5 levels in supernatants of MΦs alone or cocultured with RM1(HA) or PC3(HA). (F) Transcriptional activ- ity cell...marrow macrophages (Fig- ure 1D). ELISA evaluation for CXCL1 and CXCL5 proteins in the coculture media for apoptotic cancer cells (Figure 1E) confirmed... ELISA analysis of total pro- tein lysates from VEH- (n = 10) and AP-treated (n = 11) tumor vossicles. (G) Graphs depicting the correlation between

  19. Mature e-Government based on spatial data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvingel, Line; Baaner, Lasse; Schrøder, Lise

    2014-01-01

    The relation of spatial data and e-Government is important, but not always acknowledged in the development and implementation of e-Government. The implementation of the INSPIRE directive pushed this agenda towards a growing awareness of the role of spatial data and the need for a spatial data...... infrastructure to support e-Government. With technology, policies, data and infrastructure in place, new iterations of this relationship are needed, in order to reach a higher level of maturity. This paper analyses and discusses the need for the differentiated roles of spatial data as an important step towards...... of these data is the wording of the law and the spatial data are just visualisation thereof. Under other circumstances, the spatial data themselves represent the legal status. Compliance between spatial data and the legal administrative framework is necessary, to obtain a mature e-Government. A preliminary test...

  20. Carbon monoxide induced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells mimics the central macrophage milieu in erythroblastic islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomi Toobiak

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports the role of erythroblastic islands (EI as microenvironmental niches within bone marrow (BM, where cell-cell attachments are suggested as crucial for erythroid maturation. The inducible form of the enzyme heme oxygenase, HO-1, which conducts heme degradation, is absent in erythroblasts where hemoglobin (Hb is synthesized. Yet, the central macrophage, which retains high HO-1 activity, might be suitable to take over degradation of extra, harmful, Hb heme. Of these enzymatic products, only the hydrophobic gas molecule--CO can transfer from the macrophage to surrounding erythroblasts directly via their tightly attached membranes in the terminal differentiation stage.Based on the above, the study hypothesized CO to have a role in erythroid maturation. Thus, the effect of CO gas as a potential erythroid differentiation inducer on the common model for erythroid progenitors, K562 cells, was explored. Cells were kept under oxygen lacking environment to mimic BM conditions. Nitrogen anaerobic atmosphere (N₂A served as control for CO atmosphere (COA. Under both atmospheres cells proliferation ceased: in N₂A due to cell death, while in COA as a result of erythroid differentiation. Maturation was evaluated by increased glycophorin A expression and Hb concentration. Addition of 1%CO only to N₂A, was adequate for maintaining cell viability. Yet, the average Hb concentration was low as compared to COA. This was validated to be the outcome of diversified maturation stages of the progenitor's population.In fact, the above scenario mimics the in vivo EI conditions, where at any given moment only a minute portion of the progenitors proceeds into terminal differentiation. Hence, this model might provide a basis for further molecular investigations of the EI structure/function relationship.

  1. Suppression of dendritic cells' maturation and functions by daidzein, a phytoestrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yum, Min Kyu; Jung, Mi Young [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Daeho [Department of Life Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Sung, E-mail: tskim@korea.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Isoflavones are ubiquitous compounds in foods and in the environment in general. Daidzein and genistein, the best known of isoflavones, are structurally similar to 17{beta}-estradiol and known to exert estrogenic effects. They also evidence a broad variety of biological properties, including antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-atherogenic and anti-osteoporotic activities. Previously, daidzein was reported to increase the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages and splenocyte proliferation, and to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages. However, its potential impacts on immune response in dendritic cells (DCs), antigen-presenting cells that link innate and adaptive immunity, have yet to be clearly elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of isoflavones on the maturation and activation of DCs. Isoflavones (formononetin, daidzein, equol, biochanin A, genistein) were found to differentially affect the expression of CD86, a costimulatory molecule, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated DCs. In particular, daidzein significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the expression levels of maturation-associated cell surface markers including CD40, costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86), and major histocompatibility complex class II (I-A{sup b}) molecule on LPS-stimulated DCs. Daidzein also suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production such as IL-12p40, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha}, whereas it didn't affect IL-10 and IL-1{beta} expression. Furthermore, daidzein enhanced endocytosis and inhibited the allo-stimulatory ability of LPS-stimulated DCs on T cells, indicating that daidzein treatment can inhibit the functional maturation of DCs. These results demonstrate that daidzein may exhibit immunosuppressive activity by inhibiting the maturation and activation of DCs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daidzein inhibited expression of maturation-associated cell surface markers in DCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daidzein suppressed expression

  2. Interferon-tau attenuates uptake of nanoparticles and secretion of interleukin-1β in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Hara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I interferons (IFNs, including IFN-alpha (IFNA and IFN-beta (IFNB, have anti-inflammatory properties and are used to treat patients with autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. However, little is known of the role of IFN-tau (IFNT, a type I IFN produced by ruminant animals for inflammation. Because IFNB has recently been shown to inhibit nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome activation and subsequent secretion of the potent inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL-1β, we examined the effects of ruminant IFNT on NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β secretion in human THP-1 macrophages. METHODS AND RESULTS: IFNT dose-dependently inhibited IL-1β secretion induced by nano-silica, a well-known activators of NLRP3 inflammasomes, in human macrophages primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, TLR4 agonist and Pam3CSK4 (TLR1/2 agonist. IFNT also suppressed phagocytosis of nano-silica and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. Western blot analysis showed that IFNT inhibited both pro-IL-1β and mature IL-1β. In addition, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that IFNT suppressed IL-1β mRNA expression induced by LPS and Pam3CSK4. Although nano-silica particles did not induce IL-10 secretion, IFNT induced IL-10 secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, IFNT-suppressed IL-1β secretion was restored by anti-IL-10 neutralizing antibody. CONCLUSIONS: Ruminant IFNT inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome-driven IL-1β secretion in human macrophages via multiple pathways, including the uptake of nano-silica particles, generation of ROS, and IL-10-mediated inhibition of pro-IL-1β induction. It may be a therapeutic alternative to IFNA and IFNB.

  3. Adipose tissue conditioned media support macrophage lipid-droplet biogenesis by interfering with autophagic flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechor, Sapir; Nachmias, Dikla; Elia, Natalie; Haim, Yulia; Vatarescu, Maayan; Leikin-Frenkel, Alicia; Gericke, Martin; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Las, Guy; Rudich, Assaf

    2017-09-01

    Obesity promotes the biogenesis of adipose tissue (AT) foam cells (FC), which contribute to AT insulin resistance. Autophagy, an evolutionarily-conserved house-keeping process, was implicated in cellular lipid handling by either feeding and/or degrading lipid-droplets (LDs). We hypothesized that beyond phagocytosis of dead adipocytes, AT-FC biogenesis is supported by the AT microenvironment by regulating autophagy. Non-polarized ("M0") RAW264.7 macrophages exposed to AT conditioned media (AT-CM) exhibited a markedly enhanced LDs biogenesis rate compared to control cells (8.3 Vs 0.3 LDs/cells/h, p<0.005). Autophagic flux was decreased by AT-CM, and fluorescently following autophagosomes over time revealed ~20% decline in new autophagic vesicles' formation rate, and 60-70% decrease in autophagosomal growth rate, without marked alternations in the acidic lysosomal compartment. Suppressing autophagy by either targeting autophagosome formation (pharmacologically, with 3-methyladenine or genetically, with Atg12±Atg7-siRNA), decreased the rate of LD formation induced by oleic acid. Conversely, interfering with late autophago-lysosomal function, either pharmacologically with bafilomycin-A1, chloroquine or leupeptin, enhanced LD formation in macrophages without affecting LD degradation rate. Similarly enhanced LD biogenesis rate was induced by siRNA targeting Lamp-1 or the V-ATPase. Collectively, we propose that secreted products from AT interrupt late autophagosome maturation in macrophages, supporting enhanced LDs biogenesis and AT-FC formation, thereby contributing to AT dysfunction in obesity. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gamma rays role in the improvement of yield and early maturity in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moualla, M.Y.; Ali, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    Seeds from soybean variety glycine max (L) Merr., were irradiated with three doses of gamma rays: 100, 150 and 200 Gray in order to obtain high yielding and early maturity mutants to grown after wheat in a two crop rotation. All the three doses induced morphological and physiological variation and malformation that increased with increasing the dose. Coefficient of variation values were higher in M2 than in their respective values of M3. The results showed no selection efficiency under the non optimal environmental growing conditions with this lack of efficiency being more evident for yield than for early maturity. Using FTAB statistical programme 20 M2 and M3 plant were selected for each character and when evaluated in the following generation, it was clear that selection efficiency was higher for early maturity than for yield; the latter being high yielding and 4 early maturing m 4 mutants were obtained. 3 tabs

  5. Gamma rays role in the improvement of yield and early maturity in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moualla, M Y; Ali, N M [Atomic Energy Commission, P.O.Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    1995-10-01

    Seeds from soybean variety glycine max (L) Merr., were irradiated with three doses of gamma rays: 100, 150 and 200 Gray in order to obtain high yielding and early maturity mutants to grown after wheat in a two crop rotation. All the three doses induced morphological and physiological variation and malformation that increased with increasing the dose. Coefficient of variation values were higher in M2 than in their respective values of M3. The results showed no selection efficiency under the non optimal environmental growing conditions with this lack of efficiency being more evident for yield than for early maturity. Using FTAB statistical programme 20 M2 and M3 plant were selected for each character and when evaluated in the following generation, it was clear that selection efficiency was higher for early maturity than for yield; the latter being high yielding and 4 early maturing m 4 mutants were obtained. 3 tabs.

  6. Decreased expression of liver X receptor-α in macrophages infected with Chlamydia pneumoniae in human atherosclerotic arteries in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Killingsworth, Murray C; Lu, Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    In in vitro experiments, Chlamydia pneumoniae has been shown to infect macrophages and to accelerate foam cell formation. It has been hypothesized that the C. pneumoniae infection affects foam cell formation by suppressing the expression of liver X receptors (LXR), but whether such an event occurs in human atherosclerosis is not known. In this study we examined carotid artery segments, obtained by endarterectomy, in which the presence of C. pneumoniae was confirmed by both polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The expression of LXR-α in macrophages infected with C. pneumoniae and macrophages that were not infected was compared using a quantitative immunohistochemical analysis. The analysis revealed a 2.2-fold reduction in the expression of LXR-α in C. pneumoniae-infected cells around the lipid cores in atherosclerotic plaques. In the cytoplasm of laser-capture microdissected cells that were immunopositive for C. pneumoniae, electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of structures with the appearance of elementary, reticulate and aberrant bodies of C. pneumoniae. We conclude that LXR-α expression is reduced in C. pneumoniae-infected macrophages in human atherosclerotic lesions which supports the hypothesis that C. pneumoniae infection might suppress LXR expression in macrophages transforming into foam cells. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Morphometric Characterization of Rat and Human Alveolar Macrophage Cell Models and their Response to Amiodarone using High Content Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ewelina; Patel, Aateka; Ball, Doug; Klapwijk, Jan; Millar, Val; Kumar, Abhinav; Martin, Abigail; Mahendran, Rhamiya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Forbes, Ben; Hutter, Victoria

    2017-12-01

    Progress to the clinic may be delayed or prevented when vacuolated or "foamy" alveolar macrophages are observed during non-clinical inhalation toxicology assessment. The first step in developing methods to study this response in vitro is to characterize macrophage cell lines and their response to drug exposures. Human (U937) and rat (NR8383) cell lines and primary rat alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage were characterized using high content fluorescence imaging analysis quantification of cell viability, morphometry, and phospholipid and neutral lipid accumulation. Cell health, morphology and lipid content were comparable (p content. Responses to amiodarone, a known inducer of phospholipidosis, required analysis of shifts in cell population profiles (the proportion of cells with elevated vacuolation or lipid content) rather than average population data which was insensitive to the changes observed. A high content image analysis assay was developed and used to provide detailed morphological characterization of rat and human alveolar-like macrophages and their response to a phospholipidosis-inducing agent. This provides a basis for development of assays to predict or understand macrophage vacuolation following inhaled drug exposure.

  8. Phagocytic and chemiluminescent responses of mouse peritoneal macrophages to living and killed Salmonella typhimurium and other bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, T.; Blumenstock, E.; Kanegasaki, S.

    1981-01-01

    In the presence of luminol, resident as well as thioglycolate-induced and immunized macrophages emitted chemiluminescence more efficiently when the cells were exposed to living Salmonella typhimurium than when they were exposed to the same bacterium killed by ultraviolet light or heat. This phenomenon was observed whether or not the bacterium was opsonized. The different response to living and killed bacteria was also found with Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus morganii, and Enterobacter aerogenes, but not with Shigella sonnei, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Propionibacterium acnes. The results suggest that macrophages respond better to living, motile bacteria than to nonmotile or killed bacteria. The experimental results obtained with motility mutants of S. typhimurium, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa confirm that macrophages exposed to the motile bacteria emit chemiluminescence more efficiently and ingest the motile bacteria at a much faster rate than the nonmotile bacteria

  9. The use of maturity method in estimating concrete strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, A.E.; Abd El-Baky, S.M.; Ali, E.E.; Ghanem, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Prediction of the early age strength of concrete is essential for modernized concrete for construction as well as for manufacturing of structural parts. Safe and economic scheduling of such critical operations as form removal and re shoring, application of post-tensioning or other mechanical treatment, and in process transportation and rapid delivery of products all should be based upon a good grasp of the strength development of the concrete in use. For many years, it has been proposed that the strength of concrete can be related to a simple mathematical function of time and temperature so that strength could be assessed by calculation without mechanical testing. Such functions are used to compute what is called the m aturity o f concrete, and the computed value is believed to obtain a correlation with the strength of concrete. With its simplicity and low cost, the application of maturity concept as in situ testing method has received wide attention and found its use in engineering practice. This research work investigates the use of M aturity method' in estimating the concrete strength. An experimental program is designed to estimate the concrete strength by using the maturity method. Using different concrete mixes, with available local materials. Ordinary Portland Cement, crushed stone, silica fume, fly ash and admixtures with different contents are used . All the specimens were exposed to different curing temperatures (10, 25 and 40 degree C), in order to get a simplified expression of maturity that fits in with the influence of temperature. Mix designs and charts obtained from this research can be used as guide information for estimating concrete strength by using the maturity method

  10. Macrophage and T cell dynamics during the development and disintegration of mycobacterial granulomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egen, Jackson G; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Feng, Carl G; Winter, Nathalie; Sher, Alan; Germain, Ronald N

    2008-02-01

    Granulomas play a key role in host protection against mycobacterial pathogens, with their breakdown contributing to exacerbated disease. To better understand the initiation and maintenance of these structures, we employed both high-resolution multiplex static imaging and intravital multiphoton microscopy of Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced liver granulomas. We found that Kupffer cells directly capture blood-borne bacteria and subsequently nucleate formation of a nascent granuloma by recruiting both uninfected liver-resident macrophages and blood-derived monocytes. Within the mature granuloma, these myeloid cell populations formed a relatively immobile cellular matrix that interacted with a highly dynamic effector T cell population. The efficient recruitment of these T cells was highly dependent on TNF-alpha-derived signals, which also maintained the granuloma structure through preferential effects on uninfected macrophage populations. By characterizing the migration of both innate and adaptive immune cells throughout the process of granuloma development, these studies provide a new perspective on the cellular events involved in mycobacterial containment and escape.

  11. Colony-stimulating factor (CSF) radioimmunoassay: detection of a CSF subclass stimulating macrophage production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) stimulate the differentiation of immature precursor cells to mature granulocytes and macrophages. Purified 125 I-labeled murine L cell CSF has been used to develop a radioimmunoassay (RIA) that detects a subclass of CSFs that stimulates macrophage production. Murine CSF preparations that contain this subclass of CSF compete for all of the CSF binding sites on anti-L cell CSF antibody. With the exception of mouse serum, which can contain inhibitors of the bioassay, there is complete correspondence between activities determined by RIA and those determined by bioassay. The RIA is slightly more sensitive than the bioassay, detecting approximately 0.3 fmol of purified L cell CSF. It can also detect this subclass of CSF in chickens, rats, and humans. In the mouse, the subclass is distinguished from other CSFs by a murine cell bioassay dose-response curve in which 90% of the response occurs over a 10-fold (rather than a 100-fold) increase in concentration, by stimulating the formations of colonies contaning a high proportion of mononuclear (rather than granulocytic) cells, and by certain physical characteristics

  12. Fisetin antagonizes cell fusion, cytoskeletal organization and bone resorption in RANKL-differentiated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Sin-Hye; Han, Seon-Young; Kang, Soon Ah; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is comprised of several stage s including progenitor survival, differentiation to mononuclear preosteoclasts, cell fusion to multinuclear mature osteoclasts, and activation to osteoclasts with bone resorbing activity. Botanical antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects on bone. This study investigated that fisetin, a flavonol found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, suppressed osteoclastogenesis by disturbing receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated signaling pathway and demoting osteoclastogenic protein induction. Nontoxic fisetin at ≤10 μM inhibited the induction of RANK, tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and the activation of NF-κB in RANKL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In RANKL-differentiated osteoclasts cell fusion protein of E-cadherin was induced, which was dampened by fisetin. The formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclasts was suppressed by adding fisetin to RANKL-exposed macrophages. It was also found that fisetin reduced actin ring formation and gelsolin induction of osteclasts enhanced by RANKL through disturbing c-Src-proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 signaling. Fisetin deterred preosteoclasts from the cell-cell fusion and the organization of the cytoskeleton to seal the resorbing area and to secret protons for bone resorption. Consistently, the 5 day-treatment of fisetin diminished RANKL-induced cellular expression of carbonic anhydrase II and integrin β3 concurrently with a reduction of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. Therefore, fisetin was a natural therapeutic agent retarding osteoclast fusion and cytoskeletal organization such as actin rings and ruffled boarder, which is a property of mature osteoclasts and is required for osteoclasts to resorb bone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 7 CFR 1710.115 - Final maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Basic Policies § 1710.115 Final maturity. (a) RUS is authorized to make loans and loan guarantees with a... due, in part, to obsolescence. Operating loans to finance working capital required for the initial...

  14. Geospatial Information System Capability Maturity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    To explore how State departments of transportation (DOTs) evaluate geospatial tool applications and services within their own agencies, particularly their experiences using capability maturity models (CMMs) such as the Urban and Regional Information ...

  15. Pristipomoides filamentosus Size at Maturity Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains information used to help determine median size at 50% maturity for the bottomfish species, Pristipomoides filamentosus in the Main Hawaiian...

  16. MENTAL HEALTH OF ADOLESCENTS IN RELATION TO EMOTIONAL MATURITY AND PARENT CHILD RELATIONSHIP

    OpenAIRE

    Gurmit Singh

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to find the relation of Mental Health of Adolescents with their Emotional Maturity and Parent Child Relationship. The sample comprised of 200 9th class adolescents (100 boys and 100 girls) from Government Secondary Schools of Moga district The data was obtained by using Emotional Maturity Scale (2011) by Singh and Bhargava, Parent Child Relationship Scale (2011) by Rao and Mental Health Battery (2012) by Singh and Gupta. The results of the study showed positive...

  17. STUDIES REGARDING THE COLOR EVOLUTION DURING MATURATION OF CABERNET SAUVIGNON AND PINOT NOIR WINES

    OpenAIRE

    Luminiţa Vişan; Ciprian Nicolae Popa; Radiana Tamba-Berehoiu

    2017-01-01

    During maturation of red wines their chromatic characteristics change due to degradation reactions of anthocyanin pigments and polymers formation. It was studied the polyphenolic composition of young red wines Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir and its evolution during wines maturation. The wines were obtained in the Ceptura vine center, from the harvest year of 2015. The polyphenolic composition of wines was judged by the content in polyphenols, tannins and anthocyanins. A wine tannin structu...

  18. Differential S1P Receptor Profiles on M1- and M2-Polarized Macrophages Affect Macrophage Cytokine Production and Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jan; von Bernstorff, Wolfram; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Schulze, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Introduction . Macrophages are key players in complex biological processes. In response to environmental signals, macrophages undergo polarization towards a proinflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lysophospholipid that acts via 5 G-protein coupled receptors (S1P 1-5 ) in order to influence a broad spectrum of biological processes. This study assesses S1P receptor expression on macrophages before and after M1 and M2 polarization and performs a comparative analysis of S1P signalling in the two activational states of macrophages. Methods . Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) from C57 BL/6 mice were cultured under either M1- or M2-polarizing conditions. S1P-receptor expression was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Influence of S1P on macrophage activation, migration, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion was assessed in vitro. Results . All 5 S1P receptor subclasses were expressed in macrophages. Culture under both M1- and M2-polarizing conditions led to significant downregulation of S1P 1 . In contrast, M1-polarized macrophages significantly downregulated S1P 4 . The expression of the remaining three S1P receptors did not change. S1P increased expression of iNOS under M2-polarizing conditions. Furthermore, S1P induced chemotaxis in M1 macrophages and changed cytokine production in M2 macrophages. Phagocytosis was not affected by S1P-signalling. Discussion . The expression of different specific S1P receptor profiles may provide a possibility to selectively influence M1- or M2-polarized macrophages.

  19. Transcriptional landscape of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, Sugata; Schmeier, Sebastian; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Arner, Erik; Alam, Tanvir; Ozturk, Mumin; Tamgue, Ousman; Parihar, Suraj P.; Kawaji, Hideya; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Guler, Reto; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Brombacher, Frank; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2018-01-01

    landscape of IFNγ (M1) or IL-4/IL-13 (M2) stimulated macrophages during Mtb infection in a time-kinetic manner. Mtb infection widely and drastically altered macrophage-specific gene expression, which is far larger than that of M1 or M2 activations. Gene

  20. DNA Damage Signaling Instructs Polyploid Macrophage Fate in Granulomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrtwich, Laura; Nanda, Indrajit; Evangelou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    to a chronic stimulus, though critical for disease outcome, have not been defined. Here, we delineate a macrophage differentiation pathway by which a persistent Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 signal instructs polyploid macrophage fate by inducing replication stress and activating the DNA damage response. Polyploid...

  1. Epigenetic pathways in macrophages emerge as novel targets in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, Annette E.; van den Bossche, Jan; Hoeksema, Marten A.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disorder. Monocytes and macrophages are key immune cells in the development of disease and clinical outcome. It is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic pathways govern many aspects of monocyte and macrophage differentiation and

  2. Consistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase drives macrophages towards the inflammatory phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Rang Na

    Full Text Available Macrophages play important roles in defense against infection, as well as in homeostasis maintenance. Thus alterations of macrophage function can have unexpected pathological results. Cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitors are widely used to relieve pain, but the effects of long-term usage on macrophage function remain to be elucidated. Using bone marrow-derived macrophage culture and long-term COX inhibitor treatments in BALB/c mice and zebrafish, we showed that chronic COX inhibition drives macrophages into an inflammatory state. Macrophages differentiated in the presence of SC-560 (COX-1 inhibitor, NS-398 (COX-2 inhibitor or indomethacin (COX-1/2 inhibitor for 7 days produced more TNFα or IL-12p70 with enhanced p65/IκB phosphoylation. YmI and IRF4 expression was reduced significantly, indicative of a more inflammatory phenotype. We further observed that indomethacin or NS-398 delivery accelerated zebrafish death rates during LPS induced sepsis. When COX inhibitors were released over 30 days from an osmotic pump implant in mice, macrophages from peritoneal cavities and adipose tissue produced more TNFα in both the basal state and under LPS stimulation. Consequently, indomethacin-exposed mice showed accelerated systemic inflammation after LPS injection. Our findings suggest that macrophages exhibit a more inflammatory phenotype when COX activities are chronically inhibited.

  3. Nanomedicine Strategies to Target Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnemars-Postma, Karin A.; Storm, G; Prakash, Jai

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the influence of the tumor microenvironment (TME) on cancer progression has been better understood. Macrophages, one of the most important cell types in the TME, exist in different subtypes, each of which has a different function. While classically activated M1 macrophages are

  4. Nanomedicine strategies to target tumor-associated macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnemars-Postma, Karin; Storm, Gert; Prakash, Jai

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the influence of the tumor microenvironment (TME) on cancer progression has been better understood. Macrophages, one of the most important cell types in the TME, exist in different subtypes, each of which has a different function. While classically activated M1 macrophages are

  5. Biomaterials Influence Macrophage-Mesenchymal Stem Cell Interaction In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Grotenhuis (Nienke); S.F. De Witte (Samantha Fh); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); Y. Bayon (Yves); J.F. Lange (Johan); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Macrophages and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important cells in wound healing. We hypothesized that the cross-talk between macrophages and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ASCs) is biomaterial dependent, thereby influencing processes involved in wound healing. Materials and

  6. Macrophages are critical effectors of antibody therapies for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that derive from circulating monocytes, reside in all tissues, and participate in many states of pathology. Macrophages play a dichotomous role in cancer, where they promote tumor growth but also serve as critical immune effectors of therapeutic antibodies. Macrophages express all classes of Fcγ receptors, and they have immense potential to destroy tumors via the process of antibody-dependent phagocytosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that macrophage phagocytosis is a major mechanism of action of many antibodies approved to treat cancer. Consequently, a number of approaches to augment macrophage responses to therapeutic antibodies are under investigation, including the exploration of new targets and development of antibodies with enhanced functions. For example, the interaction of CD47 with signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα) serves as a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint that limits the response of macrophages to antibody therapies, and CD47-blocking agents overcome this barrier to augment phagocytosis. The response of macrophages to antibody therapies can also be enhanced with engineered Fc variants, bispecific antibodies, or antibody-drug conjugates. Macrophages have demonstrated success as effectors of cancer immunotherapy, and further investigation will unlock their full potential for the benefit of patients.

  7. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Back, Djuna Z.; Kostova, Elena B.; van Kraaij, Marian; van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC). During steady state hematopoiesis, approximately 10(10) RBC are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with

  8. Cytokine expression of macrophages in HIV-1-associated vacuolar myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyor, W R; Glass, J D; Baumrind, N; McArthur, J C; Griffin, J W; Becker, P S; Griffin, D E

    1993-05-01

    Macrophages are frequently present within the periaxonal and intramyelinic vacuoles that are located primarily in the posterior and lateral funiculi of the thoracic spinal cord in HIV-associated vacuolar myelopathy. But the role of these macrophages in the formation of the vacuoles is unclear. One hypothesis is that cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, are produced locally by macrophages and have toxic effects on myelin or oligodendrocytes. The resulting myelin damage eventually culminates in the removal of myelin by macrophages and vacuole formation. We studied thoracic spinal cord specimens taken at autopsy from HIV-positive (+) and HIV-negative individuals. The predominant mononuclear cells present in HIV+ spinal cords are macrophages. They are located primarily in the posterior and lateral funiculi regardless of the presence or absence of vacuolar myelopathy. Macrophages and microglia are more frequent in HIV+ than HIV-negative individuals and these cells frequently stain for class I and class II antigens, IL-1, and TNF-alpha. Activated macrophages positive for IL-1 and TNF-alpha are great increased in the posterior and lateral funiculi of HIV+ individuals with and without vacuolar myelopathy, suggesting they are present prior to the development of vacuoles. Cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, may be toxic for myelin or oligodendrocytes, leading to myelin damage and removal by macrophages and vacuole formation.

  9. Mature teratoma of the posterior mediastinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosaki, Y.; Tanaka, Y.O.; Itai, Y. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    The vast majority of germ cell tumors in the thorax arise at or near the thymus. We report a case of a 41-year-old man with mature teratoma of the posterior mediastinum. He was asymptomatic and was incidentally found to have a posterior mediastinal mass. Computed tomography was helpful in suggesting a diagnosis of mature teratoma by demonstrating the presence of fat and calcification. The differential diagnosis included neurogenic tumors, liposarcoma, and extramedullary hematopoiesis. (orig.) With 2 figs., 18 refs.

  10. Mature teratoma of the posterior mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Y.; Tanaka, Y.O.; Itai, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The vast majority of germ cell tumors in the thorax arise at or near the thymus. We report a case of a 41-year-old man with mature teratoma of the posterior mediastinum. He was asymptomatic and was incidentally found to have a posterior mediastinal mass. Computed tomography was helpful in suggesting a diagnosis of mature teratoma by demonstrating the presence of fat and calcification. The differential diagnosis included neurogenic tumors, liposarcoma, and extramedullary hematopoiesis. (orig.)

  11. Intra-follicular interactions affecting mammalian oocyte maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, H.T.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313871817

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear oocyte maturation is defined as reinitiation and progression of the first meiotic division and subsequently formation of the methaphase II (MII) plate. Concomitantly with nuclear maturation, cytoplasmic maturation which is essential for proper fertilization and early embryo development is

  12. Selective phosphorylation during early macrophage differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2015-08-26

    The differentiation of macrophages from monocytes is a tightly controlled and complex biological process. Although numerous studies have been conducted using biochemical approaches or global gene/gene profiling, the mechanisms of the early stages of differentiation remain unclear. Here we used SILAC-based quantitative proteomics approach to perform temporal phosphoproteome profiling of early macrophage differentiation. We identified a large set of phosphoproteins and grouped them as PMA-regulated and non-regulated phosphoproteins in the early stages of differentiation. Further analysis of the PMA-regulated phosphoproteins revealed that transcriptional suppression, cytoskeletal reorganization and cell adhesion were among the most significantly activated pathways. Some key involved regulators of these pathways are mTOR, MYB, STAT1 and CTNNB. Moreover, we were able to classify the roles and activities of several transcriptional factors during different differentiation stages and found that E2F is likely to be an important regulator during the relatively late stages of differentiation. This study provides the first comprehensive picture of the dynamic phosphoproteome during myeloid cells differentiation, and identifies potential molecular targets in leukemic cells.

  13. Mature students' perspectives of studying radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.; Decker, S.

    2009-01-01

    The study set out to explore the experiences of all final year mature students on a diagnostic radiography course, in one United Kingdom University. The aims were to identify any difficulties they may have had and to make recommendations to improve mature students' learning experiences with the hope of lowering attrition rates in this group. A qualitative study involving one-to-one audio recorded interviews was utilised. Analysis of the transcripts of interviews suggested that the group believed that their maturity and previous experiences helped them in the clinical environment and put them in a good position, when asked, to counsel younger students. However for some of the mature students these experiential skills did not extend fully into seeking appropriate support for themselves. The mature students were found to be highly motivated but there was a conflict between balancing clinical and academic aspects of studying as well as balancing studying with home life. The group was found to be unprepared for the volume of academic work and its detrimental effect on family life as they sacrificed other aspects of their lives in order to complete the course. It is recommended that forewarning and forearming prospective mature students be considered by radiography education providers. Setting up and utilising an on-line forum providing a 24/7 peer support environment would aid in coping with academic, clinical or personal problems

  14. Breeding of cocksfoot cultivars with different maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Snežana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important criteria in breeding process of perennial grasses is maturity. Cultivars with different maturity play a very important role in utilization of perennial grasses, by providing the ability to create a mixture of different aspects utilization and time. The first grass species in Serbia whose breeding program involved this criterion was cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata L.. In general cocksfoot is early to medium-early in maturity in comparison with other grasses and legumes, and that is mayor problem since in the optimum phase for cutting, cocksfoot is often earlier then other species in mixtures. As a result of this work, in the previous period, two cultivars of different maturity were released, Kruševačka 24 (K-24 and Kruševačka 25 (K-25. K-24 is medium and K-25 is late in maturity. New material is adapted to local agro-ecological conditions and productive in the same time. In breeding process of both cultivars initial material originated from autochthonous populations collected in eastern and central Serbia. Material from the wild flora is selected based on medium and late maturity which is already adapted and has good productivity. We applied the standard method of phenotypic recurrent selection with the creation of synthetic varieties by polycross.

  15. In vivo and in vitro pollen maturation in Lilium: influence of carbohydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Clement

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a protocol for in vitro conform pollen maturation, as a model to study the involvement of carbohydrates on pollen maturation in Lilium. In vivo and in vitro pollen maturations were followed and compared by transmission electron microscopy, and several in vitro parameters were tested in terms of carbohydrate physiology. In vivo, pollen maturation was initiated at the vacuolated microspore stage, and consisted of two successive phases. The first phase was characterized by reactivation of microspore organelles, followed by microspore mitosis, starch synthesis and vacuole breakdown. During the second phase, starch was progressively degraded whereas lipid and phytine reserves accumulated. In vivo, pollen maturation occured within 14 days and pollen germination rate was 73.6 ± 2.2%. We then attempted to realise in vitro pollen maturation starting from the vacuolated microspore stage. The best results were obtained with flower buds cultivated at 26oC, in 100 µmol/m2/s light, with a 16h/8h photoperiod on a modified Heller's medium supplemented with NAA (10-2 mg/l and sucrose (M/6. In these conditions, pollen maturation occured within 7 days only. In vitro matured pollen is cytologically comparable to in vivo developed pollen grains and the germination rate was 72.4 ± 3.7%. When flower buds were cultivated in the dark, the germination rate decreased, but this could be compensated by providing high sucrose concentrations (1M in the medium. Further, photosynthesis inhibitors had the same effect on pollen maturation than the darkness, strongly suggesting that photosynthesis occurs in the flower bud and is important for pollen maturation in Lilium.

  16. Nanopatterned bulk metallic glass-based biomaterials modulate macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayan, Mahdis; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Morris, Aaron H; Cheung, Bettina; Smith, Ryan; Schroers, Jan; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2018-06-01

    Polarization of macrophages by chemical, topographical and mechanical cues presents a robust strategy for designing immunomodulatory biomaterials. Here, we studied the ability of nanopatterned bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a new class of metallic biomaterials, to modulate murine macrophage polarization. Cytokine/chemokine analysis of IL-4 or IFNγ/LPS-stimulated macrophages showed that the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-12, CCL-2 and CXCL1 was significantly reduced after 24-hour culture on BMGs with 55 nm nanorod arrays (BMG-55). Additionally, under these conditions, macrophages increased phagocytic potential and exhibited decreased cell area with multiple actin protrusions. These in vitro findings suggest that nanopatterning can modulate biochemical cues such as IFNγ/LPS. In vivo evaluation of the subcutaneous host response at 2 weeks demonstrated that the ratio of Arg-1 to iNOS increased in macrophages adjacent to BMG-55 implants, suggesting modulation of polarization. In addition, macrophage fusion and fibrous capsule thickness decreased and the number and size of blood vessels increased, which is consistent with changes in macrophage responses. Our study demonstrates that nanopatterning of BMG implants is a promising technique to selectively polarize macrophages to modulate the immune response, and also presents an effective tool to study mechanisms of macrophage polarization and function. Implanted biomaterials elicit a complex series of tissue and cellular responses, termed the foreign body response (FBR), that can be influenced by the polarization state of macrophages. Surface topography can influence polarization, which is broadly characterized as either inflammatory or repair-like. The latter has been linked to improved outcomes of the FBR. However, the impact of topography on macrophage polarization is not fully understood, in part, due to a lack of high moduli biomaterials that can be reproducibly processed at the nanoscale. Here, we studied

  17. Rab39a interacts with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and negatively regulates autophagy induced by lipopolysaccharide stimulation in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Seto

    Full Text Available Rab39a has pleiotropic functions in phagosome maturation, inflammatory activation and neuritogenesis. Here, we characterized Rab39a function in membrane trafficking of phagocytosis and autophagy induction in macrophages. Rab39a localized to the periphery of LAMP2-positive vesicles and showed the similar kinetics on the phagosome to that of LAMP1. The depletion of Rab39a did not influence the localization of LAMP2 to the phagosome, but it augments the autophagosome formation and LC3 processing by lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation. The augmentation of autophagosome formation in Rab39a-knockdown macrophages was suppressed by Atg5 depletion or an inhibitor for phosphatidylinostol 3-kinase (PI3K. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Rab39a interacts with PI3K and that the amino acid residues from 34(th to 41(st in Rab39a were indispensable for this interaction. These results suggest that Rab39a negatively regulates the LPS-induced autophagy in macrophages.

  18. The cellular prion protein negatively regulates phagocytosis and cytokine expression in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrP(C is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored glycoprotein on the cell surface. Previous studies have demonstrated contradictory roles for PrP(C in connection with the phagocytic ability of macrophages. In the present work, we investigated the function of PrP(C in phagocytosis and cytokine expression in bone marrow-derived macrophages infected with Escherichia coli. E. coli infection induced an increase in the PRNP mRNA level. Knockout of PrP(C promoted bacterial uptake; upregulated Rab5, Rab7, and Eea1 mRNA expression; and increased the recruitment of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 to phagosomes, suggesting enhanced microbicidal activity. Remarkably, knockout of PrP(C suppressed the proliferation of internalized bacteria and increased the expression of cytokines such as interleukin-1β. Collectively, our data reveal an important role of PrP(C as a negative regulator for phagocytosis, phagosome maturation, cytokine expression, and macrophage microbicidal activity.

  19. Therapeutic potential of carbohydrates as regulators of macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Mimmi L E; Scanlan, Eoin M; Lavelle, Ed C

    2017-12-15

    It is well established for a broad range of disease states, including cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, that pathogenesis is bolstered by polarisation of macrophages towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype, known as M2. As these innate immune cells are relatively long-lived, their re-polarisation to pro-inflammatory, phagocytic and bactericidal "classically activated" M1 macrophages is an attractive therapeutic approach. On the other hand, there are scenarios where the resolving inflammation, wound healing and tissue remodelling properties of M2 macrophages are beneficial - for example the successful introduction of biomedical implants. Although there are numerous endogenous and exogenous factors that have an impact on the macrophage polarisation spectrum, this review will focus specifically on prominent macrophage-modulating carbohydrate motifs with a view towards highlighting structure-function relationships and therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Macrophages recognize size and shape of their targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishit Doshi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recognition by macrophages is a key process in generating immune response against invading pathogens. Previous studies have focused on recognition of pathogens through surface receptors present on the macrophage's surface. Here, using polymeric particles of different geometries that represent the size and shape range of a variety of bacteria, the importance of target geometry in recognition was investigated. The studies reported here reveal that attachment of particles of different geometries to macrophages exhibits a strong dependence on size and shape. For all sizes and shapes studied, particles possessing the longest dimension in the range of 2-3 microm exhibited highest attachment. This also happens to be the size range of most commonly found bacteria in nature. The surface features of macrophages, in particular the membrane ruffles, might play an important role in this geometry-based target recognition by macrophages. These findings have significant implications in understanding the pathogenicity of bacteria and in designing drug delivery carriers.

  1. Soluble ICAM-1 activates lung macrophages and enhances lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B

    1998-01-01

    production of TNF-alpha and the CXC chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). Alveolar macrophages exhibited cytokine responses to both sICAM-1 and immobilized sICAM-1, while rat PBMCs failed to demonstrate similar responses. Exposure of alveolar macrophages to sICAM-1 resulted in NFkappa......B activation (which was blocked by the presence of the aldehyde peptide inhibitor of 28S proteosome and by genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). As expected, cross-linking of CD18 on macrophages with Ab resulted in generation of TNF-alpha and MIP-2. This response was also inhibited in the presence...... of TNF-alpha and MIP-2 and increased neutrophil recruitment. Therefore, through engagement of beta2 integrins, sICAM-1 enhances alveolar macrophage production of MIP-2 and TNF-alpha, the result of which is intensified lung injury after intrapulmonary disposition of immune complexes....

  2. Engineering mechanical microenvironment of macrophage and its biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Li, Yuhui; Gao, Bin; Qin, Chuanguang; He, Yining; Xu, Feng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Min

    2018-03-01

    Macrophages are the most plastic cells in the hematopoietic system and can be widely found in almost all tissues. Recently studies have shown that mechanical cues (e.g., matrix stiffness and stress/strain) can significantly affect macrophage behaviors. Although existing reviews on the physical and mechanical cues that regulate the macrophage's phenotype are available, engineering mechanical microenvironment of macrophages in vitro as well as a comprehensive overview and prospects for their biomedical applications (e.g., tissue engineering and immunotherapy) has yet to be summarized. Thus, this review provides an overview on the existing methods for engineering mechanical microenvironment of macrophages in vitro and then a section on their biomedical applications and further perspectives are presented.

  3. Effect of Surface Modification and Macrophage Phenotype on Particle Internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daniel [Iowa State University; Phan, Ngoc [Iowa State University; Isely, Christopher [Iowa State University; Bruene, Lucas [Iowa State University; Bratlie, Kaitlin M [Ames Laboratory

    2014-11-10

    Material properties play a key role in the cellular internalization of polymeric particles. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of material characteristics such as water contact angle, zeta potential, melting temperature, and alternative activation of complement on particle internalization for pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic, and naïve macrophages by using biopolymers (~600 nm), functionalized with 13 different molecules. Understanding how material parameters influence particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes is important for targeted delivery to specific cell populations. Here, we demonstrate that material parameters affect the alternative pathway of complement activation as well as particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes. Here, we show that the quantitative structure–activity relationship method (QSAR) previously used to predict physiochemical properties of materials can be applied to targeting different macrophage phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that targeted drug delivery to macrophages could be achieved by exploiting material parameters.

  4. Macrophages Contribute to the Spermatogonial Niche in the Adult Testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony DeFalco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The testis produces sperm throughout the male reproductive lifespan by balancing self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs. Part of the SSC niche is thought to lie outside the seminiferous tubules of the testis; however, specific interstitial components of the niche that regulate spermatogonial divisions and differentiation remain undefined. We identified distinct populations of testicular macrophages, one of which lies on the surface of seminiferous tubules, in close apposition to areas of tubules enriched for undifferentiated spermatogonia. These macrophages express spermatogonial proliferation- and differentiation-inducing factors, such as colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 and enzymes involved in retinoic acid (RA biosynthesis. We show that transient depletion of macrophages leads to a disruption in spermatogonial differentiation. These findings reveal an unexpected role for macrophages in the spermatogonial niche in the testis and raise the possibility that macrophages play previously unappreciated roles in stem/progenitor cell regulation in other tissues.

  5. Assessment of cortical maturation with prenatal MRI. Part I: normal cortical maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliarini, Celine; Chaumoitre, Katia; Chapon, Frederique; Levrier, Olivier; Girard, Nadine; Fernandez, Carla; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    Cortical maturation, especially gyral formation, follows a temporospatial schedule and is a good marker of fetal maturation. Although ultrasonography is still the imaging method of choice to evaluate fetal anatomy, MRI has an increasingly important role in the detection of brain abnormalities, especially of cortical development. Knowledge of MRI techniques in utero with the advantages and disadvantages of some sequences is necessary, in order to try to optimize the different magnetic resonance sequences to be able to make an early diagnosis. The different steps of cortical maturation known from histology represent the background necessary for the understanding of maturation in order to be then able to evaluate brain maturation through neuroimaging. Illustrations of the normal cortical maturation are given for each step accessible to MRI for both the cerebral hemispheres and the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of cortical maturation with prenatal MRI. Part I: normal cortical maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogliarini, Celine [Faculte Timone, Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale, Marseille (France); Chaumoitre, Katia [Hopital Nord, Department of Radiology, Marseille (France); Chapon, Frederique; Levrier, Olivier; Girard, Nadine [Hopital Timone, Department of Neuroradiology, Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Fernandez, Carla; Figarella-Branger, Dominique [Hopital Timone, Department of Pathology, Marseille (France)

    2005-08-01

    Cortical maturation, especially gyral formation, follows a temporospatial schedule and is a good marker of fetal maturation. Although ultrasonography is still the imaging method of choice to evaluate fetal anatomy, MRI has an increasingly important role in the detection of brain abnormalities, especially of cortical development. Knowledge of MRI techniques in utero with the advantages and disadvantages of some sequences is necessary, in order to try to optimize the different magnetic resonance sequences to be able to make an early diagnosis. The different steps of cortical maturation known from histology represent the background necessary for the understanding of maturation in order to be then able to evaluate brain maturation through neuroimaging. Illustrations of the normal cortical maturation are given for each step accessible to MRI for both the cerebral hemispheres and the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  7. Chemical profile and antioxidant capacity verification of Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae) fruits at different stages of maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Heverton M; Rodrigues, Fabíola F G; Costa, Wégila D; Nonato, Carla de F A; Rodrigues, Fábio F G; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Costa, José G M

    2015-01-01

    Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae), a common plant in Cariri region, Ceara, Brazil, as well as in various parts of the world, contains high concentrations of bioactive compounds and in many communities its parts are used for therapeutic purposes. Studies describe antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-diarrheal actions from extracts obtained from leaves, but information about the activities of the fruits and comparison of these at different maturity stages (immature, partially mature and mature) are scarce. This study aims to evaluate the antioxidant properties by quantifying the levels of phenolic and flavonoid compounds, carotenoids and vitamin C of P. guajava fruits at different stages of maturation. The content of phenolic compounds for the immature fruit, partially mature and mature were: 22.41; 34.61 and 32.92 mg of AG/g fraction. The flavonoid content for immature fruits, intermediate and mature were: 2.83; 5.10 and 5.65 mg RUT/g fraction, respectively. Following the same standards of maturation stages, the ascorbic acid content was determined with values of 0.48; 0.38 and 0.21 mg AA/g fraction, respectively. HPLC analysis identified and quantified the presence of gallic acid, catechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, epicatechin, rutin, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, quercetin, kaempferol, glycosylated campeferol, tocopherol, β-carotene and lycopene. The antioxidant activity carried out by DPPH method showed the mature fruits bearing the best results, whereas chelation of Fe2+ ions showed higher percentage for the immature fruit. The results obtained by lipidic peroxidation were not satisfactory.

  8. The EBI2 signalling pathway plays a role in cellular crosstalk between astrocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra; O'Sullivan, Sinead A; Christen, Isabelle; Zhang, Juan; Sailer, Andreas W; Dev, Kumlesh K

    2016-05-11

    EBI2 is a G protein-coupled receptor activated by oxysterol 7α, 25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α25HC) and regulates T cell-dependant antibody response and B cell migration. We recently found EBI2 is expressed in human astrocytes, regulates intracellular signalling and modulates astrocyte migration. Here, we report that LPS treatment of mouse astrocytes alters mRNA levels of EBI2 and oxysterols suggesting that the EBI2 signalling pathway is sensitive to LPS-mediated immune challenge. We also find that conditioned media obtained from LPS-stimulated mouse astrocytes induces macrophage migration, which is inhibited by the EBI2 antagonist NIBR189. These results demonstrate a role for the EBI2 signalling pathway in astrocytes as a sensor for immune challenge and for communication with innate immune cells such as macrophages.

  9. DMPD: Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534111 Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-1...):575-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-...4 and IL-13. PubmedID 10534111 Title Differential responses of human monocytes an

  10. DMPD: Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited signalingpathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960231 Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited sign...82. Epub 2003 Jul 22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-media...on through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited signalingpathways. Authors Lee C, Liu QH, Tomkowicz B, Yi

  11. DMPD: Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18336664 Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages...(.html) (.csml) Show Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages. PubmedID 18...336664 Title Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macro

  12. A review of performance measurement’s maturity models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Paula Bertolli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In a context as dynamic as today, SMEs need performance measurement systems (PMS that are able to generate useful, relevant and reliable information to manage. Measuring the maturity of PMS is an essential step to achieve its evolution to an ideal state that allows a better control of the results and to act consequently, improving management and decision making. Objective: To develop a bibliographic review to identify and characterize PMS maturity models, recognizing between them the most feasible models to apply in SMEs, in order to generate a contribution for the strengthening of such systems, facilitating effective and timely decision making in organizations. Methodology: The research question defined is: which existing PMS maturity model can be used by industrial SMEs? Google Scholar database was consulted for searching information, using certain search parameters. Based on a previous criteria definition, the selected models are compared. Finally, the conclusions about these models are elaborated. Results: From the results obtained through the bibliographic search in Google Scholar, different criteria were used to select the models to be characterized and compared. The four models selected were the proposed by Wettstein and Kueng, Van Aken, Tangen and Aho. Conclusions: The models considered most adequate are those proposed by Wettstein and Kueng (2002 and Aho (2012, due to their easy application and the low requirement of resource use. However, as such models do not have an evaluation tool, it has to be defined by the company.

  13. Molecular signatures of maturing dendritic cells: implications for testing the quality of dendritic cell therapies

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    Wang Ena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are often produced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 stimulation of monocytes. To improve the effectiveness of DC adoptive immune cancer therapy, many different agents have been used to mature DCs. We analyzed the kinetics of DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ induction in order to characterize the usefulness of mature DCs (mDCs for immune therapy and to identify biomarkers for assessing the quality of mDCs. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from 6 healthy subjects by apheresis, monocytes were isolated by elutriation, and immature DCs (iDCs were produced by 3 days of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4. The iDCs were sampled after 4, 8 and 24 hours in culture with LPS and IFN-γ and were then assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, and global gene and microRNA (miRNA expression analysis. Results After 24 hours of LPS and IFN-γ stimulation, DC surface expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA Class II antigens were up-regulated. Th1 attractant genes such as CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CCL5 were up-regulated during maturation but not Treg attractants such as CCL22 and CXCL12. The expression of classical mDC biomarker genes CD83, CCR7, CCL5, CCL8, SOD2, MT2A, OASL, GBP1 and HES4 were up-regulated throughout maturation while MTIB, MTIE, MTIG, MTIH, GADD45A and LAMP3 were only up-regulated late in maturation. The expression of miR-155 was up-regulated 8-fold in mDCs. Conclusion DCs, matured with LPS and IFN-γ, were characterized by increased levels of Th1 attractants as opposed to Treg attractants and may be particularly effective for adoptive immune cancer therapy.

  14. Comparative transcriptome analyses of a late-maturing mandarin mutant and its original cultivar reveals gene expression profiling associated with citrus fruit maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of late maturity in fruit are good agronomic traits for extending the harvest period and marketing time. However, underlying molecular basis of the late-maturing mechanism in fruit is largely unknown. In this study, RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq technology was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs related to late-maturing characteristics from a late-maturing mutant ‘Huawan Wuzishatangju’ (HWWZSTJ (Citrus reticulata Blanco and its original line ‘Wuzishatangju’ (WZSTJ. A total of approximately 17.0 Gb and 84.2 M paried-end reads were obtained. DEGs were significantly enriched in the pathway of photosynthesis, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, carotenoid biosynthesis, chlorophyll and abscisic acid (ABA metabolism. Thirteen candidate transcripts related to chlorophyll metabolism, carotenoid biosynthesis and ABA metabolism were analyzed using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR at all fruit maturing stages of HWWZSTJ and WZSTJ. Chlorophyllase (CLH and divinyl reductase (DVR from chlorophyll metabolism, phytoene synthase (PSY and capsanthin/capsorubin synthase (CCS from carotenoid biosynthesis, and abscisic acid 8′-hydroxylase (AB1 and 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED1 from ABA metabolism were cloned and analyzed. The expression pattern of NCED1 indicated its role in the late-maturing characteristics of HWWZSTJ. There were 270 consecutive bases missing in HWWZSTJ in comparison with full-length sequences of NCED1 cDNA from WZSTJ. Those results suggested that NCED1 might play an important role in the late maturity of HWWZSTJ. This study provides new information on complex process that results in the late maturity of Citrus fruit at the transcriptional level.

  15. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Dal; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  16. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Dal; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kyung Pyo [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sik [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Kwang [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won, E-mail: kwon@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  17. Water relations in culture media influence maturation of avocado somatic embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Martín, Belén; Sesmero, Rafael; Quesada, Miguel A; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Sánchez-Romero, Carolina

    2011-11-15

    Application of transformation and other biotechnological tools in avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is hampered by difficulties in obtaining mature somatic embryos capable of germination at an acceptable rate. In this work, we evaluated the effect of different compounds affecting medium water relations on maturation of avocado somatic embryos. Culture media were characterized with respect to gel strength, water potential and osmotic potential. Improved production of mature somatic embryos was achieved with gelling agent concentrations higher than those considered standard. The osmotic agents such as sorbitol and PEG did not have positive effects on embryo maturation. The number of w-o mature somatic embryos per culture was positively correlated with medium gel strength. Gel strength was significantly affected by gelling agent type as well as by gelling agent and PEG concentration. Medium water potential was influenced by sorbitol concentration; incorporation of PEG to a culture medium did not affect medium water potential. The highest maturation results were achieved on a medium gelled with 10 gl(-1) agar. Moreover, these somatic embryos had improved germination rates. These results corroborate the role of water restriction as a key factor controlling maturation of somatic embryos. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. The influence of macrophage growth factors on Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV) infection and activation of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Karin M; Watson, Neva B; Minchenberg, Scott B; Massa, Paul T

    2018-02-01

    Macrophages are common targets for infection and innate immune activation by many pathogenic viruses including the neurotropic Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV). As both infection and innate activation of macrophages are key determinants of viral pathogenesis especially in the central nervous system (CNS), an analysis of macrophage growth factors on these events was performed. C3H mouse bone-marrow cells were differentiated in culture using either recombinant macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), inoculated with TMEV (BeAn) and analyzed at various times thereafter. Cytokine RNA and protein analysis, virus titers, and flow cytometry were performed to characterize virological parameters under these culture conditions. GM-CSF-differentiated macrophages showed higher levels of TMEV viral RNA and proinflammatory molecules compared to infected M-CSF-differentiated cells. Thus, GM-CSF increases both TMEV infection and TMEV-induced activation of macrophages compared to that seen with M-CSF. Moreover, while infectious viral particles decreased from a peak at 12h to undetectable levels at 48h post infection, TMEV viral RNA remained higher in GM-CSF- compared to M-CSF-differentiated macrophages in concert with increased proinflammatory gene expression. Analysis of a possible basis for these differences determined that glycolytic rates contributed to heightened virus replication and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in GM-CSF compared to M-CSF-differentiated macrophages. In conclusion, we provide evidence implicating a role for GM-CSF in promoting virus replication and proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages, indicating that GM-CSF may be a key factor for TMEV infection and the induction of chronic TMEV-induced immunopathogenesis in the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Immunoregulation of bovine macrophages by factors in the salivary glands of Rhipicephalus microplus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brake Danett K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative strategies are required to control the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, due to evolving resistance to commercially available acaricides. This invasive ectoparasite is a vector of economically important diseases of cattle such as bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. An understanding of the biological intricacies underlying vector-host-pathogen interactions is required to innovate sustainable tick management strategies that can ultimately mitigate the impact of animal and zoonotic tick-borne diseases. Tick saliva contains molecules evolved to impair host innate and adaptive immune responses, which facilitates blood feeding and pathogen transmission. Antigen presenting cells are central to the development of robust T cell responses including Th1 and Th2 determination. In this study we examined changes in co-stimulatory molecule expression and cytokine response of bovine macrophages exposed to salivary gland extracts (SGE obtained from 2-3 day fed, pathogen-free adult R. microplus. Methods Peripheral blood-derived macrophages were treated for 1 hr with 1, 5, or 10 μg/mL of SGE followed by 1, 6, 24 hr of 1 μg/mL of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Real-time PCR and cytokine ELISA were used to measure changes in co-stimulatory molecule expression and cytokine response. Results Changes were observed in co-stimulatory molecule expression of bovine macrophages in response to R. microplus SGE exposure. After 6 hrs, CD86, but not CD80, was preferentially up-regulated on bovine macrophages when treated with 1 μg/ml SGE and then LPS, but not SGE alone. At 24 hrs CD80, CD86, and CD69 expression was increased with LPS, but was inhibited by the addition of SGE. SGE also inhibited LPS induced upregulation of TNFα, IFNγ and IL-12 cytokines, but did not alter IL-4 or CD40 mRNA expression. Conclusions Molecules from the salivary glands of adult R. microplus showed bimodal concentration-, and time-dependent effects on

  20. Lactoferrin Efficiently Counteracts the Inflammation-Induced Changes of the Iron Homeostasis System in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutone, Antimo; Rosa, Luigi; Lepanto, Maria Stefania; Scotti, Mellani Jinnett; Berlutti, Francesca; Bonaccorsi di Patti, Maria Carmela; Musci, Giovanni; Valenti, Piera

    2017-01-01

    Human lactoferrin (hLf), an 80-kDa multifunctional iron-binding cationic glycoprotein, is constitutively secreted by exocrine glands and by neutrophils during inflammation. hLf is recognized as a key element in the host immune defense system. The in vitro and in vivo experiments are carried out with bovine Lf (bLf), which shares high sequence homology and identical functions with hLf, including anti-inflammatory activity. Here, in "pure" M1 human macrophages, obtained by stimulation with a mixture of 10 pg/ml LPS and 20 ng/ml IFN-γ, as well as in a more heterogeneous macrophage population, challenged with high-dose of LPS (1 µg/ml), the effect of bLf on the expression of the main proteins involved in iron and inflammatory homeostasis, namely ferroportin (Fpn), membrane-bound ceruloplasmin (Cp), cytosolic ferritin (Ftn), transferrin receptor 1, and cytokines has been investigated. The increase of IL-6 and IL-1β cytokines, following the inflammatory treatments, is associated with both upregulation of cytosolic Ftn and downregulation of Fpn, membrane-bound Cp, and transferrin receptor 1. All these changes take part into intracellular iron overload, a very unsafe condition leading in vivo to higher host susceptibility to infections as well as iron deficiency in the blood and anemia of inflammation. It is, therefore, of utmost importance to counteract the persistence of the inflammatory status to rebalance iron levels between tissues/secretions and blood. Moreover, levels of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 were increased in cells treated with high doses of LPS. Conversely, IL-10 decreased when the LPS/IFN-γ mix was used, suggesting that only the inflammation triggered by LPS high doses can switch on an anti-inflammatory response in our macrophagic model. Here, we demonstrate that bLf, when included in the culture medium, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-1β production and efficiently prevented the changes of Fpn, membrane-bound Cp, cytosolic Ftn, and

  1. Lactoferrin Efficiently Counteracts the Inflammation-Induced Changes of the Iron Homeostasis System in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antimo Cutone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human lactoferrin (hLf, an 80-kDa multifunctional iron-binding cationic glycoprotein, is constitutively secreted by exocrine glands and by neutrophils during inflammation. hLf is recognized as a key element in the host immune defense system. The in vitro and in vivo experiments are carried out with bovine Lf (bLf, which shares high sequence homology and identical functions with hLf, including anti-inflammatory activity. Here, in “pure” M1 human macrophages, obtained by stimulation with a mixture of 10 pg/ml LPS and 20 ng/ml IFN-γ, as well as in a more heterogeneous macrophage population, challenged with high-dose of LPS (1 µg/ml, the effect of bLf on the expression of the main proteins involved in iron and inflammatory homeostasis, namely ferroportin (Fpn, membrane-bound ceruloplasmin (Cp, cytosolic ferritin (Ftn, transferrin receptor 1, and cytokines has been investigated. The increase of IL-6 and IL-1β cytokines, following the inflammatory treatments, is associated with both upregulation of cytosolic Ftn and downregulation of Fpn, membrane-bound Cp, and transferrin receptor 1. All these changes take part into intracellular iron overload, a very unsafe condition leading in vivo to higher host susceptibility to infections as well as iron deficiency in the blood and anemia of inflammation. It is, therefore, of utmost importance to counteract the persistence of the inflammatory status to rebalance iron levels between tissues/secretions and blood. Moreover, levels of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 were increased in cells treated with high doses of LPS. Conversely, IL-10 decreased when the LPS/IFN-γ mix was used, suggesting that only the inflammation triggered by LPS high doses can switch on an anti-inflammatory response in our macrophagic model. Here, we demonstrate that bLf, when included in the culture medium, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-1β production and efficiently prevented the changes of Fpn, membrane-bound Cp

  2. Macrophage-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 affects influenza vaccine efficacy through the regulation of immune cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Il-Sub; Park, Hyelim; Kwak, Hye-Won; Woo Jung, Yong; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2017-08-24

    The level of antibody production induced by a vaccine involves a variety of host factors. One of these, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), plays an important role in lymphocyte maturation and antibody expression. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage-derived IGF-1 in the induction of influenza vaccine-specific antibodies using macrophage-derived IGF-1 gene knockout (MIKO) mice. The titers of vaccine-specific total immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG1 after immunization were about two- to fourfold lower in MIKO mice than in WT mice. Moreover, MIKO mice showed a relatively weak booster effect of repeated immunization. In contrast, antigen-nonspecific total IgG was about threefold higher in MIKO mice than in WT mice. After viral challenge, the viral titer and the pathological damage in lungs of MIKO mice were higher than those in WT mice despite vaccination. Interestingly, the proportions of proinflammatory immune cells including M1 macrophages, Th1 and Th17 cells was higher in unvaccinated MIKO mice than in unvaccinated WT mice. This suggests that nonspecific activation of immune cells may paradoxically impair the response to the vaccine. In addition, although the proportions of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and GL-7 + germinal center (GC) B cells were higher in MIKO mice than in WT mice, the population of CD138 + B220 + antibody-secreting plasmablasts was lower in MIKO mice, which may be a cause of the low influenza-specific antibody titer in MIKO mice. Taken together, these results suggest that macrophage-derived IGF-1 might play an important role in the vaccine-triggered immune response by regulating immune cell homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Maturity Model for Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, Mark; Widergren, Steven E.; Mater, J.; Montgomery, Austin

    2013-10-28

    Abstract—Interoperability is about the properties of devices and systems to connect and work properly. Advancing interoperability eases integration and maintenance of the resulting interconnection. This leads to faster integration, lower labor and component costs, predictability of projects and the resulting performance, and evolutionary paths for upgrade. When specifications are shared and standardized, competition and novel solutions can bring new value streams to the community of stakeholders involved. Advancing interoperability involves reaching agreement for how things join at their interfaces. The quality of the agreements and the alignment of parties involved in the agreement present challenges that are best met with process improvement techniques. The GridWise® Architecture Council (GWAC) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is supporting an effort to use concepts from capability maturity models used in the software industry to advance interoperability of smart grid technology. An interoperability maturity model has been drafted and experience is being gained through trials on various types of projects and community efforts. This paper describes the value and objectives of maturity models, the nature of the interoperability maturity model and how it compares with other maturity models, and experiences gained with its use.

  4. Soluble human leukocyte antigen G5 polarizes differentiation of macrophages toward a decidual macrophage-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Guo, YiFan; So, Kam-Hei; Vijayan, Madhavi; Guo, Yue; Wong, Vera H H; Yao, YuanQing; Lee, Kai-Fai; Chiu, Philip C N; Yeung, William S B

    2015-10-01

    What are the actions of soluble human leukocyte antigen G5 (sHLAG5) on macrophage differentiation? sHLAG5 polarizes the differentiation of macrophages toward a decidual macrophage-like phenotype, which could regulate fetomaternal tolerance and placental development. sHLAG5 is a full-length soluble isoform of human leukocyte antigen implicated in immune tolerance during pregnancy. Low or undetectable circulating level of sHLAG5 in first trimester of pregnancy is associated with pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia and spontaneous abortion. Decidual macrophages are located in close proximity to invasive trophoblasts, and are involved in regulating fetomaternal tolerance and placental development. Human peripheral blood monocytes were differentiated into macrophages by treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the presence or absence of recombinant sHLAG5 during the differentiation process. The phenotypes and the biological activities of the resulting macrophages were compared. Recombinant sHLAG5 was produced in Escherichia coli BL21 and the protein identity was verified by tandem mass spectrometry. The expression of macrophage markers were analyzed by flow cytometry and quantitative PCR. Phagocytosis was determined by flow cytometry. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 expression and activity were measured by western blot analysis and kynurenine assay, respectively. Cell proliferation and cell cycling were determined by fluorometric cell proliferation assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Cytokine secretion was determined by cytokine array and ELISA kits. Intracellular cytokine expression was measured by flow cytometry. Cell invasion and migration were determined by trans-well invasion and migration assay, respectively. sHLAG5 drove the differentiation of macrophages with 'immuno-modulatory' characteristics, including reduced expression of M1 macrophage marker CD86 and increased expression of M2 macrophage marker CD163. sHLAG5-polarized

  5. Macrophage Phenotypes Regulate Scar Formation and Chronic Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Mark; Sahin, Katherine B; West, Zoe E; Murray, Rachael Z

    2017-07-17

    Macrophages and inflammation play a beneficial role during wound repair with macrophages regulating a wide range of processes, such as removal of dead cells, debris and pathogens, through to extracellular matrix deposition re-vascularisation and wound re-epithelialisation. To perform this range of functions, these cells develop distinct phenotypes over the course of wound healing. They can present with a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype, more often found in the early stages of repair, through to anti-inflammatory M2 phenotypes that are pro-repair in the latter stages of wound healing. There is a continuum of phenotypes between these ranges with some cells sharing phenotypes of both M1 and M2 macrophages. One of the less pleasant consequences of quick closure, namely the replacement with scar tissue, is also regulated by macrophages, through their promotion of fibroblast proliferation, myofibroblast differentiation and collagen deposition. Alterations in macrophage number and phenotype disrupt this process and can dictate the level of scar formation. It is also clear that dysregulated inflammation and altered macrophage phenotypes are responsible for hindering closure of chronic wounds. The review will discuss our current knowledge of macrophage phenotype on the repair process and how alterations in the phenotypes might alter wound closure and the final repair quality.

  6. Effects of microparticle size and Fc density on macrophage phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pacheco

    Full Text Available Controlled induction of phagocytosis in macrophages offers the ability to therapeutically regulate the immune system as well as improve delivery of chemicals or biologicals for immune processing. Maximizing particle uptake by macrophages through Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis could lead to new delivery mechanisms in drug or vaccine development. Fc ligand density and particle size were examined independently and in combination in order to optimize and tune the phagocytosis of opsonized microparticles. We show the internalization efficiency of small polystyrene particles (0.5 µm to 2 µm is significantly affected by changes in Fc ligand density, while particles greater than 2 µm show little correlation between internalization and Fc density. We found that while macrophages can efficiently phagocytose a large number of smaller particles, the total volume of phagocytosed particles is maximized through the non-specific uptake of larger microparticles. Therefore, larger microparticles may be more efficient at delivering a greater therapeutic payload to macrophages, but smaller opsonized microparticles can deliver bio-active substances to a greater percentage of the macrophage population. This study is the first to treat as independent variables the physical and biological properties of Fc density and microparticle size that initiate macrophage phagocytosis. Defining the physical and biological parameters that affect phagocytosis efficiency will lead to improved methods of microparticle delivery to macrophages.

  7. Influence of Macrophages on the Rooster Spermatozoa Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzelova, L; Vasicek, J; Chrenek, P

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of macrophages in rooster semen and to investigate their impact on the spermatozoa quality. Ross 308 breeder males (n = 30) with no evidence of genital tract infections were used to determine the concentration of macrophages using fluorescently conjugated acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL). Subsequently, the roosters were divided into two groups on the basis of semen macrophage concentration, and semen quality was compared in two heterospermic samples. We applied computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) system to determine motility parameters. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry were used to evaluate occurrence of apoptotic and dead spermatozoa. Spermatozoa fertility potential was examined after intravaginal artificial insemination of hens. Eighteen roosters (control group) contained 0.2-3% of macrophages within spermatozoa population and ten roosters (macrophage group) had 10-15% of macrophages. Males from macrophage group had lower (p rooster semen may have a negative effect on some parameters of rooster spermatozoa evaluated in vitro. Furthermore, our study suggests that flow cytometry allows more precise examination of spermatozoa viability and apoptosis in a very short time compared with the fluorescent microscopy. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of 125 -I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses

  9. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  10. Multiple Myeloma Macrophages: Pivotal Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Berardi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor microenvironment is essential for multiple myeloma (MM growth, progression, and drug resistance through provision of survival signals and secretion of growth and proangiogenic factors. This paper examines the importance of macrophages within MM bone marrow (BM microenvironment, referred to as MM-associated macrophages, as a potential niche component that supports tumor plasma cells. These macrophages are derived from peripheral blood monocytes recruited into the tumor. Upon activation by MM plasma cells and mesenchymal stromal cells, macrophages can release growth factors, proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and inflammatory mediators that promote plasma cell growth and survival. Macrophages promote tumor progression through several mechanisms including angiogenesis, growth, and drug resistance. Indeed, these macrophages are essential for the induction of an angiogenic response through vasculogenic mimicry, and this ability proceeds in step with progression of the plasma cell tumors. Data suggest that macrophages play an important role in the biology and survival of patients with MM, and they may be a target for the MM antivascular management.

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of fetal lung maturity by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Hitoshi; Kakizaki, Dai; Nagai, Atsushi; Akutagawa, Osamu; Itokazu, Isao; Iso, Kazuo; Abe, Kimihiko; Takayama, Masaomi [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan); Nohira, Tomoyoshi [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan). Hachioji Medical Center

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prenatal diagnosis of fetal lung maturity. The subjects comprised 28 singleton fetuses, and underwent MRI in the third trimester (32.71{+-}3.00 wks). After obtaining axial and coronal scout images of the whole pelvis, we obtained a transverse image, a coronal image and a sagittal image of fetuses with a half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo (HASTE) sequence, determined the intensity level of the fetal lung (right lung intensity level: RL, left lung intensity level: LL). The intensity level of background outside of the maternal body was obtained as the control intensity level (CL). The contrast value (CV) of each fetal lung was calculated by the numerical formula; CV=(RL or LL-CL)/CL. We evaluated the changes of CV during the third trimester and relationship between CV and gestational weeks. There was no significant correlation between gestational weeks and RL (P=.3887), LL (P=.2367). There was a significant increase in both right and left CV (RCV=(RL-CL)/CL: P=.0108, LCV=(LL-CL)/CL: P=.0165) with gestational age. It was suggested that the fetal lung maturation could be diagnosed with HASTE using the CV formula. (author)

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of fetal lung maturity by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hitoshi; Kakizaki, Dai; Nagai, Atsushi; Akutagawa, Osamu; Itokazu, Isao; Iso, Kazuo; Abe, Kimihiko; Takayama, Masaomi; Nohira, Tomoyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prenatal diagnosis of fetal lung maturity. The subjects comprised 28 singleton fetuses, and underwent MRI in the third trimester (32.71±3.00 wks). After obtaining axial and coronal scout images of the whole pelvis, we obtained a transverse image, a coronal image and a sagittal image of fetuses with a half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo (HASTE) sequence, determined the intensity level of the fetal lung (right lung intensity level: RL, left lung intensity level: LL). The intensity level of background outside of the maternal body was obtained as the control intensity level (CL). The contrast value (CV) of each fetal lung was calculated by the numerical formula; CV=(RL or LL-CL)/CL. We evaluated the changes of CV during the third trimester and relationship between CV and gestational weeks. There was no significant correlation between gestational weeks and RL (P=.3887), LL (P=.2367). There was a significant increase in both right and left CV (RCV=(RL-CL)/CL: P=.0108, LCV=(LL-CL)/CL: P=.0165) with gestational age. It was suggested that the fetal lung maturation could be diagnosed with HASTE using the CV formula. (author)

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei; Clouse, Kathleen A.; Wahl, Larry M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM

  14. Gly[14]-humanin inhibits ox-LDL uptake and stimulates cholesterol efflux in macrophage-derived foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wa-Wa; Wang, Shu-Rong; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Cao, Yong-Jun; Wang, Fen; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chun-Feng; Xie, Ying; Xie, Ying; Zhang, Yan-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Foam cell formation, which is caused by imbalanced cholesterol influx and efflux by macrophages, plays a vital role in the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis. Humanin (HN), a mitochondria-derived peptide, can prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and death of human aortic endothelial cells exposed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and has a protective effect on patients with in early atherosclerosis. However, the effects of HN on the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in RAW 264.7 macrophages are still unknown. This study was designed to investigate the role of [Gly14]-humanin (HNG) in lipid uptake and cholesterol efflux in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Flow cytometry and live cell imaging results showed that HNG reduced Dil-ox-LDL accumulation in the RAW 264.7 macrophages. A similar result was obtained for lipid accumulation by measuring cellular cholesterol content. Western blot analysis showed that ox-LDL treatment upregulated not only the protein expression of CD36 and LOX-1, which mediate ox-LDL endocytosis, but also ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 and ABCG1, which mediate ox-LDL exflux. HNG pretreatment inhibited the upregulation of CD36 and LOX-1 levels, prompting the upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 levels induced by ox-LDL. Therefore we concluded that HNG could inhibit ox-LDL-induced macrophage-derived foam cell formation, which occurs because of a decrease in lipid uptake and an increase in cholesterol efflux from macrophage cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TRPV4 calcium-permeable channel is a novel regulator of oxidized LDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Rishov; Merth, Michael; Sharma, Shweta; Alharbi, Mazen O; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Zhu, Xiaoping; Rahaman, Shaik O

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in United States, and atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory arterial disease, is the most dominant underlying pathology. Macrophages are thought to orchestrate atherosclerosis by generating lipid-laden foam cells and by secreting inflammatory mediators. Emerging data support a role for a mechanical factor, e.g., matrix stiffness, in regulation of macrophage function, vascular elasticity, and atherogenesis. However, the identity of the plasma membrane mechanosensor and the mechanisms by which pro-atherogenic signals are transduced/maintained are unknown. We have obtained evidence that TRPV4, an ion channel in the transient receptor potential vanilloid family and a known mechanosensor, is the likely mediator of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-dependent macrophage foam cell formation, a critical process in atherogenesis. Specifically, we found that: i) genetic ablation of TRPV4 or pharmacologic inhibition of TRPV4 activity by a specific antagonist blocked oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation, and ii) TRPV4 deficiency prevented pathophysiological range matrix stiffness or scratch-induced exacerbation of oxLDL-induced foam cell formation. Mechanistically, we found that: i) plasma membrane localization of TRPV4 was sensitized to the increasing level of matrix stiffness, ii) lack of foam cell formation in TRPV4 null cells was not due to lack of expression of CD36, a major receptor for oxLDL, and iii) TRPV4 channel activity regulated oxLDL uptake but not its binding on macrophages. Altogether, these findings identify a novel role for TRPV4 in regulating macrophage foam cell formation by modulating uptake of oxLDL. These findings suggest that therapeutic targeting of TRPV4 may provide a selective approach to the treatment of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Langerhans cell sarcoma following marginal zone lymphoma: expanding the knowledge on mature B cell plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; De Falco, Giulia; Rocca, Bruno Jim; Barone, Aurora; Amato, Teresa; Bellan, Cristiana; Lazzi, Stefano; Leoncini, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    The concept of unidirectional differentiation of the haematopoietic stem cell has been challenged after recent findings that human B cell progenitors and even mature B cells can be reprogrammed into histiocytic/dendritic cells by altering expression of lineage-associated transcription factors. The conversion of mature B cell lymphomas to Langerhans cell neoplasms is not well documented. Three previous reports have described clonally related follicular lymphoma and Langerhans cell tumours, whereas no case has been published of clonally related marginal zone lymphoma and Langerhans cell sarcoma. We describe the case of a 77-year-old patient who developed a Langerhans cell sarcoma and 6 years later a nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Mutation status examination showed 100 % gene identity to the germline sequence, suggesting direct trans-differentiation or dedifferentiation of the nodal marginal zone lymphoma to the Langerhans cell sarcoma rather than a common progenitor. We found inactivation of paired box 5 (PAX-5) in the lymphoma cells by methylation, along with duplication of part of the long arm of chromosomes 16 and 17 in the sarcoma cells. The absence of PAX-5 could have triggered B cells to differentiate into macrophages and dendritic cells. On the other hand, chromosomal imbalances might have activated genes involved in myeloid lineage maturation, transcription activation and oncogenesis. We hypothesize that this occurred because of previous therapies for nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Better understanding of this phenomenon may help in unravelling the molecular interplay between transcription factors during haematopoietic lineage commitment and may expand the spectrum of clonally related mature B cell neoplasms and Langerhans cell tumours.

  17. Scrapie affects the maturation cycle and immune complex trapping by follicular dendritic cells in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian McGovern

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are infectious neurological disorders of man and animals, characterised by abnormal disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d accumulations in the brain and lymphoreticular system (LRS. Prior to neuroinvasion, TSE agents often accumulate to high levels within the LRS, apparently without affecting immune function. However, our analysis of scrapie-affected sheep shows that PrP(d accumulations within the LRS are associated with morphological changes to follicular dendritic cells (FDCs and tingible body macrophages (TBMs. Here we examined FDCs and TBMs in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs of scrapie-affected mice by light and electron microscopy. In MLNs from uninfected mice, FDCs could be morphologically categorised into immature, mature and regressing forms. However, in scrapie-affected MLNs this maturation cycle was adversely affected. FDCs characteristically trap and retain immune complexes on their surfaces, which they display to B-lymphocytes. In scrapie-affected MLNs, some FDCs were found where areas of normal and abnormal immune complex retention occurred side by side. The latter co-localised with PrP(d plasmalemmal accumulations. Our data suggest this previously unrecognised morphology represents the initial stage of an abnormal FDC maturation cycle. Alterations to the FDCs included PrP(d accumulation, abnormal cell membrane ubiquitin and excess immunoglobulin accumulation. Regressing FDCs, in contrast, appeared to lose their membrane-attached PrP(d. Together, these data suggest that TSE infection adversely affects the maturation and regression cycle of FDCs, and that PrP(d accumulation is causally linked to the abnormal pathology observed. We therefore support the hypothesis that TSEs cause an abnormality in immune function.

  18. e-Government Maturity Model Based on Systematic Review and Meta-Ethnography Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmawan Napitupulu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Maturity model based on e-Government portal has been developed by a number of researchers both individually and institutionally, but still scattered in various journals and conference articles and can be said to have a different focus with each other, both in terms of stages and features. The aim of this research is conducting a study to integrate a number of maturity models existing today in order to build generic maturity model based on e-Government portal. The method used in this study is Systematic Review with meta-ethnography qualitative approach. Meta-ethnography, which is part of Systematic Review method, is a technique to perform data integration to obtain theories and concepts with a new level of understanding that is deeper and thorough. The result obtained is a maturity model based on e-Government portal that consists of 7 (seven stages, namely web presence, interaction, transaction, vertical integration, horizontal integration, full integration, and open participation. These seven stages are synthesized from the 111 key concepts related to 25 studies of maturity model based e-Government portal. The maturity model resulted is more comprehensive and generic because it is an integration of models (best practices that exists today.

  19. Ginger extract inhibits LPS induced macrophage activation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruch David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play a dual role in host defence. They act as the first line of defence by mounting an inflammatory response to antigen exposure and also act as antigen presenting cells and initiate the adaptive immune response. They are also the primary infiltrating cells at the site of inflammation. Inhibition of macrophage activation is one of the possible approaches towards modulating inflammation. Both conventional and alternative approaches are being studied in this regard. Ginger, an herbal product with broad anti inflammatory actions, is used as an alternative medicine in a number of inflammatory conditions like rheumatic disorders. In the present study we examined the effect of ginger extract on macrophage activation in the presence of LPS stimulation. Methods Murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated by LPS in presence or absence of ginger extract and production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed. We also studied the effect of ginger extract on the LPS induced expression of MHC II, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 molecules. We also studied the antigen presenting function of ginger extract treated macrophages by primary mixed lymphocyte reaction. Results We observed that ginger extract inhibited IL-12, TNF-α, IL-1β (pro inflammatory cytokines and RANTES, MCP-1 (pro inflammatory chemokines production in LPS stimulated macrophages. Ginger extract also down regulated the expression of B7.1, B7.2 and MHC class II molecules. In addition ginger extract negatively affected the antigen presenting function of macrophages and we observed a significant reduction in T cell proliferation in response to allostimulation, when ginger extract treated macrophages were used as APCs. A significant decrease in IFN-γ and IL-2 production by T cells in response to allostimulation was also observed. Conclusion In conclusion ginger extract inhibits macrophage activation and APC function and indirectly inhibits T cell activation.

  20. Rhinovirus infection induces distinct transcriptome profiles in polarized human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Charu; Walsh, Megan P; Eder, Breanna N; Metitiri, Ediri E; Popova, Antonia P; Hershenson, Marc B

    2018-05-01

    Infections with rhinovirus (RV) cause asthma exacerbations. Recent studies suggest that macrophages play a role in asthmatic airway inflammation and the innate immune response to RV infection. Macrophages exhibit phenotypes based on surface markers and gene expression. We hypothesized that macrophage polarization state alters gene expression in response to RV infection. Cells were derived from human peripheral blood derived monocytes. M1 and M2 polarization was carried out by using IFN-γ and IL-4, respectively, and RNA was extracted for Affymetrix Human Gene ST2.1 exon arrays. Selected genes were validated by quantitative (q)PCR. Treatment of nonactivated (M0) macrophages with IFN-γ and IL-4 induced the expression of 252 and 153 distinct genes, respectively, including previously-identified M1 and M2 markers. RV infection of M0 macrophages induced upregulation of 232 genes; pathway analysis showed significant overrepresentation of genes involved in IFN-α/β signaling and cytokine signaling in the immune system. RV infection induced differential expression of 195 distinct genes in M1-like macrophages but only seven distinct genes in M2-like-polarized cells. In a secondary analysis, comparison between M0-, RV-infected, and M1-like-polarized, RV-infected macrophages revealed differential expression of 227 genes including those associated with asthma and its exacerbation. qPCR demonstrated increased expression of CCL8, CXCL10, TNFSF10, TNFSF18, IL6, NOD2, and GSDMD and reduced expression of VNN1, AGO1, and AGO2. Together, these data show that, in contrast to M2-like-polarized macrophages, gene expression of M1-like macrophages is highly regulated by RV.

  1. Maturity acceleration of Italian dried sausage by Staphylococcus carnosus - Relationship between maturity and flavor compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahnke, Louise Heller; Holck, A.; Jensen, Anni

    2002-01-01

    . Sausages with S. carnosus 833 matured more than 2 wk faster than control sausages. Maturity correlated significantly with higher amounts of branched-chain aldehydes and alcohols and both branched- and straight-chain methyl ketones-compounds arising from the breakdown of the amino acids leucine, isoleucine...

  2. IT Governance Maturity: Developing a Maturity Model Using the Delphi Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Daniël; van Hillegersberg, Jos

    2015-01-01

    To advance in maturity, organizations should pay attention to both the hard and soft sides of IT governance (ITG). The hard side is related to processes and structure, the soft side to social aspects like behavior and organizational culture. This paper describes a study to develop an ITG maturity

  3. Quantitative assessment of cervical vertebral maturation using cone beam computed tomography in Korean girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Bo-Ram; Kim, Yong-Il; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Maki, Koutaro; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6-18 years of age). CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) was used to demarcate the odontoid process and the body of the second cervical vertebra, based on the dentocentral synchondrosis. Correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used for each parameter of the cervical vertebrae (P cervical vertebral body and odontoid process, respectively, for the multiple regression models. This suggests that quantitative analysis might be used to estimate skeletal maturation status.

  4. Altered Polarization, Morphology, and Impaired Innate Immunity Germane to Resident Peritoneal Macrophages in Mice with Long-Term Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Fang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is associated with perturbed innate immunity. Macrophages, bridging innate immunity and metabolic disturbances, play important roles in controlling immune homeostasis. However, the effect of long-term diabetic milieu (DM on the functions and phenotypes of macrophages is still not clear. In this study, we used resident peritoneal macrophages (RPMs from 5-month-old db/db mice to investigate the changes of macrophages. It was found that RPMs in db/db mice significantly reduced phagocytosis and adhesion capacity. After standardization with body weight, the number of F4/80+ RPMs markedly reduced in db/db mice, and, furthermore, the macrophages skewed to M2-polarizated macrophages. The results of morphology found that the RPMs shape of db/db mice was nearly round, but the RPMs shape of control mice was spindle-shaped and irregular. In this study, we found the cell numbers, morphology, and innate immunity functions of RPMs in 5-month-old type 2 diabetic mice (db/db mice obtained by abdominal cavity lavage were significantly altered. Importantly, we also found the remarkably increased M2-RPMs in diabetic mice for the first time.

  5. Is the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method effective enough to replace the hand-wrist maturation (HWM) method in determining skeletal maturation?-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szemraj, Agnieszka; Wojtaszek-Słomińska, Anna; Racka-Pilszak, Bogna

    2018-05-01

    Chronological age provides only general information on the development of a child/adolescent. However, the biological age of the patient is more significant. One of the methods is the determination of the bone age based on the development of the hand and wrist bones. In 1972 a method for assessing cervical vertebral maturation on the cephalometric radiographs was introduced (CVM method). As a result, additional patient radiation was eliminated. Currently, this type of radiograph is routinely applied in orthodontic treatment. The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of the CVM method and to verify the assumption, according to which the CVM method modified by Baccetti et al. may replace the method for the assessment of skeletal maturation based on a hand-wrist X-ray, which is known as the hand-wrist maturation (HWM) method. The present study reviewed the literature between 2006 and 2016. In the first stage of selection 905 articles were obtained. Finally, 10 articles were enrolled for the review. All of the studies presented a high level of correlation between the examined methods. In eight articles the researchers admitted that the CVM classification could replace the HWM method, known as the "gold standard". In two studies , the researchers suggested considering the CVM method an additional method despite its compatibility and usefulness. The lowest correlation coefficient was 0.616 and the highest 0.937. The assessment of the skeletal age with the CVM is done on a cephalometric radiograph, routinely used in orthodontic practice, which makes it easy to apply. The determination of features of only C2, C3 and C4 vertebrae is possible even if the patient wears an X-ray protective thyroid collar. Therefore, the radiation dose is minimized. The CVM method shows a high level of correlation with the HWM method. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Maturation diagnosis in full term hypotrophic fetuses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharnke, H D; Gartzke, J; Fleischer, G; Isbruch, E

    1977-01-01

    Foam-Test by Clements is a valuable method for determining the foetus maturity of lungs. We introduce this test along with other parameters for the maturity-diagnosis since one year. In 15% result, the Foam-Test was not applicable because of blood, or meconic amniotic fluid, other wise wrong negative and in 0% wrong positive results. By unmatured child, there was doubtable results with Foam-Test. Since it is important to determine the early delivery of unmatured children, particularly the case of foetus maturity of lungs must be exact, we therefore decided to use the Lecithin/Sphingomyelinquotients in some cases. The results of Lecithin/Sphingomyelinquotient in unmatured children are almost with the approximated date under two. From this, one must deduce from these children, that the intrauterine unmatured lungs lately took place.

  7. Capability maturity models for offshore organisational management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutt, J E; Sharp, J V; Terry, E; Miles, R

    2006-12-01

    The goal setting regime imposed by the UK safety regulator has important implications for an organisation's ability to manage health and safety related risks. Existing approaches to safety assurance based on risk analysis and formal safety assessments are increasingly considered unlikely to create the step change improvement in safety to which the offshore industry aspires and alternative approaches are being considered. One approach, which addresses the important issue of organisational behaviour and which can be applied at a very early stage of design, is the capability maturity model (CMM). The paper describes the development of a design safety capability maturity model, outlining the key processes considered necessary to safety achievement, definition of maturity levels and scoring methods. The paper discusses how CMM is related to regulatory mechanisms and risk based decision making together with the potential of CMM to environmental risk management.

  8. Mature Oocyte Cryopreservation for Fertility Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tina; Motan, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, advances in cancer treatment have led to a dramatic improvement in long term survival. This has led to an increasing focus on quality of life after surviving cancer treatment, with fertility being an important aspect. Given the known reproductive risks of cancer therapies, there has been a growing interest in the field of fertility preservation (also referred to as oncofertility). Mature oocyte cryopreservation is no longer considered experimental and has become a realistic option for reproductive aged women prior to undergoing cancer treatment. Additionally, as cryopreservation techniques improve, mature oocyte cryopreservation is increasing being marketed to healthy women without cancer wishing to delay child bearing, also termed "social egg freezing". This chapter provides a review of the current technology, use, and outcomes of mature oocyte cryopreservation. It also outlines the ethical debate surrounding social egg freezing and directions for future research in female fertility preservation.

  9. Genetic transformation of mature citrus plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Magdalena; Juárez, José; Navarro, Luis; Peña, Leandro

    2005-01-01

    Most woody fruit species have long juvenile periods that drastically prolong the time required to analyze mature traits. Evaluation of characteristics related to fruits is a requisite to release any new variety into the market. Because of a decline in regenerative and transformation potential, genetic transformation procedures usually employ juvenile material as the source of plant tissue, therefore resulting in the production of juvenile plants. Direct transformation of mature material could ensure the production of adult transgenic plants, bypassing in this way the juvenile phase. Invigoration of the source adult material, establishment of adequate transformation and regeneration conditions, and acceleration of plant development through grafting allowed us to produce transgenic mature sweet orange trees flowering and bearing fruits in a short time period.

  10. Trade-Offs of Flowering and Maturity Synchronisation for Pineapple Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Nicodème Fassinou Hotegni

    Full Text Available In the pineapple sector of Benin, poor fruit quality prevents pineapple producers to enter the European market. We investigated effects of common cultural practices, flowering and maturity synchronisation, (1 to quantify the trade-offs of flowering and maturity synchronisation for pineapple quality and the proportion of fruits exportable to European markets, and (2 to determine the effect of harvesting practice on quality attributes. Four on-farm experiments were conducted during three years using cultivars Sugarloaf and Smooth Cayenne. A split-split plot design was used in each experiment, with flowering induction practice as main factor (artificial or natural flowering induction, maturity induction practice as split factor (artificial or natural maturity induction and harvesting practice as the split-split factor (farmers' harvest practice or individual fruit harvesting at optimum maturity. Artificial flowering induction gave fruits with lower infructescence weight, higher ratio crown: infructescence length, and a lower proportion of fruits exportable to European markets than natural flowering induction. The costs of the improvements by natural flowering induction were huge: the longer durations from planting to flowering induction and harvesting, the higher number of harvestings of the fruits increasing the labour cost and the lower proportion of plants producing fruits compared with crops from artificially flowering-induced plants. Artificial maturity induction decreased the total soluble solids concentration in the fruits compared with natural maturity induction thus decreasing the proportion of fruits exportable to European markets, at a benefit of only a slightly shorter time from flowering induction to harvesting. Harvesting individual fruits at optimum maturity gave fruits with higher total soluble solids in naturally maturity induced fruits compared with the farmers' harvest practice. Given the huge costs of natural flowering induction

  11. Targeting Dexamethasone to Macrophages in a Porcine Endotoxemic Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Hvas, Christine Lodberg; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov

    2013-01-01

    -8 minutes. CONCLUSION: Targeted delivery of dexamethasone to macrophages using a humanized CD163 antibody as carrier exhibits anti-inflammatory effects comparable with 50 times higher concentrations of free dexamethasone and does not inhibit endogenous cortisol production. This antibody-drug complex showing......OBJECTIVES: Macrophages are important cells in immunity and the main producers of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The main objective was to evaluate if specific delivery of glucocorticoid to the macrophage receptor CD163 is superior to systemic glucocorticoid therapy in dampening the cytokine response...

  12. Rediscovering peritoneal macrophages in a murine endometriosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Li, Dong; An, Min; Li, Qiuju; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Guoyun

    2017-01-01

    What are the features of peritoneal macrophage subgroups and T helper cells in the development of murine endometriosis? During the development of endometriosis in a murine model, large peritoneal macrophages (LPMs) and small peritoneal macrophages (SPMs) are polarized into M1 and M2 cells, respectively, and the proportions of T helper (Th) 1, Th17 and T regulatory (T reg ) cells are increased. Numerous studies investigating the etiology and pathogenesis of endometriosis have focused on the polarization states of peritoneal macrophages in endometriosis models and patients, but the results are inconclusive. Further studies indicate that peritoneal macrophages are composed of two distinct subsets: LPMs and SPMs, although their roles in endometriosis are unknown. This study involves a prospective and randomized experiment. Fifty C57BL/6 female mice were randomly allocated to five control and five experimental groups (n = 5/group) according to the presence or absence of transplantation. The transplant periods are 0.25, 3, 14, 28 and 42 days. C57BL/6 mice were utilized to establish an endometriosis model by i.p. injection of allogeneic endometrial segments. Dynamic changes of peritoneal macrophage subsets and polarization profiles were evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). Macrophage morphology and density were assessed by cell counting under a microscope. Dynamic changes of Th1, Th2, Th17 and T reg cells were estimated by FCM. Peritoneal macrophages are composed of two distinct subsets: LPMs and SPMs. The proportion of SPMs increased immediately after peritoneal injection of endometrial tissues, whereas LPMs showed an opposite trend. Peritoneal macrophages differentiated into both M1 and M2 macrophages. The bidirectional polarization of macrophages was caused by the inverse trends of polarization of LPMs and SPMs. Consistently, the proportions of Th1, Th17 and T reg cells were all increased in mice with endometriosis. N/A. In this study, detection was only performed in a

  13. The Role of Macrophage Lipophagy in Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Jin Jeong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage cholesterol efflux is a central step in reverse cholesterol transport, which helps to maintain cholesterol homeostasis and to reduce atherosclerosis. Lipophagy has recently been identified as a new step in cholesterol ester hydrolysis that regulates cholesterol efflux, since it mobilizes cholesterol from lipid droplets of macrophages via autophagy and lysosomes. In this review, we briefly discuss recent advances regarding the mechanisms of the cholesterol efflux pathway in macrophage foam cells, and present lipophagy as a therapeutic target in the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  14. Macrophage heterogeneity in tissues: phenotypic diversity and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Siamon; Plüddemann, Annette; Martinez Estrada, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    During development and throughout adult life, macrophages derived from hematopoietic progenitors are seeded throughout the body, initially in the absence of inflammatory and infectious stimuli as tissue-resident cells, with enhanced recruitment, activation, and local proliferation following injury and pathologic insults. We have learned a great deal about macrophage properties ex vivo and in cell culture, but their phenotypic heterogeneity within different tissue microenvironments remains poorly characterized, although it contributes significantly to maintaining local and systemic homeostasis, pathogenesis, and possible treatment. In this review, we summarize the nature, functions, and interactions of tissue macrophage populations within their microenvironment and suggest questions for further investigation. PMID:25319326

  15. Macrophage Depletion Ameliorates Peripheral Neuropathy in Aging Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xidi; Klein, Dennis; Kerscher, Susanne; West, Brian L; Weis, Joachim; Katona, Istvan; Martini, Rudolf

    2018-05-09

    Aging is known as a major risk factor for the structure and function of the nervous system. There is urgent need to overcome such deleterious effects of age-related neurodegeneration. Here we show that peripheral nerves of 24-month-old aging C57BL/6 mice of either sex show similar pathological alterations as nerves from aging human individuals, whereas 12-month-old adult mice lack such alterations. Specifically, nerve fibers showed demyelination, remyelination and axonal lesion. Moreover, in the aging mice, neuromuscular junctions showed features typical for dying-back neuropathies, as revealed by a decline of presynaptic markers, associated with α-bungarotoxin-positive postsynapses. In line with these observations were reduced muscle strengths. These alterations were accompanied by elevated numbers of endoneurial macrophages, partially comprising the features of phagocytosing macrophages. Comparable profiles of macrophages could be identified in peripheral nerve biopsies of aging persons. To determine the pathological impact of macrophages in aging mice, we selectively targeted the cells by applying an orally administered CSF-1R specific kinase (c-FMS) inhibitor. The 6-month-lasting treatment started before development of degenerative changes at 18 months and reduced macrophage numbers in mice by ∼70%, without side effects. Strikingly, nerve structure was ameliorated and muscle strength preserved. We show, for the first time, that age-related degenerative changes in peripheral nerves are driven by macrophages. These findings may pave the way for treating degeneration in the aging peripheral nervous system by targeting macrophages, leading to reduced weakness, improved mobility, and eventually increased quality of life in the elderly. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Aging is a major risk factor for the structure and function of the nervous system. Here we show that peripheral nerves of 24-month-old aging mice show similar degenerative alterations as nerves from aging

  16. Vegetative propagation of mature and juvenile northern red oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    James J. Zaczek; K. C. Steiner; C. W., Jr. Heuser

    1993-01-01

    Rooting trials were established to evaluate rooting success of cuttings from mature and juvenile, grafted and ungrafted northern red oak (NRO). Buds from 4 mature NRO ortets and juvenile seedlings were grafted onto juvenile and mature rootstock. Cuttings were collected from the grafts and from juvenile and mature shoots developed in situ and...

  17. Human mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted lactate induces M2-macrophage differentiation by metabolic reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civini, Sara; Pacelli, Consiglia; Dieng, Mame Massar; Lemieux, William; Jin, Ping; Bazin, Renée; Patey, Natacha; Marincola, Francesco M.; Moldovan, Florina; Zaouter, Charlotte; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Benabdhalla, Basma; Louis, Isabelle; Beauséjour, Christian; Stroncek, David; Le Deist, Françoise; Haddad, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to dampen immune response and promote tissue repair, but the underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. Herein, we demonstrate that umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) alter the phenotype and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) through lactate-mediated metabolic reprogramming. UC-MSC can secrete large quantities of lactate and, when present during monocyte-to-DC differentiation, induce instead the acquisition of M2-macrophage features in terms of morphology, surface markers, migratory properties and antigen presentation capacity. Microarray expression profiling indicates that UC-MSC modify the expression of metabolic-related genes and induce a M2-macrophage expression signature. Importantly, monocyte-derived DC obtained in presence of UC-MSC, polarize naïve allogeneic CD4+ T-cells into Th2 cells. Treatment of UC-MSC with an inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase strongly decreases lactate concentration in culture supernatant and abrogates the effect on monocyte-to-DC differentiation. Metabolic analysis further revealed that UC-MSC decrease oxidative phosphorylation in differentiating monocytes while strongly increasing the spare respiratory capacity proportional to the amount of secreted lactate. Because both MSC and monocytes are recruited in vivo at the site of tissue damage and inflammation, we propose the local increase of lactate concentration induced by UC-MSC and the consequent enrichment in M2-macrophage generation as a mechanism to achieve immunomodulation. PMID:27070086

  18. Retention of inhaled plutonium oxide. Elimination procedures by pulmonary lavage and effect of the alveolar macrophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolibe, Daniel.

    1977-03-01

    A large fraction of the plutonium particles, reaching the deeper lung are retained in the alveolar macrophages during several months. Cell function changes were measured in vivo and in vitro. Stimulation of macrophage mobility and phagocytosis or natural clearance processes were uneffective on PuO 2 excretion. In vivo pulmonary lavage was the only effective therapy. The procedures of in toto pulmonary lavage in order to obtain the highest number of macrophages are described. A study of the physiological and histological consequences showed no long-term pathology, lesions observed during 48 h after lavage were restored quickly. A single lavage eliminated 12-25% only of the lung burden. A procedure of ten repeated lavages (1 per week) eliminated 60-90% of the lung burden. The action of lavage seemed twofold: direct elimination in the rinsing liquid and faster pulmonary clearance with low lymph node overload. Survivals in treated animals kept for long-term observations were compatible with the lung burdens remaining after treatment. Demontration of an inhibiting effect on pulmonary fibrosis should indicate a larger utilization [fr

  19. Transcription analysis of the porcine alveolar macrophage response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is considered the major causative agent of porcine respiratory disease complex, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. To gain more insights into the pathogenesis of this organism, the high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. A total of 1033 and 1235 differentially expressed genes were identified in porcine alveolar macrophages in responses to exposure to M. hyopneumoniae at 6 and 15 hours post infection, respectively. The differentially expressed genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, defense response, signal transduction, protein folding, protein ubiquitination and so on. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were the chemokine signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (Nod-like receptor signaling pathway and apoptosis signaling pathway. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR. The expression kinetics of chemokines was further analyzed. The present study is the first to document the response of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. The data further developed our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae.

  20. Transcription analysis of the porcine alveolar macrophage response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Li; Luping, Du; Bing, Sun; Zhengyu, Yu; Maojun, Liu; Zhixin, Feng; Yanna, Wei; Haiyan, Wang; Guoqing, Shao; Kongwang, He

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is considered the major causative agent of porcine respiratory disease complex, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. To gain more insights into the pathogenesis of this organism, the high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. A total of 1033 and 1235 differentially expressed genes were identified in porcine alveolar macrophages in responses to exposure to M. hyopneumoniae at 6 and 15 hours post infection, respectively. The differentially expressed genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, defense response, signal transduction, protein folding, protein ubiquitination and so on. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were the chemokine signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (Nod)-like receptor signaling pathway and apoptosis signaling pathway. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR. The expression kinetics of chemokines was further analyzed. The present study is the first to document the response of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. The data further developed our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae.

  1. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Macrophages Share Ontogeny with MYB-Independent Tissue-Resident Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Buchrieser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-resident macrophages, such as microglia, Kupffer cells, and Langerhans cells, derive from Myb-independent yolk sac (YS progenitors generated before the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Myb-independent YS-derived resident macrophages self-renew locally, independently of circulating monocytes and HSCs. In contrast, adult blood monocytes, as well as infiltrating, gut, and dermal macrophages, derive from Myb-dependent HSCs. These findings are derived from the mouse, using gene knockouts and lineage tracing, but their applicability to human development has not been formally demonstrated. Here, we use human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs as a tool to model human hematopoietic development. By using a CRISPR-Cas9 knockout strategy, we show that human iPSC-derived monocytes/macrophages develop in an MYB-independent, RUNX1-, and SPI1 (PU.1-dependent fashion. This result makes human iPSC-derived macrophages developmentally related to and a good model for MYB-independent tissue-resident macrophages, such as alveolar and kidney macrophages, microglia, Kupffer cells, and Langerhans cells.

  2. Induced-Pluripotent-Stem-Cell-Derived Primitive Macrophages Provide a Platform for Modeling Tissue-Resident Macrophage Differentiation and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Kazuyuki; Kozaki, Tatsuya; Lee, Christopher Zhe Wei; Thion, Morgane Sonia; Otsuka, Masayuki; Lim, Shawn; Utami, Kagistia Hana; Fidan, Kerem; Park, Dong Shin; Malleret, Benoit; Chakarov, Svetoslav; See, Peter; Low, Donovan; Low, Gillian; Garcia-Miralles, Marta; Zeng, Ruizhu; Zhang, Jinqiu; Goh, Chi Ching; Gul, Ahmet; Hubert, Sandra; Lee, Bernett; Chen, Jinmiao; Low, Ivy; Shadan, Nurhidaya Binte; Lum, Josephine; Wei, Tay Seok; Mok, Esther; Kawanishi, Shohei; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Larbi, Anis; Poidinger, Michael; Renia, Laurent; Ng, Lai Guan; Wolf, Yochai; Jung, Steffen; Önder, Tamer; Newell, Evan; Huber, Tara; Ashihara, Eishi; Garel, Sonia; Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Ginhoux, Florent

    2017-07-18

    Tissue macrophages arise during embryogenesis from yolk-sac (YS) progenitors that give rise to primitive YS macrophages. Until recently, it has been impossible to isolate or derive sufficient numbers of YS-derived macrophages for further study, but data now suggest that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be driven to undergo a process reminiscent of YS-hematopoiesis in vitro. We asked whether iPSC-derived primitive macrophages (iMacs) can terminally differentiate into specialized macrophages with the help of growth factors and organ-specific cues. Co-culturing human or murine iMacs with iPSC-derived neurons promoted differentiation into microglia-like cells in vitro. Furthermore, murine iMacs differentiated in vivo into microglia after injection into the brain and into functional alveolar macrophages after engraftment in the lung. Finally, iPSCs from a patient with familial Mediterranean fever differentiated into iMacs with pro-inflammatory characteristics, mimicking the disease phenotype. Altogether, iMacs constitute a source of tissue-resident macrophage precursors that can be used for biological, pathophysiological, and therapeutic studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention. © FASEB.

  4. Adult maturational processes and the facilitating environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acklin, M W

    1986-09-01

    The psychoanalytic theory of religion has been seriously limited in its development, largely owing to Freud's emphasis on religion's neurotic elements and an overemphasis on the infantile origins of religious development. This paper offers a conceptual framework and advances the thesis, based on contemporary psychoanalytic, developmental theory, that 1) Erikson's concept of epigenesis has applicability across the life span; 2) that beyond-the-self identity is constituent to human maturation and self-completion; 3) that successful adult maturation requires a mirroring-facilitating environment; and 4) that religious values, meanings, images, and communities play an essential role-as-elements of the facilitating environment of later life.

  5. Digital Maturity of the Firm's Business Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groskovs, Sergejs; Vemula, Sreekanth

    We propose a digital maturity assessment model as an instrument for researchers and a strategic tool for managers. Existing literature lacks a conceptually clear way to measure the construct of digital maturity at the level of the firms business model. Our proposed instrument thus opens avenues...... for research into questions related to antecedents, process, and performance outcomes of the digitalization of business activities. The assessment follows the logic of first decomposing the business model into the underlying value creation activities and then evaluating the levels of automation...

  6. Posttesticular sperm maturation, infertility, and hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Whitfield

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a key molecule in the mammalian physiology of especial particular importance for the reproductive system as it is the common precursor for steroid hormone synthesis. Cholesterol is also a recognized modulator of sperm functions, not only at the level of gametogenesis. Cholesterol homeostasis regulation is crucial for posttesticular sperm maturation, and imbalanced cholesterol levels may particularly affect these posttesticular events. Metabolic lipid disorders (dyslipidemia affect male fertility but are most of the time studied from the angle of endocrine/testicular consequences. This review will focus on the deleterious effects of a particular dyslipidemia, i.e., hypercholesterolemia, on posttesticular maturation of mammalian spermatozoa.

  7. M1 Macrophages but Not M2 Macrophages Are Characterized by Upregulation of CRP Expression via Activation of NFκB: a Possible Role for Ox-LDL in Macrophage Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Marielle; Shur, Anna; Tendler, Yvgeny

    2018-04-23

    Arterial macrophages comprise a heterogeneous population: pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2). Since C-reactive protein (CRP) is produced by macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions, understanding of CRP regulation in macrophages could be crucial to decipher inflammatory patterns in atherogenesis. We aimed to analyze CRP expression in M1/M2 macrophages and to question whether it involves NFκB signaling pathway. Furthermore, we questioned whether oxidative stress affect macrophage phenotype and modulate macrophage CRP expression. M1/M2 macrophage polarization was validated using THP-1 macrophages. CRP mRNA and protein expression were determined using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Involvement of NFκB was determined by nuclear translocation of p50 subunit and the use of NFκB inhibitor. Involvement of oxidative stress in macrophage phenotypes induction was studied using oxidized-LDL (Ox-LDL) and antioxidants. M1 macrophages were characterized by elevated CRP mRNA expression (by 67%), CRP protein levels (by 108%), and upregulation of NFκB activation compared to control, but these features were not shared by M2 macrophages. Macrophages incubation with Ox-LDL led to a moderate M1 phenotype combined with a M2 phenotype, correlated with increased CRP mRNA expression. Antioxidants inhibited by up to 86% IL6 expression but did not significantly affect IL10 secretion. Antioxidants significantly inhibited CRP expression in M1 macrophages, but not in M2 macrophages. Elevated expression of CRP was characteristic of M1 macrophages rather than M2 through NFκB activation. Oxidative stress could be one of the endogenous triggers for macrophage activation to a mixed M1 and M2 phenotype, in association with increased expression of CRP.

  8. Macrophage ABCA2 deletion modulates intracellular cholesterol deposition, affects macrophage apoptosis, and decreases early atherosclerosis in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calpe-Berdiel, Laura; Zhao, Ying; de Graauw, Marjo; Ye, Dan; van Santbrink, Peter J; Mommaas, A Mieke; Foks, Amanda; Bot, Martine; Meurs, Illiana; Kuiper, Johan; Mack, Jody T; Van Eck, Miranda; Tew, Kenneth D; van Berkel, Theo J C

    2012-08-01

    The ABCA2 transporter shares high structural homology to ABCA1, which is crucial for the removal of excess cholesterol from macrophages and, by extension, in atherosclerosis. It has been suggested that ABCA2 sequesters cholesterol inside the lysosomes, however, little is known of the macrophage-specific role of ABCA2 in regulating lipid homeostasis in vivo and in modulating susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Chimeras with dysfunctional macrophage ABCA2 were generated by transplantation of bone marrow from ABCA2 knockout (KO) mice into irradiated LDL receptor (LDLr) KO mice. Interestingly, lack of ABCA2 in macrophages resulted in a diminished lesion size in the aortic root (-24.5%) and descending thoracic aorta (-36.6%) associated with a 3-fold increase in apoptotic cells, as measured by both caspase 3 and TUNEL. Upon oxidized LDL exposure, macrophages from wildtype (WT) transplanted animals developed filipin-positive droplets in lysosomal-like compartments, corresponding to free cholesterol (FC) accumulation. In contrast, ABCA2-deficient macrophages displayed an abnormal diffuse distribution of FC over peripheral regions. The accumulation of neutral sterols in lipid droplets was increased in ABCA2-deficient macrophages, but primarily in cytoplasmic clusters and not in lysosomes. Importantly, apoptosis of oxLDL loaded macrophages lacking ABCA2 was increased 2.7-fold, probably as a consequence of the broad cellular distribution of FC. Lack of functional ABCA2 generates abnormalities in intracellular lipid distribution/trafficking in macrophages consistent with its lysosomal sequestering role, leading to an increased susceptibility to apoptosis in response to oxidized lipids and reduced atherosclerotic lesion development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Vpx complementation of 'non-macrophage tropic' R5 viruses reveals robust entry of infectious HIV-1 cores into macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlcochova, Petra; Watters, Sarah A; Towers, Greg J; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Gupta, Ravindra K

    2014-03-21

    It is now known that clinically derived viruses are most commonly R5 tropic with very low infectivity in macrophages. As these viruses utilize CD4 inefficiently, defective entry has been assumed to be the dominant restriction. The implication is that macrophages are not an important reservoir for the majority of circulating viruses. Macrophage infection by clinical transmitted/founder isolates was 10-100 and 30-450 fold less efficient as compared to YU-2 and BaL respectively. Vpx complementation augmented macrophage infection by non-macrophage tropic viruses to the level of infectivity observed for YU-2 in the absence of Vpx. Augmentation was evident even when Vpx was provided 24 hours post-infection. The entry defect was measured as 2.5-5 fold, with a further 3.5-10 fold block at strong stop and subsequent stages of reverse transcription as compared to YU-2. The overall block to infection was critically dependent on the mechanism of entry as demonstrated by rescue of infection after pseudotyping with VSV-G envelope. Reverse transcription in macrophages could not be enhanced using a panel of cytokines or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Although the predominant block to clinical transmitted/founder viruses is post-entry, infectivity is determined by Env-CD4 interactions and can be rescued with VSV-G pseudotyping. This suggests a functional link between the optimal entry pathway taken by macrophage tropic viruses and downstream events required for reverse transcription. Consistent with a predominantly post-entry block, replication of R5 using viruses can be greatly enhanced by Vpx. We conclude therefore that entry is not the limiting step and that macrophages represent clinically relevant reservoirs for 'non-macrophage tropic' viruses.

  10. Experimental results obtained at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrel, V.

    1993-01-01

    A review of experimental results obtained at GANIL on the study of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions with secondary radioactive beams is presented. Mass measurements by means of the GANIL cyclotrons are described. The possibilities of GANIL/LISE3 for the production and separation of radioactive beams are illustrated through a large variety of experiments. (author). 19 refs., 8 figs

  11. Extracts of Crinum latifolium inhibit the cell viability of mouse lymphoma cell line EL4 and induce activation of anti-tumour activity of macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Yen T; Vo, Bach-Hue T; Nguyen, Lac-Thuy H; Bernad, Jose; Alaeddine, Mohamad; Coste, Agnes; Reybier, Karine; Pipy, Bernard; Nepveu, Françoise

    2013-08-26

    Crinum latifolium L. (CL) leaf extracts have been traditionally used in Vietnam and are now used all over the world for the treatment of prostate cancer. However, the precise cellular mechanisms of the action of CL extracts remain unclear. To examine the effects of CL samples on the anti-tumour activity of peritoneal murine macrophages. The properties of three extracts (aqueous, flavonoid, alkaloid), one fraction (alkaloid), and one pure compound (6-hydroxycrinamidine) obtained from CL, were studied (i) for redox capacities (DPPH and bleaching beta-carotene assays), (ii) on murine peritoneal macrophages (MTT assay) and on lymphoma EL4-luc2 cells (luciferine assay) for cytotoxicity, (iii) on macrophage polarization (production of ROS and gene expression by PCR), and (iv) on the tumoricidal functions of murine peritoneal macrophages (lymphoma cytotoxicity by co-culture with syngeneic macrophages). The total flavonoid extract with a high antioxidant activity (IC50=107.36 mg/L, DPPH assay) showed an inhibitory action on cancer cells. Alkaloid extracts inhibited the proliferation of lymphoma cells either by directly acting on tumour cells or by activating of the tumoricidal functions of syngeneic macrophages. The aqueous extract induced mRNA expression of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) indicating differentiation of macrophages into pro-inflammatory M1 polarized macrophages. The total flavonoid, alkaloid extracts and an alkaloid fraction induced the expression of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) on the surface of the polarized macrophages that could lead to the activation of macrophages towards the M1 phenotype. Aqueous and flavonoid extracts enhanced NADPH quinine oxido-reductase 1 (NQO1) mRNA expression in polarized macrophages which could play an important role in cancer chemoprevention. All the samples studied were non-toxic to normal living cells and the pure alkaloid tested, 6-hydroxycrinamidine, was not

  12. Gene expression profiling of macrophages: implications for an immunosuppressive effect of dissolucytotic gold ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifert Oliver

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold salts has previously been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but have been replaced by biologicals such as TNF-α inhibitors. The mechanisms behind the anti-inflammatory effect of metallic gold ions are still unknown, however, recent data showed that charged gold atoms are released from pure metallic gold implants by macrophages via a dissolucytosis membrane, and that gold ions are taken up by local macrophages, mast cells and to some extent fibroblasts. These findings open the question of possible immunomodulatory effects of metallic gold and motivate efforts on a deeper understanding of the effect of metallic gold on key inflammatory cells as macrophages. Methods Human macrophage cells (cell line THP-1 were grown on gold foils and intracellular uptake was analysed by autometallography. The impact of phagocytised gold ions on viability of THP-1 cells was investigated by trypan blue staining and TUNEL assay. The global gene expression profile of THP-1 cells after incorporation of gold ions was studied using microarray analysis comprising approximately 20,000 genes. The gene expression data was confirmed by measurement of secreted proteins. Results Autometallography showed intracellular uptake of gold ions into THP-1 cells. No significant effect on viability of THP-1 cells was demonstrated. Our data revealed a unique gene expression signature of dissolucytotic THP-1 cells that had taken up gold ions. A large number of regulated genes were functionally related to immunomodulation. Gold ion uptake induced downregulation of genes involved in rheumatoid arthritis such as hepatocyte growth factor, tenascin-C, inhibitor of DNA binding 1 and 3 and matrix metalloproteinase 13. Conclusion The data obtained in this study offer new insights into the mode of action of gold ions and suggest for the investigation of effects on other key cells and a possible future role of metallic gold as implants in rheumatoid arthritis or

  13. The effects of platelet lysate on maturation, fertilization and embryo development of NMRI mouse oocytes at germinal vesicle stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazoki, Hassan; Eimani, Hussein; Farokhi, Farah; Shahverdi, Abdol-Hossein; Tahaei, Leila Sadat

    2016-04-01

    Improving in vitro maturation could increase the rate of pregnancy from oocytes matured in vitro. Consequently, patients will be prevented from using gonadotropin with its related side effects. In this study, the maturation medium was enriched by platelet lysate (PL), then maturation and subsequent developments were monitored. Oocytes at germinal vesicle stage with cumulus cells (cumulus-oocyte complex) and without cumulus cells (denuded oocytes) were obtained from mature female mice. The maturation medium was enriched by 5 and 10 % PL and 5 % PL + 5 % fetal bovine serum (FBS) as experimental groups; the control groups' media consisted of 5 and 10 % FBS. After 18 h, the matured oocytes were collected and, after fertilization, subsequent development was monitored. The rates of maturation, fertilization and 2-cell embryo development for the denuded oocyte groups in experimental media 5 % PL and 5 % PL + 5 % FBS were significantly higher than those of the control groups ( P platelet lysate could improve the maturation rate in the absence of granulosa cells compared to media with FBS. This extract also had positive effects on fertilization and embryo development.

  14. Sulfite induces release of lipid mediators by alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck-Speier, I.; Dayal, N.; Maier, L. [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. for Inhalation Biology; Denzlinger, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. II, Medical Clinic; Haberl, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. III, Medical Clinic

    1998-03-01

    Air pollutants are supposed to modulate physiological responses of alveolar macrophages (AM). This study was addressed to the question whether at neutral pH sulfur(IV) species in comparison to sulfur(VI) species cause AM to release proinflammatory mediators and which pathways are involved in their generation. Supernatants obtained from canine AM treated with sulfite (0.1 mM to 2 mM) enhanced the respiratory burst of canine neutrophils, measured by lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence, whereas supernatants derived from AM treated with sulfate (1 mM) did not. The neutrophil-stimulating activity released by sulfite-treated AM consisted of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) as shown by desensitization of the platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) as shown by desensitization of the corresponding receptors. Inhibitors of phospholipase A{sub 2} substantially suppressed release of neutrophil-stimulating activity by sulfite-treated AM. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase in sulfite-treated AM also reduced neutrophil-stimulating activity, while inhibition of cyclooxygenase had no effect. In conclusion, sulfite induces AM to release lipid mediators via phospholipase A{sub 2}- and 5-lipoxygenase-dependent pathways. These mediators activate neutrophils via the receptors for PAF and LTB{sub 4}. (orig.)

  15. MicroRNA 21 Is a Homeostatic Regulator of Macrophage Polarization and Prevents Prostaglandin E2-Mediated M2 Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhuo; Brandt, Stephanie; Medeiros, Alexandra; Wang, Soujuan; Wu, Hao; Dent, Alexander; Serezani, C. Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages dictate both initiation and resolution of inflammation. During acute inflammation classically activated macrophages (M1) predominate, and during the resolution phase alternative macrophages (M2) are dominant. The molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage polarization are understudied. MicroRNAs are differentially expressed in M1 and M2 macrophages that influence macrophage polarization. We identified a role of miR-21 in macrophage polarization, and found that cross-talk between ...

  16. Modelling phenolic and technological maturities of grapes by means of the multivariate relation between organoleptic and physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, E; Ortiz, M C; Sarabia, L A; Íñiguez, M; Puras, P

    2013-01-25

    The ripeness of grapes at the harvest time is one of the most important parameters for obtaining high quality red wines. Traditionally the decision of harvesting is to be taken only after analysing sugar concentration, titratable acidity and pH of the grape juice (technological maturity). However, these parameters only provide information about the pulp ripeness and overlook the real degree of skins and seeds maturities (phenolic maturity). Both maturities, technological and phenolic, are not simultaneously reached, on the contrary they tend to separate depending on several factors: grape variety, cultivar, adverse weather conditions, soil, water availability and cultural practices. Besides, this divergence is increasing as a consequence of the climate change (larger quantities of CO(2), less rain, and higher temperatures). 247 samples collected in vineyards representative of the qualified designation of origin Rioja from 2007 to 2011 have been analysed. Samples contain the four grape varieties usual in the elaboration of Rioja wines ('tempranillo', 'garnacha', 'mazuelo' and 'graciano'). The present study is the first systematic investigation on the maturity of grapes that includes the organoleptic evaluation of the degree of grapes maturity (sugars/acidity maturity, aromatic maturity of the pulp, aromatic maturity of the skins and tannins maturity) together with the values of the physicochemical parameters (probable alcohol degree, total acidity, pH, malic acid, K, total index polyphenolics, anthocyans, absorbances at 420, 520 and 620 nm, colour index and tartaric acid) determined over the same samples. A varimax rotation of the latent variables of a PLS model between the physicochemical variables and the mean of four sensory variables allows identifying both maturities. Besides, the position of the samples in the first plane defines the effect that the different factors exert on both phenolic and technological maturities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All

  17. Low Levels of IGF-1 Contribute to Alveolar Macrophage Dysfunction in Cystic Fibrosis1

    OpenAIRE

    Bessich, Jamie L.; Nymon, Amanda B.; Moulton, Lisa A; Dorman, Dana; Ashare, Alix

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages are major contributors to lung innate immunity. Although alveolar macrophages from CFTR−/− mice have impaired function, no study has investigated primary alveolar macrophages in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). CF patients have low levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and our prior studies demonstrate a relationship between IGF-1 and macrophage function. We hypothesize that reduced IGF-1 in CF leads to impaired alveolar macrophage function and chronic infectio...

  18. Inhibiting epigenetic enzymes to improve atherogenic macrophage functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bossche, Jan; Neele, Annette E.; Hoeksema, Marten A.; de Heij, Femke; Boshuizen, Marieke C. S.; van der Velden, Saskia; de Boer, Vincent C.; Reedquist, Kris A.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages determine the outcome of atherosclerosis by propagating inflammatory responses, foam cell formation and eventually necrotic core development. Yet, the pathways that regulate their atherogenic functions remain ill-defined. It is now apparent that chromatin remodeling chromatin modifying

  19. HIV-1 Nef in Macrophage-Mediated Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Fogel, Gary B.; Singer, Elyse J.; Salemi, Marco; Nolan, David J.; Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; McGrath, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART) has significantly reduced the number of AIDS-associated illnesses and changed the course of HIV-1 disease in developed countries. Despite the ability of cART to maintain high CD4+ T-cell counts, a number of macrophage-mediated diseases can still occur in HIV-infected subjects. These diseases include lymphoma, metabolic diseases, and HIV-associated neurological disorders. Within macrophages, the HIV-1 regulatory protein “Nef” can modulate surface receptors, interact with signaling pathways, and promote specific environments that contribute to each of these pathologies. Moreover, genetic variation in Nef may also guide the macrophage response. Herein, we review findings relating to the Nef–macrophage interaction and how this relationship contributes to disease pathogenesis. PMID:23215766

  20. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  1. A stratified myeloid system, the challenge of understanding macrophage diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissmann, F; Mass, E

    2015-12-01

    The present issue of 'Seminars in Immunology' addresses the topic of macrophage biology, 100 years after the death of Elie Metchnikoff (May 1845-July 1916). As foreseen by Metchnikoff, the roles of macrophages in the maintenance of homeostasis and immunity against pathogens have become a broad and active area of investigation. We now start to realize that the myeloid system includes a multiplicity of cell types with diverse developmental origins and functions. Therefore, the textbook picture of a plastic and multifunctional macrophage does not meet the requirements of our current knowledge anymore. Further development toward a quantitative and molecular understanding of myeloid cell biology in vivo and their roles in tissue homeostasis and remodeling will benefit from taking this complexity into account. A tentative model to help in this pursuit and account for myeloid cell and macrophage diversity is discussed below. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Macrophages are necessary for epimorphic regeneration in African spiny mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkin, Jennifer; Gawriluk, Thomas R; Gensel, John C; Seifert, Ashley W

    2017-05-16

    How the immune system affects tissue regeneration is not well understood. In this study, we used an emerging mammalian model of epimorphic regeneration, the African spiny mouse, to examine cell-based inflammation and tested the hypothesis that macrophages are necessary for regeneration. By directly comparing inflammatory cell activation in a 4 mm ear injury during regeneration ( Acomys cahirinus ) and scarring ( Mus musculus ), we found that both species exhibited an acute inflammatory response, with scarring characterized by stronger myeloperoxidase activity. In contrast, ROS production was stronger and more persistent during regeneration. By depleting macrophages during injury, we demonstrate a functional requirement for these cells to stimulate regeneration. Importantly, the spatial distribution of activated macrophage subtypes was unique during regeneration with pro-inflammatory macrophages failing to infiltrate the regeneration blastema. Together, our results demonstrate an essential role for inflammatory cells to regulate a regenerative response.

  3. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorenko, Elena L.; Han, Summer S.; Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Leng, Lin; Mizue, Yuka; Anderson, George M.; Mulder, Erik J.; de Bildt, Annelies; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Chang, Joseph T.; Bucala, Richard

    OBJECTIVE. Autistic spectrum disorders are childhood neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by social and communicative impairment and repetitive and stereotypical behavior. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an upstream regulator of innate immunity that promotes

  4. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is elevated in obese adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamchybekov, Uran; Figulla, Hans R.; Gerdes, Norbert; Jung, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of obesity in childhood and adolescence is continuing rising. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) participates in inflammatory and immune responses as a pro-inflammatory cytokine. The present study aimed to investigate MIF in overweight adolescents. Methods:

  5. Geopolymer obtained from coal ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, V.; Bissari, E.S.; Uggioni, E.; Bernardin, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Geopolymers are three-dimensional alumino silicates that can be rapidly formed at low temperature from naturally occurring aluminosilicates with a structure similar to zeolites. In this work coal ash (Tractebel Energy) was used as source of aluminosilicate according a full factorial design in eight formulations with three factors (hydroxide type and concentration and temperature) and two-levels. The ash was dried and hydroxide was added according type and concentration. The geopolymer was poured into cylindrical molds, cured (14 days) and subjected to compression test. The coal ash from power plants belongs to the Si-Al system and thus can easily form geopolymers. The compression tests showed that it is possible to obtain samples with strength comparable to conventional Portland cement. As a result, temperature and molarity are the main factors affecting the compressive strength of the obtained geopolymer. (author)

  6. Truncated States Obtained by Iteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, W. B.; Almeida, N. G. de

    2008-01-01

    We introduce the concept of truncated states obtained via iterative processes (TSI) and study its statistical features, making an analogy with dynamical systems theory (DST). As a specific example, we have studied TSI for the doubling and the logistic functions, which are standard functions in studying chaos. TSI for both the doubling and logistic functions exhibit certain similar patterns when their statistical features are compared from the point of view of DST

  7. Elevated Social Anxiety among Early Maturing Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Heidemarie; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Babson, Kimberly A.; Gahr, Jessica L.; Trainor, Casey D.; Frala, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a key period in terms of the development of anxiety psychopathology. An emerging literature suggests that early pubertal maturation is associated with enhanced vulnerability for anxiety symptomatology, although few studies have examined this association with regard to social anxiety. Accordingly, the current study was designed to…

  8. Mature cystic teratomas: Relationship between histopathological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... tumor size, symptoms related to MCT and laterality of the tumor did not differ among the patients according to the MCT contents. Conclusions: Our findings suggest no relationship between the clinical features and histopathological contents of MCTs. Key words: Histopathological contents, mature cystic teratoma, ovarian, ...

  9. Intraovarian markers of follicular and oocyte maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, A; Diamond, M P; DeCherney, A H; Naftolin, F

    1987-08-01

    The use of ovulation induction for multiple follicular growth in in vitro fertilization (IVF) has introduced the problem of follicular asynchrony. As a consequence of the asynchrony, the parameters most commonly used by IVF groups to assess follicular and oocyte quality within those follicles are not sufficiently sensitive or specific. Thus, each follicle must be considered separately, and specific markers of follicular and/or oocyte maturation must be sought from within the follicle. In this review we analyze previous reports of potential markers of follicular and oocyte maturation. In regards to the follicular fluid constituents, the level of estradiol in follicular fluid correlates with fertilization and pregnancy in stimulated cycles. Other steroids are only helpful when specific stimulation protocols are used. The level of some follicular proteins such as alpha-1-antitrypsin and fibrinogen also correlates with fertilization and pregnancy outcome. Cyclic AMP levels in follicular fluid are significantly reduced in follicles leading to conception. Regulators of oocyte maturation, such as the Oocyte Maturation Inhibitor (OMI) or the Meiosis Inducing Substance (MIS) have also been correlated with IVF outcome, but their exact structure remains still unknown. In addition, other sophisticated parameters, such as chemotactic activity of human leukocytes, or simple methods, such as the presence of intrafollicular echoes, have also been used as successful markers in predicting IVF outcome.

  10. Teaching Copywriting Students about the Mature Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniany, Bonnie

    Advertising educators have a responsibility to make students aware of the importance of the mature market (older people) and to teach them methods to reach this group. An assignment in a copywriting class asked students to write and design ads to promote blue jeans to adults over 50. The assignment accomplished three things: (1) helped students…

  11. Plant regeneration in wheat mature embryo culture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kamil Haliloğlu

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... Success in genetic engineering of cereals depends on the callus formation and efficient plant regeneration system. Callus formation and plant regeneration of wheat mature embryos ... compiled by modification of methods previously mentioned in ..... of more and readily available nutrition than artificial cul-.

  12. GROWTH PATTERNS AND MATURATION OF CHILDREN WITH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GROWTH PATTERNS AND MATURATION OF CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE IN RELATION TO PLASMA ZINC STATUS. Dr. Salwa R. El Batrawy, Dr. Mervat Tawfik M. Tantawi. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  13. 7 CFR 51.2841 - Mature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... considered mature when harvested in accordance with good commercial practice at a stage which will not result...

  14. The influence of biological maturation on anthropometric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether biological maturation would significantly influence the anthropometric determinants of talent identification among U-14 provincial girl tennis players. Twenty-six of the top thirty-two provincial female players (mean age = 13.21± 0.72 years) from the Northern Gauteng and the ...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Industry, Part 1, Chapter 20-13 Market Classification, Maturity Standards and Processing or Packing... Independence Ave., Washington, DC 20250 or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov...

  16. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Florida Citrus Industry, Part 1, Chapter 20-13 Market Classification, Maturity Standards and Processing or... 2065-S, 14th and Independence Ave., Washington, DC 20250 or at the National Archives and Records...: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. ...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Citrus Industry, Part 1, Chapter 20-13 Market Classification, Maturity Standards and Processing or... 2065-S, 14th and Independence Ave., Washington, DC 20250 or at the National Archives and Records...: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. ...

  18. Analyzing Project Management Maturity Level in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot Simangunsong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Project management has been generally known and increasingly used by many organizations to gain competitive advantage. In this context, many studies have proposed maturity models to evaluate how project management knowledge has been deployed effectively and efficiently in or- ganization. As a developing country, Indonesia needs many development projects managed by government and private companies in different industries. Here, a study to assess project manage- ment maturity level in Indonesian businesses may bring insight about current business practices, which is important to speed up country development and business sustainability. Adapting the Project Management Maturity Model (ProMMM, a survey instrument has been developed and ap- plied to professionals from Jakarta and surrounding area. The result of analysis shows that con- struction and primary industry have a higher maturity level compare to manufacturing and servic- es. It is to be noted, however, that the level of project management understanding is low across in- dustries. This indicates that more quality project management training or certification is required to improve overall project management knowledge in Indonesia.

  19. Converting developing and mature sugarcane carbohydrates into ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolz, Carlos; De Leon, Roberto [Biochemical Engineering Center, Research Institute, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala (Guatemala)

    2010-10-15

    Experiments were performed employing cane particles obtained from sugarcane at different growth stages until maturation measuring the amount of ethanol produced and the carbohydrate consumption in order to estimate the sugarcane growth stage where both parameters were optimized. Two non-flowering commercial cane varieties NA56 and PR752002 were cultivated and samples taken at different time intervals. Two Saccharomyces cerevisae strains were also compared in the trials. Sucrose was poorly consumed in young cane, which was an unexpected result. Fructose on the other hand was the hexose that remained in the medium at the end of the fermentations specially when using mature sugarcane. There was an increasing trend in ethanol production as a function of days after planting (DAP) as expected; however, a plateau was reached after 225 DAP and the maximum value obtained was between 300 and 325 DAP. When these figures were compared with the corresponding DAP used for sugar production, only 25 days less were needed in the field for maximum ethanol production. On the other hand, it was clear from the data that cane harvesting for ethanol production should not be done after the recommended DAP for commercial sugar production. If this is done, the excess fructose present will not be completely utilized by yeast. Finally, it was observed that the yeast with more affinity for sugarcane fibers showed better ethanol yields in all samples tested. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Role of macrophages in the immune response to hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumgardner, G.L.; Chen, S.; Almond, S.P.; Ascher, N.L.; Payne, W.D.; Matas, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of host macrophages in the development of allospecific cytolytic T cells (allo-CTLs) in response to purified allogeneic MHC Class I+, Class II- hepatocytes in vivo in hepatocyte sponge matrix allografts (HC-SMA). Depletion of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) from responder splenocytes in mixed lymphocyte hepatocyte culture (MLHC) inhibits the development of allo-CTLs in response to purified hepatocytes. First the ability of sponge macrophages to function as accessory cells in indirect presentation of hepatocyte Class I antigen was tested in MLHC. We found that addition of irradiated sponge cells (a source of sponge macrophages) restored the development of allo-CTLs in MLHC depleted of responder APCs. Therefore, radioresistant sponge macrophages can function as accessory cells in MLHC. We next employed silica as an immunotherapy targeted against host macrophages and assessed the effect on development of allo-CTLs in HC-SMA. We found that local (intrasponge) silica treatment completely inhibited the development of allo-CTLs in HC-SMA. Combined local and systemic silica treatment resulted in inhibition of allocytotoxicity comparable to local silica treatment alone in the doses tested. We conclude that host macrophages which infiltrate HC-SMA can function as accessory cells in vitro in MLHC and that both infiltrating host macrophages and lymphocytes participate in the development of an alloimmune response to purified hepatocytes in vivo. This interaction may involve indirect antigen presentation of hepatocyte Class I antigen by macrophages to host lymphocytes which accumulate in HC-SMA