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Sample records for matter hyperintensities wmhs

  1. White matter hyperintensities and changes in white matter integrity in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liya; Mao, Hui; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Meltzer, Carolyn C.; Holder, Chad A.

    2011-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated the relationship between WMHs and white matter changes in AD using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the sensitivity of each DTI index in distinguishing AD with WMHs. Forty-four subjects with WMHs were included. Subjects were classified into three groups based on the Scheltens rating scale: 15 AD patients with mild WMHs, 12 AD patients with severe WMHs, and 17 controls with mild WMHs. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (D R ), and axial diffusivity (D A ) were analyzed using the region of interest and tract-based spatial statistics methods. Sensitivity and specificity of DTI indices in distinguishing AD groups from the controls were evaluated. AD patients with mild WMHs exhibited differences from control subjects in most DTI indices in the medial temporal and frontal areas; however, differences in DTI indices from AD patients with mild WMHs and AD patients with severe WMHs were found in the parietal and occipital areas. FA and D R were more sensitive measurements than MD and D A in differentiating AD patients from controls, while MD was a more sensitive measurement in distinguishing AD patients with severe WMHs from those with mild WMHs. WMHs may contribute to the white matter changes in AD brains, specifically in temporal and frontal areas. Changes in parietal and occipital lobes may be related to the severity of WMHs. D R may serve as an imaging marker of myelin deficits associated with AD. (orig.)

  2. DEWS (DEep White matter hyperintensity Segmentation framework): A fully automated pipeline for detecting small deep white matter hyperintensities in migraineurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bo-Yong; Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Seung-Hak; Cha, Jihoon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Hyunjin

    2018-01-01

    Migraineurs show an increased load of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and more rapid deep WMH progression. Previous methods for WMH segmentation have limited efficacy to detect small deep WMHs. We developed a new fully automated detection pipeline, DEWS (DEep White matter hyperintensity Segmentation framework), for small and superficially-located deep WMHs. A total of 148 non-elderly subjects with migraine were included in this study. The pipeline consists of three components: 1) white matter (WM) extraction, 2) WMH detection, and 3) false positive reduction. In WM extraction, we adjusted the WM mask to re-assign misclassified WMHs back to WM using many sequential low-level image processing steps. In WMH detection, the potential WMH clusters were detected using an intensity based threshold and region growing approach. For false positive reduction, the detected WMH clusters were classified into final WMHs and non-WMHs using the random forest (RF) classifier. Size, texture, and multi-scale deep features were used to train the RF classifier. DEWS successfully detected small deep WMHs with a high positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.98 and true positive rate (TPR) of 0.70 in the training and test sets. Similar performance of PPV (0.96) and TPR (0.68) was attained in the validation set. DEWS showed a superior performance in comparison with other methods. Our proposed pipeline is freely available online to help the research community in quantifying deep WMHs in non-elderly adults.

  3. Presence and progression of white matter hyperintensities and cognition A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloppenborg, Raoul P.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; van den Berg, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to quantify the effects of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on specific cognitive functions with particular attention to WMH progression and localization. Methods: PubMed (January 1990-July 2013) and bibliographies from included articles were used. Studies that were included

  4. Risk factor analysis of cerebral white matter hyperintensities in children with sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Land, Veronica; Mutsaerts, Henri J. M. M.; Engelen, Marc; Heijboer, Harriët; Roest, Mark; Hollestelle, Martine J.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is complicated by silent cerebral infarcts, visible as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both local vaso-occlusion, elicited by endothelial dysfunction, and insufficiency of cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been proposed to be involved

  5. Employing visual analytics to aid the design of white matter hyperintensity classifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raidou, Renata Georgia; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Sepasian, Neda; Pezzotti, Nicola; Bouvy, Willem H.; Breeuwer, Marcel; Vilanova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of brain white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) is important for prognosis and disease monitoring. To this end,classifiers are often trained – usually,using T1 and FLAIR weighted MR images. Incorporating additional features,derived from diffusion weighted MRI,could improve

  6. Application of variable threshold intensity to segmentation for white matter hyperintensities in fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance images

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    Yoo, Byung Il; Han, Ji Won; Oh, San Yeo Wool; Kim, Tae Hui [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Jae; Lee, Eun Young [Kyungbook National University Chilgok Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Buk-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); MacFall, James R. [Duke University Medical Center, Neuropsychiatric Imaging Research Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Payne, Martha E. [Duke University Medical Center, Neuropsychiatric Imaging Research Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Durham, NC (United States); Kim, Jae Hyoung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Woong [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Natural Sciences, Department of Brain and Cognitive Science, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are regions of abnormally high intensity on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation of WMHs is important since WMHs are often seen in the elderly and are associated with various geriatric and psychiatric disorders. We developed a fully automated monospectral segmentation method for WMHs using FLAIR MRIs. Through this method, we introduce an optimal threshold intensity (I{sub O}) for segmenting WMHs, which varies with WMHs volume (V{sub WMH}), and we establish the I{sub O} -V{sub WMH} relationship. Our method showed accurate validations in volumetric and spatial agreements of automatically segmented WMHs compared with manually segmented WMHs for 32 confirmatory images. Bland-Altman values of volumetric agreement were 0.96 ± 8.311 ml (bias and 95 % confidence interval), and the similarity index of spatial agreement was 0.762 ± 0.127 (mean ± standard deviation). Furthermore, similar validation accuracies were obtained in the images acquired from different scanners. The proposed segmentation method uses only FLAIR MRIs, has the potential to be accurate with images obtained from different scanners, and can be implemented with a fully automated procedure. In our study, validation results were obtained with FLAIR MRIs from only two scanner types. The design of the method may allow its use in large multicenter studies with correct efficiency. (orig.)

  7. Application of variable threshold intensity to segmentation for white matter hyperintensities in fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byung Il; Han, Ji Won; Oh, San Yeo Wool; Kim, Tae Hui; Lee, Jung Jae; Lee, Eun Young; MacFall, James R.; Payne, Martha E.; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Kim, Ki Woong

    2014-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are regions of abnormally high intensity on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation of WMHs is important since WMHs are often seen in the elderly and are associated with various geriatric and psychiatric disorders. We developed a fully automated monospectral segmentation method for WMHs using FLAIR MRIs. Through this method, we introduce an optimal threshold intensity (I O ) for segmenting WMHs, which varies with WMHs volume (V WMH ), and we establish the I O -V WMH relationship. Our method showed accurate validations in volumetric and spatial agreements of automatically segmented WMHs compared with manually segmented WMHs for 32 confirmatory images. Bland-Altman values of volumetric agreement were 0.96 ± 8.311 ml (bias and 95 % confidence interval), and the similarity index of spatial agreement was 0.762 ± 0.127 (mean ± standard deviation). Furthermore, similar validation accuracies were obtained in the images acquired from different scanners. The proposed segmentation method uses only FLAIR MRIs, has the potential to be accurate with images obtained from different scanners, and can be implemented with a fully automated procedure. In our study, validation results were obtained with FLAIR MRIs from only two scanner types. The design of the method may allow its use in large multicenter studies with correct efficiency. (orig.)

  8. Deletion/insertion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and white matter hyperintensities in dementia: A pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purandare, N.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Davidson, Y.; Gibbons, L.; Hardicre, J.; Byrne, J.; McCollum, C.N.; Jackson, A.; Burns, A.; Mann, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) deletion/insertion (D/I) polymorphism and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) in patients with dementia. DESIGN: Observational pilot study with adjustment for potential confounders using analysis of covariance.

  9. White matter hyperintensities in Parkinson's disease: do they explain the disparity between the postural instability gait difficulty and tremor dominant subtypes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talia Herman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain white matter hyperintensities (WMHs commonly observed on brain imaging of older adults are associated with balance and gait impairment and have also been linked to cognitive deficits. Parkinson's disease (PD is traditionally sub-classified into the postural instability gait difficulty (PIGD sub-type, and the tremor dominant (TD sub-type. Considering the known association between WMHs and axial symptoms like gait disturbances and postural instability, one can hypothesize that WMHs might contribute to the disparate clinical sub-types of patients with PD. METHODS: 110 patients with PD underwent a clinical evaluation and a 3T MRI exam. Based on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, the patients were classified into motor sub-types, i.e., TD or PIGD, and scores reflecting PIGD and TD symptoms were computed. We compared white matter burden using three previously validated methods: one using a semi-quantitative visual rating scale in specific brain regions and two automated methods. RESULTS: Overall, MRI data were obtained in 104 patients. The mean WMHs scores and the percent of subjects with lesions in specific brain regions were similar in the two subtypes, p = 0.678. The PIGD and the TD scores did not differ even when comparing patients with a relatively high burden of WMHs to patients with a relatively low burden. Across most of the brain regions, mild to moderate correlations between WMHs and age were found (r = 0.23 to 0.41; p<0.021. Conversely, no significant correlations were found between WMHs and the PIGD score or disease duration. In addition, depressive symptoms and cerebro-vascular risk factors were similar among the two subtypes. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to what has been reported previously among older adults, the present study could not demonstrate any association between WMHs and the PIGD or TD motor sub-types in patients with PD.

  10. White matter hyperintensity and stroke lesion segmentation and differentiation using convolutional neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Guerrero

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available White matter hyperintensities (WMH are a feature of sporadic small vessel disease also frequently observed in magnetic resonance images (MRI of healthy elderly subjects. The accurate assessment of WMH burden is of crucial importance for epidemiological studies to determine association between WMHs, cognitive and clinical data; their causes, and the effects of new treatments in randomized trials. The manual delineation of WMHs is a very tedious, costly and time consuming process, that needs to be carried out by an expert annotator (e.g. a trained image analyst or radiologist. The problem of WMH delineation is further complicated by the fact that other pathological features (i.e. stroke lesions often also appear as hyperintense regions. Recently, several automated methods aiming to tackle the challenges of WMH segmentation have been proposed. Most of these methods have been specifically developed to segment WMH in MRI but cannot differentiate between WMHs and strokes. Other methods, capable of distinguishing between different pathologies in brain MRI, are not designed with simultaneous WMH and stroke segmentation in mind. Therefore, a task specific, reliable, fully automated method that can segment and differentiate between these two pathological manifestations on MRI has not yet been fully identified. In this work we propose to use a convolutional neural network (CNN that is able to segment hyperintensities and differentiate between WMHs and stroke lesions. Specifically, we aim to distinguish between WMH pathologies from those caused by stroke lesions due to either cortical, large or small subcortical infarcts. The proposed fully convolutional CNN architecture, called uResNet, that comprised an analysis path, that gradually learns low and high level features, followed by a synthesis path, that gradually combines and up-samples the low and high level features into a class likelihood semantic segmentation. Quantitatively, the proposed CNN

  11. Impact of Strategically Located White Matter Hyperintensities on Cognition in Memory Clinic Patients with Small Vessel Disease.

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    Biesbroek, J Matthijs; Weaver, Nick A; Hilal, Saima; Kuijf, Hugo J; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Xu, Xin; Tan, Boon Yeow; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Postma, Albert; Biessels, Geert Jan; Chen, Christopher P L H

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the impact of small vessel disease (SVD) on cognition generally focus on white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume. The extent to which WMH location relates to cognitive performance has received less attention, but is likely to be functionally important. We examined the relation between WMH location and cognition in a memory clinic cohort of patients with sporadic SVD. A total of 167 patients with SVD were recruited from memory clinics. Assumption-free region of interest-based analyses based on major white matter tracts and voxel-wise analyses were used to determine the association between WMH location and executive functioning, visuomotor speed and memory. Region of interest-based analyses showed that WMHs located particularly within the anterior thalamic radiation and forceps minor were inversely associated with both executive functioning and visuomotor speed, independent of total WMH volume. Memory was significantly associated with WMH volume in the forceps minor, independent of total WMH volume. An independent assumption-free voxel-wise analysis identified strategic voxels in these same tracts. Region of interest-based analyses showed that WMH volume within the anterior thalamic radiation explained 6.8% of variance in executive functioning, compared to 3.9% for total WMH volume; WMH volume within the forceps minor explained 4.6% of variance in visuomotor speed and 4.2% of variance in memory, compared to 1.8% and 1.3% respectively for total WMH volume. Our findings identify the anterior thalamic radiation and forceps minor as strategic white matter tracts in which WMHs are most strongly associated with cognitive impairment in memory clinic patients with SVD. WMH volumes in individual tracts explained more variance in cognition than total WMH burden, emphasizing the importance of lesion location when addressing the functional consequences of WMHs.

  12. Menopausal Hot Flashes and White Matter Hyperintensities

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    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Derby, Carol A.; Sejdić, Ervin; Maki, Pauline M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hot flashes are the classic menopausal symptom. Emerging data links hot flashes to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, yet how hot flashes are related to brain health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship between hot flashes - measured via physiologic monitor and self-report - and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) among midlife women. Methods Twenty midlife women ages 40-60 without clinical CVD, with their uterus and both ovaries, and not taking hormone therapy were recruited. Women underwent 24 hours of ambulatory physiologic and diary hot flash monitoring to quantify hot flashes; magnetic resonance imaging to assess WMH burden; 72 hours of actigraphy and questionnaires to quantify sleep; and a blood draw, questionnaires, and physical measures to quantify demographics and CVD risk factors. Test of a priori hypotheses regarding relations between physiologically-monitored and self-reported wake and sleep hot flashes and WMH were conducted in linear regression models. Results More physiologically-monitored hot flashes during sleep were associated with greater WMH, controlling for age, race, and body mass index [beta(standard error)=.0002 (.0001), p=.03]. Findings persisted controlling for sleep characteristics and additional CVD risk factors. No relations were observed for self-reported hot flashes. Conclusions More physiologically-monitored hot flashes during sleep were associated with greater WMH burden among midlife women free of clinical CVD. Results suggest that relations between hot flashes and CVD risk observed in the periphery may extend to the brain. Future work should consider the unique role of sleep hot flashes in brain health. PMID:26057822

  13. Deep white matter hyperintensities, microstructural integrity and dual task walking in older people.

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    Ghanavati, Tabassom; Smitt, Myriam Sillevis; Lord, Stephen R; Sachdev, Perminder; Wen, Wei; Kochan, Nicole A; Brodaty, Henry; Delbaere, Kim

    2018-01-03

    To examine neural, physiological and cognitive influences on gait speed under single and dual-task conditions. Sixty-two community-dwelling older people (aged 80.0 ± 4.2 years) participated in our study. Gait speed was assessed with a timed 20-meter walk under single and dual-task (reciting alternate letters of the alphabet) conditions. Participants also underwent tests to estimate physiological fall risk based on five measures of sensorimotor function, cognitive function across five domains, brain white matter (WM) hyperintensities and WM microstructural integrity by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA). Univariate linear regression analyses showed that global physiological and cognitive measures were associated with single (β = 0.594 and β=-0.297, respectively) and dual-task gait speed (β = 0.306 and β=-0.362, respectively). Deep WMHs were associated with dual-task gait speed only (β = 0.257). Multivariate mediational analyses showed that global and executive cognition reduced the strength of the association between deep WMHs and dual-task gait speed by 27% (β = 0.188) and 44% (β = 0.145) respectively. There was a significant linear association between single-task gait speed and mean FA values of the genu (β=-0.295) and splenium (β=-0.326) of the corpus callosum, and between dual-task gait speed and mean FA values of Superior Cerebellar Peduncle (β=-0.284), splenium of the Corpus Callosum (β=-0.286) and Cingulum (β=-0.351). Greater deep WMH volumes are associated with slower walking speed under dual-task conditions, and this relationship is mediated in part by global cognition and executive abilities specifically. Furthermore, both cerebellum and cingulum are related to dual-task walking due to their role in motor skill performance and attention, respectively.

  14. Muscle mass decline, arterial stiffness, white matter hyperintensity, and cognitive impairment: Japan Shimanami Health Promoting Program study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Katsuhiko; Okada, Yoko; Ochi, Masayuki; Ohara, Maya; Nagai, Tokihisa; Tabara, Yasuharu; Igase, Michiya

    2017-08-01

    There is a close association between frailty and cognitive impairment. However, the underlying contribution of sarcopenia to the development of cognitive impairment is unclear. We investigated the possible association between muscle mass decline and cognitive impairment in a cross-sectional study of 1518 subjects aged 55 years or above. We also evaluated arterial stiffness and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) as possible underlying mechanisms for this association. Two sarcopenic indices were measured: thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA; calculated by computed tomography) and skeletal muscle mass (bioelectric impedance). Muscle mass decline was defined as either the bottom 10% or 20% of participants for each sex. Cognitive function was assessed using the Touch Panel-type Dementia Assessment Scale, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured as an index of arterial stiffness. Both sarcopenic indices were modestly but significantly associated with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in male and female subjects. The presence of WMHs was significantly associated with low thigh muscle CSA in men and with low skeletal muscle mass in women. The Touch Panel-type Dementia Assessment Scale score was modestly but significantly and positively associated with thigh muscle CSA in men and skeletal muscle mass in women. Muscle mass decline in the bottom 10% of participants on both sarcopenic indices was significantly and independently related to cognitive impairment in women. Lower sarcopenic indices are significantly related to lower cognitive scores. Arterial stiffness and WMHs could account, at least in part, for this association. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  15. TM4SF20 Ancestral Deletion and Susceptibility to a Pediatric Disorder of Early Language Delay and Cerebral White Matter Hyperintensities

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    Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Hunter, Jill V.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Willer, Jason R.; Shaw, Chad; Tian, Qi; Illner, Anna; Wang, Xueqing; Cheung, Sau W.; Patel, Ankita; Campbell, Ian M.; Gelowani, Violet; Hixson, Patricia; Ester, Audrey R.; Azamian, Mahshid S.; Potocki, Lorraine; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P.; Ramocki, Melissa B.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.P.; Wang, Gao; York, Michele K.; Justice, Monica J.; Chu, Zili D.; Bader, Patricia I.; Omo-Griffith, Lisa; Madduri, Nirupama S.; Scharer, Gunter; Crawford, Heather P.; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Eifert, Anna; Kerr, Jeffery; Bacino, Carlos A.; Franklin, Adiaha I.A.; Goin-Kochel, Robin P.; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, Ladonna; Haque, Muhammad E.; Stosic, Marija; Williams, Misti D.; Morgan, Thomas M.; Pruthi, Sumit; Omary, Reed; Boyadjiev, Simeon A.; Win, Kay K.; Thida, Aye; Hurles, Matthew; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Gallagher, Thomas E.; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Davis, Erica E.; Belmont, John W.; Dunstan, Sarah; Simmons, Cameron P.; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Lupski, James R.; Lalani, Seema R.

    2013-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) of the brain are important markers of aging and small-vessel disease. WMHs are rare in healthy children and, when observed, often occur with comorbid neuroinflammatory or vasculitic processes. Here, we describe a complex 4 kb deletion in 2q36.3 that segregates with early childhood communication disorders and WMH in 15 unrelated families predominantly from Southeast Asia. The premature brain aging phenotype with punctate and multifocal WMHs was observed in ∼70% of young carrier parents who underwent brain MRI. The complex deletion removes the penultimate exon 3 of TM4SF20, a gene encoding a transmembrane protein of unknown function. Minigene analysis showed that the resultant net loss of an exon introduces a premature stop codon, which, in turn, leads to the generation of a stable protein that fails to target to the plasma membrane and accumulates in the cytoplasm. Finally, we report this deletion to be enriched in individuals of Vietnamese Kinh descent, with an allele frequency of about 1%, embedded in an ancestral haplotype. Our data point to a constellation of early language delay and WMH phenotypes, driven by a likely toxic mechanism of TM4SF20 truncation, and highlight the importance of understanding and managing population-specific low-frequency pathogenic alleles. PMID:23810381

  16. Genome-wide scan in Hispanics highlights candidate loci for brain white matter hyperintensities.

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    Beecham, Ashley; Dong, Chuanhui; Wright, Clinton B; Dueker, Nicole; Brickman, Adam M; Wang, Liyong; DeCarli, Charles; Blanton, Susan H; Rundek, Tatjana; Mayeux, Richard; Sacco, Ralph L

    2017-10-01

    To investigate genetic variants influencing white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) in the understudied Hispanic population. Using 6.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify SNPs associated with WMH volume (WMHV) in 922 Hispanics who underwent brain MRI as a cross-section of 2 community-based cohorts in the Northern Manhattan Study and the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project. Multiple linear modeling with PLINK was performed to examine the additive genetic effects on ln(WMHV) after controlling for age, sex, total intracranial volume, and principal components of ancestry. Gene-based tests of association were performed using VEGAS. Replication was performed in independent samples of Europeans, African Americans, and Asians. From the SNP analysis, a total of 17 independent SNPs in 7 genes had suggestive evidence of association with WMHV in Hispanics ( p < 1 × 10 -5 ) and 5 genes from the gene-based analysis with p < 1 × 10 -3 . One SNP (rs9957475 in GATA6 ) and 1 gene ( UBE2C ) demonstrated evidence of association ( p < 0.05) in the African American sample. Four SNPs with p < 1 × 10 -5 were shown to affect binding of SPI1 using RegulomeDB. This GWAS of 2 community-based Hispanic cohorts revealed several novel WMH-associated genetic variants. Further replication is needed in independent Hispanic samples to validate these suggestive associations, and fine mapping is needed to pinpoint causal variants.

  17. White matter hyperintensities and working memory : An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, Barbera; Weinstein, Henry C.; Scheltens, Philip; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Scherder, Erik J. A.; Oosterman, J

    2008-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are commonly observed in elderly people and may have the most profound effect on executive functions, including working memory. Surprisingly, the Digit Span backward, a frequently employed working memory task, reveals no association with WMH. In the present study,

  18. Occipital deep white matter hyperintensity as seen by MRI, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Masahito; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 270 patients with various neurologic complaints (1-15Y) with a 0.5 tesla superconducting imaging system using a field echo T1-weighted sequence and spin echo T2-weighted and PD-weighted sequences. Twenty-seven of them had deep white matter hyperintensity (DWMH) in the occipital lobe on T2-weighted images. The frequency of mild DWMH differed in different age groups, suggesting that mild DWMH may result from delayed myelination in the central nervous system. However, the frequency of severe DWMH, which was revealed as isointense relative to cerebrospinal fluid, did not differ in different age groups and it was significantly more common in severely retarded patients. Classification of DWMH based on the signal intensity is valuable to distinguish white matter abnormalities in the occipital lobe from delayed myelination in the same site. (author)

  19. White Matter Hyperintensities Are Under Strong Genetic Influence.

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    Sachdev, Perminder S; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A; Ames, David; Wright, Margaret J; Wen, Wei

    2016-06-01

    The genetic basis of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) is still unknown. This study examines the heritability of WMH in both sexes and in different brain regions, and the influence of age. Participants from the Older Australian Twins Study were recruited (n=320; 92 monozygotic and 68 dizygotic pairs) who volunteered for magnetic resonance imaging scans and medical assessments. Heritability, that is, the ratio of the additive genetic variance to the total phenotypic variance, was estimated using the twin design. Heritability was high for total WMH volume (0.76), and for periventricular WMH (0.64) and deep WMH (0.77), and varied from 0.18 for the cerebellum to 0.76 for the occipital lobe. The genetic correlation between deep and periventricular WMH regions was 0.85, with one additive genetics factor accounting for most of the shared variance. Heritability was consistently higher in women in the cerebral regions. Heritability in deep but not periventricular WMH declined with age, in particular after the age of 75. WMH have a strong genetic influence but this is not uniform through the brain, being higher for deep than periventricular WMH and in the cerebral regions. The genetic influence is higher in women, and there is an age-related decline, most markedly for deep WMH. The data suggest some heterogeneity in the pathogenesis of WMH for different brain regions and for men and women. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. White matter hyperintensities segmentation: a new semi-automated method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela eIorio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available White matter hyperintensities (WMH are brain areas of increased signal on T2-weighted or fluid attenuated inverse recovery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans. In this study we present a new semi-automated method to measure WMH load that is based on the segmentation of the intensity histogram of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Thirty patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment with variable WMH load were enrolled. The semi-automated WMH segmentation included: removal of non-brain tissue, spatial normalization, removal of cerebellum and brain stem, spatial filtering, thresholding to segment probable WMH, manual editing for correction of false positives and negatives, generation of WMH map and volumetric estimation of the WMH load. Accuracy was quantitatively evaluated by comparing semi-automated and manual WMH segmentations performed by two independent raters. Differences between the two procedures were assessed using Student’s t tests and similarity was evaluated using linear regression model and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC. The volumes of the manual and semi-automated segmentations did not statistically differ (t-value= -1.79, DF=29, p= 0.839 for rater 1; t-value= 1.113, DF=29, p= 0.2749 for rater 2, were highly correlated (R²= 0.921, F (1,29 =155,54, p

  1. Differential impact of white matter hyperintensities on long-term outcomes in ischemic stroke patients with large artery atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyoul Baik

    Full Text Available The presence of white matter hyperintensity (WMH is related to poor long-term outcomes in stroke patients. However, the long-term outcome is unknown in patients with both large artery atherosclerosis (LAA and WMH.We investigated the impact of WMH on long-term outcome in patients with LAA. Consecutive patients in a prospective stroke registry were included. Patients were followed for a median of 7.7 years (interquartile range, 5.6-9.7. The degree of WMH was assessed by Fazekas grade on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Total WMH burden was calculated by summation of Fazekas scores in periventricular and deep white matter. Severe WMH was defined as total burden score ≥ 3.Among 2529 patients, 639 patients (25.3% were classified with the LAA subtype. After applying exclusion criteria, the data from 538 patients were analyzed. The mean patient age was 65.7 ± 10.3 years. Severe WMHs were found in 243 patients (45.2%. During follow-up, 200 patients (37.2% died. Cox regression analysis showed that LAA patients with severe WMH had a 1.50-fold (95% CI, 1.12-2.00, p = 0.007 higher death rate compared to those without. In the older age group (≥65 years, Cox regression revealed that patients with severe WMH had a 1.75-fold (95% CI, 1.15-2.65, p = 0.008 higher 5-year death rate, whereas the younger age group did not have this association.The degree of WMH might be a surrogate marker for long-term outcome in patients with LAA. Atherosclerotic burdens in both small and large arteries might impact long-term prognosis in ischemic stroke patients.

  2. Periodic Limb Movements and White Matter Hyperintensities in First-Ever Minor Stroke or High-Risk Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Mark I; Murray, Brian J; Muir, Ryan T; Gao, Fuqiang; Szilagyi, Gregory M; Huroy, Menal; Kiss, Alexander; Walters, Arthur S; Black, Sandra E; Lim, Andrew S; Swartz, Richard H

    2017-03-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that periodic limb movements (PLMs) may contribute to the development of cerebrovascular disease. White matter hyperintensities (WMHs), a widely accepted biomarker for cerebral small vessel disease, are associated with incident stroke and death. We evaluated the association between increased PLM indices and WMH burden in patients presenting with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), while controlling for vascular risk factors and stroke severity. Thirty patients presenting within 2 weeks of a first-ever minor stroke or high-risk TIA were prospectively recruited. PLM severity was measured with polysomnography. WMH burden was quantified using the Age Related White Matter Changes (ARWMC) scale based on neuroimaging. Partial Spearman's rank-order correlations and multiple linear regression models tested the association between WMH burden and PLM severity. Greater WMH burden was correlated with elevated PLM index and stroke volume. Partial Spearman's rank-order correlations demonstrated that the relationship between WMH burden and PLM index persisted despite controlling for vascular risk factors. Multivariate linear regression models revealed that PLM index was a significant predictor of an elevated ARWMC score while controlling for age, stroke volume, stroke severity, hypertension, and apnea-hypopnea index. The quantity of PLMs was associated with WMH burden in patients with first-ever minor stroke or TIA. PLMs may be a risk factor for or marker of WMH burden, even after considering vascular risk factors and stroke severity. These results invite further investigation of PLMs as a potentially useful target to reduce WMH and stroke burden. © Sleep Research Society (SRS) 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. White Matter Hyperintensities and Cognitive Impairment During Electroconvulsive Therapy in Severely Depressed Elderly Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudega, M.L.; van Exel, E.; Wattjes, M.P.; Comijs, H.C.; Scheltens, P.; Barkhof, F.; Eikelenboom, P.; Craen, A.J.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Stek, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Transient cognitive impairment during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be a reason to discontinue ECT in depressed elderly patients. We hypothesized that both white matter hyperintensities and medial temporal lobe atrophy contribute to transient cognitive impairment during ECT.

  4. Initial Incidence of White Matter Hyperintensities on MRI in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, Jason; Sherman, Paul; McGuire, Steve; Kochunov, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Previous literature has described the increase in white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden associated with hypobaric exposure in the U-2 and altitude chamber operating personnel. Although astronauts have similar hypobaric exposure pressures to the U2 pilot population, astronauts have far fewer exposures and each exposure would be associated with a much lower level of decompression stress due to rigorous countermeasures to prevent decompression sickness. Therefore, we postulated that the WMH burden in the astronaut population would be less than in U2 pilots. Methods: Twenty-one post-flight de-identified astronaut MRIs (5 mm slice thickness FLAIR sequences) were evaluated for WMH count and volume. The only additional data provided was an age range of the astronauts (43-57) and if they had ever performed an EVA (13 yes, 8 no). Results: WMH count in these 21 astronaut MRI was 21.0 +/- 24.8 (mean+/- SD) and volume was 0.382 +/- 0.602 ml, which was significantly higher than previously published results for the U2 pilots. No significant differences between EVA and no EVA groups existed. Age range of astronaut population is not directly comparable to the U2 population. Discussion: With significantly less frequent (sometimes none) and less stressful hypobaric exposures, yet a much higher incidence of increased WMH, this indicates the possibility of additional mechanisms beyond hypobaric exposure. This increase unlikely to be attributable just to the differences in age between astronauts and U2 pilots. Forward work includes continuing review of post-flight MRI and evaluation of pre to post flight MRI changes if available. Data mining for potential WMH risk factors includes collection of age, sex, spaceflight experience, EVA hours, other hypobaric exposures, hyperoxic exposures, radiation, high performance aircraft experience and past medical history. Finally, neurocognitive and vision/eye results will be evaluated for any evidence of impairment linked to

  5. Pathways linking regional hyperintensities in the brain and slower gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolandzadeh, Niousha; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Aizenstein, Howard; Harris, Tamara; Launer, Lenore; Yaffe, Kristine; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Newman, Anne; Rosano, Caterina

    2014-10-01

    Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are involved in the evolution of impaired mobility and executive functions. Executive functions and mobility are also associated. Thus, WMHs may impair mobility directly, by disrupting mobility-related circuits, or indirectly, by disrupting circuits responsible for executive functions. Understanding the mechanisms underlying impaired mobility in late life will increase our capacity to develop effective interventions. To identify regional WMHs most related to slower gait and to examine whether these regional WMHs directly impact mobility, or indirectly by executive functions. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-one WMH variables (i.e., total WMH volume and WMHs in 20 tracts), gait speed, global cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Examination; 3MS), and executive functions and processing speed (Digit-Symbol Substitution Test; DSST) were assessed. An L1-L2 regularized regression (i.e., Elastic Net model) identified the WMH variables most related to slower gait. Multivariable linear regression models quantified the association between these WMH variables and gait speed. Formal tests of mediation were also conducted. Community-based sample. Two hundred fifty-three adults (mean age: 83years, 58% women, 41% black). Gait speed. In older adults with an average gait speed of 0.91m/sec, total WMH volume, WMHs located in the right anterior thalamic radiation (ATRR) and frontal corpuscallosum (CCF) were most associated with slower gait. There was a >10% slower gait for each standard deviation of WMH in CCF, ATRR or total brain (standardized beta in m/sec [p value]: -0.11 [p=0.046], -0.15 [p=0.007] and -0.14 [p=0.010], respectively). These associations were substantially and significantly attenuated after adjustment for DSST. This effect was stronger for WMH in CCF than for ATRR or total WMH (standardized beta in m/sec [p value]: -0.07 [p=0.190], -0.12 [p=0.024] and -0.10 [p=0.049], respectively). Adjustment for 3MS did not change these

  6. White Matter Hyperintensity Volume and Cerebral Perfusion in Older Individuals with Hypertension Using Arterial Spin-Labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, J. W.; Mutsaerts, H. J. M. M.; Nederveen, A. J.; Vrenken, H.; Steenwijk, M. D.; Caan, M. W. A.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; van Gool, W. A.; Richard, E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin in elderly patients with hypertension may be part of a general cerebral perfusion deficit, involving not only the white matter hyperintensities but also the surrounding normal-appearing white matter and gray matter. We

  7. The hidden-Markov brain: comparison and inference of white matter hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tuan D.; Salvetti, Federica; Wang, Bing; Diani, Marco; Heindel, Walter; Knecht, Stefan; Wersching, Heike; Baune, Bernhard T.; Berger, Klaus

    2011-02-01

    Rating and quantification of cerebral white matter hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important tasks in various clinical and scientific settings. As manual evaluation is time consuming and imprecise, much effort has been made to automate the quantification of white matter hyperintensities. There is rarely any report that attempts to study the similarity/dissimilarity of white matter hyperintensity patterns that have different sizes, shapes and spatial localizations on the MRI. This paper proposes an original computational neuroscience framework for such a conceptual study with a standpoint that the prior knowledge about white matter hyperintensities can be accumulated and utilized to enable a reliable inference of the rating of a new white matter hyperintensity observation. This computational approach for rating inference of white matter hyperintensities, which appears to be the first study, can be utilized as a computerized rating-assisting tool and can be very economical for diagnostic evaluation of brain tissue lesions.

  8. White matter magnetic resonance hyperintensities in dementia of the Alzheimer type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldemar, G; Christiansen, P; Larsson, H B

    1994-01-01

    In a prospective MRI study the presence, appearance, volume, and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) correlates of periventricular hyperintensities (PVHs) and deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMHs) were examined in 18 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and in 10 age matched healthy...... in the Alzheimer's disease group (p ... patients had extensive DWMH lesions in the central white matter. In the group of patients with Alzheimer's disease as a whole, the volume of DWMHs correlated well with rCBF in the hippocampal region ( r = -0.72; p

  9. White matter hyperintensities and cognitive reserve during a working memory task: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in cognitively normal older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cabello, Sara; Valls-Pedret, Cinta; Schurz, Matthias; Vidal-Piñeiro, Dídac; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Bargallo, Nuria; Ros, Emilio; Bartrés-Faz, David

    2016-12-01

    Cognitive reserve (CR) models posit that lifestyle factors such as education modulate the relationship between brain damage and cognition. However, the functional correlates of CR in healthy aging are still under investigation. White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are a common age-associated finding that impacts cognition. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to characterize the patterns of brain activation during a working memory task in older participants with high and low levels of education (as a proxy of CR) and high and low WMH volumes. Ninety older volunteers (aged 63-76 years) and 16 young adults (aged 21-27) completed the study. We found that older adults with higher education had better working memory performance than their less educated peers. Among the highly educated participants, those with WMH over-recruited areas engaged by young volunteers and showed activation in additional cortical and subcortical structures. However, those with low WMH differed little with respect to their younger counterparts. Our findings demonstrate that the functional mechanisms subtending the effects of education, as a proxy of CR, are modulated according to the WMH burden. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical significance of white matter hyperintensities in MRI in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takita, Masashi

    1996-01-01

    To elucidate clinical significance of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in MRI, fifty patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) and twenty normal controls were studied. Twenty nine patients with SDAT (58.0%) had periventricular hyperintensities (PVH) and twenty three patients with SDAT (46.0%) had deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMH). Eight controls (40.0%) had PVH and ten controls (50.0%) had DWMH. There were no significant differences in frequency of WMH between patients with SDAT and normal controls. Past history of hypertension was more frequent in patients with PVH or DWMH than in patients without them. Serum cholesterol level was higher in patients with DWMH than in patients without them. However there were no significant differences in the other clinical features between patients with WMH and patients without them. The results of present study suggest that DWMH in patients with SDAT is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors such as hypertension and hyperlipidemia. (author)

  11. White matter hyperintensities are seen only in GRN mutation carriers in the GENFI cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sudre, C.H. (Carole H.); M. Bocchetta (Martina); D.M. Cash (David M); D.L. Thomas (David L); Woollacott, I. (Ione); Dick, K.M. (Katrina M.); J.C. van Swieten (John); B. Borroni (Barbara); D. Galimberti (Daniela); M. Masellis (Mario); M.C. Tartaglia (Maria Carmela); J.B. Rowe (James); M.J. Graff (Maud J.L.); F. Tagliavini (Fabrizio); G.B. Frisoni (Giovanni B.); R. Laforce (Robert); E. Finger (Elizabeth); A. De Mendonça (Alexandre); S. Sorbi (Sandro); S. Ourselin (Sebastien); M.J. Cardoso (Manuel Jorge); J.D. Rohrer (Jonathan D)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractGenetic frontotemporal dementia is most commonly caused by mutations in the progranulin (GRN), microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) genes. Previous small studies have reported the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities

  12. Genome-wide meta-analysis of cerebral white matter hyperintensities in patients with stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traylor, M.; Zhang, C.R.; Adib-Samii, P.; Devan, W.J.; Parsons, O.E.; Lanfranconi, S.; Gregory, S.; Cloonan, L.; Falcone, G.J.; Radmanesh, F.; Fitzpatrick, K.; Kanakis, A.; Barrick, T.R.; Moynihan, B.; Lewis, C.M.; Boncoraglio, G.B.; Lemmens, R.; Thijs, V.; Sudlow, C.; Wardlaw, J.; Rothwell, P.M.; Meschia, J.F.; Worrall, B.B.; Levi, C.; Bevan, S.; Furie, K.L.; Dichgans, M.; Rosand, J.; Markus, H.S.; Rost, N.; Klijn, C.J.M.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: For 3,670 stroke patients from the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, Belgium, and Italy, we performed a genome-wide meta-analysis of white matter hyperintensity volumes (WMHV) on data imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference dataset to provide insights into disease mechanisms.

  13. Relation between age-related decline in intelligence and cerebral white-matter hyperintensities in healthy octogenarians: a longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, E; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Krabbe, K

    2000-01-01

    , but no participant scored more than 75% of maximum for deep white-matter hyperintensities. Neither type was related to the WAIS IQs of the 80-year assessment, but both were significantly associated with decline in performance IQ from age 50 to age 80 years (bivariate correlation coefficients 0.32, p=0.0087, and 0......, and they agreed to further WAIS testing at age 80, and cerebral MRI at age 80-82 (mean age 82.3 years). We scored separately the numbers of periventricular and deep white-matter hyperintensities. FINDINGS: Scores for periventricular hyperintensities in this sample included all possible degrees of severity.......28, p=0.0227, respectively). An analysis based on two WAIS subtests showed that the association between white-matter hyperintensities and cognitive impairment was significant only for cognitive decline in the decade 70-80 years. INTERPRETATION: Both periventricular and deep white-matter hyperintensities...

  14. White Matter Hyperintensities on MRI in High-Altitude U-2 Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    SUBJECT TERMS MRI; white matter hyperintensities; hypobaric exposure; neurological decompression sickness 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...normal controls and did not increase with age in pilots, suggesting that hypobaric exposure produces white matter damage different from that occurring in...relapse we observed in 3 NDCS pilots after successful hyperbaric treatment (US Navy Treatment Table 6; 100% fraction of inspired oxygen; 2.8 atm absolute

  15. White matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin: a population-based study in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Mera, Robertino M; Del Brutto, Victor J; Zambrano, Mauricio; Lama, Julio

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is probably one of the most common pathogenetic mechanisms underlying stroke in Latin America. However, the importance of silent markers of small vessel disease, including white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin, has not been assessed so far. The study aims to evaluate prevalence and correlates of white matter hyperintensities in community-dwelling elders living in Atahualpa (rural Ecuador). Atahualpa residents aged ≥ 60 years were identified during a door-to-door survey and invited to undergo brain magnetic resonance imaging for identification and grading white matter hyperintensities and other markers of small vessel disease. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we evaluated whether white matter hyperintensities is associated with demographics, cardiovascular health status, stroke, cerebral microbleeds, and cortical atrophy, after adjusting for the other variables. Out of 258 enrolled persons (mean age, 70 ± 8 years; 59% women), 172 (67%) had white matter hyperintensities, which were moderate to severe in 63. Analyses showed significant associations of white matter hyperintensities presence and severity with age and cardiovascular health status, as well as with overt and silent strokes, and a trend for association with cerebral microbleeds and cortical atrophy. Prevalence and correlates of white matter hyperintensities in elders living in rural Ecuador is almost comparable with that reported from industrialized nations, reinforcing the concept that the burden of small vessel disease is on the rise in underserved Latin American populations. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  16. Longitudinal changes in white matter disease and cognition in the first year of the Alzheimer disease neuroimaging initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmichael, Owen; Schwarz, Christopher; Drucker, David; Fletcher, Evan; Harvey, Danielle; Beckett, Laurel; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael; Decarli, Charles; Abdi, Herve; Abeliovich, Asa; Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Abner, Erin; Acharya, Deepa; Adams, Nicholas; Adler, Daniel; Agrusti, Antonella; Agyemang, Alex; Ahdidan, Jamila; Ahn, Jae Eun; Aisen, Paul; Aksu, Yaman; Al-Akhras, Mousa; Alarcon, Marcelo; Alberca, Roman; Alexander, Gene; Alexander, Daniel; Almeida, Fabio; Anand, Rishi; Anand, Shyam; Andrew, Marilee; Anjum, Ayesha; Aoyama, Eiji; Ard, Michael Colin; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Armor, Tom; Arnold, Steven; Asatryan, Albert; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Ashiga, Hirokazu; Assareh, Arezoo; Aubry, Florent; Avants, Brian; Avinash, Gopal; Awasthi, Sukrati; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Bagci, Ulas; Bai, Shuyang; Baker, John; Banks, Sarah; Bard, Jonathan; Barnes, Josephine; Barret, Olivier; Bartzokis, George; Barua, Neil; Bauer, Corinna; Becker, James; Bednar, Martin; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Bek, Stephan; Bernard, Charlotte; Bertram, Lars; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Biffi, Alessandro; Bilgic, Basar; Bishnoi, Mahesh; Bishop, Courtney; Bittner, Daniel; Black, Ronald; Blennow, Kaj; Bogorodzki, Piotr; Bokde, Arun; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; Boppana, Madhu; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Bowes, Mike; Bowman, Gene; Bowman, DuBois; Braskie, Meredith; Brewer, James; Brickman, Adam; Broadbent, Steve; Brooks, David; Browndyke, Jeffrey; Bruat, Vanessa; Brunton, Simon; Buchert, Ralph; Buchsbaum, Monte; Buckley, Chris; Burger, Cyrill; Burns, Jeffrey; Burton, David; Butman, John; Cabeza, Rafael; Cairns, Nigel; Callhoff, Johanna; Calvini, Piero; Campbell, Aaron; Cantillon, Marc; Capella, Heraldo; Cardona-Sanclemente, Luis Eduardo; Carle, Adam; Carmasin, Jeremy; Carranza-Ath, Fredy; Casanova, Ramon; Cash, David; Cella, Massimo; Celsis, Pierre; Chan, Lung Tat Andrew; Chaney, Megan; Chanu, Pascal; Chao, Linda; Charil, Arnaud; Chemali, Zeina; Chen, Baojiang; Chen, Kewei; Chen, Ting; Chen, Minhua; Chen, Gennan; Chen, Rong; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Chertkow, Howard; Chiang, Gloria; Chiba, Koji; Chisholm, Jane; Cho, Youngsang; Choe, John; Choubey, Suresh; Christensen, Anette Luther; Clark, Chris; Clark, David; Clarkson, Matt; Clayton, David; Clunie, David; Coimbra, Alexandre; Compton, David; Crane, Paul; Crans, Gerald; Croop, Robert; Crowther, Daniel; Crum, William; Cui, Yue; Curry, Charles; Curtis, Steven; Cutter, Gary; Daiello, Lori; Dake, Michael; Dale, Anders; Damato, Vito Domenico; Darby, Eveleen; Darkner, Sune; Davatzikos, Christos; Dave, Jay; David, Renaud; Davidson, Julie; de Bruijne, Marleen; de Meyer, Geert; de Nunzio, Giorgio; de Santi, Susan; Dechairo, Bryan; DeDuck, Kristina; Dejkam, Arsalan; Delfino, Manuel; Delpassand, Ebrahim; Deniz, Oscar; Denney, Douglas; DeOrchis, Vincent; Depy Carron, Delphine; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Devanand, Davangere; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Diaz, Gloria; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Dickerson, Bradford; Dinov, Ivo; Dodge, Hiroko; Donohue, Michael; Dowling, Maritza; Drzezga, Alex; Duan, Xujun; Duchesne, Simon; Duff, Kevin; Dukart, Jurgen; Durazzo, Timothy; Dykstra, Kevin; Earl, Nancy; Edula, Goutham; Ekin, Ahmet; Engelman, Corinne; Epstein, Noam; Erten-Lyons, Deniz; Eskildsen, Simon; Falcone, Guido; Fan, Yong; Farnum, Michael; Farrer, Lindsay; Farzan, Ali; Feldman, Howard; Feng, Yan; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fernandes, Michel; Fernandez, Elsa; Ferrarini, Luca; Ferreira, Luiz; Ferrer, Eugene; Figurski, Michal; Filipovych, Roman; Finch, Stephen; Finlay, Daniel; Fiot, Jean-Baptiste; Flenniken, Derek; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Flynn Longmire, Crystal; Forman, Mark; Forsythe, Alan; Fox-Bosetti, Sabrina; Francis, Alexander L.; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Franko, Edit; Freeman, Stefanie; Friedrich, Christoph M.; Friesenhahn, Michel; Frings, Lars; Frisoni, Giovanni; Fritzsche, Klaus; Fujimoto, Yoko; Fujiwara, Ken; Fullerton, Terence; Furney, Simon; Gallins, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Gan, Ke; Garcia, Maria Teresa; Garcia-Linares, Antonio; Garg, Gaurav; Gaser, Christian; Gastineau, Edward; Gavidia, Giovana; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Ge, Qi; Gemme, Gianluca; German, Dwight; Ghassabi, Zeinab; Gil, Juan E.; Gill, Ryan; Gitelman, Darren; Gleason, Carey; Godbey, Michael; Goghari, Vina; Gold, Michael; Goldberg, Terry; Gomeni, Roberto; Gong, Shangwenyan; Gonzales, Celedon; Gordon, Brian; Gorriz, Juan Manuel; Grachev, Igor; Grandey, Emily; Grasela, Thaddeus; Gratt, Jeremy; Gray, Katherine; Greenberg, Barry; Gregg, Keith; Gregory, Erik; Greicius, Michael; Greve, Douglas; Grill, Joshua; Gross, Alan; Guo, Lianghao; Guo, Hongbin; Guo, Jeffrey; Habeck, Christian; Hai, Yizhen; Haight, Thaddeus; Hakansson, Kristina; Hammarstrom, Per; Hampel, Harald; Han, Tony; Han, Jian; Hanif, Muhammad; Hanna, Yousef; Hardy, Peter; Hasan, Md Kamrul; Hazart, Aurelien; Hazel, James; He, Yong; He, Huiguang; Head, Denise; Heckemann, Rolf; Heidebrink, Judith; Henderson, David; Henrard, Sebastien; Herholz, Karl; Hernandez, Monica; Hess, Christopher; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoffman, John; Holder, Daniel; Honigberg, Lee; Horsfield, Mark; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Hsu, Ailing; Hu, Zhenghui; Hu, Zhiwei; Hu, Xiaolan; Hu, William; Huang, Shu-Pang; Huang, Chun-Jung; Huang, Fude; Huang, Yifan; Huang, Juebin; Huang, Chingwen; Hubbard, Rebecca; Huentelman, Matthew; Hui, Shen; Huppertz, Hans-Jurgen; Hurko, Orest; Hurt, Stephen; Huyck, Susan; Hwang, Scott; Hyun, JungMoon; Ifeachor, Emmanuel; Iglesias, Martina; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Immermann, Fred; Inoue, Lurdes; Insel, Philip; Irizarry, Michael; Irungu, Benson mwangi; Ishibashi, Taro; Ishii, Kenji; Ismail, Shahina; Ito, Kaori; Ito, Momoyo; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Iyer, Madhumitha; Jacobson, Mark; Jacobson, Alex; Jafari, Aria; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Jaffe, Carl; Jagust, William; Jara, Hernan; Jaros, Mark; Jefferson, Angela; Jiang, Tianzi; Johnson, David K.; Juengling, Freimut; Juh, Rahyeong; Julin, Per; Bhaskar, Uday; Kadish, Bill; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Kallam, Hanimi Reddy; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Karageorgiou, Elissaios; Karantzoulis, Stella; Karasev, Peter; Kauwe, John; Kawakami, Hirofumi; Kazimipoor, Borhan; Kelleher, Thomas; Kennedy, Richard; Kerr, Douglas; Kerrouche, Nacer; Khalil, Iya; Khalil, Andre; Khatry, Deepak; Kihel, Badra; Killeen, Neil; Killiany, Ron; Kim, Hyewon; Kim, Heeyoung; Kim, Yeonhee; Kim, Jong Hun; Kimberg, Daniel; Kimura, Tokunori; King, Richard; Kirby, Justin; Kita, Hiroshi; Klimas, Michael; Klopfenstein, Erin; Kobayashi, Dione; Koikkalainen, Juha; Kokomoor, Anders; Kolasny, Anthony; Kondo, Yusuke; Koppel, Jeremy; Korolev, Igor; Kotran, Nickolas; Kouassi, Alex; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Kozma, Lynn; Kramer, Joel; Kratzer, Martina; Kuceyeski, Amy; Kuhn, Felix Pierre; Kulkarni, Mauktik; Kumar, Sreedhar; Kuo, Hsun Ting; Kuo, Julie; Kurosawa, Ken; Kwon, Oh Hun; Laforet, Genevieve; Lai, Song; Lakatos, Anita; Landau, Susan; Landen, Jaren; Lane, Richard; Langbaum, Jessica; Lanius, Vivian; Lavault, Romain; Laxamana, Joel; Le, Trung; Leahy, Richard; Lee, Noah; Lee, Vita; Lee, Joseph H.; Lee, Jong-Min; Lee, Dongsoo; Lee, Junyoung; Lefkimmiatis, Stamatis; Lemaitre, Herve; Lenz, Robert; Lester, Gayle; Levey, Allan; Li, Rui; Li, Wenjun; Li, Shanshan; Li, Lexin; Li, Shi-jiang; Li, Gang; Li, Lin; Li, Yi; Li, Jinhe; Li, Chin-Shang; Liang, Peipeng; Liang, Lichen; Liao, Yuan-Lin; Lin, Mingkuan; Lin, Lan; Lin, Ling-chih; Liu, Tao; Liu, Meijie; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Dazhong; Liu, Pu; Liu, Songling; Liu, Xiuwen; Liu, Tianming; Lo, Raymond; Logovinsky, Veronika; Lois, Augusto; Long, Xiaojing; Long, Ziyi; Looi, Jeffrey; Lu, Yuan; Lu, Po-Haong; Lukic, Ana; Lull, Juan J.; Lynch, John; Ma, Lei; Mackin, Scott; Magda, Sebastian; Maglio, Silvio; Mak, Henry Ka-Fung; Malave, Vicente; Mandal, Pravat; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Manohar, Deepak; Mansouri, Chemseddine; Mantri, Ninad; Manzour, Amir; Marambaud, Philippe; Marchewka, Artur; Marek, Kenneth; Markind, Samuel; Marshall, Gad; Martin, Jacob; Mather, Mara; Mathis, Chester; Matoug, Sofia; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Matthews, Dawn; Mayo, Agustin; McEvoy, Linda; McGeown, William; McIntyre, John; McQuail, Joseph; Meadowcroft, Mark; Meda, Shashwath; Mehta, Nirav; Mele, Valeria; Mendonca, Brian; Menendez, Manuel; Meredith, Jere; Merrill, David; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Meyer, Carsten; Mez, Jesse; Mickael, Guedj; Miftahof, Roustem; Mikhno, Arthur; Miller, David; Min, Ye; Miri, Roham; Mirza, Mubeena; Mitsis, Effie; Mohan, Ananth; Monno, Laura; Montana, Giovanni; Moore, Dana; Birgani, Parmida Moradi; Moratal, David; Morimoto, Bruce; Mortamet, Benedicte; Motyl, Rafal; Mueller, Notger; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Mulder, Emma; Murphy, Michael; Murray, Brian; Musiek, Erik; Myers, Amanda; Najafi, Shahla; Nazeri, Arash; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Neu, Scott; Neves, Simone; Ng, Yen-Bee; Nguyen, Danh; Nguyen, Nghi; Nguyen Xuan, Tuong; Nielsen, Casper; Nuneez Benjumea, Francisco; O'Neil, Alison; Obisesan, Thomas; Oh, Dong Hoon; Oh, Joonmi; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Ollesch, Julian; Olmos, Salvador; Ostrowitzki, Susanne; Oswald, Annahita; Ott, Brian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Paiva, Renata; Pan, Zhifang; Pande, Yogesh; Pardoe, Heath; Park, Kee Hyung; Park, Hyunjin; Parsey, Ramin; Parveen, Riswana; Paskavitz, James; Patel, Yogen; Patil, Manasi; Paul, Robert; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Peavy, Guerry; Peng, Yahong; Pepin, Jean louis; Perea, Rodrigo; Perneczky, Robert; Petitti, Diana; Petrella, Jeffrey; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Pezoa, Jorge; Pham, Chi-Tuan; Phillips, Nicole; Piovezan, Mauro; Podhorski, Adam; Pollari, Mika; Pontecorvo, Michael; Poppenk, Jordan; Posner, Holly; Potkin, Steven; Poulin, Stephane; Prasad, Gautam; Prenger, Kurt; Prieto, Elena; Prince, Jerry; Puchakayala, Shashidhar Reddy; Qin, Wei; Qiu, Ruolun; Qiu, Wendy; Qiu, Anqi; Qualls, Constance Dean; Rabie, Huwaida; Rajeesh, Rajeesh; Rajeesh, J. Rajeesh; Rallabandi, V. P. Subramanyam; Ramage, Amy; Randolph, Christopher; Raniga, Parnesh; Rao, Divya; Rao, Anil; Raubertas, Richard; Ray, Debashis; Razak, Hana; Redolfi, Alberto; Reid, Andrew; Reilhac, Anthonin; Reinsberger, Claus; Restrepo, Lucas; Retico, Alessandra; Rezaeitabar, Yousef; Richards, John; Richter, Mirco; Riddle, William; Ries, Michele; Rincon, Mariano; Rischall, Matt; Robieson, Weining; Rocha-Rego, Vanessa; Rogalski, Emily; Rogers, Elizabeth; Rojas, Ignacio; Romero, Klaus; Rosand, Jonathan; Rosen, Ori; Rosen, Allyson; Rosenberg, Paul; Ross, David; Ross, Joel; Rousseau, Francois; Rowe, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel; Ruiz, Agustin; Rusinek, Henry; Ryan, Laurie; Saad, Ahmed; Sabbagh, Marway; Sabuncu, Mert; Sachs, Michael; Sacuiu, Simona; Sadeghi, Ali; Said, Yasmine; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Sakata, Muneyuki; Salat, David; Salmon, David; Salomi, Sharmila; Salter, Hugh; Samwald, Matthias; Sanchez, Luciano; Sanjo, Nobuo; Sankaranarayanan, Preethi; Sato, Shinji; Sato, Hajime; Saumier, Daniel; Savio, Alexandre; Sawada, Ikuhisa; Saykin, Andrew; Schaffer, J. David; Scharre, Douglas; Schlosser, Gretchen; Schmand, Ben; Schmansky, Nick; Schmidt, Mark; Schneider, Lon; Schramm, Hauke; Schuerch, Markus; Schwartz, Eben; Schwartz, Craig; Schwarz, Adam; Seethamraju, Ravi; Seixas, Flavio; Selnes, Per; Senjem, Matthew; Senlin, Wang; Seo, Sang Won; Sethuraman, Gopalan; Sevigny, Jeffrey; Sfikas, Giorgos; Shahbaba, Babak; Shams, Soheil; Shankle, William; Shattuck, David; Shaw, Leslie; Sheela, Jaba; Shen, Weijia; Shera, David; Sherman, John; Sherman, Michelle; Sherva, Richard; Shimizu, Keiji; Shuler, Catherine; Shulman, Joshua; Siegel, Rene; Siemers, Eric; Silveira, Margarida; Silver, Michael; Silverman, Daniel; Simmons, Andy; Simpson, Ivor; Singh, Simer Preet; Singh, Nikhil; Siuciak, Judy; Sjogren, Niclas; Skup, Martha; Small, Gary; Smith, Benjamin; Smith, Michael; Smith, Charles; Smyth, Timothy; Snow, Sarah; Soares, Holly; Soldea, Octavian; Solomon, Paul; Solomon, Alan; Song, Mingli; Song, Changhong; Sorensen, Greg; Soudah, Eduardo; Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Spenger, Christian; Sperling, Reisa; Spiegel, Rene; Spies, Lothar; Squarcia, Sandro; Squire, Larry; Staff, Roger; Stern, Yaakov; Strittmatter, Stephen; Styren, Scot; Sugishita, Morihiro; Sugishita, Kazuyuki; Sukkar, Rafid; Sun, Jia; Sun, Yu; Sundell, Karen; Suri, Muhammad; Swan, Melanie; Takagi, Toshihisa; Takahasi, Tetsuhiko; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Tang, Songyuan; Tanner, William; Tao, Wenwen; Tao, Dacheng; Tariot, Pierre; Tarjoman, Mana; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Terlizzi, Rita; Thiele, Frank; Thomas, Ronald; Thomas, Benjamin; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Wesley; Thornton-Wells, Tricia; Thurfjell, Lennart; Titeux, Laurence; Tolli, Tuomas; Toma, Ahmed; Tomita, Naoki; Toro, Roberto; Tosun, Duygu; Toussaint, Paule; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Trittschuh, Emily; Truran, Diana; Tsechpenakis, Gavriil; Tucker-Drob, Elliot; Tung, Joyce; Uesugi, Humito; Ullrich, Lauren; Umadevi Venkataraju, Kannan; Umar, Nisser; Uzunbas, Gokhan; Valdivia, Fernando; van Horn, John; van Leemput, Koen; van Train, Kenneth; van Zeeland, Ashley; Vargas, Gabriel; Vasanawala, Minal; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Verwaerde, Philippe; Videbaek, Charlotte; Vidoni, Eric; Vigneron, Vincent; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Vitolo, Ottavio; Vlassenko, Andrei; Volkau, Ihar; Vounou, Maria; Wade, Sara; Walhovd, Kristine B.; Wallace, Douglas; Wan, Hong; Wang, Angela; Wang, Li-San; Wang, Yongmei Michelle; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Alex; Wang, Lubin; Wang, Yalin; Wang, Tiger; Wang, Yue; Wang, Huanli; Wang, Huali; Ward, Michael; Warfield, Simon; Waring, Stephen; Webb, David; Wei, Lili; Wen, Shu-Hui; Wenjing, Li; Wenzel, Fabian; Westlye, Lars T.; Whitcher, Brandon; Whitwell, Jennifer; WilliamFaltaos, Demiana; Williams, David; Wilmot, Beth; Wingo, Thomas; Winkler, Andreas; Wiste, Heather; Wolfson, Tanya; Wolke, Ira; Wolz, Robin; Woo, Jongwook; Woo, Ellen; Woods, Lynn; Worth, Andrew; Worth, Eric; Wouters, Hans; Wu, Liang; Wu, Xiaoling; Wu, Yi Gen; Wu, Teresa; Wyman, Bradley; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Xiao, Liu; Xu, Guofan; Xu, Jun; Yamane, Tomohiko; Yamashita, Fumio; Yamazawa, Maki; Yan, Yunyi; Yan, Pingkun; Yang, Qing X.; Yang, Zhitong; Ye, Byoung Seok; Ye, Jieping; Yee, Laura; Yesavage, Jerome; Yip, WaiKuan; Yoo, Bongin; Yuan, Kai; Yushkevich, Paul; Zagorodnov, Vitali; Zagorski, Michael; Zawadzki, Rezi; Zeitzer, Jamie; Zhang, Linda; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Tianhao; Zhang, Huixiong; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Kurt; Zhao, Qinying; Zhao, Peng; Zhen, Xiantong; Zheng, Yuanjie; Zhijun, Yao; Zhou, Sheng; Zhou, Bin; Zhou, Luping; Zhu, Wanlin; Zhu, Hongtu; Zou, Heng

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate relationships between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measures of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), measured at baseline and longitudinally, and 1-year cognitive decline using a large convenience sample in a clinical trial design with a relatively mild profile of

  17. Cognitive Function and 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tractography of White Matter Hyperintensities in Elderly Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Reginold, William; Luedke, Angela C.; Tam, Angela; Itorralba, Justine; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Reginold, Jennifer; Islam, Omar; Garcia, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study used 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tractography to determine if there was an association between tracts crossing white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and cognitive function in elderly persons. Methods: Brain T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion tensor MRI scans were acquired in participants above the age of 60 years. Twenty-six persons had WMH identified on T2 FLAIR scans. They completed a battery of neuropsychological tes...

  18. White matter hyperintensities and normal-appearing white matter integrity in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Clayden, Jonathan D; Royle, Natalie A; Murray, Catherine; Morris, Zoe; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Gow, Alan J; Starr, John M; Bastin, Mark E; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-02-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin are a common finding in brain magnetic resonance imaging of older individuals and contribute to cognitive and functional decline. It is unknown how WMH form, although white matter degeneration is characterized pathologically by demyelination, axonal loss, and rarefaction, often attributed to ischemia. Changes within normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in subjects with WMH have also been reported but have not yet been fully characterized. Here, we describe the in vivo imaging signatures of both NAWM and WMH in a large group of community-dwelling older people of similar age using biomarkers derived from magnetic resonance imaging that collectively reflect white matter integrity, myelination, and brain water content. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) were significantly lower, whereas mean diffusivity (MD) and longitudinal relaxation time (T1) were significantly higher, in WMH than NAWM (p curve, 0.982; 95% CI, 0.975-0.989). Furthermore, the level of deterioration of NAWM was strongly associated with the severity of WMH, with MD and T1 increasing and FA and MTR decreasing in NAWM with increasing WMH score, a relationship that was sustained regardless of distance from the WMH. These multimodal imaging data indicate that WMH have reduced structural integrity compared with surrounding NAWM, and MD provides the best discriminator between the 2 tissue classes even within the mild range of WMH severity, whereas FA, MTR, and T1 only start reflecting significant changes in tissue microstructure as WMH become more severe. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. White matter hyperintensities and prepulse inhibition in a mixed elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, Lise C; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Garde, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response, a measure for sensorimotor gating, exhibits a relatively high inter-individual variability in elderly subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether white matter hyperintensities (WMH), frequently identified on cranial magnetic...... rated visually on craniel MRI FLAIR images using the Fazekas scale. WMH were identified in 70% of all subjects. The latency to peak of the startle response increased significantly with increasing WMH load, whereas the inhibition of the startle response (PPI) was neither significantly related...

  20. Frontal white matter hyperintensities, clasmatodendrosis and gliovascular abnormalities in ageing and post-stroke dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aiqing; Akinyemi, Rufus O; Hase, Yoshiki; Firbank, Michael J; Ndung'u, Michael N; Foster, Vincent; Craggs, Lucy J L; Washida, Kazuo; Okamoto, Yoko; Thomas, Alan J; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Allan, Louise M; Oakley, Arthur E; O'Brien, John T; Horsburgh, Karen; Ihara, Masafumi; Kalaria, Raj N

    2016-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities as seen on brain T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging are associated with varying degrees of cognitive dysfunction in stroke, cerebral small vessel disease and dementia. The pathophysiological mechanisms within the white matter accounting for cognitive dysfunction remain unclear. With the hypothesis that gliovascular interactions are impaired in subjects with high burdens of white matter hyperintensities, we performed clinicopathological studies in post-stroke survivors, who had exhibited greater frontal white matter hyperintensities volumes that predicted shorter time to dementia onset. Histopathological methods were used to identify substrates in the white matter that would distinguish post-stroke demented from post-stroke non-demented subjects. We focused on the reactive cell marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to study the incidence and location of clasmatodendrosis, a morphological attribute of irreversibly injured astrocytes. In contrast to normal appearing GFAP+ astrocytes, clasmatodendrocytes were swollen and had vacuolated cell bodies. Other markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member L1 (ALDH1L1) showed cytoplasmic disintegration of the astrocytes. Total GFAP+ cells in both the frontal and temporal white matter were not greater in post-stroke demented versus post-stroke non-demented subjects. However, the percentage of clasmatodendrocytes was increased by >2-fold in subjects with post-stroke demented compared to post-stroke non-demented subjects (P = 0.026) and by 11-fold in older controls versus young controls (P < 0.023) in the frontal white matter. High ratios of clasmotodendrocytes to total astrocytes in the frontal white matter were consistent with lower Mini-Mental State Examination and the revised Cambridge Cognition Examination scores in post-stroke demented subjects. Double immunofluorescent staining showed aberrant co-localization of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in retracted GFAP+ astrocytes with

  1. Normal variation of focal T2 Hyperintensities in anterior parietal periventricular white matter: Another 'Terminal Zones of Myelination'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Oag; Woo, Je Ho; Ki, Tae Sung; Lee, Jong Hwa; Chung, Jin Woo; Lee, Don Young

    1994-01-01

    It has been known that there are several areas of T2 hyperintensity in normal white matter of brain, such as terminal zones of myelination, ependymitis granularis, ones of posterior internal capsule, and perivascular space. The aim of our study is to demonstrate another region of T2 hyperintensities in normal pediatric age group. We have studied brain MR for 10 normal volunteers and 35 patients without having intracranial lesions in pediatric age group(3-19 years). In 5 among 45 cases, focal T2 hyperintensities were seen in the parietal periventricular white matter beneath the postcentral gyri. They were noted as poorly defined, 5-10 mm sized areas of increased signal intensities on T2-weighted axial images. They were also characterized by bilateral, posteromedially oriented, short band-like or oval areas. Interestingly, they were directly continuous with the T2 hyperintensity of posterior internal capsule. In spite of the relatively highly frequency in the pediatric population as in our study, this finding has not been reported in the asymptomatic adults. The results show that the bilateral anterior parietal hyperintense areas may be another terminal zones of delayed myelination affecting the parietopontine tract. They should be differentiated from pathologic T2 hyperintensities by their characteristic findings

  2. Exploring DeepMedic for the purpose of segmenting white matter hyperintensity lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Fiona; Cheng, Bastian; Golsari, Amir; Weiler, Florian; Gregori, Johannes; Thomalla, Götz; Klein, Jan

    2018-02-01

    DeepMedic, an open source software library based on a multi-channel multi-resolution 3D convolutional neural network, has recently been made publicly available for brain lesion segmentations. It has already been shown that segmentation tasks on MRI data of patients having traumatic brain injuries, brain tumors, and ischemic stroke lesions can be performed very well. In this paper we describe how it can efficiently be used for the purpose of detecting and segmenting white matter hyperintensity lesions. We examined if it can be applied to single-channel routine 2D FLAIR data. For evaluation, we annotated 197 datasets with different numbers and sizes of white matter hyperintensity lesions. Our experiments have shown that substantial results with respect to the segmentation quality can be achieved. Compared to the original parametrization of the DeepMedic neural network, the timings for training can be drastically reduced if adjusting corresponding training parameters, while at the same time the Dice coefficients remain nearly unchanged. This enables for performing a whole training process within a single day utilizing a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 graphics board which makes this library also very interesting for research purposes on low-end GPU hardware.

  3. Impact of white matter hyperintensities scoring method on correlations with clinical data: the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Straaten, EC; Fazekas, F; Rostrup, Egill

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are associated with decline in cognition, gait, mood, and urinary continence. Associations may depend on the method used for measuring WMH. We investigated the ability of different WMH scoring methods to detect differences in WMH load...... between groups with and without symptoms. METHODS: We used data of 618 independently living elderly with WMH collected in the Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) study. Subjects with and without symptoms of depression, gait disturbances, urinary incontinence, and memory decline were compared with respect...... to WMH load measured qualitatively using 3 widely used visual rating scales (Fazekas, Scheltens, and Age-Related White Matter Changes scales) and quantitatively with a semiautomated volumetric technique and an automatic lesion count. Statistical significance between groups was assessed with the chi2...

  4. Relation between age-related decline in intelligence and cerebral white-matter hyperintensities in healthy octogenarians: a longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, E; Mortensen, E L; Krabbe, K

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: White-matter hyperintensities are commonly found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of elderly people with or without dementia. Studies of the relation between severity of white-matter hyperintensities and cognitive impairment have had conflicting results. We undertook a longitudinal...... study of age-related decline in intellectual function and MRI at age 80 years. METHODS: From a cohort of 698 people born in 1914 and living in seven municipalities in Denmark, 68 healthy non-demented individuals had been tested with the Wechsler adult intelligence scale (WAIS) at ages 50, 60, and 70...

  5. Contrast-based fully automatic segmentation of white matter hyperintensities: method and validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Samaille

    Full Text Available White matter hyperintensities (WMH on T2 or FLAIR sequences have been commonly observed on MR images of elderly people. They have been associated with various disorders and have been shown to be a strong risk factor for stroke and dementia. WMH studies usually required visual evaluation of WMH load or time-consuming manual delineation. This paper introduced WHASA (White matter Hyperintensities Automated Segmentation Algorithm, a new method for automatically segmenting WMH from FLAIR and T1 images in multicentre studies. Contrary to previous approaches that were based on intensities, this method relied on contrast: non linear diffusion filtering alternated with watershed segmentation to obtain piecewise constant images with increased contrast between WMH and surroundings tissues. WMH were then selected based on subject dependant automatically computed threshold and anatomical information. WHASA was evaluated on 67 patients from two studies, acquired on six different MRI scanners and displaying a wide range of lesion load. Accuracy of the segmentation was assessed through volume and spatial agreement measures with respect to manual segmentation; an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC of 0.96 and a mean similarity index (SI of 0.72 were obtained. WHASA was compared to four other approaches: Freesurfer and a thresholding approach as unsupervised methods; k-nearest neighbours (kNN and support vector machines (SVM as supervised ones. For these latter, influence of the training set was also investigated. WHASA clearly outperformed both unsupervised methods, while performing at least as good as supervised approaches (ICC range: 0.87-0.91 for kNN; 0.89-0.94 for SVM. Mean SI: 0.63-0.71 for kNN, 0.67-0.72 for SVM, and did not need any training set.

  6. Association of Cardiac Hemodynamic Factors With Severity of White Matter Hyperintensities in Chronic Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo-Jin; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Ryu, Young Jin; Kim, Jeong-Min; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2018-01-01

    The cerebral white matter hyperintensity (WMH) is frequently noted in patients with chronic heart disease. Long-term alteration of cardiac hemodynamics might have an influence on the mechanism of cerebral WMH. To investigate the association between chronically altered cardiac hemodynamics and severity of cerebral WMH in patients with chronic valvular heart disease. This cross-sectional analysis identified 303 consecutive patients at a tertiary referral center between 2008 and 2016 who were 50 years or older, and diagnosed with severe chronic valvular heart disease and underwent cardiac catherization, echocardiography, and received brain magnetic resonance imaging. Among these patients, 71 with other demonstrated cardiac disease, central nervous system disease, and/or without sufficient catheterization data were excluded, and the remaining 232 patients were included in further analyses. The site and mechanism of valve diseases, as well as clinical and medication profiles, were reviewed. Cardiac catheterization parameters such as right atrial (RA) mean pressure, right ventricular pressure, and aortic mean pressure were obtained. Comprehensive echocardiographic hemodynamic markers such as left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV mass index, LV end diastolic volume, cardiac index, and E/e' ratio were also obtained. White matter hyperintensity volume was quantitatively evaluated using volumetric analysis. This study included 232 patients (103 men [44.4%] and 129 women [55.6%]; mean [SD] (range) age, 65.6 [8.8] (51-88) years) in the final analysis. The mean (SD) WMH volume was 5.93 (7.14) mL (median [interquartile range], 4.33 [1.33-8.62] mL), and mean (SD) RA pressure was 10.0 (4.7) mm Hg. From the catheterization data, 147 patients (63.4%) were classified as having a disease involving the mitral valve; 93 (40.1%), aortic valve; 37 (15.9%), tricuspid valve; and 4 (1.7%), pulmonary valve. In multivariate linear regression analysis, adjusting the type and mechanism of

  7. Reduced binding of Pittsburgh Compound-B in areas of white matter hyperintensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Goodheart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid imaging agent, Pittsburgh Compound-B, binds with high affinity to β-amyloid (Aβ in the brain, and it is well established that PiB also shows non-specific retention in white matter (WM. However, little is known about retention of PiB in areas of white matter hyperintensities (WMH, abnormalities commonly seen in older adults. Further, it is hypothesized that WMH are related to both cognitive dysfunction and Aβ deposition. The goal of the present study was to explore PiB retention in both normal-appearing WM (NAWM and WMH in a group of elderly, cognitively normal individuals. In a group of cognitively normal elderly (n = 64; 86.5 ± 2.6 years two analyses were applied: (1 ROIs were placed over periventricular areas in which WMH caps are commonly seen on all subjects, regardless of WMH burden or size. (2 Subject-specific maps of NAWM and WMH were co-registered with the PiB-PET images and mean SUVR values were calculated in these NAWM and WMH maps. PiB retention was significantly reduced in the ROIs of subjects with high WMH compared to subjects with low WMH. Additionally, in subjects with high WMH, there was significantly lower PiB retention in subject-specific maps of WMH compared to NAWM, which was not observed in subjects with low WMH, likely because of the small size of WMH maps in this group. These data suggest that WM in areas of WMH binds PiB less effectively than does normal WM. Further exploration of this phenomenon may lead to insights about the molecular basis of the non-specific retention of amyloid tracers in white matter.

  8. Cognitive Function and 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tractography of White Matter Hyperintensities in Elderly Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Reginold

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study used 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI tractography to determine if there was an association between tracts crossing white matter hyperintensities (WMH and cognitive function in elderly persons. Methods: Brain T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR and diffusion tensor MRI scans were acquired in participants above the age of 60 years. Twenty-six persons had WMH identified on T2 FLAIR scans. They completed a battery of neuropsychological tests and were classified as normal controls (n = 15 or with Alzheimer's dementia (n = 11. Tractography was generated by the Fiber Assignment by Continuous Tracking method. All tracts that crossed WMH were segmented. The average fractional anisotropy and average mean diffusivity of these tracts were quantified. We studied the association between cognitive test scores with the average mean diffusivity and average fractional anisotropy of tracts while controlling for age, total WMH volume and diagnosis. Results: An increased mean diffusivity of tracts crossing WMH was associated with worse performance on the Wechsler Memory Scale-III Longest Span Forward (p = 0.02. There was no association between the fractional anisotropy of tracts and performance on cognitive testing. Conclusion: The mean diffusivity of tracts crossing WMH measured by tractography is a novel correlate of performance on the Wechsler Memory Scale-III Longest Span Forward in elderly persons.

  9. Cognitive Function and 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tractography of White Matter Hyperintensities in Elderly Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginold, William; Luedke, Angela C; Tam, Angela; Itorralba, Justine; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Reginold, Jennifer; Islam, Omar; Garcia, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    This study used 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tractography to determine if there was an association between tracts crossing white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and cognitive function in elderly persons. Brain T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion tensor MRI scans were acquired in participants above the age of 60 years. Twenty-six persons had WMH identified on T2 FLAIR scans. They completed a battery of neuropsychological tests and were classified as normal controls (n = 15) or with Alzheimer's dementia (n = 11). Tractography was generated by the Fiber Assignment by Continuous Tracking method. All tracts that crossed WMH were segmented. The average fractional anisotropy and average mean diffusivity of these tracts were quantified. We studied the association between cognitive test scores with the average mean diffusivity and average fractional anisotropy of tracts while controlling for age, total WMH volume and diagnosis. An increased mean diffusivity of tracts crossing WMH was associated with worse performance on the Wechsler Memory Scale-III Longest Span Forward (p = 0.02). There was no association between the fractional anisotropy of tracts and performance on cognitive testing. The mean diffusivity of tracts crossing WMH measured by tractography is a novel correlate of performance on the Wechsler Memory Scale-III Longest Span Forward in elderly persons.

  10. Reproducible segmentation of white matter hyperintensities using a new statistical definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damangir, Soheil; Westman, Eric; Simmons, Andrew; Vrenken, Hugo; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Spulber, Gabriela

    2017-06-01

    We present a method based on a proposed statistical definition of white matter hyperintensities (WMH), which can work with any combination of conventional magnetic resonance (MR) sequences without depending on manually delineated samples. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, FLAIR, and PD sequences acquired at 1.5 Tesla from 119 subjects from the Kings Health Partners-Dementia Case Register (healthy controls, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease) were used. The segmentation was performed using a proposed definition for WMH based on the one-tailed Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The presented method was verified, given all possible combinations of input sequences, against manual segmentations and a high similarity (Dice 0.85-0.91) was observed. Comparing segmentations with different input sequences to one another also yielded a high similarity (Dice 0.83-0.94) that exceeded intra-rater similarity (Dice 0.75-0.91). We compared the results with those of other available methods and showed that the segmentation based on the proposed definition has better accuracy and reproducibility in the test dataset used. Overall, the presented definition is shown to produce accurate results with higher reproducibility than manual delineation. This approach can be an alternative to other manual or automatic methods not only because of its accuracy, but also due to its good reproducibility.

  11. Location Sensitive Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Segmentation of White Matter Hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Karssemeijer, Nico; Heskes, Tom; van Uden, Inge W M; Sanchez, Clara I; Litjens, Geert; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; van Ginneken, Bram; Marchiori, Elena; Platel, Bram

    2017-07-11

    The anatomical location of imaging features is of crucial importance for accurate diagnosis in many medical tasks. Convolutional neural networks (CNN) have had huge successes in computer vision, but they lack the natural ability to incorporate the anatomical location in their decision making process, hindering success in some medical image analysis tasks. In this paper, to integrate the anatomical location information into the network, we propose several deep CNN architectures that consider multi-scale patches or take explicit location features while training. We apply and compare the proposed architectures for segmentation of white matter hyperintensities in brain MR images on a large dataset. As a result, we observe that the CNNs that incorporate location information substantially outperform a conventional segmentation method with handcrafted features as well as CNNs that do not integrate location information. On a test set of 50 scans, the best configuration of our networks obtained a Dice score of 0.792, compared to 0.805 for an independent human observer. Performance levels of the machine and the independent human observer were not statistically significantly different (p-value = 0.06).

  12. Relationship between orthostatic hypotension and white matter hyperintensity load in older patients with mild dementia.

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    Hogne Soennesyn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: White matter hyperintensities (WMH in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans of the brain, and orthostatic hypotension (OH are both common in older people. We tested the hypothesis that OH is associated with WMH. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Secondary care outpatient clinics in geriatric medicine and old age psychiatry in western Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 160 older patients with mild dementia, diagnosed according to standardised criteria. MEASUREMENTS: OH was diagnosed according to the consensus definition, measuring blood pressure (BP in the supine position and within 3 minutes in the standing position. MRI scans were performed according to a common protocol at three centres, and the volumes of WMH were quantified using an automated method (n=82, followed by manual editing. WMH were also quantified using the visual Scheltens scale (n=139. Multiple logistic regression analyses were applied, with highest vs. lowest WMH quartile as response. RESULTS: There were no significant correlations between WMH volumes and systolic or diastolic orthostatic BP drops, and no significant correlations between Scheltens scores of WMH and systolic or diastolic BP drops. In the multivariate analyses, only APOEε4 status remained a significant predictor for WMH using the automated method (p=0.037, OR 0.075 (0.007-0.851, whereas only age remained a significant predictor for WMH scores (p=0.019, OR 1.119 (1.018-1.230. CONCLUSION: We found no association between OH and WMH load in a sample of older patients with mild dementia.

  13. White matter hyperintensities, systemic inflammation, brain growth, and cognitive functions in children exposed to air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Styner, Martin; Gómez-Garza, Gilberto; Zhu, Hongtu; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Carlos, Esperanza; Solorio-López, Edelmira; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Kavanaugh, Michael; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution exposures are linked to neuroinflammation and neuropathology in young urbanites. Forty percent of exposed children and young adults exhibit frontal tau hyperphosphorylation and 51% have amyloid-β diffuse plaques compared to 0% in low pollution controls. In older adults, white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are associated with cognitive deficits while inflammatory markers correlate with greater atrophy than expected for age. We investigated patterns of WMH, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volume growth, blood inflammatory mediators, and cognition in matched children from two urban cohorts: one severely and one minimally exposed to air pollution. Baseline and one year follow-up measurements of cognitive abilities, brain MRI volumes, and blood were collected in 20 Mexico City (MC) children (10 with WMH+, and 10 without WMH-) and 10 matched controls (WMH-). MC WMH- children display the profile of classical pro-inflammatory defensive responses: high interleukin 12, production of powerful pro-inflammatory cytokines, and low concentrations of key cytokines and chemokines associated with neuroprotection. MC WMH+ children exhibit a response involved in resolution of inflammation, immunoregulation, and tissue remodeling. The MC WMH+ group responded to the air pollution-associated brain volumetric alterations with white and grey matter volume increases in temporal, parietal, and frontal regions and better cognitive performance compared to MC WMH-. We conclude that complex modulation of cytokines and chemokines influences children's central nervous system structural and volumetric responses and cognitive correlates resulting from environmental pollution exposures. Identification of biomarkers associating systemic inflammation to brain growth is critical for detecting children at higher risk for cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration, thereby warranting early implementation of neuroprotective measures.

  14. Spaceflight-induced changes in white matter hyperintensity burden in astronauts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Noam; Bagci, Ahmet M; Lee, Sang H

    2017-11-21

    To assess the effect of weightlessness and the respective roles of CSF and vascular fluid on changes in white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden in astronauts. We analyzed prespaceflight and postspaceflight brain MRI scans from 17 astronauts, 10 who flew a long-duration mission on the International Space Station (ISS) and 7 who flew a short-duration mission on the Space Shuttle. Automated analysis methods were used to determine preflight to postflight changes in periventricular and deep WMH, CSF, and brain tissue volumes in fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and high-resolution 3-dimensional T1-weighted imaging. Differences between cohorts and associations between individual measures were assessed. The short-term reversibility of the identified preflight to postflight changes was tested in a subcohort of 5 long-duration astronauts who had a second postflight MRI scan 1 month after the first postflight scan. Significant preflight to postflight changes were measured only in the long-duration cohort and included only the periventricular WMH and ventricular CSF volumes. Changes in deep WMH and brain tissue volumes were not significant in either cohort. The increase in periventricular WMH volume was significantly associated with an increase in ventricular CSF volume (ρ = 0.63, p = 0.008). A partial reversal of these increases was observed in the long-duration subcohort with a 1-month follow-up scan. Long-duration exposure to microgravity is associated with an increase in periventricular WMH in astronauts. This increase was linked to an increase in ventricular CSF volume documented in ISS astronauts. There was no associated change in or abnormal levels of WMH volumes in deep white matter as reported in U-2 high-altitude pilots. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Unsupervised detection, quantification and localization of white matter hyper-intensities in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gicquel, Sebastien

    1998-01-01

    White matter hyper-intensities (WMH) are punctual ischemic areas, related to arteriosclerosis, visible on T2- and PD-weighted MRI. They are present on elderly normal subjects, and their proportion vary between 27 to 83 % from study to study. This strong variability in their counting is especially caused by human observation, so an unsupervised detection tool is necessary. The method is based on the analysis of Tl-weighted MRI in sagittal orientation, and of T2- and PD-weighted MRI in transaxial orientation of a single subject. Detection of WMH is based on a segmentation phase, and contains a large number of pre- and post-processing. First, a correction of inhomogeneities due to instrumentation is applied, with the modelization of the intensity variations appearing on a homogenous object. and the Computing a correction matrix. The three MRI modalities are then placed in a single referential, using a MRI-PET registration method. The brain is segmented on the Tl-weighted MRI, resulting in a mask used to segment the two others modalities after registration. A multispectral bayesian segmentation algorithm extracts the white matter (WM) and objects likely to be WMH. A set of morphological operations generate an image representing WM and potential WMH. A second segmentation of this image, in two classes, results in a WMH mask. It is then possible to list the WMH, their size, their shape, and their position in the MRI referential. At last, the coordinates of the WMH centers of mass are placed into Talairach space, allowing statistical analysis on a large number of subjects. This method has been in part applied on a data base of 850 subjects. The four steps (correction of inhomogeneities, registration, segmentation of the brain and detection of AC and PC landmarks) result in a global success rate of 90 %. (author) [fr

  16. UBO Detector - A cluster-based, fully automated pipeline for extracting white matter hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiyang; Liu, Tao; Zhu, Wanlin; Koncz, Rebecca; Liu, Hao; Lee, Teresa; Sachdev, Perminder S; Wen, Wei

    2018-07-01

    We present 'UBO Detector', a cluster-based, fully automated pipeline for extracting and calculating variables for regions of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) (available for download at https://cheba.unsw.edu.au/group/neuroimaging-pipeline). It takes T1-weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) scans as input, and SPM12 and FSL functions are utilised for pre-processing. The candidate clusters are then generated by FMRIB's Automated Segmentation Tool (FAST). A supervised machine learning algorithm, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), is applied to determine whether the candidate clusters are WMH or non-WMH. UBO Detector generates both image and text (volumes and the number of WMH clusters) outputs for whole brain, periventricular, deep, and lobar WMH, as well as WMH in arterial territories. The computation time for each brain is approximately 15 min. We validated the performance of UBO Detector by showing a) high segmentation (similarity index (SI) = 0.848) and volumetric (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.985) agreement between the UBO Detector-derived and manually traced WMH; b) highly correlated (r 2  > 0.9) and a steady increase of WMH volumes over time; and c) significant associations of periventricular (t = 22.591, p deep (t = 14.523, p < 0.001) WMH volumes generated by UBO Detector with Fazekas rating scores. With parallel computing enabled in UBO Detector, the processing can take advantage of multi-core CPU's that are commonly available on workstations. In conclusion, UBO Detector is a reliable, efficient and fully automated WMH segmentation pipeline. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. White matter hyperintensities are seen only in GRN mutation carriers in the GENFI cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole H. Sudre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic frontotemporal dementia is most commonly caused by mutations in the progranulin (GRN, microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72 genes. Previous small studies have reported the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH in genetic FTD but this has not been systematically studied across the different mutations. In this study WMH were assessed in 180 participants from the Genetic FTD Initiative (GENFI with 3D T1- and T2-weighed magnetic resonance images: 43 symptomatic (7 GRN, 13 MAPT and 23 C9orf72, 61 presymptomatic mutation carriers (25 GRN, 8 MAPT and 28 C9orf72 and 76 mutation negative non-carrier family members. An automatic detection and quantification algorithm was developed for determining load, location and appearance of WMH. Significant differences were seen only in the symptomatic GRN group compared with the other groups with no differences in the MAPT or C9orf72 groups: increased global load of WMH was seen, with WMH located in the frontal and occipital lobes more so than the parietal lobes, and nearer to the ventricles rather than juxtacortical. Although no differences were seen in the presymptomatic group as a whole, in the GRN cohort only there was an association of increased WMH volume with expected years from symptom onset. The appearance of the WMH was also different in the GRN group compared with the other groups, with the lesions in the GRN group being more similar to each other. The presence of WMH in those with progranulin deficiency may be related to the known role of progranulin in neuroinflammation, although other roles are also proposed including an effect on blood-brain barrier permeability and the cerebral vasculature. Future studies will be useful to investigate the longitudinal evolution of WMH and their potential use as a biomarker as well as post-mortem studies investigating the histopathological nature of the lesions.

  18. White matter hyperintensities in middle-aged adults with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunley, Karen A.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Jennings, J. Richard; Ryan, John; Zgibor, Janice C.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Costacou, Tina; Maynard, John D.; Miller, Rachel G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although microvascular complications are common in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), few studies have quantified the severity, risk factors, and implications of cerebral microvascular damage in these patients. As life expectancy in patients with T1DM increases, patients are exposed to age- and disease-related factors that may contribute to cerebral microvascular disease. Methods: Severity and volume of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and infarcts were quantified in 97 middle-aged patients with childhood-onset T1DM (mean age and duration: 50 and 41 years, respectively) and 81 non-T1DM adults (mean age: 48 years), concurrent with cognitive and health-related measures. Results: Compared with non-T1DM participants, patients had more severe WMH (Fazekas scores 2 and 3 compared with Fazekas score 1, p the group differences in processing speed (13% for digit symbol, 11% for pegboard, both p ≤ 0.05). Among patients, prevalent neuropathies and smoking tripled the odds of high WMH burden, independent of age or disease duration. Associations between measures of blood pressure or hyperglycemia and WMH were not significant. Conclusions: Clinically relevant WMH are evident earlier among middle-aged patients with childhood-onset T1DM and are related to the slower information processing frequently observed in T1DM. Brain imaging in patients with T1DM who have cognitive difficulties, especially those with neuropathies, may help uncover cerebral microvascular damage. Longitudinal studies are warranted to fully characterize WMH development, risk factors, and long-term effects on cognition. PMID:25904692

  19. The correlation between white matter hyperintensity and balance disorder and fall risk: An observational, prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Chao Shen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The presence of an association between white matter hyperintensity (WMH and the risk of falls in older people is uncertain, with little supporting prospective evidence available at present. We aimed to determine whether WMH was associated with dysfunctions of balance and gait, and other sensorimotor factors leading to falls, and the independent factors related to falls in older Chinese people. The protective effect of exercise against falls was also addressed. Methods: In a representative sample of hospital-based individuals aged 50 years and older in China, the patients' history of falls, magnetic resonance imaging data, scores on the 9-item Berg Balance Scale (BBS-9 test and timed up-and-go test (TUGT, and sensorimotor measures of computerized dynamic posturography (CDP were analyzed. Incident falls were recorded prospectively over a 12-month period. Using regression modeling, the association between the risk of falls and baseline WMH was estimated. Results: Only individuals with severe WMH were at an increased risk of falls, and CDP was more sensitive than BBS-9 in detecting WMH-related balance and gait dysfunction. However, WMH was not an independent predictor of falls. Taller height and overweight or obese body habitus were identified as novel protective factors for falls. Female, fall history, and increased TUGT score were identified as independent risk factors for falls in older Chinese people. Conclusion: Although WMH was associated with an increased risk of falls, it was not an independent predictor. Keywords: White matter hyperintensity, Balance disorder, Gait disorder, Fall risk

  20. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, White Matter Hyperintensities, and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

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    Christopher O. Leonards

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH concentrations are frequently altered in acute ischemic stroke patients. It is becoming increasingly apparent that various hormones in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis may be associated with functional stroke outcome. We have previously shown that white matter hyperintensities (WMH of presumed vascular origin are strong indicators of functional outcome. It is unclear whether an association exists between WMH and TSH. We therefore sought to determine whether TSH levels, measured in acute ischemic stroke patients, are associated with WMH and functional outcome. Methods: We analyzed all first ischemic stroke patients who participated in the Berlin ‘Cream & Sugar' Study (NCT 01378468 and completed a 1-year follow-up assessment from January 2009 to March 2013. Patients were stratified into 3 groups: (1 low TSH (0.1-0.44 μU/ml; (2 normal TSH (0.44-2.5 μU/ml, and (3 high TSH (2.5-20 μU/ml. WMH were assessed using the Fazekas and Wahlund visual rating scales. Functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale and was performed via telephone at 1 year by a certified rater. Results: 183 patients were included [median age 66, interquartile range (IQR 54-75; 33% females; median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale 3, IQR 1-4, range 0-24]. Venous samples were collected a median of 4 days (IQR 3-5 following initial symptom onset between 8 and 9 a.m. following a 10-hour fast. Patients with normal TSH levels (n = 132; 72% had significantly higher rates of prestroke diabetes than patients with high TSH levels (normal TSH 17%; high TSH 1%; p = 0.03. Additionally, patients with normal TSH levels tended to have higher estimated glomerular filtration rates than patients with high and low TSH concentrations (normal TSH median estimated glomerular filtration rates: 83 ml/min/1.73 m2; high TSH median estimated glomerular filtration rates: 76 ml/min/1.73 m2; low TSH median: 78 ml/min/1.73 m2; p

  1. The effects of white matter hyperintensities and amyloid deposition on Alzheimer dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The amount of amyloid deposition and white matter damage independently predicts cognitive impairment. This suggests a diagnostic utility of qualitative white matter scales in addition to measuring amyloid levels.

  2. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of white matter signal hyperintensity areas in elderly subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constans, J M [Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of California Magnetic Resonance Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States); [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Meyerhoff, D J [Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of California Magnetic Resonance Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States); [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Norman, D [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Fein, G [Department of Veterans Affairs Psychiatry Service, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); [University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry; Weiner, M W [Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of California Magnetic Resonance Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States); [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine; [DVA Medical Center, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Unit, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    White matter signal hyperintensities (WMSH) are commonly seen on MRI of elderly subjects. The purpose of this study was to characterize metabolic changes in the white matter of elderly subjects with extensive WMSH. We used water-suppressed proton ({sup 1}H) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to compare six subjects with extensive WMSH with eight age-matched elderly subjects with minimal or absent WMSH, and phosphorus ({sup 31}P) MRSI to compare nine subjects with extensive WMSH and seven age-matched elderly subjects without extensive WMSH. Relative to region-matched tissue in elderly controls, extensive WMSH were associated with increased signal from choline-containing metabolites, no significant change of signal from N-acetylaspartate, and a trend to a decreased phosphomonoester (PME) resonance. These findings suggest that WMSH may be associated with an alteration of brain myelin phospholipids in the absence of axonal damage. There were no differences in energy phosphates, consistent with lack of ongoing brain ischemia. Within the group with extensive WMSH, PME resonance measures were significantly lower in WMSH than in contralateral normal-appearing white matter. These results provide information on pathophysiology of WMSH and a basis for comparison with WMSH in Alzheimer`s disease, vascular dementia, multiple sclerosis, and other diseases. (orig.). With 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Decoupling of structural and functional brain connectivity in older adults with white matter hyperintensities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmer, Y. D.; Schultz, A. P.; Leemans, A.; O'Sullivan, M. J.; Gurol, M. E.; Sperling, R.; Greenberg, S. M.; Viswanathan, A.; Hedden, T.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related impairments in the default network (DN) have been related to disruptions in connecting white matter tracts. We hypothesized that the local correlation between DN structural and functional connectivity is negatively affected in the presence of global white matter injury. In 125 clinically

  4. Age and Alzheimer's pathology disrupt default mode network functioning via alterations in white matter microstructure but not hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher A; Jiang, Yang; Smith, Charles D; Gold, Brian T

    2018-04-19

    The default mode network (DMN) comprises defined brain regions contributing to internally-directed thought processes. Reductions in task-induced deactivation in the DMN have been associated with increasing age and poorer executive task performance, but factors underlying these functional changes remain unclear. We investigated contributions of white matter (WM) microstructure, WM hyperintensities (WMH) and Alzheimer's pathology to age-related alterations in DMN function. Thirty-five cognitively normal older adults and 29 younger adults underwent working memory task fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging. In the older adults, we measured cerebrospinal fluid tau and Aβ 42 (markers of AD pathology), and WMH on FLAIR imaging (marker of cerebrovascular disease). We identified a set of regions showing DMN deactivation and a set of inter-connecting WM tracts (DMN-WM) common to both age groups. There were negative associations between DMN deactivation and task performance in older adults, consistent with previous studies. Decreased DMN deactivation was associated with AD pathology and WM microstructure but not with WMH volume. Mediation analyses showed that WM microstructure mediated declines in DMN deactivation associated with both aging and AD pathology. Together these results suggest that AD pathology may exert a "second-hit" on WM microstructure, over-and-above the effects of age, both contributing to diminished DMN deactivation in older adults. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The correlation between white matter hyperintensity and balance disorder and fall risk: An observational, prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dong-Chao; Wu, Shuo-Lin; Shi, Yu-Zhi; Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Wang, Chun-Xue

    2016-09-01

    The presence of an association between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) and the risk of falls in older people is uncertain, with little supporting prospective evidence available at present. We aimed to determine whether WMH was associated with dysfunctions of balance and gait, and other sensorimotor factors leading to falls, and the independent factors related to falls in older Chinese people. The protective effect of exercise against falls was also addressed. In a representative sample of hospital-based individuals aged 50 years and older in China, the patients' history of falls, magnetic resonance imaging data, scores on the 9-item Berg Balance Scale (BBS-9) test and timed up-and-go test (TUGT), and sensorimotor measures of computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) were analyzed. Incident falls were recorded prospectively over a 12-month period. Using regression modeling, the association between the risk of falls and baseline WMH was estimated. Only individuals with severe WMH were at an increased risk of falls, and CDP was more sensitive than BBS-9 in detecting WMH-related balance and gait dysfunction. However, WMH was not an independent predictor of falls. Taller height and overweight or obese body habitus were identified as novel protective factors for falls. Female, fall history, and increased TUGT score were identified as independent risk factors for falls in older Chinese people. Although WMH was associated with an increased risk of falls, it was not an independent predictor.

  6. Frontal white matter hyperintensity predicts lower urinary tract dysfunction in older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogama, Noriko; Yoshida, Masaki; Nakai, Toshiharu; Niida, Shumpei; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms often limit activities of daily life and impair quality of life in the elderly. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether regional white matter hyperintensity (WMH) can predict lower urinary tract symptoms in elderly with amnestic mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease. The participants were 461 patients aged 65-85 years diagnosed with amnestic mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease. Patients and their caregivers were asked about symptoms of lower urinary tract symptoms (urinary difficulty, frequency and incontinence). Cognition, behavior and psychological symptoms of dementia and medication were evaluated. WMH and brain atrophy were analyzed using an automatic segmentation program. Regional WMH was evaluated in the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes. Patients with urinary incontinence showed significantly greater volume of WMH. WMH increased with age, especially in the frontal lobe. WMH in the frontal lobe was closely associated with urinary incontinence after adjustment for brain atrophy and classical confounding factors. Frontal WMH was a predictive factor for urinary incontinence in older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease. Urinary incontinence in demented older adults is not an incidental event, and careful insight into regional WMH on brain magnetic resonance imaging might greatly help in diagnosing individuals with a higher risk of urinary incontinence. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. Longitudinal follow-up of individual white matter hyperintensities in a large cohort of elderly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillard, Pauline; Crivello, Fabrice; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie [Universite de Caen, Universite Paris Descartes, Centre d' Imagerie-Neurosciences et Applications aux Pathologies, CI-NAPS, UMR6232, CNRS, CEA, GIP Cyceron, Caen (France); Dufouil, Carole; Tzourio, Christophe [INSERM, Neuroepidemiologie U708, Paris (France); Mazoyer, Bernard [Universite de Caen, Universite Paris Descartes, Centre d' Imagerie-Neurosciences et Applications aux Pathologies, CI-NAPS, UMR6232, CNRS, CEA, GIP Cyceron, Caen (France); Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France); CHU, GIP Cyceron, Caen (France)

    2009-04-15

    We report on a method for the longitudinal follow-up of individual white matter hypersignals (WMH) and on its application to the study of WMH natural evolution in a cohort of 1,118 elderly over a 4-year period. For each subject, automated WMH detection was performed on T2-weighted MR images acquired both at baseline and at follow-up after registration in a common space. The detection algorithm was designed both to track WMH previously existing at baseline and to identify newly formed WMH. The average annual change in WMH load was found to be 0.25 cm{sup 3}/year, 36% of this change being attributable to newly formed WMH. Quantitative analyses showed that change in WMH was mainly explained by progression of juxtaventricular and periventricular WMH while the load of WMH in the deep white matter zones was found stable over 4 years of the study. Statistical parametric mapping confirmed these spatial WMH change distributions in the juxta- and periventricular zones. High blood pressure was not a significant predictor of the annual change in WMH. This study proposes a new scheme for the longitudinal study of WMH change by dissociating worsening of existent WMH from surfacing of new WMH and may thus contribute to help understanding and characterizing the neurological and etiological bases of these two processes and their potential differences. (orig.)

  8. MR Imaging Evaluation of Intracerebral Hemorrhages and T2 Hyperintense White Matter Lesions Appearing after Radiation Therapy in Adult Patients with Primary Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dong Hyun; Song, Sang Woo; Yun, Tae Jin; Kim, Tae Min; Lee, Se-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Il Han; Choi, Seung Hong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the frequency and severity of intracerebral hemorrhages and T2 hyperintense white matter lesions (WMLs) following radiation therapy for brain tumors in adult patients. Of 648 adult brain tumor patients who received radiation therapy at our institute, magnetic resonance (MR) image data consisting of a gradient echo (GRE) and FLAIR T2-weighted image were available three and five years after radiation therapy in 81 patients. Intracerebral hemorrhage was defined as a hypointense dot lesion appearing on GRE images after radiation therapy. The number and size of the lesions were evaluated. The T2 hyperintense WMLs observed on the FLAIR sequences were graded according to the extent of the lesion. Intracerebral hemorrhage was detected in 21 (25.9%) and 35 (43.2) patients in the three- and five-year follow-up images, respectively. The number of intracerebral hemorrhages per patient tended to increase as the follow-up period increased, whereas the size of the intracerebral hemorrhages exhibited little variation over the course of follow-up. T2 hyperintense WMLs were observed in 27 (33.3%) and 32 (39.5) patients in the three and five year follow-up images, respectively. The age at the time of radiation therapy was significantly higher (p T2 hyperintense WMLs than in those without lesions. Intracerebral hemorrhages are not uncommon in adult brain tumor patients undergoing radiation therapy. The incidence and number of intracerebral hemorrhages increased over the course of follow-up. T2 hyperintense WMLs were observed in more than one-third of the study population.

  9. Relationship between white matter hyperintensities volume and the circle of Willis configurations in patients with carotid artery pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Luca; Sanfilippo, Roberto; Porcu, Michele; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Montisci, Roberto; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Suri, Jasjit S; Anzidei, Michele; Wintermark, Max

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to assess if there is a difference of distribution and volume of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in the brain according to the Circle of Willis (CoW) configuration in patients with carotid artery pathology. One-hundred consecutive patients (79 males, 21 females; mean age 70 years; age range 46-84 years) that underwent brain MRI before carotid endarterectomy (CEA) were included. FLAIR-WMH lesion volume was performed using a semi-automated segmentation technique and the status of the circle of Willis was assessed by two neuroradiologists in consensus. We found a prevalence of 55% of variants in the CoW configuration; 22 cases had one variants (40%); 25 cases had two variants (45.45%) and 8 cases showed 3 variants (14.55%). The configuration that was associated with the biggest WMH volume and number of lesions was the A1+PcoA+PcoA. The PcoA variants were the most prevalent and there was no statistically significant difference in number of lesions and WMH for each vascular territory assessed and the same results were found for AcoA and A1 variants. Results of our study suggest that the more common CoW variants are not associated with the presence of an increased WMH or number of lesions whereas uncommon configurations, in particular when 2 or more segment are missing increase the WMH volume and number of lesions. The WHM volume of the MCA territory seems to be more affected by the CoW configuration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between white matter hyperintensities volume and the circle of Willis configurations in patients with carotid artery pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, Luca; Sanfilippo, Roberto; Porcu, Michele; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Montisci, Roberto; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Suri, Jasjit S.; Anzidei, Michele; Wintermark, Max

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to assess if there is a difference of distribution and volume of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in the brain according to the Circle of Willis (CoW) configuration in patients with carotid artery pathology. Material and methods: One-hundred consecutive patients (79 males, 21 females; mean age 70 years; age range 46–84 years) that underwent brain MRI before carotid endarterectomy (CEA) were included. FLAIR-WMH lesion volume was performed using a semi-automated segmentation technique and the status of the circle of Willis was assessed by two neuroradiologists in consensus. Results: We found a prevalence of 55% of variants in the CoW configuration; 22 cases had one variants (40%); 25 cases had two variants (45.45%) and 8 cases showed 3 variants (14.55%). The configuration that was associated with the biggest WMH volume and number of lesions was the A1 + PcoA + PcoA. The PcoA variants were the most prevalent and there was no statistically significant difference in number of lesions and WMH for each vascular territory assessed and the same results were found for AcoA and A1 variants. Conclusion: Results of our study suggest that the more common CoW variants are not associated with the presence of an increased WMH or number of lesions whereas uncommon configurations, in particular when 2 or more segment are missing increase the WMH volume and number of lesions. The WHM volume of the MCA territory seems to be more affected by the CoW configuration.

  11. Differential Effect of Left vs. Right White Matter Hyperintensity Burden on Functional Decline: The Northern Manhattan Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandip S. Dhamoon

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetry of brain dysfunction may disrupt brain network efficiency. We hypothesized that greater left-right white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV asymmetry was associated with functional trajectories.Methods: In the Northern Manhattan Study, participants underwent brain MRI with axial T1, T2, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, with baseline interview and examination. Volumetric WMHV distribution across 14 brain regions was determined separately by combining bimodal image intensity distribution and atlas based methods. Participants had annual functional assessments with the Barthel index (BI, range 0–100 over a mean of 7.3 years. Generalized estimating equations (GEE models estimated associations of regional WMHV and regional left-right asymmetry with baseline BI and change over time, adjusted for baseline medical risk factors, sociodemographics, and cognition, and stroke and myocardial infarction during follow-up.Results: Among 1,195 participants, greater WMHV asymmetry in the parietal lobes (−8.46 BI points per unit greater WMHV on the right compared to left, 95% CI −3.07, −13.86 and temporal lobes (−2.48 BI points, 95% CI −1.04, −3.93 was associated with lower overall function. Greater WMHV asymmetry in the parietal lobes (−1.09 additional BI points per year per unit greater WMHV on the left compared to right, 95% CI −1.89, −0.28 was independently associated with accelerated functional decline.Conclusions: In this large population-based study with long-term repeated measures of function, greater regional WMHV asymmetry was associated with lower function and functional decline. In addition to global WMHV, WHMV asymmetry may be an important predictor of long-term functional status.

  12. Relationship between white matter hyperintensities volume and the circle of Willis configurations in patients with carotid artery pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, Luca, E-mail: lucasaba@tiscali.it [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), di Cagliari – Polo di Monserrato, s.s. 554 Monserrato, Cagliari 09045 (Italy); Sanfilippo, Roberto [Department of Vascular Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), di Cagliari – Polo di Monserrato, s.s. 554 Monserrato, Cagliari 09045 (Italy); Porcu, Michele [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), di Cagliari – Polo di Monserrato, s.s. 554 Monserrato, Cagliari 09045 (Italy); Lucatelli, Pierleone [Department of Radiology, University la Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Montisci, Roberto [Department of Vascular Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), di Cagliari – Polo di Monserrato, s.s. 554 Monserrato, Cagliari 09045 (Italy); Zaccagna, Fulvio [Department of Radiology, University la Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Suri, Jasjit S. [Monitoring and Diagnostic Division, AtheroPoint, Roseville, CA (United States); Point-of-Care Devices, Global Biomedical Technologies, Inc., Roseville, CA (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Idaho (Affl.), ID (United States); Anzidei, Michele [Department of Radiology, University la Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Wintermark, Max [Department of Radiology, Stanford University (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Purpose: We aimed to assess if there is a difference of distribution and volume of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in the brain according to the Circle of Willis (CoW) configuration in patients with carotid artery pathology. Material and methods: One-hundred consecutive patients (79 males, 21 females; mean age 70 years; age range 46–84 years) that underwent brain MRI before carotid endarterectomy (CEA) were included. FLAIR-WMH lesion volume was performed using a semi-automated segmentation technique and the status of the circle of Willis was assessed by two neuroradiologists in consensus. Results: We found a prevalence of 55% of variants in the CoW configuration; 22 cases had one variants (40%); 25 cases had two variants (45.45%) and 8 cases showed 3 variants (14.55%). The configuration that was associated with the biggest WMH volume and number of lesions was the A1 + PcoA + PcoA. The PcoA variants were the most prevalent and there was no statistically significant difference in number of lesions and WMH for each vascular territory assessed and the same results were found for AcoA and A1 variants. Conclusion: Results of our study suggest that the more common CoW variants are not associated with the presence of an increased WMH or number of lesions whereas uncommon configurations, in particular when 2 or more segment are missing increase the WMH volume and number of lesions. The WHM volume of the MCA territory seems to be more affected by the CoW configuration.

  13. Differential Effect of Left vs. Right White Matter Hyperintensity Burden on Functional Decline: The Northern Manhattan Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamoon, Mandip S; Cheung, Ying-Kuen; Bagci, Ahmet; Alperin, Noam; Sacco, Ralph L; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Wright, Clinton B

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetry of brain dysfunction may disrupt brain network efficiency. We hypothesized that greater left-right white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV) asymmetry was associated with functional trajectories. Methods: In the Northern Manhattan Study, participants underwent brain MRI with axial T1, T2, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, with baseline interview and examination. Volumetric WMHV distribution across 14 brain regions was determined separately by combining bimodal image intensity distribution and atlas based methods. Participants had annual functional assessments with the Barthel index (BI, range 0-100) over a mean of 7.3 years. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models estimated associations of regional WMHV and regional left-right asymmetry with baseline BI and change over time, adjusted for baseline medical risk factors, sociodemographics, and cognition, and stroke and myocardial infarction during follow-up. Results: Among 1,195 participants, greater WMHV asymmetry in the parietal lobes (-8.46 BI points per unit greater WMHV on the right compared to left, 95% CI -3.07, -13.86) and temporal lobes (-2.48 BI points, 95% CI -1.04, -3.93) was associated with lower overall function. Greater WMHV asymmetry in the parietal lobes (-1.09 additional BI points per year per unit greater WMHV on the left compared to right, 95% CI -1.89, -0.28) was independently associated with accelerated functional decline. Conclusions: In this large population-based study with long-term repeated measures of function, greater regional WMHV asymmetry was associated with lower function and functional decline. In addition to global WMHV, WHMV asymmetry may be an important predictor of long-term functional status.

  14. White Matter Hyperintensities on T2-Weighted MRI Images among DNA-Verified Older Familial Hypercholesterolemia Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyttinen, L.; Autti, T.; Soljanlahti, S.; Rauma, S.; Vuorio, A.F.; Strandberg, T.E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder, causing an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) if untreated. Silent brain infarctions and white matter hyperintensities (WMHIs) observed on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) are associated with increased risk for stroke and myocardial infarction. Age is a strong predictor of WMHIs. Purpose: To use MRI to assess the presence of clinically silent brain lesions in older FH patients, and to compare the occurrence and size of these lesions in older FH patients with middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls. Material and Methods: A total of 43 older (age = 65 years) FH patients with the same FH North Karelia mutation, living in Finland, were identified. In this comprehensive cohort, 1.5T brain MRI was available for 33 individuals (age 65-84 years, M/F 9/24, mean duration of statin treatment 15.3 years). This group was divided into two age categories: 65-74 years (FHe1 group, n=23) and 75-84 years (FHe2 group, n=10). Infarcts, including lacunas, and WMHIs on T2-weighted images were recorded. Data from brain MRI were compared to those of a group of middle-aged FH patients with CHD (n=19, age 48-64 years) and with middle-aged healthy controls (n=29, age 49-63 years). Results: Only two (6%) of the older FH patients had clinically silent brain infarcts detected by MRI. The amount of large WMHIs (>5 mm in diameter) was similar in the FHe1 group compared with the groups of middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls, even though the FHe1 group was 13 years older. The total amount of WMHIs and the amount of large WMHIs were greatest in the FHe2 group. Conclusion: FH patients aged 65 to 74 years receiving long-term statin treatment (15 years) did not have more WMHIs on brain MRI compared to middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls

  15. White Matter Hyperintensities on T2-Weighted MRI Images among DNA-Verified Older Familial Hypercholesterolemia Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyttinen, L. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, North Karelia Central Hospital, Joensuu (Finland)); Autti, T.; Soljanlahti, S. (Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)); Rauma, S. (Dept. of Radiology, North Karelia Central Hospital, Joensuu (Finland)); Vuorio, A.F. (Dept. of Medicine, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)); Strandberg, T.E. (Dept. of Health Sciences/Geriatrics, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder, causing an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) if untreated. Silent brain infarctions and white matter hyperintensities (WMHIs) observed on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) are associated with increased risk for stroke and myocardial infarction. Age is a strong predictor of WMHIs. Purpose: To use MRI to assess the presence of clinically silent brain lesions in older FH patients, and to compare the occurrence and size of these lesions in older FH patients with middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls. Material and Methods: A total of 43 older (age = 65 years) FH patients with the same FH North Karelia mutation, living in Finland, were identified. In this comprehensive cohort, 1.5T brain MRI was available for 33 individuals (age 65-84 years, M/F 9/24, mean duration of statin treatment 15.3 years). This group was divided into two age categories: 65-74 years (FHe1 group, n=23) and 75-84 years (FHe2 group, n=10). Infarcts, including lacunas, and WMHIs on T2-weighted images were recorded. Data from brain MRI were compared to those of a group of middle-aged FH patients with CHD (n=19, age 48-64 years) and with middle-aged healthy controls (n=29, age 49-63 years). Results: Only two (6%) of the older FH patients had clinically silent brain infarcts detected by MRI. The amount of large WMHIs (>5 mm in diameter) was similar in the FHe1 group compared with the groups of middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls, even though the FHe1 group was 13 years older. The total amount of WMHIs and the amount of large WMHIs were greatest in the FHe2 group. Conclusion: FH patients aged 65 to 74 years receiving long-term statin treatment (15 years) did not have more WMHIs on brain MRI compared to middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls.

  16. Understanding the direction of the relationship between white matter hyperintensities of vascular origin, sleep quality, and chronic kidney disease-Results from the Atahualpa Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Mera, Robertino M

    2018-02-01

    The burden of cerebral small vessel disease, sleep disorders, and chronic kidney disease is on the rise in remote rural settings. However, information on potential links between these conditions is limited. We aimed to assess the relationships between these conditions in community-dwelling older adults living in rural Ecuador. Atahualpa residents aged ≥60 years were offered a brain MRI. A venous blood sample was obtained for serum creatinine determination. Baseline interviews and procedures were directed to assess demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, and sleep quality. Using generalized structural equation modeling (GSEM), we assessed the associations between white matter hyperintensities (WMH) of vascular origin, sleep quality and kidney function, as well as the directions of the relationships between these variables. Of 423 candidates, 314 (74%) were enrolled. Moderate-to-severe WMH were noticed in 74 (24%) individuals, poor sleep quality in 101 (31%), and moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease in 28 (9%). GSEM showed that the direction of the effect was from kidney function to WMH and from the latter to sleep quality. Of independent variables investigated, worse kidney function was associated with age, high glucose levels and male sex. WMH was associated with cholesterol blood levels, blood pressure, level of education and severe edentulism. Poor sleep quality was associated with poor physical activity. This population based study shows that chronic kidney disease is associated with increased severity of WMH, which, in turn, is associated with a poor sleep quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Case Report: Compound heterozygous nonsense mutations in TRMT10A are associated with microcephaly, delayed development, and periventricular white matter hyperintensities [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Narayanan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microcephaly is a fairly common feature observed in children with delayed development, defined as head circumference less than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender. It may be the result of an acquired insult to the brain, such prenatal or perinatal brain injury (congenital infection or hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, or be a part of a genetic syndrome. There are over 1000 conditions listed in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man where microcephaly is a key finding; many of these are associated with specific somatic features and non-CNS anomalies. The term primary microcephaly is used when microcephaly and delayed development are the primary features, and they are not part of another recognized syndrome.   In this case report, we present the clinical features of siblings (brother and sister with primary microcephaly and delayed development, and subtle dysmorphic features. Both children had brain MRI studies that showed periventricular and subcortical T2/FLAIR hyperintensities, without signs of white matter volume loss, and no parenchymal calcifications by CT scan. The family was enrolled in a research study for whole exome sequencing of probands and parents. Analysis of variants determined that the children were compound heterozygotes for nonsense mutations, c.277C>T (p.Arg93* and c.397C>T (p.Arg133*, in the TRMT10A gene. Mutations in this gene have only recently been reported in children with microcephaly and early onset diabetes mellitus.   Our report adds to current knowledge of TRMT10A related neurodevelopmental disorders and demonstrates imaging findings suggestive of delayed or abnormal myelination of the white matter in this disorder. Accurate diagnosis through genomic testing, as in the children described here, allows for early detection and management of medical complications, such as diabetes mellitus.

  18. Evaluation of a deep learning approach for the segmentation of brain tissues and white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeskops, Pim; de Bresser, Jeroen; Kuijf, Hugo J; Mendrik, Adriënne M; Biessels, Geert Jan; Pluim, Josien P W; Išgum, Ivana

    2018-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of brain tissues and white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin (WMH) in MRI of older patients is widely described in the literature. Although brain abnormalities and motion artefacts are common in this age group, most segmentation methods are not evaluated in a setting that includes these items. In the present study, our tissue segmentation method for brain MRI was extended and evaluated for additional WMH segmentation. Furthermore, our method was evaluated in two large cohorts with a realistic variation in brain abnormalities and motion artefacts. The method uses a multi-scale convolutional neural network with a T 1 -weighted image, a T 2 -weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) image and a T 1 -weighted inversion recovery (IR) image as input. The method automatically segments white matter (WM), cortical grey matter (cGM), basal ganglia and thalami (BGT), cerebellum (CB), brain stem (BS), lateral ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (lvCSF), peripheral cerebrospinal fluid (pCSF), and WMH. Our method was evaluated quantitatively with images publicly available from the MRBrainS13 challenge ( n  = 20), quantitatively and qualitatively in relatively healthy older subjects ( n  = 96), and qualitatively in patients from a memory clinic ( n  = 110). The method can accurately segment WMH (Overall Dice coefficient in the MRBrainS13 data of 0.67) without compromising performance for tissue segmentations (Overall Dice coefficients in the MRBrainS13 data of 0.87 for WM, 0.85 for cGM, 0.82 for BGT, 0.93 for CB, 0.92 for BS, 0.93 for lvCSF, 0.76 for pCSF). Furthermore, the automatic WMH volumes showed a high correlation with manual WMH volumes (Spearman's ρ  = 0.83 for relatively healthy older subjects). In both cohorts, our method produced reliable segmentations (as determined by a human observer) in most images (relatively healthy/memory clinic: tissues 88%/77% reliable, WMH 85%/84% reliable) despite various degrees of

  19. [Total brain T2-hyperintense lesion-volume and the axonal damage in the normal-appearing white matter of brainstem in early lapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Lozano, A M; Martínez-Bisbal, M C; Boscá-Blasco, I; Valero-Merino, C; Coret-Ferrer, F; Martí-Bonmatí, L; Martínez-Granados, B; Celda, B; Casanova-Estruch, B

    To evaluate the relationship between the total brain T2-hyperintense lesion volume (TBT2LV) and the axonal damage in the normal-appearing white matter of brainstem measured by 1H-MRS in a group of early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. 40 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and ten sex- and age-matched healthy subjects were prospectively studied for two years. T2-weighted MR and 1H-MRS imaging were acquired at time of recruitment and at year two. The TBT2LV was calculated with a semiautomatic program; N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr) and choline (Cho) resonances areas were integrated with jMRUI program and the ratios were calculated for four volume elements that represented the brainstem. At basal study we obtained an axonal loss (as a decrement of NAA/ Cho ratio) in the group of patients compared with controls (p = 0.017); this axonal loss increased at the second year of the follow-up for patients (NAA/Cho decrease, p = 0.004, and NAA/Cr decrease, p = 0.002) meanwhile control subjects had no significant metabolic changes. Higher lesion load was correlated with a poor clinical outcome, being the correlation between the basal TBT2LV and the Expanded Disability Status Scale at second year (r = 0.299; p = 0.05). Besides, axonal loss was not homogeneous for all multiple sclerosis patients, being stronger in the subgroup of patients with high basal TBT2LV (p = 0.043; ANOVA). Our data suggest that axonal damage is early in multiple sclerosis and higher in patients high basal TBT2LV, suggesting a possible relationship between these two phenomena.

  20. Segmentation of white matter hyperintensities using convolutional neural networks with global spatial information in routine clinical brain MRI with none or mild vascular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmadi, Muhammad Febrian; Valdés-Hernández, Maria Del C; Agan, Maria Leonora Fatimah; Di Perri, Carol; Komura, Taku

    2018-06-01

    We propose an adaptation of a convolutional neural network (CNN) scheme proposed for segmenting brain lesions with considerable mass-effect, to segment white matter hyperintensities (WMH) characteristic of brains with none or mild vascular pathology in routine clinical brain magnetic resonance images (MRI). This is a rather difficult segmentation problem because of the small area (i.e., volume) of the WMH and their similarity to non-pathological brain tissue. We investigate the effectiveness of the 2D CNN scheme by comparing its performance against those obtained from another deep learning approach: Deep Boltzmann Machine (DBM), two conventional machine learning approaches: Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Random Forest (RF), and a public toolbox: Lesion Segmentation Tool (LST), all reported to be useful for segmenting WMH in MRI. We also introduce a way to incorporate spatial information in convolution level of CNN for WMH segmentation named global spatial information (GSI). Analysis of covariance corroborated known associations between WMH progression, as assessed by all methods evaluated, and demographic and clinical data. Deep learning algorithms outperform conventional machine learning algorithms by excluding MRI artefacts and pathologies that appear similar to WMH. Our proposed approach of incorporating GSI also successfully helped CNN to achieve better automatic WMH segmentation regardless of network's settings tested. The mean Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) values for LST-LGA, SVM, RF, DBM, CNN and CNN-GSI were 0.2963, 0.1194, 0.1633, 0.3264, 0.5359 and 5389 respectively. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. White Matter Hyperintensity in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated with Cognitive Impairment, Functional Disability, and a High Glycoalbumin/Glycohemoglobin Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Tamura

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Although evidence has accumulated that white matter hyperintensity (WMH is associated with the deterioration of cognitive function and impairment of activities of daily living (ADL, the clinical relevance of WMH in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus (DM is not still clear. The aim of this study was to examine whether WMH volume is associated with ADL and cognitive function and whether glucose control and glucose variability can affect WMH volume in these patients.Methods: This cross-sectional study investigated the associations of WMH with cognitive function and instrumental ADL (IADL, as well as metabolic and vascular risk factors in a total of 178 elderly patients with diabetes. The study assessed WMH volumes and the functional status of cognition and IADL. WMH volumes were evaluated by obtaining axial T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence images on brain magnetic resonance imaging and assessing the images using Software for Neuro-Image Processing in Experimental Research.Results: We found a significant association between WMH volumes and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores (p = 0.039 and between WMH and IADL status (p = 0.006. Furthermore, we found significant relations of large WMH volumes with a high glycoalbumin/glycohemoglobin ratio (GA/HbA1c (p < 0.001. Large WMH volumes were also found to be associated with a low body mass index (p = 0.014 and a low diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.024, but not with HbA1c. Multiple regression analysis showed that high GA/HbA1c, which reflects high glucose variability, was a significant determining factor for large WMH volumes. We also found that GA/HbA1c was negatively associated with both MMSE (p = 0.036 and IADL (p < 0.001.Conclusion: GA/HbA1c, which is a marker of glucose variability, was independently associated with WMH volumes, which could lead to the decline of cognition and IADL in elderly patients with DM.

  2. Cerebral Microbleeds and White Matter Hyperintensities in Cognitively Healthy Elderly: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study Evaluating the Effect of Arterial Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Märta Gustavsson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arterial stiffness reflects the ageing processes in the vascular system, and studies have shown an association between reduced cognitive function and cerebral small vessel disease. Small vessel disease can be visualized as white matter hyperintensities (WMH and lacunar infarcts but also as cerebral microbleeds on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We aimed to investigate if arterial stiffness influences the presence of microbleeds, WMH and cognitive function in a population of cognitively healthy elderly. Methods: The study population is part of the Swedish BioFinder study and consisted of 208 individuals without any symptoms of cognitive impairment, who scored >27 points on the Mini-Mental State Examination. The participants (mean age, 72 years; 59% women underwent MRI of the brain with visual rating of microbleeds and WMH. Arterial stiffness was measured with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV. Eight cognitive tests covering different cognitive domains were performed. Results: Microbleeds were detected in 12% and WMH in 31% of the participants. Mean (±standard deviation, SD cfPWV was 10.0 (±2.0 m/s. There was no association between the presence of microbleeds and arterial stiffness. There was a positive association between arterial stiffness and WMH independent of age or sex (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.40, p 0.05. Cognitive performance was not associated with microbleeds, but individuals with WMH performed slightly worse than those without WMH on the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (mean ± SD, 35 ± 7.8 vs. 39 ± 8.1, p Conclusions: Arterial stiffness was not associated with the presence of cerebral microbleeds or cognitive function in cognitively healthy elderly. However, arterial stiffness was related to the presence of WMH, but the association was attenuated when multiple adjustments were made. There was a weak negative association between WMH and performance in one specific test of attention

  3. An automated procedure for the assessment of white matter hyperintensities by multispectral (T1, T2, PD) MRI and an evaluation of its between-centre reproducibility based on two large community databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, Pauline; Delcroix, Nicolas; Crivello, Fabrice; Gicquel, Sebastien; Joliot, Marc; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie; Dufouil, Carole; Alperovitch, Annick; Tzourio, Christophe; Mazoyer, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    An automated procedure for the detection, quantification, localization and statistical mapping of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented and validated based on the results of a between-centre reproducibility study. The first step is the identification of white matter (WM) tissue using a multispectral (T1, T2, PD) segmentation. In a second step, WMH are identified within the WM tissue by segmenting T2 images, isolating two different classes of WMH voxels - low- and high-contrast WMH voxels, respectively. The reliability of the whole procedure was assessed by applying it to the analysis of two large MR imaging databases (n = 650 and n710, respectively) of healthy elderly subjects matched for demographic characteristics. Average overall WMH load and spatial distribution were found to be similar in the two samples, (1.81 and 1.79% of the WM volume, respectively). White matter hyperintensity load was found to be significantly associated with both age and high blood pressure, with similar effects in both samples. With specific reference to the 650 subject cohort, we also found that WMH load provided by this automated procedure was significantly associated with visual grading of the severity of WMH, as assessed by a trained neurologist. The results show that this method is sensitive, well correlated with semi-quantitative visual rating and highly reproducible. (orig.)

  4. An automated procedure for the assessment of white matter hyperintensities by multispectral (T1, T2, PD) MRI and an evaluation of its between-centre reproducibility based on two large community databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillard, Pauline; Delcroix, Nicolas; Crivello, Fabrice; Gicquel, Sebastien; Joliot, Marc; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie [GIP Cyceron, Centre d' Imagerie-Neurosciences et Applications aux Pathologies, CI-NAPS, CNRS, CEA, Universite de Caen/Universite Paris Descartes, Boulevard Becquerel, BP 5229, Caen (France); Dufouil, Carole; Alperovitch, Annick; Tzourio, Christophe [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, INSERM U708, Neuroepidemiologie, Paris (France); Mazoyer, Bernard [GIP Cyceron, Centre d' Imagerie-Neurosciences et Applications aux Pathologies, CI-NAPS, CNRS, CEA, Universite de Caen/Universite Paris Descartes, Boulevard Becquerel, BP 5229, Caen (France); Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France); CHU du Caen, Unite IRM, Caen (France)

    2008-01-15

    An automated procedure for the detection, quantification, localization and statistical mapping of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented and validated based on the results of a between-centre reproducibility study. The first step is the identification of white matter (WM) tissue using a multispectral (T1, T2, PD) segmentation. In a second step, WMH are identified within the WM tissue by segmenting T2 images, isolating two different classes of WMH voxels - low- and high-contrast WMH voxels, respectively. The reliability of the whole procedure was assessed by applying it to the analysis of two large MR imaging databases (n = 650 and n= 710, respectively) of healthy elderly subjects matched for demographic characteristics. Average overall WMH load and spatial distribution were found to be similar in the two samples, (1.81 and 1.79% of the WM volume, respectively). White matter hyperintensity load was found to be significantly associated with both age and high blood pressure, with similar effects in both samples. With specific reference to the 650 subject cohort, we also found that WMH load provided by this automated procedure was significantly associated with visual grading of the severity of WMH, as assessed by a trained neurologist. The results show that this method is sensitive, well correlated with semi-quantitative visual rating and highly reproducible. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of white matter hyperintensities and retinal fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, inner-plexiform layer, and choroidal layer in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Ali Zeynel Abidin; Sengul, Yıldızhan; Bilak, Şemsettin

    2018-03-01

    The aim of our study is to assess retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), the ganglion cell layer (GCL), inner-plexiform layer (IPL), and choroidal layer in migraine patients with white matter lesion (WML) or without WML, using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). To our study, 77 migraine patients who are diagnosed with migraine in accordance to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-3 beta and 43 healthy control are included. In accordance to cranial MRI, migraine patients are divided into two groups as those who have white matter lesions (39 patients), and those who do not have a lesion (38 patients). OCT was performed for participants. The average age of participants was comparable. The RNFL average thickness parameter in the migraine group was significantly lower than in the control group (p layer measuring scales. The proofs showing that affected retinal nerve fiber layer are increased in migraine patients. However, it is not known whether this may affect other layers of retina, or whether there is a correlation between affected retinal structures and white matter lesions. In our study, we found thinner RNFL in migraine patients when we compared with controls but IPL, GCL, and choroid layer values were similar between each patient groups and controls. Also, all parameters were similar between patients with WML and without WML. Studies in this regard are required.

  6. Conceptual elaboration versus direct lexical access in WAIS-similarities: differential effects of white-matter lesions and gray matter volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernaeus, Sven-Erik; Hellström, Åke

    2017-09-18

    Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) subscale Similarities have been classified as a test of either verbal comprehension or of inductive reasoning. The reason may be that items divide into two categories. We tested the hypothesis of heterogeneity of items in WAIS-Similarities. Consecutive patients at a memory clinic and healthy controls participated in the study. White-matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and normalized temporal lobe volumes were measured based on Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI), and tests of verbal memory and attention were used in addition to WAIS-Similarities to collect behavioural data. Factor analysis supported the hypothesis that two factors are involved in the performance of WAIS-similarities: (1) semiautomatic lexical access and (2) conceptual elaboration. These factors were highly correlated but provided discriminative diagnostic information: In logistic regression analyses, scores of the lexical access factor and of the conceptual elaboration factor discriminated patients with mild cognitive impairment from Alzheimer's disease patients and from healthy controls, respectively. High scores of WMH, indicating periventricular white-matter lesions, predicted factor scores of direct lexical access but not those of conceptual elaboration, which were predicted only by medial and lateral temporal lobe volumes.

  7. Bilateral hyperintense basal ganglia on T1-weighted image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Seung Kug; Ahn, Woo Hyun; Choi, Han Yong; Kim, Bong Gi

    1994-01-01

    Bilateral high signal intensity in basal ganglia on T1-weighted images is unusual, the purpose of this study is to describe the pattern of high signal intensity and underlying disease. During the last three years, 8 patients showed bilateral high signal intensity in basal ganglia on T1-weighted image, as compared with cerebral white matter. Authors analyzed the images and underlying causes retrospectively. Of 8 patients, 5 were male and 3 were female. The age ranged from 15 days to 79 years. All patient were examined by a 0.5T superconductive MRI. Images were obtained by spin echo multislice technique. Underlying causes were 4 cases of hepatopathy, 2 cases of calcium metabolism disorder, and one case each of neurofibromatosis and hypoxic brain injury. These process were bilateral in all cases and usually symmetric. In all cases the hyperintense areas were generally homogenous without mass effect or edema, although somewhat nodular appearance was seen in neurofibromatosis. Lesions were located in the globus pallidus and internal capsule in hepatopathy and neurofibromatosis, head of the caudate nucleus in disorder of calcum metabolism, and the globus pallidus in hypoxic brain injury. Although this study is limited by its patient population, bilateral hyperintense basal ganglia is associated with various disease entities. On analysis of hyperintense basal ganglia lesion, the knowledge of clinical information improved diagnostic accuracy

  8. T1 hyperintense disc in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Alan A; Silbergleit, Richard; Olson, Rick E; Wilson, Jon; Krishnan, Anant

    2012-10-01

    Case report. To report a rare case of alkaptonuria presenting as a T1-hyperintense disc herniation. A 46-year-old man without previous diagnosis of alkaptonuria underwent evaluation for progressive back pain revealing a T1-hyperintense disc herniation at the L3-L4 level. Discectomy recovered a blackened disc that was pathologically confirmed to be nucleus pulposus with alkaptonuric involvement. The differential diagnosis of a T1-hyperintense, T2-hypointense disc on magnetic resonance imaging is discussed, with emphasis on the pathophysiology of alkaptonuria. A single patient is reported. Pathologically proven patient presentation with radiological and pathological images. We report a rare case of alkaptonuria presenting as a T1-hyperintense disc herniation.

  9. Periventricular hyperintensity in children with hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, S.H.A.; Ragan, Dustin K. [St. Louis Children' s Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States); Limbrick, David D. [St. Louis Children' s Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States); McKinstry, Robert C.; Shimony, Joshua S. [St. Louis Children' s Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Altaye, Mekibib [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Yuan, Weihong; Holland, Scott K. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mangano, Francesco T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Neurological Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Magnetic resonance images of children with hydrocephalus often include a rim of hyperintensity in the periventricular white matter (halo). The purpose of this study was to decide between the hypothesis that the halo is caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow during the cardiac cycle, and the alternate hypothesis that the halo is caused by anatomical changes (stretching and compression of white matter). Participants were selected from a multicenter imaging study of pediatric hydrocephalus. We compared 19 children with hydrocephalus to a group of 52 controls. We quantified ventricle enlargement using the frontal-occipital horn ratio. We conducted qualitative and quantitative analysis of diffusion tensor imaging in the corpus callosum and posterior limb of the internal capsule. Parameters included the fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity. The halo was seen in 16 of the 19 children with hydrocephalus but not in the controls. The corpus callosum of the hydrocephalus group demonstrated FA values that were significantly decreased from those in the control group (P = 4 . 10{sup -6}), and highly significant increases were seen in the mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity in the hydrocephalus group. In the posterior limb of the internal capsule the FA values of the hydrocephalus group were higher than those for the control group (P = 0.002), and higher values in the hydrocephalus group were also noted in the axial diffusivity. We noted correlations between the diffusion parameters and the frontal-occipital horn ratio. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that the halo finding in hydrocephalus is caused by structural changes rather than pulsatile CSF flow. (orig.)

  10. Periventricular hyperintensity in children with hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari, S.H.A.; Ragan, Dustin K.; Limbrick, David D.; McKinstry, Robert C.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Altaye, Mekibib; Yuan, Weihong; Holland, Scott K.; Mangano, Francesco T.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of children with hydrocephalus often include a rim of hyperintensity in the periventricular white matter (halo). The purpose of this study was to decide between the hypothesis that the halo is caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow during the cardiac cycle, and the alternate hypothesis that the halo is caused by anatomical changes (stretching and compression of white matter). Participants were selected from a multicenter imaging study of pediatric hydrocephalus. We compared 19 children with hydrocephalus to a group of 52 controls. We quantified ventricle enlargement using the frontal-occipital horn ratio. We conducted qualitative and quantitative analysis of diffusion tensor imaging in the corpus callosum and posterior limb of the internal capsule. Parameters included the fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity. The halo was seen in 16 of the 19 children with hydrocephalus but not in the controls. The corpus callosum of the hydrocephalus group demonstrated FA values that were significantly decreased from those in the control group (P = 4 . 10 -6 ), and highly significant increases were seen in the mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity in the hydrocephalus group. In the posterior limb of the internal capsule the FA values of the hydrocephalus group were higher than those for the control group (P = 0.002), and higher values in the hydrocephalus group were also noted in the axial diffusivity. We noted correlations between the diffusion parameters and the frontal-occipital horn ratio. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that the halo finding in hydrocephalus is caused by structural changes rather than pulsatile CSF flow. (orig.)

  11. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A.; Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J.; Viader, F.

    2000-01-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  12. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A. [Section of Neuropsychology, Division of Disability Science, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, 980-8575 Sendai (Japan); Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J. [MR Unit, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France); Viader, F. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France)

    2000-06-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  13. Brain hyperintensity location determines outcome in the triad of impaired cognition, physical health and depressive symptoms: A cohort study in late life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Alison; McNeil, Chris; Salarirad, Sima; Deary, Ian; Phillips, Louise; Whalley, Lawrence; Staff, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Brain hyperintensities, detectable with MRI, increase with age. They are associated with a triad of impairment in cognitive ability, depression and physical health. Here we test the hypothesis that the association between hyperintensities and cognitive ability, physical health and depressive symptoms depends on lesion location. 244 members of the Aberdeen 1936 Birth Cohort were recruited to this study. 227 participants completed brain MRI and their hyperintensities were scored using Scheltens's scale. 205 had complete imaging, cognitive, physical health and depressive symptom score data. The relationships between hyperintensity location and depressive symptoms, cognitive ability and physical health were examined by correlation and structural equation analysis. We found that depressive symptoms correlated with hyperintensity burden in the grey matter (r=0.14, p=0.04) and infratentorial regions (r=0.17, p=0.01). Infratentorial hyperintensities correlated with reduced peak expiratory flow rate (r=-0.26, pdepressive symptoms. Hyperintensities in the supratentorial and infratentorial regions were associated with reduced cognitive performance. Using structural equation modelling we found that the association between hyperintensities and depressive symptoms was mediated by negative effects on physical health and cognitive ability. Hyperintensities in deep brain structures are associated with depressive symptoms, mediated via impaired physical health and cognitive ability. Participants with higher cognitive ability and better physical health are at lower risk of depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Volumetric brain differences in children with periventricular T2-signal hyperintensities: a grouping by gestational age at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, A; Barnes, P D; Robertson, R L; Back, S A; Sleeper, L A; Sayre, J W; Kinney, H C; Volpe, J J

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare both the volumes of the lateral ventricles and the cerebral white matter with gestational age at birth of children with periventricular white matter (PVWM) T2-signal hyperintensities on MR images. The spectrum of neuromotor abnormalities associated with these hyperintensities was also determined. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 70 patients who were between the ages of 1 and 5 years and whose images showed PVWM T2-signal hyperintensities. The patients were divided into premature (n = 35 children) and term (n = 35) groups depending on their gestational age at birth. Volumetric analysis was performed on four standardized axial sections using T2-weighted images. Volumes of interest were digitized on the basis of gray-scale densities of signal intensities to define the hemispheric cerebral white matter and lateral ventricles. Age-adjusted comparisons of volumetric measurements between the premature and term groups were performed using analysis of covariance. The volume of the cerebral white matter was smaller in the premature group (54 +/- 2 cm(3)) than in the term group (79 +/- 3 cm(3), p group (30 +/- 2 cm(3)) than among those in the term group (13 +/- 1 cm(3), p groups whose PVWM T2-signal hyperintensities did not correlate with any neuromotor abnormalities but were associated with seizures or developmental delays. The differences in volumetric measurements of cerebral white matter and lateral ventricles in children with PVWM T2-signal hyperintensities are related to their gestational age at birth. Several neurologic motor abnormalities are found in children with such hyperintensities.

  15. Quantitative analysis of hyperintensity rim sign surrounding MS plaque on T1 weighted images. Comparison with lacunar infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Shinji; Ozaki, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the incidence of MR findings showing a hyperintensity rim surrounding multiple sclerosis (MS) plaque on T1-weighted images using image analysis software. We also evaluate the efficacy of this MR finding for differentiating between MS and lacunar infarction. We reviewed T1-weighted images in clinically diagnosed MS patients who underwent MR imaging between February 2006 and July 2007. Two hundred and thirty-nine nodular low signal intensities over 5 mm in minimal diameter were observed in 39 MS patients. To compare the incidence of MR findings, we also reviewed T1-weighted images in randomly selected lacunar infarction patients who underwent MR imaging during the same period. There were 51 nodular low signal intensities over 5 mm in shortest diameter in 34 lacunar infarction patients. After standardization of MR images, we calculated each signal intensity at the plaque margin (M.I.) and surrounding white matter (Wh.I.) using plot-profile analysis. We judged that hyperintensity rim sign was positive when the M.I/Wh.I. ratio was over 1.05. Among 239 T1 low intensity plaques in 39 MS patients, hyperintensity rim sign was positive for 81 (33.9%) plaques in 21 (53.8%) patients. Among 51 T1 low intensity lesions in 34 lacunar infarction patients, hyperintensity rim sign was positive for only one lesion in one patient. There were significant differences in the incidence of hyperintensity rim sign between the two patients groups (p<0.0001). On quantitative analysis using imaging standardization and plot-profile analysis, hyperintensity rim sign was observed in one-third of T1 low intensity MS plaques. This finding seems to be useful to differentiate multiple sclerosis from lacunar infarction. (author)

  16. Pediatric cervical spine marrow T2 hyperintensity: a systematic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gefen, Ron [Cooper University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Candem, NJ (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E. [The Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa (Canada); Shabshin, Nogah [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-HaShomer (Israel); Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Hyperintense areas of vertebral bone marrow on fluid-sensitive sequences are at times seen on pediatric MRI of the cervical spine in children without suspicious clinical conditions to explain marrow pathology. Although these likely have no clinical significance they may be mistaken for pathology. The purpose of this study is to systematically evaluate the locations and patterns of marrow T2 hyperintensity in the pediatric cervical spine, with respect to age. At 1.5 T, the C2 through T3 vertebrae of 82 children aged 0-17 years without clinically suspicious marrow abnormality were retrospectively reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists, who were blinded to patients' age. The frequency, intensity, and location of the foci of marrow T2 hyperintensity were recorded for each vertebra on a 12-point scoring system and were correlated with the patients' age. Foci of marrow hyperintensity were seen in 46/82 (56.1%) patients and in 241/734 (32.8%) vertebrae. Foci were most common in C4 (42% of patients), C5 (45.7%), and C6 (37.8%). The foci of T2 hyperintensity were more common inferiorly (188 foci) and adjacent to the anterior cortex (123). Analysis revealed no significant correlation between age and marrow score (Spearman = -0.147, P = 0.19), but did find a trend towards increased presence of marrow T2 hyperintensity in the ages of most rapid growth, 8-14 years (81.5% of patients). Vertebral body marrow T2 hyperintensity was most common endosteally and in the mid-cervical spine with a slight peak in adolescence. We therefore believe that these pediatric cervical marrow changes may be related to rapid bone growth at the point of maximal kyphotic stress. (orig.)

  17. Coexistência das síndromes de Capgras e Frégoli associadas à redução de volume frontotemporal e hiperintensidades em substância branca cerebral Coexistence of Capgras and Frégoli syndromes associated to frontotemporal volume reduction and cerebral white matter hyperintensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizela Turkiewicz

    2009-01-01

    psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and mood disorders, and with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and brain injury (trauma, vascular. OBJECTIVES: To describe and discuss a case of coexistent between Capgras and Frégoli syndromes in a female patient with paranoid schizophrenia and brain MRI findings. METHODS: Psychiatric interview and brain MRI scanning. RESULTS: The patient presented structural magnetic resonance imaging periventricular and subcortical white matter hyperintensities on flair images mainly concentrated in the right frontotemporal region and bilateral frontotemporal volume loss. DISCUSSION: The described neuroimaging findings may represent an organic substrate to the delusional misidentification syndromes of the present case. The delusional symptoms in Capgras and Frégoli syndromes could be the result of a right temporolimbic-frontal disconnection which results in impossibility to associate previous memories to new information and consequently misidentifying symptoms. Moreover a volume loss of such cerebral regions, as observed in the present case, may also play a significant role in the development of delusional misidentification syndromes.

  18. Heterogeneity in age-related white matter changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, R.; Schmidt, H.; Haybaeck, J.; Loitfelder, M.; Weis, S.; Cavalieri, M.; Seiler, S.; Enzinger, C.; Ropele, S.; Erkinjuntti, T.; Pantoni, L.; Scheltens, P.; Fazekas, F.; Jellinger, K.

    2011-01-01

    White matter changes occur endemically in routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of elderly persons. MRI appearance and histopathological correlates of white matter changes are heterogeneous. Smooth periventricular hyperintensities, including caps around the ventricular horns,

  19. Association between Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and occipital periventricular hyperintensities in a group of Chinese patients: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Dazhi; Shen, Lin; Cui, Chun; Shu, Tongsheng; Zheng, Jian

    2017-02-27

    While occipital periventricular hyperintensities (OPVHs) are among the most common mild white matter hyperintensities, the clinical factors associated with OPVHs remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of clinical factors in development of pure OPVHs. This study included 97 patients with OPVHs and 73 healthy controls. Univariate analysis of clinical factors in OPVH patients and controls was followed by binomial logistic regression analysis to identify clinical factors significantly associated with OPVHs. Univariate analysis indicated that age, total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoprotein-B (Apo-B) levels differed significantly between the OPVH patients and controls (p correlated with OPVH scores (p anti-correlated with OPVHs scores (p correlated with OPVHs (p correlated with OPVHs (p < 0.001). In summary, LDL-C was negatively and age was positively associated with OPVHs among Chinese patients in a hospital.

  20. Cerebral lesions on 7 tesla MRI in patients with sickle cell anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Land, Veronica; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Biemond, Bart J.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Mutsaerts, Henri J. M. M.; Visser, Fredy; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are at a high risk to develop cerebral damage. Most common are silent cerebral infarctions (SCIs), visible as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on MRI in a patient without neurological deficits. The etiology of SCIs remains largely unclear. In addition,

  1. Hyperintense hepatocellular carcinoma on gadolinium-enhanced hepatic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Jun; Matsui, Osamu; Kadoya, Masumi; Gabata, Toshifumi; Arai, Kazunori; Takashima, Tsutomu

    1992-01-01

    We reported a phenomenon in which some hepatocellular carcinomas (HHCs) visualized as hypointense on plain T1 weighted MR images became hyperintense on gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) (0.06∼0.23 mmol/kg) enhanced delayed images. Gd-DTPA enhanced images (using a super conducting magnet operating at 1.5T) of 44 HCCs were studied in comparison with contrast enhanced CT using 30∼80g of iodine. Six of 44 HCCs (14%) which were visualized as hypointense on plain T1 weighted image became hyperintense on delayed Gd-DTPA enhanced images. Although these were visualized as low intensity areas on both plain and enhanced CT, the contrast between HCC and the surrounding liver was small on post contrast CT. These findings were thought to be due to a stronger enhancement effect of Gd-DTPA than that of iodine. (author)

  2. Marchiafava-Bignami disease with hyperintensity on late diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Takayasu; Matsuo, Koushun; Morii-Kitani, Fukiko; Azuma, Fumiko; Matsuo, Hisayasu; Takada, Masahiko; Nakagawa, Masanori; Mizuno, Toshiki; Yamada, Kei

    2014-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with a decades-long history of chronic alcohol consumption was admitted with gait disturbance (short steps and spasticity), deterioration of activity, and stuporous consciousness. Head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hyperintensity on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging in the corpus callosum and frontal white matter. The lesion later became more apparent on diffusion-weighted imaging. The clinical diagnosis was Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD). As temporary treatment, refraining from alcohol consumption and administration of vitamins were prescribed. The condition of the patient gradually improved. The purposes of this study were to demonstrate the clinical and radiological variety of MBD and to identify practical methods of treatment of this pathology

  3. Brain MRI hyperintense lesions and cerebrovascular risk factors in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iidaka, Tetsuya

    1993-01-01

    It is known that asymptomatic MRI lesions of the brain are found in elderly subjects, but the significance of the lesions has not been determined. In previous reports, the prevalence of MRI lesions varied from 11% to 59%, but many of the authors indicated a close relationship with cerebrovascular risk factors. We evaluated 76 elderly subjects (over 60 years old, average age ±SD was 66.7±4.5) without a history of cerebrovascular disease and dementia, and determined the prevalence of periventricular (PVH), white matter (WMH) and pontine (PH) hyperintensity and risk factors. The severity of MRI lesion was evaluated in T2-weighted images by Fazekas' scoring method of MRI hyperintense lesions. PVH, WMH and PH were graded visually from 0 to 3 by the author and these points are added to the MRI score. In T1-weighted images, we also measured the diameter of the third ventricle, frontal horn and body of the lateral ventricle. Our results were that 62% of subjects had PVH, 64% had WMH and 8% had PH. In regard to risk factors, 38% of subjects had hypertension, 17% had diabetes mellitus, 8% had ischemic heart disease. The PVH (+) group was significantly older (p<0.01) and had larger lateral ventricles (p<0.05) than the PVH (-) group. The WMH (+) group was significantly older (p<0.05) and had higher risk of cerebrovascular disease (0.05) than the WMH (-) group. The MRI score was related, but not significantly, to a history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease. The MRI score and index of ventricular enlargement correlated with age (p<0.05). In conclusion, PVH was related to aging and cerebrovascular risk factors. Therefore, PVH and WMH were suspected to have different pathogenesis and WMH was more closely related to risk factors. Our scoring method permits evaluation and comparison of MRI lesions of different groups. (author)

  4. Relationship between levels of serum creatinine and perirenal hyperintensity on heavily T2-weighted MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erden, Ayse, E-mail: ayse.erden@medicine.ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Talatpasa Bulvari, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Sahin, Burcu Savran, E-mail: bsavrans@hotmail.com [Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Talatpasa Bulvari, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Orgodol, Horolsuren, E-mail: hoogii99@yahoo.com [Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Talatpasa Bulvari, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Erden, Ilhan, E-mail: erden@medicine.ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Talatpasa Bulvari, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Biyikli, Zeynep, E-mail: zeynep.biyikli@gmail.com [Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Talatpasa Bulvari, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To determine the frequency of perirenal hyperintensity on heavily T2-weighted images and to evaluate its relationship with serum creatinine levels. Subjects and methods: Axial and coronal single-shot fast spin-echo images which have been originally obtained for MR cholangiopancreatography in 150 subjects were examined by two observers individually for the presence of perirenal hyperintensity. The morphologic properties of perirenal hyperintensity (peripheral rim-like, discontinuous, polar) were recorded. Chi square test was used to test whether the frequencies of bilateral perirenal hyperintensity differ significantly in subjects with high serum creatinine levels and those with normal creatinine levels. This test was also used to compare the frequencies of perirenal hyperintensity in patients with and without renal cysts and in patients with and without corticomedullary differentiation. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The perirenal hyperintensity was identified in 40 of 150 cases (26.6%) on heavily T2-weighted image. Serum creatinine levels were high in 18 of 150 cases (12%). The perirenal hyperintensity was present in 11 of 18 subjects (61%) with high serum creatinine levels and 26 of 132 subjects (19.7%) with normal creatinine levels. The difference of rates in two groups was statistically significant. Odds ratio was 6407 (95% confidence interval 2264-18,129). The frequency of perirenal hyperintensity was also significantly higher in subjects with renal cyst or cysts in whom serum creatinine levels were normal (p < 0.05) (37.5% vs. 11.8%). Conclusion: Perirenal hyperintensities are more frequent in patients with high serum creatinine levels. They are also more common in patients with simple renal cysts.

  5. Relationship between levels of serum creatinine and perirenal hyperintensity on heavily T2-weighted MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erden, Ayse; Sahin, Burcu Savran; Orgodol, Horolsuren; Erden, Ilhan; Biyikli, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of perirenal hyperintensity on heavily T2-weighted images and to evaluate its relationship with serum creatinine levels. Subjects and methods: Axial and coronal single-shot fast spin-echo images which have been originally obtained for MR cholangiopancreatography in 150 subjects were examined by two observers individually for the presence of perirenal hyperintensity. The morphologic properties of perirenal hyperintensity (peripheral rim-like, discontinuous, polar) were recorded. Chi square test was used to test whether the frequencies of bilateral perirenal hyperintensity differ significantly in subjects with high serum creatinine levels and those with normal creatinine levels. This test was also used to compare the frequencies of perirenal hyperintensity in patients with and without renal cysts and in patients with and without corticomedullary differentiation. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The perirenal hyperintensity was identified in 40 of 150 cases (26.6%) on heavily T2-weighted image. Serum creatinine levels were high in 18 of 150 cases (12%). The perirenal hyperintensity was present in 11 of 18 subjects (61%) with high serum creatinine levels and 26 of 132 subjects (19.7%) with normal creatinine levels. The difference of rates in two groups was statistically significant. Odds ratio was 6407 (95% confidence interval 2264-18,129). The frequency of perirenal hyperintensity was also significantly higher in subjects with renal cyst or cysts in whom serum creatinine levels were normal (p < 0.05) (37.5% vs. 11.8%). Conclusion: Perirenal hyperintensities are more frequent in patients with high serum creatinine levels. They are also more common in patients with simple renal cysts.

  6. A clinico-MRI study of extrapyramidal symptoms in multiple system atrophy; Linear hyperintensity in the outer margin of the putamen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Iida, Mitsuo [Suzuka National Hospital, Mie (Japan); Konagaya, Yoko; Honda, Hitoshi

    1993-06-01

    We studied extrapyramidal symptoms and T2-weighted MRI findings of the putamen in 20 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and 25 with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Nine of the 20 MSA patients showed extrapyramidal symptoms. We could not observe cerebellar ataxia in two of the 9 patients because of severe rigidity and skinesia. Eight of the 9 MSA patients with extrapyramidal symptoms showed linear hyperintensity in the outer margin of the putamen. This abnormal intensity was bilateral and symmetric in most patients. However, in MSA patients without extrapyramidal symptoms, only one patient showed the linear hyperintensity. We could not find such abnormal intensity in any of the patients with Parkinson's disease. On proton density MRI, the signal intensity in the lesion was higher than that in the gray matter, which leads the speculation that the hyperintensity is gliosis of the putamen or increased extracellular fluid space caused by severe shrinkage of the putamen. These characteristic MRI findings may distinguish MSA with extrapyramidal symptoms from Parkinson's disease. (J.P.N.).

  7. FLAIR vascular hyperintensities predict early ischemic recurrence in TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki-Woong; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kim, Tae Jung; Oh, Kyungmi; Han, Moon-Ku; Ko, Sang-Bae; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2018-02-27

    To evaluate the relationship between fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) vascular hyperintensity (FVH) and early ischemic lesion recurrence (follow-up diffusion-weighted imaging [FU-DWI] [+]) in patients with lesion-negative TIA. We recruited consecutive patients with lesion-negative TIA within 24 hours of symptom onset, who underwent follow-up MRI during the acute period. FVH was defined as a focal or serpentine high signal intensity on FLAIR images. Other potential confounders were adjusted to evaluate the relationship between FVH and FU-DWI (+). Furthermore, to compare clinical outcomes between the FU-DWI (+) and FU-DWI (-) groups, we assessed 1-year recurrent ischemic stroke or TIA. Among 392 patients with lesion-negative TIA, 82 patients had FU-DWI (+) on the follow-up MRI. In the multivariate analysis, FVH remained an independent predictor of FU-DWI (+) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.45-9.29, p TIA. As FU-DWI (+) frequently occurs during the acute period and has a subsequent worse outcome after discharge, additional radiologic or clinical markers for it are necessary. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. MRI Evaluation of Non-Necrotic T2-Hyperintense Foci in Pediatric Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerk-Lamalice, O; Reddick, W E; Li, X; Li, Y; Edwards, A; Glass, J O; Patay, Z

    2016-05-19

    The conventional MR imaging appearance of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma suggests intralesional histopathologic heterogeneity, and various distinct lesion components, including T2-hypointense foci, have been described. Here we report the prevalence, conventional MR imaging semiology, and advanced MR imaging features of non-necrotic T2-hyperintense foci in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Twenty-five patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas were included in this study. MR imaging was performed at 3T by using conventional and advanced MR imaging sequences. Perfusion (CBV), vascular permeability (v e , K trans ), and diffusion (ADC) metrics were calculated and used to characterize non-necrotic T2-hyperintense foci in comparison with other lesion components, namely necrotic T2-hyperintense foci, T2-hypointense foci, peritumoral edema, and normal brain stem. Statistical analysis was performed by using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Sixteen non-necrotic T2-hyperintense foci were found in 12 tumors. In these foci, ADC values were significantly higher than those in either T2-hypointense foci (P = .002) or normal parenchyma (P = .0002), and relative CBV values were significantly lower than those in either T2-hypointense (P = .0002) or necrotic T2-hyperintense (P = .006) foci. Volume transfer coefficient values in T2-hyperintense foci were lower than those in T2-hypointense (P = .0005) or necrotic T2-hyperintense (P = .0348) foci. Non-necrotic T2-hyperintense foci are common, distinct lesion components within diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. Advanced MR imaging data suggest low cellularity and an early stage of angioneogenesis with leaky vessels resulting in expansion of the extracellular space. Because of the lack of biopsy validation, the underlying histoarchitectural and pathophysiologic changes remain unclear; therefore, these foci may correspond to a poorly understood biologic event in tumor evolution. © 2016 American Society of Neuroradiology.

  9. Persistent lesion hyperintensity on brain diffusion-weighted MRI is an early sign of intravascular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Takashi; Yamanaka, Haruo; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Suenaga, Toshihiko

    2017-06-08

    A 63-year-old man presented with right-sided hemianopia and unsteady gait. Brain MRI revealed multiple hyperintense infarct-like lesions on diffusion-weighted images (DWI). Hyperintensity persisted in some of these lesions even after 6 weeks, although his symptoms were ameliorated then. The patient developed episodic dizziness and a transient event of apraxia at 18 weeks after the first episode. Brain MRI revealed additional hyperintense lesions on DWI, which persisted even after 7 weeks. Eventually, the patient manifested cauda equina syndrome 39 weeks after the first episode. Brain MRI showed the presence of new lesions in addition to the persistent hyperintense lesions on DWI over 21 weeks in the right frontal lobe. Based on laboratory findings and the pathological assessment of bone marrow and random skin biopsies, the patient was diagnosed with intravascular lymphoma (IVL). Persistent hyperintense lesions on DWI of brain MRI may precede the clinical exacerbation of IVL. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Bilateral hippocampal hyperintensities: a new finding in MR imaging of heat stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janaki Sudhakar, Praharaju; Al-Hashimi, Hakima [Salmaniya Medical Complex, Department of Radiology, Manama (Bahrain)

    2007-12-15

    We present a child aged 2 years 3 months who suffered heat stroke after being accidentally locked in a car during summer. She was unconscious with hyperthermia on admission and later showed biochemical evidence of liver, cardiac and muscle injury and associated electrolyte imbalance. Her level of consciousness gradually improved, but she showed evidence of cortical blindness, which had improved on follow-up. MR imaging on the 5th day revealed bilateral hippocampal hyperintensities along with hyperintensities in the cerebellum and in the cerebral cortex. Previous case reports of imaging in heat stroke revealed involvement of the cerebellum, thalami, basal ganglia and scattered cerebral involvement. We report this unique finding of hippocampal hyperintensities due to heat stroke. (orig.)

  11. Bilateral hippocampal hyperintensities: a new finding in MR imaging of heat stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janaki Sudhakar, Praharaju; Al-Hashimi, Hakima

    2007-01-01

    We present a child aged 2 years 3 months who suffered heat stroke after being accidentally locked in a car during summer. She was unconscious with hyperthermia on admission and later showed biochemical evidence of liver, cardiac and muscle injury and associated electrolyte imbalance. Her level of consciousness gradually improved, but she showed evidence of cortical blindness, which had improved on follow-up. MR imaging on the 5th day revealed bilateral hippocampal hyperintensities along with hyperintensities in the cerebellum and in the cerebral cortex. Previous case reports of imaging in heat stroke revealed involvement of the cerebellum, thalami, basal ganglia and scattered cerebral involvement. We report this unique finding of hippocampal hyperintensities due to heat stroke. (orig.)

  12. Lower Neurocognitive Function in U-2 Pilots: Relationship to White Matter Hyperintensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-09

    computer-based instrument, more com- prehensive neuropsychological testing is required to draw conclu- sions about the general cognitive profile of...consistency with other neuropsychological instrument batteries.24 MRI assessment. Structural MRI data for U2Ps were collected at the Research Imaging...report no disclo- sures. L. Rowland serves as an editorial board member of Schizophrenia Bulletin and is funded by NIH grants R01MH094520 and

  13. Impaired dynamic cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia predicts development of white matter hyperintensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Sam

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Vascular impairment in regions of NAWM that progresses to WMH consists not only of decreased magnitude of ssCVR, but also a pathological decrease in the speed of vascular response. These findings support the association between cerebrovascular dysregulation and the development of WMH.

  14. White matter hyperintensities and prepulse inhibition in a mixed elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, Lise C; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Garde, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI) in elderly subjects with and without cognitive impairment, may contribute to variations in PPI. A passive acoustic PPI paradigm was applied in 92 human subjects (53 healthy and 39 patients with Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment) between 60 and 85years of age. WMH were...... rated visually on craniel MRI FLAIR images using the Fazekas scale. WMH were identified in 70% of all subjects. The latency to peak of the startle response increased significantly with increasing WMH load, whereas the inhibition of the startle response (PPI) was neither significantly related...... to the degree of WMH nor to cognitive performance. We conclude that the presence of WMH in the fronto-striatal brain circuit may affect the latency of the startle response, but not information processing in elderly subjects....

  15. Reliability and sensitivity of visual scales versus volumetry for evaluating white matter hyperintensity progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gouw, A A; van der Flier, W M; van Straaten, E C W

    2008-01-01

    the reliability and sensitivity of cross-sectional and longitudinal visual scales with volumetry for measuring WMH progression. METHODS: Twenty MRI scan pairs (interval 2 years) were included from the Amsterdam center of the LADIS study. Semi-automated volumetry of WMH was performed twice by one rater. Three...

  16. Impact of white matter hyperintensities scoring method on correlations with clinical data: the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Straaten, EC; Fazekas, F; Rostrup, Egill

    2006-01-01

    and Mann-Whitney tests. In addition, the punctate and confluent lesion type with comparable WMH volume were compared with respect to the clinical data using Student t test and chi2 test. Direct comparison of visual ratings with volumetry was done using curve fitting. RESULTS: Visual and volumetric...

  17. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablating uterine fibroids with hyperintense on T2-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Wen-Peng; Chen, Jin-Yun; Zhang, Lian; Li, Quan; Qin, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate whether uterine fibroids with hyperintense on pretreatment T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be treated with ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU). Materials and methods: 282 patients with 282 symptomatic uterine fibroids who underwent USgHIFU treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI, uterine fibroids were classified as hypointense, isointense and hyperintense. Hyperintense fibroids were subjectively further subdivided into heterogeneous hyperintense, slightly homogeneous hyperintense and markedly homogeneous hyperintense based on the signal intensity of fibroid relative to myometrium and endometrium on T2-weighted MRI. Enhanced MRI was performed within one month after HIFU treatment. Non-perfused volume (NPV, indicative of successful ablation) ratio, treatment time, treatment efficiency, energy effect ratio and adverse events were recorded. Results: The median volume of uterine fibroids was 70.3 cm 3 (interquartile range, 41.1–132.5 cm 3 ). The average NPV ratio, defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume after HIFU treatment, was 76.8 ± 19.0% (range, 0–100%) in the 282 patients. It was 86.3 ± 11.9% (range, 40.9–100.0%) in the group with hypointense fibroids, 77.1 ± 16.5% (range, 32.2–100.0%) in isointense fibroids, and 67.6 ± 23.9% (range, 0–100.0%) in hyperintense fibroids. The lowest NPV ratio, lowest treatment efficiency, more treatment time, more sonication energy and pain scores were observed in the slightly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids, and the NPV ratio was 55.8 ± 26.7% (range, 0–83.9%) in this subgroup. Conclusion: Based on our results, the heterogeneous and markedly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids were suitable for USgHIFU, and only the slightly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids should be excluded

  18. Clinico-radiological features of subarachnoid hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images in patients with meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, T.; Sakurai, K.; Hara, M.; Muto, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Tohyama, J.; Oguri, T.; Mitake, S.; Maeda, M.; Matsukawa, N.; Ojika, K.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and radiological features of meningitis with subarachnoid diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity. Materials and methods: The clinical features, laboratory data, and radiological findings, including the number and distribution of subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions and other radiological abnormalities, of 18 patients seen at five institutions were evaluated. Results: The patients consisted of eight males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 4 months to 82 years (median 65 years). Causative organisms were bacteria in 15 patients, including Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Listeria monocytogenes. The remaining three were fungal meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions were multiple in 16 of the 18 cases (89%) and predominantly distributed around the frontal lobe in 16 of the 18 cases (89%). In addition to subarachnoid abnormality, subdural empyema, cerebral infarction, and intraventricular empyema were found in 50, 39, and 39%, respectively. Compared with paediatric patients, adult patients with bacterial meningitis tended to have poor prognoses (7/10 versus 1/5; p = 0.1). Conclusion: Both bacterial and fungal meningitis could cause subarachnoid hyperintensity on DWI, predominantly around the frontal lobe. This finding is often associated with poor prognosis in adult bacterial meningitis.

  19. Clinico-radiological features of subarachnoid hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images in patients with meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, T., E-mail: madarafuebuki@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Sakurai, K.; Hara, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Muto, M. [Department of Radiology, Okazaki City Hospital, Okazaki, Aichi (Japan); Nakagawa, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Tohyama, J. [Department of Radiology, Toyota-kai Medical Corporation Kariya Toyota General Hospital, Kariya, Aichi (Japan); Oguri, T. [Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Mitake, S. [Department of Neurology, Tosei General Hospital, Seto-shi, Aichi (Japan); Maeda, M. [Department of Radiology, Mie University School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie (Japan); Matsukawa, N.; Ojika, K. [Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Shibamoto, Y. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and radiological features of meningitis with subarachnoid diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity. Materials and methods: The clinical features, laboratory data, and radiological findings, including the number and distribution of subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions and other radiological abnormalities, of 18 patients seen at five institutions were evaluated. Results: The patients consisted of eight males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 4 months to 82 years (median 65 years). Causative organisms were bacteria in 15 patients, including Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Listeria monocytogenes. The remaining three were fungal meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions were multiple in 16 of the 18 cases (89%) and predominantly distributed around the frontal lobe in 16 of the 18 cases (89%). In addition to subarachnoid abnormality, subdural empyema, cerebral infarction, and intraventricular empyema were found in 50, 39, and 39%, respectively. Compared with paediatric patients, adult patients with bacterial meningitis tended to have poor prognoses (7/10 versus 1/5; p = 0.1). Conclusion: Both bacterial and fungal meningitis could cause subarachnoid hyperintensity on DWI, predominantly around the frontal lobe. This finding is often associated with poor prognosis in adult bacterial meningitis.

  20. Regional cerebral blood flow and periventricular hyperintensity in silent cerebral infarction. Comparison with multi-infarct dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Shin; Nagazumi, Atushi; Tsuganesawa, Toshikazu; Terashi, Akiro

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate relationship between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and the white matter lesions on MRI in silent cerebral infarction, we quantitatively measured rCBF by 123 I-IMP autoradiography method (IMP ARG method) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) in 36 patients with silent cerebral infarction (SCI group), 22 patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID group), and 16 control subjects without periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) and lacunar infarction on MRI (CL group). Regions of interest (ROIs) on rCBF images were set in the frontal (F), temporal (T), parietal (P), occipital (O) cortex, and the cerebral white matter (W). The severity of PVH on MRI T 2 -weighted image was divided into four grades (grade 0-3). Though the frequency of hypertension was significantly higher in SCI group and MID group compared with CL group, no significant difference was seen in the mean age among these three groups. rCBF in the white matter and cerebral cortices except the occipital cortex in SCI group was significantly low compared with CL group (rCBF SCI /rCBF CL : W 0.87, F 0.87, T 0.87, P 0.88, O 0.92). rCBF in the white matter and cerebral cortices, especially in the white matter and frontal cortex, in MID group was significantly low compared with SCI group (rCBF MID /rCBF CL : W 0.69, F 0.71, T 0.74, P 0.75, O 0.81). The mean grade of PVH in MID group was significantly higher than that in SCI group (SCI 1.1 vs MID 2.5). The severity of PVH was significantly correlated with each rCBF in the white matter and cerebral cortices, especially in the white matter and frontal cortex. Our findings suggest that the quantitative measurement of rCBF by IMP ARG method is useful for the follow-up study in the patients with silent cerebral infarction as well as the evaluation of the severity of PVH on MRI. (author)

  1. Thickening and enhancement of multiple cranial nerves in conjunction with cystic white matter lesions in early infantile Krabbe disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beslow, Lauren A.; Boennemann, Carsten G. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Neurology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schwartz, Erin S. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Neuroradiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-06-15

    We present serial MR findings in a child ultimately diagnosed with the early infantile form of Krabbe disease. MR showed typical features of Krabbe disease including cerebellar and brainstem hyperintensity, periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensity, and cerebral atrophy. In addition, the combination of both enlargement and enhancement of multiple cranial nerves in conjunction with unusual cystic lesions adjacent to the frontal horns of the lateral ventricles was previously unreported and expands the spectrum of imaging findings in early Krabbe disease. (orig.)

  2. Callosal hyperintensities and gait speed gain from two types of mobility interventions in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Neelesh K; Perera, Subashan; Studenski, Stephanie A; Rosano, Caterina; Aizenstein, Howard J; VanSwearingen, Jessie M

    2015-06-01

    To assess whether the volume of callosal hyperintensities in the genu and splenium of older adults with mobility impairment is differentially associated with the degree of gain in gait speed after 2 types of gait interventions. Single-blind randomized controlled trial of 2 types of gait exercises in older adults. Research center in an academic institution. Ambulatory adults (N=44) aged ≥65 years with a slow and variable gait. Twelve-week physical therapist-guided trial of a conventional walking, endurance, balance, and strength (WEBS) intervention (n=20) versus a timing and coordination of gait (TC) intervention (n=22). Gain in gait speed after the intervention and its relation to callosal hyperintensities in the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Gait speed improved in both the WEBS group (mean change, 0.16m/s) and the TC group (mean change, 0.21m/s; both PMobility impaired older adults with genual hyperintensities may benefit from a rehabilitation program focused on motor skill learning rather than on strength and endurance training. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Paradoxical embolisation and cerebral white matter lesions in dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purandare, N.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; McCollum, C.; Jackson, A.; Burns, A.

    2008-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the relationship between spontaneous cerebral emboli (SCE), patent foramen ovale (PFO) and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on cerebral MRI in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). SCE were identified by transcranial Doppler of the middle

  4. Hyperintensity on diffusion weighted image along ipsilateral cortical spinal tract after cerebral ischemic stroke: A diffusion tensor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiang; Tian Wei; Li Lilin; Kolar, Balasubramanya; Qiu Xing; Chen, Feng; Dogra, Vikram S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Hyperintensity along the ipsilateral cortical spinal tract (CST) on a diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) has been reported to may be associated with motor disability after brain infarction and can be misdiagnosed as a new infarction. However, the underlying patho-physiology related to this finding is not clear. The goal of our study was to analyze the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) changes in patients with this hyperintensity. Materials and methods: Eight patients (50 ± 10 years) who exhibited hyperintensity on DWI along ipsilateral CST from 3 to 21 days after stroke onset were reviewed as positive group, including 5 patients with serial DTI examinations. Twelve patients without hyperintensity during the matched examination time were classified as reference group. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), and eigenvalues and their ratios (ipsilateral/contralateral value) in cerebral peduncle were measured, their correlation with motor function scale at eight months after stroke onset were evaluated. Results: The serial examinations showed that hyperintensity could eventually disappear. Both the ipsilateral ADC and FA values were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) compared to the contralateral side. The ipsilateral FA significantly correlated with motor function scale in both groups (r = 0.875, 0.738; p = 0.004, 0.006 respectively). Conclusions: The hyperintensity on DWI is a transient pathological process of Wallerian degeneration after ischemic stroke, its diffusion characteristics include concurrent significant decrease of ipsilateral ADC and FA. The ipsilateral FA value has the potential to predict neurological motor function outcome in such patients.

  5. Significance of T2 Hyperintensity on Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Cervical Cord Injury and Return to Play in Professional Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Zachary J; Bost, Jeffrey W; Norwig, John A; Maroon, Joseph C

    2015-07-01

    Cervical cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 hyperintensity is used as evidence of cord trauma in the evaluation and management of athletes in contact sports. The long-term pathophysiologic and prognostic value of this finding is poorly understood, especially in return to play (RTP). To examine the significance of T2 hyperintensity in the cervical spinal cord of professional athletes. Retrospective review of MRI T2 hyperintensity findings between 2007 and 2014 in 5 professional athletes. Pertinent examination and demographics, including mechanism of injury, surgical intervention, radiographs, MRI studies, long-term outcomes, and RTP recommendations were collected. Four National Football League players and 1 professional wrestler had prior traumatic neurapraxia that at the time of initial consultation had resolved. MRIs showed congenitally small cervical canal (1) and multilevel spondylosis/stenosis/disc herniation (4) along with focal cord T2 hyperintensity (5). The signal abnormalities were at C3/C4 (3), C4 mid-vertebral body (1), and C5/C6 (1). Four athletes had single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and 1 was nonoperative. Serial MRI imaging at 3 months after surgery showed hyperintensity partially resolved (4) and unchanged (1), and at 9-months 3 of the 5 completely resolved. Based on the author's RTP criteria, 4 of 5 were released to return to their sport. Clearance for RTP preceded complete resolution of MRI T2 hyperintensity in 3 of 4 athletes. The 2 athletes that have returned to profession sport have not had any additional episodes of neurapraxia or any cervical spine-related complications. MRI T2 hyperintensity in contact sport athletes who are symptom-free with normal examination and no evidence of spinal instability may not be a contraindication to RTP. Additional observations are needed to confirm this observation.

  6. Symmetrical central tegmental tract (CTT) hyperintense lesions on magnetic resonance imaging in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shoko; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Akira; Aida, Noriko; Okano, Souzo; Matsushita, Hiroko; Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko; Yoshida, Naoko; Hirota, Haruyo

    2009-01-01

    The central tegmental tract (CTT) is mainly the extrapyramidal tract connecting between the red nucleus and the inferior olivary nucleus. There are only a few case reports describing CTT abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children. Our purpose was to evaluate the frequency of CTT lesions and their characteristics on MRI, and to correlate the MR imaging findings with clinical features. We reviewed retrospectively the MR images of 392 children (215 boys and 177 girls) ranging in age from 1 to 6 years. To evaluate symmetrical CTT hyperintense lesions, we defined a CTT lesion as an area of bilateral symmetrical hyperintensity in the tegmentum pontis on both T2-weighted images and diffusion-weighted images in more than two slices. We measured the ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) values of symmetrical CTT hyperintensity, and compared them with those of children without CTT abnormality. CTT lesions were detected in 20 (5.1%) of the 392 children. The mean ADC value for these 20 children was significantly lower than that of the normal CTT (p<0.001). On MR imaging, other than CTT lesions, associated parenchymal lesion included: none (n=6); other abnormalities, including periventricular leukomalacia (n=3); thin corpus callosum (n=3); ventricular dilatation (n=2); encephalopathy (n=2). Clinically, cerebral palsy was the most frequent clinical diagnosis (n=6), accounting for 30%, which was significantly more frequent than the prevalence of cerebral palsy among children without CTT lesions (13%) (n<0.05). CTT lesions were detected in 5.1% of all the children examined. Cerebral palsy was the most frequent clinical diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Symmetrical central tegmental tract (CTT) hyperintense lesions on magnetic resonance imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shoko; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Akira [Kyoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Aida, Noriko [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Okano, Souzo; Matsushita, Hiroko [Kyoto City Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko; Yoshida, Naoko; Hirota, Haruyo [St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    The central tegmental tract (CTT) is mainly the extrapyramidal tract connecting between the red nucleus and the inferior olivary nucleus. There are only a few case reports describing CTT abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children. Our purpose was to evaluate the frequency of CTT lesions and their characteristics on MRI, and to correlate the MR imaging findings with clinical features. We reviewed retrospectively the MR images of 392 children (215 boys and 177 girls) ranging in age from 1 to 6 years. To evaluate symmetrical CTT hyperintense lesions, we defined a CTT lesion as an area of bilateral symmetrical hyperintensity in the tegmentum pontis on both T2-weighted images and diffusion-weighted images in more than two slices. We measured the ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) values of symmetrical CTT hyperintensity, and compared them with those of children without CTT abnormality. CTT lesions were detected in 20 (5.1%) of the 392 children. The mean ADC value for these 20 children was significantly lower than that of the normal CTT (p<0.001). On MR imaging, other than CTT lesions, associated parenchymal lesion included: none (n=6); other abnormalities, including periventricular leukomalacia (n=3); thin corpus callosum (n=3); ventricular dilatation (n=2); encephalopathy (n=2). Clinically, cerebral palsy was the most frequent clinical diagnosis (n=6), accounting for 30%, which was significantly more frequent than the prevalence of cerebral palsy among children without CTT lesions (13%) (n<0.05). CTT lesions were detected in 5.1% of all the children examined. Cerebral palsy was the most frequent clinical diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. Hyperintense basal ganglia lesions on T1-weighted MR images in asymptomatic patients with hepatic dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Cila, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Dincer, F.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    1995-12-31

    Cranial MRI findings in four patients who had hepatic dysfunction, including one with sole hepatic form of Wilson`s disease, were reported. The MR examinations revealed bilateral, symmetric hyperintensity in the globus pallidus, subthalamic nuclei and mesencephalon on T1-weighted images with no corresponding abnormality on T2-weighted sequences. The basal ganglia were normal on CT examinations in all patients. None of the patients had the clinical findings of hepatic encephalopathy. The MR findings in our patients did not correlate with the degree or duration of hepatic dysfunction. (orig.)

  9. A neurotological study of patients with pontine hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Yukimasa, Akiko; Oku, Masaya; Sakagami, Masafumi

    2002-01-01

    Pontine hyperintense lesions seen on T2-weighted MRI were thought to be related to disequilibrium. Some of these lesions have a low signal on T1-weighted imaging, while others have an iso-signal. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between neurological findings and pontine lesions detected by MRI. The subjects were 11 patients (6 males, 5 females; age range: 30 to 83 years [mean: 64.1 years]) with pontine hyperintense lesions identified on T2-weighted MRI. We compared the clinical signs and the MRI findings. Six of the patients had low-intensity areas on T1-weighted images, and the other 5 had iso-intensity areas. Six patients complained of vertigo, and 5 complained of dizziness. Eight complained of positionaly evoked disequilibrium. Positional nystagmus was seen in 4 patients. In 9 patients, abnormalities were found on the ENG test, including the saccadic eye movement test, ETT, and OKP. Numbness on the lips occurred in 2 patients, and cerebellar signs were present in 4. None of the patients had facial paralysis. Disequilibrium originating in the central nervous system was suggested in 10 patients. Clinical examinations revealed similar findings in patients with a low signal on T1-weighted MRI and those with an iso-signal. Our results indicate that pontine lesions identified by T2-weighted MRI cause vertigo or dizziness, and, in most cases, these lesions cause abnormal neurological or neurological abnormalities. (author)

  10. A neurotological study of patients with pontine hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Yukimasa, Akiko; Oku, Masaya; Sakagami, Masafumi [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    Pontine hyperintense lesions seen on T2-weighted MRI were thought to be related to disequilibrium. Some of these lesions have a low signal on T1-weighted imaging, while others have an iso-signal. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between neurological findings and pontine lesions detected by MRI. The subjects were 11 patients (6 males, 5 females; age range: 30 to 83 years [mean: 64.1 years]) with pontine hyperintense lesions identified on T2-weighted MRI. We compared the clinical signs and the MRI findings. Six of the patients had low-intensity areas on T1-weighted images, and the other 5 had iso-intensity areas. Six patients complained of vertigo, and 5 complained of dizziness. Eight complained of positionaly evoked disequilibrium. Positional nystagmus was seen in 4 patients. In 9 patients, abnormalities were found on the ENG test, including the saccadic eye movement test, ETT, and OKP. Numbness on the lips occurred in 2 patients, and cerebellar signs were present in 4. None of the patients had facial paralysis. Disequilibrium originating in the central nervous system was suggested in 10 patients. Clinical examinations revealed similar findings in patients with a low signal on T1-weighted MRI and those with an iso-signal. Our results indicate that pontine lesions identified by T2-weighted MRI cause vertigo or dizziness, and, in most cases, these lesions cause abnormal neurological or neurological abnormalities. (author)

  11. Continuous partial status cause of hyperintensity in cerebral cortex in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez L, Ingeborg; Gonzalez L, Daniela; Quezada R, Patricio; Cartier R, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging has demonstrated functional changes of the cerebral cortex in relation to status epilepticus, which can eventually localize the origin of the crisis. The purpose of this presentation is relevant to this condition and pretends to highlight the action of incidental situations that can modify it. We present a 29 year old woman with a neurosurgical intervention for a neuroblastoma irradiated fifteen years ago, which incidentally starts a continuous partial status epilepticus, expressed by clonies of the face and left limbs associated with functional impotence, resistant to oral therapy. Faced with the suspicion of recurrence of the tumor, a brain MRI is performed, showing hyperintensity of all neural areas the right hemisphere, with no evidence of tumor recurrence. Once submitted the status epilepticus, the hyperintensity disappeared in the hemisphere. This extensive reaction of the neural structures might be related to a permanent effect of radiation, which may have caused a mismatch functional glia, of the blood-brain barrier and interneural network

  12. Subcortical hyperintensity volumetrics in Alzheimer's disease and normal elderly in the Sunnybrook Dementia Study: correlations with atrophy, executive function, mental processing speed, and verbal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Joel; McNeely, Alicia A; Scott, Christopher Jm; Stuss, Donald T; Black, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Subcortical hyperintensities (SHs) are radiological entities commonly observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and normal elderly controls. Although the presence of SH is believed to indicate some form of subcortical vasculopathy, pathological heterogeneity, methodological differences, and the contribution of brain atrophy associated with AD pathology have yielded inconsistent results in the literature. Using the Lesion Explorer (LE) MRI processing pipeline for SH quantification and brain atrophy, this study examined SH volumes of interest and cognitive function in a sample of patients with AD (n = 265) and normal elderly controls (n = 100) from the Sunnybrook Dementia Study. Compared with healthy controls, patients with AD were found to have less gray matter, less white matter, and more sulcal and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (all significant, P deep white SH (dwSH) (P processing speed (P memory (P <0.01) in patients with AD. These brain-behavior relationships and correlations with brain atrophy suggest that subtle, yet measurable, signs of small vessel disease may have potential clinical relevance as targets for treatment in Alzheimer's dementia.

  13. A Voxel-Based Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study of White Matter in Bipolar Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Mahon, Katie; Wu, Jinghui; Malhotra, Anil K.; Burdick, Katherine E.; DeRosse, Pamela; Ardekani, Babak A.; Szeszko, Philip R.

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence from post-mortem and magnetic resonance imaging studies that hyperintensities, oligodendrioglial abnormalities and gross white matter volumetric alterations play a role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. There is also functional imaging evidence for a defect in frontal cortico-subcortical pathways in bipolar disorder, but the white matter comprising these pathways has not been well-investigated. Few studies have investigated white matter integrity in patients with b...

  14. Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with parkinsonism and symmetric hyperintense basal ganglia on T1 weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayalakshmi Sita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal high signal in the globus pallidus on T1 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain has been well described in patients with chronic liver disease. It may be related to liver dysfunction or portal-systemic shunting. We report a case of extra hepatic portal vein obstruction with portal hypertension and esophageal varices that presented with extra pyramidal features. T1 weighted MRI brain scans showed increased symmetrical signal intensities in the basal ganglia. Normal hepatic function in this patient emphasizes the role of portal- systemic communications in the development of these hyperintensities, which may be due to deposition of paramagnetic substances like manganese in the basal ganglia.

  15. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis with bilateral inferior collicular hyperintensity on magnetic resonance imaging brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is chronic encephalitis occurring after infection with measles virus. An 8-year-old boy presented with progressive behavioral changes, cognitive decline and myoclonic jerks, progressing to a bed bound state over 2 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI brain showed T2-weighted hyperintensities in the subcortical areas of the left occipital lobe and brachium of the inferior colliculus on both sides. EEG showed bilateral, synchronous periodic discharges. Serum/cerebrospinal fluid measles IgG titer was significantly positive. The overall features were suggestive of SSPE. MRI finding of bilateral inferior colliculus changes on MRI without significant involvement of other commonly involved areas suggests an uncommon/rare imaging pattern of SSPE.

  16. Significance of periventricular hyperintensity in T2 weighted MRI on memory dysfunction and depression after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokura, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Yamashita, Kazuya; Koide, Hiromi

    1994-01-01

    We studied the effect of periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) in T2 weighted MRI on memory function and post-stroke depression in 159 patients with cerebrovacular disease. Memory function was assessed with Hasegawa's scale, and depressive state was estimated with Zung's self-rating depression scale. Patients showing diffusely distributed PVH had significantly low scores in memory function tests. Localized PVH around the anterior horns of the laterals ventricle was also associated with impaired memory function when the area of PVH was large. The incidence of post-stroke depression was high in patients with large PVH around the anterior horn in comparison with patients with PVH around the posterior horn. The severity of PVH around the posterior horn did not affect memory function and post-stroke depression. These findings suggest that memory dysfunction and post-stroke depression were accelerated by the diffusely or anteriorly distributed PVH. (author)

  17. Age-related changes in volumes of the ventricles, sulci and periventricular hyperintensity area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kenji; Matsuzawa, Taiju; Ono, Shuichi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Matsui, Hiroshige; Yamada, Susumu; Hishinuma, Takashi

    1987-01-01

    Brain atrophy in 47 subjects without neurologic disturbances, ranging in age from 46 to 82 years, was studied using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Moreover, the association of the periventricular hyperintensity area (PVH) recognized with MRI, was also investigated. The volume percentages of the brain, the ventricles and sulci to cranial cavity were calculated as indicators of brain atrophy. The brain volume index decreased and the indeces of the ventricles and sulci linearly increased with age, significantly. The volume ratio of the ventricles to sulci significantly increased with increasing age (p < 0.01) and the correlation coefficient was 0.38. This ratio showed negative correlation to the brain volume index. The volume percentage of PVH to the cranial cavity started to increase in the sixties and negatively correlated with the brain volume index. There was positive correlation between the ratio of the ventricles to sulci and the index of PVH. (author)

  18. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities in predicting cerebral hyperperfusion after intracranial arterial stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Chih-Cheng; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Lee, Kun-Yu; Chiang, Chen-Hua; Chen, Chi-Jen [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shuang-Ho Hospital, New Taipei City (China); Taipei Medical University, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei (China); Yan, Feng-Xian [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shuang-Ho Hospital, New Taipei City (China)

    2017-08-15

    No reliable imaging sign predicting cerebral hyperperfusion after intracranial arterial stenting (IAS) had been described in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities (FVHs), also called hyperintense vessel sign on T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (T2-FLAIR) MR images, in predicting significant increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) defined by arterial spin labeling (ASL) after IAS. We reviewed ASL CBF images and T2-FLAIR MR images before (D0), 1 day after (D1), and 3 days after (D3) IAS of 16 patients. T1-weighted MR images were used as cerebral maps for calculating CBF. The changes in CBF values after IAS were calculated in and compared among stenting and nonstenting vascular territories. An increase more than 50% of CBF was considered as hyperperfusion. The effect of FVHs in predicting hyperperfusion was calculated. The D1 CBF value was significantly higher than the D0 CBF value in stenting vascular, contralateral anterior cerebral artery, contralateral middle cerebral artery, and contralateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territories (all P <.05). The D1 and D3 CBF values were significantly higher than the D0 CBF value in overall vascular (P <.001), overall nonstenting vascular (P <.001), and ipsilateral PCA (P <.05) territories. The rate of more than 50% increases in CBF was significantly higher in patients who exhibited asymmetric FVHs than in those who did not exhibit these findings. FVHs could be a critical predictor of a significant increase in CBF after IAS. (orig.)

  19. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities in predicting cerebral hyperperfusion after intracranial arterial stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Chih-Cheng; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Lee, Kun-Yu; Chiang, Chen-Hua; Chen, Chi-Jen; Yan, Feng-Xian

    2017-01-01

    No reliable imaging sign predicting cerebral hyperperfusion after intracranial arterial stenting (IAS) had been described in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensities (FVHs), also called hyperintense vessel sign on T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (T2-FLAIR) MR images, in predicting significant increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) defined by arterial spin labeling (ASL) after IAS. We reviewed ASL CBF images and T2-FLAIR MR images before (D0), 1 day after (D1), and 3 days after (D3) IAS of 16 patients. T1-weighted MR images were used as cerebral maps for calculating CBF. The changes in CBF values after IAS were calculated in and compared among stenting and nonstenting vascular territories. An increase more than 50% of CBF was considered as hyperperfusion. The effect of FVHs in predicting hyperperfusion was calculated. The D1 CBF value was significantly higher than the D0 CBF value in stenting vascular, contralateral anterior cerebral artery, contralateral middle cerebral artery, and contralateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territories (all P <.05). The D1 and D3 CBF values were significantly higher than the D0 CBF value in overall vascular (P <.001), overall nonstenting vascular (P <.001), and ipsilateral PCA (P <.05) territories. The rate of more than 50% increases in CBF was significantly higher in patients who exhibited asymmetric FVHs than in those who did not exhibit these findings. FVHs could be a critical predictor of a significant increase in CBF after IAS. (orig.)

  20. Progression of white matter hyperintensities and incidence of new lacunes over a 3-year period: the Leukoaraiosis and Disability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gouw, A.A.; Flier, W.M. van der; Fazekas, F.

    2008-01-01

    stroke, diabetes, and blood glucose were risk factors for WMH progression. Male sex, hypertension, systolic blood pressure, previous stroke, body mass index, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride levels were risk factors for new lacunes. CONCLUSIONS: WMH and lacunes progressed over time...

  1. The apolipoprotein E epsilon4-allele and antihypertensive treatment are associated with increased risk of cerebral MRI white matter hyperintensities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, P; Garde, Ellen; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2007-01-01

    ) in a community-based sample of elderly subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From a cohort of 976 subjects born in 1914, APOE genotype was determined and MRI examinations were carried out in 75 subjects. WMH were rated using a standard semi-quantitative method. ANOVA and regression analyses were conducted to explore...... the relative importance of the potential risk factors. RESULTS: APOE genotype and antihypertensive treatment were significantly associated with severity of total WMH load (P Pharmaceutical treatment for arterial...

  2. Pediatric Patients Demonstrate Progressive T1-Weighted Hyperintensity in the Dentate Nucleus following Multiple Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D R; Chatterjee, A R; Yazdani, M; Marebwa, B; Brown, T; Collins, H; Bolles, G; Jenrette, J M; Nietert, P J; Zhu, X

    2016-12-01

    While there have been recent reports of brain retention of gadolinium following gadolinium-based contrast agent administration in adults, a retrospective series of pediatric patients has not previously been reported, to our knowledge. We investigated the relationship between the number of prior gadolinium-based contrast agent doses and increasing T1 signal in the dentate nucleus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR imaging. We hypothesized that despite differences in pediatric physiology and the smaller gadolinium-based contrast agent doses that pediatric patients are typically administered based on weighted-adjusted dosing, the pediatric brain would also demonstrate dose-dependent increasing T1 signal in the dentate nucleus. We included children with multiple gadolinium-based contrast agent administrations at our institution. A blinded reader placed ROIs within the dentate nucleus and adjacent cerebellar white matter. To eliminate reader bias, we also performed automated ROI delineation of the dentate nucleus, cerebellar white matter, and pons. Dentate-to-cerebellar white matter and dentate-to pons ratios were compared with the number of gadolinium-based contrast agent administrations. During 20 years at our institution, 280 patients received at least 5 gadolinium-based contrast agent doses, with 1 patient receiving 38 doses. Sixteen patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria for ROI analysis. Blinded reader dentate-to-cerebellar white matter ratios were significantly associated with gadolinium-based contrast agent doses (r s = 0.77, P = .001). The dentate-to-pons ratio and dentate-to-cerebellar white matter ratios based on automated ROI placement were also significantly correlated with gadolinium-based contrast agent doses (t = 4.98, P contrast agent doses is significantly correlated with progressive T1-weighted dentate hyperintensity. Definitive confirmation of gadolinium deposition requires tissue analysis. Any potential clinical sequelae of gadolinium retention in

  3. Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker is associated with higher contrast agent dosage in acute ischaemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Schaefer, Tabea; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen B. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Rozanski, Michal; Ebinger, Martin [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Jungehuelsing, Gerhard J. [Stiftung des Buergerlichen Rechts, Juedisches Krankenhaus Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability changes. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of contrast agent dosage on HARM incidence in acute ischaemic stroke patients. We prospectively included 529 acute ischaemic stroke patients (204 females, median age 71 years). Patients underwent a first stroke-MRI within 24 hours from symptom onset and had a follow-up on day 2. The contrast agent Gadobutrol was administered to the patients for perfusion imaging or MR angiography. The total dosage was calculated as ml/kg body weight and ranged between 0.04 and 0.31 mmol/kg on the first examination. The incidence of HARM was evaluated on day 2 FLAIR images. HARM was detected in 97 patients (18.3 %). HARM incidence increased significantly with increasing dosages of Gadobutrol. Also, HARM positive patients were significantly older. HARM was not an independent predictor of worse clinical outcome, and we did not find an association with increase risk of haemorrhagic transformation. A higher dosage of Gadobutrol in acute stroke patients on initial MRI is associated with increased HARM incidence on follow-up. MRI studies on BBB should therefore standardize contrast agent dosages. (orig.)

  4. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in a Patient with Transient Ischemic Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM has initially been described in acute ischemic stroke. The phenomenon is caused by blood-brain barrier disruption following acute reperfusion and consecutive delayed gadolinium enhancement in the subarachnoid space on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images. Here we report the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with transient paresis and sensory loss in the right arm. Initial routine stroke MRI including diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging demonstrated no acute pathology. Follow-up MRI after three hours demonstrated subarachnoid gadolinium enhancement in the left middle cerebral artery territory consistent with HARM that completely resolved on follow-up MRI three days later. This case illustrates that even in transient ischemic attack patients disturbances of the blood-brain barrier may be present which significantly exceed the extent of acute ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging. Inclusion of FLAIR images with delayed acquisition after intravenous contrast agent application in MRI stroke protocols might facilitate the diagnosis of a recent acute ischemic stroke.

  5. Etiologic evaluation of periventricular hyperintensity in MR images of first-ever cerebral thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Enomoto, Mutsurou; Ogawa, Kimikazu; Yanagawa, Kiyotaka; Takasaki, Masaru [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    To clarify the etiology of periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) seen on magnetic resonance (MR) images (especially on T2-weighted images), PVH was investigated in relation to causative lesions, angiographic findings, and risk factors for cerebrovascular accidents. The subjects were 103 patients with first-ever cerebral thrombosis (thrombosis group). Age-matched 37 patients with hypertension or diabetes mellitus (risk group) and 78 other patients with neither stroke nor any risk factor served as controls. MR imaging and angiography were undertaken within 3 months after the onset of stroke. Causative lesions were confined to the cerebral cortex (CR type, n=25), centrum semiovale (CS type, n=10), internal capsule/corona radiata (IC/CR type, n=46), and brainstem/cerebellum (BS type, n=22). PVH was classified into none, rims/caps, patchy, and diffuse. Patchy and diffuse types were significantly more common in the thrombosis group and the risk group of hypertensive patients than the other control patients. Diffuse type PVH coexisted with stenosed major cerebral artery and CS type infarction. In contrast, patchy PVH was closely correlated with IC/CR infarction caused by lesions of the perforating artery. These findings suggest that hemodynamic changes caused by large vessel diseases may result in diffuse PVH, while patchy PVH was confluent with multiple lesions induced by small vessel diseases. (N.K.).

  6. Decreased hyperintense vessels on FLAIR images after endovascular recanalization of symptomatic internal carotid artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenhua; Yin Qin; Yao Lingling; Zhu Shuanggen; Xu Gelin; Zhang Renliang; Ke Kaifu; Liu Xinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hyperintense vessels (HV) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were assumed to be explained by slow antegrade or retrograde leptomeningeal collateral flow related to extracranial or intracranial artery steno-occlusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of recanalization after endovascular therapy of symptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion on the presence of HV. Methods: Eleven patients with symptomatic ICA occlusion were retrospectively enrolled. Changes in the HV on FLAIR images were examined in affected hemisphere of each patient after successful treatment with endovascular recanalization (angioplasty, n = 3; stent-assisted angioplasty, n = 8). The relationship between postoperative changes in the HV and Thrombolysis In Cerebral Ischemia (TICI) scale (I-III) was assessed. Results: After operation, HV of the 11 affected hemispheres were showed to be decreased (n = 3) or disappeared (n = 8) in treated side. The median interval between pre- and postoperative MRI examinations was 97.0 h (range, from 69. to 48.7 h). Of the 8 patients with disappeared HV, 7 achieved high TICI grade flow (III) and 1 had relatively low TICI grade flow (IIc) in treated side. However, all the 3 patients with decreased HV were found to be relatively low TICI grade flow (IIc). Conclusion: Our data indicate that endovascular recanalization of ICA occlusion was effective for decreasing HV. Postoperative decrease in HV can be considered as a marker for hemodynamic improvement.

  7. Edge Contrast of the FLAIR Hyperintense Region Predicts Survival in Patients with High-Grade Gliomas following Treatment with Bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, N; Piccioni, D; Karunamuni, R; Chang, Y-H; White, N; Delfanti, R; Seibert, T M; Hattangadi-Gluth, J A; Dale, A; Farid, N; McDonald, C R

    2018-04-05

    Treatment with bevacizumab is standard of care for recurrent high-grade gliomas; however, monitoring response to treatment following bevacizumab remains a challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine whether quantifying the sharpness of the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintense border using a measure derived from texture analysis-edge contrast-improves the evaluation of response to bevacizumab in patients with high-grade gliomas. MRIs were evaluated in 33 patients with high-grade gliomas before and after the initiation of bevacizumab. Volumes of interest within the FLAIR hyperintense region were segmented. Edge contrast magnitude for each VOI was extracted using gradients of the 3D FLAIR images. Cox proportional hazards models were generated to determine the relationship between edge contrast and progression-free survival/overall survival using age and the extent of surgical resection as covariates. After bevacizumab, lower edge contrast of the FLAIR hyperintense region was associated with poorer progression-free survival ( P = .009) and overall survival ( P = .022) among patients with high-grade gliomas. Kaplan-Meier curves revealed that edge contrast cutoff significantly stratified patients for both progression-free survival (log-rank χ 2 = 8.3, P = .003) and overall survival (log-rank χ 2 = 5.5, P = .019). Texture analysis using edge contrast of the FLAIR hyperintense region may be an important predictive indicator in patients with high-grade gliomas following treatment with bevacizumab. Specifically, low FLAIR edge contrast may partially reflect areas of early tumor infiltration. This study adds to a growing body of literature proposing that quantifying features may be important for determining outcomes in patients with high-grade gliomas. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  8. Abnormal hyperintensity within the subarachnoid space evaluated by fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery MR imaging: a spectrum of central nervous system diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Sakuma, H.; Takeda, K.; Yagishita, A.; Yamamoto, T.

    2003-01-01

    A variety of central nervous system (CNS) diseases are associated with abnormal hyperintensity within the subarachnoid space (SAS) by fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging. Careful attention to the SAS can provide additional useful information that may not be available with conventional MR sequences. The purpose of this article is to provide a pictorial essay about CNS diseases and FLAIR images with abnormal hyperintensity within the SAS. We present several CNS diseases including subarachnoid hemorrhage, meningitis, leptomeningeal metastases, acute infarction, and severe arterial occlusive diseases such as moya-moya disease. We also review miscellaneous diseases or normal conditions that may exhibit cerebrospinal fluid hyperintensity on FLAIR images. Although the detection of abnormal hyperintensity suggests the underlying CNS diseases and narrows differential diagnoses, FLAIR imaging sometimes presents artifactual hyperintensity within the SAS that can cause the misinterpretation of normal SAS as pathologic conditions; therefore, radiologists should be familiar with such artifactual conditions as well as pathologic conditions shown as hyperintensity by FLAIR images. This knowledge is helpful in establishing the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. T2 hyperintense signal in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with MRI signs of hippocampal sclerosis and in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with normal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Bruno Yukio; Coan, Ana Carolina; Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Cendes, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    Increased MRI T2 signal is commonly present not only in the hippocampus but also in other temporal structures of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and it is associated with histological abnormalities related to the epileptogenic lesion. This study aimed to verify the distribution of T2 increased signal in temporal lobe structures and its correlations with clinical characteristics of TLE patients with (TLE-HS) or without (TLE-NL) MRI signs of hippocampal sclerosis. We selected 203 consecutive patients: 124 with TLE-HS and 79 with TLE-NL. Healthy controls (N=59) were used as a comparison group/comparative group. T2 multiecho images obtained via a 3-T MRI were evaluated with in-house software. T2 signal decays were computed from five original echoes in regions of interest in the hippocampus, amygdala, and white matter of the anterior temporal lobe. Values higher than 2 standard deviations from the mean of controls were considered as abnormal. T2 signal increase was observed in the hippocampus in 78% of patients with TLE-HS and in 17% of patients with TLE-NL; in the amygdala in 13% of patients with TLE-HS and in 14% of patients with TLE-NL; and in the temporal lobe white matter in 22% of patients with TLE-HS and in 8% of patients with TLE-NL. Group analysis demonstrated a significant difference in the distribution of the T2 relaxation times of the hippocampus (ANOVA, ptemporal lobe white matter (ptemporal lobe white matter (ANOVA, p=0.025) for patients with TLE-NL compared with controls. The average signal from the hippocampus ipsilateral to the epileptogenic zone was significantly higher in patients with no family history of epilepsy (two-sample T-test, p=0.005). Increased T2 signal occurs in different temporal structures of patients with TLE-HS and in patients with TLE-NL. The hippocampal hyperintense signal is more pronounced in patients without family history of epilepsy and is influenced by earlier seizure onset. These changes in T2 signal may be

  10. Hyperintense vessels on FLAIR: A useful non-invasive method for assessing intracerebral collaterals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenhua; Xu Gelin; Yue Xuanye; Wang Xiaoliang; Ma Minmin; Zhang Renliang; Wang Handong; Zhou Changsheng; Liu Xinfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate relationship between hyperintense vessels (HV) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and artery steno-occlusion related intracerebral collaterals. Materials and methods: A total of 233 patients with 260 atherosclerotic lesions in the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were examined with FLAIR and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). HV were graded as 0, 1, 2 and 3 by its distributions in the MCA territory. Grade 0 indicated no HV; Grade 1 indicated the HV limited in Sylvian fissure; Grade 2 indicated the HV limited in Sylvian fissure and the temporal-occipital junction; Grade 3 indicated the HV extended to frontal-parietal lobes. Collateral blood flows were classified by DSA results. The relationship between HV grades and patterns of collateral flows was analyzed. Results: HV were observed in 76 out of 260 hemispheres. For patients with Grade 1 HV, most of their collateral flows (80.8%) were antegrade; for patients with Grade 2, the retrograde leptomeningeal flows were commonly manifested as anterior cerebral artery to MCA (75%); for patients with Grade 3 HV, most of the retrograde leptomeningeal flows were manifested as posterior cerebral artery to MCA (81.8%). As the grade HV increased, the frequency of retrograde leptomeningeal collateral from ACA to MCA decreased (100% to 75% and to 18.2%), and increased (0% to 25% and to 81.8%) for the retrograde leptomeningeal collateral via PCA to MCA (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The HV could assess non-invasively intracerebral collaterals in patients with steno-occlusive lesions of M1 segment of MCA.

  11. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 {+-} 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 {+-} 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  12. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de; Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 ± 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 ± 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  13. On the computational assessment of white matter hyperintensity progression: difficulties in method selection and bias field correction performance on images with significant white matter pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes Hernandez, Maria del C.; Gonzalez-Castro, Victor; Wang, Xin; Doubal, Fergus; Munoz Maniega, Susana; Wardlaw, Joanna M. [Centre for Clinical Brian Sciences, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Ghandour, Dina T. [University of Edinburgh, College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Armitage, Paul A. [University of Sheffield, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Subtle inhomogeneities in the scanner's magnetic fields (B{sub 0} and B{sub 1}) alter the intensity levels of the structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affecting the volumetric assessment of WMH changes. Here, we investigate the influence that (1) correcting the images for the B{sub 1} inhomogeneities (i.e. bias field correction (BFC)) and (2) selection of the WMH change assessment method can have on longitudinal analyses of WMH progression and discuss possible solutions. We used brain structural MRI from 46 mild stroke patients scanned at stroke onset and 3 years later. We tested three BFC approaches: FSL-FAST, N4 and exponentially entropy-driven homomorphic unsharp masking (E{sup 2}D-HUM) and analysed their effect on the measured WMH change. Separately, we tested two methods to assess WMH changes: measuring WMH volumes independently at both time points semi-automatically (MCMxxxVI) and subtracting intensity-normalised FLAIR images at both time points following image gamma correction. We then combined the BFC with the computational method that performed best across the whole sample to assess WMH changes. Analysis of the difference in the variance-to-mean intensity ratio in normal tissue between BFC and uncorrected images and visual inspection showed that all BFC methods altered the WMH appearance and distribution, but FSL-FAST in general performed more consistently across the sample and MRI modalities. The WMH volume change over 3 years obtained with MCMxxxVI with vs. without FSL-FAST BFC did not significantly differ (medians(IQR)(with BFC) = 3.2(6.3) vs. 2.9(7.4)ml (without BFC), p = 0.5), but both differed significantly from the WMH volume change obtained from subtracting post-processed FLAIR images (without BFC)(7.6(8.2)ml, p < 0.001). This latter method considerably inflated the WMH volume change as subtle WMH at baseline that became more intense at follow-up were counted as increase in the volumetric change. Measurement of WMH volume change remains challenging. Although the overall volumetric change was not significantly affected by the application of BFC, these methods distorted the image intensity distribution affecting subtle WMH. Subtracting the FLAIR images at both time points following gamma correction seems a promising technique but is adversely affected by subtle WMH. It is important to take into account not only the changes in volume but also in the signal intensity. (orig.)

  14. Reduced artefacts and improved assessment of hyperintense brain lesions with BLADE MR imaging in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, Thekla von; Fabig-Moritz, Claudia; Mueller-Abt, Peter; Zieger, Michael; Winkler, Peter [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Stuttgart (Germany); Blank, Bernd [Haematology and Immunology, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Stuttgart (Germany); Wohlfarth, Katrin [Siemens Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Assessment of small brain lesions in children is often compromised by pulsation, flow or movement artefacts. MRI with a rotating blade-like k-space covering (BLADE, PROPELLER) can compensate for these artefacts. We compared T2-weighted FLAIR images that were acquired with different k-space trajectories (conventional Cartesian and BLADE) to evaluate the impact of BLADE technique on the delineation of small or low-contrast brain lesions. The subject group comprised 26 children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1), who had been routinely scanned at 1.5 T for optic pathway gliomas with both techniques and who had the typical hyperintense brain lesions seen in NF 1. Four experienced radiologists retrospectively compared unlabelled 4-mm axial images with respect to the presence of artefacts, visibility of lesions, quality of contour and contrast. Both techniques were comparable in depicting hyperintense lesions as small as 2 mm independent of contrast and edge definition. Pulsation and movement artefacts were significantly less common with BLADE k-space trajectory. In 7 of 26 patients (27%), lesions and artefacts were rated as indistinguishable in conventional FLAIR, but not in BLADE FLAIR images. BLADE imaging significantly improved the depiction of lesions in T2-W FLAIR images due to artefact reduction especially in the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  15. Hyperintense globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging in acute kernicterus: is it common or rare?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coskun, Abdulhakim; Yikilmaz, Ali; Karahan, Okkes Ibrahim; Manav, Ali [Erciyes University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Kayseri (Turkey); Kumandas, Sefer [Erciyes University Medical School, Department of Neuropediatry, Kayseri (Turkey); Akcakus, Mustafa [Erciyes University Medical School, Department of Neonatalogy, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2005-06-01

    Globus pallidus involvement is a well-known magnetic resonance (MR) imaging finding of acute kernicterus. However, it is not clear how early the involvement of globus pallidus occurs and whether or not it is seen in every case. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the globus pallidus involvement in 13 neonates with acute kernicterus by MR imaging. Thirteen neonates who were admitted with jaundice, encephalopathy and indirect hyperbilirubinemia (mean, 37.0 mg/dl) were prospectively evaluated with cranial MR imaging. Pathological signal changes were noted concerning the globus pallidus. Eight of the 13 patients demonstrated bilateral, symmetric increased signal intensity in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging. These lesions were not apparent on T2-weighted images. Multiple parenchymal punctuate T1 hyperintense lesions were detected in one patient without globus pallidus involvement. This appearance was consistent with hemorrhage. The MR imaging findings of the other four patients showed no evidence of abnormality. The symmetric involvement of globus pallidus seen as hyperintense on T1-weighted MR imaging is a common and characteristic finding of acute kernicterus. (orig.)

  16. Hyperintense globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging in acute kernicterus: is it common or rare?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coskun, Abdulhakim; Yikilmaz, Ali; Karahan, Okkes Ibrahim; Manav, Ali; Kumandas, Sefer; Akcakus, Mustafa

    2005-01-01

    Globus pallidus involvement is a well-known magnetic resonance (MR) imaging finding of acute kernicterus. However, it is not clear how early the involvement of globus pallidus occurs and whether or not it is seen in every case. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the globus pallidus involvement in 13 neonates with acute kernicterus by MR imaging. Thirteen neonates who were admitted with jaundice, encephalopathy and indirect hyperbilirubinemia (mean, 37.0 mg/dl) were prospectively evaluated with cranial MR imaging. Pathological signal changes were noted concerning the globus pallidus. Eight of the 13 patients demonstrated bilateral, symmetric increased signal intensity in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging. These lesions were not apparent on T2-weighted images. Multiple parenchymal punctuate T1 hyperintense lesions were detected in one patient without globus pallidus involvement. This appearance was consistent with hemorrhage. The MR imaging findings of the other four patients showed no evidence of abnormality. The symmetric involvement of globus pallidus seen as hyperintense on T1-weighted MR imaging is a common and characteristic finding of acute kernicterus. (orig.)

  17. Reduced artefacts and improved assessment of hyperintense brain lesions with BLADE MR imaging in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalle, Thekla von; Fabig-Moritz, Claudia; Mueller-Abt, Peter; Zieger, Michael; Winkler, Peter; Blank, Bernd; Wohlfarth, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of small brain lesions in children is often compromised by pulsation, flow or movement artefacts. MRI with a rotating blade-like k-space covering (BLADE, PROPELLER) can compensate for these artefacts. We compared T2-weighted FLAIR images that were acquired with different k-space trajectories (conventional Cartesian and BLADE) to evaluate the impact of BLADE technique on the delineation of small or low-contrast brain lesions. The subject group comprised 26 children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1), who had been routinely scanned at 1.5 T for optic pathway gliomas with both techniques and who had the typical hyperintense brain lesions seen in NF 1. Four experienced radiologists retrospectively compared unlabelled 4-mm axial images with respect to the presence of artefacts, visibility of lesions, quality of contour and contrast. Both techniques were comparable in depicting hyperintense lesions as small as 2 mm independent of contrast and edge definition. Pulsation and movement artefacts were significantly less common with BLADE k-space trajectory. In 7 of 26 patients (27%), lesions and artefacts were rated as indistinguishable in conventional FLAIR, but not in BLADE FLAIR images. BLADE imaging significantly improved the depiction of lesions in T2-W FLAIR images due to artefact reduction especially in the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  18. Right-to-left shunt and subclinical ischemic brain lesions in Chinese migraineurs: a multicentre MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-Han; Wang, Si-Bo; Tian, Qian; Zhong, Chi; Zhang, Guan-Ling; Li, Ya-Jie; Lin, Pan; You, Yong; Guo, Rong; Cui, Ying-Hua; Xing, Ying-Qi

    2018-02-14

    Migraine is considered as a risk factor for subclinical brain ischemic lesions, and right-to-left shunt (RLS) is more common among migraineurs. This cross-sectional study assessed the association of RLS with the increased prevalence of subclinical ischemic brain lesions in migraineurs. We enrolled 334 migraineurs from a multicentre study from June 2015 to August 2016. Participants were all evaluated using contrast-enhanced transcranial Doppler, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and completed a questionnaire covering demographics, the main risk factors of vascular disease, and migraine status. RLS was classified into four grades (Grade 0 = Negative; Grade I = 1 ≤ microbubbles (MBs) ≤ 10; Grade II = MBs > 10 and no curtain; Grade III = curtain). Silent brain ischemic infarctions (SBI) and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) were evaluated on MRI. We found no significant differences between migraineurs with RLS and migraineurs without RLS in subclinical ischemic brain lesions.SBI and WMHs did not increase with the size of the RLS(p for trend for SBI = 0.066, p for trend for WMHs = 0.543). Furthermore, curtain RLS in migraineurs was a risk factor for the presence of SBI (p = 0.032, OR = 3.47; 95%CI: 1.12-10.76). There was no association between RLS and the presence of WMHs. Overall, RLS is not associated with increased SBI or WMHs in migraineurs. However, when RLS is present as a curtain pattern, it is likely to be a risk factor for SBIs in migraineurs. No. NCT02425696 ; registered on April 21, 2015.

  19. Malnutrition and Risk of Structural Brain Changes Seen on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de van der Schueren, Marian A E; Lonterman-Monasch, Sabine; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Kramer, Mark H; Maier, Andrea B; Muller, Majon

    2016-12-01

    To study the associations between protein energy malnutrition, micronutrient malnutrition, brain atrophy, and cerebrovascular lesions. Cross-sectional. Geriatric outpatient clinic. Older adults (N = 475; mean age 80 ± 7). Nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and according to serum micronutrient levels (vitamins B1, B6, B12, D; folic acid). White matter hyperintensities (WMHs), global cortical brain atrophy, and medial temporal lobe atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rated using visual rating scales. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess associations between the three MNA categories (malnutrition (MNA = 17-23.5). Participants at risk of malnutrition (odds ratio (OR) = 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-3.71) or who were malnourished (OR = 2.80, 95% CI = 1.19-6.60) had a greater probability of having severe WMHs independent of age and sex than those with adequate nutritional status. Results remained significant after further adjustments for cognitive function, depressive symptoms, cardiovascular risk factors, history of cardiovascular disease, smoking and alcohol use, and micronutrient levels. Lower vitamin B1 (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.11-2.08) and B12 (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.02-2.04) levels were also related to greater risk of severe WMHs, independent of age and sex. Results remained significant after additional adjustments. MNA and vitamin levels were not associated with measures of brain atrophy. Malnutrition and lower vitamin B1 and B12 levels were independently associated with greater risk of WMHs. Underlying mechanisms need to be further clarified, and whether nutritional interventions can modify these findings also needs to be studied. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Central pontine myelinolysis with a hyperintense lesion in diffusion weighted MRI: overview by means of a case report; Zentrale pontine Myelinolyse mit hyperintenser Laesion im diffusionsgewichteten MRT: Uebersicht anhand eines Fallberichtes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, J.; Bewermeyer, H. [Neurologische Klinik, Kliniken der Stadt Koeln gGmbH, Krankenhaus Merheim, Koeln (Germany); Harzheim, A. [Radiologische Klinik, Kliniken der Stadt Koeln gGmbH, Krankenhaus Merheim, Koeln (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is a demyelinating disease of the pons often associated with demyelination of other areas of the central nervous system (CNS). The etiology and pathogenesis of this disorder are still not fully understood. However, almost all cases of CPM are related to severe diseases or chronic alcoholism and occur in the setting of rapidly corrected serum hyponatremia and hypotonicity respectively. Depending on the involvement of other CNS structures, the clinical picture can vary considerably. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive investigation for the antemortem diagnosis of CPM, although the radiological findings lag behind and do not necessarily correlate with the clinical picture. Quite obviously diffusion-weighted imaging can be useful in the rapid diagnosis of CPM. This short review summarizes the current knowledge on the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, radiological findings, prognosis and therapeutic approaches of CPM. Characteristical clinical features and MR-findings including hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images are illustrated by a typical case. (orig.)

  1. Central pontine myelinolysis with a hyperintense lesion in diffusion weighted MRI: overview by means of a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, J.; Bewermeyer, H.; Harzheim, A.

    2005-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is a demyelinating disease of the pons often associated with demyelination of other areas of the central nervous system (CNS). The etiology and pathogenesis of this disorder are still not fully understood. However, almost all cases of CPM are related to severe diseases or chronic alcoholism and occur in the setting of rapidly corrected serum hyponatremia and hypotonicity respectively. Depending on the involvement of other CNS structures, the clinical picture can vary considerably. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive investigation for the antemortem diagnosis of CPM, although the radiological findings lag behind and do not necessarily correlate with the clinical picture. Quite obviously diffusion-weighted imaging can be useful in the rapid diagnosis of CPM. This short review summarizes the current knowledge on the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, radiological findings, prognosis and therapeutic approaches of CPM. Characteristical clinical features and MR-findings including hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images are illustrated by a typical case. (orig.)

  2. Linear signal hyperintensity adjacent to the subchondral bone plate at the knee on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences: imaging aspects and association with structural lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Balaj, Clemence [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Nancy (France); Marie, Beatrice [CHU Hopital Central, Service d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Nancy (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Blum, Alain [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Braun, Marc [CHU Hopital Central, Service de Neuroradiologie, Nancy (France)

    2014-11-15

    To describe the association between linear T2 signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone and structural knee lesions. MR studies of patients referred for the evaluation of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated and 133 of these patients presented bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) (study group) and while 61 did not (control group). The presence of linear anomalies of the subchondral bone on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences was evaluated. The findings were correlated to the presence of structural knee lesions and to the duration of the patient's symptoms. Histologic analysis of a cadaveric specimen was used for anatomic correlation. Linear T2 hyperintensities at the subchondral bone were present in 41 % of patients with BMEP. None of the patients in the control group presented this sign. When a subchondral linear hyperintensity was present, the prevalence of radial or root tears was high and that of horizontal tears was low (71.4 and 4.8 %, respectively). Sixty-nine percent of the patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture presented a subchondral linear hyperintensity. It was significantly more prevalent in patients with acute or sub-acute symptoms (p < 0.0001). The studied linear T2 hyperintensity is located at the subchondral spongiosa and can be secondary to local or distant joint injuries. Its presence should evoke acute and sub-acute knee injuries. This sign is closely related to subchondral insufficiency fractures and meniscal tears with a compromise in meniscal function. (orig.)

  3. Reversibility of hyperintense globus pallidus on T 1-weighted MRI following surgery for a portosystemic shunt in an 8-year-old girl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Shinji; Sera, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Mituhiro; Ohshiro, Hajime; Uchino, Shinichiro; Seguchi, Sasa; Endo, Fumio

    1999-01-01

    An 8-year-old Japanese girl with a portosystemic shunt had shown hyperammonaemia since she was 3 years of age. MRI of her brain showed bilateral hyperintense globus pallidus. A portosystemic shunt was evident on US and angiography. She underwent surgical banding of the shunt, after which the lesion and clinical symptoms disappeared. (orig.)

  4. Aberrant resting-state corticostriatal functional connectivity in cirrhotic patients with hyperintense globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Qi Zhu

    Full Text Available Neurobiological and neuroimaging studies have emphasized the structural and functional alterations in the striatum of cirrhotic patients, but alterations in the functional connections between the striatum and other brain regions have not yet been explored. Of note, manganese accumulation in the nervous system, frequently reflected by hyperintensity at the bilateral globus pallidus (GP on T1-weighted imaging, has been considered a factor affecting the striatal and cortical functions in hepatic decompensation. We employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to analyze the temporal correlation between the striatum and the remaining brain regions using seed-based correlation analyses. The two-sample t-test was conducted to detect the differences in corticostriatal connectivity between 44 cirrhotic patients with hyperintensity at the bilateral GP and 20 healthy controls. Decreased connectivity of the caudate was detected in the anterior/middle cingulate gyrus, and increased connectivity of the caudate was found in the left motor cortex. A reduction in functional connectivity was found between the putamen and several regions, including the anterior cingulate gyrus, right insular lobe, inferior frontal gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus, and anterior lobe of the right cerebellum; increased connectivity was detected between the putamen and right middle temporal gyrus. There were significant correlations between the corticostriatal connectivity and neuropsychological performances in the patient group, but not between the striatal connectivity and GP signal intensity. These alterations in the corticostriatal functional connectivity suggested the abnormalities in the intrinsic brain functional organiztion among the cirrhotic patients with manganese deposition, and may be associated with development of metabolic encephalopathy. The manganese deposition in nervous system, however, can not be an independent factor predicting the resting

  5. Quantifying Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying Matter explains how scientists learned to measure matter and quantify some of its most fascinating and useful properties. It presents many of the most important intellectual achievements and technical developments that led to the scientific interpretation of substance. Complete with full-color photographs, this exciting new volume describes the basic characteristics and properties of matter. Chapters include:. -Exploring the Nature of Matter. -The Origin of Matter. -The Search for Substance. -Quantifying Matter During the Scientific Revolution. -Understanding Matter's Electromagnet

  6. Status epilepticus in the elderly: Prognostic implications of rhythmic and periodic patterns in electroencephalography and hyperintensities on diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hajime; Matsumoto, Riki; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Ariyoshi, Koichi; Kawamoto, Michi; Ishii, Junko; Ikeda, Akio; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kohara, Nobuo

    2016-11-15

    To delineate the clinical characteristics and functional outcome of status epilepticus (SE) in elderly people, and elucidate prognostic implications of SE-associated rhythmic and periodic patterns (RPPs) in electroencephalography and hyperintensities on diffusion-weighted imaging. We retrospectively investigated 107 consecutive patients with SE aged≥65years in a comprehensive community hospital. RPPs were classified using the 2012 American Clinical Neurophysiology Society's Standardized Critical Care EEG Terminology. Poor outcome was defined as an increase in modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at discharge compared with that at baseline, including death. Median age of patients was 80.0years. Median mRS score at baseline was 3. Thirty-four patients (31.8%) had a previous diagnosis of epilepsy. Cerebrovascular disease and dementia were major etiologies. Poor outcome occurred in 41 (38.3%). In electroencephalography, periodic discharges (PDs) were present in 21.0% (22/105), rhythmic delta activity (RDA) in 10.5% (11/105), and conventional seizure patterns in 9.5% (10/105). Diffusion-weighted hyperintensities associated with SE were observed in 28.0% (26/93). With univariate analysis, poor outcome was significantly associated with no previous diagnosis of epilepsy, etiology, refractory SE, specific electroencephalographic patterns (PDs and conventional seizure patterns, but not RDA), and diffusion-weighted hyperintensities. With multivariate logistic regression analysis, diffusion-weighted hyperintensities (OR 6.13 [95% CI 1.72-21.9]) and refractory SE (OR 5.36 [95% CI 1.28-22.4]) were independently associated with poor outcome. SE often occurred as the first seizure in already disabled elderly people, further worsening their functional disabilities. Diffusion-weighted hyperintensities and refractory SE, but not RPPs in electroencephalography, were independent functional prognostic factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A comparison of substantia nigra T1 hyperintensity in Parkinson's disease dementia, Alzheimer's disease and age-matched controls: Volumetric analysis of neuromelanin imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Won Jin; Park, Ju Yeon; Yun, Won Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Hee Jin; Han, Seol Heui [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Ki Chang; Lee, Jong Min [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases.

  8. Múltiplas hiperintensidades no sistema nervoso central em uma criança com neurofibromatose do tipo 1 Multiple central nervous system hyperintensities in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Graziadio

    2011-12-01

    whose father presented cafe-au-lait spots and history of ear tumor surgery. The neuropsychomotor development of the child was within the normal range, without seizures or learning deficit. At the physical exam, he had several cafe-au-lait spots and freckles. The magnetic resonance image showed multiple nodular and hyperintense images in T2 and Flair, with isosignal in T1, localized in the white matter of cerebellum, brainstem and cerebral hemispheres. A prechiasmatic hamartomatous lesion was also noted. Electroencephalographic evaluation and the neurological exam were normal. COMMENTS: The hyperintensities images verified in the magnetic resonance image corresponded to the "unidentified bright objects" (UBOs. They are observed in 60 to 70% of the children with neurofibromatosis type 1, being rare in adults. Its etiology and clinical meaning are still not clear. Some studies have associated them to cognitive dysfunction, neurological deficit and risk of malignization. Hamartomas close to the optic chiasm are unusual, but they can be related to early puberty. Central nervous system imaging of asymptomatic neurofibromatosis type 1 children is controversial. However, in cases in which UBOs are occasionally identified, it is important to consider their radiological follow-up, especially in the presence of multiple and atypical lesions.

  9. Spaceflight Effect on White Matter Structural Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica K.; Kopplemans, Vincent; Paternack, Ofer; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports of elevated brain white matter hyperintensity (WMH) counts and volume in postflight astronaut MRIs suggest that further examination of spaceflight's impact on the microstructure of brain white matter is warranted. To this end, retrospective longitudinal diffusion-weighted MRI scans obtained from 15 astronauts were evaluated. In light of the recent reports of microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift and gray matter atrophy seen in astronauts, we applied a technique to estimate diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics corrected for free water contamination. This approach enabled the analysis of white matter tissue-specific alterations that are unrelated to fluid shifts, occurring from before spaceflight to after landing. After spaceflight, decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values were detected in an area encompassing the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Increased radial diffusivity (RD) and decreased axial diffusivity (AD) were also detected within overlapping regions. In addition, FA values in the corticospinal tract decreased and RD measures in the precentral gyrus white matter increased from before to after flight. The results show disrupted structural connectivity of white matter in tracts involved in visuospatial processing, vestibular function, and movement control as a result of spaceflight. The findings may help us understand the structural underpinnings of the extensive spaceflight-induced sensorimotor remodeling. Prospective longitudinal assessment of the white matter integrity in astronauts is needed to characterize the evolution of white matter microstructural changes associated with spaceflight, their behavioral consequences, and the time course of recovery. Supported by a grant from the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, NASA NCC 9-58.

  10. Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einasto J.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available I give a review of the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, thus properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic web.

  11. Arterial hyperintensity on BLADE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR) in hyperacute territorial infarction: comparison with conventional FLAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwag, Eujean; Lim, Soo Mee; Park, Ji Eun; Chae, In Hye [Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the utility of BLADE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging compared to conventional FLAIR for the detection of arterial hyperintensity (AH) in hyperacute territorial infarction. We retrospectively analysed MR images of patients with hyperacute (<6 h) territorial infarction over a 9-month study period. Special attention was paid to the presence or absence of AH in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes and the number of AHs in the sylvian fissure. We also evaluated the presence of three kinds of artefacts on BLADE FLAIR and conventional FLAIR images. AH was seen in 41 (91 %) patients with conventional FLAIR and 45 (100 %) patients with BLADE FLAIR images. More instances of AH were detected in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes and within the sylvian fissure using BLADE FLAIR. Motion artefacts, pulsation artefacts from the sigmoid sinus and incomplete cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nulling that reduced image quality were observed more frequently on conventional FLAIR images than on BLADE FLAIR images. BLADE FLAIR sequences are more sensitive than conventional FLAIR for the detection of AH in hyperacute territorial infarctions and provide better image quality by reducing artefacts. They may be used in place of conventional FLAIR for patients with hyperacute stroke. (orig.)

  12. Subcortical hyperintensity volumetrics in Alzheimer’s disease and normal elderly in the Sunnybrook Dementia Study: correlations with atrophy, executive function, mental processing speed, and verbal memory

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Joel; McNeely, Alicia A; Scott, Christopher JM; Stuss, Donald T; Black, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Subcortical hyperintensities (SHs) are radiological entities commonly observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and normal elderly controls. Although the presence of SH is believed to indicate some form of subcortical vasculopathy, pathological heterogeneity, methodological differences, and the contribution of brain atrophy associated with AD pathology have yielded inconsistent results in the literature. Methods Using the Lesion Explor...

  13. Capsule, septum, and T2 hyperintense foci for differentiation between large hepatocellular carcinoma (≥5 cm) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma on gadoxetic acid MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jiyoung; Hong, Seong Sook; Kim, Hyun-joo [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kon; Min, Ji Hye; Jeong, Woo Kyung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seo-Youn [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Soohyun; Ahn, Hyeon Seon [Research Institute for Future Medicine, Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology Center, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To determine the added value of capsule, septum, and T2 hyperintense foci for differentiating large hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; ≥ 5 cm) from intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) using gadoxetic acid MRI. The study included 116 patients (94 men, 22 women; mean age, 56.8 years) with surgically confirmed HCCs (n = 87, 5.0-18.0 cm) or ICCs (n = 29, 5.0-14.0 cm) who underwent gadoxetic acid MRI. Three observers independently reviewed MRIs in two sessions, examining enhancement patterns only and then adding capsule, septum, and T2 hyperintense foci. Reviewers used a five-point scale to score accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. A significant increase was observed in accuracy when ancillary features (96.1-98.3%) were added compared to enhancement pattern only (83.6-88.4%; p ≤ 0.02). Sensitivity was significantly increased with combined reading (97.1-98.3%) compared to enhancement features only (81.6-88.5%; p ≤ 0.006) for two observers, with no difference in specificity (84.5-89.7% vs. 86.2-98.3%; p > 0.05). We found substantial to excellent interobserver agreement for ancillary features (0.598-0.976). Adding capsule, septum, and T2 hyperintense foci to enhancement patterns for gadoxetic acid MRI increased diagnostic performance for characterizing large HCC by differentiating it from ICC. (orig.)

  14. Malnutrition and cerebral white matter lesions in dialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Masanori; Mukai, Kazumitsu; Ichikawa, Hiroo; Sanada, Daisuke; Shibata, Takanori; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Akizawa, Tadao; Wakasa, Mikio

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between nutritional status and the severity of cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) in dialysis patients. Subjects consisted of 28 patients with end-stage renal failure who underwent regular hemodialysis in the affiliated hospitals of Showa University Hospital. All subjects underwent brain MRI and various clinical and laboratory tests. All subjects were divided into three groups based on the following criteria. Group I was defined as having 0 or 1 of the 4 findings of malnutrition (body mass index 2 , total lymphocyte counts 3 , serum albumin concentrations <3.5 g/dL, normalized protein catabolic rate <0.9 g/kg/day). Group II was defined as having 2 of these 4 findings, and group III was defined as having 3 or all of these 4 findings. WMLs detected on T2-weightd MRI were rated using the semiquantitative method yielding two continuous variables (perivascular hyperintensity (PVH) scores, deep subcortical white matter hyperintensity (DSWMH) scores). PVH and DSWMH scores were significantly higher in patients in groups III and II compared to that of those in group I. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the four findings of malnourishment described above had significant impact on PVH and DSWMH scores. These findings suggest that nutritional status (especially malnutrition) in dialysis patients may be involved in the severity of WMLs. (author)

  15. Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Supported by a generous quantity of full-color illustrations and interesting sidebars, Solid Matter introduces the basic characteristics and properties of solid matter. It briefly describes the cosmic connection of the elements, leading readers through several key events in human pre-history that resulted in more advanced uses of matter in the solid state. Chapters include:. -Solid Matter: An Initial Perspective. -Physical Behavior of Matter. -The Gravity of Matter. -Fundamentals of Materials Science. -Rocks and Minerals. -Metals. -Building Materials. -Carbon Earth's Most Versatile Element. -S

  16. Speech Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse Jørgensen, Stina

    2011-01-01

    About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011.......About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011....

  17. Memory Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Memory Matters KidsHealth / For Kids / Memory Matters What's in ... of your complex and multitalented brain. What Is Memory? When an event happens, when you learn something, ...

  18. Proton MR spectroscopic imaging of basal ganglia and thalamus in neurofibromatosis type 1: correlation with T2 hyperintensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, Charlotte; Barantin, Laurent; Chabernaud, Camille; Bertrand, Philippe; Sembely, Catherine; Sirinelli, Dominique; Castelnau, Pierre; Cottier, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is frequently associated with hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images called ''unidentified bright objects'' (UBO). To better characterize the functional significance of UBO, we investigate the basal ganglia and thalamus using spectroscopic imaging in children with NF1 and compare the results to anomalies observed on T2-weighted images. Magnetic resonance (MR) data of 25 children with NF1 were analyzed. On the basis of T2-weighted images analysis, two groups were identified: one with normal MR imaging (UBO- group; n = 10) and one with UBO (UBO+ group; n = 15). Within the UBO+ group, a subpopulation of patients (n = 5) only had lesions of the basal ganglia. We analyzed herein seven regions of interest (ROIs) for each side: caudate nucleus, capsulo-lenticular region, lateral and posterior thalamus, thalamus (lateral and posterior voxels combined), putamen, and striatum. For each ROI, a spectrum of the metabolites and their ratio was obtained. Patients with abnormalities on T2-weighted images had significantly lower NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, and NAA/mI ratios in the lateral right thalamus compared with patients with normal T2. These abnormal spectroscopic findings were not observed in capsulo-lenticular regions that had UBO but in the thalamus region that was devoid of UBO. Multivoxel spectroscopic imaging using short-time echo showed spectroscopic abnormalities in the right thalamus of NF1 patients harboring UBO, which were mainly located in the basal ganglia. This finding could reflect the anatomical and functional interactions of these regions. (orig.)

  19. FLAIR vascular hyperintensities and dynamic 4D angiograms for the estimation of collateral blood flow in posterior circulation occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, Alex; Wenz, Holger; Kerl, Hans Ulrich; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Habich, Sonia; Groden, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to assess collateral blood flow in posterior circulation occlusion by MRI-based approaches (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) vascular hyperintensities (FVHs), collateralization on dynamic 4D angiograms) and investigate its relation to ischemic lesion size and growth. In 28 patients with posterior cerebral artery (PCA) and 10 patients with basilar artery (BA) occlusion, MRI findings were analyzed, with emphasis on distal FVH and collateralization on dynamic 4D angiograms. In PCA occlusion, distal FVH was observed in 18/29 (62.1 %), in BA occlusion, in 8/10 (80 %) cases. Collateralization on dynamic 4D angiograms was graded 1 in 8 (27.6 %) patients, 2 in 1 (3.4 %) patient, 3 in 12 (41.4 %) patients, and 4 in 8 (27.6 %) patients with PCA occlusion and 0 in 1 (10 %) patient, 2 in 3 (30 %) patients, 3 in 1 (10 %) patient, and 4 in 5 (50 %) patients with BA occlusion. FVH grade showed neither correlation with initial or follow-up diffusion-weighted image (DWI) lesion size nor DWI-perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) mismatch ratio. Collateralization on dynamic 4D angiograms correlated inversely with initial DWI lesion size and moderately with the DWI-(PWI) mismatch ratio. The combination of distal FVH and collateralization grade on dynamic 4D angiograms correlated inversely with initial as well as follow-up DWI lesion size and highly with the DWI-PWI mismatch ratio. In posterior circulation occlusion, FVH is a frequent finding, but its prognostic value is limited. Dynamic 4D angiograms are advantageous to examine and graduate collateral blood flow. The combination of both parameters results in an improved characterization of collateral blood flow and might have prognostic relevance. (orig.)

  20. FLAIR vascular hyperintensities and 4D MR angiograms for the estimation of collateral blood flow in anterior cerebral artery ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Gawlitza

    Full Text Available To assess FLAIR vascular hyperintensities (FVH and dynamic (4D angiograms derived from perfusion raw data as proposed magnetic resonance (MR imaging markers of leptomeningeal collateral circulation in patients with ischemia in the territory of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA.Forty patients from two tertiary care university hospitals were included. Infarct volumes and perfusion deficits were manually measured on DWI images and TTP maps, respectively. FVH and collateral flow on 4D MR angiograms were assessed and graded as previously specified.Forty-one hemispheres were affected. Mean DWI lesion volume was 8.2 (± 13.9; range 0-76.9 ml, mean TTP lesion volume was 24.5 (± 17.2, range 0-76.7 ml. FVH were observed in 26/41 (63.4% hemispheres. Significant correlations were detected between FVH and TTP lesion volume (ρ = 0.4; P<0.01 absolute (ρ = 0.37; P<0.05 and relative mismatch volume (ρ = 0.35; P<0.05. The modified ASITN/SIR score correlated inversely with DWI lesion volume (ρ = -0.58; P<0.01 and positively with relative mismatch (ρ = 0.29; P< 0.05. ANOVA of the ASITN/SIR score revealed significant inter-group differences for DWI (P<0.001 and TTP lesion volumes (P<0.05. No correlation was observed between FVH scores and modified ASITH/SIR scores (ρ = -0.16; P = 0.32.FVH and flow patterns on 4D MR angiograms are markers of perfusion deficits and tissue at risk. As both methods did not show a correlation between each other, they seem to provide complimentary instead of redundant information. Previously shown evidence for the meaning of these specific MR signs in internal carotid and middle cerebral artery stroke seems to be transferrable to ischemic stroke in the ACA territory.

  1. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    What You See Ain't What. You Got, Resonance, Vol.4,. No.9,1999. Dark Matter. 2. Dark Matter in the Universe. Bikram Phookun and Biman Nath. In Part 11 of this article we learnt that there are compelling evidences from dynamics of spiral galaxies, like our own, that there must be non-luminous matter in them. In this.

  2. The value of qualitative and quantitative assessment of lesion to cerebral cortex signal ratio on double inversion recovery sequence in the differentiation of demyelinating plaques from non-specific T2 hyperintensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamcan, Salih; Battal, Bilal; Akgun, Veysel; Sari, Sebahattin; Tasar, Mustafa [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik, Ankara (Turkey); Oz, Oguzhan; Tasdemir, Serdar [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Neurology, Ankara (Turkey); Bozkurt, Yalcin [Golcuk Military Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2017-02-15

    To assess the usefulness of the visual assessment and to determine diagnostic value of the lesion-to-cerebral cortex signal ratio (LCSR) measurement in the differentiation of demyelinating plaques and non-specific T2 hyperintensities on double inversion recovery (DIR) sequence. DIR and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences of 25 clinically diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and 25 non-MS patients with non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions were evaluated visually and LCSRs were measured by two observers independently. On DIR sequence, the calculated mean LCSR ± SD for demyelinating plaques and non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions were 1.60 ± 0.26 and 0.75 ± 0.19 for observer1, and 1.61 ± 0.27 and 0.74 ± 0.19 for observer2. LCSRs of demyelinating plaques were significantly higher than other non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions on DIR sequence. By using the visual assessment demyelinating plaques were differentiated from non-specific T2-hyperintensities with 92.8 % sensitivity, 97.5 % specificity and 95.1 % accuracy for observer1 and 92.8 % sensitivity, 95 % specificity and 93.9 % accuracy for observer2. Visual assessment and LCSR measurement on DIR sequence seems to be useful for differentiating demyelinating MS plaques from supratentorial non-specific T2 hyperintensities. This feature can be used for diagnosis of MS particularly in patients with only supratentorial T2-hyperintense lesions who are categorized as radiologically possible MS. (orig.)

  3. Corpus callosum atrophy is associated with mental slowing and executive deficits in subjects with age-related white matter hyperintensities. The LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokinen, Hanne; Ryberg, Charlotte; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2007-01-01

    Background: Previous research has indicated that corpus callosum atrophy is associated with global cognitive decline in neurodegenerative diseases, but few studies have investigated specific cognitive functions. Objective: To investigate the role of regional corpus callosum atrophy in mental speed...... of the total corpus callosum area and its subregions with cognitive performance were analysed using multiple linear regression, controlling for volume of WMH and other confounding factors. Results: Atrophy of the total corpus callosum area was associated with poor performance in tests assessing speed of mental...... processing - namely, trail making A and Stroop test parts I and II. Anterior, but not posterior, corpus callosum atrophy was associated with deficits of attention and executive functions as reflected by the symbol digit modalities and digit cancellation tests, as well as by the subtraction scores...

  4. Corpus callosum atrophy is associated with mental slowing and executive deficits in subjects with age-related white matter hyperintensities: the LADIS Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokinen, Hanna; Ryberg, Charlotte; Kalska, Hely

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous research has indicated that corpus callosum atrophy is associated with global cognitive decline in neurodegenerative diseases, but few studies have investigated specific cognitive functions. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of regional corpus callosum atrophy in mental speed...... of the total corpus callosum area and its subregions with cognitive performance were analysed using multiple linear regression, controlling for volume of WMH and other confounding factors. RESULTS: Atrophy of the total corpus callosum area was associated with poor performance in tests assessing speed of mental...... processing--namely, trail making A and Stroop test parts I and II. Anterior, but not posterior, corpus callosum atrophy was associated with deficits of attention and executive functions as reflected by the symbol digit modalities and digit cancellation tests, as well as by the subtraction scores in the trail...

  5. Deep frontal and periventricular age related white matter changes but not basal ganglia and infratentorial hyperintensities are associated with falls: cross sectional results from the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blahak, C; Baezner, H; Pantoni, L

    2009-01-01

    non-disabled individuals with reported falls was analysed, using the cross sectional data of the Leukoaraiosis and Disability (LADIS) study. Detailed anatomical distributions of ARWMC assessed by MRI studies were analysed with respect to falls and balance performance. RESULTS: The severity of global...... ARWMC was significantly associated with a history of falls in the year prior to study inclusion (22.2% in the mild, 31.6% in the moderate and 37.3% in the severe ARWMC group according to the Fazekas scale; p = 0.002). Analysing the anatomical distribution of ARWMC, using the semiquantitative Scheltens...

  6. D matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, Gary; Wang Liantao

    2004-01-01

    We study the properties and phenomenology of particlelike states originating from D branes whose spatial dimensions are all compactified. They are nonperturbative states in string theory and we refer to them as D matter. In contrast to other nonperturbative objects such as 't Hooft-Polyakov monopoles, D-matter states could have perturbative couplings among themselves and with ordinary matter. The lightest D particle (LDP) could be stable because it is the lightest state carrying certain (integer or discrete) quantum numbers. Depending on the string scale, they could be cold dark matter candidates with properties similar to that of WIMPs or wimpzillas. The spectrum of excited states of D matter exhibits an interesting pattern which could be distinguished from that of Kaluza-Klein modes, winding states, and string resonances. We speculate about possible signatures of D matter from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and colliders

  7. Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S. S.; Bennett, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Astrophysics conference in Maryland, organized by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Maryland. The topics covered included low mass stars as dark matter, dark matter in galaxies and clusters, cosmic microwave background anisotropy, cold and hot dark matter, and the large scale distribution and motions of galaxies. There were eighty five papers presented. Out of these, 10 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  8. Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, A.; Cotti, U.; De Leon, C. L.; Raya, A; Villasenor, L.

    2008-01-01

    One of the biggest scientific mysteries of our time resides in the identification of the particles that constitute a large fraction of the mass of our Universe, generically known as dark matter. We review the observations and the experimental data that imply the existence of dark matter. We briefly discuss the properties of the two best dark-matter candidate particles and the experimental techniques presently used to try to discover them. Finally, we mention a proposed project that has recently emerged within the Mexican community to look for dark matter

  9. Regional white matter lesions predict falls in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogama, Noriko; Sakurai, Takashi; Shimizu, Atsuya; Toba, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Preventive strategy for falls in demented elderly is a clinical challenge. From early-stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD), patients show impaired balance and gait. The purpose of this study is to determine whether regional white matter lesions (WMLs) can predict balance/gait disturbance and falls in elderly with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or AD. Cross-sectional. Hospital out-patient clinic. One hundred sixty-three patients diagnosed with aMCI or AD were classified into groups having experienced falls (n = 63) or not (n = 100) in the previous year. Cognition, depression, behavior and psychological symptoms of dementia, medication, and balance/gait function were evaluated. Regional WMLs were visually analyzed as periventricular hyperintensity in frontal caps, bands, and occipital caps, and as deep white matter hyperintensity in frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Brain atrophy was linearly measured. The fallers had a greater volume of WMLs and their posture/gait performance tended to be worse than nonfallers. Several WMLs in particular brain regions were closely associated with balance and gait impairment. Besides polypharmacy, periventricular hyperintensity in frontal caps and occipital WMLs were strong predictors for falls, even after potential risk factors for falls were considered. Regional white matter burden, independent of cognitive decline, correlates with balance/gait disturbance and predicts falls in elderly with aMCI and AD. Careful insight into regional WMLs on brain magnetic resonance may greatly help to diagnose demented elderly with a higher risk of falls. Copyright © 2014 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 1H MR spectroscopy of gray and white matter in carbon monoxide poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, D.; Danielsen, E.R.; Hansen, K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication leads to acute and chronic neurological deficits, but little is known about the specific noxious mechanisms. (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may allow insight into the pathophysiology of CO poisoning by monitoring neurochemical disturbances, yet only......, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing. Five patients suffered from acute high-dose CO intoxication and were in coma for 1-6 days. In these patients, MRI revealed hyperintensities of the white matter and globus pallidus and also showed increased choline (Cho) and decreased N...

  11. Continuous partial status cause of hyperintensity in cerebral cortex in magnetic resonance imaging; Estatus parcial continuo, causa de hiperintensidad de la corteza cerebral en la resonancia nuclear magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez L, Ingeborg; Gonzalez L, Daniela [Departamento de Ciencias Neurologicas Oriente. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Quezada R, Patricio [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital Salvador, Santiago (Chile); Cartier R, Luis [Departamento de Ciencias Neurologicas Oriente. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging has demonstrated functional changes of the cerebral cortex in relation to status epilepticus, which can eventually localize the origin of the crisis. The purpose of this presentation is relevant to this condition and pretends to highlight the action of incidental situations that can modify it. We present a 29 year old woman with a neurosurgical intervention for a neuroblastoma irradiated fifteen years ago, which incidentally starts a continuous partial status epilepticus, expressed by clonies of the face and left limbs associated with functional impotence, resistant to oral therapy. Faced with the suspicion of recurrence of the tumor, a brain MRI is performed, showing hyperintensity of all neural areas the right hemisphere, with no evidence of tumor recurrence. Once submitted the status epilepticus, the hyperintensity disappeared in the hemisphere. This extensive reaction of the neural structures might be related to a permanent effect of radiation, which may have caused a mismatch functional glia, of the blood-brain barrier and interneural network.

  12. Global and regional associations of smaller cerebral gray and white matter volumes with gait in older people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele L Callisaya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gait impairments increase with advancing age and can lead to falls and loss of independence. Brain atrophy also occurs in older age and may contribute to gait decline. We aimed to investigate global and regional relationships of cerebral gray and white matter volumes with gait speed, and its determinants step length and cadence, in older people. METHODS: In a population-based study, participants aged >60 years without Parkinson's disease or brain infarcts underwent magnetic resonance imaging and gait measurements using a computerized walkway. Linear regression was used to study associations of total gray and white matter volumes with gait, adjusting for each other, age, sex, height and white matter hyperintensity volume. Other covariates considered in analyses included weight and vascular disease history. Voxel-based morphometry was used to study regional relationships of gray and white matter with gait. RESULTS: There were 305 participants, mean age 71.4 (6.9 years, 54% male, mean gait speed 1.16 (0.22 m/s. Smaller total gray matter volume was independently associated with poorer gait speed (p = 0.001 and step length (p<0.001, but not cadence. Smaller volumes of cortical and subcortical gray matter in bilateral regions important for motor control, vision, perception and memory were independently associated with slower gait speed and shorter steps. No global or regional associations were observed between white matter volume and gait independent of gray matter volume, white matter hyperintensity volume and other covariates. CONCLUSION: Smaller gray matter volume in bilaterally distributed brain networks serving motor control was associated with slower gait speed and step length, but not cadence.

  13. Thalamic diffusion differences related to cognitive function in white matter lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Andújar, Marina; Soriano-Raya, Juan José; Miralbell, Júlia; López-Cancio, Elena; Cáceres, Cynthia; Bargalló, Núria; Barrios, Maite; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Toran, Pere; Alzamora, Maite; Clemente, Imma; Dávalos, Antoni; Mataró, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) are related to cognitive deficits, probably due to a disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits. We explored thalamic diffusion differences related to white matter lesions (WMLs) and their association with cognitive function in middle-aged individuals. Ninety-six participants from the Barcelona-AsIA Neuropsychology Study were included. Participants were classified into groups based on low grade and high grade of periventricular hyperintensities (PVHs) and deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMHs). Tract-Based Spatial Statistics was used to study thalamic diffusion differences between groups. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values in significant areas were calculated for each subject and correlated with cognitive performance. Participants with high-grade PVHs and DWMHs showed lower FA thalamic values compared to those with low-grade PVHs and DWMHs, respectively. Decreased FA thalamic values in high-grade DWMHs, but not high-grade PVH, were related to lower levels of performance in psychomotor speed, verbal fluency, and visuospatial skills. Thalamic diffusion differences are related to lower cognitive function only in participants with high-grade DWMHs. These results support the hypothesis that fronto-subcortical disruption is associated with cognitive function only in DWMHs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lower Serum Caveolin-1 Is Associated with Cerebral Microbleeds in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 plays pivotal roles in the endothelial damage following stroke. The present study aimed to investigate whether serum Cav-1 level is associated with the presence of cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD in patients with acute ischemic stroke. To this end, 156 patients were consecutively enrolled. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was analyzed to determine the surrogates of cSVD, including cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, silent lacunar infarcts (SLIs, and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs. After adjusting for potential confounders, patients with low Cav-1 level had a higher risk of CMBs than patients with high Cav-1 level (OR: 4.05, 95% CI: 1.77–9.30. However, there was no relationship between Cav-1 and the presence of SLIs or WMHs. When CMBs were stratified by location and number, a similar association was found in patients with deep or infratentorial CMBs (OR: 4.04, 95% CI: 1.59–10.25 and with multiple CMBs (OR: 3.18, 95% CI: 1.16–8.72. These results suggest lower serum Cav-1 levels may be associated with CMBs, especially those that are multiple and located in deep brain or infratentorial structures, in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cav-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of CMBs, and may act as a potential target for treating cSVD.

  15. Effects of Lacunar Infarctions on Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jay Chol; Kang, Sa-Yoon; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Na, Hae Ri; Park, Ji-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an inherited microangiopathy caused by mutations in the Notch3 gene. Although previous studies have shown an association between lacunar infarction and cognitive impairment, the relationship between MRI parameters and cognition remains unclear. In this study we investigated the influence of MRI parameters on cognitive impairment in CADASIL. Methods We applied a prospective protocol to 40 patients. MRI analysis included the normalized volume of white-matter hyperintensities (nWMHs), number of lacunes, and number of cerebral microbleeds. Cognition was assessed with the aid of psychometric tests [Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognition (ADAS-cog), Trail-Making Test, and Stroop interference (Stroop IF)]. Results A multivariate regression analysis revealed that the total number of lacunes influenced the performance in the MMSE, ADAS-cog, and Stroop IF, while nWMHs had a strong univariate association with ADAS-cog and Stroop IF scores. However, this association disappeared in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that the number of lacunes is the main predictive factor of cognitive impairment in CADASIL. PMID:22259617

  16. Gaseous Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    aseous Matter focuses on the many important discoveries that led to the scientific interpretation of matter in the gaseous state. This new, full-color resource describes the basic characteristics and properties of several important gases, including air, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and nitrogen. The nature and scope of the science of fluids is discussed in great detail, highlighting the most important scientific principles upon which the field is based. Chapters include:. Gaseous Matter An Initial Perspective. Physical Characteristics of Gases. The Rise of the Science of Gases. Kinetic Theory of

  17. Dark matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark. That is, not only is the night sky dark, but also most of the matter and the energy in the universe is dark. For every atom visible in planets, stars and galaxies today there exists at least five or six times as much 'Dark Matter' in the universe. Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious but pervasive dark matter, which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe. Dark energy remains even more elusive, as we lack candidate fields that emerge from well established physics. I will describe various attempts to measure dark matter by direct and indirect means, and discuss the prospects for progress in unravelling dark energy.

  18. Dirac matter

    CERN Document Server

    Rivasseau, Vincent; Fuchs, Jean-Nöel

    2017-01-01

    This fifteenth volume of the Poincare Seminar Series, Dirac Matter, describes the surprising resurgence, as a low-energy effective theory of conducting electrons in many condensed matter systems, including graphene and topological insulators, of the famous equation originally invented by P.A.M. Dirac for relativistic quantum mechanics. In five highly pedagogical articles, as befits their origin in lectures to a broad scientific audience, this book explains why Dirac matters. Highlights include the detailed "Graphene and Relativistic Quantum Physics", written by the experimental pioneer, Philip Kim, and devoted to graphene, a form of carbon crystallized in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, from its discovery in 2004-2005 by the future Nobel prize winners Kostya Novoselov and Andre Geim to the so-called relativistic quantum Hall effect; the review entitled "Dirac Fermions in Condensed Matter and Beyond", written by two prominent theoreticians, Mark Goerbig and Gilles Montambaux, who consider many other mater...

  19. Ultrasound guided high-intensity focused ultrasound combined with gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa) ablating uterine leiomyoma with homogeneous hyperintensity on T2 weighted MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shenghua; Kong, Fanjing; Hou, Ruijie; Rong, Fengmei; Ma, Nana; Li, Shaoping; Yang, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficiency of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) combined with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa)-ablating symptomatic uterine leiomyoma with homogeneous hyperintensity on T 2 weighted MRI prospectively. A total of 34 patients with 42 symptomatic uterine leiomyomas with homogeneous hyperintensity on T 2 weighted MRI were enrolled in our study. In the patient who had multiple uterine leiomyomas, only one dominant leiomyoma was treated. According to the principles of voluntariness, 18 patients underwent a 3-month therapy of GnRHa (once a month) before the high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, while 16 patients received only HIFU treatment. Enhanced MRI was performed before and after GnRHa and HIFU treatment. Evaluation of the main indicators included treatment time, sonication time, treatment efficiency, non-perfused volume (NPV) (indicative of successful ablation) ratio and energy effect ratio; adverse events were also recorded. The treatment time and sonication time of the combination group were 102.0 min (55.8-152.2 min) and 25.4 min (12.2-34.1 min); however, they were 149.0 min (87.0-210.0 min) and 38.9 min (14.0-46.7 min) in the simple USgHIFU group. The treatment and sonication time for the combination group was significantly shorter than that for the simple USgHIFU group. Treatment efficiency, NPV ratio and energy effect ratio were 46.7 mm 3  s -1 (28.5-95.8 mm 3  s -1 ), 69.2 ± 29.8% (35.5-97.4%) and 9.9 KJ mm -3 (4.5-15.7 KJ mm -3 ) in the combination group, respectively; but, the lowest treatment efficiency, lowest NPV ratio and more energy effect ratio were observed in the simple HIFU group, which were 16.8 mm 3  s -1 (8.9-32.9 mm 3  s -1 ), 50.2 ± 27.3% (0-78.6%) and 23.8 KJ mm -3 (12.4-46.2 KJ mm -3 ), respectively. Pain scores in the combination group were 3.0 ± 0.5 points (2-4 points

  20. Predictors of short-term outcome in patients with acute middle cerebral artery occlusion: unsuitability of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyperintensity scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-chan Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR vascular hyperintensity (FVH is used to assess leptomeningeal collateral circulation, but clinical outcomes of patients with FVH can be very different. The aim of the present study was to assess a FVH score and explore its relationship with clinical outcomes. Patients with acute ischemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery M1 occlusion underwent magnetic resonance imaging and were followed up at 10 days (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and 90 days (modified Rankin Scale to determine short-term clinical outcomes. Effective collateral circulation indirectly improved recovery of neurological function and short-term clinical outcome by extending the size of the pial penumbra and reducing infarct lesions. FVH score showed no correlation with 90-day functional clinical outcome and was not sufficient as an independent predictor of short-term clinical outcome.

  1. Quark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csernai, L.; Kampert, K. H.

    1994-10-15

    Precisely one decade ago the GSI (Darmstadt)/LBL (Berkeley) Collaboration at the Berkeley Bevalac reported clear evidence for collective sidewards flow in high energy heavy ion collisions. This milestone observation clearly displayed the compression and heating up of nuclear matter, providing new insights into how the behaviour of nuclear matter changes under very different conditions. This year, evidence for azimuthally asymmetric transverse flow at ten times higher projectile energy (11 GeV per nucleon gold on gold collisions) was presented by the Brookhaven E877 collaboration at the recent European Research Conference on ''Physics of High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions'', held in Helsinki from 17-22 June.

  2. Age dependent white matter lesions and brain volume changes in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, P; Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    The brain of 142 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 80 years were investigated using MR imaging. The number and size of the white matter hyperintensity lesions (WMHL) in the cerebral hemispheres were determined. Furthermore, the volume of the cerebral hemispheres and of the lateral ventricles was meas......The brain of 142 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 80 years were investigated using MR imaging. The number and size of the white matter hyperintensity lesions (WMHL) in the cerebral hemispheres were determined. Furthermore, the volume of the cerebral hemispheres and of the lateral ventricles...... was measured. An almost linear increase in the number of volunteers with WMHL was seen with aging for males and females. With aging a significant decrease in the volume of the cerebral hemispheres was found for males, and a significant increase in the volume of the lateral ventricles was seen for both males...... and females. Our results suggest that with aging central atrophy increases more (relatively) than cortical atrophy. No correlation was found between the decreasing volume of the cerebral hemispheres and the increasing number and size of WMHL, nor between the increasing volume of the lateral ventricles...

  3. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As if this was not enough, it turns out that if our knowledge of ... are thought to contain dark matter, although the evidences from them are the .... protons, electrons, neutrons ... ratio of protons to neutrons was close to unity then as they were in ...

  4. Quantum matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, Hans Peter; Calcarco, Tommaso; Dressel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Artificial atoms and molecules, tailored from solids, fractional flux quanta, molecular magnets, controlled interaction in quantum gases, the theory of quantum correlations in mott matter, cold gases, and mesoscopic systems, Bose-Einstein condensates on the chip, on the route to the quantum computer, a quantum computer in diamond. (HSI)

  5. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  6. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  7. Interstellar matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezger, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of the formation of our galaxy is presented followed by a summary of recent work in star formation and related topics. Selected discussions are given on interstellar matter including absorption characteristics of dust, the fully ionised component of the ISM and the energy density of lyc-photons in the solar neighbourhood and the diffuse galactic IR radiation

  8. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study of gas clouds orbiting in the outer regions of spiral galaxies has revealed that their gravitational at- traction is much larger than the stars alone can provide. Over the last twenty years, astronomers have been forced to postulate the presence of large quantities of 'dark matter' to explain their observations. They are ...

  9. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouze, J.; Tran Thanh Van, J.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with the papers devoted to the experimental search of signatures of the dark matter which governs the evolution of the Universe as a whole. A series of contributions describe the presently considered experimental techniques (cryogenic detectors, supraconducting detectors...). A real dialogue concerning these techniques has been instaured between particle physicists and astrophysicists. After the progress report of the particle physicists, the book provides the reader with an updated situation concerning the research in cosmology. The second part of the book is devoted to the analysis of the backgrounds at different energies such as the possible role of the cooling flows in the constitution of massive galactic halos. Any search of dark matter implies necessarily the analysis of the spatial distributions of the large scale structures of the Universe. This report is followed by a series of statistical analyses of these distributions. These analyses concern mainly universes filled up with cold dark matter. The last paper of this third part concerns the search of clustering in the spatial distribution of QSOs. The presence of dark matter should affect the solar neighborhood and related to the existence of galactic haloes. The contributions are devoted to the search of such local dark matter. Primordial nucleosynthesis provides a very powerful tool to set up quite constraining limitations on the overall baryonic density. Even if on takes into account the inhomogeneities in density possibly induced by the Quark-Hadron transition, this baryonic density should be much lower than the overall density deduced from the dynamical models of Universe or the inflationary theories

  11. Disposal Of Waste Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Hyeon; Lee, Seung Mu

    1989-02-01

    This book deals with disposal of waste matter management of soiled waste matter in city with introduction, definition of waste matter, meaning of management of waste matter, management system of waste matter, current condition in the country, collect and transportation of waste matter disposal liquid waste matter, industrial waste matter like plastic, waste gas sludge, pulp and sulfuric acid, recycling technology of waste matter such as recycling system of Black clawson, Monroe and Rome.

  12. Quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, L.; Kampert, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    Precisely one decade ago the GSI (Darmstadt)/LBL (Berkeley) Collaboration at the Berkeley Bevalac reported clear evidence for collective sidewards flow in high energy heavy ion collisions. This milestone observation clearly displayed the compression and heating up of nuclear matter, providing new insights into how the behaviour of nuclear matter changes under very different conditions. This year, evidence for azimuthally asymmetric transverse flow at ten times higher projectile energy (11 GeV per nucleon gold on gold collisions) was presented by the Brookhaven E877 collaboration at the recent European Research Conference on ''Physics of High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions'', held in Helsinki from 17-22 June

  13. A voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging study of white matter in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Katie; Wu, Jinghui; Malhotra, Anil K; Burdick, Katherine E; DeRosse, Pamela; Ardekani, Babak A; Szeszko, Philip R

    2009-05-01

    There is evidence from post-mortem and magnetic resonance imaging studies that hyperintensities, oligodendroglial abnormalities, and gross white matter volumetric alterations are involved in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. There is also functional imaging evidence for a defect in frontal cortico-subcortical pathways in bipolar disorder, but the white matter comprising these pathways has not been well investigated. Few studies have investigated white matter integrity in patients with bipolar disorder compared to healthy volunteers and the majority of studies have used manual region-of-interest approaches. In this study, we compared fractional anisotropy (FA) values between 30 patients with bipolar disorder and 38 healthy volunteers in the brain white matter using a voxelwise analysis following intersubject registration to Talairach space. Compared to healthy volunteers, patients demonstrated significantly (p or =50) higher FA within the right and left frontal white matter and lower FA within the left cerebellar white matter. Examination of individual eigenvalues indicated that group differences in both axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity contributed to abnormal FA within these regions. Tractography was performed in template space on averaged diffusion tensor imaging data from all individuals. Extraction of bundles passing through the clusters that differed significantly between groups suggested that white matter abnormalities along the pontine crossing tract, corticospinal/corticopontine tracts, and thalamic radiation fibers may be involved in the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder. Our findings are consistent with models of bipolar disorder that implicate dysregulation of cortico-subcortical and cerebellar regions in the disorder and may have relevance for phenomenology.

  14. MR imaging identification of white-matter lesions in uncomplicated chronic alcoholism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallucci, M.; Amicarelli, I.; DiCesare, E.; Rossi, A.; Stratta, P.; Casacchia, M.; Passariello, R.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic alcoholics may have central nervous system (CNS) lesions, such as microvasculitis, or glial, neural, and myelinic degeneration, as has been documented in postmortem studies on patients with Wernicke disease, corpus callosum degeneration, or central pontine myelinolisis. The presence of early white matter diseases can aslo be projected in patients not suffering the neurologic complications of alcoholism. Thirty-five alcoholics (DSM-III criteria) and 35 healthy controls underwent MR imaging at 0.5 T (repetition time/echo time = 1,800/30-120 msec). Subjects older than 60 years or who had CNS injuries or clinically evident hepatopathies were excluded. Besides the aspecific corticosubcortical and cerebellar atrophy, MR imaging disclosed multiple round hyperintense areas in the white matter of 14 patients but in none of the healthy controls. These results suggest early involvement of the brain in chronic alcoholism

  15. Brain white matter damage in aging and cognitive ability in youth and older age☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Booth, Tom; Murray, Catherine; Gow, Alan J.; Penke, Lars; Morris, Zoe; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Royle, Natalie A.; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Bastin, Mark E.; Starr, John M.; Deary, Ian J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH) reflect accumulating white matter damage with aging and impair cognition. The role of childhood intelligence is rarely considered in associations between cognitive impairment and WMH. We studied community-dwelling older people all born in 1936, in whom IQ had been assessed at age 11 years. We assessed medical histories, current cognitive ability and quantified WMH on MR imaging. Among 634 participants, mean age 72.7 (SD 0.7), age 11 IQ was the strongest predictor of late life cognitive ability. After accounting for age 11 IQ, greater WMH load was significantly associated with lower late life general cognitive ability (β = −0.14, p cognitive ability, after accounting for prior ability, age 11IQ. Early-life IQ also influenced WMH in later life. Determining how lower IQ in youth leads to increasing brain damage with aging is important for future successful cognitive aging. PMID:23850341

  16. Automated detection of Lupus white matter lesions in MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Roura Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML. In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM, gray matter (GM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection (True Positive Rate (62% and Positive Prediction Value (80% respectively as well as segmentation accuracy (Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration.

  17. Lower digit symbol substitution score in the oldest old is related to magnetization transfer and diffusion tensor imaging of the white matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay eVenkatraman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Slowing information processing is common among community-dwelling elderly and it predicts greater mortality and disability risk. Slowing information processing is related to brain macro-structural abnormalities. Specifically, greater global atrophy and greater small vessel disease of the white matter have been associated to slower processing speed. However, community-dwelling elderly with such macro-structural abnormalities can maintain processing speed. The roles of brain micro-structure for slow processing in very old adults living in the community is uncertain, as epidemiological studies relating these brain markers to cognition and in the context of other health characteristics are sparse. Hypothesis: Information processing is cross-sectionally associated with white matter micro-structure independent of overt macro-structural abnormalities and also independent of health related characteristics. Methods: Imaging indices of micro-structure (diffusion tensor imaging, DTI, and magnetization transfer imaging, MTI, macro-structure (white matter hyperintensities, gray matter volume, Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST and health characteristics were measured in 272 elderly (mean age 83 years old, 43% men, 40% Black living in the community. Results: The DTI- and MTI-indices of micro-structure from the normal appearing white matter and not from the normal appearing gray matter were associated with DSST score independent of white matter hyperintensities and gray matter volumes. Associations were also independent of age, race, gender, mini-mental score, systolic blood pressure, prevalent myocardial infarction. Interpretation: DTI and MTI indices of normal appearing white matter are indicators of information processing speed in this cohort of very old adults living in the community. Since processing slowing is a potent index of mortality and disability, these indices may serve as biomarkers in prevention or treatment trials of disability.

  18. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis concomitant with multifocal subcortical white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Jin; Chen, Bu-Dong; Qi, Dong

    2015-07-08

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is a severe autoimmune disorder characterized by severe psychiatric symptoms, seizures, decreased consciousness, autonomic dysregulation, and dyskinesias. Multifocal subcortical white matter lesions on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffuse weighted images have rarely been reported in previous literature, and serial magnetic resonance imaging changes after plasma exchange have not been presented before. A previously healthy 24-year-old Chinese woman presented with acute psychiatric symptoms characterized by fear and agitation followed by decreased consciousness, dyskinesias, and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense lesions on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffuse weighted images in bilateral subcortical white matter. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed a mild pleocytosis with lymphocytic predominance. Protein and glucose levels were normal. Aquaporin-4 antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were negative. Identification of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis. She was initially treated with combined intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone without improvement. Plasma exchange was then initiated with good response; the patient made a full recovery after several cycles of plasma exchange. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging performed 1 month after plasma exchange showed partial resolution of the hyperintense lesions in bilateral subcortical white matter, and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging 2 months after plasma exchange showed complete resolution. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis may be concomitant with multifocal subcortical white matter lesions. Such lesions may resolve after appropriate immunotherapy.

  19. Media Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Pötzsch

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution maps materialist advances in media studies. Based on the assumption that matter and materiality constitute significant aspects of communication processes and practices, I introduce four fields of inquiry - technology, political economy, ecology, and the body - and argue that these perspectives enable a more comprehensive understanding of the implications of contemporary technologically afforded forms of interaction. The article shows how each perspective can balance apologetic and apocalyptic approaches to the impact of in particular digital technologies, before it demonstrates the applicability of an integrated framework with reference to the techno-politics of NSA surveillance and the counter-practices of WikiLeaks.

  20. Play Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    ? In Play Matters, Miguel Sicart argues that to play is to be in the world; playing is a form of understanding what surrounds us and a way of engaging with others. Play goes beyond games; it is a mode of being human. We play games, but we also play with toys, on playgrounds, with technologies and design......, but not necessarily fun. Play can be dangerous, addictive, and destructive. Along the way, Sicart considers playfulness, the capacity to use play outside the context of play; toys, the materialization of play--instruments but also play pals; playgrounds, play spaces that enable all kinds of play; beauty...

  1. Episodic memory function is associated with multiple measures of white matter integrity in cognitive aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Neal Lockhart

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging research indicates that white matter injury and integrity, measured respectively by white matter hyperintensities (WMH and fractional anisotropy (FA obtained from diffusion tensor imaging, differ with aging and cerebrovascular disease and are associated with episodic memory deficits in cognitively normal older adults. However, knowledge about tract-specific relationships between WMH, FA, and episodic memory in aging remains limited. We hypothesized that white matter connections between frontal cortex and subcortical structures as well as connections between frontal and temporo-parietal cortex would be most affected. In the current study, we examined relationships between WMH, FA and episodic memory in 15 young adults, 13 elders with minimal WMH and 15 elders with extensive WMH, using an episodic recognition memory test for object-color associations. Voxel-based statistics were used to identify voxel clusters where white matter measures were specifically associated with variations in episodic memory performance, and white matter tracts intersecting these clusters were analyzed to examine white matter-memory relationships. White matter injury and integrity measures were significantly associated with episodic memory in extensive regions of white matter, located predominantly in frontal, parietal, and subcortical regions. Template based tractography indicated that white matter injury, as measured by WMH, in the uncinate and inferior longitudinal fasciculi were significantly negatively associated with episodic memory performance. Other tracts such as thalamo-frontal projections, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and dorsal cingulum bundle demonstrated strong negative associations as well. The results suggest that white matter injury to multiple pathways, including connections of frontal and temporal cortex and frontal-subcortical white matter tracts, plays a critical role in memory differences seen in older individuals.

  2. Marginal Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hecke, Martin

    2013-03-01

    All around us, things are falling apart. The foam on our cappuccinos appears solid, but gentle stirring irreversibly changes its shape. Skin, a biological fiber network, is firm when you pinch it, but soft under light touch. Sand mimics a solid when we walk on the beach but a liquid when we pour it out of our shoes. Crucially, a marginal point separates the rigid or jammed state from the mechanical vacuum (freely flowing) state - at their marginal points, soft materials are neither solid nor liquid. Here I will show how the marginal point gives birth to a third sector of soft matter physics: intrinsically nonlinear mechanics. I will illustrate this with shock waves in weakly compressed granular media, the nonlinear rheology of foams, and the nonlinear mechanics of weakly connected elastic networks.

  3. Deep versus periventricular white matter lesions and cognitive function in a community sample of middle-aged participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Raya, Juan José; Miralbell, Júlia; López-Cancio, Elena; Bargalló, Núria; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Barrios, Maite; Cáceres, Cynthia; Toran, Pere; Alzamora, Maite; Dávalos, Antoni; Mataró, Maria

    2012-09-01

    The association of cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) with cognitive status is not well understood in middle-aged individuals. Our aim was to determine the specific contribution of periventricular hyperintensities (PVHs) and deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMHs) to cognitive function in a community sample of asymptomatic participants aged 50 to 65 years. One hundred stroke- and dementia-free adults completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery and brain MRI protocol. Participants were classified according to PVH and DWMH scores (Fazekas scale). We dichotomized our sample into low grade WMLs (participants without or with mild lesions) and high grade WMLs (participants with moderate or severe lesions). Analyses were performed separately in PVH and DWMH groups. High grade DWMHs were associated with significantly lower scores in executive functioning (-0.45 standard deviations [SD]), attention (-0.42 SD), verbal fluency (-0.68 SD), visual memory (-0.52 SD), visuospatial skills (-0.79 SD), and psychomotor speed (-0.46 SD). Further analyses revealed that high grade DWMHs were also associated with a three- to fourfold increased risk of impaired scores (i.e.,<1.5 SD) in executive functioning, verbal fluency, visuospatial skills, and psychomotor speed. Our findings suggest that only DWMHs, not PVHs, are related to diminished cognitive function in middle-aged individuals. (JINS, 2012, 18, 1-12).

  4. Blood Pressure Control in Aging Predicts Cerebral Atrophy Related to Small-Vessel White Matter Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C. Kern

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small-vessel damage manifests as white matter hyperintensities and cerebral atrophy on brain MRI and is associated with aging, cognitive decline and dementia. We sought to examine the interrelationship of these imaging biomarkers and the influence of hypertension in older individuals. We used a multivariate spatial covariance neuroimaging technique to localize the effects of white matter lesion load on regional gray matter volume and assessed the role of blood pressure control, age and education on this relationship. Using a case-control design matching for age, gender, and educational attainment we selected 64 participants with normal blood pressure, controlled hypertension or uncontrolled hypertension from the Northern Manhattan Study cohort. We applied gray matter voxel-based morphometry with the scaled subprofile model to (1 identify regional covariance patterns of gray matter volume differences associated with white matter lesion load, (2 compare this relationship across blood pressure groups, and (3 relate it to cognitive performance. In this group of participants aged 60–86 years, we identified a pattern of reduced gray matter volume associated with white matter lesion load in bilateral temporal-parietal regions with relative preservation of volume in the basal forebrain, thalami and cingulate cortex. This pattern was expressed most in the uncontrolled hypertension group and least in the normotensives, but was also more evident in older and more educated individuals. Expression of this pattern was associated with worse performance in executive function and memory. In summary, white matter lesions from small-vessel disease are associated with a regional pattern of gray matter atrophy that is mitigated by blood pressure control, exacerbated by aging, and associated with cognitive performance.

  5. Tract-specific fractional anisotropy predicts cognitive outcome in a community sample of middle-aged participants with white matter lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Raya, Juan José; Miralbell, Júlia; López-Cancio, Elena; Bargalló, Núria; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Barrios, Maite; Cáceres, Cynthia; Toran, Pere; Alzamora, Maite; Dávalos, Antoni; Mataró, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) have been consistently related to cognitive dysfunction but the role of white matter (WM) damage in cognitive impairment is not fully determined. Diffusion tensor imaging is a promising tool to explain impaired cognition related to WMLs. We investigated the separate association of high-grade periventricular hyperintensities (PVHs) and deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMHs) with fractional anisotropy (FA) in middle-aged individuals. We also assessed the predictive value to cognition of FA within specific WM tracts associated with high-grade WMLs. One hundred participants from the Barcelona-AsIA Neuropsychology Study were divided into groups based on low- and high-grade WMLs. Voxel-by-voxel FA were compared between groups, with separate analyses for high-grade PVHs and DWMHs. The mean FA within areas showing differences between groups was extracted in each tract for linear regression analyses. Participants with high-grade PVHs and participants with high-grade DWMHs showed lower FA in different areas of specific tracts. Areas showing decreased FA in high-grade DWMHs predicted lower cognition, whereas areas with decreased FA in high-grade PVHs did not. The predictive value to cognition of specific WM tracts supports the involvement of cortico-subcortical circuits in cognitive deficits only in DWMHs.

  6. Hyperintense signal alteration in the suprapatellar fat pad on MRI is associated with degeneration of the patellofemoral joint over 48 months. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaiger, Benedikt J.; Gersing, Alexandra S.; Mbapte Wamba, John; Facchetti, Luca; Link, Thomas M.; Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E.

    2018-01-01

    To analyze associations of suprapatellar fat pad (SPFP) hyperintense signal alterations and mass effect with progression of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) and clinical symptoms over 48 months. Subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (n = 426; 51.8 ± 3.8 years; 49.8% women) without radiographic tibiofemoral OA underwent 3T-MRI of their right knees and clinical evaluation using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score at baseline and at 48 months. Elevated SPFP signal was assessed on intermediate-weighted, fat-saturated turbo spin-echo (TSE) images. Mass effect was defined as a convex posterior contour. Patellofemoral cartilage, bone marrow lesions (BML), and subchondral cysts were assessed using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS). Associations of SPFP imaging findings with MRI and clinical progression were assessed using general linear models and logistic regressions. Baseline SPFP signal alterations were found in 51% of the subjects (n = 217), of whom 11% (n = 23) additionally had a mass effect. Progression of cartilage lesions was significantly higher in subjects with signal alteration versus without (adjusted mean increases, 95% CI; patella: 0.29, -0.07 to 0.64 vs -0.04, -0.40 to 0.31; p < 0.001; trochlea: 0.47, 0.16 to 0.77 vs 0.31, 0.01 to 0.61; p = 0.007). BML progression was also more likely in subjects with signal alteration (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.82; p = 0.021). Mass effect was not associated with joint degeneration and SPFP findings were not associated with clinical worsening (p > 0.18 for all). Patellofemoral joint degeneration over 48 months was significantly increased in subjects with SPFP signal alteration, suggesting an association between SPFP abnormalities and the progression of patellofemoral OA. (orig.)

  7. Hyperintense signal alteration in the suprapatellar fat pad on MRI is associated with degeneration of the patellofemoral joint over 48 months. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaiger, Benedikt J.; Gersing, Alexandra S. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Mbapte Wamba, John; Facchetti, Luca; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E. [University of California, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2018-03-15

    To analyze associations of suprapatellar fat pad (SPFP) hyperintense signal alterations and mass effect with progression of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) and clinical symptoms over 48 months. Subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (n = 426; 51.8 ± 3.8 years; 49.8% women) without radiographic tibiofemoral OA underwent 3T-MRI of their right knees and clinical evaluation using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score at baseline and at 48 months. Elevated SPFP signal was assessed on intermediate-weighted, fat-saturated turbo spin-echo (TSE) images. Mass effect was defined as a convex posterior contour. Patellofemoral cartilage, bone marrow lesions (BML), and subchondral cysts were assessed using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS). Associations of SPFP imaging findings with MRI and clinical progression were assessed using general linear models and logistic regressions. Baseline SPFP signal alterations were found in 51% of the subjects (n = 217), of whom 11% (n = 23) additionally had a mass effect. Progression of cartilage lesions was significantly higher in subjects with signal alteration versus without (adjusted mean increases, 95% CI; patella: 0.29, -0.07 to 0.64 vs -0.04, -0.40 to 0.31; p < 0.001; trochlea: 0.47, 0.16 to 0.77 vs 0.31, 0.01 to 0.61; p = 0.007). BML progression was also more likely in subjects with signal alteration (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.82; p = 0.021). Mass effect was not associated with joint degeneration and SPFP findings were not associated with clinical worsening (p > 0.18 for all). Patellofemoral joint degeneration over 48 months was significantly increased in subjects with SPFP signal alteration, suggesting an association between SPFP abnormalities and the progression of patellofemoral OA. (orig.)

  8. Loss of Substantia Nigra Hyperintensity at 3.0-T MR Imaging in Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: Comparison with 123I-FP-CIT SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yun Jung; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Kyeong Joon; Kim, Eunhee; Park, Hyun Soo; Kang, Seo Young; Yoon, In-Young; Lee, Jee-Young; Jeon, Beomseok; Kim, Sang Eun

    2018-04-01

    Purpose To examine whether the loss of nigral hyperintensity (NH) on 3.0-T susceptibility-weighted (SW) magnetic resonance (MR) images can help identify high synucleinopathy risk in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD). Materials and Methods Between March 2014 and April 2015, 18 consecutively recruited patients with iRBD were evaluated with 3.0-T SW imaging and iodine 123-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-nortropane ( 123 I-FP-CIT) single photon emission computed tomography and compared with 18 healthy subjects and 18 patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Two readers blinded to clinical diagnosis independently assessed the images. 123 I-FP-CIT uptake ratios were compared by using the Kruskal-Wallis test, and intra- and interobserver agreements were assessed with the Cohen κ. The synucleinopathy conversion according to NH status was evaluated in patients with iRBD after follow-up. Results NH was intact in seven patients with iRBD and lost in 11. The 123 I-FP-CIT uptake ratios were comparable between those with intact NH (mean, 3.22 ± 0.47) and healthy subjects (mean, 3.37 ± 0.47) (P = .495). The 123 I-FP-CIT uptake ratios in the 11 patients with iRBD and NH loss (mean, 2.48 ± 0.44) were significantly lower than those in healthy subjects (mean, 3.37 ± 0.47; P 0.9). Five patients with iRBD and NH loss developed symptoms of parkinsonism or dementia 18 months after neuroimaging. Conclusion NH loss at 3.0-T SW imaging may be a promising marker for short-term synucleinopathy risk in iRBD. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  9. Baryonic matter and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We summarize recent developments in identifying the ground state of dense baryonic matter and beyond. The topics include deconfinement from baryonic matter to quark matter, a diquark mixture, topological effect coupled with chirality and density, and inhomogeneous chiral condensates.

  10. Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging of Unusual White Matter Lesion in a Patient with Menkes Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Shin; Ryoo, Jae Wook; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Jae Min; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Shin, Hee Suk

    2007-01-01

    We report here on the diffusion-weighted imaging of unusual white matter lesions in a case of Menkes disease. On the initial MR imaging, the white matter lesions were localized in the deep periventricular white matter in the absence of diffuse cortical atrophy. The lesion showed diffuse high signal on the diffusion weighted images and diffuse progression and persistent hyperintensity on the follow up imaging. Our case suggests that the white matter lesion may precede diffuse cortical atrophy in a patient with Menkes disease. Menkes disease is an X-linked disorder that's caused by impaired intracellular transport of copper. We describe here the DWI findings of unusual and progressive white matter lesions in a case of Menkes disease. Menkes disease is an X-linked recessive disorder, and it is due to an inborn error of copper metabolism. The cause of Menkes disease has been isolated to a genetic defect in copper-transporting adenosine triphosphatase, and this results in low levels of intracellular copper. It is characterized clinically by failure to thrive, retarded mental and motor development, clonic seizure and peculiarly coarse, sparse and colorless scalp hair. These clinical findings can be explained by a dysfunction of the copper-dependent enzymes

  11. Front Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HLRC Editor

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Higher Learning Research Communications (HLRC, ISSN: 2157-6254 [Online] is published collaboratively by Walden University (USA, Universidad Andrés Bello (Chile, Universidad Europea de Madrid (Spain and Istanbul Bilgi University (Turkey. Written communication to HLRC should be addressed to the office of the Executive Director at Laureate Education, Inc. 701 Brickell Ave Ste. 1700, Miami, FL 33131, USA. HLRC is designed for open access and online distribution through www.hlrcjournal.com. The views and statements expressed in this journal do not necessarily reflect the views of Laureate Education, Inc. or any of its affiliates (collectively “Laureate”. Laureate does not warrant the accuracy, reliability, currency or completeness of those views or statements and does not accept any legal liability arising from any reliance on the views, statements and subject matter of the journal. Acknowledgements The Guest Editors gratefully acknowledge the substantial contribution of the readers for the blind peer review of essays submitted for this special issue as exemplars of individuals from around the world who have come together in a collective endeavor for the common good: Robert Bringle (Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, US, Linda Buckley (University of the Pacific, US, Guillermo Calleja (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain, Eva Egron-Polak (International Association of Universities, France, Heather Friesen (Abu Dhabi University, UAE, Saran Gill (National University of Malaysia, Malaysia, Chester Haskell (higher education consultant, US, Kanokkarn Kaewnuch (National Institute for Development Administration, Thailand, Gil Latz (Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, US, Molly Lee (higher education consultant, Malaysia, Deane Neubauer (East-West Center at University of Hawaii, US, Susan Sutton (Bryn Mawr College, US, Francis Wambalaba (United States International University, Kenya, and Richard Winn (higher education

  12. Conducting compositions of matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Tito (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides conductive compositions of matter, as well as methods for the preparation of the conductive compositions of matter, solutions comprising the conductive compositions of matter, and methods of preparing fibers or fabrics having improved anti-static properties employing the conductive compositions of matter.

  13. Condensed elementary particle matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajantie, K.

    1996-01-01

    Quark matter is a special case of condensed elementary particle matter, matter governed by the laws of particle physics. The talk discusses how far one can get in the study of particle matter by reducing the problem to computations based on the action. As an example the computation of the phase diagram of electroweak matter is presented. It is quite possible that ultimately an antireductionist attitude will prevail: experiments will reveal unpredicted phenomena not obviously reducible to the study of the action. (orig.)

  14. Pittsburgh compound-B PET white matter imaging and cognitive function in late multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeydan, Burcu; Lowe, Val J; Schwarz, Christopher G; Przybelski, Scott A; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Zuk, Samantha M; Senjem, Matthew L; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Roberts, Rosebud O; Mielke, Michelle M; Benarroch, Eduardo E; Rodriguez, Moses; Machulda, Mary M; Lesnick, Timothy G; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Kantarci, Kejal; Kantarci, Orhun H

    2018-05-01

    There is growing interest in white matter (WM) imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). We studied the association of cognitive function in late multiple sclerosis (MS) with cortical and WM Pittsburgh compound-B PET (PiB-PET) binding. In the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, 24 of 4869 participants had MS (12 underwent PiB-PET). Controls were age and sex matched (5:1). We used automated or semi-automated processing for quantitative image analyses and conditional logistic regression for group differences. MS patients had lower memory ( p = 0.03) and language ( p = 0.02) performance; smaller thalamic volumes ( p = 0.003); and thinner temporal ( p = 0.001) and frontal ( p = 0.045) cortices on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) than controls. There was no difference in global cortical PiB standardized uptake value ratios between MS and controls ( p = 0.35). PiB uptake was lower in areas of WM hyperintensities compared to normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in MS ( p = 0.0002). Reduced PiB uptake in both the areas of WM hyperintensities ( r = 0.65; p = 0.02) and NAWM ( r = 0.69; p = 0.01) was associated with decreased visuospatial performance in MS. PiB uptake in the cortex in late MS is not different from normal age-matched controls. PiB uptake in the WM in late MS may be a marker of the large network structures' integrity such as those involved in visuospatial performance.

  15. Soil organic matter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A total of 77 papers were presented and discussed during this symposium, 37 are included in this Volume II. The topics covered in this volume include: biochemical transformation of organic matter in soils; bitumens in soil organic matter; characterization of humic acids; carbon dating of organic matter in soils; use of modern techniques in soil organic matter research; use of municipal sludge with special reference to heavy metals constituents, soil nitrogen, and physical and chemical properties of soils; relationship of soil organic matter and plant metabolism; interaction between agrochemicals and organic matter; and peat. Separate entries have been prepared for those 20 papers which discuss the use of nuclear techniques in these studies

  16. Financial literacy is associated with white matter integrity in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S Duke; Boyle, Patricia A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Fleischman, Debra; Yu, Lei; James, Bryan D; Bennett, David A

    2016-04-15

    Financial literacy, the ability to understand, access, and utilize information in ways that contribute to optimal financial outcomes, is important for independence and wellbeing in old age. We previously reported that financial literacy is associated with greater functional connectivity between brain regions in old age. Here, we tested the hypothesis that higher financial literacy would be associated with greater white matter integrity in old age. Participants included 346 persons without dementia (mean age=81.36, mean education=15.39, male/female=79/267, mean MMSE=28.52) from the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Financial literacy was assessed using a series of questions imbedded as part of an ongoing decision making study. White matter integrity was assessed with diffusion anisotropy measured with diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI). We tested the hypothesis that higher financial literacy is associated with higher diffusion anisotropy in white matter, adjusting for the effects of age, education, sex, and white matter hyperintense lesions. We then repeated the analysis also adjusting for cognitive function. Analyses revealed regions with significant positive associations between financial literacy and diffusion anisotropy, and many remained significant after accounting for cognitive function. White matter tracts connecting right hemisphere temporal-parietal brain regions were particularly implicated. Greater financial literacy is associated with higher diffusion anisotropy in white matter of nondemented older adults after adjusting for important covariates. These results suggest that financial literacy is positively associated with white matter integrity in old age. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypovascular hypointense nodules on hepatobiliary phase without T2 hyperintensity on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR images in patients with chronic liver disease: long-term outcomes and risk factors for hypervascular transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Seek [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jeonju-si, Chonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ji Soo; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Han, Young Min [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jeonju-si, Chonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the long-term outcomes and imaging features associated with hypervascularization of hypovascular nodules that show T2 iso-/hypointensity and hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase (HBP) of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients with chronic liver disease. Sixty patients and 114 nodules, which were hypovascular and iso-/hypointense on T2-weighted images and hypointense on HBP of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI, were included. We evaluated the effect of baseline clinical features, baseline MR features and growth rate on subsequent hypervascularization. Twenty-seven nodules in 21 patients transformed to hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using multivariate Cox analysis, T1 hyperintensity (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.69, P = 0.021), previous history of HCC (HR = 2.64, P = 0.021), and initial nodule size (HR = 1.09, P = 0.046) were identified to be associated with hypervascularization. The growth rate of nodules was a more powerful determinant of subsequent hypervascularization than baseline clinical and MR features. At long-term follow-up after >3 years, only one nodule with T1 isointensity showed hypervascularization. Careful follow-up or diagnostic procedures, such as biopsy, should be considered for up to 3 years after detection of hypointense nodules on HBP with T1 hyperintensity or a higher growth rate. (orig.)

  18. Association of Aortic Compliance and Brachial Endothelial Function with Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: Assessment with High-Resolution MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the possible association of aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 patients by using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. Sixty-two clinically confirmed DM2 patients (25 women and 37 men; mean age: 56.8±7.5 years were prospectively enrolled for noninvasive MR examinations of the aorta, brachial artery, and brain. Aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV, flow-mediated dilation (FMD of brachial artery, lacunar brain infarcts, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities (WMHs were assessed. Pearson and Spearman correlation analysis were performed to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with clinical data and biochemical test results. Univariable logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with cerebral small vessel disease. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to find out the independent predictive factors of cerebral small vessel disease. Results. Mean PWV was 6.73±2.00 m/s and FMD was 16.67±9.11%. After adjustment for compounding factors, PWV was found significantly associated with lacunar brain infarcts (OR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.14–3.2; P<0.05 and FMD was significantly associated with periventricular WMHs (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71–0.95; P<0.05. Conclusions. Quantitative evaluation of aortic compliance and endothelial function by using high-resolution MRI may be potentially useful to stratify DM2 patients with risk of cerebral small vessel disease.

  19. Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    In the first two of these lectures, I present the evidence for baryonic dark matter and describe possible forms that it may take. The final lecture discusses formation of baryonic dark matter, and sets the cosmological context.

  20. Grammar of the matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the author describes the structure of the matter and presents the families of elementary particles (fermions) and the interaction messengers (bosons) with their properties. He presents the actual status and future trends of research on nuclear matter

  1. Dark matter detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, G.

    1995-01-01

    A fundamental question of astrophysics and cosmology is the nature of dark matter. Astrophysical observations show clearly the existence of some kind of dark matter, though they cannot yet reveal its nature. Dark matter can consist of baryonic particles, or of other (known or unknown) elementary particles. Baryonic dark matter probably exists in the form of dust, gas, or small stars. Other elementary particles constituting the dark matter can possibly be measured in terrestrial experiments. Possibilities for dark matter particles are neutrinos, axions and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). While a direct detection of relic neutrinos seems at the moment impossible, there are experiments looking for baryonic dark matter in the form of Massive Compact Halo Objects, and for particle dark matter in the form of axions and WIMPS. (orig.)

  2. Dence Cold Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavinskiy Alexey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Possible way to create dense cold baryonic matter in the laboratory is discussed. The density of this matter is comparable or even larger than the density of neutron star core. The properties of this matter can be controlled by trigger conditions. Experimental program for the study of properties of dense cold matter for light and heavy ion collisions at initial energy range √sNN~2-3GeV is proposed..

  3. Dark Matter Effective Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We organize the effective (self)interaction terms for complex scalar dark matter candidates which are either an isosinglet, isodoublet or an isotriplet with respect to the weak interactions. The classification has been performed ordering the operators in inverse powers of the dark matter cutoff...... scale. We assume Lorentz invariance, color and charge neutrality. We also introduce potentially interesting dark matter induced flavor-changing operators. Our general framework allows for model independent investigations of dark matter properties....

  4. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  5. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.J.; Chung, D.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Kolb, E.W.; Riotto, A.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may be elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should not be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  6. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may be elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should not be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  7. Matter and Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Karam, P Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In Matter and Energy, readers will learn about the many forms of energy, the wide variety of particles in nature, and Albert Einstein's world-changing realization of how matter can be changed into pure energy. The book also examines the recent discoveries of dark matter and dark energy and the future of the universe.

  8. Secretly asymmetric dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Kilic, Can; Swaminathan, Sivaramakrishnan; Trendafilova, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    We study a mechanism where the dark matter number density today arises from asymmetries generated in the dark sector in the early Universe, even though the total dark matter number remains zero throughout the history of the Universe. The dark matter population today can be completely symmetric, with annihilation rates above those expected from thermal weakly interacting massive particles. We give a simple example of this mechanism using a benchmark model of flavored dark matter. We discuss the experimental signatures of this setup, which arise mainly from the sector that annihilates the symmetric component of dark matter.

  9. Dark Matter Caustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, Aravind

    2010-01-01

    The continuous infall of dark matter with low velocity dispersion in galactic halos leads to the formation of high density structures called caustics. Dark matter caustics are of two kinds : outer and inner. Outer caustics are thin spherical shells surrounding galaxies while inner caustics have a more complicated structure that depends on the dark matter angular momentum distribution. The presence of a dark matter caustic in the plane of the galaxy modifies the gas density in its neighborhood which may lead to observable effects. Caustics are also relevant to direct and indirect dark matter searches.

  10. Dark Matter Searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Shigetaka

    2008-01-01

    Recent cosmological as well as historical observations of rotational curves of galaxies strongly suggest the existence of dark matter. It is also widely believed that dark matter consists of unknown elementary particles. However, astrophysical observations based on gravitational effects alone do not provide sufficient information on the properties of dark matter. In this study, the status of dark matter searches is investigated by observing high-energy neutrinos from the sun and the earth and by observing nuclear recoils in laboratory targets. The successful detection of dark matter by these methods facilitates systematic studies of its properties. Finally, the XMASS experiment, which is due to start at the Kamioka Observatory, is introduced

  11. Location of lacunar infarcts correlates with cognition in a sample of non-disabled subjects with age-related white-matter changes: the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benisty, S; Gouw, A A; Porcher, R

    2009-01-01

    evaluation was based on the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), a modified Alzheimer Diseases Assessment Scale for global cognitive functions, and compound Z scores for memory, executive functions, speed and motor control. WMH were rated according to the Fazekas scale; the number of lacunes was assessed...... a significant negative association between the presence of lacunes in putamen/pallidum and the memory compound Z score (beta = -0.13; p = 0.038). By contrast, no significant negative association was found between cognitive parameters and the presence of lacunes in internal capsule, lobar white matter......OBJECTIVES: In cerebral small vessel disease, white-matter hyperintensities (WMH) and lacunes are both related to cognition. Still, their respective contribution in older people remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to assess the topographic distribution of lacunes and determine whether...

  12. The spatial distribution of age-related white matter changes as a function of vascular risk factors--results from the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, E; Gouw, A A; Vrenken, H

    2012-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are a frequent finding on brain MRI of elderly subjects, and have been associated with various risk factors, as well as with development of cognitive and functional impairment. While an overall association between WMH load and risk factors is well described...... associations were found for age, gender and hypertension. Different distribution patterns were found for men and women. Further, increased probability was found in association with self-reported alcohol and tobacco consumption, as well as in those with a history of migraine. It is concluded that the location...... of WMH is dependent on the risk factors involved pointing towards a regionally different pathogenesis and/or vulnerability of the white matter....

  13. Impeded Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence & Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Johannes Gutenberg University,Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Slatyer, Tracy R. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wang, Xiao-Ping [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence & Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Johannes Gutenberg University,Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Xue, Wei [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-12-12

    We consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario “Impeded Dark Matter”. We demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.

  14. Impeded Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Xue, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario “Impeded Dark Matter”. We demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.

  15. Asymptomatic changes in white matter following CNS prophylaxis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menor, F.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Arana, E.; Castell, V.; Verdequer, A.

    1995-01-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can present early white matter changes related to central nervous system prophylaxis. These changes are frequently reversible and have little neurological impact. Our aim is to assess the incidence of this finding and the influence of chemotherapy and radiotherapy on its development. We have reviewed the neuroradiological explorations performed between 3 and 7 months after meningeal prophylaxis in 32 children with ALL, 18 of whom presented standard risk and 14, high risk. In addition to intrathecal chemotherapy, the latter group underwent delayed cranial radiotherapy at the age of 3 years. All were neurologically asymptomatic at the time of the study. The CT study disclosed low attenuation of the periventricular white matter in 22% of cases (7/32), while 41% (9/22) present hyperintensity in MR (PD, T2-weighted and STIR images), there being very good agreement between the two techniques. This finding was more frequent and more widely extended among the cases of high-risk ALL (50%) than in those presenting standard risk (11%). Three patients exhibited the tendency to reverse this anomaly at one-year follow-up. We consider that cranial radiotherapy plays a major role in the development of asymptomatic changes in the white matter. The iatrogenic origin is probably potentiated by previous methotrexate administration. 15 refs

  16. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-02

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  17. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R.; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-01

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  18. Sterile neutrino dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Merle, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This book is a new look at one of the hottest topics in contemporary science, Dark Matter. It is the pioneering text dedicated to sterile neutrinos as candidate particles for Dark Matter, challenging some of the standard assumptions which may be true for some Dark Matter candidates but not for all. So, this can be seen either as an introduction to a specialized topic or an out-of-the-box introduction to the field of Dark Matter in general. No matter if you are a theoretical particle physicist, an observational astronomer, or a ground based experimentalist, no matter if you are a grad student or an active researcher, you can benefit from this text, for a simple reason: a non-standard candidate for Dark Matter can teach you a lot about what we truly know about our standard picture of how the Universe works.

  19. An autopsied case of MM1 + MM2-cortical with thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with hyperintensities on diffusion-weighted MRI before clinical onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-02-01

    A 78-year-old Japanese man presented with rapidly progressive dementia and gait disturbances. Eight months before the onset of clinical symptoms, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) demonstrated hyperintensities in the right temporal, right parietal and left medial occipital cortices. Two weeks after symptom onset, DWI showed extensive hyperintensity in the bilateral cerebral cortex, with regions of higher brightness that existed prior to symptom onset still present. Four weeks after clinical onset, periodic sharp wave complexes were identified on an electroencephalogram. Myoclonus was observed 8 weeks after clinical onset. The patient reached an akinetic mutism state and died 5 months after onset. Neuropathological examination showed widespread cerebral neocortical involvement of fine vacuole-type spongiform changes with large confluent vacuole-type spongiform changes. Spongiform degeneration with neuron loss and hypertrophic astrocytosis was also observed in the striatum and medial thalamus. The inferior olivary nucleus showed severe neuron loss with hypertrophic astrocytosis. Prion protein (PrP) immunostaining showed widespread synaptic-type PrP deposition with perivacuolar-type PrP deposition in the cerebral neocortex. Mild to moderate PrP deposition was also observed extensively in the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum and brainstem, but it was not apparent in the inferior olivary nucleus. PrP gene analysis showed no mutations, and polymorphic codon 129 showed methionine homozygosity. Western blot analysis of protease-resistant PrP showed both type 1 scrapie type PrP (PrP Sc ) and type 2 PrP Sc . Based on the relationship between the neuroimaging and pathological findings, we speculated that cerebral cortical lesions with large confluent vacuoles and type 2 PrP Sc would show higher brightness and continuous hyperintensity on DWI than those with fine vacuoles and type 1 PrP Sc . We believe the present patient had a combined form of MM1

  20. Strategies for dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The present status of alternative forms of dark matter, both baryonic and nonbaryonic, is reviewed. Alternative arguments are presented for the predominance of either cold dark matter (CDM) or of baryonic dark matter (BDM). Strategies are described for dark matter detection, both for dark matter that consists of weakly interacting relic particles and for dark matter that consists of dark stellar remnants

  1. Stars of strange matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethe, H.A.; Brown, G.E.; Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    We investigate suggestions that quark matter with strangeness per baryon of order unity may be stable. We model this matter at nuclear matter densities as a gas of close packed Λ-particles. From the known mass of the Λ-particle we obtain an estimate of the energy and chemical potential of strange matter at nuclear densities. These are sufficiently high to preclude any phase transition from neutron matter to strange matter in the region near nucleon matter density. Including effects from gluon exchange phenomenologically, we investigate higher densities, consistently making approximations which underestimate the density of transition. In this way we find a transition density ρ tr > or approx.7ρ 0 , where ρ 0 is nuclear matter density. This is not far from the maximum density in the center of the most massive neutron stars that can be constructed. Since we have underestimated ρ tr and still find it to be ∝7ρ 0 , we do not believe that the transition from neutron to quark matter is likely in neutron stars. Moreover, measured masses of observed neutron stars are ≅1.4 M sun , where M sun is the solar mass. For such masses, the central (maximum) density is ρ c 0 . Transition to quark matter is certainly excluded for these densities. (orig.)

  2. Hidden charged dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Tu, Huitzu; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Can dark matter be stabilized by charge conservation, just as the electron is in the standard model? We examine the possibility that dark matter is hidden, that is, neutral under all standard model gauge interactions, but charged under an exact (\\rm U)(1) gauge symmetry of the hidden sector. Such candidates are predicted in WIMPless models, supersymmetric models in which hidden dark matter has the desired thermal relic density for a wide range of masses. Hidden charged dark matter has many novel properties not shared by neutral dark matter: (1) bound state formation and Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation after chemical freeze out may reduce its relic density, (2) similar effects greatly enhance dark matter annihilation in protohalos at redshifts of z ∼ 30, (3) Compton scattering off hidden photons delays kinetic decoupling, suppressing small scale structure, and (4) Rutherford scattering makes such dark matter self-interacting and collisional, potentially impacting properties of the Bullet Cluster and the observed morphology of galactic halos. We analyze all of these effects in a WIMPless model in which the hidden sector is a simplified version of the minimal supersymmetric standard model and the dark matter is a hidden sector stau. We find that charged hidden dark matter is viable and consistent with the correct relic density for reasonable model parameters and dark matter masses in the range 1 GeV ∼ X ∼< 10 TeV. At the same time, in the preferred range of parameters, this model predicts cores in the dark matter halos of small galaxies and other halo properties that may be within the reach of future observations. These models therefore provide a viable and well-motivated framework for collisional dark matter with Sommerfeld enhancement, with novel implications for astrophysics and dark matter searches

  3. CNS involvement in primary Sjogren Syndrome: assessment of gray and white matter changes with MRI and voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzarouchi, Loukia C; Tsifetaki, Niki; Konitsiotis, Spyridon; Zikou, Anastasia; Astrakas, Loukas; Drosos, Alexandros; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate with MRI the involvement of gray matter and white matter structures in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome. Fifty-three patients with primary Sjögren syndrome, 18 age- and disease duration-matched patients with systemic sclerosis, and 35 age-matched control subjects were examined for differences in white matter hyperintensities (WMHIs) detected on FLAIR MR images. Differences in brain volume between patients with primary Sjögren syndrome and controls were studied by application of voxel-based morphometry to a 3D T1-weighted sequence. WMHIs were observed in 38 of the 53 patients with primary Sjögren syndrome, six of 18 patients with systemic sclerosis, and 17 of 35 controls. The numbers of WMHIs 2 mm or larger and the number smaller than 2 mm were higher in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome than in controls (≥ 2 mm, p = 0.004; syndrome patients and that in systemic sclerosis patients. After control for age, a positive relation was found between disease duration and total number of WMHIs (p = 0.037) and number of WMHIs 2 mm or larger (p = 0.023) in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome. In comparison with the controls, patients with primary Sjögren syndrome had decreased gray matter volume in the cortex, deep gray matter, and cerebellum. Associated loss of white matter volume was observed in areas corresponding to gray matter atrophy and in the corpus callosum (p syndrome have WMHIs and gray and white matter atrophy, probably related to cerebral vasculitis.

  4. A radiological study of cerebral white matter lesions in patients with dementia using diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Hiroaki; Hanyu, Haruo; Kakizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko; Takasaki, Masaru

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the changes in water diffusion in the cerebral white matter and the corpus callosum in 12 patients with Binswanger's disease (BD), and 19 patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD), including 12 without (AD-) and 7 with periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) lesions (AD+), using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in the anterior and posterior white matter were significantly higher in patients with BD and AD than in 12 age-matched controls. The ADCs were significantly higher in AD (+) than in AD (-) patients. Anisotropic ratios (ARs), defined as diffusion restricted perpendicular to the direction of the nerve fibers, were significantly higher in BD and AD (+) patients, and even in AD (-) patients, than in the controls. ARs in the anterior white matter were significantly higher in BD than in AD (+), while in the posterior white matter the ratios were significantly higher in AD (+) rather than BD patients. The ADCs and ARs in the genu of the corpus callosum were significantly higher in patients with BD and AD (+) compared to the control subjects, while ADCs and ARs in the splenium were significantly higher in patients with AD (+) and AD (-) than in those with BD. These results suggest that mild myelin loss occurs in AD patients even in apparently normal white matter and in the splenium of the corpus callosum. A definite loss of myelin and axons, including incomplete infarction, occurs preferentially in anterior white matter in BD, while in posterior white matter in AD (+), as seen on T2-weighted images as PVH. Studies with diffusion-weighted MRI may allow the characterization of different pathological processes and enable the demonstration of underlying white matter lesion in patients with dementia that cannot be visualized by conventional MRI. (author)

  5. Codecaying Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Kuflik, Eric; Ng, Wee Hao

    2016-11-18

    We propose a new mechanism for thermal dark matter freeze-out, called codecaying dark matter. Multicomponent dark sectors with degenerate particles and out-of-equilibrium decays can codecay to obtain the observed relic density. The dark matter density is exponentially depleted through the decay of nearly degenerate particles rather than from Boltzmann suppression. The relic abundance is set by the dark matter annihilation cross section, which is predicted to be boosted, and the decay rate of the dark sector particles. The mechanism is viable in a broad range of dark matter parameter space, with a robust prediction of an enhanced indirect detection signal. Finally, we present a simple model that realizes codecaying dark matter.

  6. Diseases of white matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The diagnosis of white matter abnormalities was revolutionized by the advent of computed tomography (CT), which provided a noninvasive method of detection and assessment of progression of a variety of white matter processes. However, the inadequacies of CT were recognized early, including its relative insensitivity to small foci of abnormal myelin in the brain when correlated with autopsy findings and its inability to image directly white matter diseases of the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, sensitive to the slight difference in tissue composition of normal gray and white matter and to subtle increase in water content associated with myelin disorders, is uniquely suited for the examination of white matter pathology. Its clinical applications include the evaluation of the normal process of myelination in childhood and the various white matter diseases, including disorders of demyelination and dysmyelination

  7. Detecting dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Roger L.

    2000-01-01

    Dark matter is one of the most pressing problems in modern cosmology and particle physic research. This talk will motivate the existence of dark matter by reviewing the main experimental evidence for its existence, the rotation curves of galaxies and the motions of galaxies about one another. It will then go on to review the corroborating theoretical motivations before combining all the supporting evidence to explore some of the possibilities for dark matter along with its expected properties. This will lay the ground work for dark matter detection. A number of differing techniques are being developed and used to detect dark matter. These will be briefly discussed before the focus turns to cryogenic detection techniques. Finally, some preliminary results and expectations will be given for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment

  8. Clumpy cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  9. Cardiac diastolic dysfunction is associated with cerebral white matter lesions in elderly patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masugata, Hisashi; Senda, Shoichi; Goda, Fuminori [Kagawa Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Miki, Kagawa (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    Cerebral white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered to be the result of brain ischemic injury and a risk factor for clinical stroke. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between the cardiac diastolic function and cerebral white matter lesions in elderly patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis. The study subjects were 55 patients (75{+-}7 years) with risk factors for atherosclerosis including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. Patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular events were excluded from the study. Cerebral white matter lesions, which were defined as exhibiting high intensity regions on brain MRI, were evaluated with the degrees of periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) according to the Japanese Brain Dock Guidelines of 2003. Peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E' velocity) was measured by tissue Doppler echocardiography, and was used as a parameter of cardiac diastolic function. The mean value of E' velocity was decreased due to the cardiac diastolic dysfunction (5.2{+-}1.4 cm/s). In addition, the E' velocity was inversely correlated with the degree of PVH ({rho}=-0.701, p<0.001). Stepwise regression analysis showed that the decrease in the E' velocity ({beta} coefficient=-0.42, p<0.001) and the presence of hypertension ({beta} coefficient=0.31, p=0.001) were independent determinants of the degree of PVH. Thus, cardiac diastolic dysfunction is correlated to the severity of cerebral white matter lesions, suggesting the cardio-cerebral connection in elderly patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis. (author)

  10. Hybrid Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Dark matter can be produced in the early universe via the freeze-in or freeze-out mechanisms. Both scenarios were investigated in references, but the production of dark matters via the combination of these two mechanisms are not addressed. In this paper we propose a hybrid dark matter model where dark matters have two components with one component produced thermally and the other one produced non-thermally. We present for the first time the analytical calculation for the relic abundance of th...

  11. The quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Mannque.

    1980-04-01

    The present status of our understanding of the physics of hadronic (nuclear or neutron) matter under extreme conditions, in particular at high densities is discussed. This is a problem which challenges three disciplines of physics: nuclear physics, astrophysics and particle physics. It is generally believed that we now have a correct and perhaps ultimate theory of the strong interactions, namely quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The constituents of this theory are quarks and gluons, so highly dense matters should be describable in terms of these constituents alone. This is a question that addresses directly to the phenomenon of quark confinement, one of the least understood aspects in particle physics. For nuclear physics, the possibility of a phase change between nuclear matter and quark matter introduces entirely new degrees of freedom in the description of nuclei and will bring perhaps a deeper understanding of nuclear dynamics. In astrophysics, the properties of neutron stars will be properly understood only when the equation of state of 'neutron' matter at densities exceeding that of nuclear matter can be realiably calculated. Most fascinating is the possibility of quark stars existing in nature, not entirely an absurd idea. Finally the quark matter - nuclear matter phase transition must have occured in the early stage of universe when matter expanded from high temperature and density; this could be an essential ingredient in the big-bang cosmology

  12. Soft matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Soft matter (polymers, colloids, surfactants and liquid crystals) are an important class of materials in modern technology. They also form the basis of many future technologies, for example in medical and environmental applications. Soft matter shows complex behaviour between fluids and solids, and used to be a synonym of complex materials. Due to the developments of the past two decades, soft condensed matter can now be discussed on the same sound physical basis as solid condensedmatter. The purpose of this book is to provide an overview of soft matter for undergraduate and graduate students

  13. Searching for dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Three teams of astronomers believe they have independently found evidence for dark matter in our galaxy. A brief history of the search for dark matter is presented. The use of microlensing-event observation for spotting dark matter is described. The equipment required to observe microlensing events and three groups working on dark matter detection are discussed. The three groups are the Massive Compact Halo Objects (MACHO) Project team, the Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres (EROS) team, and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) team. The first apparent detections of microlensing events by the three teams are briefly reported.

  14. Dark matter and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ``cold`` and ``hot`` non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ``seeds`` that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  15. Dark matter and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between cold'' and hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  16. Superball dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kusenko, A

    1999-01-01

    Supersymmetric models predict a natural dark-matter candidate, stable baryonic Q-balls. They could be copiously produced in the early Universe as a by-product of the Affleck-Dine baryogenesis. I review the cosmological and astrophysical implications, methods of detection, and the present limits on this form of dark matter.

  17. Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    De Paolis, F.; Jetzer, Ph.; Ingrosso, G.; Roncadelli, M.

    1997-01-01

    Reasons supporting the idea that most of the dark matter in galaxies and clusters of galaxies is baryonic are discussed. Moreover, it is argued that most of the dark matter in galactic halos should be in the form of MACHOs and cold molecular clouds.

  18. Dark matter detection - II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the mysterious missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of today's particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world-wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  19. Dark matter and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the Ω = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ''cold'' and ''hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ''seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed

  20. Matter in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-01-01

    We explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, where a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU(N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU(N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.

  1. CONFERENCE: Quark matter 88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Maurice

    1988-01-01

    The 'Quark Matter' Conference caters for physicists studying nuclear matter under extreme conditions. The hope is that relativistic (high energy) heavy ion collisions allow formation of the long-awaited quark-gluon plasma, where the inter-quark 'colour' force is no longer confined inside nucleon-like dimensions

  2. Dark matter detection - I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the mysterious missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of today's particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world-wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  3. Dark matter detection - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of todays particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the Universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the Universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world- wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  4. Asymptotically Safe Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for dark matter (DM) interactions in which the interaction strength is asymptotically safe. In models of this type, the coupling strength is small at low energies but increases at higher energies, and asymptotically approaches a finite constant value. The resulting...... searches are the primary ways to constrain or discover asymptotically safe dark matter....

  5. Asymmetric dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, David E.; Luty, Markus A.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a simple class of models in which the relic density of dark matter is determined by the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. In these models a B-L asymmetry generated at high temperatures is transferred to the dark matter, which is charged under B-L. The interactions that transfer the asymmetry decouple at temperatures above the dark matter mass, freezing in a dark matter asymmetry of order the baryon asymmetry. This explains the observed relation between the baryon and dark matter densities for the dark matter mass in the range 5-15 GeV. The symmetric component of the dark matter can annihilate efficiently to light pseudoscalar Higgs particles a or via t-channel exchange of new scalar doublets. The first possibility allows for h 0 →aa decays, while the second predicts a light charged Higgs-like scalar decaying to τν. Direct detection can arise from Higgs exchange in the first model or a nonzero magnetic moment in the second. In supersymmetric models, the would-be lightest supersymmetric partner can decay into pairs of dark matter particles plus standard model particles, possibly with displaced vertices.

  6. Inelastic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David; Weiner, Neal

    2001-01-01

    Many observations suggest that much of the matter of the universe is nonbaryonic. Recently, the DAMA NaI dark matter direct detection experiment reported an annual modulation in their event rate consistent with a WIMP relic. However, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) Ge experiment excludes most of the region preferred by DAMA. We demonstrate that if the dark matter can only scatter by making a transition to a slightly heavier state (Δm∼100 keV), the experiments are no longer in conflict. Moreover, differences in the energy spectrum of nuclear recoil events could distinguish such a scenario from the standard WIMP scenario. Finally, we discuss the sneutrino as a candidate for inelastic dark matter in supersymmetric theories

  7. Baryonic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uson, Juan M.

    2000-01-01

    Many searches for baryonic dark matter have been conducted but, so far, all have been unsuccessful. Indeed, no more than 1% of the dark matter can be in the form of hydrogen burning stars. It has recently been suggested that most of the baryons in the universe are still in the form of ionized gas so that it is possible that there is no baryonic dark matter. Although it is likely that a significant fraction of the dark matter in the Milky Way is in a halo of non-baryonic matter, the data do not exclude the possibility that a considerable amount, perhaps most of it, could be in a tenuous halo of diffuse ionized gas

  8. Macro Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, David M; Lynn, Bryan W.

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter is a vital component of the current best model of our universe, $\\Lambda$CDM. There are leading candidates for what the dark matter could be (e.g. weakly-interacting massive particles, or axions), but no compelling observational or experimental evidence exists to support these particular candidates, nor any beyond-the-Standard-Model physics that might produce such candidates. This suggests that other dark matter candidates, including ones that might arise in the Standard Model, should receive increased attention. Here we consider a general class of dark matter candidates with characteristic masses and interaction cross-sections characterized in units of grams and cm$^2$, respectively -- we therefore dub these macroscopic objects as Macros. Such dark matter candidates could potentially be assembled out of Standard Model particles (quarks and leptons) in the early universe. A combination of earth-based, astrophysical, and cosmological observations constrain a portion of the Macro parameter space; ho...

  9. Dark matter universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-06

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of hyperintensity on T1-weighted MRI in liver cirrhosis : correlation with child-pugh classification and hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, Hyo Won; Choi, Hye Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Yi, Sun Young

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the differences in signal changes in the globus pallidus and white matter, as seen on T1-weighted MR brain images, and to determine whether these differences can be used as an indicator of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy. A total of 25 cases of liver cirrhosis were evaluated and as a control group, 20 subjects were also studied. Using a 1.5T MRI scannet, brain MR images were obtained, and the differences in signal intensity in both the globus pallidus and thalamus and in both white and gray matter were then quantified using the contrast to noise ratio(CNR). On the basis of the Child-Pugh classification, 25patients with liver cirrhosis were divided into three groups, with eight in group A, eight in B, and nine in C. Using clinical criteria, hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed in seven of the 25 patients. There after, CNRs(CNR1 and CNR2) were conpared between the control and cirrhotic groups and between cirrhotic groups with or without hepatic encephalopathy. In the control group, mean values were 3.2±5.9 for CNR1 and 8.4±8.0 for CNR2. In the cirrhotic group, these values were 10.6±9.0 for CNR1 and 9.8±6.4 for CNR2. A statistically significant difference was noted between normal and cirrhotic groups only for CNR1(p<0.05). CNR values in patients with liver cirrhosis were 8.5±11.5 for CNR1 and 11.7±8.7 for CNR2 in the Child A group, 10.4±5.1 for CNR1 and 9.3±3.2 for CNR2 in the B group, and 12.8±9.7 for CNR1 and 8.7±6.5 for CNR2 in the C group. There was no significant difference in mean CNRI values between patients with or without hepatic encephalopathy. Differences in signal intensities in the globus pallidus and white matter, as seen on T1-weighted MR brain images, cannot be used as an indicator of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis

  11. Quantitative evaluation of hyperintensity on T1-weighted MRI in liver cirrhosis : correlation with child-pugh classification and hepatic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, Hyo Won; Choi, Hye Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Yi, Sun Young [Ewha Womans Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    To investigate the differences in signal changes in the globus pallidus and white matter, as seen on T1-weighted MR brain images, and to determine whether these differences can be used as an indicator of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy. A total of 25 cases of liver cirrhosis were evaluated and as a control group, 20 subjects were also studied. Using a 1.5T MRI scannet, brain MR images were obtained, and the differences in signal intensity in both the globus pallidus and thalamus and in both white and gray matter were then quantified using the contrast to noise ratio(CNR). On the basis of the Child-Pugh classification, 25patients with liver cirrhosis were divided into three groups, with eight in group A, eight in B, and nine in C. Using clinical criteria, hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed in seven of the 25 patients. There after, CNRs(CNR1 and CNR2) were conpared between the control and cirrhotic groups and between cirrhotic groups with or without hepatic encephalopathy. In the control group, mean values were 3.2{+-}5.9 for CNR1 and 8.4{+-}8.0 for CNR2. In the cirrhotic group, these values were 10.6{+-}9.0 for CNR1 and 9.8{+-}6.4 for CNR2. A statistically significant difference was noted between normal and cirrhotic groups only for CNR1(p<0.05). CNR values in patients with liver cirrhosis were 8.5{+-}11.5 for CNR1 and 11.7{+-}8.7 for CNR2 in the Child A group, 10.4{+-}5.1 for CNR1 and 9.3{+-}3.2 for CNR2 in the B group, and 12.8{+-}9.7 for CNR1 and 8.7{+-}6.5 for CNR2 in the C group. There was no significant difference in mean CNRI values between patients with or without hepatic encephalopathy. Differences in signal intensities in the globus pallidus and white matter, as seen on T1-weighted MR brain images, cannot be used as an indicator of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  12. Exothermic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Saraswat, Prashant; Harnik, Roni; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism for dark matter to explain the observed annual modulation signal at DAMA/LIBRA which avoids existing constraints from every other dark matter direct detection experiment including CRESST, CDMS, and XENON10. The dark matter consists of at least two light states with mass ∼few GeV and splittings ∼5 keV. It is natural for the heavier states to be cosmologically long-lived and to make up an O(1) fraction of the dark matter. Direct detection rates are dominated by the exothermic reactions in which an excited dark matter state downscatters off of a nucleus, becoming a lower energy state. In contrast to (endothermic) inelastic dark matter, the most sensitive experiments for exothermic dark matter are those with light nuclei and low threshold energies. Interestingly, this model can also naturally account for the observed low-energy events at CoGeNT. The only significant constraint on the model arises from the DAMA/LIBRA unmodulated spectrum but it can be tested in the near future by a low-threshold analysis of CDMS-Si and possibly other experiments including CRESST, COUPP, and XENON100.

  13. Dark matter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  14. Physics of condensed matter

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Prasanta K

    2012-01-01

    Physics of Condensed Matter is designed for a two-semester graduate course on condensed matter physics for students in physics and materials science. While the book offers fundamental ideas and topic areas of condensed matter physics, it also includes many recent topics of interest on which graduate students may choose to do further research. The text can also be used as a one-semester course for advanced undergraduate majors in physics, materials science, solid state chemistry, and electrical engineering, because it offers a breadth of topics applicable to these majors. The book be

  15. Light, Matter, and Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    Interaction of light and matter produces the appearance of materials. To deal with the immense complexity of nature, light and matter is modelled at a macroscopic level in computer graphics. This work is the first to provide the link between the microscopic physical theories of light and matter...... of a material and determine the contents of the material. The book is in four parts. Part I provides the link between microscopic and macroscopic theories of light. Part II describes how to use the properties of microscopic particles to compute the macroscopic properties of materials. Part III illustrates...

  16. QED coherence in matter

    CERN Document Server

    Preparata, Giuliano

    1995-01-01

    Up until now the dominant view of condensed matter physics has been that of an "electrostatic MECCANO" (erector set, for Americans). This book is the first systematic attempt to consider the full quantum-electrodynamical interaction (QED), thus greatly enriching the possible dynamical mechanisms that operate in the construction of the wonderful variety of condensed matter systems, including life itself.A new paradigm is emerging, replacing the "electrostatic MECCANO" with an "electrodynamic NETWORK," which builds condensed matter through the long range (as opposed to the "short range" nature o

  17. Nuclear matter revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negele, J.W.; Zabolitzky, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    It is stated that at the Workshop on Nuclear and Dense Matter held at the University of Illinois in May 1977 significant progress was reported that largely resolves many of the questions raised in this journal Vol. 6, p.149, 1976. These include perturbative versus variational methods as applied to nuclear matter, exact solutions for bosons, what is known as the fermion 'homework problem', and various other considerations regarding nuclear matter, including the use of variational methods as opposed to perturbation theory. (15 references) (U.K.)

  18. Dark matter: the astrophysical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of dark matter is one of the most urgent problems in cosmology. I describe the astrophysical case for dark matter, from both an observational and a theoretical perspective. This overview will therefore focus on the observational motivations rather than the particle physics aspects of dark matter constraints on specific dark matter candidates. First, however, I summarize the astronomical evidence for dark matter, then I highlight the weaknesses of the standard cold dark matter model (LCDM) to provide a robust explanation of some observations. The greatest weakness in the dark matter saga is that we have not yet identified the nature of dark matter itself

  19. Matter-antimatter and matter-matter interactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Antonio Carlos Fontes dos

    2002-01-01

    This article presents some of the recent experimental advances on the study on antimatter-matter and matter-matter interactions, and some of the subtle differences stimulated a great theoretical efforts for explanation of the results experimentally observed

  20. Little composite dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Reuven; Perez, Gilad; Weiler, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    We examine the dark matter phenomenology of a composite electroweak singlet state. This singlet belongs to the Goldstone sector of a well-motivated extension of the Littlest Higgs with T -parity. A viable parameter space, consistent with the observed dark matter relic abundance as well as with the various collider, electroweak precision and dark matter direct detection experimental constraints is found for this scenario. T -parity implies a rich LHC phenomenology, which forms an interesting interplay between conventional natural SUSY type of signals involving third generation quarks and missing energy, from stop-like particle production and decay, and composite Higgs type of signals involving third generation quarks associated with Higgs and electroweak gauge boson, from vector-like top-partners production and decay. The composite features of the dark matter phenomenology allows the composite singlet to produce the correct relic abundance while interacting weakly with the Higgs via the usual Higgs portal coupling [Formula: see text], thus evading direct detection.

  1. Inflatable Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed "inflatable dark matter," in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early Universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many, otherwise, well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context. Thermal relics that would, otherwise, be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the nonthermal abundance of grand unified theory or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ∼MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the standard model.

  2. Dark matter search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernabei, R.

    2003-01-01

    Some general arguments on the particle Dark Matter search are addressed. The WIMP direct detection technique is mainly considered and recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized. (author)

  3. Mind Over Matter: Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Guide and Series / Methamphetamine Mind Over Matter: Methamphetamine (Meth) Print Order Free Publication in: English Spanish ... paranoia, aggressiveness, and hallucinations. The Brain's Response to Methamphetamine Hi, my name's Sara Bellum. Welcome to my ...

  4. Matter Tracking Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Matter Tracking Information System (MTIS) principle function is to streamline and integrate the workload and work activity generated or addressed by our 300 plus...

  5. Lectures on dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seljak, U.

    2001-01-01

    These lectures concentrate on evolution and generation of dark matter perturbations. The purpose of the lectures is to present, in a systematic way, a comprehensive review of the cosmological parameters that can lead to observable effects in the dark matter clustering properties. We begin by reviewing the relativistic linear perturbation theory formalism. We discuss the gauge issue and derive Einstein's and continuity equations for several popular gauge choices. We continue by developing fluid equations for cold dark matter and baryons and Boltzmann equations for photons, massive and massless neutrinos. We then discuss the generation of initial perturbations by the process of inflation and the parameters of that process that can be extracted from the observations. Finally we discuss evolution of perturbations in various regimes and the imprint of the evolution on the dark matter power spectrum both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime. (author)

  6. Prevention Research Matters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Prevention Research Matters is a series of one-on-one interviews with researchers from 26 university prevention research centers across the country. Their work focuses on preventing and controlling chronic diseases like obesity, cancer, and heart disease.

  7. Dynamics of interstellar matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, F.D.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the dynamics of interstellar matter is presented, considering the basic equations of fluid flow, plane waves, shock waves, spiral structure, thermal instabilities and early star cocoons. (B.R.H.)

  8. Lectures on dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seljak, U [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2001-11-15

    These lectures concentrate on evolution and generation of dark matter perturbations. The purpose of the lectures is to present, in a systematic way, a comprehensive review of the cosmological parameters that can lead to observable effects in the dark matter clustering properties. We begin by reviewing the relativistic linear perturbation theory formalism. We discuss the gauge issue and derive Einstein's and continuity equations for several popular gauge choices. We continue by developing fluid equations for cold dark matter and baryons and Boltzmann equations for photons, massive and massless neutrinos. We then discuss the generation of initial perturbations by the process of inflation and the parameters of that process that can be extracted from the observations. Finally we discuss evolution of perturbations in various regimes and the imprint of the evolution on the dark matter power spectrum both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime. (author)

  9. Dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R [Dipto. di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and INFN, sez. Roma2, Rome (Italy)

    2003-08-15

    Some general arguments on the particle Dark Matter search are addressed. The WIMP direct detection technique is mainly considered and recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized. (author)

  10. Soft Active Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, M. C.; Joanny, J. -F.; Ramaswamy, S.; Liverpool, T. B.; Prost, J.; Rao, Madan; Simha, R. Aditi

    2012-01-01

    In this review we summarize theoretical progress in the field of active matter, placing it in the context of recent experiments. Our approach offers a unified framework for the mechanical and statistical properties of living matter: biofilaments and molecular motors in vitro or in vivo, collections of motile microorganisms, animal flocks, and chemical or mechanical imitations. A major goal of the review is to integrate the several approaches proposed in the literature, from semi-microscopic t...

  11. DARK MATTER: Optical shears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence for dark matter continues to build up. Last year (December 1993, page 4) excitement rose when the French EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) and the US/Australia MACHO collaborations reported hints that small inert 'brown dwarf stars could provide some of the Universe's missing matter. In the 1930s, astronomers first began to suspect that there is a lot more to the Universe than meets the eye

  12. Charming dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Thomas; Kirk, Matthew; Lenz, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    We have considered a model of Dark Minimal Flavour Violation (DMFV), in which a triplet of dark matter particles couple to right-handed up-type quarks via a heavy colour-charged scalar mediator. By studying a large spectrum of possible constraints, and assessing the entire parameter space using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), we can place strong restrictions on the allowed parameter space for dark matter models of this type.

  13. Dynamics of Soft Matter

    CERN Document Server

    García Sakai, Victoria; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of Soft Matter: Neutron Applications provides an overview of neutron scattering techniques that measure temporal and spatial correlations simultaneously, at the microscopic and/or mesoscopic scale. These techniques offer answers to new questions arising at the interface of physics, chemistry, and biology. Knowledge of the dynamics at these levels is crucial to understanding the soft matter field, which includes colloids, polymers, membranes, biological macromolecules, foams, emulsions towards biological & biomimetic systems, and phenomena involving wetting, friction, adhesion, or micr

  14. Matter-antimatter Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omnes, R.

    1973-01-01

    The possible existence of antimatter on a large scale in the universe is evaluated. As a starting point, an attempt was made to understand the origin of matter as being essentially analogous to the origin of backgound thermal radiation. Several theories and models are examined, with particular emphasis on nucleon-antinucleon interactions at intermediate energies. Data also cover annihilation interaction with the matter-antimatter boundary to produce the essential fluid motion known as coalesence.

  15. Matter and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effenberger, R.

    1974-09-01

    The author summarizes some of the many questions and answers which have been raised over the years regarding the nature of matter, the origin of its forms and the associated concept of cosmology including the formation of the universe, our place in it and its course of evolution. An examination of the development of the classical concept of matter and its subsequent transformations within the space-time fields of relativity and quantum theory is also presented

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging of brain tumours at 3 T: A potential tool for assessing White matter tract invasion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, S.J.; Burnet, N.G.; Donovan, T.; Green, H.A.L.; Pena, A.; Antoun, N.M.; Pickard, J.D.; Carpenter, T.A.; Gillard, J.H. E-mail: jhg21@cam.ac.uk

    2003-06-01

    AIM: To determine whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of brain tumours can demonstrate abnormalities distal to hyperintensities on T2-weighted images, and possibly relate these to tumour grade. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial tumours, both gliomas (high and low grade) and metastases, were imaged at 3 T using T2-weighted and DTI sequences. Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn within the tumour, in white matter at various distances from the tumour and in areas of abnormality on DTI that appeared normal on T2-weighted images. The relative anisotropy index (RAI)--a measure of white matter organization, was calculated for these ROI. RESULTS: The abnormality on DTI was larger than that seen on T2-weighted images in 10/13 patients (77%) with high-grade gliomas. New abnormalities were seen in the contralateral white matter in 4/13 (30%) of these cases. In these high-grade tumours the RAI in areas of white matter disruption with normal appearance on T2-weighted images was reduced (0.19{+-}0.04). Even excluding patients with previous radiotherapy this difference remains significant. In all non high-grade tumours (WHO grade II gliomas and metastases) the tumour extent on DTI was identical to the abnormalities shown on T2-weighted imaging and RAI measurements were not reduced (0.3{+-}0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Subtle white matter disruption can be identified using DTI in patients with high-grade gliomas. Such disruption is not identified in association with metastases or low-grade gliomas despite these tumours producing significant mass effect and oedema. We suggest the changes in DTI may be due to tumour infiltration and that the DTI may provide a useful method of detecting occult white matter invasion by gliomas.

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging of brain tumours at 3 T: A potential tool for assessing White matter tract invasion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, S.J.; Burnet, N.G.; Donovan, T.; Green, H.A.L.; Pena, A.; Antoun, N.M.; Pickard, J.D.; Carpenter, T.A.; Gillard, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of brain tumours can demonstrate abnormalities distal to hyperintensities on T2-weighted images, and possibly relate these to tumour grade. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial tumours, both gliomas (high and low grade) and metastases, were imaged at 3 T using T2-weighted and DTI sequences. Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn within the tumour, in white matter at various distances from the tumour and in areas of abnormality on DTI that appeared normal on T2-weighted images. The relative anisotropy index (RAI)--a measure of white matter organization, was calculated for these ROI. RESULTS: The abnormality on DTI was larger than that seen on T2-weighted images in 10/13 patients (77%) with high-grade gliomas. New abnormalities were seen in the contralateral white matter in 4/13 (30%) of these cases. In these high-grade tumours the RAI in areas of white matter disruption with normal appearance on T2-weighted images was reduced (0.19±0.04). Even excluding patients with previous radiotherapy this difference remains significant. In all non high-grade tumours (WHO grade II gliomas and metastases) the tumour extent on DTI was identical to the abnormalities shown on T2-weighted imaging and RAI measurements were not reduced (0.3±0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Subtle white matter disruption can be identified using DTI in patients with high-grade gliomas. Such disruption is not identified in association with metastases or low-grade gliomas despite these tumours producing significant mass effect and oedema. We suggest the changes in DTI may be due to tumour infiltration and that the DTI may provide a useful method of detecting occult white matter invasion by gliomas

  18. Hyperintensity of basal ganglia on T1-weighted images in patients with liver cirrhosis. Correlation with hepatic encephalopathy and liver function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroko; Kita, Keisuke; Mizobata, Toshiharu; Kimura, Masashi; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazushi; Tanaka, Kayo; Sato, Morio; Yamada, Ryosaku

    1995-01-01

    Brain MR imaging was performed in 38 liver cirrhosis (LC) patients and 9 normal volunteers. On T 1 -weighted images, the signal intensity of globus pallidus (S1) and frontal white matter (S2) was measured and S1/S2 ratio was explored. We examined the relationship between S1/S2 ratio and liver function parameters. High signal intensity in bilateral globus pallidus was noted on T 1 W1 in 28 of 38 LC patients. The S1/S2 ratio of 1.186±0.097 in the 38 LC patients was significantly higher than 0.987±0.062 in the 9 normal volunteers (p 2 -weighted images showed no abnormal intensity. Compared with the LC patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) (n=7) and without HE (n=31), the former S1/S2 ratio (1.239±0.057) was significantly higher than the latter (1.174±0.097) (p 15 (r=0.501, p 1 -WI and the degree of liver dysfunction. (author)

  19. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The author both reviews and makes the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that (i) there are no dark-matter candidates within the open-quotes standard modelclose quotes of particle physics, (ii) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics, and (iii) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for open-quotes new physics.close quotes The compelling candidates are a very light axion (10 -6 --10 -4 eV), a light neutrino (20--90 eV), and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. The author briefly mentions more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos. 119 refs

  20. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ''new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10 -6 eV--10 -4 eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos

  1. Soil organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The nature, content and behaviour of the organic matter, or humus, in soil are factors of fundamental importance for soil productivity and the development of optimum conditions for growth of crops under diverse temperate, tropical and arid climatic conditions. In the recent symposium on soil organic matter studies - as in the two preceding ones in 1963 and 1969 - due consideration was given to studies involving the use of radioactive and stable isotopes. However, the latest symposium was a departure from previous efforts in that non-isotopic approaches to research on soil organic matter were included. A number of papers dealt with the behaviour and functions of organic matter and suggested improved management practices, the use of which would contribute to increasing agricultural production. Other papers discussed the turnover of plant residues, the release of plant nutrients through the biodegradation of organic compounds, the nitrogen economy and the dynamics of transformation of organic forms of nitrogen. In addition, consideration was given to studies on the biochemical transformation of organic matter, characterization of humic acids, carbon-14 dating and the development of modern techniques and their impact on soil organic matter research

  2. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10[sup [minus]6] eV--10[sup [minus]4] eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  3. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  4. Hyperintensity of basal ganglia on T{sub 1}-weighted images in patients with liver cirrhosis. Correlation with hepatic encephalopathy and liver function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroko; Kita, Keisuke; Mizobata, Toshiharu; Kimura, Masashi; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazushi; Tanaka, Kayo; Sato, Morio; Yamada, Ryosaku [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    Brain MR imaging was performed in 38 liver cirrhosis (LC) patients and 9 normal volunteers. On T{sub 1}-weighted images, the signal intensity of globus pallidus (S1) and frontal white matter (S2) was measured and S1/S2 ratio was explored. We examined the relationship between S1/S2 ratio and liver function parameters. High signal intensity in bilateral globus pallidus was noted on T{sub 1} W1 in 28 of 38 LC patients. The S1/S2 ratio of 1.186{+-}0.097 in the 38 LC patients was significantly higher than 0.987{+-}0.062 in the 9 normal volunteers (p<0.001), while T{sub 2}-weighted images showed no abnormal intensity. Compared with the LC patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) (n=7) and without HE (n=31), the former S1/S2 ratio (1.239{+-}0.057) was significantly higher than the latter (1.174{+-}0.097) (p<0.05). There was a significant correlation between the value of the S1/S2 ratio and deterioration of ICG R{sub 15} (r=0.501, p<0.005), prolongation of prothrombine time (r=-0.392, p<0.05) and decrease of choline esterase (r=-0.336, p<0.05). There was, however, little correlation between the value of the S1/S2 ratio and ammonia and Fisher ratio. In conclusion, there is a significant relationship between high intensity of globus pallidus on T{sub 1}-WI and the degree of liver dysfunction. (author).

  5. Long-term prognosis of geriatric major depression in relation to cognition and white matter integrity: follow up of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo de Oliveira Alves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The geriatric depression (GD represents one of the most frequent psychiatric disorders in outpatient services specialized in old-age treatment. OBJECTIVE: The course of two illustrative cases of GD is discussed, highlighting its clinical picture after antidepressant treatment and underlining variables related to disease prognosis, treatment effectiveness and conversion to major cognitive disorders such as vascular dementia (VD. METHODS: The cognitive performance, depressive symptoms, autonomy and brain structural measurements as white matter hyperintensities (WMH and hippocampal size, and microstructural integrity of WM with diffusion tensor imaging were followed during four years. RESULTS: Case 1, with a severe degree of WMH, was associated with worsening cognition and increasing functional disability. Case 2, with mild WMH, an improvement of cognitive functioning could be seen. CONCLUSIONS: The existence of different subtypes of GD, as presented in this report, points a pathophysiological heterogeneity of GD, and suggests a possible continuum vascular depression (VaDp and vascular cognitive impairment (VCI.

  6. Imperfect Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander, E-mail: l.mirzagholi@physik.uni-muenchen.de, E-mail: alexander.vikman@lmu.de [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Theresienstr. 37, Munich, D-80333 Germany (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models.

  7. Entropy, matter, and cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigogine, I; Géhéniau, J

    1986-09-01

    The role of irreversible processes corresponding to creation of matter in general relativity is investigated. The use of Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensors together with conformal (Minkowski) coordinates suggests that this creation took place in the early universe at the stage of the variation of the conformal factor. The entropy production in this creation process is calculated. It is shown that these dissipative processes lead to the possibility of cosmological models that start from empty conditions and gradually build up matter and entropy. Gravitational entropy takes a simple meaning as associated to the entropy that is necessary to produce matter. This leads to an extension of the third law of thermodynamics, as now the zero point of entropy becomes the space-time structure out of which matter is generated. The theory can be put into a convenient form using a supplementary "C" field in Einstein's field equations. The role of the C field is to express the coupling between gravitation and matter leading to irreversible entropy production.

  8. Imperfect Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models

  9. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto, E-mail: aguirre@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: alberto.diez@fisica.ugto.mx [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  10. Imperfect Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models.

  11. WISPy cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Cadamuro, Davide; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches - exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques - can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  12. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Min Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1D. After the U(1D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3→2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  13. Thermal Properties of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachan, Joe

    2018-02-01

    The ancient Greeks believed that all matter was composed of four elements: earth, water, air, and fire. By a remarkable coincidence (or perhaps not), today we know that there are four states of matter: solids (e.g. earth), liquids (e.g. water), gasses (e.g. air) and plasma (e.g. ionized gas produced by fire). The plasma state is beyond the scope of this book and we will only look at the first three states. Although on the microscopic level all matter is made from atoms or molecules, everyday experience tells us that the three states have very different properties. The aim of this book is to examine some of these properties and the underlying physics.

  14. Asymmetric Higgsino dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kfir; Efrati, Aielet; Grossman, Yuval; Nir, Yosef; Riotto, Antonio

    2012-08-03

    In the supersymmetric framework, prior to the electroweak phase transition, the existence of a baryon asymmetry implies the existence of a Higgsino asymmetry. We investigate whether the Higgsino could be a viable asymmetric dark matter candidate. We find that this is indeed possible. Thus, supersymmetry can provide the observed dark matter abundance and, furthermore, relate it with the baryon asymmetry, in which case the puzzle of why the baryonic and dark matter mass densities are similar would be explained. To accomplish this task, two conditions are required. First, the gauginos, squarks, and sleptons must all be very heavy, such that the only electroweak-scale superpartners are the Higgsinos. With this spectrum, supersymmetry does not solve the fine-tuning problem. Second, the temperature of the electroweak phase transition must be low, in the (1-10) GeV range. This condition requires an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  15. Cerebral white matter hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, R.B.; Shields, W.D.; Sankar, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the MR imaging findings in children with cerebral white matter hypoplasia (CWMH). The MR studies of four children, aged 3-7 y (mean age, 2.3 y) with a diagnosis of CWMH were reviewed. In all cases multiplanar T1-weighted and T2-weighted spin-echo images were obtained. All children had similar histories of severe developmental delay and nonprogressive neurologic deficits despite normal gestational and birth histories. In two cases there was a history of maternal cocaine abuse. Autopsy correlation was available in one child. The MR images of all four children demonstrated diffuse lack of white matter and enlarged ventricles but normal-appearing gray matter. The corpus callosum, although completely formed, was severely thinned. There was no evidence of gliosis or porencephaly, and the distribution of myelin deposition was normal for age in all cases. Autopsy finding in one child correlated exactly with the MR finding

  16. Dark matter from unification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Tuominen, Kimmo; Virkajärvi, Jussi Tuomas

    2013-01-01

    We consider a minimal extension of the Standard Model (SM), which leads to unification of the SM coupling constants, breaks electroweak symmetry dynamically by a new strongly coupled sector and leads to novel dark matter candidates. In this model, the coupling constant unification requires...... eigenstates of this sector and determine the resulting relic density. The results are constrained by available data from colliders and direct and indirect dark matter experiments. We find the model viable and outline briefly future research directions....... the existence of electroweak triplet and doublet fermions singlet under QCD and new strong dynamics underlying the Higgs sector. Among these new matter fields and a new right handed neutrino, we consider the mass and mixing patterns of the neutral states. We argue for a symmetry stabilizing the lightest mass...

  17. Matter and memory

    CERN Document Server

    Bergson, Henri

    1991-01-01

    Since the end of the last century," Walter Benjamin wrote, "philosophy has made a series of attempts to lay hold of the 'true' experience as opposed to the kind that manifests itself in the standardized, denatured life of the civilized masses. It is customary to classify these efforts under the heading of a philosophy of life. Towering above this literature is Henri Bergson's early monumental work, Matter and Memory."Along with Husserl's Ideas and Heidegger's Being and Time, Bergson's work represents one of the great twentieth-century investigations into perception and memory, movement and time, matter and mind. Arguably Bergson's most significant book, Matter and Memory is essential to an understanding of his philosophy and its legacy.This new edition includes an annotated bibliography prepared by Bruno Paradis.Henri Bergson (1859-1941) was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1927. His works include Time and Free Will, An Introduction to Metaphysics, Creative Evolution, and The Creative Mind.

  18. Interacting hot dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Davidson, S.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the viability of a light particle (∼30eV neutrino) with strong self-interactions as a dark matter candidate. The interaction prevents the neutrinos from free-streaming during the radiation-dominated regime so galaxy-sized density perturbations can survive. Smaller scale perturbations are damped due to neutrino diffusion. We calculate the power spectrum in the imperfect fluid approximation, and show that it is damped at the length scale one would estimate due to neutrino diffusion. The strength of the neutrino-neutrino coupling is only weakly constrained by observations, and could be chosen by fitting the power spectrum to the observed amplitude of matter density perturbations. The main shortcoming of our model is that interacting neutrinos cannot provide the dark matter in dwarf galaxies. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. Interacting warm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ m α ρ e β form, where ρ m and ρ e are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w m and w e of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used

  20. Neutrons for probing matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, F. Ed.; Mazzucchetti, D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors tell the story of the French Orphee reactor located in Saclay from the decision to build it in the seventies, to its commissioning in 1980, to its upgrading in the nineties and to its today's operating life. As early as its feasibility studies Orphee has been designed as a dual-purpose reactor: scientific research for instance in crystallography and magnetism, and industrial uses like neutron radiography, silicon doping or radionuclide production. This book is divided into 4 parts: 1) the neutron: an explorer of the matter, 2) the Orphee reactor: a neutron source, 3) the adventurers of the matter: Leon Brillouin laboratory's staff, and 4) the perspectives for neutrons

  1. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Isihara, A

    2007-01-01

    More than a graduate text and advanced research guide on condensed matter physics, this volume is useful to plasma physicists and polymer chemists, and their students. It emphasizes applications of statistical mechanics to a variety of systems in condensed matter physics rather than theoretical derivations of the principles of statistical mechanics and techniques. Isihara addresses a dozen different subjects in separate chapters, each designed to be directly accessible and used independently of previous chapters. Topics include simple liquids, electron systems and correlations, two-dimensional

  2. Quantitative analysis of the corpus callosum in children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay: correlation with cerebral white matter volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Barnes, Patrick D.; Robertson, Robert L.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Sayre, James W.

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to quantitatively correlate the thickness of the corpus callosum with the volume of cerebral white matter in children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay. Material and methods: A clinical database of 70 children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay was established with children between the ages of 1 and 5 years. These children also demonstrated abnormal periventricular T2 hyperintensities associated with and without ventriculomegaly. Mid-sagittal T1-weighted images were used to measure the thickness (genu, mid-body, and splenium) and length of the corpus callosum. Volumes of interest were digitized based on gray-scale densities to define the hemispheric cerebral white matter on axial T2-weighted and FLAIR images. The thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum was correlated with cerebral white matter volume. Subgroup analysis was also performed to examine the relationship of this correlation with both gestational age and neuromotor outcome. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Pearson correlation coefficients. There was a positive correlation between the thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum and the volume of cerebral white matter across all children studied (R=0.665, P=0.0001). This correlation was not dependent on gestational age. The thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum was decreased in the spastic diplegia group compared to the two other groups (hypotonia and developmental delay only; P<0.0001). Within each neuromotor subgroup, there was a positive correlation between thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum and volume of the cerebral white matter. (orig.)

  3. Quantitative analysis of the corpus callosum in children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay: correlation with cerebral white matter volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panigrahy, Ashok [Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Barnes, Patrick D. [Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Lucile Salter Packard Children' s Hospital, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Robertson, Robert L. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Sleeper, Lynn A. [New England Research Institute, Watertown, MA (United States); Sayre, James W. [UCLA Medical Center, Departments of Radiology and Biostatistics, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-12-01

    This study was conducted to quantitatively correlate the thickness of the corpus callosum with the volume of cerebral white matter in children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay. Material and methods: A clinical database of 70 children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay was established with children between the ages of 1 and 5 years. These children also demonstrated abnormal periventricular T2 hyperintensities associated with and without ventriculomegaly. Mid-sagittal T1-weighted images were used to measure the thickness (genu, mid-body, and splenium) and length of the corpus callosum. Volumes of interest were digitized based on gray-scale densities to define the hemispheric cerebral white matter on axial T2-weighted and FLAIR images. The thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum was correlated with cerebral white matter volume. Subgroup analysis was also performed to examine the relationship of this correlation with both gestational age and neuromotor outcome. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Pearson correlation coefficients. There was a positive correlation between the thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum and the volume of cerebral white matter across all children studied (R=0.665, P=0.0001). This correlation was not dependent on gestational age. The thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum was decreased in the spastic diplegia group compared to the two other groups (hypotonia and developmental delay only; P<0.0001). Within each neuromotor subgroup, there was a positive correlation between thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum and volume of the cerebral white matter. (orig.)

  4. Magnetization transfer imaging of periventricular white matter lesions in patients with multi-infarct dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Imon, Yukari; Asano, Tetsuichi; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru

    1998-01-01

    Using magnetization transfer (MT) imaging, we studied the underlying pathological conditions of periventricular hyperintense (PVH) white matter changes seen on T2-weighted MR images of patients with multi-infarct dementia. Twenty-two patients with multiple lacunar infarcts and PVH lesions, including 11 with dementia (diagnosed as multi-infarct dementia) and 11 without dementia, and 10 control subjects (with multiple lacunes, but no PVH lesion) were studied using the MT technique. MT ratios (MTRs) were calculated for PVH lesions (normal-appearing frontal white matter in controls) and the genu of the corpus callosum. Signal intensities on T2-weighted images in PVH lesions of patients were significantly higher than those in normal-appearing white matter of controls, while there were no significant differences in signal intensity in the genu of the corpus callosum among the dementia, non-dementia and control groups. However, MTRs in patients with PVH lesions were significantly lower than those in controls, and MTRs in demented patients were significantly lower than those in non-demented patients. Moreover, MTRs in the genu of the corpus callosum of demented patients were significantly lower than in those in non-demented patients and controls. MTRs in PVH lesions and the genu of the corpus callosum significantly correlated with Hasegawa's dementia scale score. These results suggest that there is some difference in histopathologic changes of PVH lesions between demented and non-demented patients and that the pathological substrate in the corpus callosum may play a role in inducing cognitive decline. Studies with MT imaging may allow the characterization of different pathological conditions that cannot be visualized by conventional MRI. (author)

  5. Interacting dark matter disguised as warm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, Celine; Riazuelo, Alain; Hansen, Steen H.; Schaeffer, Richard

    2002-01-01

    We explore some of the consequences of dark-matter-photon interactions on structure formation, focusing on the evolution of cosmological perturbations and performing both an analytical and a numerical study. We compute the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and matter power spectrum in this class of models. We find, as the main result, that when dark matter and photons are coupled, dark matter perturbations can experience a new damping regime in addition to the usual collisional Silk damping effect. Such dark matter particles (having quite large photon interactions) behave like cold dark matter or warm dark matter as far as the cosmic microwave background anisotropies or matter power spectrum are concerned, respectively. These dark-matter-photon interactions leave specific imprints at sufficiently small scales on both of these two spectra, which may allow us to put new constraints on the acceptable photon-dark-matter interactions. Under the conservative assumption that the abundance of 10 12 M · galaxies is correctly given by the cold dark matter, and without any knowledge of the abundance of smaller objects, we obtain the limit on the ratio of the dark-matter-photon cross section to the dark matter mass σ γ-DM /m DM -6 σ Th /(100 GeV)≅6x10 -33 cm 2 GeV -1

  6. Energy Matters, July 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, E.

    1999-07-09

    This issue of Energy Matters focuses on selling an energy-efficient project to management. There are also articles on combined heat and power systems, inspecting steam traps for efficient system, root cause failure analysis on AC induction motors, and performance optimization tips.

  7. Little composite dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Reuven; Perez, Gilad; Weiler, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    We examine the dark matter phenomenology of a composite electroweak singlet state. This singlet belongs to the Goldstone sector of a well-motivated extension of the Littlest Higgs with T-parity. A viable parameter space, consistent with the observed dark matter relic abundance as well as with the various collider, electroweak precision and dark matter direct detection experimental constraints is found for this scenario. T-parity implies a rich LHC phenomenology, which forms an interesting interplay between conventional natural SUSY type of signals involving third generation quarks and missing energy, from stop-like particle production and decay, and composite Higgs type of signals involving third generation quarks associated with Higgs and electroweak gauge boson, from vector-like top-partners production and decay. The composite features of the dark matter phenomenology allows the composite singlet to produce the correct relic abundance while interacting weakly with the Higgs via the usual Higgs portal coupling λ _{ {DM}}˜ O(1%), thus evading direct detection.

  8. Matter: the fundamental particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Landua, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    "The largest particle physics centre in the world is located in Europe. It straddles the Franco-Swiss border, near Geneva. At CERN - the European Organisation for Nuclear Research , which is focused on the science of nuclear matter rather than on the exploitation of atomic energy - there are over 6 500 scientists." (1 page)

  9. Why Philosophy Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The motives of philosophers tend to be personal. Philosophy has mattered politically as part of continuing political debates. Its effects on politics, religion and the development of the sciences have been evident. Philosophy has been supposed to have special educational value, from its contents or from the benefits of its methods and arguments.…

  10. with dark matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-16

    Nov 16, 2012 ... November 2012 physics pp. 1271–1274. Radiative see-saw formula in ... on neutrino physics, dark matter and all fermion masses and mixings. ... as such, high-energy accelerators cannot directly test the underlying origin of ...

  11. The Birth of Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    To mark the World Year of Physics, the Physics Section of the University of Geneva is organising a series of lectures for the uninitiated. Each lecture will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de Musique de Genève, of how these signals from the farthest reaches of the Universe can be used to create 'cosmic music'. The fourth lecture in the series, entitled 'The Birth of Matter', will take place on Tuesday 3 May 2005 and will be given by CERN's theoretical physicist, John Ellis. Where does matter come from? Where do the structures that surround us, such as galaxies, come from? Are we living in a world of invisible matter? Why is the universe so old and so big? John Ellis will show how elementary particle physics and, in particular, the LHC under construction at CERN, can answer these questions. The Birth of Matter Professor John Ellis Tuesday 3 May, starting 8.00 p.m. Main Auditorium...

  12. The Birth of Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    To mark the World Year of Physics, the Physics Section of the University of Geneva is organising a series of lectures for the uninitiated. Each lecture will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de Musique de Genève, of how these signals from the farthest reaches of the Universe can be used to create "cosmic music". The fourth lecture in the series, entitled "The Birth of Matter", will take place on Tuesday 3 May 2005 and will be given by CERN's theoretical physicist, John Ellis. Where does matter come from? Where do the structures that surround us, such as galaxies, come from? Are we living in a world of invisible matter? Why is the universe so old and so big? John Ellis will show how elementary particle physics and, in particular, the LHC under construction at CERN, can answer these questions. The Birth of Matter Professor John Ellis Tuesday 3 May, starting 8.00 p.m. Main Audito...

  13. Exceptional composite dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo [Universite Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, Institut de Physique Theorique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Carmona, Adrian [CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Chala, Mikael [Universitat de Valencia y IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-15

    We study the dark matter phenomenology of non-minimal composite Higgs models with SO(7) broken to the exceptional group G{sub 2}. In addition to the Higgs, three pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons arise, one of which is electrically neutral. A parity symmetry is enough to ensure this resonance is stable. In fact, if the breaking of the Goldstone symmetry is driven by the fermion sector, this Z{sub 2} symmetry is automatically unbroken in the electroweak phase. In this case, the relic density, as well as the expected indirect, direct and collider signals are then uniquely determined by the value of the compositeness scale, f. Current experimental bounds allow one to account for a large fraction of the dark matter of the Universe if the dark matter particle is part of an electroweak triplet. The totality of the relic abundance can be accommodated if instead this particle is a composite singlet. In both cases, the scale f and the dark matter mass are of the order of a few TeV. (orig.)

  14. The origin of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.

    2004-01-01

    The author presents the issue of how matter triumphed over anti-matter in the formation of the universe. Theories focus on the nature of asymmetry that might have created an excess of matter over anti-matter. Sakharov and Kuzmin listed 3 conditions that must be met for baryogenesis to take place. First the baryon number must not be conserved: there must be some interactions that change the number of baryons, baryon-number violation can rise from an interaction between quarks and leptons. Secondly, 2 symmetries that relate particles to antiparticles must be violated. The CP violation in Kaon decay is too weak to create enough baryon asymmetry, so physicists believe that larger sources of CP violation await discovery. Thirdly, there must be the loss of thermal equilibrium of the universe. In thermal equilibrium, baryons are decaying but inverse processes are also taking place, quarks are fusing to form baryons, rates being equal no baryon asymmetry is generated. But if thermal equilibrium is broken, to say temperature is decreasing, at a certain temperature a pair of quarks will no longer have enough energy to produce a heavy particle which generates baryon asymmetry. (A.C.)

  15. Elliott on Mind Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maattanen, Pentti

    2000-01-01

    Argues that David Elliott's conception of the human mind presented in his book "Music Matters" is not coherent. Outlines three alternatives to Elliott's theory of mind. Suggests that the principles associated with the pragmatism of Charles Sanders Pierce would complement Elliott's ideas in his book. (CMK)

  16. Simplified Dark Matter Models

    OpenAIRE

    Morgante, Enrico

    2018-01-01

    I review the construction of Simplified Models for Dark Matter searches. After discussing the philosophy and some simple examples, I turn the attention to the aspect of the theoretical consistency and to the implications of the necessary extensions of these models.

  17. Condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The condensed matter physics research in the Physics Department of Risoe National Laboratory is predominantly experimental utilising diffraction of neutrons and x-rays. The research topics range from studies of structure, excitations and phase transitions in model systems to studies of ion transport, texture and recrystallization kinetics with a more applied nature. (author)

  18. 6d Conformal matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotto, Michele Del; Heckman, Jonathan J.; Tomasiello, Alessandro; Vafa, Cumrun

    2015-01-01

    A single M5-brane probing G, an ADE-type singularity, leads to a system which has G×G global symmetry and can be viewed as “bifundamental” (G,G) matter. For the A N series, this leads to the usual notion of bifundamental matter. For the other cases it corresponds to a strongly interacting (1,0) superconformal system in six dimensions. Similarly, an ADE singularity intersecting the Hořava-Witten wall leads to a superconformal matter system with E 8 ×G global symmetry. Using the F-theory realization of these theories, we elucidate the Coulomb/tensor branch of (G,G ′ ) conformal matter. This leads to the notion of fractionalization of an M5-brane on an ADE singularity as well as fractionalization of the intersection point of the ADE singularity with the Hořava-Witten wall. Partial Higgsing of these theories leads to new 6d SCFTs in the infrared, which we also characterize. This generalizes the class of (1,0) theories which can be perturbatively realized by suspended branes in IIA string theory. By reducing on a circle, we arrive at novel duals for 5d affine quiver theories. Introducing many M5-branes leads to large N gravity duals.

  19. States of Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak Dhar. States of Matter. Deepak Dhar. Keywords. Solid, liquid, gas, glasses, powders. D Dhar is a theoretical physicist at the Tata. Institute of Funamental. Research, Mumbai. His research interests are mainly in the area of non- equilibrium statistical physics. All of us have read about solid, liquid and gaseous.

  20. The Dark Matter Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    1. Introduction; 2. Early history of the dark matter hypothesis; 3. The stability of disk galaxies: the dark halo solutions; 4. Direct evidence: extended rotation curves of spiral galaxies; 5. The maximum disk: light traces mass; 6. Cosmology and the birth of astroparticle physics; 7. Clusters

  1. Template Composite Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drach, Vincent; Hietanen, Ari; Pica, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We present a non perturbative study of SU(2) gauge theory with two fundamental Dirac flavours. We discuss how the model can be used as a template for composite Dark Matter (DM). We estimate one particular interaction of the DM candidate with the Standard Model : the interaction through photon...

  2. Little composite dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balkin, Reuven; Weiler, Andreas [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, First Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Perez, Gilad [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel)

    2018-02-15

    We examine the dark matter phenomenology of a composite electroweak singlet state. This singlet belongs to the Goldstone sector of a well-motivated extension of the Littlest Higgs with T-parity. A viable parameter space, consistent with the observed dark matter relic abundance as well as with the various collider, electroweak precision and dark matter direct detection experimental constraints is found for this scenario. T-parity implies a rich LHC phenomenology, which forms an interesting interplay between conventional natural SUSY type of signals involving third generation quarks and missing energy, from stop-like particle production and decay, and composite Higgs type of signals involving third generation quarks associated with Higgs and electroweak gauge boson, from vector-like top-partners production and decay. The composite features of the dark matter phenomenology allows the composite singlet to produce the correct relic abundance while interacting weakly with the Higgs via the usual Higgs portal coupling λ{sub DM} ∝ O(1%), thus evading direct detection. (orig.)

  3. Dark matter axions '96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikivie, P.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses why axions have been postulated to exist, what cosmology implies about their presence as cold dark matter in the galactic halo, how axions might be detected in cavities wherein strong magnetic fields stimulate their conversion into photons, and relations between axions' energy spectra and galactic halos' properties

  4. Condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is a summary of condensed matter physics in Brazil. It discusses as well, the perspectives and financing evolved in this research area for the next decade. It is specially concerned with semiconductors, magnetic materials, superconductivity, polymers, glasses, crystals ceramics, statistical physics, magnetic resonance and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (A.C.A.S.)

  5. Matter and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effenberger, R.

    1975-07-01

    The author looks empirically at the processes by which the various forms of matter, the chemical elements, come into existence. In doing so he examines unification within relativity and quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear structure, the quantum idea as a unifying concept, particle physics and finally nucleosynthesis and a viable nucleosynthetic theory

  6. Soft Matter Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Borsali, Redouane

    2008-01-01

    Progress in basic soft matter research is driven largely by the experimental techniques available. Much of the work is concerned with understanding them at the microscopic level, especially at the nanometer length scales that give soft matter studies a wide overlap with nanotechnology. This 2 volume reference work, split into 4 parts, presents detailed discussions of many of the major techniques commonly used as well as some of those in current development for studying and manipulating soft matter. The articles are intended to be accessible to the interdisciplinary audience (at the graduate student level and above) that is or will be engaged in soft matter studies or those in other disciplines who wish to view some of the research methods in this fascinating field. Part 1 contains articles with a largely (but, in most cases, not exclusively) theoretical content and/or that cover material relevant to more than one of the techniques covered in subsequent volumes. It includes an introductory chapter on some of t...

  7. Dibaryons and nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besliu, C.; Popa, L.; Popa, V.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss some recent ideas concerning the structure and the properties of the dibaryonic resonances, with special emphasis on their behaviour when produced in dense nuclear matter. Some features of their de-excitation mechanism and consequent experimentally identifiable signatures are predicted. (Author)

  8. Dark matter and its detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Xiaojun; Qin Bo

    2011-01-01

    We first explain the concept of dark matter,then review the history of its discovery and the evidence of its existence. We describe our understanding of the nature of dark matter particles, the popular dark matter models,and why the weakly interacting massive particles (called WIMPs) are the most attractive candidates for dark matter. Then we introduce the three methods of dark matter detection: colliders, direct detection and indirect detection. Finally, we review the recent development of dark matter detection, including the new results from DAMA, CoGent, PAMELA, ATIC and Fermi. (authors)

  9. Endothelial Function Is Associated with White Matter Microstructure and Executive Function in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan F. Johnson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Age-related declines in endothelial function can lead to cognitive decline. However, little is known about the relationships between endothelial function and specific neurocognitive functions. This study explored the relationship between measures of endothelial function (reactive hyperemia index; RHI, white matter (WM health (fractional anisotropy, FA, and WM hyperintensity volume, WMH, and executive function (Trail Making Test (TMT; Trail B − Trail A. Participants were 36 older adults between the ages of 59 and 69 (mean age = 63.89 years, SD = 2.94. WMH volume showed no relationship with RHI or executive function. However, there was a positive relationship between RHI and FA in the genu and body of the corpus callosum. In addition, higher RHI and FA were each associated with better executive task performance. Tractography was used to localize the WM tracts associated with RHI to specific portions of cortex. Results indicated that the RHI-FA relationship observed in the corpus callosum primarily involved tracts interconnecting frontal regions, including the superior frontal gyrus (SFG and frontopolar cortex, linked with executive function. These findings suggest that superior endothelial function may help to attenuate age-related declines in WM microstructure in portions of the corpus callosum that interconnect prefrontal brain regions involved in executive function.

  10. Does white matter structure or hippocampal volume mediate associations between cortisol and cognitive ageing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Simon R.; MacPherson, Sarah E.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Hernández, Maria del C. Valdés; Bastin, Mark E.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated glucocorticoid (GC) levels putatively damage specific brain regions, which in turn may accelerate cognitive ageing. However, many studies are cross-sectional or have relatively short follow-up periods, making it difficult to relate GCs directly to changes in cognitive ability with increasing age. Moreover, studies combining endocrine, MRI and cognitive variables are scarce, measurement methods vary considerably, and formal tests of the underlying causal hypothesis (cortisol → brain → cognition) are absent. In this study, 90 men, aged 73 years, provided measures of fluid intelligence, processing speed and memory, diurnal and reactive salivary cortisol and two measures of white matter (WM) structure (WM hyperintensity volume from structural MRI and mean diffusivity averaged across 12 major tracts from diffusion tensor MRI), hippocampal volume, and also cognitive ability at age 11. We tested whether negative relationships between cognitive ageing differences (over more than 60 years) and salivary cortisol were significantly mediated by WM and hippocampal volume. Significant associations between reactive cortisol at 73 and cognitive ageing differences between 11 and 73 (r = −.28 to −.36, p cognition associations (cognitive ageing differences from childhood to the early 70s, partly via brain WM structure. PMID:26298692

  11. Non-baryonic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkes, I.

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses the nature of the dark matter and the possibility of the detection of non-baryonic dark matter in an underground experiment. Among the useful detectors the low temperature bolometers are considered in some detail. (author)

  12. Differentiating therapy-induced leukoencephalopathy from unmyelinated white matter in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2003-05-01

    Reliably detecting subtle therapy-induced leukoencephalopathy in children treated for cancer is a challenging task due to its nearly identical MR properties and location with unmyelinated white matter. T1, T2, PD, and FLAIR images were collected for 44 children aged 1.7-18.7 (median 5.9) years near the start of therapy for ALL. The ICBM atlas and corresponding apriori maps were spatially normalized to each patient and resliced using SPM99 software. A combined imaging set consisting of MR images and WM, GM and CSF apriori maps were then analyzed with a Kohonen Self-Organizing Map. Vectors from hyperintense regions were compared to normal appearing genu vectors from the same patient. Analysis of the distributions of the differences, calculated on T2 and FLAIR images, revealed two distinct groups. The first large group, assumed normal unmyelinated white matter, consisted of 37 patients with changes in FLAIR ranging from 80 to 147 (mean 117-/+17) and T2 ranging from 92 to 217 (mean 144-/+28). The second group, assumed leukoencephalopathy, consisted of seven patients with changes in FLAIR ranging from 154 to 196 (mean 171-/+19) and T2 ranging from 190 to 287 (mean 216-/+33). A threshold was established for both FLAIR (change > 150) and T2 (change > 180).

  13. Is old organic matter simple organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, Naoise; Lerch, Thomas; Pouteau, Valérie; Mora, Philippe; Changey, Fréderique; Kätterer, Thomas; Herrmann, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Bare fallow soils that have been deprived of fresh carbon inputs for prolonged periods contain mostly old, stable organic carbon. In order to shed light on the nature of this carbon, the functional diversity profiles (MicroResp™, Biolog™ and enzyme activity spectra) of the microbial communities of long-term barefallow soils were analysed and compared with those of the microbial communities from their cultivated counterparts. The study was based on the idea that microbial communities adapt to their environment and that therefore the catabolic and enzymatic profiles would reflect the type of substrates available to the microbial communities. The catabolic profiles suggested that the microbial communities in the long-term bare-fallow soil were exposed to a less diverse range of substrates and that these substrates tended to be of simpler molecular forms. Both the catabolic and enzyme activity profiles suggested that the microbial communities from the long-term bare-fallow soils were less adapted to using polymers. These results do not fit with the traditional view of old, stable carbon being composed of complex, recalcitrant polymers. An energetics analysis of the substrate use of the microbial communities for the different soils suggested that the microbial communities from the long-term bare-fallow soils were better adapted to using readily oxidizable,although energetically less rewarding, substrates. Microbial communities appear to adapt to the deprivation of fresh organic matter by using substrates that require little investment.

  14. Direct search for dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Dark matter is hypothetical matter which does not interact with electromagnetic radiation. The existence of dark matter is only inferred from gravitational effects of astrophysical observations to explain the missing mass component of the Universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles are currently the most popular candidate to explain the missing mass component. I review the current status of experimental searches of dark matter through direct detection using terrestrial detectors.

  15. Particle Dark Matter: An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roszkowski, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Dark matter in the Universe is likely to be made up of some new, hypothetical particle which would be a part of an extension of the Standard Model of particle physics. In this overview, I will first briefly review well motivated particle candidates for dark matter. Next I will focus my attention on the neutralino of supersymmetry which is the by far most popular dark matter candidate. I will discuss some recent progress and comment on prospects for dark matter detection.

  16. Topological hierarchy matters — topological matters with superlattices of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jing; Kou Su-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators/superconductors are new states of quantum matter with metallic edge/surface states. In this paper, we review the defects effect in these topological states and study new types of topological matters — topological hierarchy matters. We find that both topological defects (quantized vortices) and non topological defects (vacancies) can induce topological mid-gap states in the topological hierarchy matters after considering the superlattice of defects. These topological mid-gap states have nontrivial topological properties, including the nonzero Chern number and the gapless edge states. Effective tight-binding models are obtained to describe the topological mid-gap states in the topological hierarchy matters. (topical review)

  17. Flipped dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.; Hagelin, J.S.; Kelley, S.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Olive, K.A.

    1988-08-04

    We study candidates for dark matter in a minimal flipped SU(5) x U(1) supersymmetric GUT. Since the model has no R-parity, spin-1/2 supersymmetric partners of conventional particles mix with other neutral fermions including neutrinos, and can decay into them. The lighest particle which is predominantly a gaugino/higgsino mixture decays with a lifetime tau/sub chi/ approx. = 1-10/sup 9/ s. The model contains a scalar 'flaton' field whose coherent oscillations decay before cosmological nucleosynthesis, and whose pseudoscalar partner contributes negligibly to ..cap omega.. if it is light enough to survive to the present epoch. The fermionic 'flatino' partner of the flaton has a lifetime tau/sub PHI/ approx. = 10/sup 28/-10/sup 34/ yr and is a viable candiate for metastable dark matter with ..cap omega.. < or approx. 1.

  18. Deuterium in organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straaten, C.M. van der.

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain an insight in the processes governing the macroclimate on earth, a knowledge is required of the behaviour of climates in the past. It is well known that D/H ratio of rain varies with temperature determined by latitude as well as by season. Because land plants use this water during the assimilation process, it is expected that the D/H variations are propagated in the organic plant matter. The D/H palaeoclimatic method has therefore been applied to peat to distinguish between the chemical constituents and trace the stable hydrogen fraction in the organic matter. The relation between the hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation and climatic factors such as the temperature have also been studied. (Auth.)

  19. A matter of quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Quarks are understood to interact through the 'colour' force, carried by gluons. Under normal conditions these quarks are confined - frozen together in 'colourless' states such as protons, neutrons and other strongly interacting particles. However if the quarks are compressed tightly together and/or are 'heated' by increasing their energy, they should eventually break loose from their colour bonds to form a new kind of matter – the so-called quark-gluon plasma. Although QGP has not yet been synthesized in the Laboratory, it was most likely the stuff of the Universe 10 -5 second after the Big Bang. Thus the search for this 'new' matter is attracting a growing number of physicists, theorists and experimenters from both the particle physics and nuclear physics fields

  20. Hyperons in dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dapo, Haris

    2009-01-28

    The hyperon-nucleon YN low momentum effective interaction (V{sub low} {sub k}) allows for an extensive study of the behavior of hyperons in dense matter, together with an investigation of effects of the presence of hyperons on dense matter. The first step towards this goal is the construction of the matrix elements for the hyperon-nucleon low momentum potential. In order to assess the different properties of hyperons within these potentials we calculate the hyperon single-particle potentials in the Hartree-Fock approximation for all of the interactions. Their dependence on both momentum and density, is studied. The single-particle potentials are then used to determine the chemical potential of hyperons in neutron stars. For nucleonic properties, the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} can be used with the caveat that the calculation of the ground-state energy of symmetric nuclear matter does not correctly reproduce the properties of matter at saturation. With the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} one is unable to reach the densities needed for the calculation of neutron star masses. To circumvent this problem we use two approaches: in the first one, we parametrize the entire nucleonic sector. In the second one, we replace only the three-body force. The former will enable us to study neutron star masses, and the latter for studying the medium's response to the external probe. In this thesis we take the external probe to be the neutrino. By combining this parametrization with the YN V{sub low} {sub k} potential, we calculate the equation of state of equilibrated matter. Performing the calculation in the Hartree-Fock approximation at zero temperature, the concentrations of all particles are calculated. From these we can ascertain at which densities hyperons appear for a wide range of parameters. Finally, we calculate the masses of neutron stars with these concentrations. For the calculation of the medium's response to an external probe, we replace the three

  1. Hyperons in dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dapo, Haris

    2009-01-01

    The hyperon-nucleon YN low momentum effective interaction (V low k ) allows for an extensive study of the behavior of hyperons in dense matter, together with an investigation of effects of the presence of hyperons on dense matter. The first step towards this goal is the construction of the matrix elements for the hyperon-nucleon low momentum potential. In order to assess the different properties of hyperons within these potentials we calculate the hyperon single-particle potentials in the Hartree-Fock approximation for all of the interactions. Their dependence on both momentum and density, is studied. The single-particle potentials are then used to determine the chemical potential of hyperons in neutron stars. For nucleonic properties, the nucleon-nucleon V low k can be used with the caveat that the calculation of the ground-state energy of symmetric nuclear matter does not correctly reproduce the properties of matter at saturation. With the nucleon-nucleon V low k one is unable to reach the densities needed for the calculation of neutron star masses. To circumvent this problem we use two approaches: in the first one, we parametrize the entire nucleonic sector. In the second one, we replace only the three-body force. The former will enable us to study neutron star masses, and the latter for studying the medium's response to the external probe. In this thesis we take the external probe to be the neutrino. By combining this parametrization with the YN V low k potential, we calculate the equation of state of equilibrated matter. Performing the calculation in the Hartree-Fock approximation at zero temperature, the concentrations of all particles are calculated. From these we can ascertain at which densities hyperons appear for a wide range of parameters. Finally, we calculate the masses of neutron stars with these concentrations. For the calculation of the medium's response to an external probe, we replace the three-body force with a density-dependent interaction. This

  2. Compressed Baryonic Matter of Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Baryonic matter in the core of a massive and evolved star is compressed significantly to form a supra-nuclear object, and compressed baryonic matter (CBM) is then produced after supernova. The state of cold matter at a few nuclear density is pedagogically reviewed, with significant attention paid to a possible quark-cluster state conjectured from an astrophysical point of view.

  3. Normal matter storage of antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs

  4. Hadrons in dense matter. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buballa, M.; Noerenberg, W.; Schaefer, B.J.; Wambach, J.

    2000-03-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Elementary hadronic reactions, Delta dynamics in nuclei, in-medium s-wave ππ-correlations, strangeness in hot and dense matter, medium modifications of vector mesons and dilepton production, medium modifications of charmonium, thermal properties of hot and dense hadronic matter, nuclear matter, spectral functions and QCD sum rules

  5. Dark Matter Searches at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Terashi, Koji; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will present dark matter searches at the LHC in the PIC2017 conference. The main emphasis is placed on the direct dark matter searches while the interpretation of searches for SUSY and invisible Higgs signals for the dark matter is also presented.

  6. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Marder, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    This Second Edition presents an updated review of the whole field of condensed matter physics. It consolidates new and classic topics from disparate sources, teaching not only about the effective masses of electrons in semiconductor crystals and band theory, but also about quasicrystals, dynamics of phase separation, why rubber is more floppy than steel, granular materials, quantum dots, Berry phases, the quantum Hall effect, and Luttinger liquids.

  7. Baryonic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Both canonical primordial nucleosynthesis constraints and large-scale structure measurements, as well as observations of the fundamental cosmological parameters, appear to be consistent with the hypothesis that the universe predominantly consists of baryonic dark matter (BDM). The arguments for BDM to consist of compact objects that are either stellar relics or substellar objects are reviewed. Several techniques for searching for halo BDM are described.

  8. Matter in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two theories of matter in general relativity, the fluid theory and the kinetic theory, were studied. Results include: (1) a discussion of various methods of completing the fluid equations; (2) a method of constructing charged general relativistic solutions in kinetic theory; and (3) a proof and discussion of the incompatibility of perfect fluid solutions in anisotropic cosmologies. Interpretations of NASA gravitational experiments using the above mentioned results were started. Two papers were prepared for publications based on this work.

  9. Nuclear matter theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negele, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Recent advances in variational and perturbative theories are surveyed which offer genuine promise that nuclear matter will soon become a viable tool for investigating nuclear interactions. The basic elements of the hypernetted chain expansion for Jastrow variational functions are briefly reviewed, and comparisons of variational and perturbative results for a series of increasingly complicated systems are presented. Prospects for investigating realistic forces are assessed and the unresolved, open problems are summarized

  10. Dark Matter remains obscure

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabio Capello

    2011-01-01

    It is one of the hidden secrets that literally surround the Universe. Experiments have shown no result so far because trying to capture particles that do not seem to interact with ordinary matter is no trivial exercise. The OSQAR experiment at CERN is dedicated to the search for axions, one of the candidates for Dark Matter. For its difficult challenge, OSQAR counts on one of the world’s most powerful magnets borrowed from the LHC. In a recent publication, the OSQAR collaboration was able to confirm that no axion signal appears out of the background. In other words: the quest is still on.   The OSQAR experiment installed in the SM18 hall. (Photo by F. Capello) The OSQAR “Light Shining Through a Wall” experiment was officially launched in 2007 with the aim of detecting axions, that is, particles that might be the main components of Dark Matter. OSQAR uses the powerful LHC dipole magnet to intensify the predicted photon-axion conversions in the presence of strong m...

  11. Changes in cerebral white matter in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a low incidence with a new therapeutic protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menor, F.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Fortuno, J. R.; Verdeguer, A.; Castell, V.; Esteban, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) assessment of changes in cerebral white matter in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after the application of a new treatment. A prospective study was carried out in 50 consecutive children with ALL who had undergone MR imaging during the first 6 months after diagnosis. ALL was classified as standard risk (SR), high risk (HR) or very high risk (VHR) on the basis of conventional criteria. The major difference in the new protocol consisted in a phase of intensification in which different drugs are combined with dexamethasone in cases of HR ALL, together with the exclusion of cranial irradiation in a subgroup of HR patients. ALL the HR and VHR children with changes in white matter, as well as some of those in the SR group, underwent follow-up MR imaging. Thirty-two patients were classified as SR, 15 as HR and 3 as VHR. Changes were observed in 8% of cases (3 patients in the SR group and 1 in the HR group); all were neurologically asymptomatic. The lesions were hyperintense in protein density (PD) and T2-weighted images, with a frontal and occipital periventricular distribution in two cases and occipital in the other two. Serial follow-up images showed a reduction in the lesion in two cases and its persistence in one. The fourth patients died before follow-up images were achieved. There were no new changes in any of the patients. None of the children undergoing cranial irradiation (4 in the HR group and 2 in the VHR group) presented changes in white matter. The incidence of asymptomatic changes in white matter following central nervous system prophylaxis in children with ALL is lower than expected. The different chemoprophylactic protocol during the intensification phase probably protects against the development of these changes. Chemotherapy plays a predominant role in this type of atherogenesis. (Author) 15 refs

  12. Cardiac diastolic dysfunction is associated with cerebral white matter lesions in elderly patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masugata, Hisashi; Senda, Shoichi; Goda, Fuminori

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered to be the result of brain ischemic injury and a risk factor for clinical stroke. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between the cardiac diastolic function and cerebral white matter lesions in elderly patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis. The study subjects were 55 patients (75±7 years) with risk factors for atherosclerosis including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. Patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular events were excluded from the study. Cerebral white matter lesions, which were defined as exhibiting high intensity regions on brain MRI, were evaluated with the degrees of periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) according to the Japanese Brain Dock Guidelines of 2003. Peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E' velocity) was measured by tissue Doppler echocardiography, and was used as a parameter of cardiac diastolic function. The mean value of E' velocity was decreased due to the cardiac diastolic dysfunction (5.2±1.4 cm/s). In addition, the E' velocity was inversely correlated with the degree of PVH (ρ=-0.701, p<0.001). Stepwise regression analysis showed that the decrease in the E' velocity (β coefficient=-0.42, p<0.001) and the presence of hypertension (β coefficient=0.31, p=0.001) were independent determinants of the degree of PVH. Thus, cardiac diastolic dysfunction is correlated to the severity of cerebral white matter lesions, suggesting the cardio-cerebral connection in elderly patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis. (author)

  13. Dark matter in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormendy, J.; Knapp, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    Until recently little more was known than that dark matter appears to exist; there was little systematic information about its properties. Only in the past several years was progress made to the point where dark matter density distributions can be measured. For example, with accurate rotation curves extending over large ranges in radius, decomposing the effects of visible and dark matter to measure dark matter density profiles can be tried. Some regularities in dark matter behaviour have already turned up. This volume includes review and invited papers, poster papers, and the two general discussions. (Auth.)

  14. Dark Matter Detection: Current Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerib, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    Overwhelming observational evidence indicates that most of the matter in the Universe consists of non-baryonic dark matter. One possibility is that the dark matter is Weakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) that were produced in the early Universe. These relics could comprise the Milky Way's dark halo and provide evidence for new particle physics, such as Supersymmetry. This talk focuses on the status of current efforts to detect dark matter by testing the hypothesis that WIMPs exist in the galactic halo. WIMP searches have begun to explore the region of parameter space where SUSY particles could provide dark matter candidates.

  15. Cognitive deficits are associated with frontal and temporal lobe white matter lesions in middle-aged adults living in the community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bunce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association between brain white matter lesions and cognitive impairment in old age is well established. However, little is known about this association in midlife. As this information will inform policy for early preventative healthcare initiatives, we investigated non-periventricular frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobe white matter hyperintensities (WMH in relation to cognitive function in 428 (232 women community-dwelling adults aged 44 to 48 years. RESULTS: Frontal white matter lesions were significantly associated with greater intraindividual RT variability in women, while temporal WMH were associated with face recognition deficits in men. Parietal and occipital lobe lesions were unrelated to cognitive performance. These findings did not differ when education and a range of health variables, including vascular risk factors, were taken into account. CONCLUSION: Gender differences in WMH-cognition associations are discussed, and we conclude that small vessel disease is present in midlife and has functional consequences which are generally not recognized. Preventative strategies should, therefore, begin early in life.

  16. Dark matter wants Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Asano, M.; Fujii, K.; Takubo, Y.; Honda, T.; Saito, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Humdi, R.S.; Ito, H.; Kanemura, S; Nabeshima, T.; Okada, N.; Suehara, T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main purposes of physics at the International Linear Collider (ILC) is to study the property of dark matter such as its mass, spin, quantum numbers, and interactions with particles of the standard model. We discuss how the property can or cannot be investigated at the ILC using two typical cases of dark matter scenario: 1) most of new particles predicted in physics beyond the standard model are heavy and only dark matter is accessible at the ILC, and 2) not only dark matter but also other new particles are accessible at the ILC. We find that, as can be easily imagined, dark matter can be detected without any difficulties in the latter case. In the former case, it is still possible to detect dark matter when the mass of dark matter is less than a half mass of the Higgs boson.

  17. Metric to quantify white matter damage on brain magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes Hernandez, Maria del C.; Munoz Maniega, Susana; Anblagan, Devasuda; Bastin, Mark E.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Chappell, Francesca M.; Morris, Zoe; Sakka, Eleni; Dickie, David Alexander; Royle, Natalie A.; Armitage, Paul A.; Deary, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is challenging. It is important to harmonise results from different software tools considering not only the volume but also the signal intensity. Here we propose and evaluate a metric of white matter (WM) damage that addresses this need. We obtained WMH and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) volumes from brain structural MRI from community dwelling older individuals and stroke patients enrolled in three different studies, using two automatic methods followed by manual editing by two to four observers blind to each other. We calculated the average intensity values on brain structural fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI for the NAWM and WMH. The white matter damage metric is calculated as the proportion of WMH in brain tissue weighted by the relative image contrast of the WMH-to-NAWM. The new metric was evaluated using tissue microstructure parameters and visual ratings of small vessel disease burden and WMH: Fazekas score for WMH burden and Prins scale for WMH change. The correlation between the WM damage metric and the visual rating scores (Spearman ρ > =0.74, p =0.72, p < 0.0001). The repeatability of the WM damage metric was better than WM volume (average median difference between measurements 3.26% (IQR 2.76%) and 5.88% (IQR 5.32%) respectively). The follow-up WM damage was highly related to total Prins score even when adjusted for baseline WM damage (ANCOVA, p < 0.0001), which was not always the case for WMH volume, as total Prins was highly associated with the change in the intense WMH volume (p = 0.0079, increase of 4.42 ml per unit change in total Prins, 95%CI [1.17 7.67]), but not with the change in less-intense, subtle WMH, which determined the volumetric change. The new metric is practical and simple to calculate. It is robust to variations in image processing methods and scanning protocols, and sensitive to subtle and severe white

  18. Metric to quantify white matter damage on brain magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes Hernandez, Maria del C.; Munoz Maniega, Susana; Anblagan, Devasuda; Bastin, Mark E.; Wardlaw, Joanna M. [University of Edinburgh, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); University of Edinburgh, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); UK Dementia Research Institute, Edinburgh Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Chappell, Francesca M.; Morris, Zoe; Sakka, Eleni [University of Edinburgh, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); UK Dementia Research Institute, Edinburgh Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Dickie, David Alexander; Royle, Natalie A. [University of Edinburgh, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); University of Edinburgh, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Armitage, Paul A. [University of Sheffield, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Deary, Ian J. [University of Edinburgh, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); University of Edinburgh, Department of Psychology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    Quantitative assessment of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is challenging. It is important to harmonise results from different software tools considering not only the volume but also the signal intensity. Here we propose and evaluate a metric of white matter (WM) damage that addresses this need. We obtained WMH and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) volumes from brain structural MRI from community dwelling older individuals and stroke patients enrolled in three different studies, using two automatic methods followed by manual editing by two to four observers blind to each other. We calculated the average intensity values on brain structural fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI for the NAWM and WMH. The white matter damage metric is calculated as the proportion of WMH in brain tissue weighted by the relative image contrast of the WMH-to-NAWM. The new metric was evaluated using tissue microstructure parameters and visual ratings of small vessel disease burden and WMH: Fazekas score for WMH burden and Prins scale for WMH change. The correlation between the WM damage metric and the visual rating scores (Spearman ρ > =0.74, p < 0.0001) was slightly stronger than between the latter and WMH volumes (Spearman ρ > =0.72, p < 0.0001). The repeatability of the WM damage metric was better than WM volume (average median difference between measurements 3.26% (IQR 2.76%) and 5.88% (IQR 5.32%) respectively). The follow-up WM damage was highly related to total Prins score even when adjusted for baseline WM damage (ANCOVA, p < 0.0001), which was not always the case for WMH volume, as total Prins was highly associated with the change in the intense WMH volume (p = 0.0079, increase of 4.42 ml per unit change in total Prins, 95%CI [1.17 7.67]), but not with the change in less-intense, subtle WMH, which determined the volumetric change. The new metric is practical and simple to calculate. It is robust to variations in

  19. Antiprotons are another matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Theories of gravity abound, whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer these properties from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster, and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependance in the earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ∼4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H - ions which simulates the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton, yet is a baryon to ∼0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H - ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ∼10 6 to 10 7 particles

  20. Matter and antimatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schopper, H.

    1989-01-01

    For many years the physicist Herwig Schopper has been contributing in leading positions - either as director of DESY in Hamburg or as general director of CERN in Geneva - to the development of a fascinating field of modern physics. His book is the first comprehensive presentation of experimental particle physics for non-physicists. The search for the smallest constituents of matter, i.e. the exploration of the microcosmos, apart from the advance of the man into space belongs to the most exciting scientific-technical adventures of our century. Contrarily to the stars, atoms, atomic nuclei, and quarks cannot be seen. How objects are studied which are by thousands smaller than the smallest atomic nucleus? Can matter be decomposed in ever smaller constituents, or does there exist a limit? What is matter, and what is of consequence for the mysterious antimatter. Do the laws of the infinitely small also determine the development of the universe since its origin? Such and other questions - expressions of human curiosity - Schopper wants to answer with his generally understandable book. Thereby the 'machines' and the experiments of high-energy physics play a decicive role in the presentation. The author describes the development of the accelerators - in Europe, as well as in the Soviet Union, Japan, or in the USA -, and he shows, why for the investigation of the smallest immense experimental facilities - the 1989 finished LEP storage ring at CERN has a circumference of 27 kilometers - are necessary. Schopper explains how the 'machines' work and how the single experiments run. His book satisfies the curiosity of all those, who want to know more about the world of the quarks. (orig.) With 96 figs [de

  1. Antiprotons are another matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    Theories of gravity abound whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer this property from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependence in the Earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ≅ 4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H - ions which simulate the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton yet are baryons to ≅ 0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H - ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ≅ 10 6 -10 7 particles. (orig.)

  2. Interaction of the radiation with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This third chapter presents the ionization, excitation, activation and radiation breaking; radiation directly and indirectly ionizing; interaction of the electromagnetic radiation with matter; interaction of neutrons with matter; interaction of radiation directly ionizing with matter; interaction of electrons with matter, interaction of alpha particle with matter; interaction of fission fragments with matter; travel time and integrated processes of interaction: energy dissipation

  3. Why international primacy matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    Does international primacy matter? The answer seems so obvious that one first wonders why someone as intelligent, perceptive, and knowledgeable as Robert Jervis raises the question. On further thought, however, one sees that while the answer may be obvious for most people, the reasons why it is obvious may not be all that clear and may have been forgotten or lost in the other concerns of political scientists and economists studying international relations. By posing this question at this time of change in world affairs Jervis has constructively forced us to rethink why primacy is of central importance. This issue involves several subordinate questions

  4. Kaons in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomeitsev, E.E.

    1997-02-01

    The subject of the doctoral thesis is examination of the properties of kaons in nuclear matter. A specific method is explained that has been developed for the scientific objectives of the thesis and permits description of the kaon-nucleon interactions and kaon-nucleon scattering in a vacuum. The main challenge involved was to find approaches that would enable application of the derived relations out of the kaon mass shell, connected with the second objective, namely to possibly find methods which are independent of models. The way chosen to achieve this goal relied on application of reduction formulas as well as current algebra relations and the PCAC hypothesis. (orig./CB) [de

  5. Discrete dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, M; Peinado, E; Valle, J W F

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new motivation for the stability of dark matter (DM). We suggest that the same non-abelian discrete flavor symmetry which accounts for the observed pattern of neutrino oscillations, spontaneously breaks to a Z2 subgroup which renders DM stable. The simplest scheme leads to a scalar doublet DM potentially detectable in nuclear recoil experiments, inverse neutrino mass hierarchy, hence a neutrinoless double beta decay rate accessible to upcoming searches, while reactor angle equal to zero gives no CP violation in neutrino oscillations.

  6. Matter and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.F.G. da

    1976-01-01

    Rutherford's and Bhor's atomic models are presented, as well as the general configuration of the atom. In the study of energy, emphasis is given to its forms and unities, to equivalence between mass and energy and to the energy levels of the atom. Electrons and nuclear constituents, nuclear forces, stability and nuclear potential barrier are studied. The concepts of radioactive state, activity and nuclear decay are analysed, as well as nuclear reactions, fission, radioisotope production and cosmic rays. Interactions between radiation and matter are also analysed [pt

  7. Cool quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kurkela, Aleksi

    2016-07-20

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative Equation of State of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to order g^5 in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated using a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft non-zero modes are resummed using the Hard Thermal Loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  8. The condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapoval, B.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the laboratory of the Condensed Matter Physics (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Laboratory activities are related to the physics of semiconductors and disordered phases. The electrical and optical properties of the semiconductors, mixed conductor, superionic conductors and ceramics, are studied. Moreover, the interfaces of those systems and the sol-gel inorganic polymerization phenomena, are investigated. The most important results obtained, concern the following investigations: the electrochemical field effect transistor, the cathodoluminescence, the low energy secondary electrons emission, the fluctuations of a two-dimensional diffused junction and the aerogels [fr

  9. Light, Matter, and Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is about physically-based modelling of the appearance of materials. When a material is graphically rendered, its appearance is computed by considering the interaction of light and matter at a macroscopic level. In particular, the shape and the macroscopic optical properties of the mat......) a model which finds the appearance of ice given temperature, salinity, density, and mineral and algal contents of the ice; and (3) a model which finds the appearance of milk given fat and protein contents of the milk....

  10. Topology in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Monastyrsky, M I

    2006-01-01

    This book reports new results in condensed matter physics for which topological methods and ideas are important. It considers, on the one hand, recently discovered systems such as carbon nanocrystals and, on the other hand, new topological methods used to describe more traditional systems such as the Fermi surfaces of normal metals, liquid crystals and quasicrystals. The authors of the book are renowned specialists in their fields and present the results of ongoing research, some of it obtained only very recently and not yet published in monograph form.

  11. Cosmology and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tkachev, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This lecture course covers cosmology from the particle physicist perspective. Therefore, the emphasis will be on the evidence for the new physics in cosmological and astrophysical data together with minimal theoretical frameworks needed to understand and appreciate the evidence. I review the case for non-baryonic dark matter and describe popular models which incorporate it. In parallel, the story of dark energy will be developed, which includes accelerated expansion of the Universe today, the Universe origin in the Big Bang, and support for the Inflationary theory in CMBR data.

  12. Heterogeneous Active Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Thomas; Klotsa, Daphne

    Active systems are composed of self-propelled (active) particles that locally convert energy into motion and exhibit emergent collective behaviors, such as fish schooling and bird flocking. Most works so far have focused on monodisperse, one-component active systems. However, real systems are heterogeneous, and consist of several active components. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of multi-component active matter systems and report on their emergent behavior. We discuss the phase diagram of dynamic states as well as parameters where we see mixing versus segregation.

  13. Span of control matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathcart, Deb; Jeska, Susan; Karnas, Joan; Miller, Sue E; Pechacek, Judy; Rheault, Lolita

    2004-09-01

    Prompted by manager concerns about span of control, a large, integrated health system set out to determine if span of control really mattered. Was there something to it, or was it just an excuse for poor performance? A team of middle managers studied the problem and ultimately demonstrated a strong relationship between span of control and employee engagement. Consequently, it was decided to add 4 management positions to note the effect. One year later, positive changes were observed in employee engagement scores in all 4 areas. This study suggests careful review of manager spans of control to address the untoward effects of large spans of control on employee engagement.

  14. Posterior white matter disease distribution as a predictor of amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanprasertsuk, Sekh; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Pontes-Neto, Octavio Marques; Ni, Jun; Ayres, Alison; Reed, Anne; Swords, Kyleen; Gurol, M. Edip; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to examine whether a posterior distribution of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) is an independent predictor of pathologically confirmed cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and whether it is associated with MRI markers of CAA, in patients without lobar intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods: We developed a quantitative method to measure anteroposterior (AP) distribution of WMH. A retrospective cohort of patients without intracerebral hemorrhage and with pathologic evaluation of CAA was examined to determine whether posterior WMH distribution was an independent predictor of CAA (n = 59). The relationship of AP distributions of WMH to strictly lobar microbleeds (MBs) (n = 259) and location of dilated perivascular spaces (DPVS) (n = 85) was examined in a separate cohort of patients evaluated in a memory clinic. Results: A more posterior WMH distribution was found to be an independent predictor of pathologic evidence of CAA (p = 0.001, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 1.19 [1.07–1.32]), even in the subgroup without lobar MBs (p = 0.016, odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 1.18 [1.03–1.36]). In the memory clinic cohort, strictly lobar MBs were independently associated with more posterior WMH distribution (p = 0.009). AP distribution of WMH was also associated with location of DPVS (p = 0.001), in that patients with predominant DPVS in the white matter over the basal ganglia harbored a more posterior WMH distribution. Conclusions: Our results suggest that AP distribution of WMH may represent an additional marker of CAA, irrespective of the presence of lobar hemorrhages. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that there is a significant association between the AP distribution of WMH on MRI with the presence of pathologically confirmed CAA pathology. PMID:25063759

  15. Deep gray matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis: a tensor based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Guozhi; Datta, Sushmita; He, Renjie; Nelson, Flavia; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2009-07-15

    Tensor based morphometry (TBM) was applied to determine the atrophy of deep gray matter (DGM) structures in 88 relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. For group analysis of atrophy, an unbiased atlas was constructed from 20 normal brains. The MS brain images were co-registered with the unbiased atlas using a symmetric inverse consistent nonlinear registration. These studies demonstrate significant atrophy of thalamus, caudate nucleus, and putamen even at a modest clinical disability, as assessed by the expanded disability status score (EDSS). A significant correlation between atrophy and EDSS was observed for different DGM structures: (thalamus: r=-0.51, p=3.85 x 10(-7); caudate nucleus: r=-0.43, p=2.35 x 10(-5); putamen: r=-0.36, p=6.12 x 10(-6)). Atrophy of these structures also correlated with 1) T2 hyperintense lesion volumes (thalamus: r=-0.56, p=9.96 x 10(-9); caudate nucleus: r=-0.31, p=3.10 x 10(-3); putamen: r=-0.50, p=6.06 x 10(-7)), 2) T1 hypointense lesion volumes (thalamus: r=-0.61, p=2.29 x 10(-10); caudate nucleus: r=-0.35, p=9.51 x 10(-4); putamen: r=-0.43, p=3.51 x 10(-5)), and 3) normalized CSF volume (thalamus: r=-0.66, p=3.55 x 10(-12); caudate nucleus: r=-0.52, p=2.31 x 10(-7), and putamen: r=-0.66, r=2.13 x 10(-12)). More severe atrophy was observed mainly in thalamus at higher EDSS. These studies appear to suggest a link between the white matter damage and DGM atrophy in MS.

  16. Mirror matter as self-interacting dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, R.N.; Nussinov, S.; Teplitz, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    It has been argued that the observed core density profile of galaxies is inconsistent with having a dark matter particle that is collisionless and that alternative dark matter candidates which are self-interacting may explain observations better. One new class of self-interacting dark matter that has been proposed in the context of mirror universe models of particle physics is the mirror hydrogen atom, whose stability is guaranteed by the conservation of mirror baryon number. We show that the effective transport cross section for mirror hydrogen atoms has the right order of magnitude for solving the 'cuspy' halo problem. Furthermore, the suppression of dissipation effects for mirror atoms due to a higher mirror mass scale prevents the mirror halo matter from collapsing into a disk, strengthening the argument for mirror matter as galactic dark matter

  17. Phase transition from nuclear matter to color superconducting quark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, W. E-mail: bentz@keyaki.cc.u-tokai.ac.jp; Horikawa, T.; Ishii, N.; Thomas, A.W

    2003-06-02

    We construct the nuclear and quark matter equations of state at zero temperature in an effective quark theory (the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model), and discuss the phase transition between them. The nuclear matter equation of state is based on the quark-diquark description of the single nucleon, while the quark matter equation of state includes the effects of scalar diquark condensation (color superconductivity). The effect of diquark condensation on the phase transition is discussed in detail.

  18. Matter reflects Antimatter

    CERN Document Server

    Bianconi, A.; Cristiano, A.; Leali, M.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N.

    2008-01-01

    It is common belief that the interaction between antimatter and ordinary solid matter is dominated by annihilation. However, non-destructive processes may play a relevant role too. One century ago E. Rutherford wrote about the "diffuse reflection" of alpha and beta particles by thin layers of different metals: "The observations ... of Geiger and Marsden on the scattering of alpha rays indicate that some of the alpha particles must suffer a deflexion of more than a right angle at a single encounter.... It will be shown that the main deductions from the theory are independent of whether the central charge is supposed to be positive or negative". Although the theory of electromagnetic scattering is in first approximation independent of the relative sign of the colliding particles, in the case where projectile antiprotons are shot against a wall of solid matter the Rutherford diffuse reflection mechanism competes with the annihilation process. So it is not obvious at all that a relevant part of an antiproton beam...

  19. Commission on Legal Matters

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    What is a commission within the Staff Association (SA)? A commission is a working group of the CERN Staff Council, led by a staff representative. The commission is composed mainly of staff representatives, but interested members of the SA can apply to participate in the work of a commission. What is the commission on legal matters? The commission on legal matters works on texts governing the employment conditions of staff (Employed Members of Personnel and Associated Members of Personnel). This covers legal documents such as the Staff Rules and Regulations, administrative and operational circulars, as well as any other document relating to employment conditions. How is the work organised in this commission? The revision process of the text is generally done along following lines: The HR department, and its legal experts, proposes new texts or modifications to existing texts. A schedule for the study of these texts is established each year and this calendar by the commission to plan its work. The new or modi...

  20. Dark matter candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of? Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs

  1. Baryonic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.; Gilmore, G.

    1990-01-01

    Dark matter, first definitely found in the large clusters of galaxies, is now known to be dominant mass in the outer parts of galaxies. All the mass definitely deduced could be made up of baryons, and this would fit well with the requirements of nucleosynthesis in a big bang of small Ω B . However, if inflation is the explanation of the expansion and large scale homogeneity of the universe and of baryon synthesis, and if the universe did not have an infinite extent at the big bang, then Ω should be minutely greater than unity. It is commonly hypothesized that most mass is composed of some unknown, non-baryonic form. This book first discusses the known forms, comets, planets, brown dwarfs, stars, gas, galaxies and Lyman α clouds in which baryons are known to exist. Limits on the amount of dark matter in baryonic form are discussed in the context of the big bang. Inhomogeneities of the right type alleviate the difficulties associated with Ω B = 1 cosmological nucleosynthesis

  2. Levitating dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloper, Nemanja [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Padilla, Antonio, E-mail: kaloper@physics.ucdavis.edu, E-mail: antonio.padilla@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra 'antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < −1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger 'Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  3. Levitating dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra `antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < -1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger `Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  4. Radiative accidental matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal [IFPA, Dép. AGO, Université de Liège,Bât B5, Sart Tilman B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María - Departamento de Física,Casilla 110-V, Avda. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Simoes, C.; Wegman, D. [IFPA, Dép. AGO, Université de Liège,Bât B5, Sart Tilman B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)

    2016-07-25

    Accidental matter models are scenarios where the beyond-the-standard model physics preserves all the standard model accidental and approximate symmetries up to a cutoff scale related with lepton number violation. We study such scenarios assuming that the new physics plays an active role in neutrino mass generation, and show that this unavoidably leads to radiatively induced neutrino masses. We systematically classify all possible models and determine their viability by studying electroweak precision data, big bang nucleosynthesis and electroweak perturbativity, finding that the latter places the most stringent constraints on the mass spectra. These results allow the identification of minimal radiative accidental matter models for which perturbativity is lost at high scales. We calculate radiative charged-lepton flavor violating processes in these setups, and show that μ→eγ has a rate well within MEG sensitivity provided the lepton-number violating scale is at or below 5×10{sup 5} GeV, a value (naturally) assured by the radiative suppression mechanism. Sizeable τ→μγ branching fractions within SuperKEKB sensitivity are possible for lower lepton-number breaking scales. We thus point out that these scenarios can be tested not only in direct searches but also in lepton flavor-violating experiments.

  5. Matter-antimatter asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The Conference is devoted to a multidisciplinary study of matter-antimatter asymmetry and, in particular, from the point of view of particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. A number of topics, such as the practical applications of antimatter in medical imaging, of particular interest to non-specialists, will also be briefly covered. More than thirty years after the discovery of CP violation in the kaon system, precision experiments with kaons at CERN and Fermilab have demonstrated the existence of direct CP violation, opening a window on a hitherto poorly explored part of particle physics. On the one hand, two experiments devoted mainly to CP violation in B mesons, BABAR and Belle, are beginning to test CP violation in the Standard Model in a decisive way. On the other hand, balloon experiments and the space-based AMS project are circumscribing precise limits on the cosmological abundance of antimatter. Finally, the fundamental problem of cosmological matter-antimatter asymmetry at a Grand Unification scale or at the Electroweak phase transition has been the object of intense theoretical activity in recent years. This document gathers most of the slides that have been presented in the plenary and parallel sessions.

  6. Dark matter in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opher, Reuven

    2001-01-01

    We treat here the problem of dark matter in galaxies. Recent articles seem to imply that we are entering into the precision era of cosmology, implying that all of the basic physics of cosmology is known. However, we show here that recent observations question the pillar of the standard model: the presence of nonbaryonic 'dark matter' in galaxies. Using Newton's law of gravitation, observations indicate that most of the matter in galaxies in invisible or dark. From the observed abundances of light elements, dark matter in galaxies must be primarily nonbaryonic. The standard model and its problems in explaining nonbaryonic dark matter will first be discussed. This will be followed by a discussion of a modification of Newton's law of gravitation to explain dark matter in galaxies. (author)

  7. Nonlocal gravity simulates dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Hehl, Friedrich W.; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2009-01-01

    A nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation is constructed within the framework of the translational gauge theory of gravity. In the linear approximation, the nonlocal theory can be interpreted as linearized general relativity but in the presence of "dark matter" that can be simply expressed as an integral transform of matter. It is shown that this approach can accommodate the Tohline-Kuhn treatment of the astrophysical evidence for dark matter.

  8. Baryonic dark matter and Machos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griest, K.

    2000-01-01

    A brief description of the status of baryons in the Universe is given, along with recent results from the MACHO collaboration and their meaning. A dark matter halo consisting of baryons in the form of Machos is ruled out, leaving an elementary particle as the prime candidate for the dark matter. The observed microlensing events may make up around 20% of the dark matter in the Milky Way, or may indicate an otherwise undetected component of the Large Magellanic Cloud

  9. Dark Matter in Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Calmet, Xavier; Latosh, Boris

    2018-01-01

    We show that quantum gravity, whatever its ultra-violet completion might be, could account for dark matter. Indeed, besides the massless gravitational field recently observed in the form of gravitational waves, the spectrum of quantum gravity contains two massive fields respectively of spin 2 and spin 0. If these fields are long-lived, they could easily account for dark matter. In that case, dark matter would be very light and only gravitationally coupled to the standard model particles.

  10. Comprehensive asymmetric dark matter model

    OpenAIRE

    Lonsdale, Stephen J.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2018-01-01

    Asymmetric dark matter (ADM) is motivated by the similar cosmological mass densities measured for ordinary and dark matter. We present a comprehensive theory for ADM that addresses the mass density similarity, going beyond the usual ADM explanations of similar number densities. It features an explicit matter-antimatter asymmetry generation mechanism, has one fully worked out thermal history and suggestions for other possibilities, and meets all phenomenological, cosmological and astrophysical...

  11. Quark matter or new particles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  12. Phase transitions in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1984-11-01

    The rather general circumstances under which a phase transition in hadronic matter at finite temperature to an abnormal phase in which baryon effective masses become small and in which copious baryon-antibaryon pairs appear is emphasized. A preview is also given of a soliton model of dense matter, in which at a density of about seven times nuclear density, matter ceases to be a color insulator and becomes increasingly color conducting. 22 references

  13. Supersymmetric dark matter: Indirect detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, L.

    2000-01-01

    Dark matter detection experiments are improving to the point where they can detect or restrict the primary particle physics candidates for non baryonic dark matter. The methods for detection are usually categorized as direct, i.e., searching for signals caused by passage of dark matter particles in terrestrial detectors, or indirect. Indirect detection methods include searching for antimatter and gamma rays, in particular gamma ray lines, in cosmic rays and high-energy neutrinos from the centre of the Earth or Sun caused by accretion and annihilation of dark matter particles. A review is given of recent progress in indirect detection, both on the theoretical and experimental side

  14. Collapsing stage of 'bosonic matter'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoukian, E.B.; Muthaporn, C.; Sirininlakul, S.

    2006-01-01

    We prove rigorously that for 'bosonic matter', if deflation occurs upon collapse as more and more such matter is put together, then for a non-vanishing probability of having the negatively charged particles, with Coulomb interactions, within a sphere of radius R, the latter necessarily cannot decrease faster than N -1/3 for large N, where N denotes the number of the negatively charged particles. This is in clear distinction with matter (i.e., matter with the exclusion principle) which inflates and R necessarily increases not any slower than N 1/3 for large N

  15. Galactic searches for dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strigari, Louis E.

    2013-01-01

    For nearly a century, more mass has been measured in galaxies than is contained in the luminous stars and gas. Through continual advances in observations and theory, it has become clear that the dark matter in galaxies is not comprised of known astronomical objects or baryonic matter, and that identification of it is certain to reveal a profound connection between astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics. The best explanation for dark matter is that it is in the form of a yet undiscovered particle of nature, with experiments now gaining sensitivity to the most well-motivated particle dark matter candidates. In this article, I review measurements of dark matter in the Milky Way and its satellite galaxies and the status of Galactic searches for particle dark matter using a combination of terrestrial and space-based astroparticle detectors, and large scale astronomical surveys. I review the limits on the dark matter annihilation and scattering cross sections that can be extracted from both astroparticle experiments and astronomical observations, and explore the theoretical implications of these limits. I discuss methods to measure the properties of particle dark matter using future experiments, and conclude by highlighting the exciting potential for dark matter searches during the next decade, and beyond

  16. Dark matter. A light move

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Doebrich, Babette [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    This proceedings contribution reports from the workshop Dark Matter - a light move, held at DESY in Hamburg in June 2013. Dark Matter particle candidates span a huge parameter range. In particular, well motivated candidates exist also in the sub-eV mass region, for example the axion. Whilst a plethora of searches for rather heavy Dark Matter particles exists, there are only very few experiments aimed at direct detection of sub-eV Dark Matter to this date. The aim of our workshop was to discuss if and how this could be changed in the near future.

  17. Dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comelli, D.; Pietroni, M.; Riotto, A.

    2003-01-01

    It is a puzzle why the densities of dark matter and dark energy are nearly equal today when they scale so differently during the expansion of the universe. This conundrum may be solved if there is a coupling between the two dark sectors. In this Letter we assume that dark matter is made of cold relics with masses depending exponentially on the scalar field associated to dark energy. Since the dynamics of the system is dominated by an attractor solution, the dark matter particle mass is forced to change with time as to ensure that the ratio between the energy densities of dark matter and dark energy become a constant at late times and one readily realizes that the present-day dark matter abundance is not very sensitive to its value when dark matter particles decouple from the thermal bath. We show that the dependence of the present abundance of cold dark matter on the parameters of the model differs drastically from the familiar results where no connection between dark energy and dark matter is present. In particular, we analyze the case in which the cold dark matter particle is the lightest supersymmetric particle

  18. Dark matter. A light move

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, Javier; Doebrich, Babette

    2013-11-01

    This proceedings contribution reports from the workshop Dark Matter - a light move, held at DESY in Hamburg in June 2013. Dark Matter particle candidates span a huge parameter range. In particular, well motivated candidates exist also in the sub-eV mass region, for example the axion. Whilst a plethora of searches for rather heavy Dark Matter particles exists, there are only very few experiments aimed at direct detection of sub-eV Dark Matter to this date. The aim of our workshop was to discuss if and how this could be changed in the near future.

  19. Dark matter and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Astrophysicists now know that 80% of the matter in the universe is 'dark matter', composed of neutral and weakly interacting elementary particles that are not part of the Standard Model of particle physics. I will summarize the evidence for dark matter. I will explain why I expect dark matter particles to be produced at the CERN LHC. We will then need to characterize the new weakly interacting particles and demonstrate that they the same particles that are found in the cosmos. I will describe how this might be done. (author)

  20. Searching dark matter at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Mihoko M.

    2007-01-01

    We now believe that the dark matter in our Universe must be an unknown elementary particle, which is charge neutral and weakly interacting. The standard model must be extended to include it. The dark matter was likely produced in the early universe from the high energy collisions of the particles. Now LHC experiment starting from 2008 will create such high energy collision to explore the nature of the dark matter. In this article we explain how dark matter and LHC physics will be connected in detail. (author)

  1. Nucleons, Nuclear Matter and Quark Matter: A unified NJL approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Lawley; W. Bentz; A.W. Thomas

    2006-02-10

    We use an effective quark model to describe both hadronic matter and deconfined quark matter. By calculating the equations of state and the corresponding neutron star properties, we show that the internal properties of the nucleon have important implications for the properties of these systems.

  2. Might dark matter not be concentric with luminous matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chongming; Lu Tan.

    1986-12-01

    In this paper, an idea on dark matter nonconcentric with luminous matter is proposed. This case could influence the rotation curve of galaxy differently in its different direction. Recently, Rubin and Ford's observation on rotation curve of Hickson 88a has been explained by means of the idea. Some possible observational predictions have also been given. (author)

  3. Nucleons, nuclear matter and quark matter: a unified NJL approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawley, S [Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter, University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 (Australia); Bentz, W [Department of Physics, School of Science, Tokai University Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Thomas, A W [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2006-05-01

    We use an effective quark model to describe both hadronic matter and deconfined quark matter. By calculating the equations of state and the corresponding neutron star properties, we show that the internal properties of the nucleon have important implications for the properties of these systems.

  4. White matter lesion progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C

    2015-01-01

    10 cohorts. To assess the relative contribution of genetic factors to progression of WML, we compared in 7 cohorts risk models including demographics, vascular risk factors plus single-nucleotide polymorphisms that have been shown to be associated cross-sectionally with WML in the current......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants...... associated with WML progression in elderly participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium. METHODS: Heritability of WML progression was calculated in the Framingham Heart Study. The genome-wide association study included 7773 elderly participants from...

  5. Superheavy dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Riotto, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    It is usually thought that the present mass density of the Universe is dominated by a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), a fossil relic of the early Universe. Theoretical ideas and experimental efforts have focused mostly on production and detection of thermal relics, with mass typically in the range a few GeV to a hundred GeV. Here, we will review scenarios for production of nonthermal dark matter whose mass may be in the range 10/sup 12/ to 10/sup 19/ GeV, much larger than the mass of thermal wimpy WIMPS. We will also review recent related results in understanding the production of very heavy fermions through preheating after inflation. (19 refs).

  6. Management does matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroustrup, Jonas

    studies approach the paper acknowledges that management and project management technologies does matter, but comes in many shapes, and is performed differently in various socio-technical settings. The field of STS offers a new ground for a participatory and practice oriented approach to the development......The positivist and managerialist approaches to project management research has historically defined practice as a ‘technical’ discipline. This has recently been challenged by critical project management studies, who advocates for an opening of the field research to also include the social...... and organizational dynamics of projects. Following the topic of the panel this paper will discuss how these two positions, although seemingly different, both places the project manager as an omnipotent subject of control. The consequences becomes either a priori explanations or ideological pitfalls. From a science...

  7. Ultralight particle dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwald, A.

    2013-10-01

    We review the physics case for very weakly coupled ultralight particles beyond the Standard Model, in particular for axions and axion-like particles (ALPs): (i) the axionic solution of the strong CP problem and its embedding in well motivated extensions of the Standard Model; (ii) the possibility that the cold dark matter in the Universe is comprised of axions and ALPs; (iii) the ALP explanation of the anomalous transparency of the Universe for TeV photons; and (iv) the axion or ALP explanation of the anomalous energy loss of white dwarfs. Moreover, we present an overview of ongoing and near-future laboratory experiments searching for axions and ALPs: haloscopes, helioscopes, and light-shining-through-a-wall experiments.

  8. Supergravity and matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamietz, P.; Binetruy, P.; Girardi, G.; Grimm, R.

    1992-07-01

    The properties of a linear multiplet in interaction with supergravity and matter are presented, with a special emphasis on the coupling of Chern-Simons forms, relevant for the problem of the chiral and conformal anomalies in relation with Kaehler transformations and the corresponding anomaly cancellations. The linear supermultiplet describes an antisymmetric tensor gauge field together with a dilaton and a Majorana spinor. In particular, these fields are found among the massless modes of superstring theories. The general properties of this supermultiplet is reviewed in the Kaehler superspace formalism and the complete supersymmetric action is constructed. This includes the classically Kaehler invariant component field action for all the kinetic terms as well as a Green-Schwarz type action which exhibits a non-holomorphic gauge coupling function. (author) 32 refs

  9. Ultralight particle dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringwald, A.

    2013-10-15

    We review the physics case for very weakly coupled ultralight particles beyond the Standard Model, in particular for axions and axion-like particles (ALPs): (i) the axionic solution of the strong CP problem and its embedding in well motivated extensions of the Standard Model; (ii) the possibility that the cold dark matter in the Universe is comprised of axions and ALPs; (iii) the ALP explanation of the anomalous transparency of the Universe for TeV photons; and (iv) the axion or ALP explanation of the anomalous energy loss of white dwarfs. Moreover, we present an overview of ongoing and near-future laboratory experiments searching for axions and ALPs: haloscopes, helioscopes, and light-shining-through-a-wall experiments.

  10. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan-e~Alam; Subhasis~Chattopadhyay; Tapan~Nayak

    2008-10-01

    Quark Matter 2008—the 20th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions was held in Jaipur, the Pink City of India, from 4-10 February, 2008. Organizing Quark Matter 2008 in India itself indicates the international recognition of the Indian contribution to the field of heavy-ion physics, which was initiated and nurtured by Bikash Sinha, Chair of the conference. The conference was inaugurated by the Honourable Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Smt. Vasundhara Raje followed by the key note address by Professor Carlo Rubbia. The scientific programme started with the theoretical overview, `SPS to RHIC and onwards to LHC' by Larry McLerran followed by several theoretical and experimental overview talks on the ongoing experiments at SPS and RHIC. The future experiments at the LHC, FAIR and J-PARC, along with the theoretical predictions, were discussed in great depth. Lattice QCD predictions on the nature of the phase transition and critical point were vigorously debated during several plenary and parallel session presentations. The conference was enriched by the presence of an unprecedented number of participants; about 600 participants representing 31 countries across the globe. This issue contains papers based on plenary talks and oral presentations presented at the conference. Besides invited and contributed talks, there were also a large number of poster presentations. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role in the selection of speakers, both for plenary and parallel session talks. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from helping to prepare the academic programme down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both the committees for making Quark Matter 2008 a very effective and interesting platform for scientific deliberations. Quark Matter 2008 was financially supported by: Air Liquide (New Delhi) Board of Research Nuclear Sciences (Mumbai) Bose

  11. Quark matter 93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otterlund, Ingvar; Ruuskanen, Vesa

    1993-12-15

    In his welcome address to the 10th International Conference on Ultra- Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Quark Matter '93), held in Borlange, Sweden, from 20-24 June, Hans-Ake Gustafsson was puzzled why this year's conference was billed as the tenth in the series. He had tried to count but could only find eight forerunners - Bielefeld (1982), Brookhaven (1983), Helsinki (1984), Asilomar (1986), Nordkirchen (1987), Lenox (1988), Menton (1990), Gatlinburg (1991), making this year's meeting at Borlange the ninth. The answer was given by Helmut Satz in his introductory talk, pointing out that at the time of the Bielefeld meeting, a few conferences dealing with similar topics had already been held. The Bielefeld organizers thus did not consider their conference the first. Whatever its pedigree, the Borlange meeting covered particle production in highly excited and compressed nuclear matter, fluctuations and correlations, quark phenomena (quantum chromodynamics - QCD) in nuclear collisions, probes and signatures of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), future collider experiments and instrumentation. The theoretical talks were split between the fundamental properties of the hot and dense matter at or near equilibrium, and the interface between theory and experiment. The phenomenological modelling of heavy ion collisions seems to reproduce at least all the main features of the data with hadrons, resonances and strings as the degrees of freedom. However secondary interactions among the produced hadrons or strings need to be added. Hydrodynamic calculations lead to results which reproduce the main features of the collisions. With increasing collision energy, the parton degrees of freedom become more important. Klaus Geiger described an ambitious scheme treating the whole nucleus-nucleus collision in terms of a kinetic parton (quark/gluon) cascade. The initial parton distribution at the beginning of the collision is determined from the quark-gluon nuclear structure and the

  12. Quark matter 93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otterlund, Ingvar; Ruuskanen, Vesa

    1993-01-01

    In his welcome address to the 10th International Conference on Ultra- Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Quark Matter '93), held in Borlange, Sweden, from 20-24 June, Hans-Ake Gustafsson was puzzled why this year's conference was billed as the tenth in the series. He had tried to count but could only find eight forerunners - Bielefeld (1982), Brookhaven (1983), Helsinki (1984), Asilomar (1986), Nordkirchen (1987), Lenox (1988), Menton (1990), Gatlinburg (1991), making this year's meeting at Borlange the ninth. The answer was given by Helmut Satz in his introductory talk, pointing out that at the time of the Bielefeld meeting, a few conferences dealing with similar topics had already been held. The Bielefeld organizers thus did not consider their conference the first. Whatever its pedigree, the Borlange meeting covered particle production in highly excited and compressed nuclear matter, fluctuations and correlations, quark phenomena (quantum chromodynamics - QCD) in nuclear collisions, probes and signatures of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), future collider experiments and instrumentation. The theoretical talks were split between the fundamental properties of the hot and dense matter at or near equilibrium, and the interface between theory and experiment. The phenomenological modelling of heavy ion collisions seems to reproduce at least all the main features of the data with hadrons, resonances and strings as the degrees of freedom. However secondary interactions among the produced hadrons or strings need to be added. Hydrodynamic calculations lead to results which reproduce the main features of the collisions. With increasing collision energy, the parton degrees of freedom become more important. Klaus Geiger described an ambitious scheme treating the whole nucleus-nucleus collision in terms of a kinetic parton (quark/gluon) cascade. The initial parton distribution at the beginning of the collision is determined from the quark-gluon nuclear structure

  13. Environmental psychology matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Environmental psychology examines transactions between individuals and their built and natural environments. This includes investigating behaviors that inhibit or foster sustainable, climate-healthy, and nature-enhancing choices, the antecedents and correlates of those behaviors, and interventions to increase proenvironmental behavior. It also includes transactions in which nature provides restoration or inflicts stress, and transactions that are more mutual, such as the development of place attachment and identity and the impacts on and from important physical settings such as home, workplaces, schools, and public spaces. As people spend more time in virtual environments, online transactions are coming under increasing research attention. Every aspect of human existence occurs in one environment or another, and the transactions with and within them have important consequences both for people and their natural and built worlds. Environmental psychology matters.

  14. Executive Functions in Healthy Older Adults Are Differentially Related to Macro- and Microstructural White Matter Characteristics of the Cerebral Lobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Hirsiger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with microstructural white matter (WM changes. WM microstructural characteristics, measured with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, are different in normal appearing white matter (NAWM and WM hyperintensities (WMH. It is largely unknown how the microstructural properties of WMH are associated with cognition and if there are regional effects for specific cognitive domains. We therefore examined within 200 healthy older participants (a differences in microstructural characteristics of NAWM and WMH per cerebral lobe; and (b the association of macrostructural (WMH volume and microstructural characteristics (within NAWM and WMH separately of each lobe with measures of executive function and processing speed. Multi-modal imaging (i.e., T1, DTI, and FLAIR was used to assess WM properties. The Stroop and the Trail Making Test were used to measure inhibition, task-switching (both components of executive function, and processing speed. We observed that age was associated with deterioration of white matter microstructure of the NAWM, most notably in the frontal lobe. Older participants had larger WMH volumes and lowest fractional anisotropy values within WMH were found in the frontal lobe. Task-switching was associated with cerebral NAWM volume and NAWM volume of all lobes. Processing speed was associated with total NAWM volume, and microstructural properties of parietal NAWM, the parietal WMH, and the temporal NAWM. Task-switching was related to microstructural properties of WMH of the frontal lobe and WMH volume of the parietal lobe. Our results confirm that executive functioning and processing speed are uniquely associated with macro- and microstructural properties of NAWM and WMH. We further demonstrate for the first time that these relationships differ by lobar region. This warrants the consideration of these distinct WM indices when investigating cognitive function.

  15. The dark side of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.

    2003-01-01

    The number of baryons (protons and neutrons) of the universe can be deduced from the relative abundances of light elements (deuterium, helium and lithium) that were generated during the very first minutes of the cosmic history. This calculation has shown that the baryonic matter represents only 5% of the total mass of the universe. As for neutrinos (hot dark matter), their very low mass restraints their contribution to only 0,3%. The spinning movement of galaxies requires the existence of huge quantity of matter that seems invisible (black matter). Astrophysicists have recently discovered that the universal expansion is accelerating and that the space geometry is euclidean, from these 2 facts they have deduced a value of the mass-energy density that implies the existence of something different from dark matter called dark energy and that is expected to represent about 70% of the mass of the universe. Physicists face the challenge of detecting black matter and black energy. The first attempt for detecting black matter began in 1997 when the UKDMC detector entered into service. Now more than half a dozen of detectors are searching for dark matter but till now in vain. A new generation of detectors (CDMS-2, ZEPLIN-2, CRESST-2 and Edelweiss-2) combining detection, new methods of particle discrimination and the study of the evolution of the signal over very long periods of time are progressively entering into operation. (A.C.)

  16. Exponential Potential versus Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-15

    scale of the solar system. Galaxy, Dark matter , Galaxy cluster, Gravitation, Quantum gravity...A two parameter exponential potential explains the anomalous kinematics of galaxies and galaxy clusters without need for the myriad ad hoc dark ... matter models currently in vogue. It also explains much about the scales and structures of galaxies and galaxy clusters while being quite negligible on the

  17. Introduction: Teaching Black Lives Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Austin; Erica Cardwell; Christopher Kennedy; Robyn Spencer

    2016-01-01

    An introduction to Radical Teacher, Issue 106: Teaching Black Lives Matter. This issue brings together a diverse collection of articles exploring educator’s responses, strategies, and stories on how #BlackLivesMatter has informed their teaching practice, the content of their courses, and their personal relationship to colleagues, family, friends, and self.

  18. Introduction: Teaching Black Lives Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Austin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An introduction to Radical Teacher, Issue 106: Teaching Black Lives Matter. This issue brings together a diverse collection of articles exploring educator’s responses, strategies, and stories on how #BlackLivesMatter has informed their teaching practice, the content of their courses, and their personal relationship to colleagues, family, friends, and self.

  19. Nuclear matter and electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sick, I [Dept. fuer Physik und Astronomie, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)

    1998-06-01

    We show that inclusive electron scattering at large momentum transfer allows a measurement of short-range properties of nuclear matter. This provides a very valuable constraint in selecting the calculations appropriate for predicting nuclear matter properties at the densities of astrophysical interest. (orig.)

  20. High density matter at RHIC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    QCD predicts a phase transition between hadronic matter and a quark-gluon plasma at high energy density. The relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a new facility dedicated to the experimental study of matter under extreme conditions. Already the first round of experimental results at ...

  1. Quark Matter '87: Concluding remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1988-03-01

    This year marked the beginning of the experimental program at BNL and CERN to probe the properties of ultra dense hadronic matter and to search for the quark-gluon plasma phase of matter. Possible implications of the preliminary findings are discussed. Problems needing further theoretical and experimental study are pointed out. 50 refs

  2. Indirect searches for dark matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The current status of indirect searches for dark matter has been reviewed in a schematic way here. The main relevant experimental results of the recent years have been listed and the excitements and disappointments that their phenomenological interpretations in terms of almost-standard annihilating dark matter have ...

  3. Z2 SIMP dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, Nicolás; Chu, Xiaoyong

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter with strong self-interactions provides a compelling solution to several small-scale structure puzzles. Under the assumption that the coupling between dark matter and the Standard Model particles is suppressed, such strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) allow for a successful thermal freeze-out through N-to-N' processes, where N dark matter particles annihilate to N' of them. In the most common scenarios, where dark matter stability is guaranteed by a Z 2 symmetry, the seemingly leading annihilating channel, i.e. 3-to-2 process, is forbidden, so the 4-to-2 one dominate the production of the dark matter relic density. Moreover, cosmological observations require that the dark matter sector is colder than the thermal bath of Standard Model particles, a condition that can be dynamically generated via a small portal between dark matter and Standard Model particles, à la freeze-in. This scenario is exemplified in the context of the Singlet Scalar dark matter model

  4. Advances in Soft Matter Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shaofan

    2012-01-01

    "Advances in Soft Matter Mechanics" is a compilation and selection of recent works in soft matter mechanics by a group of active researchers in the field. The main objectives of this book are first to disseminate the latest developments in soft matter mechanics in the field of applied and computational mechanics, and second to introduce soft matter mechanics as a sub-discipline of soft matter physics. As an important branch of soft matter physics, soft matter mechanics has developed rapidly in recent years. A number of the novel approaches discussed in this book are unique, such as the coarse grained finite element method for modeling colloidal adhesion, entropic elasticity, meshfree simulations of liquid crystal elastomers, simulations of DNA, etc. The book is intended for researchers and graduate students in the field of mechanics, condensed matter physics and biomaterials. Dr. Shaofan Li is a professor of the University of California-Berkeley, U.S.A; Dr. Bohua Sun is a professor of Cape Peninsula Universit...

  5. Order and disorder in matter

    CERN Document Server

    Careri, Giorgio

    1984-01-01

    Order and Disorder in Matter offers a comprehensive and up-to-date view of structures and processes in matter, in terms of the evolving concepts of order and disorder. Particular emphasis is given to the recent evolution of these concepts and their relationship to the more complex systems in nature.

  6. Condensed matter physics in electrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornyshev, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Some topics in electrochemistry are considered from the condensed matter physics viewpoint in relation to the problems discussed in this book. Examples of the successful application of condensed matter physics to electrochemistry are discussed together with prospective problems and pressing questions. (author). 127 refs, 4 figs

  7. Dark matter versus Mach's principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borzeszkowski, H.-H.; Treder, H.-J.

    1998-02-01

    Empirical and theoretical evidence show that the astrophysical problem of dark matter might be solved by a theory of Einstein-Mayer type. In this theory up to global Lorentz rotations the reference system is determined by the motion of cosmic matter. Thus one is led to a "Riemannian space with teleparallelism" realizing a geometric version of the Mach-Einstein doctrine. The field equations of this gravitational theory contain hidden matter terms where the existence of hidden matter is inferred safely from its gravitational effects. It is argued that in the nonrelativistic mechanical approximation they provide an inertia-free mechanics where the inertial mass of a body is induced by the gravitational action of the comic masses. Interpreted form the Newtonian point of view this mechanics shows that the effective gravitational mass of astrophysical objects depends on r such that one expects the existence of dark matter.

  8. Dark matter and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masiero, A [SISSA-ISAS, Trieste (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Pascoli, S [SISSA-ISAS, Trieste (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy)

    2001-11-15

    Dark matter constitutes a key-problem at the interface between Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology. Indeed, the observational facts which have been accumulated in the last years on dark matter point to the existence of an amount of non-baryonic dark matter. Since the Standard Model of Particle Physics does not possess any candidate for such non-baryonic dark matter, this problem constitutes a major indication for new Physics beyond the Standard Model. We analyze the most important candidates for non-baryonic dark matter in the context of extensions of the Standard Model (in particular supersymmetric models). The recent hints for the presence of a large amount of unclustered 'vacuum' energy (cosmological constant?) is discussed from the Astrophysical and Particle Physics perspective. (author)

  9. In search of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, Kenneth C

    2006-01-01

    The dark matter problem is one of the most fundamental and profoundly difficult to solve problems in the history of science. Not knowing what makes up most of the known universe goes to the heart of our understanding of the Universe and our place in it. In Search of Dark Matter is the story of the emergence of the dark matter problem, from the initial erroneous ‘discovery’ of dark matter by Jan Oort to contemporary explanations for the nature of dark matter and its role in the origin and evolution of the Universe. Written for the educated non-scientist and scientist alike, it spans a variety of scientific disciplines, from observational astronomy to particle physics. Concepts that the reader will encounter along the way are at the cutting edge of scientific research. However the themes are explained in such a way that no prior understanding of science beyond a high school education is necessary.

  10. Dark matter search with XENON1T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, J.

    2018-01-01

    Most matter in the universe consists of 'dark matter' unknown to particle physics. Deep underground detectors such as XENON1T attempt to detect rare collisions of dark matter with ordinary atoms. This thesis describes the first dark matter search of XENON1T, how dark matter signals would appear in

  11. Unified Origin for Baryonic Visible Matter and Antibaryonic Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Morrissey, David E.; Tulin, Sean; Sigurdson, Kris

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel mechanism for generating both the baryon and dark matter densities of the Universe. A new Dirac fermion X carrying a conserved baryon number charge couples to the standard model quarks as well as a GeV-scale hidden sector. CP-violating decays of X, produced nonthermally in low-temperature reheating, sequester antibaryon number in the hidden sector, thereby leaving a baryon excess in the visible sector. The antibaryonic hidden states are stable dark matter. A spectacular signature of this mechanism is the baryon-destroying inelastic scattering of dark matter that can annihilate baryons at appreciable rates relevant for nucleon decay searches.

  12. Unified origin for baryonic visible matter and antibaryonic dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Morrissey, David E; Sigurdson, Kris; Tulin, Sean

    2010-11-19

    We present a novel mechanism for generating both the baryon and dark matter densities of the Universe. A new Dirac fermion X carrying a conserved baryon number charge couples to the standard model quarks as well as a GeV-scale hidden sector. CP-violating decays of X, produced nonthermally in low-temperature reheating, sequester antibaryon number in the hidden sector, thereby leaving a baryon excess in the visible sector. The antibaryonic hidden states are stable dark matter. A spectacular signature of this mechanism is the baryon-destroying inelastic scattering of dark matter that can annihilate baryons at appreciable rates relevant for nucleon decay searches.

  13. Matter and dark matter from false vacuum decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, W.; Schmitz, K.; Vertongen, G.

    2010-08-15

    We study tachyonic preheating associated with the spontaneous breaking of B-L, the difference of baryon and lepton number. Reheating occurs through the decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos which are produced during preheating and in decays of the Higgs particles of B-L breaking. Baryogenesis is an interplay of nonthermal and thermal leptogenesis, accompanied by thermally produced gravitino dark matter. The proposed mechanism simultaneously explains the generation of matter and dark matter, thereby relating the absolute neutrino mass scale to the gravitino mass. (orig.)

  14. Matter and dark matter from false vacuum decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; Schmitz, K.; Vertongen, G.

    2010-08-01

    We study tachyonic preheating associated with the spontaneous breaking of B-L, the difference of baryon and lepton number. Reheating occurs through the decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos which are produced during preheating and in decays of the Higgs particles of B-L breaking. Baryogenesis is an interplay of nonthermal and thermal leptogenesis, accompanied by thermally produced gravitino dark matter. The proposed mechanism simultaneously explains the generation of matter and dark matter, thereby relating the absolute neutrino mass scale to the gravitino mass. (orig.)

  15. Dipolar dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masso, Eduard; Mohanty, Subhendra; Rao, Soumya

    2009-01-01

    If dark matter (DM) has nonzero direct or transition, electric or magnetic dipole moment then it can scatter nucleons electromagnetically in direct detection experiments. Using the results from experiments like XENON, CDMS, DAMA, and COGENT, we put bounds on the electric and magnetic dipole moments of DM. If DM consists of Dirac fermions with direct dipole moments, then DM of mass less than 10 GeV is consistent with the DAMA signal and with null results of other experiments. If on the other hand DM consists of Majorana fermions then they can have only nonzero transition moments between different mass eigenstates. We find that Majorana fermions with masses 38 χ < or approx. 100-200 GeV and mass splitting of the order of (150-200) keV can explain the DAMA signal and the null observations from other experiments and in addition give the observed relic density of DM by dipole-mediated annihilation. The absence of the heavier DM state in the present Universe can be explained by dipole-mediated radiative decay. This parameter space for the mass and for dipole moments is allowed by limits from L3 but may have observable signals at LHC.

  16. Quark matter and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.; Fields, B.; Thomas, D.

    1992-01-01

    The possible implications of the quark-hadron transition for cosmology are explored. Possible surviving signatures are discussed. In particular, the possibility of generating a dark matter candidate such as strange nuggets or planetary mass black holes is noted. Much discussion is devoted to the possible role of the transition for cosmological nucleosynthesis. It is emphasized that even an optimized first order phase transition will not significantly alter the nucleosynthesis constraints on the cosmological baryon density nor on neutrino counting. However, it is noted that Be and B observations in old stars may eventually be able to be a signature of a cosmologically significant quark-hadron transition. It is pointed out that the critical point in this regard is whether the observed B/Be ratio can be produced by spallation processes or requires cosmological input. Spallation cannot produce a B/Be ratio below 7.6. A supporting signature would be Be and B ratios to oxygen that greatly exceed galactic values. At present, all data is still consistent with a spallagenic origin

  17. Superstring dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, B.A.; Ellis, J.; Enqvist, K.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Hagelin, J.S.; Olive, K.A.

    1986-02-01

    It is argued that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) emerging from the superstring theory is a mixture of neutral gauginos and matter fermions. Their mixing matrix is calculated in a plausible minimal low-energy model abstracted from the superstring and the composition of the LSP chi is exhibited. Its relic cosmological density is computed and it is found that it lies within a factor 2 of the critical density required for closure, over a wide range of possible input parameters. The flux of neutrinos from LSP annihilation in the Sun is computed and it is found that it straddles the upper bound from proton decay detectors. Acceptable fluxes are obtained if m chi is less than m/sub t/, in which case the superstring relic can have the critical density for a present Hubble expansion rate H 0 greater than or approximately equal to 50 km/s/Mpc only if m/sub t/ is greater than or approximately 40 GeV. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research

  19. The Evolution of Galaxies by the Incompatibility between Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Ding-Yu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the evolution of galaxies is by the incompatibility between dark matter and baryonic matter. Due to the structural difference, baryonic matter and dark matter are incompatible to each other as oil droplet and water in emulsion. In the interfacial zone between dark matter and baryonic matter, this incompatibility generates the modification of Newtonian dynamics to keep dark matter and baryonic matter apart. The five periods of baryonic structure development in the order of incre...

  20. The search for dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Nigel; Spooner, Neil

    2000-01-01

    Experiments housed deep underground are searching for new particles that could simultaneously solve one of the biggest mysteries in astrophysics and reveal what lies beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. Physicists are very particular about balancing budgets. Energy, charge and momentum all have to be conserved and often money as well. Astronomers were therefore surprised and disturbed to learn in the 1930s that our own Milky Way galaxy behaved as if it contained more matter than could be seen with telescopes. This puzzling non-luminous matter became known as ''dark matter'' and we now know that over 90% of the matter in the entire universe is dark. In later decades the search for this dark matter shifted from the heavens to the Earth. In fact, the search for dark matter went underground. Today there are experiments searching for dark matter hundreds and thousands of metres below ground in mines, road tunnels and other subterranean locations. These experiments are becoming more sensitive every year and are beginning to test various new models and theories in particle physics and cosmology. (UK)

  1. AMS-02 fits dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Csaba; Li, Tong

    2016-05-01

    In this work we perform a comprehensive statistical analysis of the AMS-02 electron, positron fluxes and the antiproton-to-proton ratio in the context of a simplified dark matter model. We include known, standard astrophysical sources and a dark matter component in the cosmic ray injection spectra. To predict the AMS-02 observables we use propagation parameters extracted from observed fluxes of heavier nuclei and the low energy part of the AMS-02 data. We assume that the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion coupling to third generation fermions via a spin-0 mediator, and annihilating to multiple channels at once. The simultaneous presence of various annihilation channels provides the dark matter model with additional flexibility, and this enables us to simultaneously fit all cosmic ray spectra using a simple particle physics model and coherent astrophysical assumptions. Our results indicate that AMS-02 observations are not only consistent with the dark matter hypothesis within the uncertainties, but adding a dark matter contribution improves the fit to the data. Assuming, however, that dark matter is solely responsible for this improvement of the fit, it is difficult to evade the latest CMB limits in this model.

  2. Phases of cannibal dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, Marco [New High Energy Theory Center, Department of Physics, Rutgers University,136 Frelinghuisen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Pappadopulo, Duccio; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Trevisan, Gabriele [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University,New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2016-12-13

    A hidden sector with a mass gap undergoes an epoch of cannibalism if number changing interactions are active when the temperature drops below the mass of the lightest hidden particle. During cannibalism, the hidden sector temperature decreases only logarithmically with the scale factor. We consider the possibility that dark matter resides in a hidden sector that underwent cannibalism, and has relic density set by the freeze-out of two-to-two annihilations. We identify three novel phases, depending on the behavior of the hidden sector when dark matter freezes out. During the cannibal phase, dark matter annihilations decouple while the hidden sector is cannibalizing. During the chemical phase, only two-to-two interactions are active and the total number of hidden particles is conserved. During the one way phase, the dark matter annihilation products decay out of equilibrium, suppressing the production of dark matter from inverse annihilations. We map out the distinct phenomenology of each phase, which includes a boosted dark matter annihilation rate, new relativistic degrees of freedom, warm dark matter, and observable distortions to the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  3. Dark matter and dark radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, Lotty; Buckley, Matthew R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We explore the feasibility and astrophysical consequences of a new long-range U(1) gauge field ('dark electromagnetism') that couples only to dark matter, not to the standard model. The dark matter consists of an equal number of positive and negative charges under the new force, but annihilations are suppressed if the dark-matter mass is sufficiently high and the dark fine-structure constant α-circumflex is sufficiently small. The correct relic abundance can be obtained if the dark matter also couples to the conventional weak interactions, and we verify that this is consistent with particle-physics constraints. The primary limit on α-circumflex comes from the demand that the dark matter be effectively collisionless in galactic dynamics, which implies α-circumflex -3 for TeV-scale dark matter. These values are easily compatible with constraints from structure formation and primordial nucleosynthesis. We raise the prospect of interesting new plasma effects in dark-matter dynamics, which remain to be explored.

  4. AMS-02 fits dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balázs, Csaba; Li, Tong [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale,School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2016-05-05

    In this work we perform a comprehensive statistical analysis of the AMS-02 electron, positron fluxes and the antiproton-to-proton ratio in the context of a simplified dark matter model. We include known, standard astrophysical sources and a dark matter component in the cosmic ray injection spectra. To predict the AMS-02 observables we use propagation parameters extracted from observed fluxes of heavier nuclei and the low energy part of the AMS-02 data. We assume that the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion coupling to third generation fermions via a spin-0 mediator, and annihilating to multiple channels at once. The simultaneous presence of various annihilation channels provides the dark matter model with additional flexibility, and this enables us to simultaneously fit all cosmic ray spectra using a simple particle physics model and coherent astrophysical assumptions. Our results indicate that AMS-02 observations are not only consistent with the dark matter hypothesis within the uncertainties, but adding a dark matter contribution improves the fit to the data. Assuming, however, that dark matter is solely responsible for this improvement of the fit, it is difficult to evade the latest CMB limits in this model.

  5. Particle Dark Matter: Status and Searches

    OpenAIRE

    Sandick, Pearl

    2010-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the phenomenology of particle dark matter and the properties of some of the most widely studied dark matter candidates. Recent developments in direct and indirect dark matter searches are discussed.

  6. Probes for dark matter physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.

    The existence of cosmological dark matter is in the bedrock of the modern cosmology. The dark matter is assumed to be nonbaryonic and consists of new stable particles. Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) miracle appeals to search for neutral stable weakly interacting particles in underground experiments by their nuclear recoil and at colliders by missing energy and momentum, which they carry out. However, the lack of WIMP effects in their direct underground searches and at colliders can appeal to other forms of dark matter candidates. These candidates may be weakly interacting slim particles, superweakly interacting particles, or composite dark matter, in which new particles are bound. Their existence should lead to cosmological effects that can find probes in the astrophysical data. However, if composite dark matter contains stable electrically charged leptons and quarks bound by ordinary Coulomb interaction in elusive dark atoms, these charged constituents of dark atoms can be the subject of direct experimental test at the colliders. The models, predicting stable particles with charge ‑ 2 without stable particles with charges + 1 and ‑ 1 can avoid severe constraints on anomalous isotopes of light elements and provide solution for the puzzles of dark matter searches. In such models, the excessive ‑ 2 charged particles are bound with primordial helium in O-helium atoms, maintaining specific nuclear-interacting form of the dark matter. The successful development of composite dark matter scenarios appeals for experimental search for doubly charged constituents of dark atoms, making experimental search for exotic stable double charged particles experimentum crucis for dark atoms of composite dark matter.

  7. Comprehensive asymmetric dark matter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Stephen J.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2018-05-01

    Asymmetric dark matter (ADM) is motivated by the similar cosmological mass densities measured for ordinary and dark matter. We present a comprehensive theory for ADM that addresses the mass density similarity, going beyond the usual ADM explanations of similar number densities. It features an explicit matter-antimatter asymmetry generation mechanism, has one fully worked out thermal history and suggestions for other possibilities, and meets all phenomenological, cosmological and astrophysical constraints. Importantly, it incorporates a deep reason for why the dark matter mass scale is related to the proton mass, a key consideration in ADM models. Our starting point is the idea of mirror matter, which offers an explanation for dark matter by duplicating the standard model with a dark sector related by a Z2 parity symmetry. However, the dark sector need not manifest as a symmetric copy of the standard model in the present day. By utilizing the mechanism of "asymmetric symmetry breaking" with two Higgs doublets in each sector, we develop a model of ADM where the mirror symmetry is spontaneously broken, leading to an electroweak scale in the dark sector that is significantly larger than that of the visible sector. The weak sensitivity of the ordinary and dark QCD confinement scales to their respective electroweak scales leads to the necessary connection between the dark matter and proton masses. The dark matter is composed of either dark neutrons or a mixture of dark neutrons and metastable dark hydrogen atoms. Lepton asymmetries are generated by the C P -violating decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos in both sectors. These are then converted by sphaleron processes to produce the observed ratio of visible to dark matter in the universe. The dynamics responsible for the kinetic decoupling of the two sectors emerges as an important issue that we only partially solve.

  8. Phase transition to QGP matter : confined vs deconfined matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maire, Antonin

    2015-01-01

    Simplified phase diagram of the nuclear phase transition, from the regular hadronic matter to the QGP phase. The sketch is meant to describe the transition foreseen along the temperature axis, at low baryochemical potential, µB.

  9. Alternative dark matter candidates. Axions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwald, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The axion is arguably one of the best motivated candidates for dark matter. For a decay constant >or similar 10 9 GeV, axions are dominantly produced non-thermally in the early universe and hence are ''cold'', their velocity dispersion being small enough to fit to large scale structure. Moreover, such a large decay constant ensures the stability at cosmological time scales and its behaviour as a collisionless fluid at cosmological length scales. Here, we review the state of the art of axion dark matter predictions and of experimental efforts to search for axion dark matter in laboratory experiments.

  10. Capturing prokaryotic dark matter genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasc, Cyrielle; Ribière, Céline; Parisot, Nicolas; Beugnot, Réjane; Defois, Clémence; Petit-Biderre, Corinne; Boucher, Delphine; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Prokaryotes are the most diverse and abundant cellular life forms on Earth. Most of them, identified by indirect molecular approaches, belong to microbial dark matter. The advent of metagenomic and single-cell genomic approaches has highlighted the metabolic capabilities of numerous members of this dark matter through genome reconstruction. Thus, linking functions back to the species has revolutionized our understanding of how ecosystem function is sustained by the microbial world. This review will present discoveries acquired through the illumination of prokaryotic dark matter genomes by these innovative approaches. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Matter-Wave Tractor Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorlach, Alexey A.; Gorlach, Maxim A.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Optical and acoustic tractor beams are currently the focus of intense research due to their counterintuitive property of exerting a pulling force on small scattering objects. In this Letter we propose a matter-wave tractor beam and utilize the de Broglie waves of nonrelativistic matter particles...... are compared, and the matter-wave pulling force is found to have exclusive properties of dragging slow particles in short-range potentials. We envisage that the use of tractor beams could lead to the unprecedented precision in manipulation with atomic-scale quantum objects....

  12. Alternative dark matter candidates. Axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringwald, Andreas

    2017-01-15

    The axion is arguably one of the best motivated candidates for dark matter. For a decay constant >or similar 10{sup 9} GeV, axions are dominantly produced non-thermally in the early universe and hence are ''cold'', their velocity dispersion being small enough to fit to large scale structure. Moreover, such a large decay constant ensures the stability at cosmological time scales and its behaviour as a collisionless fluid at cosmological length scales. Here, we review the state of the art of axion dark matter predictions and of experimental efforts to search for axion dark matter in laboratory experiments.

  13. Dark matter in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahcall, J.; Piran, T.; Weinberg, S.

    1988-01-01

    If standard gravitational theory is correct, then most of the matter in the universe is in an unidentified form which does not emit enough light to have been detected by current instrumentation. This proceedings was devoted to a discussion of the so-called ''missing matter'' problem in the universe. The goal of the School was to make current research work on unseen matter accessible to students or facilities without prior experience in this area. Due to the pedagogical nature of the School and the strong interactions between students and the lecturers, the written lectures included in this volume often contain techniques and explanations not found in more formal journal publications

  14. Constraining Dark Matter with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Czodrowski, Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The presence of a non-baryonic dark matter component in the Universe is inferred from the observation of its gravitational interaction. If dark matter interacts weakly with the Standard Model it would be produced at the LHC, escaping the detector and leaving a large missing transverse momentum as their signature. The ATLAS detector has developed a broad and systematic search program for dark matter production in LHC collisions. The results of these searches on the first 13 TeV data, their interpretation, and the design and possible evolution of the search program will be presented.

  15. Indirect detection of dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J; Lamanna, G; Lavalle, J

    2006-01-01

    This article is an experimental review of the status and prospects of indirect searches for dark matter. Experiments observe secondary particles such as positrons, antiprotons, antideuterons, gamma-rays and neutrinos which could originate from annihilations of dark matter particles in various locations in the galaxy. Data exist from some experiments which have been interpreted as hints of evidence for dark matter. These data and their interpretations are reviewed together with the new experiments which are planned to resolve the puzzles and make new measurements which could give unambiguous results

  16. Mathematical models of granular matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Paolo; Giovine, Pasquale

    2008-01-01

    Granular matter displays a variety of peculiarities that distinguish it from other appearances studied in condensed matter physics and renders its overall mathematical modelling somewhat arduous. Prominent directions in the modelling granular flows are analyzed from various points of view. Foundational issues, numerical schemes and experimental results are discussed. The volume furnishes a rather complete overview of the current research trends in the mechanics of granular matter. Various chapters introduce the reader to different points of view and related techniques. New models describing granular bodies as complex bodies are presented. Results on the analysis of the inelastic Boltzmann equations are collected in different chapters. Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry is also discussed.

  17. Sterile neutrinos as dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodelson, S.; Widrow, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    The simplest model that can accommodate a viable nonbaryonic dark matter candidate is the standard electroweak theory with the addition of right-handed (sterile) neutrinos. We consider a single generation of neutrinos with a Dirac mass μ and a Majorana mass M for the right-handed component. If M much-gt μ (standard hot dark matter corresponds to M=0), then sterile neutrinos are produced via oscillations in the early Universe with energy density independent of M. However, M is crucial in determining the large scale structure of the Universe; for M∼100 eV, sterile neutrinos make an excellent warm dark matter candidate

  18. Mixed dark matter from technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Alexander; T. Frandsen, Mads; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We study natural composite cold dark matter candidates which are pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons (pNGB) in models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. Some of these can have a significant thermal relic abundance, while others must be mainly asymmetric dark matter. By considering the thermal...... abundance alone we find a lower bound of MW on the pNGB mass when the (composite) Higgs is heavier than 115 GeV. Being pNGBs, the dark matter candidates are in general light enough to be produced at the LHC....

  19. Probing nuclear matter with dileptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-06-01

    Dileptons are shown to be of interest in helping probe extreme conditions of temperature and density in nuclear matter. The current state of experimental knowledge about dileptons is briefly described, and their use in upcoming experiments with light ions at CERN SPS are reviewed, including possible signatures of quark matter formation. Use of dileptons in an upcoming experiment with a new spectrometer at Berkeley is also discussed. This experiment will probe the nuclear matter equation of state at high temperature and density. 16 refs., 8 figs

  20. Casting light on dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, John

    2012-01-01

    The prospects for detecting a candidate supersymmetric dark matter particle at the LHC are reviewed, and compared with the prospects for direct and indirect searches for astrophysical dark matter. The discussion is based on a frequentist analysis of the preferred regions of the Minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model with universal soft supersymmetry breaking (the CMSSM). LHC searches may have good chances to observe supersymmetry in the near future - and so may direct searches for astrophysical dark matter particles, whereas indirect searches may require greater sensitivity, at least within the CMSSM.