WorldWideScience

Sample records for matter diagenesis sedimentology

  1. Sedimentology, organic matter and diagenesis of fishscale shales in the molasse basin of upper Austria (Upper Eocene - Lower Oligocene); Sedimentologie, organisches Material und Diagenese des Fischschiefers im oberoesterreichischen Molasse-Becken (Obereozaen - Unteroligozaen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, H.M. [Inst. fuer Geologie und Palaeontologie der TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Bechtel, A. [Inst. fuer Geowiss. der Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Wien (Austria); Wagner, L.; Polesny, H.

    2002-07-01

    Fishscale shales (Schoeneck Formation) is an important parent rock of petroleum in prealpine molasse. Two different formation models are discussed, i.e. deposition and accumulation of organic matter (a) in a stagnating basin and (b) in a buoyancy zone. Both models were derived from samples, but they provide no information on the lithological and geochemical characteristics of complete fishscale shale sequences. This investigation focused on the vertical and lateral sedimentary development and the diagenetic changes of organic matter in the fishscale shales of upper Austria. Additionally, organic-geochemical data were used for validating the two deposition models. [German] Der Fischschiefer (Schoeneck Formation) stellt ein wichtiges Erdoelmuttergestein der alpinen Vorlandmolasse der. Waehrend seiner Ablagerung im Obereozaen(?)-Unteroligozaen wurde infolge der alpinen Orogenese die Paratethys von der Tethys abgetrennt und der Wasseraustausch zur Tethys eingeschraenkt. Gleichzeitig stroemten kalte Wassermassen ueber die polnische Senke in die Paratethys. Die Ablagerung der organisch-reichen Sedimente wird auf diese veraenderte palaeo-ozeanographische Situation zurueckgefuehrt. Zwei unterschiedliche Modelle werden fuer deren Bildung diskutiert: Ablagerung und Akkumulation von organischem Material in (a) einem stagnierenden Becken oder (b) in einer Auftriebszone. Die bislang diskutierten Modelle beruhen auf Ergebnissen vereinzelter Proben. Jedoch liegen keine Informationen hinsichtlich der lithologischen und geochemischen Charakteristika vollstaendiger Fischschiefer-Abfolgen vor. Es ist das Ziel dieses Beitrages, die vertikale und laterale sedimentaere Entwicklung, sowie die diagenetischen Veraenderungen des organischen Materials im Fischschiefer in Oberoesterreich vorzustellen. Zusaetzlich werden organisch-geochemische Daten eingesetzt, um die beiden vorgestellten Ablagerungsmodelle zu ueberpruefen. (orig.)

  2. Sedimentology and geochemistry of carbonates diagenesis. Application to the Malm of the eastern edge of the Paris basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, B.

    2001-12-01

    The important heterogeneity of neritic carbonates reflects: 1 - the facies characteristics of the initial sediments, linked with the diversity of sedimentation environments, and 2 - the post-sedimentation diagenesis characteristics. The aim of this work is to explore this heterogeneity using the δ 18 O isotopic signal. A three step pluri-disciplinary approach with different observation scales is established: 1 - a sedimentology study (facies inventory, paleo-environment variations, stratigraphic cycles), 2 - an inventory and chronology of the diagenesis phases and products which have modified he initial sediments, and 3 - a geochemical approach based on the δ 18 O signal. This last step combines ionic microprobe measurements performed on separated phases and measurements performed on the whole rock carbonated phase. The carbonate formations under study correspond to the HTM102 borehole made by the ANDRA in the Malm of the eastern edge of the Paris basin. For the stratigraphic approach, some field analogues have been studied (Pagny-sur-Meuse and Gudmont-Villiers sections). (J.S.)

  3. Early diagenesis of recently deposited organic matter: A 9-yr time-series study of a flood deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, T.; Langone, L.; Goñi, M. A.; Wheatcroft, R. A.; Miserocchi, S.; Bertotti, L.

    2012-04-01

    In Fall 2000, the Po River (Italy) experienced a 100-yr return period flood that resulted in a 1-25 cm-thick deposit in the adjacent prodelta (10-25 m water depth). In the following years, numerous post-depositional perturbations occurred including bioturbation, reworking by waves with heights exceeding 5 m, as well as periods of extremely high and low sediment supply. Cores collected in the central prodelta after the Fall 2000 flood and over the following 9 yr, allowed characterization of the event-strata in their initial state and documentation of their subsequent evolution. Sedimentological characteristics were investigated using X-radiographs and sediment texture analyses, whereas the composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) was studied via bulk and biomarker analyses, including organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), carbon stable isotope composition (δ13C), lignin phenols, cutin-products, p-hydroxy benzenes, benzoic acids, dicarboxylic acids, and fatty acids. The 9-yr time-series analysis indicated that roughly the lower half of the original event bed was preserved in the sediment record. Conversely, the upper half of the deposit experienced significant alterations including bioturbation, addition of new material, as well as coarsening. Comparison of the recently deposited material with 9-yr old preserved strata represented a unique natural laboratory to investigate the diagenesis of sedimentary OM in a non-steady system. Bulk data indicated that OC and TN were degraded at similar rates (loss ∼17%) whereas biomarkers exhibited a broad spectrum of reactivities (loss from ∼6% to ∼60%) indicating selective preservation during early diagenesis. Given the relevance of episodic sedimentation in several margins, this study has demonstrated the utility of event-response and time-series sampling of the seabed for understanding the early diagenesis in non-steady conditions.

  4. Bacterial cell wall preservation during organic matter diagenesis in sediments off Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Niggemann, Jutta; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    BACTERIAL CELL WALL PRESERVATION DURING ORGANIC MATTER DIAGENESIS IN SEDIMENTS OFF PERU The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids, total hydrolysable amino sugars and amino acid enantiomers (D- and L-forms) were investigated in surface sediments at 20 stations in the Peru margin: 9......°45 S - 13º32 S. The objective of this study was to assess the preservation of bacterial cell walls during diagenesis of organic matter. Bacterial cell walls were traced by analysis of biomarkers uniquely produced by bacteria (D-amino acids and muramic acid). The diagenetic status of the sediments......:00 Presentation is given by student: No...

  5. The role of low-temperature organic matter diagenesis in carbonate precipitation within a marine deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakawa, Kazuya; Ishii, Eiichi; Hirota, Akinari; Komatsu, Daisuke D.; Ikeya, Kosuke; Tsunogai, Urumu

    2017-01-01

    Carbonate minerals in veins can record paleo-hydrogeological information that enables the reconstruction of groundwater history. This paper investigates the cause of differences in the occurrence of carbonate veins in the Koetoi and Wakkanai formations, both Neogene mudstone units in northwestern Hokkaido, from the perspective of controls on CO_2 supply from the alteration of organic matter. Carbonate veins are rare in the Koetoi Formation, but are widespread in the Wakkanai Formation. This area is a region of oil and gas accumulation where deep groundwater is saturated mainly with CH_4 and CO_2. The results show high δ"1"3C values in co-existing CH_4 (∼–32.6‰) and CO_2 (∼+31.0‰) gases. An investigation of δ"1"3C – δD systematics among these gases indicates that isotopic fractionation was caused by microbial CO_2 reduction. Although total organic carbon content in the Koetoi Formation decreases with increasing depth, total organic content in the Wakkanai Formation remains roughly constant with depth. Furthermore, although δ"1"3C values also show depth dependence, values from the Wakkanai Formation are higher than those from the Koetoi Formation. This "1"3C-enrichment could be explained by Rayleigh fractionation in a closed system. Based on these results, the processes behind the formation of the carbonate veins can be summarized as follows. Carbon dioxide behavior is thought to play an important role with respect to carbonate formation because CO_2 abundance is closely linked to pH and pressure. In shallow sedimentary rocks such as the Koetoi Formation that have started to experience diagenetic alteration of organic matter, CO_2 in groundwater is supplied by microbial decomposition of organic matter and is reduced to CH_4 by methanogens. In deep sedimentary rocks such as the Wakkanai Formation that have undergone diagenesis but have only experienced moderate temperatures so that thermal decomposition of organic matter has not yet begun, microbial

  6. Sedimentology and geochemistry of carbonates diagenesis. Application to the Malm of the eastern edge of the Paris basin; Sedimentologie et geochimie de la diagenese des carbonates. Application au Malm de la Bordure Est du Bassin de Paris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, B

    2001-12-01

    The important heterogeneity of neritic carbonates reflects: 1 - the facies characteristics of the initial sediments, linked with the diversity of sedimentation environments, and 2 - the post-sedimentation diagenesis characteristics. The aim of this work is to explore this heterogeneity using the {delta}{sup 18}O isotopic signal. A three step pluri-disciplinary approach with different observation scales is established: 1 - a sedimentology study (facies inventory, paleo-environment variations, stratigraphic cycles), 2 - an inventory and chronology of the diagenesis phases and products which have modified he initial sediments, and 3 - a geochemical approach based on the {delta}{sup 18}O signal. This last step combines ionic microprobe measurements performed on separated phases and measurements performed on the whole rock carbonated phase. The carbonate formations under study correspond to the HTM102 borehole made by the ANDRA in the Malm of the eastern edge of the Paris basin. For the stratigraphic approach, some field analogues have been studied (Pagny-sur-Meuse and Gudmont-Villiers sections). (J.S.)

  7. Diagenesis of amorphous organic matter as an essential aspect of genesis and alteration of tabular-type uranium-vanadium deposits, Colorado Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spirakis, C.S.; Hansley, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Organic matter was the key to the initial concentration of uranium and vanadium (during the sulfate reduction stage of early diagenesis) in all sandstone-hosted, tabular deposits in the Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau. In deposits rich in amorphous organic matter, as are many in the Grants uranium region (GUR), diagenesis did not proceed beyond sulfate reduction. In contrast, in organic-poor, chlorite deposits of the Henry Mountains district, 13 C- and 18 O-enriched dolomites preserve evidence of a subsequent methanogenic stage. In these and similar organic-poor deposits in the Slick Rock district and in parts of the GUR, aluminosilicate dissolution (including a distinctive, organic-acid-induced etching of garnets) and growth of coarse-grained coffinite, albite, ankerite, and chlorite suggest diagenesis reached the organic acid stage. Temperature and thermal maturation indicators (vitrinite reflectance, type IIb chlorite, ordered illite/smectite, and fluid inclusion data) are consistent with temperatures of organic-acid stage diagenesis (∼ 100 0 C). The localization of these alterations in and around organic-poor, clay-rich ore; the similarities in type and sequence of these alterations to the normal alteration of organic-bearing sediments; the alteration of iron-titanium oxides (attributed to the action of soluble organic complexes) around both organic-rich and organic-poor deposits; and the gradation from organic-rich to organic-poor, chlorite-rich deposits (in GUR) suggest that (1) amorphous organic matter was involved in the genesis of all of these deposits and (2) differences among deposits may reflect varying degrees of diagenesis of the organic matter

  8. Principles of lake sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janasson, L.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive outline on the basic sedimentological principles for lakes, and focuses on environmental aspects and matters related to lake management and control-on lake ecology rather than lake geology. This is a guide for those who plan, perform and evaluate lake sedimentological investigations. Contents abridged: Lake types and sediment types. Sedimentation in lakes and water dynamics. Lake bottom dynamics. Sediment dynamics and sediment age. Sediments in aquatic pollution control programmes. Subject index

  9. Palaeoenvironmental assessment of Westphalian fluvio-lacustrine deposits of Lorraine (France) using a combination of organic geochemistry and sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleck, Stephanie; Michels, Raymond; Izart, Alain; Elie, Marcel; Landais, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    The quality and the quantity of organic carbon preserved in modern and ancient terrestrial sediments is the result of a complex interactions of sedimentological factors, such as in-situ productivity, allochtonous supply of organic matter, oxidation processes, biodegradation and sediment accumulation rates. The study aims at utilizing multidisciplinary information in order to characterize the palaeoenvironment in Westphalian fluvio-lacustrine deposits of the Lorraine Coal Basin (NE France). In this basin, the lack of outcrops is the major difficulty. To compensate for this problem, sedimentology, and molecular geochemistry are combined in order to significantly improve the palaeoenvironmental assessment of the area. Geochemical analyses and sedimentology have been carried out on several core samples of the Saulcy drill hole to evaluate local palaeoenvironmental variability. The lithofacies associations in the Upper Carboniferous of the Lorraine basin suggest an alluvial plain environment without marine incursions. Sedimentological interpretations of the core, as well as comparison with sedimentological models, suggests the recognition of different depositional environments from braided and/or meandering rivers to swamp and lakes. The organic geochemistry is focussed on the recognition of aliphatic hydrocarbons and especially on molecular biomarkers, which provide valuable information about the original organic matter and the transformations that took place during sedimentation and diagenesis. In the Lorraine basin, the botanical variability is high and clearly related to the position of the vegetation communities in the fluvial system. The biomarkers (e.g., diterpanes, steranes) show variations, which can be related to the diversity of this ecosystem. In this study, a reinterpretation of the environmental zonation in the sterane ternary diagram adapted to a fluvio-lacustrine sedimentology is proposed. The correlation between sedimentological and geochemical

  10. Diagenesis and sedimentology of the Clearwater Formation at Tucker Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutcheon, I; Abercrombie, H J; Putnam, P; Gardner, R; Krouse, H R

    1989-03-01

    The Clearwater Formation at Tucker Lake Alberta, contains heavy oil and is the site of a steam simulation pilot. The best developed reservoir intervals are north-south oriented distributary channel fill and rivermouth bar sand-stones. Oil bearing sands are underlain by a water zone and calcite cements are more abundant in the transition zone. Mineralogy and petrography were studied by x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy, and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were measured for calcite in the samples studied. The diagenetic history is complex. Early diagenetic minerals include pyrite, quarts, K-feldspar and albite overgrowths, isopachous calcite, iron-rich chlorite, siderite and smectite. Further burial and modification of fluid composition resulted in dissolution of framework mineral grains and precipitation of clinoptilolite and opal. The emplacement of oil retarded mineral diageneses, and was accompanied by a change in aqeous fluid composition. Kaolinite was deposited during and after oil deposition as relativley fresh water entered the Clearwater Formation. The degradation and fermentation of oil and introduction of meteoric water resulted in the production of a late, isotopically distinct, post-bitumen calite cement. 29 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Diagenesis and {sup 210}Pb; Diagenesis y {sup 210}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Fernandez, Ana Carolina [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia (Mexico); Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert [Organismo Internacional de la Energia Atomica, Laboratorios del Medio Marino (Monaco)

    2012-07-01

    One of the basic questions when studying cores for historical reconstructions of environmental changes is whether the profiles of {sup 210}Pb heavy metals and temporal distributions represent actual or have been affected by diagenetic processes. The term refers to processes occurring in the sediment during and after its formation. Such processes can be physical (such as water loss by compaction in clay sludge), biogeochemical (as the decomposition of organic matter) or biological (eg the ingestion of sediments by infauna.) In this chapter we will refer specifically to diagenetic processes caused by the establishment of a vertical zonation of redox conditions and their effects on concentrations of Fe, Mn and other redox-sensitive metals associated. The redox conditions (defined redox potential Eh) of sediments are primarily controlled by the bacterial decomposition of sedimentary organic matter, and are limited by the rate of supply of organic matter (primary production or other sources) and the rate at that accumulates (rate of accumulation of organic matter). During the bacterial decomposition occurs a sequence of reactions involving a succession of oxidants (or electron acceptors) between which the primary oxidant is O{sub 2}. However, when the dissolved O{sub 2} is consumed and the redox potential has decreased enough to favor the most efficient oxidizing the organic matter decomposition can continue through secondary sources of oxidants (suboxic diagenesis). [Spanish] Una de las preguntas basicas cuando estudiamos cores para realizar reconstrucciones historicas de cambios ambientales es si los perfiles de {sup 210}Pb y metales pesados representan las distribuciones temporales reales o si han sido afectados por procesos diageneticos. El termino diagenesis sedimentaria se refiere a los procesos que ocurren en el sedimento durante y despues de su formacion. Estos procesos pueden ser fisicos (como la perdida de agua en lodos arcillosos por compactacion

  12. Diagenesis of diatomite from the Kolubara Coal Basin, Barosevac, Serbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obradovic, J; Hein, J R; Djurdjevic, J [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Mining and Geology

    1994-09-01

    Diatomite associated with the Kolubara Coal Basin was studied to better understand early stage silica diagenesis of shallow water deposits. The Kolubara Basin consists of Neogene siliciclastic rocks, diatomite, marlstone and rare carbonates. Palaeozoic metamorphic and Mesozoic sedimentary and igneous basement rocks are transgressively overlain by Upper Miocene sandstone, siltstone, shale and mudstone. This Upper Miocene section is transgressively overlain by the Pontian section, which contains diatomite and coal beds. White and grey diatomite form beds 0.7-2.2 m thick that are continuous over an area of about 2 km[sup 2]. Siliceous rocks vary in composition from diatomite (81-89% SiO[sub 2]) to diatom-bearing shale (58-60% SiO[sub 2]). Siliceous deposits are laminated in places, with the laminae defined by variations in clay minerals, organic matter and diatoms. Diatomite shows only incipient diagenesis characterized by the fragmentation of diatom frustules, the minor to moderate corrosion of frustules and the formation of minor amounts of opal-A (X-ray amorphous inorganic opal) cement. The low degree of diagenesis results from the young age of the deposits, low burial temperatures and possibly also from the presence of abundant organic matter and the dissolution of kaolinite. The presence of only weak diagenesis is also reflected by the characteristically poor consolidation of the rocks and low rank of the associated coal.

  13. Radioactive tracers in Sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, H.T.

    1973-01-01

    First is given a broad description of the uses of radioactive tracers in Sedimentology. The general method is established, including determinations of probability and standard deviation. Following are determined: the response law of the detector, the minimum mass for statistical detection, and the minimum mass for dynamic detection. The granularity is an important variable in these calculations. Final conclusions are given, and results are compared with existing theories

  14. Radioisotopes in sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtois, G.

    1967-01-01

    Radioisotopes have two main uses in sedimentology: they are used for the study of sediment movements in rivers and seas, and for continuous measurements of the amount of sediment suspended in a given medium. These two uses are considered in detail, and brief accounts given of some other uses. Study of sediment movements. After describing the basic technique used in sediment movement studies (injection of a labelled sediment or a simulator into the current, followed by tracking the radioactivity), the author enumerates as fully as possible the problems that can be solved with the help of this technique. Essentially, these problems fall into two groups: 1. Problems related to civil engineering works in coastal areas: the siltation of harbour channels and docks, the formation of banks and bars, the choice of sites for disposing of dredged sediment, the siting of ports, coastline protection, etc. Problems associated with civil engineering works in and near rivers; siting of the water intakes of hydroelectric and nuclear power stations, the effects of construction work on the transport of solids, the construction of dams, the protection of river banks, the construction of jetties, the siltation of lakes, etc. Problems common to these include the transport of effluent and the calibration of hydraulic models. The bibliography is based mainly on fairly recent references and on current research work. 2. Problems related to basic or applied research conducted mainly by universities and research centres: the study of the Quarternary of a particular region, pure sedimentology, the investigation of major sediment transport currents, the confirmation or refutation of transport theories, research into fundamental transport phenomena associated with channel experiments. After referring to the possible exploitation of natural tracers (contained in radioactive waste and fallout), the author discusses the technical aspects of using artificial tracers: the choice of radioisotope

  15. The role of NAA in studies of organic diagenesis of rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hays, P.D.; Tieh, T.T.; James, W.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Delaware Mountain Group in west Texas and southeast New Mexico provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the impact of organic matter alteration in sediment diagenesis. Trace elements have been measured using neutron activation analysis in organic bitumen as well as authigenic and detrital material separates. Correlations between siltstone organic matter and authigenic minerals in adjacent permeable sandstones establish the close relationship between the organic matter and pore water from which the authigenic minerals precipitated. (author) 22 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Reservoir diagenesis research of Silurian Longmaxi Formation in Sichuan Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingming Kong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The reservoir diagenesis of Silurian Longmaxi Formation in Sichuan Basin was studied based on a large number of thin section identification, scanning electron microscopy analysis, X-ray diffraction tests, and some other experiments. Seven diagenetic processes were identified, including compaction, cementation, clay mineral transformation, replacement, dissolution, organic matter thermal maturation, and tectonic disruption. Three kinds of cements (quartz, carbonate and sulfide were recognized, while the source material of quartz cements and the main factor of forming abundant carbonate cements were summed up. According to the single well analysis of the Well N3, it shows that the best, the suboptimal and the none shale reservoir sections were subjected to different diagenetic transformations. As to best shale reservoir, except for compaction, all the main inorganic diagenesis were significantly related to organic matter maturation. Through comprehensive analysis of diagenetic indicators, it is observed that the reservoir has already been in period B of middle diagenetic stage to late diagenetic stage. The inorganic diagenesis has a significant impact on shale reservoir, because it not only controls the conservation, development, and evolution of porosity, but also the mechanical property and the adsorption capacity of rocks. The organic diagenesis is the source material of shale gas, and it generates a large number of nanoporosity in organic matter, which increases the total porosity and the adsorption capacity of the reservoir.

  17. Sedimentology and paleoenvironments of the Las Chacritas carbonate paleolake, Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Jurassic), Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaleri, Nora G.; Benavente, Cecilia A.

    2013-02-01

    The Las Chacritas Member is the lower part of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Jurassic). The unit is a completely continental limestone succession with volcanic contributions that were deposited during the development of the Cañadón Asfalto Rift Basin (Chubut province, Patagonia, Argentina). A detailed sedimentological analysis was performed in the Fossati depocenter to determine the paleoenvironments that developed in the context of this rift. The Las Chacritas Member represents a carbonate paleolake system with ramp-shaped margins associated with wetlands that were eventually affected by subaerial exposure and pedogenesis. This process is represented by three main subenvironments: a) a lacustrine setting sensu stricto (lacustrine limestone facies association), represented by Mudstones/Wackestones containing porifera spicules (F1), Intraclastic packstones (F6) and Tabular stromatolites (F10) in which deposition and diagenesis were entirely subaqueous; b) a palustrine setting (palustrine limestone facies association) containing Microbial Mudstones (F2), Intraclastic sandy packstone with ostracode remains (F3), Oncolitic packstone (F5), Brecciated limestone (F7) and Nodular-Mottled limestone (F8) representing shallow marginal areas affected by groundwater fluctuations and minor subaerial exposure; and c) a pedogenic paleoenvironment (pedogenic limestone facies association) including Intraclastic limestone (F4) and Packstones containing Microcodium (F9) facies displaying the major features of subaerial exposure, pedogenic diagenesis and the development of paleosols. The fluvial-palustrine-lacustrine succession shows a general shallow upward trend in which contraction-expansion cycles are represented (delimited by exposure and surface erosion). The variations in the successive formations reflect the responses to fluctuations in a combination of two major controls, the tectonic and local climatic variables. The predominance of the palustrine facies associations was

  18. The effects of early diagenesis on the chemical and stable carbon isotopic composition of wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiker, E.C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of modern and ancient buried wood show that there is a linear correlation between carbohydrate content and the stable carbon isotope composition as carbohydrates are preferentially degraded during early diagenesis. As the carbohydrate content decreases, the delta 13 C value of the degraded wood decreases 1 to 2 per mil, approaching the value of the residual lignin. These results indicate that carbohydrate degradation products are lost and not incorporated into the aromatic structure as lignin is selectively preserved during early diagenesis of wood. These results also indicate that attempts to quantify terrestrial inputs to modern sedimentary organic matter based on delta 13 C values should consider the possibility of a 1 to 2 per mil decrease in the delta 13 C value of degraded wood. (author)

  19. Sedimentology of polar carbonate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, T. D.; James, N. P.

    2013-12-01

    The key attributes, processes, and products associated with carbonate accumulation and diagenesis at tropical and temperate latitudes are well known. Comparatively little work has concentrated on carbonate deposition at the coldest end of the depositional spectrum, the polar shelves. Such deposits are not abundant, but they have the potential to provide unique insights into paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic conditions in regions of the planet that are arguably the most sensitive to global change. We examined skeletal assemblages, facies, stratigraphy, petrography, geochemistry, and diagenesis of Quaternary deposits from the Ross Sea, Antarctica and Permian counterparts from Gondwana (now eastern Australia). These modern and ancient polar carbonate factories possess several unique characteristics that set them apart from better-known systems of the temperate and tropical latitudes. All production is biogenic and there are no significant calcareous phototrophs. Carbonate communities are not capable of building rigid frameworks, and thus their deposits are prone to winnowing and reworking by waves and bottom currents. The seawater, although frigid, is isothermal, and thus deep-water benthic communities can exist near the surface. Carbonate saturation, which is at or below solubility for both aragonite and high-Mg calcite, plays a key role in determining the dominant mineralogy of benthos as well as the preservation potential of skeletal debris. As many taxa precipitate low-Mg calcite in isotopic equilibrium, deposits have potential to provide geochemical proxy information for use in paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic reconstructions. More than any other type of carbonate system, the slow biogenic carbonate production and accumulation in cold waters is achieved firstly by arresting siliciclastic sedimentation and secondly by increasing nutrient availability. Thus, carbonate deposition may occur during the coldest of times, such as during glacial advance when

  20. Organic diagenesis in commercial nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toste, A.P.; Lechner-Fish, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear industry currently faces numerous challenges. Large volumes of already existing wastes must be permanently disposed using environmentally acceptable technologies. Numerous criteria must be addressed before wastes can be permanently disposed. Waste characterization is certainly one of the key criteria for proper waste management. some wastes are complex melting pots of inorganics, radiochemicals, and, occasionally, organics. It is clear, for example, that organics have been used extensively in nuclear operations, such as waste reprocessing, and continue to be used widely as solvents, decontamination agents, etc. The authors have analyzed the organic content of many kinds of nuclear wastes, ranging from commercial to defense wastes. In this paper, the finale analyses are described of three commercial wastes: one waste from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and two wastes from a boiling water reactor (BWR). The PWR waste is a boric acid concentrate waste. The two BWR wastes, BWR wastes Nos. 1 and 2, are evaporator concentrates of liquid wastes produced during the regeneration of ion-exchange resins used to purify reactor process water. In preliminary analyses, which were reported previously, a few know organics and myriad unknowns were detected. Recent reexamination of mass-spectral data, coupled with reanalysis of the wastes, has resulted in the firm identification of the unknowns. Most of the compounds, over thirty distinct organics, are derived from the degradation, or diagenesis, of source-term organics, revealing, for the first time, that organic diagenesis in commercial wastes is both vigorous and varied

  1. Benthic hypoxia and early diagenesis in the Black Sea shelf sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Audrey; Roevros, Nathalie; Capet, Arthur; Grégoire, Marilaure; Fagel, Nathalie; Chou, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Marine waters of semi-enclosed seas are affected by a major environmental issue which is oxygen depletion in bottom waters. Deoxygenation is one of the most widespread man-induced consequences which can be catastrophic for living species. Between 1970 and 1990, the benthic compartment of the Black Sea underwent modifications due to the occurrence and increase of hypoxia. Indeed, these changes might cause a deterioration of the structure and functioning of the ecosystems. Nowadays, some regions, such as the north-western shelf, are still affected seasonally by this phenomenon. Within the framework of the BENTHOX project, a biogeochemical study focusing on the early diagenesis is conducted in the Black Sea. It aims (1) to obtain a better understanding of the impact of benthic hypoxia on the diagenetic pathways, (2) to contribute to a new dataset of biogeochemical measurements in the sediments including porewaters. During a cruise (Emblas II - May 2016), on board the RV Mare Nigrum, sediment cores were taken at 4 stations on the Ukrainian shelf. Porewaters were extracted on board the ship using Rhizon technique under N2 atmosphere and will be analyzed for dissolved nutrients and major ions. In addition, sediments were sliced and will be determined for major solid phases and trace element contents. A multi-proxies (biological, sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical) approach will be used to identify the hypoxic events and to reconstruct the history of bottom hypoxia. The results obtained will be presented and discussed with emphasis on the first outcomes and the major biogeochemical processes involved in the early diagenesis.

  2. Alteration of /sup 15/N//sup 14/N and /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios of plant matter during the initial stages of diagenesis: studies utilizing archaeological specimens from Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeNiro, M J [California Univ., Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences; Hastorf, C A [California Univ., Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Anthropology

    1985-01-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of plants extracted from Peruvian archaeological sites, ranging in age from 400 to 4000 years B.P., have been measured. The delta/sup 13/C and delta/sup 15/N values of prehistoric plants that were carbonized prior to deposition are similar to those of modern plants which have the same carbon dioxide fixation or nitrogen assimilation mechanisms. In contrast, the delta/sup 15/N values of prehistoric plants that were not carbonized are generally 10 to 20 per mille and as much as 35 per mille more positive than those of their modern counterparts. The delta/sup 13/C and delta/sup 15/N values of different parts of prehistoric uncarbonized plants differ by as much as 8 per mille and 21 per mille respectively, whereas the same parts of modern plants have delta/sup 13/C or delta/sup 15/N values that lie within 2 per mille of one another. SEM analysis eliminated the possibility that diagenetic alteration of the isotope ratios of the prehistoric uncarbonized plants was caused by the adsorption of particulate soil matter. The results are discussed.

  3. Influence of macrobenthos on chemical diagenesis of marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, R.C.

    1977-05-01

    Diagenetic reactions involving the decomposition of organic matter and the dissolution, mobilization, and reprecipitation of metals sensitive to oxidation-reduction reactions, are most intense and rapid in the upper 1 m and especially the upper 10 cm of marine sediment. It is in this upper zone where most benthic organisms live and interact with sediments and where exchange rates of dissolved and particulate material between sediment and overlying water are largely determined. In Long Island Sound, U.S.A., both spatial and temporal trends in sediment chemistry and the flux of material out of the bottom demonstrate the control of diagenesis by bottom fauna. /sup 234/Th//sup 238/U disequilibrium studies demonstrate that particle reworking rates near the sediment-water interface vary both temporally and spatially in the Sound. The most rapid reworking occurs in protobranch-inhabited bottom areas as do the highest /sup 234/Th inventories. Excess /sup 234/Th profiles in the sediment allow determination of the rates of selected diagenetic reactions, such as Mn/sup + +/ production, near the sediment surface. Both the /sup 234/Th disequilibrium and flux measurements indicate that intra-estuarine redistribution of metals continually takes place.

  4. Uranium band types in carbonaceous sediments with different diagenesis levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borstel, D. von.

    1984-01-01

    Uraniferous peats, lignites and coals were studied by chemical and geological methods in order to determine the influence of carbonaceous substances with different diagenesis levels on uranium enrichment in sediments. It was found that the main factor of deposit genesis is not the chemical bending of uranium to the organic substance but rather the reduction from mobile U(VI) to immobile U(IV) in the course of diagenesis to epigenesis. (orig./PW) [de

  5. Trace Metals And Organic Matter Diagenesis At The Oman Margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.

    Trace Metals (e.g. Mn and Fe) play an important role as secondary oxidants in the degradation of sedimentary OM under sub-oxic conditions. Hence the remineralisation of organic constituents of sediments in the marine environment may significantly...

  6. Tissue Microarray Analysis Applied to Bone Diagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Rafael Barrios; Silva, Maria Regina Regis; Alves, Maria Teresa Seixas; Evison, Martin Paul; Guimarães, Marco Aurelio; Francisco, Rafaella Arrabaca; Astolphi, Rafael Dias; Iwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazato

    2017-01-04

    Taphonomic processes affecting bone post mortem are important in forensic, archaeological and palaeontological investigations. In this study, the application of tissue microarray (TMA) analysis to a sample of femoral bone specimens from 20 exhumed individuals of known period of burial and age at death is described. TMA allows multiplexing of subsamples, permitting standardized comparative analysis of adjacent sections in 3-D and of representative cross-sections of a large number of specimens. Standard hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff and silver methenamine, and picrosirius red staining, and CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemistry were applied to TMA sections. Osteocyte and osteocyte lacuna counts, percent bone matrix loss, and fungal spheroid element counts could be measured and collagen fibre bundles observed in all specimens. Decalcification with 7% nitric acid proceeded more rapidly than with 0.5 M EDTA and may offer better preservation of histological and cellular structure. No endothelial cells could be detected using CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemistry. Correlation between osteocytes per lacuna and age at death may reflect reported age-related responses to microdamage. Methodological limitations and caveats, and results of the TMA analysis of post mortem diagenesis in bone are discussed, and implications for DNA survival and recovery considered.

  7. Diagenesis of Holocene reef and associated beachrock of certain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ally exposed corals of Holocene and Last Inter- glacial age, which may be subjected to diagenesis, primarily in the ... During the period of low tide, spring reef flat is covered by ..... Kallankurichchi formation, Ariyalur group, South India and its ...

  8. Volcanology and volcano sedimentology of Sahand region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moine Vaziri, H.; Amine Sobhani, E.

    1977-01-01

    There was no volcano in Precambrian and Mesozoic eras in Iran, but in most place of Iran during the next eras volcanic rocks with green series and Dacites were seen. By the recent survey in Sahand mountain in NW of Iran volcanography, determination of rocks and the age of layers were estimated. The deposits of Precambrian as sediment rocks are also seen in the same area. All of volcanic periods in this place were studied; their extrusive rocks, their petrography and the result of their analytical chemistry were discussed. Finally volcano sedimentology of Sahand mountain were described

  9. Sedimentology and marine geology of the Banda Arc, Eastern Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Situmorang, M

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze and to relate several aspects of the sedimentological, petrological and geotechnical characteristics of the Quaternary sea floor lithofacies deposited in tectonically active basins in the Banda Sea region. The combined sedimentological, petrological, and faunal

  10. Sedimentology and marine geology of the Banda Arc, Eastern Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Situmorang, M.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze and to relate several aspects of the sedimentological, petrological and geotechnical characteristics of the Quaternary sea floor lithofacies deposited in tectonically active basins in the Banda Sea region. The combined sedimentological, petrological, and

  11. Sedimentological analysis of a contaminated groundwater aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towse, D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of sedimentological reservoir analysis techniques adapted from standard oilfield practice can improve the efficiency and reduce the costs of the evaluation of groundwater aquifers and the design of restoration programs. An evaluation/restoration program at a site in California drilled over 200 test wells in about 750 ac. All wells were logged lithologically and with wireline. The shallow aquifer is a complex braided alluvial floodplain deposit of Late Quaternary age. Analysis demonstrates depositional and erosional responses to periodic hinterland uplifts and to changing climatic conditions. Channel, overbank, lacustrine, and minor deltaic deposits can be recognized. The aquifer architecture has been interpreted to explain the movement of fuel and halogenated hydrocarbon solvents in the sediments and water. Routine engineering geology techniques and hydrologic tests were used to evaluate contamination and to design experimental restoration processes. As demonstrated here, sedimentological techniques show promise in reducing the costs and time required for this type of study. The abundant detailed data will be used in an attempt to develop a microcomputer-based expert system for rapid preliminary analyses of similar aquifers or reservoirs

  12. Carbonate Formation And Diagenesis In Pastos Grandes Laguna (Bolivia): Modern Analog For The South Atlantic Cretaceous Presalt Travertinoid Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, E.; Ader, M.; Gérard, E.; Virgone, A.; Gaucher, E.; Bougeault, C.; Durlet, C.; Moreira, M. A.; Virgile, R.; Vennin, E.; Agogué, H.; Hugoni, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Cretaceous Presalt travertinoid deposits of the South Atlantic are usually considered as "strange deposits" having poor equivalents in modern environments. Pastos Grandes Laguna, which is located in a 2.9 Ma caldera on the andean-bolivian Altiplano (at 4450 m), is intersected by active faults with hydrothermal fluids and presents a spherulitic plateform with similar sedimentological facies to the Presalt: halite and bedded evaporites, shrub-shaped calcites, ooids, pisolites and various stromatolites. Pastos Grandes Laguna is certainly one of the best modern analog of the Presalt for investigating the on going processes of carbonate deposition and diagenesis and the influence of biology. During two expeditions, we recovered samples of gas, water and microbial mats from the hydrothermal sources to the evaporating zones on the spherulitic plateform. These samples are being analyzed to determine 1) the influence of the gases emitted at the hydrothermal sources (chemical and isotopic composition) on the chemistry of the Laguna and the mineralogy of its sediments and 2) the role of ecosystems that develop in this environment on carbonate formation. Preliminary results on gas composition, corrected for the atmospheric contribution, indicates a magmatic source of CO2 partly mantellic associated with a small crustal contribution. Other initial results have so far indicated that CO2 gas emissions, evaporation, as well as photosynthesis and respiration play a role on water chemistry and carbonate precipitation. This study will contribute to the overall understanding of the role of organisms in sedimentation and the predictive diagenetic evolution of hydrothermal and lacustrine deposits.

  13. Low temperature anaerobic bacterial diagenesis of ferrous monosulfide to pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Ravin; Southam, Gordon

    1999-07-01

    In vitro enrichment cultures of dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria precipitated FeS and catalyzed its transformation into FeS 2 at ambient temperature and pressure under anaerobic conditions. When compared to purely abiotic processes, the bacterially mediated transformation was shown to be more efficient in transforming FeS into FeS 2. This occurred due to the large, reactive surface area available for bacterially catalyzed diagenesis, where the biogenic FeS precursor was immobilized as a thin film (˜25 nm thick) on the μm-scale bacteria. The bacteria also contained the source(s) of sulfur for diagenesis to occur. Using a radiolabeled organic-sulfur tracer study, sulfur was released during cell autolysis and was immobilized at the bacterial cell surface forming FeS 2. The formation of FeS 2 occurred on both the inner and outer surfaces of the cell envelope and represented the first step of bacterial mineral diagenesis. Pyrite crystals, having linear dimensions of ˜1 μm, grew outward from the bacterial cell surfaces. These minerals were several orders of magnitude larger in volume than those originating abiotically.

  14. Diagenesis in tephra-rich sediments from the Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc: Pore fluid constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Natalie A.; McManus, James; Palmer, Martin R.; Haley, Brian; Manners, Hayley

    2018-05-01

    We present sediment pore fluid and sediment solid phase results obtained during IODP Expedition 340 from seven sites located within the Grenada Basin of the southern Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc region. These sites are generally characterized as being low in organic carbon content and rich in calcium carbonate and volcanogenic material. In addition to the typical reactions related to organic matter diagenesis, pore fluid chemistry indicates that the diagenetic reactions fall within two broad categories; (1) reactions related to chemical exchange with volcanogenic material and (2) reactions related to carbonate dissolution, precipitation, or recrystallization. For locations dominated by reaction with volcanogenic material, these sites exhibit increases in dissolved Ca with coeval decreases in Mg. We interpret this behavior as being driven by sediment-water exchange reactions from the alteration of volcanic material that is dispersed throughout the sediment package, which likely result in formation of Mg-rich secondary authigenic clays. In contrast to this behavior, sediment sequences that exhibit decreases in Ca, Mg, Mn, and Sr with depth suggest that carbonate precipitation is an active diagenetic process affecting solute distributions. The distributions of pore fluid 87Sr/86Sr reflect these competitive diagenetic reactions between volcanic material and carbonate, which are inferred by the major cation distributions. From one site where we have solid phase 87Sr/86Sr (site U1396), the carbonate fraction is found to be generally consistent with the contemporaneous seawater isotope values. However, the 87Sr/86Sr of the non-carbonate fraction ranges from 0.7074 to 0.7052, and these values likely represent a mixture of local arc volcanic sources and trans-Atlantic eolian sources. Even at this site where there is clear evidence for diagenesis of volcanogenic material, carbonate diagenesis appears to buffer pore fluid 87Sr/86Sr from the larger changes that might be

  15. Revised interpretations of stable C and O patterns in carbonate rocks resulting from meteoric diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Peter K.; Oehlert, Amanda M.

    2018-02-01

    A positive correlation between the δ13C and δ18O values of carbonate rocks is a screening tool widely used to identify the overprint of meteoric diagenesis on the original isotopic composition of a sample. In particular, it has been suggested that systematic change from negative to positive δ13C and δ18O values with increasing depth in the core is an indicator of alteration within the zone of mixing between meteoric and marine waters. In this paper, we propose that such covariance is not generated within the traditionally defined mixing zone, and that positive correlations between δ13C and δ18O values in marine carbonates are not necessarily indicators of meteoric alteration. This new interpretation is based on data collected from the shallow sub-surface of the Bahamas, a region unequivocally influenced by meteoric waters to depths of at least 200 m below the current sediment-water interface. The classic interpretation of the diagenetic environments, based on changes in the δ13C and δ18O values, would suggest the maximum penetration of freshwater occurs between 65 and 100 m below seafloor. Below these depths, a strong positive covariation between the δ13C and δ18O values exists, and would traditionally be defined as the mixing zone. However, based upon known changes in sea level, the penetration of the freshwater lens extends significantly below this limit. We contend that the zone showing covariance of δ13C and δ18O values is actually altered within the freshwater lens, and not the mixing zone as previously proposed. The co-varying trend in δ13C and δ18O values is the result of diagenetic processes occurring at the interface between vadose and phreatic zones. Significantly greater rates of recrystallization and neomorphism are driven by the increased rates of oxidation of organic matter at this transition with progressively less alteration occurring with increasing depth. As sea level oscillates, the position of this interface moves through the

  16. Use of radioactive tracers in dynamic sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tola, Francois.

    1982-01-01

    In the first part, developments in the use of radioactive tracers in sedimentology are recalled together with the corresponding fields of application and the identities of the main users. The state-of-the-art in France is also discussed; The main characteristics of the method are then described and compared with those of more classical methods. The results that can be obtained with tracer methods are then outlined. The criteria employed to establish the granulometry characteristics of the tracer, the particular radioisotope to be used, and the masses and activities involved, are treated. A list is then given of the main isotopes available in France and their characteristics. The various different labelling techniques employed are studied together with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The special case of pelitic sediments is mentioned. The use of reduced model isotope generators, double labelling and applications to studies of the mud plug in the Gironde Estuary are also discussed. The methods and materials used for injecting and detecting tracers are described, emphasis being given to the economic factors associated with the use of radioactive tracers in sedimentology. The second part of the report contains two chapters: - studies of transport by driftage: presentation and analysis of results and the application of the Count Rate Balance method to obtain quantitative information on transport; - studies of in-suspension transport of fine sediments in the sea: the procedures adopted from the moment when the tracer is introduced up to the time when the results are analyzed and interpreted, enables the trajectories and mean velocities of the transported sediments to be determined together with their degree of dilution and their settling speeds and rates; it is also possible to investigate the evolution and horizontal dispersion of the sediments in this way. Results from recent experiments are presented in both parts of the report

  17. Relationship between radionuclides and sedimentological variables in the South Atlantic Continental Margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Paulo A.L.; Figueira, Rubens C.L.

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of information regarding marine radioactivity in sediments of the Continental Margin of the South Atlantic. "1"3"7Cs and "4"0K radioactivity and sedimentological variables were determined in superficial sediment samples. It was demonstrated that "4"0K is a good indicator for sediment granulometry, whilst "1"3"7Cs presents a good correlation with its chemical composition. Moreover, it was identified through the radiometric data the occurrence of input of allochtonous matter to the Brazilian southernmost compartment from the Rio de La Plata estuary, as previously reported in the literature. (author)

  18. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of Bhuban sandstones (Neogene), Titas Gas Field, Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminul Islam, M.

    2009-06-01

    This study deals with the diagenesis and reservoir quality of sandstones of the Bhuban Formation located at the Titas Gas Field of Bengal Basin. Petrographic study including XRD, CL, SEM and BSE image analysis and quantitative determination of reservoir properties were carried out for this study. The sandstones are fine to medium-grained, moderately well to well sorted subfeldspathic arenites with subordinate feldspathic and lithic arenites. The diagenetic processes include clay infiltration, compaction and cementation (quartz overgrowth, chlorite, kaolinite, calcite and minor amount of pyrite, dolomite and K-feldspar overgrowth). Quartz is the dominant pore occluding cement and generally occurred as small euhedral crystals, locally as large pyramidal crystals in the primary pores. Pressure solution derived from grain contact is the main contributor of quartz overgrowths. Chlorite occurs as pore-lining and pore filling cement. In some cases, chlorite helps to retain porosity by preventing quartz overgrowth. In some restricted depth interval, pore-occlusion by calcite cement is very much intense. Kaolinite locally developed as vermiform and accelerated the minor porosity loss due to pore-occlusion. Kaolinite/chlorite enhances ineffective microporosity. Kaolinite is a by-product of feldspar leaching in the presence of acidic fluid produced during the maturation of organic matter in the adjacent Miocene or deeper Oligocene source rocks. The relation between diagenesis and reservoir quality is as follows: the initial porosity was decreased by compaction and cementation and then increased by leaching of the metastable grains and dissolution of cement. Good quality reservoir rocks were deposited in fluvial environment and hence quality of reservoir rocks is also environment selective. Porosity and permeability data exhibit good inverse correlation with cement. However, some data points indicate multiple controls on permeability. Reservoir quality is thus controlled by

  19. Rare earth and trace elements of fossil vertebrate bioapatite as palaeoenvironmental and sedimentological proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigaitė, Živilė; Fadel, Alexandre; Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Jeffries, Teresa

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth (REE) and trace element compositions of fossil vertebrate dental microremains have been studied in Silurian and Devonian vertebrate dental scales and spines in-situ, using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Samples were selected from the well-known Silurian bone beds of Vesiku and Ohesaare in Saaremaa island of Estonia, and a number of Lower Devonian localities from Spitsbergen (Svalbard), Andrée Land group. Biomineral preservation was assessed using spot semi-quantitative elemental chemistry (SEM-EDS) and electron back-scatter difractometry (EBSD) for cristallinity imaging. The obtained PAAS shale-normalised REE concentrations were evaluated using basic geochemical calculations and quantifications. The REE patterns from the Lower Devonian vertebrate apatite from Andrée Land, Spitsbergen (Wood Bay and Grey Hœk formations) did not show any recognisable taxon-specific behavior, but had rather well expressed differences of REE compositions related to biomineral structure and sedimentary settings, suggesting REE instead to reflect burial environments and sedimentological history. The Eu anomaly recorded in two of the studied localities but not in the other indicate different taphonomic conditions and palaeoenvironment, while La/Sm, La/Yb ratios sugeest considerable influence of terrestrial freshwater during the early diagenesis. The La/Yb and La/Sm plots also agree with the average REE concentrations, reflecting domination of the adsoption over substitution as principal REE uptake mechanism in the fossils which had significantly lower overall REE concentrations, and vice versa. Vesiku (Homerian, Wenlock) microremains yielded very uniform REE patterns with slightly lower overall REE concentrations in enameloid than in dentine, with strong enrichment in middle REE and depletion in heavy REE. Negative Europium (Eu) anomaly was pronounced in all the profiles, but Cerium (Ce) anomalies were not detected suggesting possible

  20. Isotopic and sedimentological clues to productivity change in Late

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    610Ma) intracratonic carbonate successions viz., Bhander Limestone of Vindhyan Basin and Raipur Limestone of Chattisgarh Basin suggest higher organic productivity during this period. This view is supported by sedimentological evidence of ...

  1. SANCOR marine sedimentology programme January 1984-December 1988

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rust, IC

    1984-03-01

    Full Text Available to marine sedimentation; the synthesis of palaeo-oceanographic and palaeo-geographic models applicable to the geological record, and; the prediction of expected variations in sedimentological and other trends in the South African marine environment. Research...

  2. Geothermal alteration of clay minerals and shales: diagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a critical review of the data on the mineral and chemical alterations that occur during diagenesis and low-grade metamorphism of shale and other clay-rich rocks - conditions similar to those expected from emplacement of heat-producing radioactive waste in a geologic repository. The conclusions drawn in this document are that the following type of alterations could occur: smectite alteration, ion mobilization, illitic shales, kaolinite reactions, chlorite reactions, organic reactions, paleotemperatures, low temperature shales, high temperature shales, and phase equilibrium changes.

  3. Geothermal alteration of clay minerals and shales: diagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a critical review of the data on the mineral and chemical alterations that occur during diagenesis and low-grade metamorphism of shale and other clay-rich rocks - conditions similar to those expected from emplacement of heat-producing radioactive waste in a geologic repository. The conclusions drawn in this document are that the following type of alterations could occur: smectite alteration, ion mobilization, illitic shales, kaolinite reactions, chlorite reactions, organic reactions, paleotemperatures, low temperature shales, high temperature shales, and phase equilibrium changes

  4. Impact of stylolitization on diagenesis of a Lower Cretaceous carbonate reservoir from a giant oilfield, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, Matteo; Al Harthi, Amena; Morad, Daniel; Morad, Sadoon; Ceriani, Andrea; Mansurbeg, Howri; Al Suwaidi, Aisha; Al-Aasm, Ihsan S.; Ehrenberg, Stephen N.; Sirat, Manhal

    2016-04-01

    Bed-parallel stylolites are a widespread diagenetic feature in Lower Cretaceous limestone reservoirs, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Diagenetic calcite, dolomite, kaolin and small amounts of pyrite, fluorite, anhydrite and sphalerite occur along and in the vicinity of the stylolites. Petrographic observations, negative δ18OVPDB, fluid inclusion microthermometry, and enrichment in 87Sr suggest that these cements have precipitated from hot basinal brines, which migrated along the stylolites and genetically related microfractures (tension gashes). Fluid migration was presumably related to lateral tectonic compression events related to the foreland basin formation. The low solubility of Al3 + in formation waters suggests that kaolin precipitation was linked to derivation of organic acids during organic matter maturation, probably in siliciclastic source rocks. The mass released from stylolitization was presumably re-precipitated as macro- and microcrystalline calcite cement in the host limestones. The flanks of the oilfield (water zone) display more frequent presence and higher amplitude of stylolites, lower porosity and permeability, higher homogenization temperatures and more radiogenic composition of carbonates compared to the crest (oil zone). This indicates that oil emplacement retards diagenesis. This study demonstrates that stylolitization plays a crucial role in fluid flow and diagenesis of carbonate reservoirs during basin evolution.

  5. Tectonic and sedimentological environments of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits, with special reference to the Karoo Basin of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The principal tectonic and sedimentological settings for sandstone-hosted uranium deposits are described. Back-arc basins filled with post-Silurian, fluvial sediments bordering subduction zone magmatic arcs of calc-alkaline composition are considered favourable tectonic environments. The basins should be closed to prevent excessive oxidation of the sediments. Uranium deposits are concentrated near basin rims in the transition zone between uplift and basin subsidence, because of favourable sedimentary facies in those areas. Syn- and post-depositional deformation could have affected the localisation of uranium ore-bodies, while intrusive centres or uplifted arcs commonly have surrounding aprons of potential host rocks. Stratigraphic zoning is also related to source area tectonics and can be used to predict favourable sedimentary environments. Sedimentological processes had a direct influence on the permeability and carbonaceous matter content of sandstones and therefore have often controlled the localisation of ore-bodies. (author)

  6. Meteoric diagenesis of Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene-Eocene shallow-water carbonates in the Kruja Platform (Albania): geochemical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heba, Grigor; Prichonnet, Gilbert; El Albani, Abderrazak

    2009-04-01

    In the central part of the Kruja Platform (Albania) located in the Apulian passive margin, geochemical analyses (calcimetry, Sr, REE and isotopic, δ13C and δ18O) coupled with sedimentological and sequence stratigraphic study were carried out on Upper Cretaceous (CsB4, CsB5, CsB6 Biozones) and Paleocene to Middle Eocene shallow-water carbonates that crop out in the Kruje-Dajt massif (L'Escalier section) and Makareshi massif (La Route section). The lower values in Sr contents, the homogeneous δ18O values in both sections and the covariance between δ13C and δ18O values (La Route section) are attributed to diagenesis influence by a meteoric water-buffer system, supported by petrographic observations. Moreover, a new exposure surface during the Late Cretaceous time (between CsB5 and CsB6 Biozones) may be proposed according to the low or negative excursions of Sr values, the negative excursions of isotopic values in both sections and a positive peak of normalized REE values (La Route section). These variations correlate with the geochemical signal reported by the decreasing strontium isotope values of rudist shells in the Island of Brač carbonate platform (Apulia domain) during the late Middle Campanian (77.3 Ma). Also, this continental exposure is consistent with the global sea-level fall reported from the Boreal Realm, North Atlantic, and the southern Tethyan margin. This geochemical evidence is a complementary tool for the sedimentological analysis and suggests a maximum regression (a sea-level fall) at the transition between the CsB5 and CsB6 Biozones. The high values of Sr content in Middle Eocene carbonates (L'Escalier section) reflect changes in depositional environment from restricted to open marine conditions. REE values increase through transgressive systems tract, characterized by small increase of detrital input. However, anomalies of certain values in both sections suggest disturbances linked either to the changes in clay input and to diagenetic

  7. Spatial and Seasonal Studies of Sedimentological and Neoichnological Characteristics from Mangrove areas of Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Us Saher

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to appraise the physicochemical properties of mangrove sediments and their influence on neoichnological properties produced by different crab species from Korangi Creek (S1 and Sandspit backwater areas (S2 and S3, Karachi. The significant spatial, seasonal and tidal differences (p <0.05 were examined in %moisture, %porosity and sorting coefficient Φ.The significant spatial and seasonal variations were observed in total organic matter, mean Φ, skewness Φ and kurtosis Φ of sediment. Neoichnological properties (burrow number, diameter and total burrow opening area were observed with significant differences among the macrohabitat (stations and microhabitat (tidal levels. The correlation analysis indicated that the neoichnological properties are strongly linked with sedimentological properties such as water contents, total organic matter and textural parameters. This study could be employed to distinguish between different paleoenvironmental controlling factors, predicated on similar paleoichnological features made by similar fossil organisms in a mangrove environment.

  8. The end-Permian regression in the western Tethys: sedimentological and geochemical evidence from offshore the Persian Gulf, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Naderi-Khujin, Mehrangiz; Seyedmehdi, Zahra

    2018-04-01

    Detailed sedimentological and geochemical records across the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) in five offshore wells of the central Persian Gulf served to interpret the end-Permian sea-level change in this region. A decrease in sea level at the PTB was established by petrographical and geochemical study of the boundary. Thin sections showed that Upper Permian strata are composed of dolomite with minor anhydrite, changing into limestone in Lower Triassic sediments. Brine dilution toward the boundary supports sea-level fall in the Permian-Triassic transition, reflected by a decrease in anhydrite content and a shallowing-upward trend from lagoonal to peritidal facies. Isotopic changes at the boundary are in favor of sea-level fall. Changes in both carbon (from about 4 to -1‰) and oxygen (from 2 to -5‰) stable isotopes show negative excursions. The shift in carbon isotope values is a global phenomenon and is interpreted as resulting from carbonate sediment interaction with 12C-rich waters at the end-Permian sea-level fall. However, the oxygen isotope shift is attributed to the effect of meteoric waters with negative oxygen isotope values. The increase in strontium isotope ratios is also consistent with the high rate of terrestrial input at the boundary. The effect of meteoric conditions during diagenesis is evident from vuggy and moldic porosities below the PTB. The following transgression at the base of the Triassic is evident from the presence of reworked fossils and intraclasts resulting from deposition from agitated water.

  9. Reconstructing the Holocene depositional environments along the northern coast of Sfax (Tunisia): Mineralogical and sedimentological approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamourou, Ali; Touir, Jamel; Fagel, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    A sedimentological and mineralogical study of sedimentary cores allowed reconstructing the evolution of depositional environments along the Northern coast of Sfax (Tunisia). The aim of this research work is to identify the factors controlling the sedimentation from the Holocene to the Present time. Three 30-m sediment cores collected by drilling at 30 m water depth were analyzed for their color, magnetic susceptibility signal, grain size by laser diffraction, organic matter content by loss of ignition, carbonate content by calcimetry and mineralogy by X-ray diffraction on bulk powder and clay <2 μm. They broadly present the same sedimentological and mineralogical features. Microscopical observations of petrographic slides allowed identifying six main sedimentary facies. Bulk mineralogical assemblages comprised clay minerals, quartz, calcite, gypsum and K-feldspars were examined. Considerable change was observed in the carbonate content that mimicked the bioclaste abundance and diluted the detrital minerals (clay minerals, quartz and feldspars). The gypsum mainly occurred in the lower sedimentary columns (SC12 and SC9) and in the upper/middle of core SC6. The clay fraction was made of a mixture of kaolinite, illite, smectite and palygorskite with no clear variation through core depth. Both grain-size parameters and magnetic susceptibility profile showed a sharp transition in the upper 2-5 m of the sedimentological columns. Coarse, sandy to gravely sediments characterized by a low magnetic susceptibility signal were replaced by fine bioclastic-rich clayey sediments. The analysis of vertical succession of depositional facies revealed a fluvial depositional environment (coastal plain) basically marked by fluvial channels and inundation plains at the bottom of all cores. However, core-top sediments recorded a littoral marine environment with sand depositions rich in gastropods, lamellibranches and algæ. Depositional facies, sedimentological and mineralogical

  10. Hétérogenéité quantitative et qualitative de la matière organique dans les argiles du Kimmeridgien du val de Pickering (Yorkshire, UK. Cadre sédimentologique et stratigraphique Quantitative and Qualitative Heterogeneity of the Organic Matter Within the Kimmeridge Clay of the Vale of Pickering (Yorkshire, Uk. Sedimentological and Stratigraphical Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penn I. E.

    2006-11-01

    character of the sequence is geographically and stratigraphically homogeneous, indicating generally unchanging conditions of deposition overall. Sedimentation generally occurred in a low energy depositional environment and comprises essential clay minerals (kaolinite, illite and mixed-layer illite-smectite with accessory biogenic calcite, mainly planktonic (coccolith material. Intercalated with the main body of mudstone, are beds of carbonate, which facilitate inter borehole correlation. These beds are coccolith-rich limestones which have subsequently been dolomitised, increasingly so toward the west, by a process dependent on the amount of organic carbon present. Their great lateral extent witnesses to geodynamic controlof regional extent. Preserved organic carbon content shows a gradual increase (by over 50% when traced from the highin the east towards the centre of the basin in the west, where the beds are thickest. This is true despite cyclic fluctuation in both quantity and quality which can also be followed from the Reighton 87 to the Marton 87 borehole. In each borehole, stratigraphical variability of organic carbon is related to, fundamentally cyclic, sedimentological variation. The earliest preserved organic matter lies within the Cymodoce Zone. Three subsequent maxima were attained; at the top of the Eudoxus Zones, the base of the Hudlestoni Zone, and at the base of the Pectinatus Zone. The two highest horizons correspond to episodes of maximum transgression or highstand. Although very variable in time and space, the geographical distribution of organic matter may be easily explained, being related to bed thickness, depth of water and transgressive and regressive cycles of sedimentation. Consistent variations which has been found on the scale of tens of kilometres in the Cleveland Basin can be moreover extended at a palaeogegraphical scale. For example, the phase of maximum occurrence of organic material at the top of the Wheatleyensis Zone corresponds to the

  11. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and bulk organic geochemistry of black ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stratigraphy, sedimentology and bulk organic geochemistry of black shales from the Proterozoic. Vindhyan Supergroup (central India). S Banerjee1,∗. , S Dutta. 2. , S Paikaray. 1 and U Mann. 2. 1. Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076, India. 2. Forschungszentrum ...

  12. Reading and Abstracting Journal Articles in Sedimentology and Stratigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Susan Howes

    1991-01-01

    An assignment centered on reading journal articles and writing abstracts is an effective way to improve student reading and writing skills in sedimentology and stratigraphy laboratories. Each student reads two articles and writes informative abstracts from the author's point of view. (PR)

  13. Organic sediments of the equatorial east Atlantic: Effects of origin, transport, diagenesis, and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerhausen, L.

    1992-01-01

    The origins and diagenesis of organic matter in recent sediments of the equatorial Eastern Atlantic are assessed on the basis of the 13 C/ 12 C composition of the organic carbon (δ 13 C TOC ), the C/N ratio, and molecular biomarkers from terrigenic and marine sources. Also investigated was the effect of global climate on the 13 C/ 12 C ratios of marine organic carbon and on the origins of organic matter on sedimentary cores. The terrigenic fraction of organic carbon is calculated using a binary δ 13 C TOC mixing model. To begin with, the δ 13 C TOC values were standardized to a uniform surface water temperature and water depth. The calculated terrigenic TOC fractions amount to more than 60% for shelf sediments off the coast of Eastern Liberia, Ivory Coast, and the continental shelf of Gabun. The higher terrigenic TOC fractions of up to 20% in recent sediments on the continental shelf along the coast of Guinea to Ivory Coast are interpreted in terms of a transport of terrigenic substances in down hill direction and parallel to the coast. The effects of the global climate on the TOC accumulation rates and on the 13 C/ 12 C ratio of organic carbon were investigated in a pelogic sedimentary core (M16772) from the tropical Eastern Atlantic. Prior to this, the δ 13 C TOC values were standardized to a uniform surface temperature and a uniform 13 C/ 12 C ratio of the dissolved inorganic carbon using the UK 37 index and the δ 13 C values of G.ruber. During the cold periods the export production increases, which - together with the low CO 2 partial pressure in the atmosphere, and thus also in the surface water -induces 13 C accumulation in the marine organic carbon. There is nothing to suggest an effect of 13 C-accumulating phytoplancton, e.g. dinoflagellats, on the 13 C/ 12 C ratio. (orig./KW). 32 figs., 8 tabs [de

  14. Diagenesis of conifer needles in a coastal marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, John I.; Weliky, K.

    1989-10-01

    Physically intact fir, hemlock and cedar needles were isolated from different horizons of a sediment core from a coastal marine bay (Dabob Bay, Washington State, U.S.A.) and from nearby trees and forest litter. Green fir, hemlock and cedar needles were all characterized by glucose-rich aldose mixtures (~30% of tissue carbon), the production of vanillyl and cinnamyl CuO-derived phenols (~8% of tissue carbon) and the presence of both pinitol and myo-inositol (1-2% of tissue carbon). Needles from forest litter were enriched in lignin phenols and non-glucose aldoses and depleted in glucose and cyclitols. The sediment core contained an average of 10 mg/1 of physically intact fir, hemlock and cedar needles, which occurred in similar relative abundances and accounted for less than 1% of the total nonwoody gymnosperm tissue. Compared to the green and litter counterparts, all sedimentary needles were greatly depleted in cyclitols, glucose and p-coumaric acid and enriched in vanillyl phenol precursors. The degree of elevation of vanillyl phenol yield from the degraded needles was used to estimate minimal carbon losses from the samples, which ranged from near 40% for needle litter to almost 70% for the deepest (~100 years old) sedimentary fir/hemlock samples. Although downcore increases in carbon loss and refractory organic components indicated in situ diagenesis, the bulk of overall degradation occurred either on land or during the first 10-20 years after deposition. Atomic C/N ratios of degraded needles were lower than for green counterparts, but nitrogen was lost overall. These relative changes indicate the following stability series: vanillyl phenols > N > ferulic acid, p-hydroxy phenols, most aldoses and bulk tissue > glucose and p-coumaric acid > cyclitols (near 100% loss). Vanillic acid to vanillin ratios, (Ad/Al)v, of the green fir and hemlock needles were unusually high (0.36-0.38) and decreased downcore. Diagenesis also decreased the cinnamyl/vanillyl phenol ratio

  15. Deep Magnetic Diagenesis in Sediments: Progressive and Punctuated Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, R. J.; Kars, M. A. C.; Vega, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic diagenesis in the tuffaceous muds, mudstones and volcaniclastic rocks cored at IODP Site U1437 is a product of progressive processes that continue throughout the 1800-m-thick sequence, punctuated by superimposed features corresponding to a series of influxes of fluids and concentrations of hydrocarbons. XRD, visual examination and SEM images indicate the presence of both magnetite and the magnetic sulfide greigite. Inferences from high values of saturation isothermal remanence normalised by magnetic susceptibility (SIRM/χ), distribution of hysteresis data near a diagenetic greigite curve on a Day plot, and 'humping' of low-temperature cycles of SIRM suggest that detrital magnetite and diagenetic greigite are both significant contributors to the magnetic assemblage, with greigite constituting a higher proportion in shallower samples. Progressive magnetic diagenesis is expressed as a continuing background decrease in SIRM/χ. FORC curves indicate an initial diagenetic growth of one or more higher-coercivity phases, followed downhole by increasing loss of all but low-coercivity material. The downhole pattern is consistent with progressive loss of fine-grained magnetite, initial authigenesis of greigite, and progressive pyritisation of the greigite. Some coarse-grained samples from the base of the sequence buck the trend, exhibiting SD behavior probably related to surviving magnetite inclusions in silicates. Shipboard fluid analysis revealed a complex profile of interstitial-water geochemistry, marked by several fluid influxes, including inputs of sulfate-rich water at about 275 and 460 meters below seafloor (mbsf). Methane concentrations, mostly low, markedly increase in the interval between 750 and 1460 mbsf, and ethane appears below an inferred fault at 1104 mbsf. Each of these fluid events is marked by offsets in the rock magnetic parameters SIRM/χ, S-0.3T, and DJH, representing repeated phases of late diagenetic growth of greigite in response to

  16. Relative influence of deposition and diagenesis on carbonate reservoir layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, Emmanuelle [Total E and P, Courbevoie (France); Javaux, Catherine [Total E and P, Pointe Noire (Congo)

    2008-07-01

    The architecture heterogeneities and petrophysical properties of carbonate reservoirs result from a combination of platform morphology, related depositional environments, relative sea level changes and diagenetic events. The reservoir layering built for static and dynamic modelling purposes should reflect the key heterogeneities (depositional or diagenetic) which govern the fluid flow patterns. The layering needs to be adapted to the goal of the modelling, ranging from full field computations of hydrocarbon volumes, to sector-based fine-scale simulations to test the recovery improvement. This paper illustrates various reservoir layering types, including schemes dominated by depositional architecture, and those more driven by the diagenetic overprint. The examples include carbonate platform reservoirs from different stratigraphic settings (Tertiary, Cretaceous, Jurassic and Permian) and different regions (Europe, Africa and Middle East areas). This review shows how significant stratigraphic surfaces (such as sequence boundaries or maximum flooding) with their associated facies shifts, can be often considered as key markers to constrain the reservoir layering. Conversely, how diagenesis (dolomitization and karst development), resulting in units with particular poroperm characteristics, may significantly overprint the primary reservoir architecture by generating flow units which cross-cut depositional sequences. To demonstrate how diagenetic processes can create reservoir bodies with geometries that cross-cut the depositional fabric, different types of dolomitization and karst development are illustrated. (author)

  17. 87Sr/86Sr and 18O/16O ratios, interstitial water chemistry and diagenesis in deep-sea carbonate sediments of the Ontong Java Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elderfield, H.; Oldfield, R.K.; Hawkesworth, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    Interstitial waters and sediments from DSDP sites 288 and 289 contain information on the chemistry and diagenesis of carbonate in deep-sea sediments and on the role of volcanic matter alteration processes. Sr/Ca ratios are species dependent in unaltered foraminifera from site 289 and atom ratios exceed those predicted by distribution coefficient data. During diagenesis Sr/Ca ratios of carbonates decrease and reach the theoretical distribution at a depth which is identical to the depth of Sr isotopic equilibration, where 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios of interstitial waters and carbonates converge. Mg/Ca ratios in the carbonates do not increase with depth as found in some other DSDP sites, possibly because of diagenetic re-equilibration with interstitial waters showing decreasing Mg 2+ /Ca 2+ ratios with depth due to Ca input and Mg removal by alteration of volcanic matter. Interstitial 18 O/ 16 O ratios increase with depth at site 289 to delta 18 O = 0.67 per thousand (SMOW), reflecting carbonate recrystallization at elevated temperatures, the first recorded evidence of this effect in interstitial waters. Interstitial Sr 2+ concentrations reach high levels, up to 1 mM, chiefly because of carbonate recrystallization. However, 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios decrease from 0.7092 to less than 0.7078, lower than for contemporaneous sea water, showing that there is a volcanic input of strontium at depth. (author)

  18. New achievements in sedimentology and lithofacies-paleogeography at present. Sidelights on the fourth national sedimentology and lithofacies-paleogeography academic conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daisheng

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current new trends and new achievements in sedimentology and lithofacies-paleogeography. They include such aspects as sequence stratigraphy, quantitative lithofacies-paleogeography, sedimentary petrology, lithofacies-paleogeography, resource prognosis, research methods and testing approaches, recent sediment investigation and modern sedimentology frontiers

  19. Carboniferous bioconstructions of the Bechar Basin, Algerian Sahara: Sedimentology, diagenesis, and petroleum potential. Les bioconstructions carboniferes du Bassin de Bechar, Sahara algerien: Sedimentologie, diagenese et potentiel petrolifere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madi, A.

    1994-01-01

    Carbonate massifs which surface on the northwest of the Bechar Basin in the Algerian Sahara are studied, in particular the lithostratigraphic section of the upper Visean of the Grand Erg Occidental. The latter corresponds to a succession of 13 shallowing-upward parasequences. An ideal parasequence comprises a massive biohermal assemblage, constructed by the association of Fenestelles and sponges, buried under strata of crinoidal and/or oolithic grainstones. The vertical distribution of the microflora within the facies translates into a zonation as function of depth. An idealized ecological succession formed from seven benthic assemblages is proposed. Diagenetic analysis of the studied sequences has revealed nine diagenetic phases corresponding to six calcitic cements, two dolomitization phases, and one of silicification. Most of these diagenetic events were produced in medium to deep burial, after 650 m. The stratified oolithic-crinoidal carbonates could have served as reservoir rocks if trapping conditions were present. A hypothesis has been formed according to which the porous strata formed natural conduits on a regional scale and three trapping possibilities are proposed. These models, which integrate all the parameters which influence the existence of a petroleum deposit, could contribute to the establishment of an exploration strategy for the Bechar Basin Carboniferous carbonate strata. 146 refs., 61 figs., 29 tabs.

  20. Cryostratigraphy and sedimentology of high-Arctic fjord-valleys

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Graham Lewis

    2018-01-01

    Fjord-valleys, as sediment-filled palaeofjords, are characteristic of formerly glaciated mountainous coastal areas. High-Arctic fjord-valleys commonly host permafrost, but are poorly accessible and hence have drawn relatively little research. The research presented in this thesis combines the methods of cryostratigraphy, clastic sedimentology, sequence stratigraphy, geomorphology and geochronology to investigate the sedimentary infilling, permafrost formation and late Quaternary landscape dev...

  1. Sedimentology of the Paleogene succession at Calypsostranda, Svalbard

    OpenAIRE

    Poole, Louise Kristiansen

    2018-01-01

    The following study encompasses sedimentological investigations of the Calypsostranda Group. The Calypsostranda Group is comprised of Paleogene sediments where outcrops are well exposed in a coastal section at Renardodden (Calypsostranda area), on the southern shores of Bellsund in western Spitsbergen. The aim of the study is to: i) generate reliable depositional models for the evolution of the sediments of the Calypsostranda Group, through facies recognition and break-down ii) investigate an...

  2. Seasonal variation of early diagenesis and greenhouse gas production in coastal sediments of Cadiz Bay: Influence of anthropogenic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Macarena; Ortega, Teodora; Bohórquez, Julio; Corzo, Alfonso; Rabouille, Christophe; Forja, Jesús M.

    2018-01-01

    Greenhouse gas production in coastal sediments is closely associated with the early diagenesis processes of organic matter and nutrients. Discharges from anthropogenic activities, particularly agriculture, fish farming and waste-water treatment plants supply large amounts of organic matter and inorganic nutrients that affect mineralization processes. Three coastal systems of Cadiz Bay (SW Spain) (Guadalete River, Rio San Pedro Creek and Sancti Petri Channel) were chosen to determine the seasonal variation of organic matter mineralization. Two sampling stations were selected in each system; one in the outer part, close to the bay, and another more inland, close to a discharge point of effluent related to anthropogenic activities. Seasonal variation revealed that metabolic reactions were driven by the annual change of temperature in the outer station of the systems. In contrast, these reactions depended on the amount of organic matter reaching the sediments in the outermost part of the systems, which was higher during winter. Oxygen is consumed in the first 0.5 cm indicating that suboxic and anoxic processes, such as denitrification, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis are important in these sediments. Sulfate reduction seems to account for most of the mineralization of organic matter at the marine stations, while methanogenesis is the main pathway at the sole freshwater station of this study, located inside the estuary of the Guadalete River, because of the lack of sulfate as electron acceptor. Results point to denitrification being the principal process of N2O formation. Diffusive fluxes varied between 2.6 and 160 mmol m-2 d-1 for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC); 0.9 and 164.3 mmol m-2 d-1 for TA; 0.8 and 17.4 μmol m-2 d-1 for N2O; and 0.1 μmol and 13.1 mmol m-2 d-1 for CH4, indicating that these sediments act as a source of greenhouse gases to the water column.

  3. The role of crystal structure and fabrics in early diagenesis: examples from continental and marine settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea; Bajo, Petra; Hellstrom, John

    2015-04-01

    Palaeoclimate research based on geological archives relies on the assumption that the system has remained closed to phase transformation and re-mobilization of chemical species, the extent of which depends on the crystallization pathways. Early diagenesis, in fact, encompasses processes that occur soon after deposition, from a few hours to centuries. In the last decade, speleothems-based palaeoclimate research has gained momentum. Speleothems (cave secondary mineral deposits) have provided geochemical records of climate, pollution, volcanism, land use and vegetation changes at seasonal to millennial scale for the past million year. Critically, the accuracy of their records relies on the absence of diagenetic modifications. Yet, contrary to late diagenetic dissolution and re-precipitation, early diagenesis is difficult to detect in stalagmites and flowstones. A striking example is a Holocene stalagmite from Corchia cave, whose fabrics appear compact and of primary origin. Nevertheless, U-Th dating by mass spectrometry of 5 out of 47 samples shows offset from neighboring samples of up to 40%. Careful petrographic observations reveal that elongated columnar fabric contains microstructural defects, expressed by irregular crystal boundaries, which allow for the percolation of diagenetic fluids and U loss. Speleothem allow for the precise dating of diagenetic processes. Aggradation of micrite into microsparite may occur in less than a hundred year. Similar aggrading neomorphism of micrite has been documented for subglacial carbonates, where aggradation occurred at secular scale. Aggradation can be fingerprinted by the stable isotope ratio values, commonly more positive than in the columnar fabrics. In speleothems, aragonite may be transformed into calcite in less than 100 years. The phase transformation may partially preserve the original fabric, and appears to commence from calcite nucleated on organic compounds at twin boundaries, taking advantage of crystal defects as

  4. Hydrodynamic and sedimentological controls governing formation of fluvial levees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, G. H.; Edmonds, D. A.; David, S. R.; Czuba, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Fluvial levees are familiar features found on the margins of river channels, yet we know little about what controls their presence, height, and shape. These attributes of levees are important because they control sediment transfer from channel to floodplain and flooding patterns along a river system. Despite the familiarity and importance of levees, there is a surprising lack of basic geomorphic data on fluvial levees. Because of this we seek to understand: 1) where along rivers do levees tend to occur?; 2) what geomorphic and hydrodynamic variables control cross-sectional shape of levees? We address these questions by extracting levee shape from LiDAR data and by collecting hydrodynamic and sedimentological data from reaches of the Tippecanoe River, the White River, and the Muscatatuck River, Indiana, USA. Fluvial levees are extracted from a 1.5-m resolution LiDAR bare surface model and compared to hydrological, sedimentological, and geomorphological data from USGS stream gages. We digitized banklines and extracted levee cross-sections to calculate levee slope, taper, height, e-folding length, and e-folding width. To answer the research questions, we performed a multivariable regression between the independent variables—channel geometry, sediment grain size and concentration, flooding conditions, and slope—and the dependent levee variables. We find considerable variation in levee presence and shape in our field data. On the Muscatatuck River levees occur on 30% of the banks compared to 10% on the White River. Moreover, levees on the Muscatatuck are on average 3 times wider than the White River. This is consistent with the observation that the Muscatatuck is finer-grained compared to the White River and points to sedimentology being an important control on levee geomorphology. Future work includes building a morphodynamic model to understand how different hydrodynamic and geomorphic conditions control levee geometry.

  5. A kinetic model that explains the dependence of magnetic susceptibility of sediment on grain size and organic matter content in transitional marine environments. Testing case studies in estuarine-like environments of NW Iberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, D.; Mohamed, K. J.; Andrade, A.; Rubio, B.; Bernabeu, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    The wide use of magnetic proxies to study pollution, sedimentological processes, and environmental and paleoclimatic changes is currently limited by the lack of transference functions that closely correlate with the unmeasurable variables. Among them, magnetic susceptibility (MS) is the oldest and most popular, but have yet to live up to its expectations. This paper explores and quantifies how MS values of surficial sediments in transitional environments depends on grain size and on what can be said about the spatial distribution of hydrodynamic forces and the potential modulation of MS by sediment and organic matter provenances. The concentration of (oxyhydr)oxides in sands (d50 > 63 microns) is primarily controlled by their degree of dilution in the diamagnetic framework, which is larger for coarser grainsizes. In contrast, the concentration of (oxyhydr)oxides in muddy sediments is controlled by their dissolution rate during very early diagenesis, which is controlled by their content in organic matter (TOC), inversely dependent of grainsize. The balance between both components results in the study area in sands of d50 = 68 microns displaying the maximum MS values. The influence of organic matter on the dissolution of magnetite in surficial sediments can be quantified using a simple kinetic model. The model reveals the existence of a negative exponential relationship between magnetic susceptibility and grain size, that depends on the TOC of the fine-grained fraction. The model accurately predicts that a TOC increase of 0.35% results in a 50% reduction in the concentration of magnetite in the sediments of the Ría the Muros. We have also encountered this relationship not universal in this form, as its quantification is strongly modulated by coarse sediment mineralogy, TOC lability and by other factors such as wave climate, depth, and sediment oxygenation. Better understanding and quantification of the role that TOC, hydrodynamics, and changes in the geochemical

  6. Diagenesis in subrecent marine sediments in the Eastern Scheldt Southwest Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, O.

    1988-01-01

    The diagenesis in fine-grained sediments from a 300 to 400-years-old Dunkirk deposit, exposed on the intertidal flat, was studied at a site in the Eastern Scheldt. A new in situ pore water sampling technique that allowed repeated sampling at exactly the same place was used to monitor the seasonal

  7. Water-rock interaction during diagenesis and thermal recovery, Cold Lake, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, H.J.

    1988-12-01

    Fluid and rocks interact at high temperatures during diagenesis and steam assisted thermal recovery of bitumen from the Clearwater Formation at Cold Lake, Alberta. A study was carried out to assess the effects of natural diagenesis in rocks of the formation, and using these data, to relate the chemical and isotopic compositions of fluids produced during thermal recovery to water-rock interactions occurring in the reservoir. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on core from Leming and Marguerite Lake document a variety of diagenetic clays including mixed layer minerals smectite-illite and chlorite-smectite, chlorite, illite, berthierine and kaolinite. A method for internally generating factors to convert clay mineral XRD peak heights to relative weight percents was used. Semi-quantitative results show that smectite-illite is ubiquitous and the most abundant clay present. Details are provided of the diagenetic sequence illustrating water-rock interaction over a prolonged period. Three types of water were found to be produced from the wells: injected water, formation water associated with bitumen, and bottom water from the underlying McMurray Formation. Produced water compositions were used to estimate in-situ temperatures of fluids produced from reservoirs. It is concluded that equilibrium closed-system models can be applied to natural diagenesis and artificial diagenesis induced during thermal recovery. 132 refs., 52 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. The tracer techniques and the problems in hydrology and sedimentology. 1974 status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauzay, G.

    1974-01-01

    Two kinds of nuclear techniques are used in sedimentology. Determination of the sediment mass at a given place using radiometric gages; determination of a sediment mass in motion using nuclear tracer techniques. Some recent applications are described: studies on dredging wastes; study of sedimentation mechanisms in a estuary; study of the possible transport of coarse materials by the swell; adjustement of sedimentological models [fr

  9. Diagenesis of polymineralic temperate limestones in a cyclothemic sedimentary succession, eastern North Island, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywick, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Temperate carbonate petrofacies (calcarenite and coquina) in the Pliocene-Pleistocene Petane Group of eastern North Island, New Zealand, are dominated by aragonite faunas consisting primarily of bivalves and gastropods. Unlike calcite-dominated temperate limestones, these polymineralic carbonates have undergone extensive early diagenetic alteration including extensive calcite cementation induced by aragonite dissolution. Marine cementation (type 1: pore-lining, bladed calcite) was isolated to biogenic pores. It predated glauconite and may have been precipitated as low-magnesium calcite, possibly in marine phreatic environments during sea-level transgressions. Four phases of calcite cement with varying but definitive degrees of meteoric influence occur in the Petane Group. Type 2 (ferroan scalenohedral calcite) was the initial pore-filling cement and precipitated from reduced pore fluids in a phreatic environment, possibly during or soon after the transition from marine to meteoric diagenesis. Type 3 (moderately ferroan drusy) calcite and type 4 (non-ferroan drusy) calcite were sequentially precipitated during meteoric conditions from pore waters that changed from reducing to oxidising. Type 5 (sinter) cements comprise several forms precipitated during vadose meteoric diagenesis, the final meteoric phase of alteration in the Petane Group. Ferroan calcite cementation of silt matrix in coquina limestones overlain by terrigenous silt (type 6: matrix cement) probably occurred simultaneously with type 2/3 pore-filling phases. A similar ferroan to moderately ferroan to non-ferroan suite of drusy calcite cements also lithified concretions in non-carbonate (siliciclastic sand) facies in the Petane Group, but only after the onset of compaction. Extensive skeletal diagenesis (stabilisation of magnesium calcite allochems, dissolution/recrystallisation of aragonite) occurred during type 3 and 4 cementation phases. Diagenesis in the Petane Group was stratigraphically influenced

  10. Paleomagnetic and oxygen isotopic evidence for long term diagenesis in radiolarian chert, Pindos Mountains, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltuck, Miriam

    1987-02-01

    Paleomagnetics was used in an attempt to improve chronostratigraphy in the Middle and Upper Jurassic radiolarian chert and siliceous mudstone of the Pindos Zone, Greece. Remanent magnetism studies showed strong magnetic intensity but scattered orientation. Orientation of some pressure solution features in the radiolarities indicates their formation under horizontal pressure, a condition which in Pindos geologic history would only have occurred during early Cretaceous or Cenozoic tectonics, indicating very late diagenesis in these parts of the section. From time of deposition to later time at which diagenesis can be documented, the Earth's magnetic field would have reversed many times. Remagnetization during solution-precipitation steps of silica diagenesis could complicate the rock magnetics. Oxygen isotopic and major element analyses of radiolarite lithologies show a systematic variation of rate of silica diagenesis in different host lithologies, thus solution-precipitation would occur at widely differing times throughout the section lithologies. If the dissolution of the silica cement were physically to free magnetic material from an earlier orientation, the result could be a partial shift toward alignment with the ambient magnetic field. Alternatively, complete reorientation of particles could have occurred at varying times in different parts of the section as a function of host lithology. During the northward movement and clockwise rotation of the Apulian subplate (including Pindos) these different lithologies could completely reorient during different stages of silica diagenesis, locking the orientation of iron magnetic moments into alignment with the ambient magnetic field at time of precipitation to result in a strong intensity but scattered orientation of Pindos rock magnetics.

  11. Excretion is Faster Than Diagenesis for Nutrient Recycling in Lake Michigan Benthos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, C.; Cuhel, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Regeneration of phytoplankton growth nutrients including ammonium (NH4+) and phosphate (HPO4=) occurs in aquatic systems worldwide through biogeochemical processes of diagenesis. Organic matter falling to the bottom accumulates in sediments, and bacterial decomposition removes oxygen from the sub-surface. Anaerobic metabolism is energetically inefficient, and bacteria a few cm below the surface respire or ferment organic matter into carbon dioxide or organic acids, excreting nitrogen (NH4+) or phosphorus inorganic 'waste'. Subsurface production of bacterial metabolic products often leads to sharp gradients in porewater concentrations of NH4+ and HPO4=, which drive diffusive flux out of the sediments into overlying water. Aquatic systems with totally aerobic water overlying anoxic sediment (e.g., Lake Michigan) have muted efflux of certain inorganic nutrients arising from organic matter decomposition. For example, NH4+ is oxidized to nitrate in the upper few mm of surficial sediments by nitrifying bacteria. Strong subsurface porewater gradients, especially of redox- or geochemically-reactive compounds, often decline to low values well below the sediment-water interface, indicating transformation by sediment bacterial populations, or by purely geochemical processes such as calcium hydroxyphosphate (apatite) precipitation. For these, little flux to the water column occurs. In Lake Michigan, neither NH4+ nor HPO4= escapes substantially from the biogeochemical barriers between their diagenetic sources and overlying waters, either before or after ecosystem alteration by invasive quagga mussels (QM). Silicate and total CO2 evade unimpeded in the same cores. The organic matter deposited from the water column is also the nutrition of benthic bivalve filter feeders such as QM in Lake Michigan, or the Asian Clam in San Francisco Bay. In animal metabolism for energy production, only the carbon component is oxidized through respiration, with NH4+ (from protein) and HPO4= (from

  12. Diagenesis of echinoderm skeletons: Constraints on paleoseawater Mg/Ca reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelak, Przemysław; Krzykawski, Tomasz; Stolarski, Jarosław

    2016-09-01

    One of the most profound environmental changes thought to be reflected in chemical composition of numerous geological archives is Mg/Ca ratio of the seawater, which has varied dramatically throughout the Phanerozoic. Echinoderms that today typically form high magnesium calcite skeletons are increasingly being utilized as a proxy for interpreting secular changes in seawater chemistry. However, accurate characterization of the diagenetic changes of their metastable high magnesium calcite skeletons is a prerequisite for assessing their original, major-element geochemical composition. Here we expand the existing models of diagenesis of echinoderm skeleton by integration of various analytical methods that up to now rarely have been used to assess the diagenetic changes of fossil echinoderms. We validated the preservation of a suite of differently preserved echinoderm ossicles, mostly crinoids, ranging in age from the Cambrian through Recent. In 13 of 99 fossil echinoderm ossicles we found well-preserved porous microstructure (stereom), non-luminescent behaviour or blotchy dark color in cathodoluminescence, and distinct nanostructural features (layered and nanocomposite structure). Moreover, in representatives of such preserved samples, distribution of sulphates associated with organic matter is identical to those in Recent echinoderms. Only such ossicles, despite of local micrometer-scale diagenetic changes, were herein considered well-preserved, retaining their original major-element skeletal composition. By contrast, majority of samples show transformation to the stable low magnesium calcite that leads to obliteration of the primary geochemical and micro/nanostructural features and is accompanied with increase in cathodoluminescence emission intensity. Using only well-preserved fossil echinoderm samples, we found purely random variation in Mg/Ca in echinoderm skeletons through the observed time series; any periodicities in echinoderm skeletal Mg/Ca ratio which might

  13. A quantitative reconstruction of organic matter and nutrient diagenesis in Mediterranean Sea sediments over the Holocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, D.C.; Slomp, C.P.; Lange, G.J. de

    2011-01-01

    A multicomponent diagenetic model was developed and applied to reconstruct the conditions under which the most recent sapropel, S1, was deposited in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Simulations demonstrate that bottom waters must have been anoxic and sulphidic during the formation of S1 and that

  14. Early diagenesis of phosphorus in continental margin sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomp, C.P.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the organic material in the oceans that reaches the sea floor is deposited on continental margins and not in the deep sea. This organic matter is the principal carrier of phosphorus (P) to sediments. A part of the organic material is buried definitely. The other part decomposes,

  15. Impact of Diagenesis on Biosignature Preservation Potential in Playa Lake Evaporites of the Verde Formation, Arizona: Implications for Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolyar, S.; Farmer, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    We studied evaporite subfacies in the Verde Fmn., AZ. We identified diagenetic pathways and assessed how diagenesis affected biosignature preservation potential (BPP) in each. Results revealed eight pathways, each with diverse impacts on BPP.

  16. Distribution, provenance and early diagenesis of major and trace metals in sediment cores from the Mandovi estuary, western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prajith, A.; Rao, V.P.; Chakraborty, P.

    Major elements and trace metals were analyzed in four sediment cores recovered along a transect in the Mandovi estuary for their distribution, provenance and early diagenesis. The sediments were clayey silts in cores from the upper/lower estuary...

  17. Sedimentology and Stratigraphy of the Stevns-2 core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boussaha, Myriam

    The 350 m long Stevns-2 core (drilled in the Stevns peninsula, south of Copenhagen, DK) was the subject of a multidisciplinary study combining sedimentology, isotopic geochemistry and micropaleontology, whose main results and interpretations have been the subject of papers presented in this thesis...... along with complementary results. A new Boreal biozonation based on calcareous nannofossils has been erected for the upper Campanian–Maastrichtian interval, based on results from this new drilled core, compiled with results of three additional sites spanning the same time interval in the Danish basin...... and clay input seem to be the most likely controlling factors to explain the long-term changes in sedimentation of the Boreal epicontinental chalk sea. Time series analysis was performed in these three intervals, based on the bulk carbonate carbon isotopes and facies successions, demonstrating...

  18. Relationship between radionuclides and sedimentological variables in the South Atlantic Continental Margin; Relacoes entre radionuclideos e variaveis sedimentologicas na Margem Continental do Atlantico Sul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo A.L.; Figueira, Rubens C.L., E-mail: paulo.alves.ferreira@usp.br, E-mail: rfigueira@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IO/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto Oceanografico

    2015-07-01

    There is a lack of information regarding marine radioactivity in sediments of the Continental Margin of the South Atlantic. {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K radioactivity and sedimentological variables were determined in superficial sediment samples. It was demonstrated that {sup 40}K is a good indicator for sediment granulometry, whilst {sup 137}Cs presents a good correlation with its chemical composition. Moreover, it was identified through the radiometric data the occurrence of input of allochtonous matter to the Brazilian southernmost compartment from the Rio de La Plata estuary, as previously reported in the literature. (author)

  19. Radiocarbon age and diagenesis of oolitic sediments from the Persian Gulf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silar, J.

    1980-01-01

    Radiocarbon measurements of different parts of ooids of Pleistocene and Holocene oolitic sediments from the Persian Gulf on the coast of Kuwait indicated that atmospheric carbon dioxide had been involved in the recrystallization of aragonite and in the diagenesis of the oolitic sediments. The radiocarbon activity of different layers of sediments generally corresponds to their stratigraphic sequence. The radiocarbon ages of several earlier layers, however, seem to be reduced due to recrystallization and diagenesis. The radiocarbon ages of well-preserved shells of mollusks of the fossiliferous horizon are lower than their alleged Pleistocene geological age. The rate of emergence of the shore between one and several mm.yr -1 was established which corresponds to that recorded in the mouth of the Persian Gulf and in Qatar. (author)

  20. What do we really know about early diagenesis of non-marine carbonates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boever, Eva; Brasier, Alexander T.; Foubert, Anneleen; Kele, Sándor

    2017-11-01

    Non-marine carbonate rocks including cave, spring, stream, calcrete and lacustrine-palustrine sediments, are susceptible to early diagenetic processes. These can profoundly alter the carbonate fabric and affect paleoclimatic proxies. This review integrates recent insights into diagenesis of non-marine carbonates and in particular the variety of early diagenetic processes, and presents a conceptual framework to address them. With ability to study at smaller and smaller scales, down to nanometers, one can now observe diagenesis taking place the moment initial precipitates have formed, and continuing thereafter. Diagenesis may affect whole rocks, but it typically starts in nano- and micro-environments. The potential for diagenetic alteration depends on the reactivity of the initial precipitate, commonly being metastable phases like vaterite, Ca-oxalates, hydrous Mg-carbonates and aragonite with regard to the ambient fluid. Furthermore, organic compounds commonly play a crucial role in hosting these early transformations. Processes like neomorphism (inversion and recrystallization), cementation and replacement generally result in an overall coarsening of the fabric and homogenization of the wide range of complex, primary microtextures. If early diagenetic modifications are completed in a short time span compared to the (annual to millennial) time scale of interest, then recorded paleoenvironmental signals and trends could still acceptably reflect original, depositional conditions. However, even compact, non-marine carbonate deposits may behave locally and temporarily as open systems to crystal-fluid exchange and overprinting of one or more geochemical proxies is not unexpected. Looking to the future, relatively few studies have examined the behaviour of promising geochemical records, such as clumped isotope thermometry and (non-conventional) stable isotopes, in well-constrained diagenetic settings. Ongoing and future in-vitro and in-situ experimental approaches will

  1. Controls on chemistry and diagenesis of naturally occurring iron-oxide phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nancy W. Hinman; J. Michelle Kotler; Beizhan Yan; Aaron Tenesch; Richard V. Morris; Daphne L. Stoner; Jill R. Scott

    2009-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to (i) document chemical and mineralogical compositions in two naturally acidic drainages over a 1 m soil profile, (ii) document organic and inorganic signatures representative of past chemical or biological processes in the soils, and (iii) determine whether mineralogical and chemical differences are a consequence of differences in original composition, depositional conditions, or diagenesis. Two sites were studied: Paymaster Creek in the Heddleston Mining District near Lincoln, Montana and the New World Mining District near Cooke City, Montana. The oldest deposits at both naturally acidic sites pre-date human mining activity by several thousand years, although there is recent human activity at both sites. Both sites have streams with high dissolved Fe and moderately low pH and actively accumulate schwertmannite on streambeds. Soil deposits away from the streambed at Paymaster Creek contained goethite with adsorbed sulfate, but no schwertmannite, suggesting either that the original conditions precluded schwertmannite precipitation or that diagenesis occurred rapidly converting the schwertmannite to goethite. The New World Mining District site showed the expected profile, which is a gradual transition from schwertmannite- and goethite-bearing soils to goethite-only soils. Concentrations of Cr, As and other trace elements shown to retard diagenesis were higher at the New World site than at the Paymaster site.

  2. Source of uranium in the Elblag formation (upper buntsandstein): sedimentological approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworowski, K.

    1986-01-01

    On the basis of results of sedimentological survey of area of typical development of the Elblag formation, the evidence supporting previously published hypothesis on source of uranium in this formation is presented. 10 refs., 9 figs. (M.F.W.)

  3. MOSAIC: An organic geochemical and sedimentological database for marine surface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagna, Maria Luisa; Usman, Muhammed; De Avelar, Silvania; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Modern ocean sediments serve as the interface between the biosphere and the geosphere, play a key role in biogeochemical cycles and provide a window on how contemporary processes are written into the sedimentary record. Research over past decades has resulted in a wealth of information on the content and composition of organic matter in marine sediments, with ever-more sophisticated techniques continuing to yield information of greater detail and as an accelerating pace. However, there has been no attempt to synthesize this wealth of information. We are establishing a new database that incorporates information relevant to local, regional and global-scale assessment of the content, source and fate of organic materials accumulating in contemporary marine sediments. In the MOSAIC (Modern Ocean Sediment Archive and Inventory of Carbon) database, particular emphasis is placed on molecular and isotopic information, coupled with relevant contextual information (e.g., sedimentological properties) relevant to elucidating factors that influence the efficiency and nature of organic matter burial. The main features of MOSAIC include: (i) Emphasis on continental margin sediments as major loci of carbon burial, and as the interface between terrestrial and oceanic realms; (ii) Bulk to molecular-level organic geochemical properties and parameters, including concentration and isotopic compositions; (iii) Inclusion of extensive contextual data regarding the depositional setting, in particular with respect to sedimentological and redox characteristics. The ultimate goal is to create an open-access instrument, available on the web, to be utilized for research and education by the international community who can both contribute to, and interrogate the database. The submission will be accomplished by means of a pre-configured table available on the MOSAIC webpage. The information on the filled tables will be checked and eventually imported, via the Structural Query Language (SQL), into

  4. Early diagenesis driven by widespread meteoric infiltration of a Central European carbonate ramp: A reinterpretation of the Upper Muschelkalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Arthur; Diamond, Larryn W.

    2017-12-01

    Meteoric diagenesis of carbonate ramps is often difficult to interpret and can commonly be confused with other coinciding diagenetic processes. The Middle Triassic Upper Muschelkalk of Switzerland provides an insightful case in which the effects of several overprinting diagenetic environments, including matrix dolomitization, can be clearly unravelled. Previous studies suggested that diagenesis took place in connate marine waters, with later meteoric waters being invoked to explain recrystallization of dolomite. In this study, diagenetic analyses (C-O stable isotope ratios, thin-section point counting, cathodoluminescence and UV-fluorescence microscopy) of calcitic bioclastic samples have revealed that early diagenesis (pre-stylolitization) and the accompanying porosity evolution did not occur exclusively in the presence of marine fluids. Five sequential stages of diagenesis have been identified: marine, shallow burial, mixing-zone, meteoric and dolomitization. Marine diagenesis induced precipitation of bladed and inclusion-rich syntaxial cements that fluoresce strongly under UV-light. Both cements account for a mean 7.5 vol% reduction in the porosity of bioclastic beds. Shallow burial diagenesis likely induced mouldic porosity and associated fluorescent dog-tooth cementation. Based on light oxygen isotope and elevated strontium isotope ratios, matrix aragonite-calcite neomorphism is interpreted to have occurred in a mixture of marine and meteoric fluids. The combination of shallow burial and mixing-zone processes reduced porosity on average by 4.8 vol%. Evidence for subsequent meteoric diagenesis is found in abundant dog-tooth and blocky calcite cements that have mean δ18OVPDB of - 9.36‰ and no signs of recrystallization. These meteoric cements reduced porosity by a further 13.4 vol%. Percolation of meteoric water through the ramp was driven by hydraulic gradients on an adjacent basement high, which was exposed by a cycle of early Ladinian regressions

  5. Sedimentological regimes for turbidity currents: Depth-averaged theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Thomas C.; Kumar, Amit; Perillo, Mauricio M.

    2017-07-01

    Turbidity currents are one of the most significant means by which sediment is moved from the continents into the deep ocean; their properties are interesting both as elements of the global sediment cycle and due to their role in contributing to the formation of deep water oil and gas reservoirs. One of the simplest models of the dynamics of turbidity current flow was introduced three decades ago, and is based on depth-averaging of the fluid mechanical equations governing the turbulent gravity-driven flow of relatively dilute turbidity currents. We examine the sedimentological regimes of a simplified version of this model, focusing on the role of the Richardson number Ri [dimensionless inertia] and Rouse number Ro [dimensionless sedimentation velocity] in determining whether a current is net depositional or net erosional. We find that for large Rouse numbers, the currents are strongly net depositional due to the disappearance of local equilibria between erosion and deposition. At lower Rouse numbers, the Richardson number also plays a role in determining the degree of erosion versus deposition. The currents become more erosive at lower values of the product Ro × Ri, due to the effect of clear water entrainment. At higher values of this product, the turbulence becomes insufficient to maintain the sediment in suspension, as first pointed out by Knapp and Bagnold. We speculate on the potential for two-layer solutions in this insufficiently turbulent regime, which would comprise substantial bedload flow with an overlying turbidity current.

  6. The morphodynamics and sedimentology of large river confluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Andrew; Sambrook Smith, Greg; Best, James; Bull, Jon; Dixon, Simon; Goodbred, Steven; Sarker, Mamin; Vardy, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Confluences are key locations within large river networks, yet surprisingly little is known about how they migrate and evolve through time. Moreover, because confluence sites are associated with scour pools that are typically several times the mean channel depth, the deposits associated with such scours should have a high potential for preservation within the rock record. However, paradoxically, such scours are rarely observed, and the sedimentological characteristics of such deposits are poorly understood. This study reports results from a physically-based morphodynamic model, which is applied to simulate the evolution and resulting alluvial architecture associated with large river junctions. Boundary conditions within the model simulation are defined to approximate the junction of the Ganges and Jamuna rivers, in Bangladesh. Model results are supplemented by geophysical datasets collected during boat-based surveys at this junction. Simulated deposit characteristics and geophysical datasets are compared with three existing and contrasting conceptual models that have been proposed to represent the sedimentary architecture of confluence scours. Results illustrate that existing conceptual models may be overly simplistic, although elements of each of the three conceptual models are evident in the deposits generated by the numerical simulation. The latter are characterised by several distinct styles of sedimentary fill, which can be linked to particular morphodynamic behaviours. However, the preserved characteristics of simulated confluence deposits vary substantial according to the degree of reworking by channel migration. This may go some way towards explaining the confluence scour paradox; while abundant large scours might be expected in the rock record, they are rarely reported.

  7. Provenance, diagenesis, tectonic setting and reservoir quality of the sandstones of the Kareem Formation, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Samir M.

    2013-09-01

    The Middle Miocene Kareem sandstones are important oil reservoirs in the southwestern part of the Gulf of Suez basin, Egypt. However, their diagenesis and provenance and their impact on reservoir quality, are virtually unknown. Samples from the Zeit Bay Oil Field, and the East Zeit Oil Field represent the Lower Kareem (Rahmi Member) and the Upper Kareem (Shagar Member), were studied using a combination of petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical techniques. The Lower Rahmi sandstones have an average framework composition of Q95F3.4R1.6, and 90% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. By contrast, the Upper Shagar sandstones are only slightly less quartzose with an average framework composition of Q76F21R3 and 82% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. The Kareem sandstones are mostly quartzarenite with subordinate subarkose and arkose. Petrographical and geochemical data of sandstones indicate that they were derived from granitic and metamorphic terrains as the main source rock with a subordinate quartzose recycled sedimentary rocks and deposited in a passive continental margin of a syn rift basin. The sandstones of the Kareem Formation show upward decrease in maturity. Petrographic study revealed that dolomite is the dominant cement and generally occurs as fine to medium rhombs pore occluding phase and locally as a grain replacive phase. Authigenic quartz occurs as small euhedral crystals, locally as large pyramidal crystals in the primary pores. Authigenic anhydrites typically occur as poikilotopic rhombs or elongate laths infilling pores but also as vein filling cement. The kaolinite is a by-product of feldspar leaching in the presence of acidic fluid produced during the maturation of organic matter in the adjacent Miocene rocks. Diagenetic features include compaction; dolomite, silica and anhydrite cementation with minor iron-oxide, illite, kaolinite and pyrite cements; dissolution of feldspars, rock fragments. Silica dissolution, grain replacement and

  8. Differentiating pedogenesis from diagenesis in early terrestrial paleoweathering surfaces formed on granitic composition parent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driese, S.G.; Medaris, L.G.; Ren, M.; Runkel, Anthony C.; Langford, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Unconformable surfaces separating Precambrian crystalline basement and overlying Proterozoic to Cambrian sedimentary rocks provide an exceptional opportunity to examine the role of primitive soil ecosystems in weathering and resultant formation of saprolite (weathered rock retaining rock structure) and regolith (weathered rock without rock structure), but many appear to have been affected by burial diagenesis and hydrothermal fluid flow, leading some researchers to discount their suitability for such studies. We examine one modern weathering profile (Cecil series), four Cambrian paleoweathering profiles from the North American craton (Squaw Creek, Franklin Mountains, Core SQ-8, and Core 4), one Neoproterozoic profile (Sheigra), and one late Paleoproterozoic profile (Baraboo), to test the hypothesis that these paleoweathering profiles do provide evidence of primitive terrestrial weathering despite their diagenetic and hydrothermal overprinting, especially additions of potassium. We employ an integrated approach using (1) detailed thin-section investigations to identify characteristic pedogenic features associated with saprolitization and formation of well-drained regoliths, (2) electron microprobe analysis to identify specific weathered and new mineral phases, and (3) geochemical mass balance techniques to characterize volume changes during weathering and elemental gains and losses of major and minor elements relative to the inferred parent materials. There is strong pedogenic evidence of paleoweathering, such as clay illuviation, sepic-plasmic fabrics, redoximorphic features, and dissolution and alteration of feldspars and mafic minerals to kaolinite, gibbsite, and Fe oxides, as well as geochemical evidence, such as whole-rock losses of Na, Ca, Mg, Si, Sr, Fe, and Mn greater than in modern profiles. Evidence of diagenesis includes net additions of K, Ba, and Rb determined through geochemical mass balance, K-feldspar overgrowths in overlying sandstone sections, and

  9. Blueprint for a coupled model of sedimentology, hydrology, and hydrogeology in streambeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partington, Daniel; Therrien, Rene; Simmons, Craig T.; Brunner, Philip

    2017-06-01

    The streambed constitutes the physical interface between the surface and the subsurface of a stream. Across all spatial scales, the physical properties of the streambed control surface water-groundwater interactions. Continuous alteration of streambed properties such as topography or hydraulic conductivity occurs through erosion and sedimentation processes. Recent studies from the fields of ecology, hydrogeology, and sedimentology provide field evidence that sedimentological processes themselves can be heavily influenced by surface water-groundwater interactions, giving rise to complex feedback mechanisms between sedimentology, hydrology, and hydrogeology. More explicitly, surface water-groundwater exchanges play a significant role in the deposition of fine sediments, which in turn modify the hydraulic properties of the streambed. We explore these feedback mechanisms and critically review the extent of current interaction between the different disciplines. We identify opportunities to improve current modeling practices. For example, hydrogeological models treat the streambed as a static rather than a dynamic entity, while sedimentological models do not account for critical catchment processes such as surface water-groundwater exchange. We propose a blueprint for a new modeling framework that bridges the conceptual gaps between sedimentology, hydrogeology, and hydrology. Specifically, this blueprint (1) fully integrates surface-subsurface flows with erosion, transport, and deposition of sediments and (2) accounts for the dynamic changes in surface elevation and hydraulic conductivity of the streambed. Finally, we discuss the opportunities for new research within the coupled framework.

  10. Coral zonation and diagenesis of an emergent Pleistocene patch reef, Belize, Central America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lighty, R.G.; Russell, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    Transect mapping and petrologic studies reveal a new depositional model and limited diagenesis of a well-exposed Pleistocene reef outcrop at Ambergris Cay, northern Belize. This emergent shelf-edge reef forms a rocky wave-washed headland at the northern terminus of the present-day 250 km long flourishing Belize Barrier Reef. Previously, the Belize reef outcrop was thought to extend southward in the subsurface beneath the modern barrier reef as a Pleistocene equivalent. The authors study indicate that this outcrop is a large, coral patch reef and not part of a barrier reef trend. Sixteen transects 12.5 m apart described in continuous cm increments from fore reef to back reef identified: extensive deposits of broken Acropora cervicornis; small thickets of A. palmata with small, oriented branches; and muddy skeletal sediments with few corals or reef rubble. Thin section and SEM studies show three phases of early submarine cementation: syntaxial and rosette aragonite; Mg-calcite rim cement and peloids; and colloidal Mg-calcite geopetal fill. Subaerial exposure in semi-arid northern Belize caused only minor skeletal dissolution, some precipitation of vadose whisker calcite, and no meteoric phreatic diagenesis. Facies geometry, coral assemblages, lack of rubble deposits, coralline algal encrustations and Millepora framework, and recognition of common but discrete submarine cements, all indicate that this Pleistocene reef was an isolated, coral-fringed sediment buildup similar to may large patch reefs existing today in moderate-energy shelf environments behind the modern barrier reef in central and southern Belize.

  11. Radioisotopes in sedimentology; Emploi des radioelements en sedimentologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtois, G [CEA, Centre d' etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France)

    1967-05-15

    Radioisotopes have two main uses in sedimentology: they are used for the study of sediment movements in rivers and seas, and for continuous measurements of the amount of sediment suspended in a given medium. These two uses are considered in detail, and brief accounts given of some other uses. Study of sediment movements. After describing the basic technique used in sediment movement studies (injection of a labelled sediment or a simulator into the current, followed by tracking the radioactivity), the author enumerates as fully as possible the problems that can be solved with the help of this technique. Essentially, these problems fall into two groups: 1. Problems related to civil engineering works in coastal areas: the siltation of harbour channels and docks, the formation of banks and bars, the choice of sites for disposing of dredged sediment, the siting of ports, coastline protection, etc. Problems associated with civil engineering works in and near rivers; siting of the water intakes of hydroelectric and nuclear power stations, the effects of construction work on the transport of solids, the construction of dams, the protection of river banks, the construction of jetties, the siltation of lakes, etc. Problems common to these include the transport of effluent and the calibration of hydraulic models. The bibliography is based mainly on fairly recent references and on current research work. 2. Problems related to basic or applied research conducted mainly by universities and research centres: the study of the Quarternary of a particular region, pure sedimentology, the investigation of major sediment transport currents, the confirmation or refutation of transport theories, research into fundamental transport phenomena associated with channel experiments. After referring to the possible exploitation of natural tracers (contained in radioactive waste and fallout), the author discusses the technical aspects of using artificial tracers: the choice of radioisotope

  12. Effect of site on sedimentological characteristics and metal pollution in two semi-enclosed embayments of great freshwater reservoir: Lake Nasser, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Hassan I.; Aly, Walid

    2018-05-01

    This study was carried out to assess the effect of site on the spatial variations of sedimentological characteristics and heavy metal pollution of two semi-enclosed embayments of Lake Nasser. Grain Size, texture and mode of transportation as well as some heavy metals and organic matter were assessed in sediment samples from those embayments. The results indicated that the grain size of the lake sediments was affected by site variation. Moreover, heavy metal distribution in the sediments was mainly directed by grain size distribution and organic matter, though, the organic matter was more critical than grain size in controlling heavy metals distribution in each embayment. The main source of heavy metals in studied embayments was concluded to be the metals brought with flood waters rather than being of anthropogenic origin. The results also indicated the association of studied metals with Fe and Mn oxides of suspended matters and dissolved solids which come with flood water and trapped and settled to the bottom sediment in the stagnation period. Measured indices indicated that southern embayment is more polluted than northern one, which could be explained on the basis that the southern embayment reserves larger amounts of suspended matter coming with the flood than northern embayment.

  13. Provenance and diagenesis of the evaporite-bearing Burns formation, Meridiani Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, S.M.; Bell, J.F.; Calvin, W.M.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; de Souza, P.A.; Farmer, J.; Farrand, W. H.; Fike, D.A.; Gellert, Ralf; Ghosh, A.; Glotch, T.D.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Hahn, B.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Hurowitz, J.A.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, S.S.; Jolliff, B.; Klingelhofer, G.; Knoll, A.H.; Learner, Z.; Malin, M.C.; McSween, H.Y.; Pocock, J.; Ruff, S.W.; Soderblom, L.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Tosca, N.J.; Watters, W.A.; Wyatt, M.B.; Yen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Impure reworked evaporitic sandstones, preserved on Meridiani Planum, Mars, are mixtures of roughly equal amounts of altered siliciclastic debris, of basaltic provenance (40 ?? 10% by mass), and chemical constituents, dominated by evaporitic minerals (jarosite, Mg-, Ca-sulfates ?? chlorides ?? Fe-, Na-sulfates), hematite and possibly secondary silica (60 ?? 10%). These chemical constituents and their relative abundances are not an equilibrium evaporite assemblage and to a substantial degree have been reworked by aeolian and subaqueous transport. Ultimately they formed by evaporation of acidic waters derived from interaction with olivine-bearing basalts and subsequent diagenetic alteration. The rocks experienced an extended diagenetic history, with at least two and up to four distinct episodes of cementation, including stratigraphically restricted zones of recrystallization and secondary porosity, non-randomly distributed, highly spherical millimeter-scale hematitic concretions, millimeter-scale crystal molds, interpreted to have resulted from dissolution of a highly soluble evaporite mineral, elongate to sheet-like vugs and evidence for minor synsedimentary deformation (convolute and contorted bedding, possible teepee structures or salt ridge features). Other features that may be diagenetic, but more likely are associated with relatively recent meteorite impact, are meter-scale fracture patterns, veins and polygonal fractures on rock surfaces that cut across bedding. Crystallization of minerals that originally filled the molds, early cement and sediment deformation occurred syndepositionally or during early diagenesis. All other diagenetic features are consistent with formation during later diagenesis in the phreatic (fluid saturated) zone or capillary fringe of a groundwater table under near isotropic hydrological conditions such as those expected during periodic groundwater recharge. Textural evidence suggests that rapidly formed hematitic concretions post

  14. Changing sedimentary environment during the late Quaternary: Sedimentological and isotopic evidence from the distal Bengal Fan

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kessarkar, P.M.; Rao, V.P.; Ahmad, S.M.; Patil, S.K.; AnilKumar, A.; AnilBabu, G.; Chakraborty, S.; SounderRajan, R

    The sediments recovered from two gravity cores of the lower and distal Bengal Fan were investigated for sedimentological properties and Sr -Nd isotopes.Each core exhibits two distinct units, the lower unit 2 and upper unit 1 sediments. The unit 2...

  15. Monitoring iron and manganese diagenesis in constructed wetlands with continuous gradient gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edenborn, H.M.; Brickett, L.A.; Dvorak, D.H.; Edenborn, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    Average removal rates for Fe and Mn in wetlands constructed for the treatment of coal mine drainage have been developed based on field observations, but few details are known about the spatial and temporal variation in metal diagenesis within these wetlands. The heterogeneous distribution of biological activity in constructed wetland sediments makes it difficult to assess the importance of specific diagenetic processes without taking large numbers of samples at great expense. In this study, continuous gradient gels were used to evaluate Pennsylvania. Continuous gradient gels provided rapid and detailed information on the regions of stability of Fe and Mn compounds within the wetland sediments. The resulting data were mapped and used to demonstrate how this technique can be used to assess the overall efficiency of constructed wetlands in the removal of Fe and Mn

  16. Stable isotope geochemistry and evidence for meteoric diagenesis in Kudankulam formation, Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong Altrin Sam, J.; Ramasamy, S.; Makhnach, A.

    2001-01-01

    The results obtained from stable isotope study of Neogene carbonates of Kudankulam, Tamil Nadu show negative values for δ 13c arbon, which range from -2.6% to -9.7% PDB. The δ 18O values range from -4.5% to -11.4% PDB. The depleted nature of the δ 18O and δ 13C values suggests the strong effect of meteoric diagenesis in the Kudankulam carbonates. Standard bivariate plots of δ 18O versus δ 13C for carbonate materials/rocks helped to identify their depositional and diagenetic environments. Petrographic study points out large-scale emplacement of ferroan sparry calcite cement into vugs and other leached cavities. (author)

  17. Mineralogy of Fluvio-Lacustrine Sediments Investigated by Curiosity During the Prime Mission: Implications for Diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Blake, D. F.; Ming, D. W.; Farmer, J. D.; Morrison, S. M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity investigated sedimentary rocks that were deposited in a diversity of fluvio-lacustrine settings. The entire science payload was employed to characterize the mineralogy and chemistry of the Sheepbed mudstone at Yellowknife Bay and the Windjana sandstone at the Kimberley. Data from the CheMin instrument, a transmission Xray diffractometer, were used to determine the quantitative mineralogy of both samples. The Sheepbed mudstone contains detrital basaltic minerals, calcium sulfates, iron oxides or hydroxides, iron sulfides, trioctahedral smectite, and amorphous material. The mineral assemblage and chemical data from APXS suggest that the trioctahedral smectite and magnetite formed authigenically as a result of alteration of olivine. The apparent lack of higher-grade phyllosilicates (e.g., illite and chlorite) and the presence of anhydrite indicate diagenesis at 50- 80 ºC. The mineralogy of the Windjana sandstone is different than the Sheepbed mudstone. Windjana contains significant abundances of K-feldspar, low- and high-Ca pyroxenes, magnetite, phyllosilicates, and amorphous material. At least two distinct phyllosilicate phases exist: a 10 Å phase and a component that is expanded with a peak at 11.8 Å. The identity of the expanded phase is currently unknown, but could be a smectite with interlayer H2O, and the 10 Å phase could be illite or collapsed smectite. Further work is necessary to characterize the phyllosilicates, but the presence of illite could suggest that Windjana experienced burial diagenesis. Candidates for the cementing agents include fine-grained phyllosilicates, Fe-oxides, and/or amorphous material. Interpretations of CheMin data from the Windjana sandstone are ongoing at the time of writing, but we will present an estimate of the composition of the amorphous material from mass balance calculations using the APXS bulk chemistry and quantitative mineralogy from CheMin.

  18. Formation of Mg-aluminosilicates During Early Diagenesis of Carbonate Sediments in the Volcanic Crater Lake of Dziani Dzaha (Mayotte - Indian Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, V. P.; Jezequel, D.; Debure, M.; Marty, N.; Guyot, F. J.; Claret, F.; Virgone, A.; Gaucher, E.; Ader, M.

    2017-12-01

    Authigenic clays are increasingly reported in ancient carbonate rocks, but their origin remains poorly understood, strongly limiting paleoenvironmental interpretations. To tackle this issue, the carbonate sediments of the volcanic crater lake Dziani Dzaha are studied and reactive transport modeling is performed to assess the processes originating carbonate sediments associated with Mg-rich silicates during early diagenesis. The Dziani Dzaha is characterized by CO2-rich gases bubbling in three different locations, a high primary productivity leading to organic carbon contents of up to 30wt.% in the sediment, an alkalinity of 0.26 molal in the water column and pH values of 9 to 9.5. Characterization of bulk samples and clay fraction (fueled by inputs of CO2-rich volcanic gases, which generates high pH, promoting the formation of saponite, aragonite and hydromagnesite, which precipitates at first before being destabilized at depth due to organic matter mineralization. The observed carbon cycle, influenced by volcanic gases, may thus play a key role in the development of carbonate rocks associated with Mg-silicates.

  19. Sedimentology of the Paestum travertines, Salerno, Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzalone, E.; Ferreri, V.; D'Argenio, B.

    2009-04-01

    forming the town wall between Porta Sirena and Porta Giustizia (southern-eastern side of Paestum) and in the civil and sacred architecture. The time-space relationships among the above lithofacies associations clearly emerge in the Porta Marina area both in the Greek walls of the ancient town (slope and swamp facies) and in the outcropping travertine substrate (slope and waterfall deposits). Based on the above sedimentological results, it may be inferred that, like other ambient temperature travertine systems studied in southern Italy, the Paestum travertine growth developed over a gentle slope surface (in our case dipping to the west), laterally evolving into rapid and waterfall deposits. At the same time, the aggradational growth of the travertine system resulted in a flattened summit area with widespread swamp and marsh environments. The ruins of Paestum, including the lower parts of sacred and civil buildings as well as town roads and walls, are even today largely covered by recent semi-coherent travertines (tufa), originating from waters that encrusted and then "fossilized" a large part of the town. Inside the town walls, these materials were pedogenized and nowadays are largely cultivated around and within the archeological area. A portion of these deposits was removed during the excavations of the beginning of last century, but traces of them may still be observed in different parts of the ancient town. Like the foundation travertines, the recent deposits are mainly made up of calcareous encrustations. Gastropods, ostracods and other organisms typical of terrestrial humid environments may be found in the phytoclastic textures. Usually, they are weakly cemented and at places incorporate different materials, including brick, wood and coal fragments. These sediments patchy cover the town within the wall perimeter, for a few decimetres in the sacred areas, but reaching over 4 meters downhill and outside the walls: a process of "fossilization" that appears to have been

  20. A review of Arbuckle Group strata in Kansas from a sedimentologic perspective: Insights for future research from past and recent studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franseen, E.K.

    2000-01-01

    Arbuckle Group and equivalent-age rocks (Cambrian and Lower Ordovician) represent an important record of sediment deposition in the history of the North American continent and they contain important accumulations of hydrocarbons (oil and gas) and base metal deposits. This is true for Kansas as well where Arbuckle strata account for approximately 40% of the volume of produced petroleum and known reserves. However, in comparison to their counterparts in other areas, such as the Ellenburger and Knox, Arbuckle rocks in Kansas remain relatively understudied, especially with respect to sedimentology and diagenesis. The Arbuckle is present in the subsurface in most of Kansas and is absent only in areas of northeastern and northwestern Kansas, and over ancient uplifts and buried Precambrian highs. Arbuckle rocks thicken from north to south and are up to 1,390 feet in the southeastern corner of Kansas. Arbuckle Group and equivalent-age rocks from Kansas and surrounding areas are similar, consisting of platform deposits dominated by ramp-type subtidal to peritidal carbonates (mostly dolomitized) which can be subdivided into cycles, less than 0.5 m to 40 m thick, based on facies type and depositional patterns. Recent studies from central Kansas show that major depositional facies consist of coarse-grained packstones/ grainstones, fine-grained packstones/wackestones/mudstones, stromatolites-thrombolites, intraclastic conglomerate and breccia, and shale. In addition, secondary features include dolomitization, breccia, fracture, and conglomerate related to early subaerial exposure and later karst, burial or structural processes, silicification, and local mineralization. Arbuckle and equivalent strata in the Midcontinent were affected by prolonged subaerial exposure that began immediately after Arbuckle deposition, forming the sub-Tippecanoe to sub-Absaroka unconformity. Favorable reservoir qualities generally are thought to be related directly to basement structural elements and

  1. What classic greywacke (litharenite) can reveal about feldspar diagenesis: An example from Permian Rotliegend sandstone in Hessen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Nicolaas; Felder, Marita; Bär, Kristian; Götz, Annette E.

    2015-08-01

    Rotliegend siliciclastic sediments in southern Hessen (Germany) are a good example of dissolution of detrital feldspars, which is a common feature in many sandstones. Dissolution occurred after mechanical compaction of the lithic-rich sandstone, which experienced framework collapse with pores and pore connections filled and obstructed by deformed ductile lithic grains (pseudomatrix) thereby reducing pore space to microporosity., The advanced degree of compaction and reduced porosity caused low permeability and low hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass. This is further reduced by the presence of wackes and shales that occur intercalated with the sandstones. Feldspar dissolution thus took place in low permeable sediments when large-scale flow of meteoric or acidic fluids is ruled out as a cause of feldspar dissolution. Mineral precipitation (illite, kaolinite, and albite) took place within pseudomatrix and detrital matrix as well as in secondary pores created by feldspar dissolution. Feldspar was the source for the authigenesis. The system was thus closed during burial after framework collapse, and diagenetic reactants in the form of detrital components were already present within the system. The original mass was preserved, but redistributed and diagenetic minerals were the local sinks for the dissolved reactants, precipitating within the system. This also suggests that burial diagenesis in general might be more mass conservative than usually assumed. Rotliegend sandstones thus form a case where, despite of the lack of external exchange of mass by fluid flow, major diagenetic processes did take place and significantly modified the original mineralogy and texture. Feldspar diagenesis can take place from other processes than mere large-scale flushing of open systems as often supposed. It implies that the volumes of rock affected by feldspar diagenesis may be much larger than anticipated based upon the common hold believe that feldspar diagenesis is linked to

  2. Numerical modelling of fluid-rock interactions: Lessons learnt from carbonate rocks diagenesis studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Fadi; Bachaud, Pierre; Michel, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of fluid-rock interactions and their impact on carbonate host-rocks has recently become a very attractive research topic within academic and industrial realms. Today, a common operational workflow that aims at predicting the relevant diagenetic processes on the host rocks (i.e. fluid-rock interactions) consists of three main stages: i) constructing a conceptual diagenesis model including inferred preferential fluids pathways; ii) quantifying the resulted diagenetic phases (e.g. depositing cements, dissolved and recrystallized minerals); and iii) numerical modelling of diagenetic processes. Most of the concepts of diagenetic processes operate at the larger, basin-scale, however, the description of the diagenetic phases (products of such processes) and their association with the overall petrophysical evolution of sedimentary rocks remain at reservoir (and even outcrop/ well core) scale. Conceptual models of diagenetic processes are thereafter constructed based on studying surface-exposed rocks and well cores (e.g. petrography, geochemistry, fluid inclusions). We are able to quantify the diagenetic products with various evolving techniques and on varying scales (e.g. point-counting, 2D and 3D image analysis, XRD, micro-CT and pore network models). Geochemical modelling makes use of thermodynamic and kinetic rules as well as data-bases to simulate chemical reactions and fluid-rock interactions. This can be through a 0D model, whereby a certain process is tested (e.g. the likelihood of a certain chemical reaction to operate under specific conditions). Results relate to the fluids and mineral phases involved in the chemical reactions. They could be used as arguments to support or refute proposed outcomes of fluid-rock interactions. Coupling geochemical modelling with transport (reactive transport model; 1D, 2D and 3D) is another possibility, attractive as it provides forward simulations of diagenetic processes and resulting phases. This

  3. Mineralogy, early marine diagenesis, and the chemistry of shallow-water carbonate sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Lundstrom, E. A.; Santiago-Ramos, D. P.; Akhtar, A. A.; Crüger Ahm, A.-S.; Bialik, O.; Holmden, C.; Bradbury, H.; Murray, S. T.; Swart, P. K.

    2018-01-01

    Shallow-water carbonate sediments constitute the bulk of sedimentary carbonates in the geologic record and are widely used archives of Earth's chemical and climatic history. One of the main limitations in interpreting the geochemistry of ancient carbonate sediments is the potential for post-depositional diagenetic alteration. In this study, we use paired measurements of calcium (44Ca/40Ca or δ44Ca) and magnesium (26Mg/24Mg or δ26Mg) isotope ratios in sedimentary carbonates and associated pore-fluids as a tool to understand the mineralogical and diagenetic history of Neogene shallow-water carbonate sediments from the Bahamas and southwest Australia. We find that the Ca and Mg isotopic composition of bulk carbonate sediments at these sites exhibits systematic stratigraphic variability that is related to both mineralogy and early marine diagenesis. The observed variability in bulk sediment Ca isotopes is best explained by changes in the extent and style of early marine diagenesis from one where the composition of the diagenetic carbonate mineral is determined by the chemistry of the fluid (fluid-buffered) to one where the composition of the diagenetic carbonate mineral is determined by the chemistry of the precursor sediment (sediment-buffered). Our results indicate that this process, together with variations in carbonate mineralogy (aragonite, calcite, and dolomite), plays a fundamental and underappreciated role in determining the regional and global stratigraphic expressions of geochemical tracers (δ13C, δ18O, major, minor, and trace elements) in shallow-water carbonate sediments in the geologic record. Our results also provide evidence that a large shallow-water carbonate sink that is enriched in 44Ca can explain the mismatch between the δ44/40Ca value of rivers and deep-sea carbonate sediments and call into question the hypothesis that the δ44/40Ca value of seawater depends on the mineralogy of primary carbonate precipitations (e.g. 'aragonite seas' and

  4. The sedimentology and uranium mineralisation of the Banksgaten deposit, Sutherland district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J.P.

    1982-08-01

    As part of its research program, NUCOR carried out a sedimentological investigation of the Banksgaten uranium deposit discovered by Esso Minerals. The Banksgaten prospect is situated on a promontory of the Nuweveld Escarpment, 35 km south-east of Sutherland. The six prominent sandstone units exposed in the study area form part of the arenaceous Oukloof Member of the Teekloof Formation. Palaeocurrent studies show a wide variation in transport direction. However, the vector mean palaeocurrent trend is towards the north-north-east. The sedimentological environment is a distal braided river forming part of a deltaic plain. The uranium mineralisation occurs on three stratigraphic levels and is concentrated almost exclusively in the channels of the different sandstones. These channels are vertically superimposed and probably inherited the drainage pattern of pre-existing channels

  5. Deformation of textural characteristics and sedimentology along micro-tidal estuarine beaches

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dora, G.U.; SanilKumar, V.; Philip, C.S.; Johnson, G.

    Indian Journal of Geo Marine Sciences Vol. 45 (11), November 2016, pp. 1432-1444 *Corresponding author Deformation of textural characteristics and sedimentology along micro- tidal estuarine beaches G. Udhaba Dora, V. Sanil Kumar*, C... sediment is a foremost parameter for a coastal researcher/engineer/designer due to its various applications for sorting out a coastal environment. Sedimentary process at foreshore zone is a highly dynamical whereas textural characteristics...

  6. Petrophysical and sedimentological characterization of the Zuata field in Orinoco Oil Belt. Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, M.; Baena, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Zuata field is in the middle of the Jun in block in Orinoco Oil Belt and its production is handled by the district of Cabrutica which planning to develop a comprehensive reservoir model that allows leverage a correct management of hydrocarbon reserves. The purpose of this study is to generate a sedimentological and petrophysical model to know the architecture and quality of the rocks

  7. Sedimentological time-averaging and 14C dating of marine shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Osamu; Kamataki, Takanobu; Masuda, Fujio

    2004-01-01

    The radiocarbon dating of sediments using marine shells involves uncertainties due to the mixed ages of the shells mainly attributed to depositional processes also known as 'sedimentological time-averaging'. This stratigraphic disorder can be removed by selecting the well-preserved indigenous shells based on ecological and taphonomic criteria. These criteria on sample selection are recommended for accurate estimation of the depositional age of geologic strata from 14 C dating of marine shells

  8. Sedimentological measurements in the river Ghezel Uzan using the radioactive source Cs-137 and Ba-133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panahandeh, H.; Parvaresh, P.; Hadadi-Parsa, M.A.; Keshavarzi, C.

    1981-01-01

    A new gamma-backscattering sedimentological gauge has been designed to measure the high concentrations of suspended sediments of rivers in a stationary position for different depths at flooding times continuously for 9 hours. The instrument is capable of measuring concentrations from 5 to 95 g/l with a good accuracy and of higher concentrations as well. In comparison to common instruments based on gamma radiation absorption this one classifies for higher concentrations. (orig.) [de

  9. The Borschovo section of the Gauja and Amata regional stages (Leningrad Region, Russia): sedimentology and biostratigraphy

    OpenAIRE

    Ervīns Lukševičs; Ģirts Stinkulis; Alexander Ivanov; Daiga Tirzmale

    2018-01-01

    The results of the detailed sedimentological study and bed-by-bed collecting of fossils from the Borschovo section exposing the upper Givetian–lower Frasnian boundary beds are discussed. The succession consists of sandstones alternating with argillaceous and clayey packages that contain vertebrate and plant remains in the upper part. The grain size, sedimentary structures and cross-bed orientation considerably differ in the Oredezh Beds and the Staritsa Beds. Fine- to coarse-grained cross-str...

  10. A martian case study of segmenting images automatically for granulometry and sedimentology, Part 2: Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunatillake, Suniti; McLennan, Scott M.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Husch, Jonathan M.; Hardgrove, Craig; Skok, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    In a companion work, we bridge the gap between mature segmentation software used in terrestrial sedimentology and emergent planetary segmentation with an original algorithm optimized to segment whole images from the Microscopic Imager (MI) of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER). In this work, we compare its semi-automated outcome with manual photoanalyses using unconsolidated sediment at Gusev and Meridiani Planum sites for geologic context. On average, our code and manual segmentation converge to within ∼10% in the number and total area of identified grains in a pseudo-random, single blind comparison of 50 samples. Unlike manual segmentation, it also locates finer grains in an image with internal consistency, enabling robust comparisons across geologic contexts. When implemented in Mathematica-8, the algorithm segments an entire MI image within minutes, surpassing the extent and speed possible with manual segmentation by about a factor of ten. These results indicate that our algorithm enables not only new sedimentological insight from the MER MI data, but also detailed sedimentology with the Mars Science Laboratory’s Mars Hand Lens Instrument.

  11. ASPEK PROSES DIAGENESIS TERHADAP SIFAT FISIK BATUPASIR FORMASI KEREK, DAERAH KALIPUTIH DAN SEKITARNYA, KECAMATAN SINGOROJO, KABUPATEN KENDAL, JAWA TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanny Hertanto Vahyu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The sedimentary rock is formed and associated with the diagenesis processes, as all the physical, chemical, andbiological changes in the characteristics of a sediment accumulation from the time the grains are deposited untilthey are metamorphosed. This process is profoundly influence the characteristic of sedimentary rock, including thetexture, internal structure, mineral composition, cementation type, and pore space. Hence, it is important to knowor learn the stage of sandstone diagenesis, especially in the Kerek Formation to mark the correlation betweendiagenesis and physical properties of sandstone.The purpose of this research is to identify the stage of diagenetic processes, diagenetic environment, the type ofcementation, and the relationship between diagenetic stage and physical properties of sandstone. The methods usedin this research are survey method and data analysis method. The survey method includes the making of crosssectionalmeasured stratigraphy and data analysis method includes petrographic and scanning electron microscopy(SEM.The sedimentary structures found in the carbonate sandstones are burrows, convolute ripple lamination, gradedbedding, parallel lamination, cross lamination, current ripple lamination; which are features of turbidity deposition(Bouma sequence. Based on the petrography analysis results for sample P 01 and P 02 showed compaction,cementation, dissolution, and bioturbation, with a porosity value of 1 %. Sample P 03 showed compaction,cementation, dissolution, and bioturbation, with a porosity value of 7 %. Sample P 04 showed compaction,cementation, and dissolution, with a porosity value of 1 %. Sample P 06 showed compaction, cementation,dissolution and replacement, with a porosity value of 5 %. Sample P 07 showed compaction, and cementation, witha porosity value of 30 %. The Lithology type in the research area was Calcarenite with dominant shell fragment,the lithology names are Packed biomicrite (Folks, 1959; in

  12. Behaviour of sulphur during diagenesis of a maritime ombrotrophic peat from Yell, Shetland Islands, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, Rebecca; Bottrell, Simon; Coulson, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Surface water, pore water, vegetation and peat cores were sampled from a waterlogged ombrotrophic peat bog on the Shetland Isles, UK and analysed for different S forms and their isotopic composition, in an attempt to elucidate the biogeochemical processes affecting S during peat diagenesis. Surface waters show that inputs of S to the peat have a maritime-dominated isotopic composition close to +20%% CDT . Uptake of S by vegetation introduces a -10%% shift in δ 34 S from these input values. Below the vegetation layer and down to 18cm depth, bacterial SO 4 2- reduction is the major control on S species distribution and isotopic composition within the solid peat and pore waters. In this part of the peat, preferential reduction of 32 SO 4 in pore water during metabolism produces isotopically light sulphide, which is incorporated into the solid phase in both inorganic and organic forms, while pore water SO 4 2- becomes enriched in 34 S. From 18 to 28cm, organic S content falls relative to C and residual organic S becomes 34 S-enriched, indicative of mineralization of organic S, a process which releases isotopically light S to the pore waters. Still deeper in the core (28 to ∼50cm), bacterial reduction of pore-water SO 4 2- , now enriched in 34 S, results in addition of isotopically heavy S to the solid phase. Limited pore water data suggest that below 50cm mineralization reactions again release S from the organic fraction of the peat

  13. Overpressure generation by load transfer following shale framework weakening due to smectite diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahann, R.W.; Swarbrick, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    Basin model studies which have addressed the importance of smectite conversion to illite as a source of overpressure in the Gulf of Mexico have principally relied on a single-shale compaction model and treated the smectite reaction as only a fluid-source term. Recent fluid pressure interpretation and shale petrology studies indicate that conversion of bound water to mobile water, dissolution of load-bearing grains, and increased preferred orientation change the compaction properties of the shale. This results in substantial changes in effective stress and fluid pressure. The resulting fluid pressure can be 1500-3000psi higher than pressures interpreted from models based on shallow compaction trends. Shale diagenesis changes the mineralogy, volume, and orientation of the load-bearing grains in the shale as well as the volume of bound water. This process creates a weaker (more compactable) grain framework. When these changes occur without fluid export from the shale, some of the stress is transferred from the grains onto the fluid. Observed relationships between shale density and calculated effective stress in Gulf of Mexico shelf wells confirm these changes in shale properties with depth. Further, the density-effective stress changes cannot be explained by fluid-expansion or fluid-source processes or by prediagenesis compaction, but are consistent with a dynamic diagenetic modification of the shale mineralogy, texture, and compaction properties during burial. These findings support the incorporation of diagenetic modification of compaction properties as part of the fluid pressure interpretation process. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Organic matter diagenesis within the water column and surface sediments of the northern Sargasso Sea revealed by lipid biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, M. H.; Pedrosa Pàmies, R.; Weber, J.

    2017-12-01

    The intensity of particle cycling processes within the mesopelagic and bathypelagic ocean controls the length scale of organic material (OM) remineralization and diagenetic transformations of OM composition through the water column and into the sediments. To elucidate the OM cycling in the oligotrophic North Atlantic gyre, we analyzed lipid biomarkers in the suspended particles (30-4400 m depth, 100 mab), the particle flux (500 m, 1500 m and 3200 m depth), and in the underlying surficial sediments (0-0.5 cm, 4500-4600 m depth) collected at the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) time series site located 75km SE of Bermuda. Changes in lipid biomarker concentration and composition with depth highlight the rapid remineralization of OM within the upper mesopelagic layer and continuing diagenetic transformations of OM throughout the water column and within surficial sediments. Despite observed similarities in biomarker composition in suspended and sinking particles, results show there are also consistent differences in relative contributions of phytoplankton-, bacterial- and zooplankton-derived sources that are maintained throughout the water column. For example, sinking particles are more depleted in labile biomarkers (e.g. polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)) and more enriched in bacteria-derived biomarkers (e.g. hopanoids and odd/branched fatty acids) and indicators of fecal-derived OM (e.g. saturated fatty acids, FA 18:1w9 and cholesterol) than in the suspended pool. Strong seasonality in deep (3200 m) fluxes of phytoplankton-derived biomarkers reflect the seasonal input of bloom-derived material to underlying sediments. The rapid diagenetic alteration of this bloom-derived input is evidenced by depletion of PUFAs and enrichment of microbial biomarkers (e.g. odd/branched fatty acids) in surficial sediments over a two month period.

  15. Petroacoustic Modelling of Heterolithic Sandstone Reservoirs: A Novel Approach to Gassmann Modelling Incorporating Sedimentological Constraints and NMR Porosity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; Lovell, M.; Davies, S. J.; Pritchard, T.; Sirju, C.; Abdelkarim, A.

    2012-12-01

    Heterolithic or 'shaly' sandstone reservoirs constitute a significant proportion of hydrocarbon resources. Petroacoustic models (a combination of petrophysics and rock physics) enhance the ability to extract reservoir properties from seismic data, providing a connection between seismic and fine-scale rock properties. By incorporating sedimentological observations these models can be better constrained and improved. Petroacoustic modelling is complicated by the unpredictable effects of clay minerals and clay-sized particles on geophysical properties. Such effects are responsible for erroneous results when models developed for "clean" reservoirs - such as Gassmann's equation (Gassmann, 1951) - are applied to heterolithic sandstone reservoirs. Gassmann's equation is arguably the most popular petroacoustic modelling technique in the hydrocarbon industry and is used to model elastic effects of changing reservoir fluid saturations. Successful implementation of Gassmann's equation requires well-constrained drained rock frame properties, which in heterolithic sandstones are heavily influenced by reservoir sedimentology, particularly clay distribution. The prevalent approach to categorising clay distribution is based on the Thomas - Stieber model (Thomas & Stieber, 1975), this approach is inconsistent with current understanding of 'shaly sand' sedimentology and omits properties such as sorting and grain size. The novel approach presented here demonstrates that characterising reservoir sedimentology constitutes an important modelling phase. As well as incorporating sedimentological constraints, this novel approach also aims to improve drained frame moduli estimates through more careful consideration of Gassmann's model assumptions and limitations. A key assumption of Gassmann's equation is a pore space in total communication with movable fluids. This assumption is often violated by conventional applications in heterolithic sandstone reservoirs where effective porosity, which

  16. Across the Gap: Geochronological and Sedimentological Analyses from the Late Pleistocene-Holocene Sequence of Goda Buticha, Southeastern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrat, Asfawossen; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Chapon, Cécile; Douville, Eric; Fragnol, Carole; Hernandez, Marion; Hovers, Erella; Leplongeon, Alice; Martin, Loïc; Pleurdeau, David; Pearson, Osbjorn; Puaud, Simon; Assefa, Zelalem

    2017-01-01

    Goda Buticha is a cave site near Dire Dawa in southeastern Ethiopia that contains an archaeological sequence sampling the late Pleistocene and Holocene of the region. The sedimentary sequence displays complex cultural, chronological and sedimentological histories that seem incongruent with one another. A first set of radiocarbon ages suggested a long sedimentological gap from the end of Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 3 to the mid-Holocene. Macroscopic observations suggest that the main sedimentological change does not coincide with the chronostratigraphic hiatus. The cultural sequence shows technological continuity with a late persistence of artifacts that are usually attributed to the Middle Stone Age into the younger parts of the stratigraphic sequence, yet become increasingly associated with lithic artifacts typically related to the Later Stone Age. While not a unique case, this combination of features is unusual in the Horn of Africa. In order to evaluate the possible implications of these observations, sedimentological analyses combined with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) were conducted. The OSL data now extend the radiocarbon chronology up to 63 ± 7 ka; they also confirm the existence of the chronological gap between 24.8 ± 2.6 ka and 7.5 ± 0.3 ka. The sedimentological analyses suggest that the origin and mode of deposition were largely similar throughout the whole sequence, although the anthropic and faunal activities increased in the younger levels. Regional climatic records are used to support the sedimentological observations and interpretations. We discuss the implications of the sedimentological and dating analyses for understanding cultural processes in the region. PMID:28125597

  17. Sedimentology of the Shangoluwe breccias and timing of the Cu mineralisation (Katanga Supergroup, D. R. of Congo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mambwe, Pascal; Kipata, Louis; Chabu, Mumba; Muchez, Philippe; Lubala, Toto; Jébrak, Michel; Delvaux, Damien

    2017-08-01

    The origin of breccias in the Neoproterozoic Katanga Supergroup in D.R of Congo is still a matter of debate. At the Shangoluwe Cu deposit located in the Kambove mining district (central part of the Lufilian arc), the sedimentary breccias bearing Cu mineralisation have been investigated for lithological and sedimentological study, quantitative analysis of the breccias fragments and fault kinematic analysis in order to understand the origin of the breccias, their lithostratigraphic position and the timing of mineralisation. At Shangoluwe, three sedimentary breccias sequentially deposited within the Kundelungu rocks can be identified on the basis of the nature of the matrix and fragments; from bottom to the top, the Ferruginous Breccias, the Dolomitic Breccias and the Siliceous Breccias. These breccias were deposited as lenses. The presence of debris and grain flows, a finely laminated matrix, pseudo-stratification, normal and reverse graded-bedding, and the presence of interbedded siltstone, sandy shale, dolomitic shale, shale and dolomite, are considered as evidence of a sedimentary origin of the breccias. The log normal distribution of the fragments indicates that gravity flow was the main deposition mechanism. The Ferruginous and Dolomitic Breccias are regarded as contemporaneous with the Kundelungu Group. They were deposited as lenses interbedded in the Kanianga and Mongwe formations, both affected by the Lufilian orogeny (D1 - Kolwezian and D2 - Monwezian phases). The Siliceous Breccias are post-orogenic as shown by the presence of an erosional and angular unconformity respectively on the Dolomitic Breccias and the Kundelungu formations. Therefore, the Siliceous Breccias are attributed to the Lower Palaeozoic Biano Subgroup and the lithostratigraphy of the Biano Subgroup is proposed for revision accordingly. Copper mineralisation post-dates the deposition of the breccias, the dissolution of dolomite fragments and in-situ fragmentation. This mineralisation

  18. Holocene mangrove swamps of West Africa sedimentology and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marius, C.; Lucas, J.

    environment rich in organic matter and iron. The salinity is mainly related to the sea water which is flooding the mangrove or which flows through the water table up to the tanne. It is mainly sodic chloride. From the geochemical point of view, the disequilibrium between mangrove and tanne is appearing by a high increase in the tanne area of silica in one hand due to the dissolution, partly of the quartz, but mainly of diatomaceous frustules, and increase of magnesium, on the other hand, due to the clay mineral weathering.

  19. Raman spectral, elemental, crystallinity, and oxygen-isotope variations in conodont apatite during diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Cao, Ling; Zhao, Laishi; Algeo, Thomas J.; Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Li, Zhihong; Lv, Zhengyi; Wang, Xiangdong

    2017-08-01

    Conodont apatite has long been used in paleoenvironmental studies, often with minimal evaluation of the influence of diagenesis on measured elemental and isotopic signals. In this study, we evaluate diagenetic influences on conodonts using an integrated set of analytical techniques. A total of 92 points in 19 coniform conodonts from Ordovician marine units of South China were analyzed by micro-laser Raman spectroscopy (M-LRS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), high-resolution X-ray microdiffraction (HXRD), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Each conodont element was analyzed along its full length, including the albid crown, hyaline crown, and basal body, in either a whole specimen (i.e., reflecting the composition of its outer layer) or a split specimen (i.e., reflecting the composition of its interior). In the conodonts of this study, the outer surfaces consist of hydroxyfluorapatite and the interiors of strontian hydroxyfluorapatite. Ionic substitutions resulted in characteristic Raman spectral shifts in the position (SS1) and width (SS2) of the ν1-PO43- stretching band. Although multiple elements were enriched (Sr2+, Mg2+) and depleted (Fe3+, Mn2+, Ca2+) during diagenesis, geochemical modeling constraints and known Raman spectral patterns suggest that Sr uptake was the dominant influence on diagenetic redshifts of SS1. All study specimens show lower SS2 values than modern bioapatite and synthetic apatite, suggesting that band width decreases with time in ancient bioapatite, possibly through an annealing process that produces larger, more uniform crystal domains. Most specimens consist mainly of amorphous or poorly crystalline apatite, which is inferred to represent the original microstructure of conodonts. In a subset of specimens, some tissues (especially albid crown) exhibit an increased degree of crystallinity developed through aggrading neomorphism. However, no systematic relationship was observed between

  20. The Effect of Early Diagenesis on the 238U/235U Ratio of Platform Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, F.; Chen, C.; Go, B. M.; Naziemiec, M.; Healy, G.; Swart, P. K.; Dauphas, N.

    2017-12-01

    In the past 15 years, the so-called non-traditional stable isotopes systems (e.g., Mg, Fe, Mo, U) have emerged as powerful tracers of both high-T and low-T geochemical processes (e.g., [1]). Of particular interest for paleoredox studies is the ratio of "stable" isotopes of U (238U/235U), which has the potential to track the global extent of oceanic anoxia (e.g., [2, 3]). Indeed, in the modern ocean, U exists in two main oxidation states, soluble U6+ and insoluble U4+, and has a mean residence time of 400 kyr ([4]), much longer than the global ocean mixing time (1-2 kyr). As such the salinity-normalized ocean is homogeneous with regards to both U concentrations and isotopes (δ238USW = -0.392±0.005 ‰, [2]). The value of δ238USW at any given time is therefore the balance between U input to the ocean, mainly from rivers, and U removal, mostly into biogenic carbonates, anoxic/euxinic sediments and suboxic/hypoxic sediments (e.g., [2, 5]). Because the 238U/235U ratio of the past ocean cannot be measured directly, it has to be estimated from the measurement of the 238U/235U ratio of a sedimentary rock and assuming a constant fractionation factor. Carbonates appear as a promising record since they span most of Earth's history, and the δ238U values of modern primary carbonate precipitates and well-preserved fossil aragonitic coral up to 600 ka are indistinguishable from that of seawater (e.g., [2, 6, 7]). Yet, the effect of secondary processes on the δ238U values of non-coral carbonates, which represent the bulk of the rock record, has only been studied in a handful of shallow samples (down to 40cm, [6]) and remains poorly understood. To investigate the effect of early diagenesis on the 238U/235U ratio of carbonates on the 30kyr to 1Myr timescale, we measured δ13C, δ18O, and δ238U in samples from a 220m long drill core from the Bahamas carbonate platform. In order to separate lattice bound U from secondary U we developed a leaching protocol applicable to carbonate

  1. Geochemical characteristics and early diagenesis of recent carbonate mound sediments in the Gulf of Cadiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaekers, Helen; Foubert, Anneleen; Wienberg, Claudia; Hebbeln, Dierk; Swennen, Rudy

    2010-05-01

    investigate the influence of early diagenesis. Along with the dating that has been performed, the obtained geochemical data give an overview of the extent to which palaeo-environmental conditions and diagenesis have influenced the carbonate mound sediments in the Gulf of Cádiz. References Foubert, A., Depreiter, D., Beck, T., Maignien, L., Pannemans, B., Frank, N., Blamart, D., Henriet, J.P., 2008. Carbonate mounds in a mud volcano province off north-west Morocco: Key to processes and controls. Marine Geology, 248, 74-96. Wienberg, C., Hebbeln, D., Fink, H.G., Mienis, F., Dorschel, B., Vertino, A., López Correa, M., Freiwald, A., 2009. Scleractinian cold-water corals in the Gulf of Cádiz - First clues about their spatial and temporal distribution, Deep-Sea Research I, 56, 1873-1893.

  2. Impact of diagenesis and low grade metamorphosis on Triassic sabkha dolomite δ26Mg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenhauser, A.; Geske, A.; Richter, D.; Buhl, D.; Niedermayr, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dolomite is a common rock forming mineral in the geological record but its value as archive of ancient seawater δ26Mg signatures and their variations in time are at present underexplored. Unknown factors include the sensitivity of δ26Mg ratio to processes in the diagenetic and low grade metamorphic domain. Here, we document and discusses the first detailed δ26Mg data set from early diagenetic and burial dolomites. Samples come from the Upper Triassic Hauptdolomit (Dolomia Principale; The Dolomites, Italy) and include coeval dolmicrites that underwent differential burial diagenesis in a temperature range between about 100 and more than 350°C. As indicated by dolmicrite 87/86Sr ratios, sabkha calcian D1 dolomites precipitated from evaporated seawater and stabilized at an early diagenetic stage to D2 dolomites analysed here. With increasing burial temperature, dolomite δ26Mg ratio scatter in the data set decreases with increasing Mg/Ca ratio and degree of order. Specifically, δ26Mg ratio variability is reduced from ~0.7‰ at burial temperatures beneath 100°C to about ~0.2‰ at temperatures in excess of 350°C, respectively, with mean δ26Mg values ranging constantly near -1.9‰. This suggests that, at least for the rock buffered system investigated here, dolmicrite δ26Mg proxy data are conservative and preserve near pristine values even at elevated burial temperatures. At present, the main element of uncertainty is the Mg-isotope fractionation factor between (evaporated) seawater and dolomite. A possible solution to this problem includes the compilation of a data from modern sabkha environments including pore water and calcian dolomite δ26Mg isotope signatures.

  3. P-wave velocity anisotropy related to sealed fractures reactivation tracing the structural diagenesis in carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matonti, C.; Guglielmi, Y.; Viseur, S.; Garambois, S.; Marié, L.

    2017-05-01

    Fracture properties are important in carbonate reservoir characterization, as they are responsible for a large part of the fluid transfer properties at all scales. It is especially true in tight rocks where the matrix transfer properties only slightly contribute to the fluid flow. Open fractures are known to strongly affect seismic velocities, amplitudes and anisotropy. Here, we explore the impact of fracture evolution on the geophysical signature and directional Vp anisotropy of fractured carbonates through diagenesis. For that purpose, we studied a meter-scale, parallelepiped quarry block of limestone using a detailed structural and diagenetic characterization, and numerous Vp measurements. The block is affected by two en-échelon fracture clusters, both being formed in opening mode (mode 1) and cemented, but only one being reactivated in shear. We compared the diagenetic evolution of the fractures, which are almost all 100% filled with successive calcite cements, with the P-wave velocities measured across this meter-scale block of carbonate, which recorded the tectonic and diagenetic changes of a South Provence sedimentary basin. We found that a directional Vp anisotropy magnitude as high as 8-16% correlates with the reactivated fractures' cluster dip angle, which is explained by the complex filling sequence and softer material present inside the fractures that have been reactivated during the basin's tectonic inversion. We show that although a late karstification phase preferentially affected these reactivated fractures, it only amplified the pre-existing anisotropy due to tectonic shear. We conclude that Vp anisotropy measurements may help to identify the fracture sealing/opening processes associated with polyphased tectonic history, the anisotropy being independent of the current stress-state. This case shows that velocity anisotropies induced by fractures resulted here from a cause that is different from how these features have often been interpreted

  4. Late Quaternary high resolution micropaleontological and sedimentological records in the Gulf of Cadiz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, B.; Ducassou, E.; Zarikian, C.; Bout-Roumazeilles, V.; Flores, J. A.; Paytan, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present preliminary micropaleontological and sedimentological data from IODP Site U1390 (Expedition 339), located in the central middle slope of the Gulf of Cadiz, since the last glaciation. This site has been targeted for reconstruction of regional paleo-circulation as it shows particularly high sedimentation rates, throughout the Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). We use micropaleontological and sedimentological proxies to understand the bottom current variations through time and the ecological conditions at the sea surface (planktonic foraminifer, pteropod and nannofossil assemblages), and the sea bottom (ostracod assemblages). Eleven samples, chosen at transitions of planktonic foraminifer assemblages, have been dated by AMS radiocarbon analyses. Preliminary results from benthic ostracod assemblages show variations in bottom water ventilation and food supply. Planktonic foraminifer assemblages clearly show the well-known cold events of this period such as the Younger Dryas and Heinrich stadial associated to coarser sediment, and warmer phases such as the Bölling-Allerød associated to muddy sediment. Other bio-events within the Holocene period are also recorded. The preservation of the coccolithophore assemblages is good to moderate. Coccolith abundances (expressed in coccoliths/gr of sediment) show higher values during the Holocene and generally are like assemblages previously reported for the same area. Implications for characterization of the Holocene, the last termination and LGM ecological conditions at high resolution and their potential fluctuations (i.e. amplitude and magnitude) under the influence of the lower core of the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW), with this multi proxy approach based on sedimentological, and paleontological data will be discussed.

  5. Sedimentological and paleoenvironmental constraints of the Statherian and Stenian Espinhaço rift system, Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Marcelo Nascimento dos; Chemale Júnior, Farid; Dussin, Ivo Antonio; Martins, Maximiliano de Souza; Assis, Tiago A. R.; Jelinek, Andréa Ritter; Guadagnin, Felipe; Armstrong, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Espinhaço Basin in eastern Brazil contains depositional sequences developed in the São Francisco paleoplate and its margins. Detailed mapping was conducted and combined with U–Pb detrital zircon dating to determine the sedimentological-stratigraphic framework, provenance and minimum and maximum ages of the syn-rift-deposits. The two cycles have minimum ages of 1192 and 923 Ma and maximum ages of 1785 and 1685 Ma. The first depositional cycle, represented by the Bandeirinha and São João da...

  6. Relationships between sea-bed radionuclide activities and some sedimentological variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligero, R.A.; Ramos-Lerate, I.; Barrera, M.; Casas-Ruiz, M.

    2001-01-01

    Natural radionuclides ( 232 Th, 226 Ra, 40 K) and 137 Cs, coming from atmospheric radioactive fallout, have been measured in sea-bed sediments of the Bay of Cadiz (South Western Spain). In this report, multivariate analysis methods have been employed to study the relationships between the activities of the radionuclides and some sedimentological variables like granulometric facies, organic content and apparent density. The correlation functions found show that it is possible to determine, with a satisfactory degree of approximation, the granulometric facies of the sediments using only radiometric information

  7. Sedimentological Investigations of the Martian Surface using the Mars 2001 Robotic Arm Camera and MECA Optical Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. W., Jr.; Smith, P. H.; Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The first microscopic sedimentological studies of the Martian surface will commence with the landing of the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) December 3, 1999. The Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) has a resolution of 25 um/p which will permit detailed micromorphological analysis of surface and subsurface materials. The Robotic Ann will be able to dig up to 50 cm below the surface. The walls of the trench will also be inspected by RAC to look for evidence of stratigraphic and / or sedimentological relationships. The 2001 Mars Lander will build upon and expand the sedimentological research begun by the RAC on MPL. This will be accomplished by: (1) Macroscopic (dm to cm): Descent Imager, Pancam, RAC; (2) Microscopic (mm to um RAC, MECA Optical Microscope (Figure 2), AFM This paper will focus on investigations that can be conducted by the RAC and MECA Optical Microscope.

  8. Modeling the effects of diagenesis on carbonate clumped-isotope values in deep- and shallow-water settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, Daniel A.; Eiler, John M.; Higgins, John A.

    2018-04-01

    The measurement of multiply isotopically substituted ('clumped isotope') carbonate groups provides a way to reconstruct past mineral formation temperatures. However, dissolution-reprecipitation (i.e., recrystallization) reactions, which commonly occur during sedimentary burial, can alter a sample's clumped-isotope composition such that it partially or wholly reflects deeper burial temperatures. Here we derive a quantitative model of diagenesis to explore how diagenesis alters carbonate clumped-isotope values. We apply the model to a new dataset from deep-sea sediments taken from Ocean Drilling Project site 807 in the equatorial Pacific. This dataset is used to ground truth the model. We demonstrate that the use of the model with accompanying carbonate clumped-isotope and carbonate δ18O values provides new constraints on both the diagenetic history of deep-sea settings as well as past equatorial sea-surface temperatures. Specifically, the combination of the diagenetic model and data support previous work that indicates equatorial sea-surface temperatures were warmer in the Paleogene as compared to today. We then explore whether the model is applicable to shallow-water settings commonly preserved in the rock record. Using a previously published dataset from the Bahamas, we demonstrate that the model captures the main trends of the data as a function of burial depth and thus appears applicable to a range of depositional settings.

  9. Structural diagenesis in Upper Carboniferous tight gas sandstones. Lessons learned from the Piesberg analog study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindorf, P.; Hoehne, M.; Becker, S.; Hilgers, C. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Energy and Mineral Resources Group (EMR); Koehrer, B. [Wintershall Holding GmbH, Barnstorf (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    unconventional reservoir properties at a subseismic scale, considering both the alteration and evolution of pore space during diagenesis and the formation of structures. Combined with well-log and core data, uncertainties in 3D-reservoir modeling parameters and fluid migration pathways from seismic- to micro-scale of analogous subsurface tight gas reservoirs may be significantly reduced. (orig.)

  10. Quantifying Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying Matter explains how scientists learned to measure matter and quantify some of its most fascinating and useful properties. It presents many of the most important intellectual achievements and technical developments that led to the scientific interpretation of substance. Complete with full-color photographs, this exciting new volume describes the basic characteristics and properties of matter. Chapters include:. -Exploring the Nature of Matter. -The Origin of Matter. -The Search for Substance. -Quantifying Matter During the Scientific Revolution. -Understanding Matter's Electromagnet

  11. Sedimentology and paleoecology of an Eocene Oligocene alluvial lacustrine arid system, Southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldi-Campesi, Hugo; Cevallos-Ferriz, Sergio R. S.; Centeno-García, Elena; Arenas-Abad, Concepción; Fernández, Luis Pedro

    2006-10-01

    A depositional model of the Eocene-Oligocene Coatzingo Formation in Tepexi de Rodríguez (Puebla, Mexico) is proposed, based on facies analysis of one of the best-preserved sections, the Axamilpa Section. The sedimentary evolution is interpreted as the retrogradation of an alluvial system, followed by the progressive expansion of an alkaline lake system, with deltaic, palustrine, and evaporitic environments. The analysis suggests a change towards more arid conditions with time. Fossils from this region, such as fossil tracks of artiodactyls, aquatic birds and cat-like mammals, suggest that these animals traversed the area, ostracods populated the lake waters, and plants grew on incipient soils and riparian environments many times throughout the history of the basin. The inferred habitat for some fossil plants coincides with the sedimentological interpretation of an arid to semiarid climate for that epoch. This combined sedimentological-paleontological study of the Axamilpa Section provides an environmental context in which fossils can be placed and brings into attention important biotic episodes, like bird and camelid migrations or the origin of endemic but extinct plants in this area.

  12. The sedimentology and uranium mineralisation of the Matjieskloof (GT7) deposit, Fraserburg district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J.P.

    1982-08-01

    A sedimentological investigation was carried out on the Matjieskloof prospect of JCI, 40 km south of Fraserburg at the foot of the Teekloof pass. The deposit is located in a thick, tabular sandstone forming part of the Poortjie Member at the base of the Teekloof Formation. A study of sedimentary structures, grain sizes and palaeocurrents in the sandstone sequence at Matjieskloof suggests a general decrease in energy conditions upward in the succession, indicating denudation of the source areas to the south-west. The depositional environment of the mineralised S1-sandstone as revealed by field work and borehole analysis, is that of a low-sinuosity, braided river of the Bijou Creek type, deposited during ephemeral flash floods in a semi-arid environment. Three main flow systems are revealed by the palaeocurrent analysis, showing good correspondence with the reconstructed palaeoriver system. In the areas where these flow systems cross, scouring of the S2-sandstone into the underlying S1-sandstone occured. These regions also correspond to the confluence areas of channels within the braided river system, and apparently formed favourable environments for uranium mineralisation. This may be due to the presence of erosion surfaces within these areas, the increased thickness of sandstones and the accumulation of plant material, controlled by current velocities. Molybdenum shows a similar distribution to the uranium mineralisation, and both are clearly controlled by the sedimentological sub-environments

  13. Sedimentology of the upper Karoo fluvial strata in the Tuli Basin, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordy, Emese M.; Catuneanu, Octavian

    2001-08-01

    The sedimentary rocks of the Karoo Supergroup in the Tuli Basin (South Africa) may be grouped in four stratigraphic units: the basal, middle and upper units, and the Clarens Formation. This paper presents the findings of the sedimentological investigation of the fluvial terrigenous clastic and chemical deposits of the upper unit. Evidence provided by primary sedimentary structures, palaeontological record, borehole data, palaeo-flow measurements and stratigraphic relations resulted in the palaeo-environmental reconstruction of the upper unit. The dominant facies assemblages are represented by sandstones and finer-grained sediments, which both can be interbedded with subordinate intraformational coarser facies. The facies assemblages of the upper unit are interpreted as deposits of a low-sinuosity, ephemeral stream system with calcretes and silcretes in the dinosaur-inhabited overbank area. During the deposition of the upper unit, the climate was semi-arid with sparse precipitation resulting in high-magnitude, low-frequency devastating flash floods. The current indicators of the palaeo-drainage system suggest flow direction from northwest to southeast, in a dominantly extensional tectonic setting. Based on sedimentologic and biostratigraphic evidence, the upper unit of the Tuli Basin correlates to the Elliot Formation in the main Karoo Basin to the south.

  14. Contribution to the geology of the Niari basin: sedimentology and metallogeny of the mining region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigotte, G.

    1956-01-01

    This thesis is divided in two parts: a detailed petrographical and stratigraphical study of the upper layers of calcareous schist in Congo which lead to some sedimentological considerations, and a metallogenic study of the ores of Niari basin which lead to a theoretical description of the metallogeny in Congo. In the first part, after a brief description of the methods used, a petrographical survey of the rocks of the upper layers of calcareous schist of the Boko-Congo area is given as well as sedimentological conclusions and stratigraphical data. The studies and conclusions related to this limited area are extended to a region scale. A structural study and precised descriptions of this region lead to an attempt of tectonic explanation. In the second part, an inventory and description of known mineralisation points in the Niari basin are given and in particular the detailed descriptions of four deposits: La Grande-Mine, M'Passa, Diangala and Djenguile. The interpretations and conclusions are based on the study of the general characters of the mineralisation in Niari basin and its comparison with the mineralisation in Katanga (now Shaba region) and North Rhodesia (now Zambia). (M.P.)

  15. Diagenesis of magnetic minerals in a gas hydrate/cold seep environment off the Krishna-Godavari basin, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dewangan, P.; Basavaiah, N; Badesab, F.K.; Usapkar, A; Mazumdar, A; Joshi, R.; Ramprasad, T.

    Detailed magnetic measurements of the core (MD161/8) located in the vicinity of Site NGHP-01-10 was carried out, where approx. 128 m of hydrate is confirmed by drilling/coring, to understand the diagenesis of magnetic minerals in a gas hydrates...

  16. Effects of post-burial siliceous diagenesis deformations on the microthermometric behaviour of fluid inclusions: an example in the Francevillian uraniferous sandstone reservoir (Gabon)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier-Lafaye, F.; Weber, F.

    1984-01-01

    New data about fluid inclusions associated to a siliceous diagenesis show that a deformation phase in the first stage of catagenesis disturbed their microthermometric behaviour. Nevertheless, temperature and pressure of fluids associated to the uraniferous paragenesis and contemporary with the Oklo natural reactors are estimated at 140-160 0 C and 250-500 bar [fr

  17. Extreme diagenesis displayed by Pliocene-Pleistocene Calcareous Nannofossils in IODP Hole 1396A, adjacent to Montserrat Island in the Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljahdali, M. H.; Behzad, A.; Missimer, T. M.; Wise, S. W.; Scientists, E.

    2013-12-01

    Adjacent to Montserrat Island in the Lesser Antilles of the Caribbean Sea, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site 1396 recovered lower Pliocene to Pleistocene calcareous nannofossil assemblages (CN11 to CN15) that range between common to abundant and display a variety of preservations. High-resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observation of calcareous nannofossil assemblages in selected samples from Hole 1396A, shows severe diagenesis (overgrowth and/or dissolution) even near the top of the sequence. The nannofossil assemblages in this relatively shallow basin (e.g., 800 m) reveal abnormal diagenesis for such young specimens that are quite similar to the heavy overgrowths and dissolution generally seen only in older deposits (e.g., Cretaceous). Our hypothesis is that volcanic activity in the region probably induced this extreme diagenesis. A more detailed examination of these samples should provide a better understanding of the progression of carbonate diagenesis in this basin. The nannofossil biostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy at Site 1396 also suggest lower sedimentation rates in the Pleistocene than in the Pliocene. A comparison site (ODP Leg 165 Site 1000) in the Caribbean Sea also shows a similar sedimentation-rate pattern. This we interpret as a regional event caused by the closure of the Central American Seaway.

  18. Implications of sedimentological studies for environmental pollution assessment and management: Examples from fluvial systems in North Queensland and Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Bradley; McConchie, David

    1993-05-01

    Sedimentology is of increasing importance in environmental research, particularly environmental pollution studies, where past trends in environmental processes need to be combined with data on present conditions to predict likely future changes—the past and present as a key to the future. Two examples are used to illustrate the role of sedimentology in assessing the influence of major processes on the transport, accumulation, deposition and modification of contaminants in fluvial/estuarine systems and in developing environmental management plans. Example 1 shows that when assessing nutrient behaviour in fluvial/estuarine depositional settings, it is important to examine the partitioning of phosphorus between grain size fractions to evaluate the sedimentological processes which control the dispersion and trapping of these contaminants. Example 2 shows that in studies of anthropogenic metal inputs to modern depositional settings, lateral and stratigraphic trends in sediment texture and mineralogy should be examined, in addition to trends in metal loads and evaluation of the prevailing physical, chemical and biological processes that may influence metal mobility and dispersion. Clearly, basic sedimentological data should form part of any assessment of potentially contaminated sites and part of investigations into the dispersion and trapping of contaminants in fluvial systems. These data are also required for rational environmental management to ensure that planning decisions are compatible with natural environmental constraints.

  19. Geomorphologic and sedimentologic controls on records of flood-induced alluviation in Las Cajas National Park, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodbell, D. T.; Bustamante, M. G.; Marks, S.; Abbott, M. B.; Moy, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    The sediment record from Laguna Pallcacocha in Las Cajas National Park, southern Ecuador (4060 masl; 2°46'S; 79°14'W) has been interpreted to record El Niño floods spanning the Holocene (Rodbell et al., 1999; Moy et al., 2002). The sediment record is unusual for the nearly continuous dark- and light-colored laminations (0.1-2.0 cm thick) that comprise the Holocene. Light laminae typically have erosive basal contacts and fine-upwards, whereas dark laminae possess abrupt or gradational lower contacts and reveal no grain size trends. Light laminae contain 7%), and contain 3-10% biogenic silica. Light laminae represent deposition during periods of increased precipitation, mobilization of unvegetated sediment above the lake, and increased stream discharge, all of which generate density-driven undercurrents. Conversely, dark laminae are deposited relatively slowly by sedimentation of organic matter, some derived from surface soil horizons. Time series analysis of light laminae reveal the ENSO spectral signature (2-8 yr) that evolves through the Holocene. However, none of the sediment cores taken from many nearby lakes reveal an alluvial record comparable in terms of frequency and magnitude to that preserved in Pallcacocha thus raising questions as to the factors responsible for the rich stratigraphy preserved in Pallcacocha, and, moreover, the regional paleoclimatic significance of the Pallcacocha record. A review of lacustrine sediment cores obtained from Las Cajas National Park suggests that drainage basin factors are the primary control on the sedimentologic signal recorded. These factors include bedrock geology, presence of unvegetated sediment exposed on slopes, connectivity of exposed sediment to primary inflow streams, drainage basin slope, drainage basin:lake surface area ratio, and position of lake in paternoster sequence of lakes. Bedrock is comprised of Quaternary silicic ignimbrite, rhyolite, and andesite of the Tarqui Formation. Ignimibrite provides the

  20. Experimental diagenesis: insights into aragonite to calcite transformation of Arctica islandica shells by hydrothermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Laura A.; Griesshaber, Erika; Yin, Xiaofei; Ziegler, Andreas; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Müller, Dirk; Ritter, Ann-Christine; Hippler, Dorothee; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Dietzel, Martin; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schöne, Bernd R.; Angiolini, Lucia; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

    2017-03-01

    Biomineralised hard parts form the most important physical fossil record of past environmental conditions. However, living organisms are not in thermodynamic equilibrium with their environment and create local chemical compartments within their bodies where physiologic processes such as biomineralisation take place. In generating their mineralised hard parts, most marine invertebrates produce metastable aragonite rather than the stable polymorph of CaCO3, calcite. After death of the organism the physiological conditions, which were present during biomineralisation, are not sustained any further and the system moves toward inorganic equilibrium with the surrounding inorganic geological system. Thus, during diagenesis the original biogenic structure of aragonitic tissue disappears and is replaced by inorganic structural features. In order to understand the diagenetic replacement of biogenic aragonite to non-biogenic calcite, we subjected Arctica islandica mollusc shells to hydrothermal alteration experiments. Experimental conditions were between 100 and 175 °C, with the main focus on 100 and 175 °C, reaction durations between 1 and 84 days, and alteration fluids simulating meteoric and burial waters, respectively. Detailed microstructural and geochemical data were collected for samples altered at 100 °C (and at 0.1 MPa pressure) for 28 days and for samples altered at 175 °C (and at 0.9 MPa pressure) for 7 and 84 days. During hydrothermal alteration at 100 °C for 28 days most but not the entire biopolymer matrix was destroyed, while shell aragonite and its characteristic microstructure was largely preserved. In all experiments up to 174 °C, there are no signs of a replacement reaction of shell aragonite to calcite in X-ray diffraction bulk analysis. At 175 °C the replacement reaction started after a dormant time of 4 days, and the original shell microstructure was almost completely overprinted by the aragonite to calcite replacement reaction after 10 days

  1. Experimental diagenesis of quartz with petroleum; Diagenese experimentale du quartz en presence d'hydrocarbures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teinturier, St.

    2002-11-01

    Quartz cementation has a great impact on petroleum reservoir quality by controlling the porosity and thus the gas or oil storage. However, the possible cementation of quartz during petroleum emplacement is still debated. In most cases, the reconstitution and the understanding of diagenetic processes is based on fluid inclusions studies. However, many questions concerning the representativeness and the reading of the fluid inclusions still remains misunderstood. The experiments were carried out in a silica{+-}water{+-}salts{+-}oil{+-}gas system with the objective to simulate the siliceous diagenesis of natural petroleum reservoirs and to better understand the mechanisms of fluid inclusions formation and quartz cementation in a water and/or petroleum system. Calibration curves have been established using Raman micro-spectroscopy and synthetic reference inclusions to calculate the methane content of aqueous inclusions in the H{sub 2}O-CH{sub 4}-NaCl system. A quantitative procedure for FT-IR micro-spectrometry has been developed to obtain, from individual petroleum fluid inclusions, mole % concentrations of methane, alkanes and carbon dioxide as constraints to thermodynamic modelling. Synthetic aqueous inclusions were created within quartz micro-fractures, with methane (from 150 deg C-200 bar), with petroleum (from 184 deg C-163 bar) and inside quartz overgrowth with the presence of hydrocarbons (from 277 deg C-300 bar). Synthetic petroleum inclusions were created with different water/oil ratios (W/O) within quartz micro-fractures (0

  2. Diagenetic fractionation of carbon isotopes in particulate and dissolved organic matter in sediments from Skan Bay, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alperin, M.J.; Reeburgh, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Isotope fractionation during organic matter diagenesis was investigated by measuring detailed depth distributions of stable carbon isotope ratios in sediment particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoirs. The δ 13 C value of the POC shifted systematically from -19 per-thousand at the surface to -21 per-thousand at 10 cm. Significant trends were also apparent in the δ 13 C-DOC profile. Proceeding down-core, DOC became isotopically heavier between 0 and 5 cm and isotopically lighter at greater depths. Two mechanisms could account for the observed down-core shift in δ 13 C-POC: (a) temporal changes in the isotope ratios of deposited organic matter and (b) isotope fractionation associated with diagenesis. The δ 15 C-DOC depth distribution is sensitive to which mechanism controls the isotopic composition of the POC reservoir. A diagenetic model that couples POC and DOC reservoirs was used to discriminate between temporal changes and diagenetic alteration of the POC isotopic composition. The model indicated that observed trends in δ 13 C-POC and δ 13 C-DOC depth distributions are consistent with isotopic fractionation of POC during diagenesis

  3. Incorporation of sedimentological data into a calibrated groundwater flow and transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, N.J.; Young, S.C.; Barton, D.H.; Hurst, B.T.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis suggests that a high hydraulic conductivity (K) zone is associated with a former river channel at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). A two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) groundwater flow model was developed base on a sedimentological model to demonstrate the performance of a horizontal well for plume capture. The model produced a flow field with magnitudes and directions consistent with flow paths inferred from historical trichloroethylene (TCE) plume data. The most dominant feature affecting the well's performance was preferential high- and low-K zones. Based on results from the calibrated flow and transport model, a passive groundwater collection system was designed and built. Initial flow rates and concentrations measured from a gravity-drained horizontal well agree closely to predicted values

  4. Morphology and sedimentology of the Itaipú Embayment - Niterói/RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SALVADOR MARCUS VINICIUS S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bathymetric and sedimentological data from water depths between 3 and 28 meters are the basis of a detailed bathymetric map of the Itaipú Embayment and an understanding of its sedimentary dynamics. Shallower than 16 meters the contours are parallel to the shoreline whereas the morphology of the deeper bottom is influenced by the Menina, Mãe, and Pai islands. Medium sand is prevalent, with local variations in more protected or less protected areas. Minor amount of black mud possibly derives from the Itaipú Lagoon. Siliciclastic granules and pebbles may be relict. The Itaipú Embayment's bottom morphology is controlled by stormy waves and the calmer easternmost part of the embayment presents a tendency to accumulate finer sediments.

  5. The sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Early Tertiary, Cusiana field, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulham, Andrew J.

    1995-01-01

    The cusiana field (BP, Ecopetrol, Total and Triton is located in the llanos foothills of Eastern Colombia. There are three key reservoirs in the Cusiana field; the late Eocene to Early Oligocene Mirador Formation, the late Paleocene Barco Formation and the Santonian to Late Campanian Guadalupe Formation. The Mirador Formation contains over 50% of the original oil in place. Production for 1995 is planned at 130.000 barrels of oil per day (bopd; daily average), principally for the Mirador Formation with some production from the Guadalupe Formation. The mirador formation has therefore been the focus of a detailed reservoir description study aimed at understanding reservoir performance and putting a foundation in place for long-term reservoir management. The Mirador Formation comprises sandy (>60%), high frequency sequences dominated by the deposits of incised valleys. This paper describes the sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Mirador and the methodology chosen to construct a reservoir model fit for reservoir simulation

  6. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the K/T boundary deposit in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S.; Sigurdsson, H.; Dhondt, S.; Espindola, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The K/T boundary sequence is exposed in uplifted carbonate sediments of the southwest peninsula of Haiti. It is found at 15 localities within the Beloc formation, a sequence of limestone and marls interpreted as a monoclinal nappe structure thrust to the north. This tectonic deformation has affected the K/T boundary deposit to varying degrees. In some cases the less competent K/T deposit has acted as a slip plane leading to extensive shearing of the boundary layer, as well as duplication of the section. The presence of glassy tektites, shocked quartz, and an Ir anomaly directly link the deposit to a bolide impact. Stratigraphic and sedimentological features of the tripartite sequence indicate that it was formed by deposition from ballistic fallout of coarse tektites, emplacement of particle gravity flows and fine grained fallout of widely dispersed impact ejecta.

  7. Carbonate sedimentology of Seribu Islands patch reef complex: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, D. A.; Hakim, A. R.

    2018-02-01

    Many oil and gas reservoirs in the world are reserved in fossil carbonate sediment. Knowledge of modern carbonate sedimentology is important for a better understanding of ancient carbonate sedimentation. Equatorial coral reefs comprise almost half of the world coral reef production, and yet their dynamics, distributions, and cycles are still not well understood. Contrary to their subtropical counterpart, South East Asian carbonate system is known to be strongly influenced by the combination of oceanographic and climatic conditions. Hence carbonate sediments in the tropics have a distinct depositional system, and ought to be treated differently since common distribution models were developed from the (sub-tropical) Atlantic and Pacific regions. This paper systematically summarizes carbonate sediment studies in Seribu Islands and its dominant oceanographic configuration to provide insights and a sense of research direction in the future.

  8. Application of the nuclear gages in dynamic sedimentology for the solid transport study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamdasni, Y.

    1994-02-01

    The problems caused by the solid particle transport in rivers, dams, harbors, estuaries and in navigation channels have considerable economical consequences. The technical difficulties met when trying to limit or manage these problems are very important because of lack of knowledge. The nuclear gages and the radioactive tracers can be the measurement and monitoring means which, associated to the conventional techniques, permit to develop strongly the knowledge in the solid transport field. This report gives the modes of solid transport and the problems caused by these transports and exposes the physical properties of the fine sediments and their behavior under the hydrodynamic effects. In the same way, it deals with the theory of the nuclear gages, often applied in dynamic sedimentology and gives some examples of their applications. 29 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs. (F.M.)

  9. Report on a structural and sedimentological analysis in the uranium province of the Orobic Alps, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassinis, G.; Dal Piaz, G.V.; Massari, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed structural and sedimentological studies have been conducted in two areas near the Val Vedello uranium mine in northern Italy. These studies indicate that both the Variscan basement (locally called the Orobic basement) and the Permian cover rocks were thrust southward during the Alpine orogeny. Variscan mylonitic zones were rejuvenated during the Alpine orogeny and became fault boundaries for the Permo-Triassic basins. Alpine faults also are related to contemporaneous east-west folds and these faults have displaced Permo-Triassic uranium deposits. Uranium mineralisation is attributed to a Late Permian to Triassic geothermal event which leached uranium from Permian ignimbrites and transported it along Permo-Triassic faults. Detailed mapping indicates that the host sediments formed in an arid, closed basin characterised by alluvial fans and perennial saline lakes. (orig.)

  10. The Andatza coarse-grained turbidite system (westernmost Pyrenees: Stratigraphy, sedimentology and structural control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bodego

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a field-based work that describes the stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Andatza Conglomerate Formation. Based on facies analysis three facies associations of a coarse-grained turbidite system and the related slope have been identified: (1 an inner fan of a turbidite system (or canyon and (2 a low- and (3 a high-gradient muddy slope respectively. The spatial distribution of the facies associations and the palaeocurrent analysis allow to interpret a depositional model for the Andatza Conglomerates consisting of an L-shaped, coarse-grained turbidite system, whose morphology was structurally controlled by synsedimentary basement-involved normal faults. The coarse-grained character of the turbidite system indicates the proximity of the source area, with the presence of a narrow shelf that fed the turbidite canyon from the north.

  11. Geochemical and sedimentological signature of catastrophic saltwater inundations (tsunami), New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chague-Goff, C.; Goff, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Three tidal marshes in Able Tasman National Par, New Zealand, were studied using geochemical, sedimentological and radiometric dating techniques. Charcoal and plant material samples were taken from one core in each inlet for 14 C analysis. radiocarbon ages were converted to dendrocalibrated years . All samples produced a terrestrial 13 C signal. Near surface samples were date d by measuring 137 Cs. A 1700 year record of catastrophic saltwater inundations (CSI) events (Tsunami) was produced. Up to four such events were identified, with ruptures of one or more of the Wellington, Wairarapa and Alpine Faults being the most likely tsunamigenic source. CSI signatures include: peaks in Fe and/or S, a peak in fines and contemporaneous or delayed peaks in organic content and/or loss on ignition (LOI). Geochemical data in association with grain size analyses proved to be a valuable tool in the interpretation of these events

  12. Sedimentology models from activity concentration measurements: application to the 'Bay of Cadiz' Natural Park (SW Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligero, R.A.; Vidal, J.; Melendez, M.J.; Hamani, M.; Casas-Ruiz, M.

    2009-01-01

    A previous study on seabed sediments of the Bay of Cadiz (SW of Spain) enabled us to identify several relations between sedimentological variables and activity concentrations of environmental radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K. In this paper the study has been extended to a large neighbouring inter-tidal area in order to establish if the above mentioned models can be generalized. As a result we have determined that the measured activity concentrations are closely to the values predicted by the theoretical models (correlation coefficient range = 0.85-0.93). Furthermore, the proposal model for granulometric facies as a function of activity concentrations of the abovementioned radionuclides provides for the sediments distribution a representation which agrees with the values of the tidal energy distribution obtained using numeric models calibrated with experimental data from current meters and water level recorders

  13. Sedimentological study of a lagoon through natural radioactivity and 137Cs determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Miguel, E.G.; Perez-Moreno, J.P.; Aguado, J.L.; Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2003-01-01

    Profiles of artificial fallout (such as 137 Cs) and natural radioactivity radionuclides in sediment cores are useful tools to study sedimentological properties of different aquatic environments as well as to evaluate average sedimentation rates. In the Portil lagoon, a small natural reservoir located in Huelva province (southwest of Spain), and through the analysis of 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 137 Cs, 238 U and 210 Po vertical profiles in sediment cores, it is shown how the accumulative or transport character of the collection zones may be inferred. In the accumulation zone of the lagoon the influence of focusing effects has been analysed and an average sedimentation rate has been determined through 210 Pb in one sediment core. This 210 Pb-sedimentation rate is consistent with sediment dating based on the 137 Cs data. (author)

  14. Sedimentologic and volcanologic investigation of the deep tyrrhenian sea: preliminary result of cruise VST02

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bertagnini

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The VST02 cruise carried out in the summer of 2002 was focused at sedimentologic and volcanologic researches over selected areas of the deep portion of the Tyrrhenian sea. Chirp lines and seafloor samples were collected from the Calabrian slope surrounding Stromboli island, in the Marsili deep sea fan, in the Vavilov basin and in the Vavilov seamount. Submarine volcanic activity, both explosive and effusive, is occuring in the Stromboli edifice. Explosive submarine volcanism affects also the shallowest areas of the Vavilov seamount. Submarine carbonate lithification has been observed on the sediment-starved flanks of the Vavilov seamount. Acoustic transparent layers make up the recentmost infill of the Gortani basin, the easternmost portion of the Vavilov basin. Channels comprised of a variety of architectural elements and depositional lobes are the main elements of the Marsili deep-sea fan where, apparently, sedimentation occurs mainly through debris flow processes.

  15. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Molecular-level analyses of neutral sugars and lignin-derived phenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Ronald; Weliky, Karen; Hedges, John I.

    1990-07-01

    should be interpreted with caution. During early diagenesis of leaves, leaching produces relatively large quantities of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the lignin component, in particular, may provide a convenient tracer for studying the distribution and fate of mangrove-derived DOM in estuarine and coastal waters.

  16. New sedimentological and palynological data from surface Miocene strata in the central Amazonas Basin area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emílio Alberto Amaral Soares

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The scarcity of stratigraphic data has hindered the demarcation of the outcropping area of Miocene deposits of the Amazon Basin, represented informally by the Novo Remanso Formation. Moreover, this unit is characterized by a sparse and irregular geographic distribution due to its sedimentological features and rare fossil content. Miocene deposits cropping out in central Amazonas Basin area were described in sedimentological terms and analyzed palynologically. All analyses were undertaken in samples collected at the Uatumã River banks (Itapiranga and São Sebastião do Uatumã cities. Lithostratigraphic data shows that Novo Remanso Formation consists of sandstones, with subordinate conglomerates and pelites, characteristic of a meandering fluvial paleosystem, with fluvial channel, point bar, floodplain and crevasse splay facies. The palynoflora retrieved from five samples consists exclusively of continental-origin palynomorphs dominated by angiosperms species. Trilete spores are well represented, while gymnosperms pollen grains are minor components. The presence of Psilastephanoporites tesseroporus, Syncolporites poricostatus, Jandufouria seamrogiformis and Polypodiaceoisporites potoniei ensure these deposits fits into the Grimsdalea magnaclavata palynozone (Regali et al. 1974a, b, and the Grimsdalea magnaclavata/Crassoretitriletes vanraadshooveni palynozones of Jaramillo et al. (2011 considered Middle Miocene age. This age is confirmed by the zonation of Jaramillo et al. (2011, based on the LADs of Bombacacidites baumfalki (11.57Ma and Crototricolpites annemariae (12.91Ma; and the FAD of Psilastephanoporites tesseroporus (14.00Ma. With these new data presented herein, it is possible to assume that the Miocene strata represented by the Novo Remanso Formation covers a larger area in the basin than previously considered, and that it may be extended for about 300 km until the Manacapuru village, indicating a Miocene subsidence phase.

  17. Sedimentological reservoir characteristics of the Paleocene fluvial/lacustrine Yabus Sandstone, Melut Basin, Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, M. I.; Padmanabhan, E.; Abdullatif, O. M.

    2016-11-01

    Melut Basin in Sudan is regionally linked to the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Central and Western African Rift System (CWARS). The Paleocene Yabus Formation is the main oil producing reservoir in the basin. It is dominated by channel sandstone and shales deposited in fluvial/lacustrine environment during the third phase of rifting in the basin. Different scales of sedimentological heterogeneities influenced reservoir quality and architecture. The cores and well logs analyses revealed seven lithofacies representing fluvial, deltaic and lacustrine depositional environments. The sandstone is medium to coarse-grained, poorly to moderately-sorted and sub-angular to sub-rounded, arkosic-subarkosic to sublitharenite. On the basin scale, the Yabus Formation showed variation in sandstone bodies, thickness, geometry and architecture. On macro-scale, reservoir quality varies vertically and laterally within Yabus Sandstone where it shows progressive fining upward tendencies with different degrees of connectivity. The lower part of the reservoir showed well-connected and amalgamated sandstone bodies, the middle to the upper parts, however, have moderate to low sandstone bodies' connectivity and amalgamation. On micro-scale, sandstone reservoir quality is directly affected by textures and diagenetic changes such as compaction, cementation, alteration, dissolution and kaolinite clays pore fill and coat all have significantly reduced the reservoir porosity and permeability. The estimated porosity in Yabus Formation ranges from 2 to 20% with an average of 12%; while permeability varies from 200 to 500 mD and up to 1 Darcy. The understanding of different scales of sedimentological reservoir heterogeneities might contribute to better reservoir quality prediction, architecture, consequently enhancing development and productivity.

  18. Sedimentology and ichnology of Neogene Coastal Swamp deposits in the Niger Delta Basin, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezeh Sunny C.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Often analyses of depositional environments from sparse data result in poor interpretation, especially in multipartite depositional settings such as the Niger Delta. For instance, differentiating channel sandstones, heteroliths and mudstones within proximal environments from those of distal facies is difficult if interpretations rely solely on well log signatures. Therefore, in order to achieve an effective and efficient interpretation of the depositional conditions of a given unit, integrated tools must be applied such as matching core descriptions with wireline log signature. In the present paper cores of three wells from the Coastal Swamp depositional belt of the Niger Delta are examined in order to achieve full understanding of the depositional environments. The well sections comprise cross-bedded sandstones, heteroliths (coastal and lower shoreface and mudstones that were laid down in wave, river and tidal processes. Interpretations were made from each data set comprising gamma ray logs, described sedimentological cores showing sedimentary features and ichnological characteristics; these were integrated to define the depositional settings. Some portions from one of the well sections reveal a blocky gamma ray well log signature instead of a coarsening-upward trend that characterises a shoreface setting while in other wells the signatures for heteroliths at some sections are bell blocky in shaped rather than serrated. Besides, heteroliths and mudstones within the proximal facies and those of distal facies were difficult to distinguish solely on well log signatures. However, interpretation based on sedimentology and ichnology of cores from these facies was used to correct these inconsistencies. It follows that depositional environment interpretation (especially in multifarious depositional environments such as the Niger Delta should ideally be made together with other raw data for accuracy and those based solely on well log signatures should

  19. The sedimentology of uranium-bearing sandstones on the farm Riet Kuil 307, Beaufort West area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D.I.

    1980-10-01

    The sedimentology of four sandstones was studied in outcrop and in the subsurface on the farm Riet Kuil 307, near Beaufort West. Only two of these sandstones are mineralised. These are four surface and two subsurface uranium anomalies and one surface uranium anomaly. The sedimentological study was made by means of 47 vertical profiles measured across and adjacent to the surface anomalies as well as 11 core-logs, which intersected the subsurface anomalies. The unmineralised sandstones are included in this study. A total of 19 sedimentary facies was recognised within the fluvial sandstone sequence according to the criteria of grain-size and sedimentary structure. Transitions between the facies were subjected to a Markov chain analysis in order to delineate Markov-dependent transitions. Uranium mineralisation is almost entirely confined to the coarser-grained sedimentary facies, which probably acted as suitable aquifers for the transport of uraniferous solutions prior to the precipitation of the uranium. Horizontally bedded sandstone facies comprises 60 per cent of the total cumulative thickness of mineralisation. The nature of the bedding of this facies may have provided a more effective permeability zone for the transport of uraniferous solutions. This facies contains an abundance of carbonaceous material which acted as an important indirect reductant for the precipitation of uranium from solution. The direct reductant was most probably H 2 S produced by enaerobic bacteria acting on this carbonaceous material shortly after deposition of the sediments. Carbonaceous material also occurs in the other mineralised facies and is considered to be the major control on the mineralisation in the uranium-bearing sandstones

  20. Investigation of Sediment Pathways and Concealed Sedimentological Features in Hidden River Cave, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, S.; Maclachlan, J. C.; Reinhardt, E. G.; McNeill-Jewer, C.; Eyles, C.

    2016-12-01

    Hidden River Cave is part of a cave system hydrogeologically related to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky and is a multi-level active cave system with 25km of mapped passages. Upper levels experience flow during flood events and lower levels have continuously flowing water. Improper industrial and domestic waste disposal and poor understanding of local hydrogeology lead to contamination of Hidden River Cave in the early 1940s. Previously used for hydroelectric power generation and as a source of potable water the cave was closed to the public for almost 50 years. A new sewage treatment plant and remediation efforts since 1989 have improved the cave system's health. This project focuses on sedimentological studies in the Hidden River Cave system. Water and sediment transport in the cave are being investigated using sediment cores, surface sediment samples and water level data. An Itrax core scanner is used to analyze sediment cores for elemental concentrations, magnetic susceptibility, radiography, and high resolution photography. Horizons of metal concentrations in the core allow correlation of sedimentation events in the cave system. Thecamoebian (testate amoebae) microfossils identified in surface samples allow for further constraint of sediment sources, sedimentation rates, and paleoclimatic analysis. Dive recorders monitor water levels, providing data to further understand the movement of sediment through the cave system. A general time constraint on the sediment's age is based on the presence of microplastic in the surface samples and sediment cores, and data from radiocarbon and lead-210 dating. The integration of various sedimentological data allows for better understanding of sedimentation processes and their record of paleoenvironmental change in the cave system. Sediment studies and methodologies from this project can be applied to other karst systems, and have important applications for communities living on karst landscapes and their water management policies.

  1. Sedimentologic and Geometric Characterization of Turbidites of Brazos-Trinity Basin IV in the Gulf of Mexico: Preliminary Results of IODP Expedition 308

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Pastor, J.; Pirmez, C.; Flemings, P. B.; Behrmann, J. H.; John, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    Brazos Trinity Basin IV is located about 200 km offshore Texas, and belongs to a linked system of four intra slope mini basins. Basin IV provides a type section to characterize turbidites in salt withdrawal mini-basins of the Gulf of Mexico. IODP Expedition 308 has cored and logged complete pre-fan and fan sequences that are clearly distinguished with high-resolution seismic profiles at Brazos Trinity Basin IV at Sites U1319, U1320 and U1321. Seismically imaged pre-fan and fan units also can be distinguished and correlated with the sedimentological and logging data. Turbidite facies display distinct properties in terms of grain size, bed thickness, color, organic matter content, vertical organization of beds and lateral distribution in all the units of the fan through the basin. The pre-fan sequence is composed of terrigenous laminated clay with color banding and it is interpreted to result from deposition from fluvial plumes and/or muddy turbidity currents overspilling from basins upstream of Basin IV. The lower fan is characterized by laminated and bioturbated muds with thin beds of silt and sand, and represent the initial infill of the basin by mostly muddy turbidity currents, although an exceptionally sand-rich unit occurs at the base of the lower fan. The middle and upper fan represent the main pulses of turbidity current influx into Basin IV, and contain fine to medium sand turbidite beds organized in packets ranging in thickness from 5 to 25 m. The middle fan displays an overall upward increase in sand content at Site U1320, suggesting increased flow by-pass from the updip basins through time. Key examples of turbidites from each fan unit are analysed in detail to infer the depositional processes and infilling history of Brazos-Trinity Basin IV. The study of turbidites in a calibrated basin such as Basin IV provides ground truth for the sedimentological processes and resultant seismic facies, which can be used to interpret the infill history of other

  2. Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einasto J.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available I give a review of the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, thus properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic web.

  3. Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Supported by a generous quantity of full-color illustrations and interesting sidebars, Solid Matter introduces the basic characteristics and properties of solid matter. It briefly describes the cosmic connection of the elements, leading readers through several key events in human pre-history that resulted in more advanced uses of matter in the solid state. Chapters include:. -Solid Matter: An Initial Perspective. -Physical Behavior of Matter. -The Gravity of Matter. -Fundamentals of Materials Science. -Rocks and Minerals. -Metals. -Building Materials. -Carbon Earth's Most Versatile Element. -S

  4. Landscape changes based on sedimentological and geochemical studies in the region of Brudzeń Duży

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolska Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentological and geochemical research carried out in North- West Mazovia, central Poland, allowed the determination of landscape transformation in relation to the history of human settlement. The types of sediments subject to analysis included palaeochannel filling, accumulation on the river floodplain and colluvial deposits. The absolute ages of sediments and their sedimentological features allow the conclusion that the first response to human activity in the area is recorded in the overbank deposits in the Skrwa River valley as a result of the Wielbarska Culture in 200-300 AD. Subsequently, fan accumulation at the mouths of gullies started around the 12th-13th centuries AD. Frequent changes of sediment properties have been observed since the early Middle Ages. The subsequent anthropogenic impact on homogenous deposits is recorded in increased heavy metal concentration in vertical geological profiles.

  5. Stable isotope (δ"1"3C and δ"1"5N) based interpretation of organic matter source and paleoenvironmental conditions in Al-Azraq basin, Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Khaldoun; Davies, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen from cored lacustrine sediments of the Al-Azraq, an arid lake basin on the Jordan Plateau. Lacustrine sediments contain valuable records of paleoenvironmental conditions, recording local and regional responses to environmental change. Previous paleo-reconstructions on the Jordan Plateau are based on archaeology, pollen, mineralogy, and stratigraphy. The application of organic geochemistry analyses to these lake sediments identifies multiple sources of organic matter, biological production, and contributes to understanding the paleoenvironments of the Al-Azraq basin during the mid-Pleistocene period. Organic carbon concentration (Corg) provides an overview of the organic matter distribution. Carbon isotopic composition (δ13Corg) and nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) are indicators of organic matter sources and paleoproductivity. Magnetic susceptibility (MGSUS) measured the concentration of ferromagnetic minerals and indicated aeolian inputs. Organic geochemistry differentiated five paleoenvironmental zones with specific sources of organic matter, both aquatic and terrestrial. It identified a long period of climate wetter than the present, punctuated by a short intense period of aridity. Diagenesis plays an important role in the decomposition of organic matter and studies indicate this degradation can alter the isotopic signals of organic matter. Analyses of the isotopic signals and statistical analyses demonstrate diagenesis is not a factor in the Al-Azraq sediments in all but Zone 4 of the paleoenvironmental zones. This Zone is defined by less negative carbon isotopic composition and the presence of thick primary gypsum layers, in addition to the influx of high peaks of aeolian sediment as reflected in the magnetic susceptibility data. Stable isotope geochemistry provides detailed information on the paleoenvironments of lake sediments, and is applicable to typically challenging arid basin sediments

  6. Refining the Neoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic record of carbon cycling and seawater chemistry using quantitative geochemical models of redox dynamics and carbonate diagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Anne-Sofie Crüger

    based records. Despite the prevalence of diagenesis in sedimentary rocks there are currently few robust geochemical tools capable of providing quantitative information on the extent of alteration from the primary signal. In order to fill this gap, Chapter 3 presents a numerical model of marine carbonate...... through diagenesis and provide more robust estimates for past seawater chemistry. Ancient carbonate rocks with extreme negative carbon isotopes are found worldwide bracketing the Marinoan glaciation (∼635 Ma). There is no scientific consensus as to whether these excursions originate from a primary...... perturbation in the carbon cycle or from diagenetic alterations. Chapter 4 merges new measurements of calcium, magnesium, and strontium isotopes in these sediments with the diagenetic model developed in Chapter 3 to offer new insights into the potential origin of these extreme isotope anomalies....

  7. Activites of the radioisotopes division of IPR-CDTN-NUCLEBRAS in the studies of sedimentology and hidric polution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aun, P.E.

    1979-07-01

    This work describes, in a very general way, the utilization of fluorescent and radioactive tracers in sedimentological studies. It presents the specific applications of those tracers in following the motion of sediments in suspension and in the bottom. The paper describes in short the labelling, detection and analysis techniques, as well as several actual applications of those techniques by the Radioisotopes Division of Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear-CDTN-NUCLEBRAS. (author) [pt

  8. Constraining the sedimentology and stratigraphy of submarine intraslope lobe deposits using exhumed examples from the Karoo Basin, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Flint, Stephen; Hodgson, David; Spychala, Yvonne; Mountney, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    Intraslope lobe deposits provide a process record of the infill of accommodation on submarine slopes and their recognition enables the accurate reconstruction of the stratigraphic evolution of submarine slope systems. Extensive exposures of discrete sand-prone packages in Units D/E and E, Fort Brown Formation, Karoo Basin, South Africa, permit analysis of the sedimentology and stacking patterns of three intraslope lobe complexes and their palaeogeographic reconstruction via bed-scale analysis...

  9. How were the ditches filled? Sedimentological and micromorphological classification of formation processes within graben-like archaeological objects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lisá, Lenka; Komoróczy, Balázs; Vlach, Marek; Válek, M.; Bajer, A.; Kovárník, J.; Rajtár, J.; Hüssen, C.-M.; Šumberová, Radka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 370, 3 June (2015), s. 66-76 ISSN 1040-6182 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M300011201 Program:M Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:68081758 ; RVO:67985912 Keywords : formation processes * micromorphology * Neolithic rondel structures * Roman ditch * sedimentology * V-shaped ditch Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 2.067, year: 2015

  10. Speech Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse Jørgensen, Stina

    2011-01-01

    About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011.......About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011....

  11. Memory Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Memory Matters KidsHealth / For Kids / Memory Matters What's in ... of your complex and multitalented brain. What Is Memory? When an event happens, when you learn something, ...

  12. Sedimentology and Rock Magnetism of Bailey River Peat Cores, Sudbury Area: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtseven, A.; Cioppa, M. T.; Dean, K.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic measurements on peat can reveal atmospheric anthropogenic contamination. Two cores were collected from a marsh surrounding the Bailey River, 10 km north of Sudbury, Ontario, using a Russian peat borer. The BR1 core (1.4 m) was collected right at the river's edge, whereas the BR2 core (2.5 m) was collected about 50 m away from the river's edge, close to the edge of the marsh and near the forest. Significant sedimentological variation between the two cores was observed: core BR1 had several centimeter to decimeter scale fine to coarse grey sand layers at 0.14 m, 0.46 m and 0.87 m between thicker organic-rich (peat) zones, whereas core BR2 had only one 5 cm sand-rich layer at 0.94 m within the organic-rich material. The cores were subsampled at 2.5 cm intervals for laboratory magnetic analysis. Volume susceptibility was measured using a Bartington MS2B meter, and mass-specific susceptibility was then calculated. In core BR1, the sand layers had relatively higher susceptibility (13 x 10-8 m3/kg) , while the organic rich layers had very low susceptibility (0 - 2 x 10-8 m3/kg). In core BR2, which had little sand, the susceptibility variation was dominated by higher values near-surface (10 x 10-8 m3/kg), and very low susceptibility (0.3 x 10-8 m3/kg) below 0.3 m depth. Since the lithology in this core did not vary substantially, susceptibility variations may be controlled by anthropogenic deposition in the near-surface during the peak mining and smelting decades. These preliminary results suggest that any anthropogenic signal in core BR1 appears to be masked by the sedimentological variation. On pilot results from eight samples in core BR1, saturation isothermal remanence acquisition showed 95% saturation by 200 mT, and the S-ratios (0.3T/0.9T) were above 0.93, suggesting that magnetite is the major magnetization carrier. In core BR2, six out of eight samples showed similar results; however, two samples had slightly more higher coercivity minerals (90% saturation

  13. Beach ridge sedimentology: field observation and palaeoenvironmental interpretation for Anegada Island, British Virgin Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescon, Anna Lisa; Cooper, J. Andrew G.; Jackson, Derek W. T.

    2014-05-01

    Beach ridge landforms have been observed in different environments and in settings that range from polar to tropical. Their stratigraphy and sedimentology has received a limited amount of discussion in the literature (Tamura, 2012). In coastal geomorphology a beach ridge can be seen as a transitional deposit between onshore and offshore environments. They are regarded as representing high level wave action along a coastline. In the Caribbean the origin of beach ridges has been variously attributed to one of three extreme wave events: extreme swell, extreme storm or tsunami waves. Beach ridges are arranged in beach ridge plains where there is succession of the landforms and can be several kilometres long. Beach ridge accumulation is not continuous and the coast shows alternating accretion and erosion periods. The use of beach ridges as palaeostorm archives is therefore not straightforward. The temporal continuity of beach ridge formation is being assessed on the beach ridge plains of Anegada, British Virgin Islands (Lesser Antilles). This carbonate platform surrounded by a fringing reef contains two beach ridge plains. There are more than 30 ridges in the Atlantic facing- coast and around 10 in the south, Caribbean- facing coast. The sediments of the modern beaches are dominated by the sand fraction and are 100% biogenic origin due to the isolation of Anegada from terrestrial sediment sources. The beach ridge sections have been studied in different area of Anegada beach ridge plains and present low angle seaward-dipping bedding. The sand fraction is dominant in the stratigraphy with a few intact shells. At only one site were coral pebbles deposited in association with the sand fraction. Aeolian deposits represent the upper part of the beach ridges and reflect the stabilization of the beach ridges with ongoing accretion. The sedimentology of the contemporary beach and dunes will be discussed in terms of their implications for understanding beach ridge genesis and its

  14. Danube paleohydrology: Hyperspectral and sedimentological high-resultion study of the last glacial Black Sea rythmites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Lamas, R.; Debret, M.; Deloffre, J.; Toucanne, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Black Sea has undergone alternating phases of lacustrine and marine environment over geological timescales directly related to its semi-enclosed character and to eustatic sea-level oscillations. During lowstand conditions, as during the last glacial period, the Black Sea was a giant lake disconnected from the global ocean. At that time, Black Sea water-level was controlled by regional climate, and by Eurasian rivers, including the Danube that acted as an outlet of European Ice Sheet and the Alpine ice cap. Thus, the paleo-mouth of the Danube river contains a high quality archive for the study of the paleohydrology of the Danube River and by extension of the European climate changes during the last 30 kyr. For this purpose, we have focused on the GAS-CS01 calypso long-piston core (33.4 m) which was taken during GHASS cruise (Ifremer, 2015) on the upper slope (240 m. depth) at about 25 km east of the Danube Canyon, i.e. in the sediment pile of the Danube paleo-mouth during the last glacial period. Our chronology reveals that core GAS-CS01 extends back to 31 cal kyr BP. The lithology of GAS-CS01 is characterized by clastic rythmites which are presented as a high-resolution Danube runoff proxy. Preliminary results of sedimentological and chronological analysis showed five peaks of terrestrial discharges between ca 31 and 14 ka BP, probably linked to five phases of the enhanced runoff during the studied period. In order to understand the origin and the depositional processes of this laminae, we combined sedimentary analysis (x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, grain size ...) and hyperspectral images analysis. Hyperspectral imagery is a non-destructive fast method classically used to quantify colour and provides data with high spatial (57-µm pixel size) and spectral (3 nm) resolution. The multi-proxy calibration is essential in order to obtain a high-resolution sedimentological dataset. This information allows us to reconstruct the nature and depositional

  15. The diagenesis-metamorphism limit in pelitic rocks: an X-ray diffraction and decomposition study of illite and interstratified illite/smectite minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharrabi, M.

    1995-01-01

    The definition of the limit between diagenesis and metamorphism has long been debated. Various approaches have been used to describe this limit including mineral reaction such as the appearance of pyrophyllite, illite crystallinity and rock textures (i.e. the development of schistosity). The aim of this study is to characterize the illite clays transformation during this transition. Study of the (001) and (003) XRD peaks of illite and illite-rich interstratified illite/smectite (I/S) by decomposition of XRD spectra allows to define the transformation that affect these minerals in the transition from extensive diagenesis to low grade metamorphism. We studied Paleozoic pelites from the Illinois Basin (USA), Cornwall (UK), Brittany (France) and the Anti-Atlas mountains and the Eastern-Haou/Basin (Morocco) that have undergone this transition. Illite clays pass through three evolutionary stages during the transition from diagenesis to metamorphism: advanced diagenesis where the population of illite particles is composed of the following phases: interstratified illite/smectite (I/S), small illite crystallites (PCI) and large illite crystallites (WCI). The composition of I/S particles that contain approximately 95 % illite layers changes very little at low temperatures even over long periods of time. The most important change during this stage is the reduction in the amount of this phase. These I/S particles (<5% smectite layers) dissolve and furnish the chemical constituents necessary for the growth of PCI and WCI before they are transformed into 100 % illite. Particles of PCI also contain smectite interlayers in their structure. These smectite interlayers may be considered as a characteristic of diagenetic conditions. The second stage, corresponding to anchizone metamorphism is characterized by the disappearance of I/S. The disappearance is caused by higher thermal regime. In the last stage corresponding to epizone metamorphism there exists only one population of illite

  16. Diagenesis of arc-derived sandstones of Cretaceous formations in the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia, Canada(MEMORIAL VOLUME TO THE LATE PROFESSOR TERUHIKO SAMESHIMA)

    OpenAIRE

    Yagishita, Koji

    1994-01-01

    Diagenesis of sediments derived from a magmatic arc provenance may greatly differ from that of sediments derived from an intracratonic- or foreland-type provenance. Sediments from the magmatic arc are compositionally immature and rich in volcanic and sedimentary rock fragments. Sandstone samples of mid- to Upper Cretaceous formations in the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia, Canada, contain either large amounts of pseudomatrix or authigenic cements. An inverse relationship between the...

  17. A sedimentological approach to refining reservoir architecture in a mature hydrocarbon province: the Brent Province, UK North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampson, G.J.; Sixsmith, P.J.; Johnson, H.D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Science and Engineering

    2004-04-01

    Improved reservoir characterisation in the mature Brent Province of the North Sea, aimed at maximising both in-field and near-field hydrocarbon potential, requires a clearer understanding of sub-seismic stratigraphy and facies distributions. In this context, we present a regional, high-resolution sequence stratigraphic framework for the Brent Group, UK North Sea based on extensive sedimentological re-interpretation of core and wireline-log data, combined with palynostratigraphy and published literature. This framework is used to place individual reservoirs in an appropriate regional context, thus resulting in the identification of subtle sedimentological and tectono-stratigraphic features of reservoir architecture that have been previously overlooked. We emphasise the following insights gained from our regional, high-resolution sequence stratigraphic synthesis: (1) improved definition of temporal and spatial trends in deposition both within and between individual reservoirs, (2) development of regionally consistent, predictive sedimentological models for two enigmatic reservoir intervals (the Broom and Tarbert Formations), and (3) recognition of subtle local tectono-stratigraphic controls on reservoir architecture, and their links to the regional, Middle Jurassic structural evolution of the northern North Sea. We discuss the potential applications of these insights to the identification of additional exploration potential and to improved ultimate recovery. (author)

  18. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    What You See Ain't What. You Got, Resonance, Vol.4,. No.9,1999. Dark Matter. 2. Dark Matter in the Universe. Bikram Phookun and Biman Nath. In Part 11 of this article we learnt that there are compelling evidences from dynamics of spiral galaxies, like our own, that there must be non-luminous matter in them. In this.

  19. The sedimentology and uranium mineralization of the Klipbankskraal deposit north of Merweville, C.P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J.P.

    1982-08-01

    A sedimentological study was conducted on the farm Klipbankskraal, north-west of Merweville. The orebody is located in the Poortjie Member at the base of the Teekloof Formation. The mineralised sandstone, S1, is a tabular lithosome deposited in an ephemeral, braided river environment. It consists of two major and several minor mesocycles, with the upper major cycle showing evidence of having inherited the drainage pattern of the lower mesocycle. The vector mean azimuth of the sequence as a whole is towards 059 degrees. The uranium is present as stacked, tabular lenses associated with permeable zones in the immediate vicinity of erosional inter-cycle contacts. Although no obvious relationship exists between the uranium and channels or bars, the distribution of plant material was controlled by the current velocities which also controlled the type of sedimentary structures. Uranium occurs preferentially in fissile-weathering (horizontal-bedded) sandstone and mud-pebble conglomerate, both permeable lithologies, and in mudstone or silt-stone. Uranium is genetically related to other elements such as Mn, Mo, Cu, Co and Pb, which must have been constituents of the ore fluid. Uraniferous granites in the source areas probaly supplied most of the uranium

  20. Paleoecology, stratigraphy and sedimentology of the deposit of diatomite Loma Camastro, Liberia-Guanacaste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa-Sojo, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    The use of fossil diatoms have sought to establish the evolution of the paleoecological and sedimentary processes, a section of paleolake in the warehouse Loma Camacho, Liberia-Guanacaste. The same has consisted of a volcano-sedimentary sequence of continental origin, shown as a lacustrine deposit, due to the presence of diatoms as their predominant fossil feature. The stratigraphy and sedimentology are established in detail of a portion of the formation of the Loma indicating, by this analysis, materials reworked of volcaniclastic origin and sedimentary deposits of lacustrine origin. The study has coincided to a sequence of tobitas, differentiated by their granulometry, microscopically corresponded to lodolites or claystones, with concentrations different of diatom fossils and crystals (predominantly quartz and biotic), in a clay matrix. Patterns of variation in the diatom paleocommunities are determined and have been recognized different species. General environmental conditions of paleolake are established, such as pH, productivity, solar radiation, salinity, etc. In addition, changes in diatom communities, sedimentation patterns and relations to the local and regional context were correlated setting dominant paleoenvironmental conditions for that depositional period in Loma Camastro. The main influence has been the seasonal changes in dry and rainy periods and constant volcanic activity of Volcan Rincon de la Vieja [es

  1. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of the Lopingian (Late Permian) coal measures in southwestern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao [School of Geosciences and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China); School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds (United Kingdom); Shao, Longyi; Hao, Liming; Zhang, Pengfei [School of Geosciences and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China); Glasspool, Ian J. [Department of Geology, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Wheeley, James R.; Hilton, Jason [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Wignall, Paul B. [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds (United Kingdom); Yi, Tongsheng [Guizhou Bureau of Coal Geological Exploration, Guiyang, Guizhou (China); Zhang, Mingquan [Coal Geology and Prospecting Institute of Yunnan Province, Kunming, Yunnan (China)

    2011-01-01

    The Lopingian coal measures of southwestern China were deposited within a range of facies associations spanning a spectrum of settings from fluvial to marine carbonate platform. The transitional to terrestrial coal measures are dominated by siliciclastics, but they also contain fifteen laterally extensive marine bands (limestone beds and mudstone). These bands act as marker horizons that enable correlation between fully marine and terrestrial facies. Examination of this range of facies and their sedimentology has enabled the development of a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic framework. Set against the established backdrop of second-order Lopingian transgression, sixteen fourth-order sequences and three composite sequences (third-order) are recognized. Results show that, in the composite sequences, peat accumulation in the seaward parts of the study area predominantly correlates with early transgressive sequence sets (TSS), while in more landward areas it correlates with the middle TSS to late highstand sequence sets (HSS). Differences in peat-accumulation regimes within the sequence stratigraphic framework are attributed to variations in subsidence and background siliciclastic input rates in different depositional settings, with these combining to produce differences in the rate of accommodation change. The preservation of coal resources in the middle to late HSS in this area was most likely related to the rise of the regional base level throughout the Lopingian. (author)

  2. The 1957 Valencia flood: hydrological and sedimentological reconstruction and comparison to the current situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Puertes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to improve the knowledge of the flood that took place in Valencia, Spain, in 1957. In other words, the aim is to test if it is possible to explain the flood waves with the incorporation of sediment cycle to a distributed hydrological model. Furthermore, this work aims to be aware of the current consequences of a similar event, taking into account land use changes, particularly, the urban rise in the lower basin, and the current flood defenses of the city. To do this, the hydrological model was implemented in the current basin situation. Once implemented, a reconstruction of precipitation at hourly discretization for the 1957 event was made and the sedimentological sub-model was calibrated. Then, the hydrographs in the chosen points were obtained. Finally, a simulation using the 1957 precipitation in the current basin situation was made, in order to be aware of the current consequences.

  3. Taphonomic and sedimentological aspects from PICOS II paleontological site, a quaternary pond deposit of Alagoas, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Yumi; Silva, Jorge Luiz Lopes da; Silva, Ana Paula Lopes da; Silva, Elaine Pollyanne Alves da; Omena, Érica Cavalcante

    2016-11-01

    The Picos II Paleontological Site (PIIPS), located in the city of Piranhas, in Alagoas State, is a fossil deposit with a pond-like geomorphological feature, a kind of peculiar deposit for the Quaternary of Northeast Brazil. A detailed taphonomic study is presented about the PIIPS assemblage, from material collection to the laboratory analysis. The conservation state of the collected fossils in PIIPS is different from that found in other tank deposits, showing a high degree of specimen preservation. Two taxa of pleistocenic mammals have been identified: Eremotherium laurillardi and Notiomastodon platensis, and fragments of an avian bone, whose taxonomic identification was not possible. The taphonomic analysis indicates that the deposited material experienced a short transportation in high-energy event, with a short period of subaerial exposure before the final burial, where at least the final disarticulation occurred in situ, which explains the high conservation level of the material. The sedimentological analysis made in each layer of the deposit corroborates the information related to the transport of the material, which were obtained in taphonomic analysis. Regarding these aspects, PIIPS reflects nearly non-biased biocenotic patterns. The well-preserved material found in PIIPS demonstrates the great potential of deposits with pond-like geomorphological features, with sidelines that are less steep than traditional tanks, providing smoother transport and accommodation for skeletal elements, which is a distinguishing factor in preserving fossils of vertebrates.

  4. Petrographic and sedimentological characteristics of drift sediments from the radiotracer experiment array at Drigg, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.

    1990-11-01

    A detailed petrographic, mineralogical and sedimentological study has been made of five drift sediment cores taken from shallow boreholes at Drigg, Cumbria, forming part of the British Geological Survey's migration test borehole array. The cores correspond to the aquifer in which tests are undertaken. The study shows that several discrete units can be recognised within the aquifer but that these may vary laterally by a considerable amount over short distances. The sands and silts comprising the aquifer zone are generally finely laminated and show an upwards coarsening of grain size. They are interpreted as proximal glacial sediments, possibly having been deposited in a lake or ponded basin. Petrographic analysis shows that most of the porosity is lined by detrital ferruginous illitic clay which coats the sand grains. Some evidence of feldspar dissolution is identified. Pyrite is also present as an important detrital component. In the upper part of the aquifer the pyrite has been largely oxidised to form secondary ferric oxide compounds. However, pyrite increases in abundance with depth and its preservation may reflect a variation in redox across the aquifer. (author)

  5. The sedimentology and uranium mineralisation of the DR-3 deposit, Laingsburg district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J.P.

    1982-08-01

    As part of its research program in the Karoo, NUCOR carried out a sedimentological investigation of the DR-3 deposit, discovered by JCI. It is located on the farm Drie Vaderlandsche Rietvalleyen, 40 km north of Laingsburg, in an unnamed sandstone package of the Abrahamskraal Formation. The orebody lies in an area affected by southward-dipping monoclines, which possibly originated because of basement faults during subsidence of the Karoo trough. These monoclines may be have locally altered the courses of rivers flowing from the source areas to the south-west. The S1-sandstone which hosts the uranium was probably deposited in a braided river environment of the Donjek type. The vector mean azimuth is towards 075 degrees for S1 and 062 degrees for the studied sequence as a whole, but towards the east there is a marked change in the palaeocurrent direction. On a more regional scale, preliminary investigations indicate the braided river system was at least 5 km wide. Uranium mineralisation on DR-3 is concentrated within a major east-west-trending channel, with the best-developed ore at the junctions of this channel with tributaries from the south. This is probably due to plant material settling out in the areas of reduced current velocities where opposing streams meet

  6. The sedimentology of uranium-bearing sandstones on the farm Ryst Kuil 351 Beaufort West area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D.I.

    1979-06-01

    A study of the sedimentology of some uranium-bearing sandstones on the farm Ryst Kuil 351 was made in order to assess possible relationships between the mineralisation and the sedimentary facies and/or the palaeo-environment. Use was made of 6 vertical profiles, derived from horizontal traverses. 12 sedimentary facies were recognised according to grain-size and sedimentary structure. The transitions between these facies, as derived from the vertical profiles, were subjected to Markov analysis. Only 3 Markov-dependent transitions were derived, but several facies transitions and associations occurred with greater than random frequency. These, together with the vertical profiles, were used to interpret the palaeo-environmental succession. This succession is fluvial meandering and two sub-environments - channel and flood plain - were delineated according to the prevalence of sandstone or mudstone facies. The uranium-bearing sandstones occur in the lower part of a thick (29 - 46m) multistorey point bar sequence within the channel sub-environment. The mineralisation is associated with koffieklip and is restricted to two sedimentary facies - massive very fine-to-finegrained sandstone and horizontally bedded, very fine- to fine-grained sandstone. The mineralisation normally occurs near the bases of the point bars

  7. Cryostratigraphy, sedimentology, and the late Quaternary evolution of the Zackenberg River delta, northeast Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Graham L.; Cable, Stefanie; Thiel, Christine

    2017-01-01

    The Zackenberg River delta is located in northeast Greenland (74 degrees 30' N, 20 degrees 30' E) at the outlet of the Zackenberg fjord valley. The fjord-valley fill consists of a series of terraced deltaic deposits (ca. 2 km2) formed during relative sea-level (RSL) fall. We investigated the depo......The Zackenberg River delta is located in northeast Greenland (74 degrees 30' N, 20 degrees 30' E) at the outlet of the Zackenberg fjord valley. The fjord-valley fill consists of a series of terraced deltaic deposits (ca. 2 km2) formed during relative sea-level (RSL) fall. We investigated...... the deposits using sedimentological and cryostratigraphic techniques together with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. We identify four facies associations in sections (4 to 22 m in height) exposed along the modern Zackenberg River and coast. Facies associations relate to (I) overriding glaciers......, (II) retreating glaciers and quiescent glaciomarine conditions, (III) delta progradation in a fjord valley, and (IV) fluvial activity and niveo-aeolian processes. Pore, layered, and suspended cryofacies are identified in two 20 m deep ice-bonded sediment cores. The cryofacies distribution, together...

  8. Sedimentological characters of the mangrove ecosystem of Kali estuary, Karwar, west coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Estuarine mangroves give natural support to the protection of the riverbanks, due to their accumulative nature. To study this effect, it is necessary to measure sedimentation rates under estuarine mangroves. Sediment plays an important role in the storage and release of nutrient into the water column, the mineralization of organic carbon deposits by various kinds of microbes. In association with other parameters, the sediment is responsible for the variations in densities of majority of benthic organisms. Regular monthly collections of bottom water and sediment were made for a period thirteen months from January 2008 and January 2009 at five different study sites using the motorized outrigger canoe. The present investigation encompassed collection of data pertaining to various aspects of sedimentology. Sediment temperature varied from 25.100c to 30.450c. The pH ranged between 6.18 to 8.30. Organic carbon Varied between 2.06 to 29.45%, moisture content varied from 20.10% to 41.88. Values of interstitial water content is varied between 1.60% to 30.95%. Wide variation in the percentage composition of sand (28.45% to 80.10%, silt (12.78% to 54.28%, and clay (3.66% to 33.63% was observed.

  9. Little Ice Age glacial geomorphology and sedimentology of Portage Glacier, South-Central Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Córdova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of glacial landforms and deposits is important, as it isdifficult to observe processes under modern glaciers and ice-sheets. Thus landscapes and sediments that are the product of present glaciation can give insight into processes that occurred during Pleistocene times. This study investigates the genesis of little ice age glacial landforms present in Portage Glacier, South-Central Alaska. The present day moraine morphology and sedimentology in Portage Glacier valley reveals the presence of two types of till and moraines. The clast-rich sandy diamicton present on the 1852 moraine is interpreted to be a basal till indicating this feature is a pushmoraine representing an advance or a standstill position of Portage Glacier in 1852. The moderately sorted gray sandy boulder gravel present on the 1900 and 1922 moraines is interpreted to be an ice-marginal deposit (ablation till with a mixture of supraglacial and glaciofluvial sediments deposited by slumping and stream sortingprocesses. All of these features are interpreted to be ablation moraines representing glacier retreat and moraine building in 1900 and1922.

  10. The sedimentology, mineralogy and geochemistry of the Mooifontein deposit, Orange Free State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynard, H.J.; Jakob, W.R.O.; Le Roux, J.P.

    1982-08-01

    The sedimentology, mineralogy and geochemistry of the Mooifontein deposit, which is situated north-west of Edenburg, Orange Free State, has been investigated. The orebody is located stratigraphically in the Adelaide Subgroup of the Karoo Sequence. Palaeocurrent and geological sections afford a picture of a fan-shaped distributary system and together with features such as small-scale channeling, cyclical deposition and an upward coarsening cycle, suggest a lacustrine-delta model of formation. The rocks constituting the deposit are feldspathic greywackes and feldspathic silt- and mudstones and can be divided into five texturally distinguishable groups. The mineralised lenses of the Mooifontein deposit attain a thickness of 7 m which can be split into two or three zones. The average grade of 0,85 kg U 3 O 8 /t is lower than that of the southern Karoo deposits (1 kg U 3 O 8 /t). The shallow depth of the orebody makes it amenable to open-cast mining. Molybdenum concentrations in the deposit are too low to be of economic significance. The sediments have low copper, vanadium and arsenic contents and the above-average calcite content of 9% will result in high acid consumption should an acid leaching process be used for uranium recovery. Both calcite and fluorite are unrelated to the uranium mineralisation. The deposit as a whole appears to have been little affected by post-genetic processes with only minor redistribution of uranium and moderate oxidation of organic carbon and sulphides

  11. Biostratigraphy, sedimentology and paleoenvironments of the northern Danube Basin: Ratkovce 1 well case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybár Samuel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ratkovce 1 well, drilled in the Blatné depocenter of the northern Danube Basin penetrated the Miocene sedimentary record with a total thickness of 2000 m. Biostratigraphically, the NN4, NN5 and NN6 Zones of calcareous nannoplankton were documented; CPN7 and CPN8 foraminifer Zones (N9, 10, 11 of the global foraminiferal zonation; and MMi4a; MMi5 and MMi6 of the Mediterranean foraminiferal zonation were recognized. Sedimentology was based on description of well core material, and together with SP and RT logs, used to characterize paleoenvironmental conditions of the deposition. Five sedimentary facies were reconstructed: (1 fan-delta to onshore environment which developed during the Lower Badenian; (2 followed by the Lower Badenian proximal slope gravity currents sediments; (3 distal slope turbidites were deposited in the Lower and Upper Badenian; (4 at the very end of the Upper Badenian and during the Sarmatian a coastal plain of normal marine to brackish environment developed; (5 sedimentation finished with the Pannonian-Pliocene shallow lacustrine to alluvial plain deposits. The provenance analysis records that the sediment of the well-cores was derived from crystalline basement granitoides and gneisses and from the Permian to Lower Cretaceous sedimentary cover and nappe units of the Western Carpathians and the Eastern Alps. Moreover, the Lower Badenian volcanism was an important source of sediments in the lower part of the sequence.

  12. High-resolution sedimentological and subsidence analysis of the Late Neogene, Pannonian Basin, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, E.; Muller, P.; Toth-Makk, A.; Hamor, T.; Farkas-Bulla, J.; Suto-Szentai, M.; Phillips, R.L.; Ricketts, B.

    1996-01-01

    Detailed sedimentological and paleontological analyses were carried out on more than 13,000 m of core from ten boreholes in the Late Neogene sediments of the Pannonian Basin, Hungary. These data provide the basis for determining the character of high-order depositional cycles and their stacking patterns. In the Late Neogene sediments of the Pannonian Basin there are two third-order sequences: the Late Miocene and the Pliocene ones. The Miocene sequence shows a regressive, upward-coarsening trend. There are four distinguishable sedimentary units in this sequence: the basal transgressive, the lower aggradational, the progradational and the upper aggradational units. The Pliocene sequence is also of aggradational character. The progradation does not coincide in time in the wells within the basin. The character of the relative water-level curves is similar throughout the basin but shows only very faint similarity to the sea-level curve. Therefore, it is unlikely that eustasy played any significant role in the pattern of basin filling. Rather, the dominant controls were the rapidly changing basin subsidence and high sedimentation rates, together with possible climatic factors.

  13. Sedimentologic indicators of the Miocene tectonic evolution in the Nunchia syncline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Arias, Juan Carlos; Mora, Andres; Parra, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    The study area corresponds to the Nunchia syncline, which is located in the eastern foothills of the eastern cordillera of Colombia. This structure is bounded by the Yopal thrust to the east, and Guaicaramo thrust to the west. This syncline has mostly outcrops of Miocene units, which belong to the Carbonera (C1-C5), Leon and Guayabo formations. Here we use sedimentologic data, especially in the Guayabo Formation, in order to determine the influence of active tectonics during its deposition. Petrographic analyses of sandstones indicate the presence of components associated with upper Cretaceous - Paleocene formations in the eastern cordillera. Paleocurrent orientation shows a preferential trend towards the se during the deposition of most of the studied formations, with a reversal in flow direction towards the W-NW during the deposition of the middle Guayabo Formation preserved in the Nunchia syncline. The collected data allows establishing a structural evolution in the Nunchia syncline which was therefore active during most of the Miocene. This evolution appears to be continuous, although fragmentation of the geological record shows more specific periods of tectonic activity.

  14. A comparison between geostatistical analyses and sedimentological studies at the Hartbeestfontien gold mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magri, E.J.

    1978-01-01

    For life-of-mine planning, as well as for short- and medium-term planning of grades and mine layouts, it is extremely important to have a clear understanding of the patterns followed by the distribution of gold and uranium within the mining area. This study is an attempt to reconcile the geostatistical approach to the determination of ore-shoot directions, via an analysis of the spatial distribution of gold and uranium values, with the sedimentological approach, which is based on the direct measurement of geological features. For the routine geostatistical estimation of ore reserves, the Hartebeestfontein gold mine was divided into ll sections. In each of these sections, the ore-shoot directions were calculated for gold and uranium from the anisotropies disclosed by geostatistical variogram analyses. This study presents a comparison of these results with those obtained from direct geological measurements of paleo-current directions. The results suggest that geological and geostatistical studies could be of significant mutual benefit [af

  15. The Borschovo section of the Gauja and Amata regional stages (Leningrad Region, Russia: sedimentology and biostratigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervīns Lukševičs

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the detailed sedimentological study and bed-by-bed collecting of fossils from the Borschovo section exposing the upper Givetian–lower Frasnian boundary beds are discussed. The succession consists of sandstones alternating with argillaceous and clayey packages that contain vertebrate and plant remains in the upper part. The grain size, sedimentary structures and cross-bed orientation considerably differ in the Oredezh Beds and the Staritsa Beds. Fine- to coarse-grained cross-stratified sandstones of the Oredezh Beds most probably are fluvial deposits, whereas the sandstones of the Staritsa Beds yielding tidal structures that show variable directions of the cross-bedding were accumulated in a tidally influenced or even tidally dominated environment. The Oredezh Beds in the study area lack fossils; however, sedimentary features allow correlation with the Sietiņi Formation corresponding to the lower part of the Gauja Regional Stage. The age of the Staritsa Beds is defined based on the distribution of vertebrate taxa as corresponding to the Amata Regional Stage. Probably, the deposits from the Borschovo locality represent the most complete section of the Staritsa Beds, including its lowermost part. Rather good preservation of some thin and fragile fish bones, buried together with large-sized quartz grains, and wide taxonomical diversity, are characteristic of the Borschovo locality, which is not common for the vertebrate localities of the Main Devonian Field corresponding to the Amata Regional Stage.

  16. Cryostratigraphy, sedimentology, and the late Quaternary evolution of the Zackenberg River delta, northeast Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Graham L.; Cable, Stefanie; Thiel, Christine; Christiansen, Hanne H.; Elberling, Bo

    2017-05-01

    The Zackenberg River delta is located in northeast Greenland (74°30' N, 20°30' E) at the outlet of the Zackenberg fjord valley. The fjord-valley fill consists of a series of terraced deltaic deposits (ca. 2 km2) formed during relative sea-level (RSL) fall. We investigated the deposits using sedimentological and cryostratigraphic techniques together with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. We identify four facies associations in sections (4 to 22 m in height) exposed along the modern Zackenberg River and coast. Facies associations relate to (I) overriding glaciers, (II) retreating glaciers and quiescent glaciomarine conditions, (III) delta progradation in a fjord valley, and (IV) fluvial activity and niveo-aeolian processes. Pore, layered, and suspended cryofacies are identified in two 20 m deep ice-bonded sediment cores. The cryofacies distribution, together with low overall ground-ice content, indicates that permafrost is predominately epigenetic in these deposits. Fourteen OSL ages constrain the deposition of the cored deposits to between approximately 13 and 11 ka, immediately following deglaciation. The timing of permafrost aggradation was closely related to delta progradation and began following the subaerial exposure of the delta plain (ca. 11 ka). Our results reveal information concerning the interplay between deglaciation, RSL change, sedimentation, permafrost aggradation, and the timing of these events. These findings have implications for the timing and mode of permafrost aggradation in other fjord valleys in northeast Greenland.

  17. Sedimentological Characteristics and Re-interpretation of the Paleoenvironment of Lokoja Sandstone, Southern Bida Basin, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, O. J.; Akande, S. O.

    2002-01-01

    Detail mapping of the Lokoja Formation consisting predominantly of sandstones exposed along Okene-Abuja highway near the confluence of Rivers Niger and Benue in the southern Bida Basin was undertaken in an attempt to reconstruct their depositional history. The analyses of the lithofacies characteristics, pebble morphogenesis and ichnofossil content of the Lokoja sandstones in the study area reveal their depositional environments which evolved from alluvial fans through braided stream into nearshore shallow marine conditions. The massive, immature, matrix to grain supported conglomerate subfacies can be interpreted as debris flow. The conglomeratic sandstone facies (massive, cross stratified and graded subfacies) reflect deposits of deep braided channels. The bioturbated and herringbone cross stratified conglomeratic sandstones indicate shallowing to marginal marine environments. The fine to medium grained sandstones, siltstones and claystones are interpreted as channel bars and floodplain deposits.Results of pebble morphogenesis analysis indicate predominance of fluvial processes. Minor high energy (probably beach) condition is indicated by some individual clasts from the conglomeratic sandstone facies with sphericity and OP index values less that 0.66 and -1.5 respectively.The study is significant because it represents the first sedimentological evidence of influence of shallow marine in the development of Lokoja sandstones during Campanian-Maastrichtian times

  18. Some holocene geomorphological and sedimentological observations from Oman and their palaeogeological implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beydoun, Z R

    1980-04-01

    Observed exhumed Pleistocene river channel conglomerates now standing as ridges, and inland sabkha sedimentological structural phenomena from Oman, are discussed. Their significance as tools in the interpretation of similar palaeogeological environments is considered. Correlation with similar channel fills elsewhere in Arabia and Iran indicates aggradation as having occurred between 35,000 to 7000 y BP and suggests that this was principally by sustained flow during pluvial phases accompanying the last global glaciation, (at least in this part of the Middle East). Elevations of the now inverted channels above their deflated desert surroundings are used for calculating deflation rates, and reservoir porosity-permeability characteristics of similar ancient deposits are considered. Additional and new data on halite crust structures from the Umm-as-Samim inland sabkha are presented mainly in photographs backed by factural data which are commented upon; sabkha formation probably commenced about 4500 y BP. The preservation of similar origin halite deposits in the stratigraphic record is briefly discussed. This note is intended to augment data on desert environments that appear to have either had passing mention, or simply recording without assessment of their significance as tools or indicators in the interpretation of similar palaeogeological environments. It is the hope that the observations recorded here will stimulate further work on these and other Holocene phenomena in the region concerned and also elsewhere, together with dissemination of results, so that their implications to various aspects of applied geology can be better evaluated and understood. 9 figures.

  19. The sedimentology and mineralogy of the river uranium deposit near Phuthaditjhaba, Qwa-Qwa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynard, H.J.; Le Roux, J.P.

    1982-08-01

    A sedimentological and mineralogical investigation was carried out on the River deposit discovered by Mining Corporation (Pty) Ltd in Qwa-Qwa, 15 km south-west of Phuthaditjhaba. The orebody is located in fluvial sandstones of the upper Elliot Formation. Palaeocurrent directions reflect a low- to very low-sinuosity river system with a vector mean azimuth towards 062 degrees. A study of sedimentary structures and grain sizes in cliff sections was supplemented by an analysis of borehole logs, which disclosed the sedimentary environment as a braided river of the Donjek type. Uranium mineralisation at the River prospect is unusually thick, averaging almost 2 m, but lower overall grade than the southern Karoo deposits. Almost 30% of the uranium is present in mudstone and siltstone, and the fact that mineralisation in the sandstone is of similar grade and thickness to that of the former two lithological types suggests that grain sizes played a minor role in the dispersion of the ore fluids. The rocks are mainly of three types, viz. lithic graaywackes, feldspathic graywackes and siltstones, of which calcareous and carbonaceous varieties of the former two occur. Uranium mineralisation is associated mainly with organic carbon which occurs in various modes. A small amount of uranium is present as secondary beta-uranophane which occurs interstitially to detrital grains and in the pores of the clayey matrix and lithic fragments. Uranium is the only trace element of economic significance

  20. The sedimentological characteristics and geochronology of the marshes of Dauphin Island, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Alisha M.; Smith, Christopher G.; Marot, Marci E.

    2018-03-22

    In August 2015, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center collected 11 push cores from the marshes of Dauphin Island and Little Dauphin Island, Alabama. Sample site environments included high marshes, low salt marshes, and salt flats, and varied in distance from the shoreline. The sampling efforts were part of a larger study to assess the feasibility and sustainability of proposed restoration efforts for Dauphin Island, Alabama, and to identify trends in shoreline erosion and accretion. The data presented in this publication can provide a basis for assessing organic and inorganic sediment accumulation rates and temporal changes in accumulation rates over multiple decades at multiple locations across the island. This study was funded by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, via the Gulf Environmental Benefit Fund. This report serves as an archive for the sedimentological and geochemical data derived from the marsh cores. Downloadable data are available and include Microsoft Excel spreadsheets (.xlsx), comma-separated values (.csv) text files, JPEG files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata in a U.S. Geological Survey data release.

  1. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watney, W.L.

    1994-12-01

    Reservoirs in the Lansing-Kansas City limestone result from complex interactions among paleotopography (deposition, concurrent structural deformation), sea level, and diagenesis. Analysis of reservoirs and surface and near-surface analogs has led to developing a {open_quotes}strandline grainstone model{close_quotes} in which relative sea-level stabilized during regressions, resulting in accumulation of multiple grainstone buildups along depositional strike. Resulting stratigraphy in these carbonate units are generally predictable correlating to inferred topographic elevation along the shelf. This model is a valuable predictive tool for (1) locating favorable reservoirs for exploration, and (2) anticipating internal properties of the reservoir for field development. Reservoirs in the Lansing-Kansas City limestones are developed in both oolitic and bioclastic grainstones, however, re-analysis of oomoldic reservoirs provides the greatest opportunity for developing bypassed oil. A new technique, the {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Pickett crossplot (formation resistivity vs. porosity) and its use in an integrated petrophysical characterization, has been developed to evaluate extractable oil remaining in these reservoirs. The manual method in combination with 3-D visualization and modeling can help to target production limiting heterogeneities in these complex reservoirs and moreover compute critical parameters for the field such as bulk volume water. Application of this technique indicates that from 6-9 million barrels of Lansing-Kansas City oil remain behind pipe in the Victory-Northeast Lemon Fields. Petroleum geologists are challenged to quantify inferred processes to aid in developing rationale geologically consistent models of sedimentation so that acceptable levels of prediction can be obtained.

  2. Uranium deposits of Gabon and Oklo reactors. Metallogenic model for rich deposits of the lower proterozoic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier-Lafaye, F.

    1986-05-01

    The geology of the Franceville basin (Gabon) is examined: stratigraphy, tectonics and geodynamics. The mobile zone of the Ogooue is specially studied: lithology, metamorphism and tectonics, isotopic geochronologic data are given. The different uranium deposits are described. A whole chapter is devoted to the study of Oklo natural nuclear reactor. A metallogenic model is proposed evidencing conditions required for deposit genesis. Tectonics, microstructures sedimentology, organic matter, diagenesis and uraniferous mineralizations are examined [fr

  3. Diagenesis of Flint and Porcellanite in the Maastrichtian Chalk at Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus Madsen, Heine; Stemmerik, Lars

    2010-01-01

    and ordered megaquartz in irregular voids indicates that silica gel and/or opal-CT transformed to the -quartz phases, microquartz, lutecite, chalcedony, and megaquartz, through the dissolution–precipitation process (Ostwald ripening). These results motivate a conceptual model in which the replacement process...... was initiated by microbial decomposition of organic matter and took place during periods of low rate of, or even stopped, sedimentation which fixed the redox boundary and the microbial metabolic zones at a specific depth below the sea floor. Biogenic opal-A incorporated in the sediment column below the sea...... floor was dissolved and precipitated at the redox boundary as silica gel and/or opal-CT, possibly aided by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. During burial, the dissolution–precipitation process transformed the silica gel and opal-CT to the -quartz phases. The results of this study indicate that precipitation...

  4. [Discussion on diagenesis of Xilingang pluton-constrained by X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy, plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu-Kun; Chen, Guo-Neng; Zhang, Ke; Huang, Hai-Hua

    2013-05-01

    The results on Xilingang pluton, mainly consisting of red beds, granites containing numerous debris of red beds and granites, obtained by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy show: (1) Xilingang pluton from red beds, granites containing numerous debris of red beds to granites has obvious characteristics of decreasing silicon and alkali content, and rising ignition loss, dark mineral content and oxidation index; (2) Chondrite-normalized REE distribution curves and primitive mantle-normalized spider diagram for trace elements of redbed, granites containing numerous debris of red beds and granites have a good consistency, the distribution characteristics of elements are similar to Nanling transformation-type granite; (3) The value of Raman spectrogram characteristic peak of quartz crystal in Xilingang granite decreased from the center of quartz crystal, and FWHM is steady. According to the above, the authors believe that Xilingang granite formed was related to in-situ melting of red beds and underlying strata and magma consolidation. Volatile components were discharged continuously, and oxidation index decreased gradually in the melting process. In the process of diagenesis, the top of pluton tend to be an ongoing silicon and alkali increase, while TFeO and MgO continue to migrate to bottom, and crystallization environment is a relatively closed and steady system.

  5. Diagenesis and geochemistry of Australian ochre deposits: a review of methods and prospects for geochemically finger-printing major sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.A. [National Museum of Australia, Canberra, ACT (Australia). People and Environment Section; Fankhauser, B. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Division of Archaeology and Natural History

    1997-12-31

    Full text: The potential to examine prehistoric trade, exchange systems, social boundaries or regional interconnections through characterising the major ethnographic red ochre sources has long been recognised by Australian archaeologists. Recently several teams have made a start in characterising major ochre deposits and in attempting to source ochres recovered in archaeological contexts. Here we review prospects and progress with this line of research. We present case studies of the geochemistry of several major Australian ochre deposits - including Bookartoo, Karrku and Wilgie Mia -looking at their diagenesis, geochemistry and variability and explore the application of various analytical techniques, principally XRD, SEM/EDXA, ICP/MS and stable isotope analysis. We then explore an archaeological application at the Puritjarra shelter in central Australia where ochre sourcing has major implications for understanding prehistoric land use. Our results show that a systematic program of characterising ochre sources and archaeological ochres has great potential in Australia. Major ochre sources often have distinctive chemical fingerprints, particularly if a range of analytical techniques are used in conjunction to characterise ochres. Ochre is frequently found in both late Pleistocene and Holocene contexts, often in sufficient quantity to permit systematic study of temporal changes in prehistoric systems. To fully realize the potential of this research however it will be important to work collaboratively to build up centralized data files of compositional analyses of Australian ochres.

  6. Diagenesis and geochemistry of Australian ochre deposits: a review of methods and prospects for geochemically finger-printing major sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.A.; Fankhauser, B.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The potential to examine prehistoric trade, exchange systems, social boundaries or regional interconnections through characterising the major ethnographic red ochre sources has long been recognised by Australian archaeologists. Recently several teams have made a start in characterising major ochre deposits and in attempting to source ochres recovered in archaeological contexts. Here we review prospects and progress with this line of research. We present case studies of the geochemistry of several major Australian ochre deposits - including Bookartoo, Karrku and Wilgie Mia -looking at their diagenesis, geochemistry and variability and explore the application of various analytical techniques, principally XRD, SEM/EDXA, ICP/MS and stable isotope analysis. We then explore an archaeological application at the Puritjarra shelter in central Australia where ochre sourcing has major implications for understanding prehistoric land use. Our results show that a systematic program of characterising ochre sources and archaeological ochres has great potential in Australia. Major ochre sources often have distinctive chemical fingerprints, particularly if a range of analytical techniques are used in conjunction to characterise ochres. Ochre is frequently found in both late Pleistocene and Holocene contexts, often in sufficient quantity to permit systematic study of temporal changes in prehistoric systems. To fully realize the potential of this research however it will be important to work collaboratively to build up centralized data files of compositional analyses of Australian ochres

  7. Modelling of water-gas-rock geo-chemical interactions. Application to mineral diagenesis in geological reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bildstein, Olivier

    1998-01-01

    Mineral diagenesis in tanks results from interactions between minerals, water, and possibly gases, over geological periods of time. The associated phenomena may have a crucial importance for reservoir characterization because of their impact on petrophysical properties. The objective of this research thesis is thus to develop a model which integrates geochemical functions necessary to simulate diagenetic reactions, and which is numerically efficient enough to perform the coupling with a transport model. After a recall of thermodynamic and kinetic backgrounds, the author discusses how the nature of available analytic and experimental data influenced choices made for the formalization of physical-chemical phenomena and for behaviour laws to be considered. Numerical and computational aspects are presented in the second part. The model is validated by using simple examples. The different possible steps during the kinetic competition between two mineral are highlighted, as well the competition between mineral reaction kinetics and water flow rate across the rock. Redox reactions are also considered. In the third part, the author reports the application of new model functions, and highlights the contribution of the modelling to the understanding of some complex geochemical phenomena and to the prediction of reservoir quality. The model is applied to several diagenetic transformations: cementation of dolomitic limestone by anhydride, illite precipitation, and thermal reduction of sulphates [fr

  8. Regional diagenesis of sandstone in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansley, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    The author reports that early authigenic mineral assemblages and vitroclastic textures are very well preserved in upper sandstones of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. The distributions of the authigenic minerals were controlled, in part, by chemical gradients in a large saline, alkaline lake (Lake T'oo'dichi) that existed in late Morrison time. Sandstones on lake margins were cemented by smectite and silica, whereas sandstones nearer the lake center, in which waters were most saline and alkaline, were cemented by zeolites. Diagenetic alterations in sandstones were promoted by alkaline interstitial waters that emanated from adjacent fine-grained, tuffaceous lake beds. Metastable phases that precipitated first were replaced relatively quickly by more stable, ordered phases in the geochemically favorable environment of the closed basin setting. Elevation of temperatures above the geothermal gradient was proved by the influx of warm, deep-basin waters that locally modified early diagenetic assemblages during burial diagenesis. In organic- (and commonly also uranium ore-) bearing sandstones located primarily in the southern part of the basin, complex diagenetic assemblages resulted from water/rock reactions involving soluble organic complexes

  9. Radium isotopes, alkaline earth diagenesis, and age determination of travertine from Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyoming, U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturchio, N.C.

    1990-01-01

    Travertine from active springs, former vents, and drill core was analyzed for Ra isotopes, other alkaline earth elements, and mineralogical composition. Thermal water also was analyzed. Travertine, presently being deposited, contains 3.0-15.3 pCi/g 226 Ra, and has a 228 Ra/ 226 Ra ratio identical to that in thermal water. Travertine precipitates mostly as aragonite and experiences a complete diagenetic transformation to calcite within 9 a. Systematic compositional changes associated with this diagenetic transformation are enrichment of Mg and depletion of Sr, Ba and Ra. Apparent mineral-water distribution coefficients for Mg, Sr and Ba in aragonite and calcite are within the range of those determined experimentally, implying near-equilibrium conditions and high water-rock ratios during diagenesis. Impure travertine from near the base of a section in the Y-10 drill hole (at 72.9 m depth) has a 230 Th/ 234 U isochron age of 7700±440 a. The content of 226 Ra in the normal, subhorizontally layered, porous travertine decreases with depth. The observed 226 Ra vs depth relation is consistent with continuous deposition of travertine at the site from 7700 a BP to near present at a mean rate of ∼1.0 cm/a, and indicates minimal exchange of Ra between travertine and pore water after the early diagenetic transformation of aragonite to calcite. (author)

  10. Application of organic facies in sedimentological-stratigraphical model of the Oligo-Miocene and Miocene of the Campos Basin; Aplicacao da faciologia organica no modelo sedimentologico-estratigrafico do Oligo-Mioceno e Mioceno da Bacia de Campos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca Filho, Joao Graciano; Mendonca, Joalice de Oliveira; Oliveira, Antonio Donizeti de; Torres, Jaqueline [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza. Inst. de Geociencias (Brazil)], e-mails: graciano@geologia.ufrj.br, donizeti@lafo.geologia.ufrj.br, joalice@lafo.geologia.ufrj.br, jaqueline@lafo.geologia.ufrj.br; Menezes, Taissa Rego [Centro de Pesquisas da Petrobras (CENPES), RJ (Brazil). P e D em Geociencias. Gerencia de Geoquimica], e-mail: taissamenezes@petrobras.com.br; Santos, Viviane Sampaio Santiago dos; Arienti, Luci Maria [Centro de Pesquisas da Petrobras (CENPES), RJ (Brazil). P e D em Geociencias. Gerencia de Sedimentologia e Estratigrafia], e-mails: vsss@petrobras.com.br, arienti@petrobras.com.br

    2010-05-15

    This study integrates palynofacies analyses and the sedimentological and stratigraphic model of the Oligo-Miocene/Miocene siliciclastic deposits from the stratigraphic interval of the shallow continental platform up to the slope/basin of the Oligo-Miocene/ Miocene of the Campos Basin proposed. The main objective of the palynofacies study was to characterize the particulate sedimentary organic matter to obtain information about the proximal-distal relationship and the sedimentary organic matter preservation and depositional environmental conditions. The 158 core samples collected in 29 wells of the 9 oil production fields (Albacora, Barracuda, Marlim Sul, Marlim, Voador, Marlim Leste, Moreia and Albacora Leste), were studied. This technique provides information about the proximal-distal relationship and the paleoenvironmental conditions of deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic matter, to facilitate the evaluation and comparisons between the associations of particulate organic components. Thus, the palynofacies technique can be used as another tool in the characterization of depositional systems, based on the spatial and temporal distribution of sedimentary intervals. In general the palynofacies assemblages showed the predominance of the Phytoclast Group (terrestrial derived organic matter) at various degradation stages due to the selective preservation process diagnosed in the studied samples. Some samples, revealed high dinocysts percentages indicative of transgressive depositional conditions. From the obtained data, it was possible to characterize the stratigraphic sequences according to the distribution of particulate organic content (e.g. influence of fluvio-deltaic systems, oxygen system, regressive-transgressive tendencies of each sequence). Additional analyses of Total Organic Carbon (% wt) showed the control of the particulate components from the Phytoclast Group on the TOC (% wt) content, suggesting that the relative sea-level variation curves

  11. Sedimentological characteristics and depositional processes of sediment gravity flows in rift basins: The Palaeogene Dongying and Shahejie formations, Bohai Bay Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Chen, Hongde; Zhong, Yijiang; Wang, Jun; Xu, Changgui; Chen, Anqing; Du, Xiaofeng

    2017-10-01

    Sediment gravity flow deposits are common, particularly in sandy formations, but their origin has been a matter of debate and there is no consensus about the classification of such deposits. However, sediment gravity flow sandstones are economically important and have the potential to meet a growing demand in oil and gas exploration, so there is a drive to better understand them. This study focuses on sediment gravity flow deposits identified from well cores in Palaeogene deposits from the Liaodong Bay Depression in Bohai Bay Basin, China. We classify the sediment gravity flow deposits into eight lithofacies using lithological characteristics, grain size, and sedimentary structures, and interpret the associated depositional processes. Based on the scale, spatial distribution, and contact relationships of sediment gravity flow deposits, we defined six types of lithofacies associations (LAs) that reflect transformation processes and depositional morphology: LA1 (unconfined proximal breccia deposits), LA2 (confined channel deposits), LA3 (braided-channel lobe deposits), LA4 (unconfined lobe deposits), LA5 (distal sheet deposits), and LA6 (non-channelized sheet deposits). Finally, we established three depositional models that reflect the sedimentological characteristics and depositional processes of sediment gravity flow deposits: (1) slope-apron gravel-rich depositional model, which involves cohesive debris flows deposited as LA1 and dilute turbidity currents deposited as LA5; (2) non-channelized surge-like turbidity current depositional model, which mainly comprises sandy slumping, suspended load dominated turbidity currents, and dilute turbidity currents deposited as LA5 and LA6; and (3) channelized subaqueous-fan depositional model, which consists of non-cohesive bedload dominated turbidity currents, suspended load dominated turbidity currents, and dilute turbidity currents deposited as LA2-LA5, originating from sustained extrabasinal turbidity currents

  12. D matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, Gary; Wang Liantao

    2004-01-01

    We study the properties and phenomenology of particlelike states originating from D branes whose spatial dimensions are all compactified. They are nonperturbative states in string theory and we refer to them as D matter. In contrast to other nonperturbative objects such as 't Hooft-Polyakov monopoles, D-matter states could have perturbative couplings among themselves and with ordinary matter. The lightest D particle (LDP) could be stable because it is the lightest state carrying certain (integer or discrete) quantum numbers. Depending on the string scale, they could be cold dark matter candidates with properties similar to that of WIMPs or wimpzillas. The spectrum of excited states of D matter exhibits an interesting pattern which could be distinguished from that of Kaluza-Klein modes, winding states, and string resonances. We speculate about possible signatures of D matter from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and colliders

  13. Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S. S.; Bennett, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Astrophysics conference in Maryland, organized by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Maryland. The topics covered included low mass stars as dark matter, dark matter in galaxies and clusters, cosmic microwave background anisotropy, cold and hot dark matter, and the large scale distribution and motions of galaxies. There were eighty five papers presented. Out of these, 10 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  14. Impacts of flocculation on the distribution and diagenesis of iron in boreal estuarine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jilbert

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe plays a key role in sedimentary diagenetic processes in coastal systems, participating in various redox reactions and influencing the burial of organic carbon. Large amounts of Fe enter the marine environment from boreal river catchments associated with dissolved organic matter (DOM and as colloidal Fe oxyhydroxides, principally ferrihydrite. However, the fate of this Fe pool in estuarine sediments has not been extensively studied. Here we show that flocculation processes along a salinity gradient in an estuary of the northern Baltic Sea efficiently transfer Fe and OM from the dissolved phase into particulate material that accumulates in the sediments. Flocculation of Fe and OM is partially decoupled. This is likely due to the presence of discrete colloidal ferrihydrite in the freshwater Fe pool, which responds differently from DOM to estuarine mixing. Further decoupling of Fe from OM occurs during sedimentation. While we observe a clear decline with distance offshore in the proportion of terrestrial material in the sedimentary particulate organic matter (POM pool, the distribution of flocculated Fe in sediments is modulated by focusing effects. Labile Fe phases are most abundant at a deep site in the inner basin of the estuary, consistent with input from flocculation and subsequent focusing. The majority of the labile Fe pool is present as Fe (II, including both acid-volatile sulfur (AVS-bound Fe and unsulfidized phases. The ubiquitous presence of unsulfidized Fe (II throughout the sediment column suggests Fe (II-OM complexes derived from reduction of flocculated Fe (III-OM, while other Fe (II phases are likely derived from the reduction of flocculated ferrihydrite. Depth-integrated rates of Fe (II accumulation (AVS-Fe + unsulfidized Fe (II + pyrite for the period 1970–2015 are greater in the inner basin of the estuary with respect to a site further offshore, confirming higher rates of Fe reduction in near-shore areas

  15. Impacts of flocculation on the distribution and diagenesis of iron in boreal estuarine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilbert, Tom; Asmala, Eero; Schröder, Christian; Tiihonen, Rosa; Myllykangas, Jukka-Pekka; Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Kotilainen, Aarno; Peltola, Pasi; Ekholm, Päivi; Hietanen, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    Iron (Fe) plays a key role in sedimentary diagenetic processes in coastal systems, participating in various redox reactions and influencing the burial of organic carbon. Large amounts of Fe enter the marine environment from boreal river catchments associated with dissolved organic matter (DOM) and as colloidal Fe oxyhydroxides, principally ferrihydrite. However, the fate of this Fe pool in estuarine sediments has not been extensively studied. Here we show that flocculation processes along a salinity gradient in an estuary of the northern Baltic Sea efficiently transfer Fe and OM from the dissolved phase into particulate material that accumulates in the sediments. Flocculation of Fe and OM is partially decoupled. This is likely due to the presence of discrete colloidal ferrihydrite in the freshwater Fe pool, which responds differently from DOM to estuarine mixing. Further decoupling of Fe from OM occurs during sedimentation. While we observe a clear decline with distance offshore in the proportion of terrestrial material in the sedimentary particulate organic matter (POM) pool, the distribution of flocculated Fe in sediments is modulated by focusing effects. Labile Fe phases are most abundant at a deep site in the inner basin of the estuary, consistent with input from flocculation and subsequent focusing. The majority of the labile Fe pool is present as Fe (II), including both acid-volatile sulfur (AVS)-bound Fe and unsulfidized phases. The ubiquitous presence of unsulfidized Fe (II) throughout the sediment column suggests Fe (II)-OM complexes derived from reduction of flocculated Fe (III)-OM, while other Fe (II) phases are likely derived from the reduction of flocculated ferrihydrite. Depth-integrated rates of Fe (II) accumulation (AVS-Fe + unsulfidized Fe (II) + pyrite) for the period 1970-2015 are greater in the inner basin of the estuary with respect to a site further offshore, confirming higher rates of Fe reduction in near-shore areas. Mössbauer 57Fe

  16. Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, A.; Cotti, U.; De Leon, C. L.; Raya, A; Villasenor, L.

    2008-01-01

    One of the biggest scientific mysteries of our time resides in the identification of the particles that constitute a large fraction of the mass of our Universe, generically known as dark matter. We review the observations and the experimental data that imply the existence of dark matter. We briefly discuss the properties of the two best dark-matter candidate particles and the experimental techniques presently used to try to discover them. Finally, we mention a proposed project that has recently emerged within the Mexican community to look for dark matter

  17. Sedimentological and Stratigraphic Controls on Natural Fracture Distribution in Wajid Group, SW Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaafi, Mohammed; Hariri, Mustafa; Abdullatif, Osman; Makkawi, Mohammed; Korvin, Gabor

    2016-04-01

    The Cambro-Permian Wajid Group, SW Saudi Arabia, is the main groundwater aquifer in Wadi Al-Dawasir and Najran areas. In addition, it has a reservoir potentiality for oil and natural gas in Rub' Al-Khali Basin. Wajid Group divided into four formations, ascending Dibsiyah, Sanamah, Khussyayan and Juwayl. They are mainly sandstone and exposed in an area extend from Wadi Al-Dawasir southward to Najran city and deposited within fluvial, shallow marine and glacial environments. This study aims to investigate the sedimentological and stratigraphic controls on the distribution of natural fractures within Wajid Group outcrops. A scanline sampling method was used to study the natural fracture network within Wajid Group outcrops, where the natural fractures were measured and characterized in 12 locations. Four regional natural fracture sets were observed with mean strikes of 050o, 075o, 345o, and 320o. Seven lithofacies characterized the Wajid Group at these locations and include fine-grained sandstone, coarse to pebbly sandstone, cross-bedded sandstone, massive sandstone, bioturbated sandstone, conglomerate sandstone, and conglomerate lithofacies. We found that the fine-grained and small scale cross-bedded sandstones lithofacies are characterized by high fracture intensity. In contrast, the coarse-grained sandstone and conglomerate lithofacies have low fracture intensity. Therefore, the relative fracture intensity and spacing of natural fractures within Wajid Group in the subsurface can be predicted by using the lithofacies and their depositional environments. In terms of stratigraphy, we found that the bed thickness and the stratigraphic architecture are the main controls on fractures intensity. The outcomes of this study can help to understand and predict the natural fracture distribution within the subsurface fractured sandstone hosting groundwater and hydrocarbon in Wajid and Rub' Al-Khali Basins. Hence, the finding of this study might help to explore and develop the

  18. Miocene climate variations in the Moesian Platform sediments based on sedimentology and biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butiseaca, Geanina; Vasiliev, Iuliana; Rabagia, Traian; Dinu, Corneliu; Mulch, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    During the Miocene the Moesian Platform (southern Romania and northern Bulgaria) had a complicated flexural behavior due to the mobility of the nearby orogens. The different behavior induced varying sediment charges, sediment distribution and sediment types. The northern part of the study area (on which the Dacian Basin is overlaid) is characterized by siliciclastic units with dominantly deep facieses, while the southern part is characterized by carbonate production in shallower basin waters. Since the Miocene, the Dacian and Black Sea basins have been highly sensitive to fluctuations in the hydrological cycle. To establish the dynamic evolution of the basin and the climate variations during the Miocene, we have sampled both northern and southern margins of the basin. To discriminate between the tectonic imprint and the eustatic influence over the sedimentation rate we have chosen a multidisciplinary approach including sedimentology, tectonics and organic geochemistry based reconstructions. The sedimentary succession is interrupted by few unconformities correspondent with the main phases of orogeny (in the Carpathian Foredeep) while the southern part seems to have been exposed more often expressed in the geological record by a higher number of unconformities and paleo-soils levels. The n-alkanes distribution recovered from the lipids extracted from the sedimentary rocks indicates a mixture of terrestrial and marine input in the northern, Romanian, closer to Carpathians, part of the Dacian Basin. Surprisingly, the southern, Bulgarian side, showed a more predominant terrestrial input (with higher contribution of the long chain n-alkanes) at least for the Sarmatian (arround 10 Ma). The estimated paleotemperatures based on branched GDGT's indicate much warmer conditions than present day, up to a value of 20 C mean annual temperatures. We will further investigate the paleoenvironmental changes during the latest Miocene of the Dacian basin, using the biomarker approach

  19. The Ardross reservoir gridblock analogue: Sedimentology, statistical representivity, and flow upscaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringrose, P.; Pickup, G.; Jensen, J. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    We have used a reservoir gridblock-sized outcrop (10m by 100m) of fluvio-deltaic sandstones to evaluate the importance of internal heterogeneity for a hypothetical waterflood displacement process. Using a dataset based on probe permeameter measurements taken from two vertical transacts representing {open_quotes}wells{close_quotes} (5cm sampling) and one {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} sample (exhaustive 1mm-spaced sampling), we evaluate the permeability variability at different lengthscales, the correlation characteristics (structure of the variogram, function), and larger-scale trends. We then relate these statistical measures to the sedimentology. We show how the sediment architecture influences the effective tensor permeability at the lamina and bed scale, and then calculate the effective relative permeability functions for a waterflood. We compare the degree of oil recovery from the formation: (a) using averaged borehole data and no geological structure, and (b) modelling the sediment architecture of the interwell volume using mixed stochastic/deterministic methods. We find that the sediment architecture has an important effect on flow performance, mainly due to bedscale capillary trapping and a consequent reduction in the effective oil mobility. The predicted oil recovery differs by 18% when these small-scale effects are included in the model. Traditional reservoir engineering methods, using averages permeability values, only prove acceptable in high-permeability and low-heterogeneity zones. The main outstanding challenge, represented by this illustration of sub-gridblock scale heterogeneity, is how to capture the relevant geological structure along with the inherent geo-statistical variability. An approach to this problem is proposed.

  20. Geomorphic and sedimentologic evidence for the separation of Lake Superior from Lake Michigan and Huron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J.W.; Thompson, T.A.; Wilcox, D.A.; Baedke, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    A common break was recognized in four Lake Superior strandplain sequences using geomorphic and sedimentologic characteristics. Strandplains were divided into lakeward and landward sets of beach ridges using aerial photographs and topographic surveys to identify similar surficial features and core data to identify similar subsurface features. Cross-strandplain, elevation-trend changes from a lowering towards the lake in the landward set of beach ridges to a rise or reduction of slope towards the lake in the lakeward set of beach ridges indicates that the break is associated with an outlet change for Lake Superior. Correlation of this break between study sites and age model results for the strandplain sequences suggest that the outlet change occurred sometime after about 2,400 calendar years ago (after the Algoma phase). Age model results from one site (Grand Traverse Bay) suggest an alternate age closer to about 1,200 calendar years ago but age models need to be investigated further. The landward part of the strandplain was deposited when water levels were common in all three upper Great Lakes basins (Superior, Huron, and Michigan) and drained through the Port Huron/Sarnia outlet. The lakeward part was deposited after the Sault outlet started to help regulate water levels in the Lake Superior basin. The landward beach ridges are commonly better defined and continuous across the embayments, more numerous, larger in relief, wider, have greater vegetation density, and intervening swales contain more standing water and peat than the lakeward set. Changes in drainage patterns, foreshore sediment thickness and grain size help in identifying the break between sets in the strandplain sequences. Investigation of these breaks may help identify possible gaps in the record or missing ridges in strandplain sequences that may not be apparent when viewing age distributions and may justify the need for multiple age and glacial isostatic adjustment models. ?? 2006 Springer Science

  1. Sedimentological and Scanning Electron Miscroscopic Descriptions of Afowo Oil Sand Deposits, South Western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinmosin A

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentological and scanning electron microscopic analyses of some shallow reservoir tar sand samples in parts of Southwestern Nigeria were carried out with the aim of characterizing the reservoir properties in relation to bitumen saturation and recovery efficiency. The production of impregnated tar from the sands requires the reservoir to be of good quality. A total of thirty samples were collected at different localities within the tar sand belt (ten out of these samples were selected for various reservoir quality analyses based on their textural homogeneity. The result of particle size distribution study showed that bulk of the sands is medium – coarse grained and moderately sorted. The grain morphologies are of low to high sphericity with shapes generally sub-angular to sub-rounded, implying that the sands have undergone a fairly long transportation history with depositional energy having a moderate to high velocity. The quartz content was made up of about 96% of the total mineralogical components; the sediments of the Afowo Formation can be described to be mineralogically and texturally stable. The result of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis revealed that the oil sands contained minerals which had been precipitated and occurred as pore filling cement; these minerals include sheet kaolinite, block kaolinite, vermiform kaolinite, pyrite crystals and quartz. The SEM images also showed micro-pores ranging from 0.057µm to 0.446µm and fractures. The study showed that the clay minerals contained in the Afowo reservoir rocks were mainly kaolinite. Kaoline unlike some other clays (e.g Montimorillonite does not swell with water, hence it is not expected to have any negative effects on the reservoir quality, especially during enhanced oil recovery operations.

  2. Cryostratigraphy, sedimentology, and the late Quaternary evolution of the Zackenberg River delta, northeast Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Gilbert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Zackenberg River delta is located in northeast Greenland (74°30′ N, 20°30′ E at the outlet of the Zackenberg fjord valley. The fjord-valley fill consists of a series of terraced deltaic deposits (ca. 2 km2 formed during relative sea-level (RSL fall. We investigated the deposits using sedimentological and cryostratigraphic techniques together with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL dating. We identify four facies associations in sections (4 to 22 m in height exposed along the modern Zackenberg River and coast. Facies associations relate to (I overriding glaciers, (II retreating glaciers and quiescent glaciomarine conditions, (III delta progradation in a fjord valley, and (IV fluvial activity and niveo-aeolian processes. Pore, layered, and suspended cryofacies are identified in two 20 m deep ice-bonded sediment cores. The cryofacies distribution, together with low overall ground-ice content, indicates that permafrost is predominately epigenetic in these deposits. Fourteen OSL ages constrain the deposition of the cored deposits to between approximately 13 and 11 ka, immediately following deglaciation. The timing of permafrost aggradation was closely related to delta progradation and began following the subaerial exposure of the delta plain (ca. 11 ka. Our results reveal information concerning the interplay between deglaciation, RSL change, sedimentation, permafrost aggradation, and the timing of these events. These findings have implications for the timing and mode of permafrost aggradation in other fjord valleys in northeast Greenland.

  3. Paleohydrology and paleoenvironments at Bir Sahara: Pleistocene lithostratigraphy and sedimentology in the southern Egyptian Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christopher L.; Schild, Romuald

    2017-12-01

    The Bir Sahara area contains a remarkable record of Middle and Late Pleistocene hydrologic and environmental conditions for Saharan North Africa, based on lithostratigraphic and sedimentologic evidence from basin-fill deposits. Some of the deposits contain Lower Paleolithic (Acheulean) or Middle Paleolithic artifacts that help to constrain their age, since Acheulian artifacts are assigned to the Middle Pleistocene, while Middle Paleolithic artifacts are limited to either the Middle or Late Pleistocene. Locality BS-14 is in the southern part of Bir Sahara, while localities E-88-15, E-88-2, BS-13, and BS-16 are situated in the south-central part of the deflational basin, closer to the present-day water-hole. Lowered groundwater conditions during arid intervals resulted in erosional topographic basins. These deflational basins were later filled with sediments associated with wetter hydrologic conditions. The oldest studied sedimentary sequence in the Bir Sahara depression (BS-14) contains in situ Acheulian artifacts. Acheulian handaxes are found in sands underlying carbonates that are interpreted as evidence of spring-fed pond and marsh environments during a Middle Pleistocene wet interval. At the E-88-15 locality, the stratigraphic sequence documents deposition in a possible perennial pond or small lake that varied in extent and depth and is associated with Middle Paleolithic artifacts. At E-88-12 and BS-13, lateral and vertical variations in the lithofacies of the basin-fill sediments provide additional records of changing hydrologic conditions during the Late Pleistocene. These hydrologic conditions appear to reflect variations in water-table levels related to groundwater recharge and, at times, local rains.

  4. Sedimentology and chemostratigraphy of a Valanginian carbonate succession from the Baja Guajira Basin, northern Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Silva-Tamayo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The Kesima Member of the Palanz Formation constitutes the first record of Cretaceous marine sedimentation along the Baja Guajira Basin, northern Colombia. Sedimentologic and petrographic analyses suggest a deposition along a coral reef dominated rimmed carbonate platform. 87Sr/86Sr values between 0.707350 and 0.707400 suggest a Valanginian (136 - 132 Ma depositional age for the Kesima Member. A positive anomaly on the δ13C values of ~2.2‰ suggests that this rimmed carbonate platform registered the Valanginian Weissert oceanic anoxic event. Although the Weissert oceanic anoxic event resulted on a major drowning of the Circum Tethyan carbonate platforms, it seems to have not affected those from the Circum Caribbean, where several shallow marine carbonate platform successions crop out. The Kesima Member displays a change from an organically produced carbonate factory into an inorganically produced, ooids dominated, carbonate factory during the peak of the Weissert event δ13C anomaly. This change in the carbonate factory, which may represent a major perturbation of the marine carbonate budget along tropical settings during the Weissert event, coincides with a major decrease in global sea level. Finally, the age of the Kesima Member is considerably older than that of other Cretaceous carbonate successions cropping out in other northern South America sedimentary basins (i.e. Perija-Merida, Cesar-Rancheria. Differences in the timing of the Cretaceous marine incursion along northern South America, together with the differences in the Triassic-Jurassic stratigraphy of several sedimentary basins in northern South America, suggest that the Baja Guajira and Maracaibo basins remained as an isolated tectonic block separated from northern South America after the breakup of Pangea.

  5. The sedimentology of uranium-bearing sandstones on the farm Kaffersfontein 328, Beaufort West area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D.I.

    1979-10-01

    The sedimentology of uranium-bearing sandstones on the farm Kaffersfontein 328 was studied by use of 23 vertical profiles measured across and adjacent to 3 mineralised deposits. The profiles consist of 18 field sections and 5 borehole logs. The vertical profiles basically consist of a succession of sedimentary facies. A total of 18 facies were recognised within the fluvial sandstone sequence according to the criteria of grain-size and sedimentary structures. Transitions between the facies were subjected to a Markov chain analysis in order to delineate Markov-dependent transitions. Uranium mineralisation coincides with areas of thicker sandstone, usually where channel over-deepening has taken place. It always occurs above the base of a channel, which often marks the base of the fluvial sandstone sequence. Irregularities in the base of the channel probably caused interruptions to the flow of uraniferous solutions and allowed sufficient time for the precipitation of the uranium. Carbonaceous debris is always associated with the mineralisation and most likely acted as an indirect reductant for the precipitation of uranium from solution. The direct reductant was most probably H 2 S produced by anaerobic bacteria acting on the carbonaceous debris. The mineralisation is confined to the coarser-grained sedimentary facies, which suggests that permeability was an important control on the mineralisation. These facies probably acted as suitable aquifers for the transport of uraniferous solutions. Horizontally bedded sandstone facies comprises 41 per cent of the total cumulative thickness of mineralisation. This facies represents a higher stream power and may consequently contain more carbonaceous material derived from plants, which were eroded from upstream areas. The nature of the bedding may also have provided a more effective permeability zone for the transport of uraniferous solutions prior to precipitation of the uranium

  6. GEOMORPHOLOGY AND SEDIMENTOLOGY OF UNION GLACIER AREA, ELLSWORTH MOUNTAINS, OCCIDENTAL ANTARCTICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa do Couto Silva Costa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The work aims to investigate the geomorphological and sedimentological aspects of Union Glacier area (79°45’00’’S; 82°30’00’’W, southern sector of Ellsworth Mountains. Geomorphological cartography based on 15 m ASTER (2010 satellite imagery and field works were carried out during the Brazilian expedition (2011/2012 enabled the identification of morainic formations: ice-cored hummock moraines, supraglacial moraines, and recession moraines in the interior of the valleys. With the exception of the latter one, all types of moraines have been developed on the blue-ice areas. The evidence for paleo wet-based glacial conditions is reconstructed from a range of geomorphological record, including exposed abrasion marks, striations and glaciotectonic deformation. This type of deformation is represented by lee sides of oversteepening bedrock promontories which follow the tributaries of glaciers ice flow. Glacial sediments were collected from the moraines for granulometric and morphometric analyses. They show the prevalence of sandy gravel and sand texture, low quantity of fine fractions, and absence of attributes such as striated and faceted clasts, which indicate, on the other side, low-sediment transport capacity from the ice sheet bottom. It is inferred that the moraine debris are originated from local sources. Weathering action and constant katabatic winds are possibly the major agents of transport and alteration of the exposed sediments. The geomorphological features reveal an ancient thicker ice sheet, and sedimentary characteristics of the morainic formations reveal a latter thinner ice sheet in this sector of Ellsworth Mountains.

  7. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of the Nkporo Group (Campanian–Maastrichtian, Anambra Basin, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley O. Odunze

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Integration of sedimentologic and sequence stratigraphic interpretations of the Nkporo Group has provided the basis for a basin-wide framework for prediction of potential source, seal and reservoir rocks in the Anambra Basin, Nigeria. Lithofacies and biostratigraphic data show that the Nkporo Group in the Anambra Basin contains three main facies associations (fluvio-deltaic facies, estuarine central basin/shallow shelf facies and estuarine channel fill facies that determine the reservoir containers, flow units and seals. The units are arranged to form two stratigraphic sequences represented by the Nkporo Shale–Owelli Sandstone and Owelli Sandstone–Enugu Shale successions, respectively. The transgressive systems tract in each sequence comprises coarse-grained fluvio-deltaic sandstone and an overlying open marine black carbonaceous mud rock. The highstand systems tracts comprise delta front deposits with average porosity, permeability and net-to-gross values estimated in the ranges of 30%, 3000 md and 0.9, respectively. The fluvio-deltaic and delta front facies which are encased in organically rich estuarine central basin/shallow shelf mud rocks are likely the potential reservoirs. Trapping capacity is enhanced by the presence of several N–S trending normal faults, and other microstructures related to the post-Santonian tensional regime in the Benue. The new information presented in this paper on potential seal, source and reservoir lithofacies within the Nkporo Group should serve as a useful contribution to the geological modelling of reservoirs within the Late Cretaceous–Paleocene succession in the Anambra Basin.

  8. The sedimentological characteristics of microbialites of the Cambrian in the vicinity of Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Ye Wu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With oil and gas exploration transferring to deeper and more ancient marine strata, more researches have been conducted about the Meso–Neoproterozoic and Cambrian microbial carbonate rocks by petroleum geologists. The Cambrian deposits experienced the first transgression of the Paleozoic, with shallow marine facies depositing in most areas, which are favorable for different kinds of biological reproduction. The Lower Cambrian in Beijing area is lithologically dominated by purple red shales interbedded with limestones, the Middle Cambrian is mainly composed of thick oolitic limestones, and the Upper Cambrian consists of thin limestones and flat-pebble conglomerates. Two beds of microbial carbonate rocks were discovered in the Cambrian outcrops in the vicinity of Beijing. One is from the Zhangxia Formation of Middle Cambrian, and the other is from the Gushan Formation of Upper Cambrian. The microbialites are characterized by combination of multiple stromatolites forming different bioherms. The bioherms are mostly in oval shape and with different sizes, which are 3–4 m long, and 1–3 m high. The surrounding strata beneath the bioherms are oolitic limestones. A central core of flat-pebble conglomerates occurred within each bioherm. Wavy or columnar stromatolites grow on the basis of flat-pebble conglomerates, with dentate erosional surfaces. The bioherm carbonate rocks are interpreted as products from a deep ramp sedimentary environment where potential oil and gas reservoirs can be found. The analysis of sedimentological characteristics of bioherm carbonate rocks and its lithofacies palaeogeography has significant implication for petroleum exploration. Research on geological record of microbialites is beneficial to investigating the Earth evolution, biodiversity, palaeoenvironment and palaeoclimate change, as well as biological extinction event during geological transitions. It also gives warning to human beings of modern biological crisis.

  9. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and eruptive mechanisms in the tuff cone of El Golfo (Lanzarote, Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Martí, Joan; Geyer, Adelina

    2013-07-01

    The tuff cone of El Golfo on the western coast of Lanzarote (Canary Islands) is a typical hydrovolcanic edifice. Along with other edifices of the same age, it was constructed along a fracture oriented NEE-SWW that coincides with the main structural trend of recent volcanism in this part of the island. We conducted a detailed stratigraphic study of the succession of deposits present in this tuff cone and here interpret them in light of the depositional processes and eruptive dynamics that we were able to infer. The eruptive sequence is represented by a succession of pyroclastic deposits, most of which were emplaced by flow, plus a number of air-fall deposits and ballistic blocks and bombs. We distinguished five different eruptive/depositional stages on the basis of differences in inferred current flow regimes and fragmentation efficiencies represented by the resulting deposits; the different stages may be related to variations in the explosive energy. Eight lithofacies were identified based on sedimentary discontinuities, grain size, components, variations in primary laminations and bedforms. The volcanic edifice was constructed very rapidly around the vent, and this is inferred to have controlled the amount of water that was able to enter the eruption conduit. The sedimentological characteristics of the deposits and the nature and distribution of palagonitic alteration suggest that most of the pyroclastic succession in El Golfo was deposited in a subaerial environment. This type of hydrovolcanic explosive activity is common in the coastal zones of Lanzarote and the other Canary Islands and is one of the main potential hazards that could threaten the human population of this archipelago. Detailed studies of these hydrovolcanic eruptions such as the one we present here can help volcanologists understand the hazards that this type of eruption can generate and provide essential information for undertaking risk assessment in similar volcanic environments.

  10. Geochemical and multi-isotopic (87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 238U/235U) perspectives of sediment sources, depositional conditions, and diagenesis of the Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thai T.; Gardiner, James B.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate sediment sources, depositional conditions and diagenetic processes affecting the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin, eastern USA, a major target of natural gas exploration. Multiple proxies, including trace metal contents, rare earth elements (REE), the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope systems, and U isotopes were applied to whole rock digestions and sequentially extracted fractions of the Marcellus shale and adjacent units from two locations in the Appalachian Basin. The narrow range of εNd values (from -7.8 to -6.4 at 390 Ma) is consistent with derivation of the clastic sedimentary component of the Marcellus Shale from a well-mixed source of fluvial and eolian material of the Grenville orogenic belt, and indicate minimal post-depositional alteration of the Sm-Nd system. While silicate minerals host >80% of the REE in the shale, data from sequentially extracted fractions reflect post-depositional modifications at the mineralogical scale, which is not observed in whole rock REE patterns. Limestone units thought to have formed under open ocean (oxic) conditions have δ238U values and REE patterns consistent with modern seawater. The δ238U values in whole rock shale and authigenic phases are greater than those of modern seawater and the upper crust. The δ238U values of reduced phases (the oxidizable fraction consisting of organics and sulfide minerals) are ∼0.6‰ greater than that of modern seawater. Bulk shale and carbonate cement extracted from the shale have similar δ238U values, and are greater than δ238U values of adjacent limestone units. We suggest these trends are due to the accumulation of chemically and, more likely, biologically reduced U from anoxic to euxinic bottom water as well as the influence of diagenetic reactions between pore fluids and surrounding sediment and organic matter during diagenesis and catagenesis.

  11. Deposition and diagenesis of the Hibernia member, Jeanne d'Arc Basin, offshore Newfoundland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, C E

    1987-01-01

    The Jeanne d'Arc Basin was formed during Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous time by two episodes of rifting that caused repeated movement on one set of basin-forming faults. This resulted in up to 14 km of sediments, some of which contain huge reserves of hydrocarbons. The Hibernia member, the subject of this thesis, is a sandstone dominated zone within this basin-fill that contains a high proportion of the discovered hydrocarbons. Deposition of the Hibernia member is a result of two simultaneous and related events during Tithonian to Berriasian time: deep erosion of upthrown sides of the fault blocks, and a global eustatic rise of sea level. The provenance and depositional environment are interpreted from the examination of cores, cuttings, microfossils, and thin sections. The siliciclastics were derived from a southern source of sediments and sedimentary rocks that had an original metamorphic origin. They were deposited in a non-marine to brackish water environment of channels and associated floodplains in an anastomosed fluvial system. Rates of sedimentation and subsidence were high, and coupled with a contemporaneous eustatic sea level rise resulted in rapid aggradation and a thick sequence. The center of the basin currently has the highest geothermal gradient and thinnest oil window. Burial and thermal history curves show that the source rocks reached maturity first at the Ben Nevis well; early-formed hydrocarbons may have been lost during tectonic movements in Albian time. The source rocks underlying the Hibernia field are presently at peak oil-generating capability. Organic acids formed during the maturation of organic matter have produced excellent secondary porosity in the sandstones of the Hibernia field. However, at Ben Nevis, subsequent thermal degradation of carboxylic acids allowed late-stage cementation by ferroan calcite cement, destroying the reservoir porosity. 63 refs., 79 figs., 1 tab

  12. A 2D hydrodynamic-sedimentological model for gravel-bed rivers. Part I: theory and validation

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Kaless; Mario A. Lenzi; Luca Mao

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel 2D-depth average model especially developed for gravel-bed rivers, named Lican-Leufú (Lican=pebble and Leufu=river, in Mapuche’s language, the native inhabitants of Central Patagonia, Argentina). The model consists of three components: a hydrodynamic, a sedimentological, and a morphological model. The flow of water is described by the depth-averaged Reynolds equations for unsteady, free-surface, shallow water flows. It includes the standard k-e model for turbulence...

  13. Sedimentology of the Teekloof formation to the east of Aberdeen (C.P.) with reference to uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmonds, A.L.E.

    1982-01-01

    An area to the immediate east of Aberdeen (C.P.), banded in the north by the Rooiberge and to the east by the Sundays River, has been sedimentologically studied. A notable feature of the sediments investigated, is the presence of linear zones of increased sandstone. Some of the sediments also showed an exessive volume of argillaceous rocks. The sandstones cropping out in the Aberdeen District may be classified as lithic arkoses. Due to the manner in which the detrital grains appear to 'float' in calcite, an expansive growth mechanism is envisaged. This implies early crystallization of calcite, and emplacement of uranium

  14. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of the Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation tight sandstones in the southern Songliao Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Kelai; Cao, Yingchang; Jahren, Jens; Zhu, Rukai; Bjørlykke, Knut; Haile, Beyene Girma; Zheng, Lijing; Hellevang, Helge

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation in the southern Songliao Basin is the typical tight oil sandstone in China. For effective exploration, appraisal and production from such a tight oil sandstone, the diagenesis and reservoir quality must be thoroughly studied first. The tight oil sandstone has been examined by a variety of methods, including core and thin section observation, XRD, SEM, CL, fluorescence, electron probing analysis, fluid inclusion and isotope testing and quantitative determination of reservoir properties. The sandstones are mostly lithic arkoses and feldspathic litharenites with fine to medium grain size and moderate to good sorting. The sandstones are dominated by feldspar, quartz, and volcanic rock fragments showing various stages of disintegration. The reservoir properties are quite poor, with low porosity (average 8.54%) and permeability (average 0.493 mD), small pore-throat radius (average 0.206 μm) and high displacement pressure (mostly higher than 1 MPa). The tight sandstone reservoirs have undergone significant diagenetic alterations such as compaction, feldspar dissolution, quartz cementation, carbonate cementation (mainly ferrocalcite and ankerite) and clay mineral alteration. As to the onset time, the oil emplacement was prior to the carbonate cementation but posterior to the quartz cementation and feldspar dissolution. The smectite to illite reaction and pressure solution at stylolites provide a most important silica sources for quartz cementation. Carbonate cements increase towards interbedded mudstones. Mechanical compaction has played a more important role than cementation in destroying the reservoir quality of the K1q4 sandstone reservoirs. Mixed-layer illite/smectite and illite reduced the porosity and permeability significantly, while chlorite preserved the porosity and permeability since it tends to be oil wet so that later carbonate cementation can be inhibited to some extent. It is likely that the oil emplacement occurred

  15. Compositional variations and differential diagenesis in Miocene turbidites from the western coast of Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Sonja; Westphal, Hildegard; Munnecke, Axel; Mateu Vicens, Guillem

    2010-05-01

    Compositional variations and differential diagenesis in Miocene turbidites from the western coast of Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) Sonja Felder (1), Hildegard Westphal (1), Axel Munnecke (2), Guillem Mateu Vicens (1,3) (1) MARUM and Department of Geosciences, Universität Bremen, Leobener Straße, 28359 Bremen, Germany (2) GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Loewenichstr. 28, 91054 Erlangen, Germany (3) Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Roma "La Sapienza", Ple Aldo 7 Moro, 5. I-00185 Roma, Italy Cyclic alternations of limestone and marl beds crop out along the western coast of the Island of Mallorca. This Miocene succession is traditionally interpreted to represent more weathering-resistant turbidites interlayered by softer hemipelagic background sediment. However, the cementation patterns that dominate the appearance of the outcrop do not always consistently follow sedimentary layering; locally the cemented beds are systematically oblique to the sedimentary layers. Compositional studies demonstrate that differences in non-carbonate fraction, carbonate concentration and fossil content (e.g. foraminiferal assemblages) trace sedimentary bedding, regardless the diagenetic style. Limestone versus marl lithology, in contrast, is defined by the diagenetic style, tight cementation by calcite cements in the limestones versus low porosity and compaction in the marls. The reason for this striking pattern of diagenetic bedding cross-cutting sedimentary layers is assumed to be related to tectonic fracturing, opening pathways for diagenetic fluids. This example cautions the straight-forward interpretation of limestone-marl alternations as direct witnesses of environmental or climatic variations.

  16. Cadmium Diagenesis in Polluted Sediments of a Tropical Estuary of SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchineelam, S. R.; Metzger, E.; Jézéquel, D.; Sarazin, G.; Smoak, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    of 20pM. The downward diffusion of dissolved Cd in the pore water probably facilitated the formation of Cd sulfide or adsorption on particulate matter.

  17. Gaseous Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    aseous Matter focuses on the many important discoveries that led to the scientific interpretation of matter in the gaseous state. This new, full-color resource describes the basic characteristics and properties of several important gases, including air, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and nitrogen. The nature and scope of the science of fluids is discussed in great detail, highlighting the most important scientific principles upon which the field is based. Chapters include:. Gaseous Matter An Initial Perspective. Physical Characteristics of Gases. The Rise of the Science of Gases. Kinetic Theory of

  18. Biogeomorphological influence of slope processes and sedimentology on vascular talus vegetation in the southern Cascades, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Francisco L.

    2012-02-01

    The vascular vegetation of alpine talus slopes between 2035 and 3095 m altitude was studied at Lassen Volcanic National Park (California) in the Cascade Range. Taluses show a diverse flora, with 79 plant species; growth forms include coniferous trees, shrubs, suffrutices, herbs, graminoids, and ferns. Spatial patterns of plant distribution were studied along 40 point-intercept transects. Plant cover was low (0-32.7%) on all slopes, spatially variable, and showed no consistent trends. Sedimentological characteristics were determined by photosieving next to 1500 plants; this census indicated preferential plant growth on blocks and cobbles, with 43.2% and 23.3% of the plants growing on these stones, respectively; fewer specimens were rooted on pebbles (13%) or on stone-free gravel areas (20.5%). Growth forms displayed different substrate preferences: 92.5% of the shrubs and 83% of the suffrutices colonized blocks or cobbles, but only 57.2% of the herbs and 59.8% of the graminoids grew on large stones. Plants are associated with large clasts because (1) coarse talus is more stable than fine sediment areas, which are more frequently disturbed by various geomorphic processes, and (2) large stones help conserve substrate water beneath them while moisture quickly evaporates from fine debris. Root patterns were studied for 30 plant species; 10 specimens for each species were excavated and inspected, and several root growth ratios calculated. All species exhibited pronounced root asymmetry, as roots for most plants grew upslope from their shoot base. For 23 species, all specimens had 100% of their roots growing upslope; for the other 7 species, 92.2-99.3% of below-ground biomass extended uphill. This uneven root distribution is ascribed to continual substrate instability and resulting talus shift; as cascading debris progressively buries roots and stems, plants are gradually pushed and/or stretched downhill. Various disturbance events affect root development. Slope erosion

  19. Sedimentological imprint on subseafloor microbial communities in Western Mediterranean Sea Quaternary sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, M.-C.; Rabineau, M.; Droz, L.; Révillon, S.; Ghiglione, J.-F.; Dennielou, B.; Jorry, S.-J.; Kallmeyer, J.; Etoubleau, J.; Pignet, P.; Crassous, P.; Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O.; Laugier, J.; Guégan, M.; Godfroy, A.; Alain, K.

    2012-09-01

    ) strongly influenced the community structure. In contrast, within the Gulf of Lion core, characterized by a homogeneous lithological structure of upper-slope environment, most detected groups were Bacteroidetes and, to a lesser extent, Betaproteobacteria. At both site, the detection of Betaproteobacteria coincided with increased terrestrial inputs, as confirmed by the geochemical measurements (Si, Sr, Ti and Ca). In the Gulf of Lion, geochemical parameters were also found to drive microbial community composition. Taken together, our data suggest that the palaeoenvironmental history of erosion and deposition recorded in the Western Mediterranean Sea sediments has left its imprint on the sedimentological context for microbial habitability, and then indirectly on structure and composition of the microbial communities during the late Quaternary.

  20. Earthquake and human impact on the sedimentology and geochemistry of Ahuriri Estuary, Hawke's Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chague-Goff, C.; Nichol, S.L.; Ditchburn, R.G.; Trompetter, W.J.; Sutherland, V.T.

    1998-01-01

    Three cores were collected from the intertidal and salt marsh sediments in Ahuriri Estuary, Hawke's Bay, and analysed by sedimentological, chemical and geochronological techniques. Signatures of various events, of both natural and anthropogenic origin, were identified. Evidence for the 1931 Hawke's Bay earthquake, which resulted in an uplift of one to two metres in the Napier area, is given by a change in grainsize distribution in a core from the southern shore of the Lower Estuary. The change to a high energy environment, similar to the present one in the Lower Estuary, has resulted in deposition of sand over fine silt. The data suggest increased sediment accumulation rates following the uplift event, which might be attributed to increased erosion in the upper catchment. There is no evidence of the earthquake at the two other sites sampled, which is probably due to their more sheltered location in the estuary. Post-European settlement impact is mainly restricted to the Lower Estuary, where increased concentrations of Zn, Cr, Pb and Cu may be due to industrial discharges. Evidence of agricultural runoff is given by an increase in Cu concentrations near the Poraiti Hills. The chemical data (Cl and S) suggest a change in the depositional environment in the Upper Estuary due to increased freshwater influx and/or decrease in seawater influence. Dating by 210 Pb infers that this occurred prior to 1931, but the origin and timing of the event are still to be determined. Sediment accumulation rates have averaged 2.5 mm/yr for the last 45 years in the Lower Estuary and 3.8 mm/yr for the last 70 years or so in the Upper Estuary. The variation probably reflects the difference in depositional environment, from a high energy environment dominated by tidal and wave action to a low energy environment with additional organic and fine sediment input from stream runoff. The various signatures identified are based on known events but may be used for identifying events in other less

  1. Sedimentology, sequence-stratigraphy, and geochemical variations in the Mesoproterozoic Nonesuch Formation, northern Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury Stewart, Esther; Mauk, Jeffrey L.

    2017-01-01

    We use core descriptions and portable X-ray fluorescence analyses to identify lithofacies and stratigraphic surfaces for the Mesoproterozoic Nonesuch Formation within the Ashland syncline, Wisconsin. We group lithofacies into facies associations and construct a sequence stratigraphic framework based on lithofacies stacking and stratigraphic surfaces. The fluvial-alluvial facies association (upper Copper Harbor Conglomerate) is overlain across a transgressive surface by the fluctuating-profundal facies association (lower Nonesuch Formation). The fluctuating-profundal facies association comprises a retrogradational sequence set overlain across a maximum flooding surface by an aggradational-progradational sequence set comprising fluctuating-profundal, fluvial-lacustrine, and fluvial-alluvial facies associations (middle Nonesuch through lower Freda Formations). Lithogeochemistry supports sedimentologic and stratigraphic interpretations. Fe/S molar ratios reflect the oxidation state of the lithofacies; values are most depleted above the maximum flooding surface where lithofacies are chemically reduced and are greatest in the chemically oxidized lithofacies. Si/Al and Zr/Al molar ratios reflect the relative abundance of detrital heavy minerals vs. clay minerals; greater values correlate with larger grain size. Vertical facies association stacking records depositional environments that evolved from fluvial and alluvial, to balanced-fill lake, to overfilled lake, and returning to fluvial and alluvial. Elsewhere in the basin, where accommodation was greatest, some volume of fluvial-lacustrine facies is likely present below the transgressive stratigraphic surface. This succession of continental and lake-basin types indicates a predominant tectonic driver of basin evolution. Lithofacies distribution and geochemistry indicate deposition within an asymmetric half-graben bounded on the east by a west-dipping growth fault. While facies assemblages are lacustrine and continental

  2. Sedimentology of the lower Karoo Supergroup fluvial strata in the Tuli Basin, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordy, Emese M.; Catuneanu, Octavian

    2002-11-01

    The Karoo Supergroup in the Tuli Basin (South Africa) consists of a sedimentary sequence (˜450-500 m) composed of four stratigraphic units, namely the informal Basal, Middle and Upper Units, and the formal Clarens Formation. The units were deposited in continental settings from approximately Late Carboniferous to Middle Jurassic. This paper focuses on the ˜60-m-thick Basal Unit, which was examined in terms of sedimentary facies and palaeo-environments based on evidence provided by primary sedimentary structures, palaeo-flow measurements, palaeontological findings, borehole data (59 core descriptions) and stratigraphic relations. Three main facies associations have been identified: (i) gravelstone (breccias and conglomerate-breccias), (ii) sandstone and (iii) fine-grained sedimentary rocks. The coarser facies are interpreted as colluvial fan deposits, possibly associated with glaciogenic diamictites. The sandstone facies association is mainly attributed to channel fills of low sinuosity, braided fluvial systems. The coal-bearing finer-grained facies are interpreted as overbank and thaw-lake deposits, and represent the lower energy correlatives of the sandy channel fills. Sediment aggradation in this fluvio-lacustrine system took place under cold climatic conditions, with floating lake ice likely associated with lacustrine environments. Palaeo-current indicators suggest that the highly weathered, quartz-vein-rich metamorphic rock source of the Basal Unit was situated east-northeast of the study area. The accumulation of the Basal Unit took place within the back-bulge depozone of the Karoo foreland system. In addition to flexural subsidence, the amount of accommodation in this tectonic setting was also possibly modified by extensional tectonism in the later stages of the basin development. Based on sedimentological and biostratigraphic evidence, the coal-bearing fine-grained facies association displays strong similarities with the Vryheid Formation of the main Karoo

  3. Sedimentology, tephrostratigraphy, and chronology of the DEEP site sediment record, Lake Ohrid (Albania, FYROM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicher, Niklas; Wagner, Bernd; Francke, Alexander; Just, Janna; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Sulpizio, Roberto; Giaccio, Biagio; Nomade, Sebastien

    2017-04-01

    Lake Ohrid, located on the Balkan Peninsula, is one of the very few lakes in the world that provides a continuous and high-resolution record of environmental change of >1.3 Ma. The sedimentary archive was drilled in spring 2013 within the scope of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and the Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO) project in order to investigate local and regional geological and paleoclimatic processes, as well as triggers of evolutionary patterns and endemic biodiversity. The continuous composite profile (584 m) of the main drill site DEEP was logged (XRF, MSCL) and subsampled for biogeochemical (TIC, TOC, TN, TS) and sedimentological (grain size) analyses. The lithology of the DEEP site indicates that the history of Lake Ohrid can roughly be separated into two parts, with the older section between 584 and 450 m depth being characterised by a sedimentary facies indicating shallow water conditions, which is likely younger than ca. 1.9 Ma. In the lowermost few meters of the succession gravels and pebbles hampered a deeper drilling penetration and indicate that fluvial conditions existed during the onset of lake formation. Together with geotectonic, seismic, and biological information, the data imply that the Ohrid basin formed by transtension during the Miocene, opened during the Pliocene and Pleistocene, and that the lake established between 1.9 and 1.3 Ma ago. The sediments of the younger part (DEEP site sequence and are subject of ongoing investigations aimed at identifying their specific volcanic sources and equivalent known tephra by using geochemical fingerprinting of glass fragments. This was already successfully approved for tephra horizons in the upper 247.8 m of the sequence, obtaining important chronological information from 11 well dated tephra layers. These tephrochronological constraints were complemented by ages obtained from tuning the consistent pattern of the

  4. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of the Lower Jurassic Kayenta Formation, Colorado Plateau, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Diego Ignacio

    2001-07-01

    Detailed outcrop analysis of the Lower Jurassic Kayenta Formation provides the basis for the formulation of a new sequence stratigraphic model for arid to semi-arid continental deposits and the generation of a comprehensive set of sedimentologic criteria for the recognition of ephemeral stream deposits. Criteria for the recognition of ephemeral deposits in the ancient record were divided into three categories according to the scale of the feature being considered. The first category takes into account sedimentary structures commonly found in the record of ephemeral stream deposits including hyperconcentrated and debris flow deposits, planar parallel bedding, sigmoidal cross-bedding, hummocky cross-bedding, climbing ripple lamination, scour-and-fill structures, convolute bedding, overturned cross-bedding, ball-and-pillow structures, pocket structures, pillars, mud curls, flaser lamination, algal lamination, termite nests, and vertebrate tracks. The second category is concerned with the mesoscale facies architecture of ephemeral stream deposits and includes waning flow successions, bedform climb, downstream accretion, terminal wadi splays, and channel-fill successions indicating catastrophic flooding. At the large-scale facies architecture level, the third category, ephemeral stream deposits are commonly arranged in depositional units characterized by a downstream decrease in grain size and scale of sedimentary structures resulting from deposition in terminal fan systems. Outcrops of the Kayenta Formation and its transition to the Navajo Sandstone along the Vermilion and Echo Cliffs of Northern Arizona indicate that wet/dry climatic cyclicity exerted a major control on regional facies architecture. Two scales of wet/dry climatic cyclicity can be recognized in northern Arizona. Three sequence sets composed of rocks accumulated under predominantly dry or wet conditions are the expression of long-term climatic cyclicity. Short-term climatic cyclicity, on the other hand

  5. Sedimentological imprint on subseafloor microbial communities in Western Mediterranean Sea Quaternary sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-C. Ciobanu

    2012-09-01

    analyses (CCA showed that the availability of electron acceptors and the quality of electron donors (indicated by age strongly influenced the community structure. In contrast, within the Gulf of Lion core, characterized by a homogeneous lithological structure of upper-slope environment, most detected groups were Bacteroidetes and, to a lesser extent, Betaproteobacteria. At both site, the detection of Betaproteobacteria coincided with increased terrestrial inputs, as confirmed by the geochemical measurements (Si, Sr, Ti and Ca. In the Gulf of Lion, geochemical parameters were also found to drive microbial community composition. Taken together, our data suggest that the palaeoenvironmental history of erosion and deposition recorded in the Western Mediterranean Sea sediments has left its imprint on the sedimentological context for microbial habitability, and then indirectly on structure and composition of the microbial communities during the late Quaternary.

  6. Dark matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark. That is, not only is the night sky dark, but also most of the matter and the energy in the universe is dark. For every atom visible in planets, stars and galaxies today there exists at least five or six times as much 'Dark Matter' in the universe. Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious but pervasive dark matter, which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe. Dark energy remains even more elusive, as we lack candidate fields that emerge from well established physics. I will describe various attempts to measure dark matter by direct and indirect means, and discuss the prospects for progress in unravelling dark energy.

  7. Dirac matter

    CERN Document Server

    Rivasseau, Vincent; Fuchs, Jean-Nöel

    2017-01-01

    This fifteenth volume of the Poincare Seminar Series, Dirac Matter, describes the surprising resurgence, as a low-energy effective theory of conducting electrons in many condensed matter systems, including graphene and topological insulators, of the famous equation originally invented by P.A.M. Dirac for relativistic quantum mechanics. In five highly pedagogical articles, as befits their origin in lectures to a broad scientific audience, this book explains why Dirac matters. Highlights include the detailed "Graphene and Relativistic Quantum Physics", written by the experimental pioneer, Philip Kim, and devoted to graphene, a form of carbon crystallized in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, from its discovery in 2004-2005 by the future Nobel prize winners Kostya Novoselov and Andre Geim to the so-called relativistic quantum Hall effect; the review entitled "Dirac Fermions in Condensed Matter and Beyond", written by two prominent theoreticians, Mark Goerbig and Gilles Montambaux, who consider many other mater...

  8. Depositional setting analysis using seismic sedimentology: Example from the Paleogene Lishagang sequence in the Fushan depression, South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Fushan depression is a classic lacustrine rifted sub-basin in the Beibuwan Basin, South China Sea. The Paleogene Liushagang sequence is the main hydrocarbon-bearing stratigraphic unit in the depression. Using three-dimensional (3-D seismic data and logging data, we analyzed depositional setting of the Liushagang sequence. We use wave impedance inversion to describe progradational directions of provenance and the general distribution of sand body. The seismic facies was analyzed by using the seismic sedimentology approach based on 3-D seismic data, and summed into eight types of seismic facies which could be well related to sedimentary facies. Seismic attributes with six objective sequence boundaries were extracted. Consequently, four provenance system of Liushagang sequence in the study area were confirmed by the corresponding relationship between the geologic information and the warm color and higher value area of seismic attributes: (i the Hainan uplift provenance area in the south, (ii the Linggao uplift provenance area in the west, (iii the Yunlong uplift provenance area in the east and (iv the northern provenance area. The seismic sedimentology used in this study may provide new insights into a better understanding of depositional setting in continental lacustrine rifted basins.

  9. Study on the application of seismic sedimentology in a stratigraphic-lithologic reservoir in central Junggar Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yixin; Xia, Zhongmou

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses the research idea of description for stratigraphic-lithologic reservoir based on seismic sedimentology methods. The sandstone reservoir of Jurrassic XiShanyao Formation in Junggar Basin is studied according to the theory and approaches of seismic sedimentology. By making full use of borehole data, the technologies of layer correlation based on the stratigraphic sequence framework, the forward seismic modeling, the stratal slicing and lithologic inversion are applied. It describes the range of denudation line, the distribution characteristics of sedimentary facies of the strata, the vertical and horizontal distribution of sand bodies and the favourable oil-gas bearing prospective area. The results shows that study area are dominated braided delta deposition including underwater distributary channel and distributary bay microfacies, the nip-out lines of the formation are northeast to southwest from north to south, the second Middle Jurassic sand body is the most widely distributed one among three sand bodies, the prospective oil-gas bearing area located in the south part and around the YG2 well area. The study result is effective on the practice of exploration in study area.

  10. Selected contributions from the 9th International Conference on Tidal Sedimentology, November 2015, Puerto Madryn, Patagonia, Argentina: an introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scasso, Roberto A.; Cuitiño, José I.

    2017-08-01

    This special issue of Geo-Marine Letters presents selected contributions from the 9th International Conference on Tidal Sedimentology held on 17-19 November 2015 in Puerto Madryn, Chubut Province, Patagonia, Argentina. The guest editors are the conference organizers Roberto A. Scasso and José I. Cuitiño. Gerardo M. Perillo was the head of the Scientific Committee. The conferences on tidal sedimentology have been traditionally held every 4 years. However, only 3 years separated the last conference held in Caen (France, 2012) from this conference. Increasing numbers of contributions and the growing interest in tidal sedimentation have been the reasons for shortening the inter-conference period. The 2015 conference served as a discussion forum focusing on advances in modern and ancient tidal sedimentation at different locations worldwide. The papers presented in this Special Issue provide a selective view of the latest research results, the main topics dealing with tidal hydrodynamics and sediment transport, tidal coastal morphodynamics, modern and ancient tidal sedimentation, geotechnical processes in tidal environments, and tidal basins, facies and reservoirs.

  11. The sedimentological changes caused by human impact at the artificial channel of Medjerda-River (Coastal zone of Medjerda, Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmoussa, Thouraya; Amrouni, Oula; Dezileau, Laurent; Mahé, Gil; Abdeljaouad, Saâdi

    2018-04-01

    Recent sedimentary and morphological changes at the new mouth of Medjerda-River (Gulf of Tunis) are investigated using a multiproxy approach of sediment cores complited by 210Pbex and 137Cs method dating. The subject of the study is to focus on surveying the sedimentary evolution of Medjerda-Raoued Delta caused by the human intervention in the management of the main tributaries of the Medjerda-River (artificial channel of Henchir Tobias). Sediment cores (CEM-1 and CEM-3) were subjected to both multiproxy approaches (Grain size, geochemical analysis and dating radiometric 210Pbex and 137Cs). The sedimentological analysis of the new deltaic deposits shows a progradation sequence with the silt and clay deposits on the historic sandy substratum. The mean grain size evolution on the old beach profile shows a decreasing trend from backshore (CEM-3) to nearshore (CEM-1). The geochemical results show varying concentrations of chemical elements such as Fe, K, Rb, Nb, Cr, Ti, Ba, Ca, Sr, Zr, V, and potentially toxic metal trace elements such as Pb, Zn and the As. The Principal component Analysis (PCA) applied in the geochemical elements evolution confirms the marine origin of the sand deposits in the basic layers of the two cores. The chronological method (210Pbex and 137Cs) affirms that the first fluvial deposits were set up only after 1950. The sedimentological and geochemical result confirm the actual unless of coarser fluvial supplies under the human activities leading the negative coastal sediment balance and the shoreline retreat as well.

  12. Sedimentology of the Early Jurassic terrestrial Steierdorf Formation in Anina, Colonia Cehă Quarry, South Carpathians, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kędzior, Artur; Popa, Mihai E.

    2013-06-01

    Kędzior, A. and Popa, E.M. 2013. Sedimentology of the Early Jurassic terrestrial Steierdorf Formation in Anina, Colonia Cehă Quarry, South Carpathians, Romania. Acta Geologica Polonica, 63 (2), 175-199. Warszawa. The continental, coal bearing Steierdorf Formation, Hettangian - Sinemurian in age, is included in the Mesozoic cover of the Reşiţa Basin, Getic Nappe, South Carpathians, Romania. The Steierdorf Formation can be studied in Anina, a coal mining center and an exceptional locality for Early Jurassic flora and fauna, occurring in the middle of the Reşiţa Basin. This paper presents the results of sedimentological, stratigraphical and paleobotanical researches undertaken in Colonia Cehă open cast mine in Anina, where the Steierdorf Formation outcrops widely. Several sedimentary facies associations have been described, these associations permitting the reconstruction of various depositional systems such as alluvial fans, braided and meandering river systems, as well as lacustrine and coal generating marsh systems of the Steierdorf Formation. The sedimentary associations recorded within the Steierdorf Formation show a gradual fining upward trend, pointing to a rising marine water table and a decreasing relief within the source area.

  13. Shoreline deposits and diagenesis resulting from two Late Pleistocene highstands near +5 and +6 metres, Durban, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J.A.G.; Flores, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    In exposures of Pleistocene rocks on the east coast of South Africa, eight sedimentary facies were distinguished on the basis of petrology, grain size, internal structures and field relationships. These are interpreted as deposits of surf zone, breaker zone, swash zone, backbeach, boulder beach and dune environments. Three phases of deposition and diagenesis are recognized. As a result of the stabilising effect of pre-existing coastal facies, the deposits from successive sea level stands are stacked vertically in a narrow coast-normal strip. Early cementation prevented erosion of the deposits during subsequent transgressions. Deposition of subsequent facies took place on an existing coastal dune (Facies 1). A terrace was cut into this dune at a sea level 4.5 to 5 m above present. At this sea level, clastic shoreline sediments were deposited which make up the main sedimentary sequence exposed (Facies 2-7). The steep swash zone, coarse grain size, and comparison with modern conditions in the study area indicate clastic deposition on a high-energy, wave-dominated, microtidal coastline. Vertical stacking of progressively shallower water facies indicates progradation associated with slightly regressive conditions, prior to stranding of the succession above sea level. During a subsequent transgression to 5.5 or 6 m above present sea level, a second terrace was cut across the existing facies, which by then were partly lithified. A boulder beach (Facies 8) deposited on this terrace is indicative of high wave energy and a rocky coastline, formed by existing cemented coastal facies. Comparison with dated deposits from other parts of the South African coast suggest a Late Pleistocene age for Facies 2-8. Deposition was terminated by subsequent regression and continuing low sea levels during the remainder of the Pleistocene. Cementation of the facies took place almost entirely by carbonate precipitation. The presence of isopachous fibrous cements suggests early cementation of

  14. Modelling of clay diagenesis using a combined approach of crystalchemistry and thermochemistry: a case study in the smectite illitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Claudio; Previde Massara, Elisabetta; Di Paola, Eleonora; Ortenzi, Andrea; Gherardi, Fabrizio; Blanc, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    procedure benefits from: (i) (minor) improvements of the I/O structure of the SSP; (ii) the development of a suite of python scripts to automate the steps needed to augment the thermodynamic database by integrating the external information provided by potential users with the XLS tool and the SSP; (iii) the creation of specific outputs to allow for more convenient handling and inspection of computed parameters of the thermodynamic database. A case study focused on non-isothermal smectite-illite transformation is presented to show the capability of our numerical models to account for clay compaction under 1D geometry conditions. This model considers fluid flow driven by the compaction of a clay layer, and chemistry-fluid flow mutual feedback with the underlying sandstone during the advancement of the diagenesis. Due to this complex interaction, as a result of the smectite-illite transformation in the clays, significant quartz cementation affects the sandstone adjacent to the compacting clay.

  15. Stepwise Rock-Eval pyrolysis as a tool for typing heterogeneous organic matter in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetenyi, M.; Nyilas, T.; Toth, T.M. [Department of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Petrology, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 651, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2005-08-15

    This paper presents an application of Rock-Eval pyrolysis for estimating the proportion of the components with different thermal stability in soil organic matter, the maturity of which corresponds to the early stage of diagenesis. For testing the validity of the modified Rock-Eval method, parallel series of pyrolysis were carried out on sedimentary rock samples. The temperature program was selected on the basis of the results obtained from stepwise Rock-Eval pyrolysis and from the mathematical deconvolution of pyrograms. The proportion of the original biomolecules in soil organic matter was calculated by the integration of pyrograms below 350{sup o}C and could be determined rapidly by one single pyrolysis using 350{sup o}C as initial cracking temperature. At 380{sup o}C, both the mathematical and the experimental methods provide reliable information about the proportion of the humic substances. Conversely, for rock samples, mathematical deconvolution of the pyrograms showed the heterogeneity of the sedimentary organic matter, the maturity of which corresponds to late diagenesis, without any estimation of the proportion of the different components. The rate of organic carbon accumulation in the studied soils and the decomposition rate of biopolymers were interpreted as a function of land-use and redox conditions. Differences in the precursor vegetation and in the environmental parameters resulted in markedly reduced carbon storage and higher degree of humification in the agricultural soil than in the adjacent forest soil. Redox conditions strongly affected both the amount and the elemental composition of the stored organic matter. The decomposition rate of biopolymers appeared to be controlled mainly by the contribution of resistant lignin components to the source biomass and, to a lesser extent, by redox conditions.

  16. Sedimentological Properties of Natural Gas Hydrates-Bearing Sands in the Nankai Trough and Mallik Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, T.; Tsuji, T.; Waseda, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Nankai Trough parallels the Japanese Island, where extensive BSRs have been interpreted from seismic reflection records. High resolution seismic surveys have definitely indicated gas hydrate distributions, and drilling the MITI Nankai Trough wells in 2000 and the METI Tokai-oki to Kumano-nada wells in 2004 have revealed subsurface gas hydrate in the eastern part of Nankai Trough. In 1998 and 2002 Mallik wells were drilled at Mackenzie Delta in the Canadian Arctic that also clarified the characteristics of gas hydrate-dominant sandy layers at depths from 890 to 1110 m beneath the permafrost zone. During the field operations, the LWD and wire-line well log data were continuously obtained and plenty of gas hydrate-bearing sand cores were recovered. Subsequence sedimentological and geochemical analyses performed on those core samples revealed the crucial geologic controls on the formation and preservation of natural gas hydrate in sediments. Pore-space gas hydrates reside in sandy sediments mostly filling intergranular porosity. Pore waters chloride anomalies, core temperature depression and core observations on visible gas hydrates confirm the presence of pore-space gas hydrates within moderate to thick sandy layers, typically 10 cm to a meter thick. Sediment porosities and pore-size distributions were obtained by mercury porosimetry, which indicate that porosities of gas hydrate-bearing sandy strata are approximately 45 %. According to grain size distribution curves, gas hydrate is dominant in fine- to very fine-grained sandy strata. Gas hydrate saturations are typically up to 80 % in pore volume throughout most of the hydrate-dominant sandy layers, which are estimated by well log analyses as well as pore water chloride anomalies. It is necessary for investigating subsurface fluid flow behaviors to evaluate both porosity and permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sandy sediments, and the measurements of water permeability for them indicated that highly saturated

  17. Sedimentology and arsenic pollution in the Bengal Basin: insight into arsenic occurrence and subsurface geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Andrew; McArthur, John

    2014-05-01

    The Bengal delta system is a geologically recent feature overlying a deeply incised palaeo-surface formed during the Last Glacial Maximum. This surface is a series of terraces and valleys created by river incision (Goodbred & Kuehl 2003). The terraces were weathered, forming a thin, indurated laterite deposit (Goodbred & Kuehl 2000) at depths greater than 50 m. McArthur et al. (2008) define this as a palaeosol and have identified it at depths greater than 30 m though out Bangladesh and West Bengal. It has been observed that arsenic concentrations at these sites are lower than the rest of the delta. It has been assumed that the surface morphology at sites where there is a palaeosol are similar and can therefore be characterised by remote sensing, in the form of Google Earth images. Sites were selected in Bangladesh and West Bengal, from work by McArthur et al. (2011); Hoque et al. (2012), where groundwater chemistry and sedimentology data are available making it possible to determine if the subsurface is a palaeo-channel or palaeo-interfluve. Arsenic concentration data have been inputted into Google Earth and the palaeo-channels marked where the arsenic concentration is greater than 10 µg/L, and palaeo-interfluves where arsenic concentration is less than 10 µg/L. The surface morphologies in these domains have been examined for similarities, and it was shown that avulsion scars and abandoned river channels are found where arsenic concentrations are greater than 10 µg/L. Conversely the surrounding areas that are devoid of channel scars have arsenic concentrations less than 10 µg/L. Using the correlation between avulsion features being representative of palaeo-channels and high arsenic concentrations, sites were selected that had a similar surface morphology to the type localities. A comparison of these images and arsenic concentrations showed that the postulate is valid for over 80 percent of cases. Where this is not valid, this could indicate that the subsurface

  18. Quark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csernai, L.; Kampert, K. H.

    1994-10-15

    Precisely one decade ago the GSI (Darmstadt)/LBL (Berkeley) Collaboration at the Berkeley Bevalac reported clear evidence for collective sidewards flow in high energy heavy ion collisions. This milestone observation clearly displayed the compression and heating up of nuclear matter, providing new insights into how the behaviour of nuclear matter changes under very different conditions. This year, evidence for azimuthally asymmetric transverse flow at ten times higher projectile energy (11 GeV per nucleon gold on gold collisions) was presented by the Brookhaven E877 collaboration at the recent European Research Conference on ''Physics of High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions'', held in Helsinki from 17-22 June.

  19. Geochemical modeling of water-gas-rock interactions. Application to mineral diagenesis in geologic reservoirs; Modelisation geochimique des interactions eau-gaz-roche. Application a la diagenese minerale dans les reservoirs geologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bildstein, O

    1998-03-13

    The Ph.D. report describes a conceptual and numerical model for simulating gas-water-rock interaction during mineral diagenesis of sediments. The main specific features of this model are the following: applicable to open systems, half-implicit resolution numerical method, feedback on the texture evolution (grain model), existence of a gas phase, oxido-reduction phenomena. (author) 217 refs.

  20. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As if this was not enough, it turns out that if our knowledge of ... are thought to contain dark matter, although the evidences from them are the .... protons, electrons, neutrons ... ratio of protons to neutrons was close to unity then as they were in ...

  1. Quantum matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, Hans Peter; Calcarco, Tommaso; Dressel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Artificial atoms and molecules, tailored from solids, fractional flux quanta, molecular magnets, controlled interaction in quantum gases, the theory of quantum correlations in mott matter, cold gases, and mesoscopic systems, Bose-Einstein condensates on the chip, on the route to the quantum computer, a quantum computer in diamond. (HSI)

  2. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  3. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  4. Interstellar matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezger, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of the formation of our galaxy is presented followed by a summary of recent work in star formation and related topics. Selected discussions are given on interstellar matter including absorption characteristics of dust, the fully ionised component of the ISM and the energy density of lyc-photons in the solar neighbourhood and the diffuse galactic IR radiation

  5. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study of gas clouds orbiting in the outer regions of spiral galaxies has revealed that their gravitational at- traction is much larger than the stars alone can provide. Over the last twenty years, astronomers have been forced to postulate the presence of large quantities of 'dark matter' to explain their observations. They are ...

  6. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Sedimentologic and paleontologic study of the southeast coast of Buenos Aires province, Argentina: A late Pleistocene Holocene paleoenvironmental reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramayo, S. A.; Téllez, B. Gutiérrez; Schillizzi, R. A.

    2005-10-01

    A paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the southeast coast of Buenos Aires province, Argentina, is made mainly on the basis of paleontological and paleoichnological studies, supported by sedimentological analyses and radiocarbon dating. Continental late Pleistocene and continental, transitional, and marine Holocene stratigraphic units are identified. The former comprises fossil mammals and ichnites of 16000-12,000 BP. The continental early Holocene time, ca. 8100 BP, is represented by an interdune paleoenvironment in which shallow brackish ponds were colonized by diatoms, fish, rodents, and birds. A transitional paleoenvironment in the middle Holocene—6930-6570 BP—is recorded by deposits formed by estuarine crabs. During the late Holocene, between 5000 and 4800 BP, a marine transgression was recorded by a rich mollusc fauna.

  8. Punctuated Sediment Discharge during Early Pliocene Birth of the Colorado River: Evidence from Regional Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, and Paleontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Rebecca J.; O'Connell, Brennan; McDougall, Kristin; Homan, Mindy B.

    2018-01-01

    The Colorado River in the southwestern U.S. provides an excellent natural laboratory for studying the origins of a continent-scale river system, because deposits that formed prior to and during river initiation are well exposed in the lower river valley and nearby basinal sink. This paper presents a synthesis of regional stratigraphy, sedimentology, and micropaleontology from the southern Bouse Formation and similar-age deposits in the western Salton Trough, which we use to interpret processes that controlled the birth and early evolution of the Colorado River. The southern Bouse Formation is divided into three laterally persistent members: basal carbonate, siliciclastic, and upper bioclastic members. Basal carbonate accumulated in a tide-dominated marine embayment during a rise of relative sea level between 6.3 and 5.4 Ma, prior to arrival of the Colorado River. The transition to green claystone records initial rapid influx of river water and its distal clay wash load into the subtidal marine embayment at 5.4-5.3 Ma. This was followed by rapid southward progradation of the Colorado River delta, establishment of the earliest through-flowing river, and deposition of river-derived turbidites in the western Salton Trough (Wind Caves paleocanyon) between 5.3 and 5.1 Ma. Early delta progradation was followed by regional shut-down of river sand output between 5.1 and 4.8 Ma that resulted in deposition of marine clay in the Salton Trough, retreat of the delta, and re-flooding of the lower river valley by shallow marine water that deposited the Bouse upper bioclastic member. Resumption of sediment discharge at 4.8 Ma drove massive progradation of fluvial-deltaic deposits back down the river valley into the northern Gulf and Salton Trough. These results provide evidence for a discontinuous, start-stop-start history of sand output during initiation of the Colorado River that is not predicted by existing models for this system. The underlying controls on punctuated sediment

  9. The Study of Radiation of Gamma-Ray Background at Sedimentology Laboratorium, P3TIR, BATAN, Using Gamma Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, Ali Arman; Aliyanta, Barokah; Darman

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of background radiation of gamma-ray has been done at Sedimentology Laboratory, SDAL building, P3TIR, BATAN using gamma spectrometer. The measurement was done without shielding with the range of energy between 50 keV and 1500 keV. The identified radiations are coming from environmental radionuclide and man-made radionuclide as well with 32 energy peaks. The environmental radionuclides are from Uranium series, Thorium series, and 4 0 K having dose rate of 12.510 ± O.980, 36.408 ± 3.243, 9.455 ±O.016 n Sv/day, respectively, whilst man-made radionuclide is 6 O C o having dose rate of O.136 ±O.078 n Sv/day

  10. Sedimentology and geomorphology analysis of coastal area along pantai penarik, terengganu before and during northeast monsoon season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Tengku Ahmad Imran Ku; Shaufi Sokiman, Mohamad

    2017-10-01

    This research is conducted to understand the sedimentology and morphological change before and during the northeast monsoon at the east coast of peninsular Malaysia. The increase in wind speed, wave energy and rainfall during the northeast monsoon are believed to causes the coastal erosion to increase during the season. Rapid development along the east coast area might disrupt the sediments distribution which can increase the coastal erosion rate every year. The understanding on the sediments distribution, erosion and deposition as well as the morphological change can help to figure out if the coastal erosion can affect the infrastructure in the future. The result of the study can show the necessity to perform mitigation or any required action toward the problem that might happen

  11. Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouze, J.; Tran Thanh Van, J.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with the papers devoted to the experimental search of signatures of the dark matter which governs the evolution of the Universe as a whole. A series of contributions describe the presently considered experimental techniques (cryogenic detectors, supraconducting detectors...). A real dialogue concerning these techniques has been instaured between particle physicists and astrophysicists. After the progress report of the particle physicists, the book provides the reader with an updated situation concerning the research in cosmology. The second part of the book is devoted to the analysis of the backgrounds at different energies such as the possible role of the cooling flows in the constitution of massive galactic halos. Any search of dark matter implies necessarily the analysis of the spatial distributions of the large scale structures of the Universe. This report is followed by a series of statistical analyses of these distributions. These analyses concern mainly universes filled up with cold dark matter. The last paper of this third part concerns the search of clustering in the spatial distribution of QSOs. The presence of dark matter should affect the solar neighborhood and related to the existence of galactic haloes. The contributions are devoted to the search of such local dark matter. Primordial nucleosynthesis provides a very powerful tool to set up quite constraining limitations on the overall baryonic density. Even if on takes into account the inhomogeneities in density possibly induced by the Quark-Hadron transition, this baryonic density should be much lower than the overall density deduced from the dynamical models of Universe or the inflationary theories

  12. Disposal Of Waste Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Hyeon; Lee, Seung Mu

    1989-02-01

    This book deals with disposal of waste matter management of soiled waste matter in city with introduction, definition of waste matter, meaning of management of waste matter, management system of waste matter, current condition in the country, collect and transportation of waste matter disposal liquid waste matter, industrial waste matter like plastic, waste gas sludge, pulp and sulfuric acid, recycling technology of waste matter such as recycling system of Black clawson, Monroe and Rome.

  13. Quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, L.; Kampert, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    Precisely one decade ago the GSI (Darmstadt)/LBL (Berkeley) Collaboration at the Berkeley Bevalac reported clear evidence for collective sidewards flow in high energy heavy ion collisions. This milestone observation clearly displayed the compression and heating up of nuclear matter, providing new insights into how the behaviour of nuclear matter changes under very different conditions. This year, evidence for azimuthally asymmetric transverse flow at ten times higher projectile energy (11 GeV per nucleon gold on gold collisions) was presented by the Brookhaven E877 collaboration at the recent European Research Conference on ''Physics of High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions'', held in Helsinki from 17-22 June

  14. Microfacies, sedimentary environment and diagenesis of the upper part of Dalan and Kangan Formations in the Kuh-e Surmeh area, Folded Zagros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadhossein Adabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The upper part of Dallan and Kangan formations (Permian-Triassic, are located in the Kuh-e Surmeh area in folded Zagros Basin with a thickness of 325 m overlying by Nar evaporite member and underlying by Dashtak Formation. Dominant lithology of these formations are limestone and dolomite. Our purpose in this study is to identify microfacieses, sedimentary environment and diagenetic proceses. To overcome this aim, thin sections petrographic studies, leaded to identify 12 microfacieses related to 4 facieses belt: tidal flat, lagoon, shoal and open marine. The observed microfacies patterns indicate a ramp carbonate platform as depositional environment. Based on petrographic studies, the important diagenetic processes in these formations consist of: micritization, dolomitization, cementation, stilolitization and chemical and physical compactions. Burial diagenesis is dominated diagenetic event. The observed porosities in this section are primary and secondary such as fenestral, vuggy, fracture, moldic, interparticle, intraparticle and channel

  15. The origin of soil organic matter controls its composition and bioreactivity across a mesic boreal forest latitudinal gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, L.; Philben, M. J.; Edwards, K. A.; Podrebarac, F. A.; Jamie, W.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    Warmer climates have been associated with reduced soil organic matter (SOM) bioreactivity, lower respiration rates at a given temperature, which is typically attributed to the presence of more decomposed SOM. Cross site studies, however, indicate that ecosystem regime shifts associated with long-term climate warming can affect SOM properties through changes in vegetation and plant litter inputs to soils. The relative importance of these two controls, diagenesis and inputs, on SOM properties as ecosystems experience climate warming remains poorly understood. To address this, we characterized the elemental, chemical (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and total hydrolysable amino acids), and isotopic composition of plant litter and SOM across a well-constrained mesic boreal forest latitudinal transect in Atlantic Canada. Results across forest sites within each of three climate regions indicated that (1) climate history and diagenesis affect distinct parameters of SOM chemistry, (2) increases in SOM bioreactivity with latitude were associated with elevated proportions of carbohydrates relative to plant waxes and lignin, and (3) despite the common forest type across regions, differences in SOM chemistry by climate region were associated with chemically distinct litter inputs and not different degrees of diagenesis. Climate effects on vascular plant litter chemistry explained only part of the regional differences in SOM chemistry, most notably the higher protein content of SOM from warmer regions. Greater proportions of lignin and aliphatic compounds and smaller proportions of carbohydrates in warmer sites' soils were explained by the higher proportion of vascular plant relative to moss litter in the warmer forests. These results indicate that a climate induced decrease in the proportion of moss inputs will not only impact SOM chemistry but also increase the resistance of SOM to decomposition, thus significantly altering SOM cycling in these boreal forest soils.

  16. Detailed sedimentology and geomorphology elucidate mechanisms of formation of modern and historical sequences of minor moraines in the European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyshnytzky, Cianna; Lukas, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Suites of closely-spaced minor moraines may help further understanding of glacier retreat and predict its geomorphological effects through the observations of moraine formation on short timescales. This research is common in lowland, maritime settings (Sharp, 1984; Boulton, 1986; Krüger, 1995; Reinardy et al., 2013), but remains sparse in high-mountain settings (Hewitt, 1967; Ono, 1985; Beedle et al., 2009; Lukas, 2012). This research presents detailed sedimentological and geomorphological research on minor moraines at two high-mountain settings in the Alps: Silvrettagletscher, Switzerland, as a modern setting and Schwarzensteinkees, Austria, as a historical setting. Geomorphological investigations included mapping and measurements through field observations and assessing aerial imagery. Additionally, terrestrial laser scanning and ground-penetrating radar data were collected in the Schwarzensteinkees foreland. Detailed sedimentological investigations followed excavation of seven moraines at Silvrettagletscher and five moraines at Schwarzensteinkees and include multiple scales of observation and measurements to support interpretations of sediment transport and deposition (e.g. Evans and Benn, 2004). The modern moraines at Silvrettagletscher, in the immediately proglacial foreland, have been forming since before 2003. Four mechanisms of formation show distinct sedimentological signatures: formerly ice-cored moraines (e.g. Kjær & Krüger, 2001; Lukas, 2012; Reinardy et al., 2013) , push moraine formation on a reverse bedrock slope (e.g. Lukas, 2012), push moraine formation incorporating sediments deposited in a former proglacial basin, and basal freeze-on (e.g. Andersen & Sollid, 1971; Krüger, 1995; Reinardy et al., 2013). Schwarzensteinkees still exists but is currently restricted to steeply-dipping bedrock slabs above the main valley. This study therefore investigates the moraines in the foreland that formed between approximately 1850 and 1930. The minor

  17. Media Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Pötzsch

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution maps materialist advances in media studies. Based on the assumption that matter and materiality constitute significant aspects of communication processes and practices, I introduce four fields of inquiry - technology, political economy, ecology, and the body - and argue that these perspectives enable a more comprehensive understanding of the implications of contemporary technologically afforded forms of interaction. The article shows how each perspective can balance apologetic and apocalyptic approaches to the impact of in particular digital technologies, before it demonstrates the applicability of an integrated framework with reference to the techno-politics of NSA surveillance and the counter-practices of WikiLeaks.

  18. Play Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicart (Vila), Miguel Angel

    ? In Play Matters, Miguel Sicart argues that to play is to be in the world; playing is a form of understanding what surrounds us and a way of engaging with others. Play goes beyond games; it is a mode of being human. We play games, but we also play with toys, on playgrounds, with technologies and design......, but not necessarily fun. Play can be dangerous, addictive, and destructive. Along the way, Sicart considers playfulness, the capacity to use play outside the context of play; toys, the materialization of play--instruments but also play pals; playgrounds, play spaces that enable all kinds of play; beauty...

  19. 550 years in sedimentological record from a varved type lake (Bolătău, Bukovina, NE Romania - changing storm frequency and climate fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra NEMETH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we introduce lake Bolătău, located in Obcina Feredeului, Eastern Carpathians (Romania, with seasonally controlled sedimentation and significant potential for generating precipitation sensitive proxy record. Two sediment cores were compared against each other in order to achieve a better understanding of the lateral discontinuity of observed microfacies and an accurate interpretation of the sedimentological data.

  20. A sedimentological analysis of sediments corresponding to the San Gregorio Formation )Lower Permian), located in the eastern border of the North Uruguayan Basin, Sierra Guazunambi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goso Aguilar, C.; Gama, E.

    1998-01-01

    A sedimentological analysis of sediments corresponding to the San Gregorio Formation (Lower Permian), located in the eastern border of the Norte Uruguayan Basin, Sierra Guazunambi, Cerro Largo Departament was made. Facies analysis of about 100 otucrops fand more than 1.300 meters, in an area of 45 square kilometers showed diamictites rhytmites and massive sandstones, formed by gravitational sedimentary flows. Also present are prodelta mudrocks and deltaic front sandstones.(author)

  1. Sedimentology and geochemistry of early Proterozoic storm-dominated deposits in the transition zone from microbanded Kuruman to granular Griquatown iron-formation, Griqualand West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beukes, N.J.; Klein, C.

    1990-01-01

    A transition from microbanded Kuruman to granular Griquatown iron-formation is described in terms of sedimentological, petrographic, and geochemical characteristics, as well as whole rock carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions. Five major lithofacies are present in the Kuruman-Griquatown transition zone. The lithofacies are arranged in an upward coarsening sequence. It is concluded that the coarsening upward microbanded-granular iron-formation units in the Kuruman-Griquatown sequence represent shallowing upward storm-dominated deposits. 2 refs

  2. Disentangling the record of diagenesis, local redox conditions, and global seawater chemistry during the latest Ordovician glaciation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Anne-Sofie Crüger; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Hammarlund, Emma U.

    2017-01-01

    as pyrite in core samples, while outcrop samples have been significantly altered as pyrite has been oxidized and remobilized by modern weathering processes. Fe speciation in the more pristine core samples indicates persistent deep water anoxia, at least locally through the Late Ordovician, in contrast...... to the prevailing interpretation of increased Hirnantian water column oxygenation in shallower environments. Deep water redox conditions were likely decoupled from shallower environments by a basinal shift in organic matter export driven by decreasing rates of organic matter degradation and decreasing shelf areas......The Late Ordovician stratigraphic record integrates glacio-eustatic processes, water-column redox conditions and carbon cycle dynamics. This complex stratigraphic record, however, is dominated by deposits from epeiric seas that are susceptible to local physical and chemical processes decoupled from...

  3. Historical changes in organic matter input to the muddy sediments along the Zhejiang-Fujian Coast, China over the past 160 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-lei; Liu, Jian; Xing, Lei; Krauss, Ken W.; Wang, Jia-sheng; Xu, Gang; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    The burial of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) in the large river-influenced estuarine-coastal regions is affected by hydrodynamic sorting, diagenesis and human activities. Typically, the inner shelf region of the East China Sea is a major carbon sink of the Yangtze River-derived fine-grained sediments. Most of the previous work concentrated on the studies of surface sediments or used a single-proxy in this region. In this study, two cores from the Zhejiang-Fujian Coast were analyzed using bulk (TOC, TN and δ13CTOC) and molecular biomarker (n-alkane, brassicasterol, dinosterol and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether lipids) techniques to clarify the sources, spatiotemporal distribution and fate of SOM in the Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent shelf. Results from this study indicated that the effects of diagenesis and diffusion on different sedimentary biomarkers resulted in overestimation of the relative contribution of terrestrial organic matter (%OMterr), compared with those based on δ13CTOC. The amounts of terrestrial plant organic matter (OMplant) and%OMterr in sediments decreased offshore. In contrast, the amounts of marine organic matter (OMmarine) increased offshore, but closer to the Yangtze River mouth, the amounts of soil organic matter (OMsoil) increased. Moreover, the amounts of TOC, OMplant and OMmarine biomarkers increased, but OMsoil and%OMterrdecreased over time in recent decades. Our study suggests that spatial organic matter distribution patterns in marine shelf sediments were controlled primarily by hydrodynamic sorting and nutrient concentrations, and temporally diverse patterns were controlled predominantly by anthropogenic influence (e.g., dam construction and soil conservation, reclamation and agricultural plantations, anthropogenic nutrient input, dust storms, eutrophication, etc) and climate events (e.g., interdecadal climatic jump and heavy rain events) in the geological period.

  4. Marginal Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hecke, Martin

    2013-03-01

    All around us, things are falling apart. The foam on our cappuccinos appears solid, but gentle stirring irreversibly changes its shape. Skin, a biological fiber network, is firm when you pinch it, but soft under light touch. Sand mimics a solid when we walk on the beach but a liquid when we pour it out of our shoes. Crucially, a marginal point separates the rigid or jammed state from the mechanical vacuum (freely flowing) state - at their marginal points, soft materials are neither solid nor liquid. Here I will show how the marginal point gives birth to a third sector of soft matter physics: intrinsically nonlinear mechanics. I will illustrate this with shock waves in weakly compressed granular media, the nonlinear rheology of foams, and the nonlinear mechanics of weakly connected elastic networks.

  5. Constraining the sedimentology and stratigraphy of submarine intraslope lobe deposits using exhumed examples from the Karoo Basin, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spychala, Y. T.; Hodgson, D. M.; Flint, S. S.; Mountney, N. P.

    2015-06-01

    Intraslope lobe deposits provide a process record of the infill of accommodation on submarine slopes and their recognition enables the accurate reconstruction of the stratigraphic evolution of submarine slope systems. Extensive exposures of discrete sand-prone packages in Units D/E and E, Fort Brown Formation, Karoo Basin, South Africa, permit analysis of the sedimentology and stacking patterns of three intraslope lobe complexes and their palaeogeographic reconstruction via bed-scale analysis and physical correlation of key stratal surfaces. The sand-prone packages comprise tabular, aggradationally to slightly compensationally stacked lobe deposits with constituent facies associations that can be attributed to lobe axis, lobe off-axis, lobe-fringe and distal lobe-fringe environments. Locally, intraslope lobe deposits are incised by low aspect ratio channels that mark basinward progradation of the deepwater system. The origin of accommodation on the slope for lobe deposition is interpreted to be due to differential compaction or healing of scars from mass wasting processes. The stacking patterns and sedimentary facies arrangement identified in this study are distinct from those of more commonly recognized basin-floor lobe deposits, thereby enabling the establishment of recognition criteria for intraslope lobe deposits in other less well exposed and studied fine-grained systems. Compared to basin floor lobes, intraslope lobes are smaller in volume, influenced by higher degrees of confinement, and tend to show aggradational stacking patterns.

  6. Detrital gold, uranium, and pyrite concentrations related to sedimentology in the precambrian Vaal Reef placer, Witwatersrand, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minter, W.E.L.

    1976-01-01

    This study integrates stratigraphical, structural, petrological, and mineralogical data with a comprehensive set of sedimentological data to synthesize a model that describes the genesis of the Vaal Reef placer. Results show that the Vaal Reef placer was a shoreline feature of the Upper Witwatersrand Basin and that its deposition was controlled, firstly, by the major structure of the basin and, secondly, by a minor transverse synclinal structure that induced an entry point. New geological aspects that have emerged are, firstly, that the tectonic framework during Vaal Reef Stage deposition was very much simpler than previously envisaged. There is no evidence of subsidiary incipient basining. Secondly, modifications of previous conceptual models are made which emphasize the importance that detailed dispersal patterns and subtle paleosurface forms had on heavy mineral distribution in the distal fluviodeltaic environment of carbon-seam placers. Thirdly, sedimentary responses involving unconformities, disconformities, and accumulation are evidently related to particular entry points and may not be specifically correlated beyond their local tectonic framework. Fourthly, tectonic instability and basining is dated between Lower and Upper Ventersdorp System time and certainly before deposition of the Transvaal System

  7. Geomorphologic, stratigraphic and sedimentologic evidences of tectonic activity in Sone-Ganga alluvial tract in Middle Ganga Plain, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sudarsan; Saha, Dipankar

    2014-08-01

    The basement of the Ganga basin in the Himalayan foreland is criss-crossed by several faults, dividing the basin into several sub-blocks forming horsts, grabens, or half-grabens. Tectonic perturbations along basement faults have affected the fluvial regime and extent of sediment fill in different parts of the basin during Late Quaternary. The East Patna Fault (EPF) and the West Patna Fault (WPF), located in Sone-Ganga alluvial tract in the southern marginal parts of Middle Ganga Plain (MGP), have remained tectonically active. The EPF particularly has acted significantly and influenced in evolving the geomorphological landscape and the stratigraphic architecture of the area. The block bounded by the two faults has earlier been considered as a single entity, constituting a half-graben. The present investigation (by morpho-stratigraphic and sedimentologic means) has revealed the existence of yet another fault within the half-graben, referred to as Bishunpur-Khagaul Fault (BKF). Many of the long profile morphological characters (e.g., knick-zone, low width-depth ratio) of the Sone River at its lower reaches can be ascribed to local structural deformation along BKF. These basement faults in MGP lie parallel to each other in NE-SW direction.

  8. A 2D hydrodynamic-sedimentological model for gravel bed rivers. Part II, Case study: the Brenta River in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Kaless

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A 2D depth average model has been used to simulate water and sediment flow in the Brenta River so as to interpret channel changes and to assess model predictive capabilities. The Brenta River is a gravel bed river located in Northern Italy. The study reach is 1400 long and has a mean slope of 0.0056. High resolution digital terrain models has been produced combining laser imaging detection and ranging data with colour bathymetry techniques. Extensive field sedimentological surveys have been also carried out for surface and subsurface material. The data were loaded in the model and the passage of a high intense flood (R.I. > 9 years was simulated. The model was run under the hypothesis of a substantial equilibrium between sediment input and transport capacity. In this way, the model results were considered as a reference condition, and the potential trend of the reach was assessed. Low-frequency floods (R.I. » 1.5 years are expected to produce negligible changes in the channel while high floods may focalize erosion on banks instead than on channel bed. Furthermore, the model predicts well the location of erosion and siltation areas and the results promote its application to other reaches of the Brenta River in order to assess their stability and medium-term evolution.

  9. Late Quaternary stratigraphy, sedimentology, and geochemistry of an underfilled lake basin in the Puna (north-west Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlue, Michael M.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Kowler, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Depositional models of ancient lakes in thin-skinned retroarc foreland basins rarely benefit from appropriate Quaternary analogues. To address this, we present new stratigraphic, sedimentological and geochemical analyses of four radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from the Pozuelos Basin (PB; northwest Argentina) that capture the evolution of this low-accommodation Puna basin over the past ca. 43 cal kyr. Strata from the PB are interpreted as accumulations of a highly variable, underfilled lake system represented by lake-plain/littoral, profundal, palustrine, saline lake and playa facies associations. The vertical stacking of facies is asymmetric, with transgressive and thin organic-rich highstand deposits underlying thicker, organic-poor regressive deposits. The major controls on depositional architecture and basin palaeogeography are tectonics and climate. Accommodation space was derived from piggyback basin-forming flexural subsidence and Miocene-Quaternary normal faulting associated with incorporation of the basin into the Andean hinterland. Sediment and water supply was modulated by variability in the South American summer monsoon, and perennial lake deposits correlate in time with several well-known late Pleistocene wet periods on the Altiplano/Puna plateau. Our results shed new light on lake expansion–contraction dynamics in the PB in particular and provide a deeper understanding of Puna basin lakes in general.

  10. Architectural element analysis within the Kayenta Formation (Lower Jurassic) using ground-probing radar and sedimentological profiling, southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Mark

    1994-05-01

    A well exposed outcrop in the Kayenta Formation (Lower Jurassic) in southwestern Colorado was examined in order to delineate the stratigraphy in the subsurface and test the usefulness of ground-probing radar (GPR) in three-dimensional architectural studies. Two fluvial styles are present within the Kayenta Formation. Sandbodies within the lower third of the outcrop are characterized by parallel laminations that can be followed in the cliff-face for well over 300 m. These sandbodies are sheet-like in appearance, and represent high-energy flood deposits that most likely resulted from episodic floods. The remainder of the outcrop is characterized by concave-up channel deposits with bank-attached and mid-channel macroforms. Their presence suggests a multiple channel river system. The GPR data collected on the cliff-top, together with sedimentological data, provided a partial three-dimensional picture of the paleo-river system within the Kayenta Formation. The 3-D picture consists of stacked channel-bar lenses approximately 50 m in diameter. The GPR technique offers a very effective means of delineating the subsurface stratigraphy. Its high resolution capabilities, easy mobility, and rapid rate of data collection make it a useful tool. Its shallow penetration depth and limitation to low-conductivity environments are its only drawbacks.

  11. Texture and composition of the Rosa Marina beach sands (Adriatic coast, southern Italy: a sedimentological/ecological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moretti Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Beach sands from the Rosa Marina locality (Adriatic coast, southern Italy were analysed mainly microscopically in order to trace the source areas of their lithoclastic and bioclastic components. The main cropping out sedimentary units were also studied with the objective to identify the potential source areas of lithoclasts. This allowed to establish how the various rock units contribute to the formation of beach sands. The analysis of the bioclastic components allows to estimate the actual role of organisms regarding the supply of this material to the beach. Identification of taxa that are present in the beach sands as shell fragments or other remains was carried out at the genus or family level. Ecological investigation of the same beach and the recognition of sub-environments (mainly distinguished on the basis of the nature of the substrate and of the water depth was the key topic that allowed to establish the actual source areas of bioclasts in the Rosa Marina beach sands. The sedimentological analysis (including a physical study of the beach and the calculation of some statistical parameters concerning the grain-size curves shows that the Rosa Marina beach is nowadays subject to erosion.

  12. Implications of sedimentological and hydrological processes on the distribution of radionuclides: the example of a salt marsh near Ravenglass, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, A.P.; Blackley, M.W.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes sedimentological and hydrological studies at a salt marsh site on the north bank of the River Esk near Ravenglass which have a bearing on the fate of the low-level radioactive effluent from the reprocessing facility at Sellafield, Cumbria. A range of techniques has been used including electromagnetic distance measurement (EDM) and pore water pressure studies. The results show that: (a) Over a two-year period there were no significant net changes in salt marsh creek level, although shorter-term (probably seasonal) fluctuations, of the order of 2 cm, occurred. These were attributed to expansion of clay particles during the winter months. Nearby, however, there were vertical changes of the order of 1 m due to erosion. (b) Pore water pressures indicated a dynamic situation with very rapid responses both to tidal fluctuations and to rainfall. During neap tides there was clear evidence for water seeping upwards from the underlying clay/sand interface. Shortlived radionuclides ( 95 Zr/ 95 Nb and 106 Ru) were detected in this zone. (c) soil polygons, once initiated by desiccation, thereafter provide preferential routes for water (and radionuclides) to the sub-surface sediment. These, and other results, are discussed in the context of previous studies. It is concluded that the complexity of the estuarine environment results in most data being site specific. (author)

  13. Variations of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) in the Kerguelen Sector during the Last Deglaciation : sedimentological and geochemical evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bout-Roumazeilles, V.; Beny, F.; Mazaud, A.; Michel, E.; Crosta, X.; Davies, G. R.; Bory, A. J. M.

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution sedimentological and geochemical records were obtained from two sediment cores recovered by the French R/V Marion Dufresne during the INDIEN-SUD-ACC cruises near the sub-Antarctic Kerguelen Islands (49°S). This area is ideal to record past oceanic and atmospheric changes in the Southern Ocean because they are currently located in the northern branch of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and under the direct influence of Southern Hemisphere Westerly wind belt. This study focuses on the last termination, with specific emphasis on the impact of severe climatic events (Heinrich Stadial 1, Antarctic Cold Reversal, Younger Dryas) onto the ocean-atmospheric exchange. Results indicates that most of the sediment is derived from the Kerguelen Plateau, characterized by high smectite content. Periodically, a minor contribution of Antarctica is noticeable. In particular, illite variations suggest fast and short northward incursions of Antarctic Bottom Water, probably formed in the Prydz Bay during the last glaciation. Grainsize repartition combined to magnetic parameters show a southward migration of the ACC and the fronts associated from the beginning of the deglaciation, which is consistent with Southern Hemisphere climate variations. On the opposite, it highlights an asynchronous decrease of the ACC strength, with a large drop during the Antarctic Cold Reversal when atmospheric CO2 increase was slowed down. Thus, at least in the studied area, the ACC strength and the Antarctic Climate were not synchronous during the last deglaciation.

  14. Interpretation of sedimentological processes of coarse-grained deposits applying a novel combined cluster and discriminant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farics, Éva; Farics, Dávid; Kovács, József; Haas, János

    2017-10-01

    The main aim of this paper is to determine the depositional environments of an Upper-Eocene coarse-grained clastic succession in the Buda Hills, Hungary. First of all, we measured some commonly used parameters of samples (size, amount, roundness and sphericity) in a much more objective overall and faster way than with traditional measurement approaches, using the newly developed Rock Analyst application. For the multivariate data obtained, we applied Combined Cluster and Discriminant Analysis (CCDA) in order to determine homogeneous groups of the sampling locations based on the quantitative composition of the conglomerate as well as the shape parameters (roundness and sphericity). The result is the spatial pattern of these groups, which assists with the interpretation of the depositional processes. According to our concept, those sampling sites which belong to the same homogeneous groups were likely formed under similar geological circumstances and by similar geological processes. In the Buda Hills, we were able to distinguish various sedimentological environments within the area based on the results: fan, intermittent stream or marine.

  15. The sedimentology of uranium-bearing sandstones on the Waterval portion of the farm Brandewyns Gat 214, Beaufort West area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D.I.

    1980-08-01

    The sedimentology of two uranium-bearing sandstones on the Waterval portion of the farm Brandewyns Gat 214 was studied by means of 36 vertical profiles measured across, through and adjacent to 4 mineralised deposits. The vertical profiles basically consist of a succession of sedimentary facies. A total of 19 facies was recognised within the fluvial sandstone sequence according to the criteria of grain-size and sedimentary structure. Transitions between the facies were subjected to a Markov chain analysis in order to delineate Markov-dependent transitions. Uranium mineralisation occurs mostly within the lower half of the fluvial sandstone sequence and is confined to the coarser-grained sedimentary facies. These facies probably acted as suitable aquifers for the transport of uraniferous solutions and permeability differences between the sandstone and the underlying mudstone and siltstone must have restricted these solutions to the lower half of the channel sandstone. The massive mudstone facies contains 13 per cent of the total cumulative thickness of mineralisation. This mineralisation probably originated from synchronously deposited tuffaceous material. Subsequent migration of uraniferous solutions may have concentrated the uranium

  16. A 2D hydrodynamic-sedimentological model for gravel-bed rivers. Part I: theory and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Kaless

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel 2D-depth average model especially developed for gravel-bed rivers, named Lican-Leufú (Lican=pebble and Leufu=river, in Mapuche’s language, the native inhabitants of Central Patagonia, Argentina. The model consists of three components: a hydrodynamic, a sedimentological, and a morphological model. The flow of water is described by the depth-averaged Reynolds equations for unsteady, free-surface, shallow water flows. It includes the standard k-e model for turbulence closure. Sediment transport can be divided in different size classes (sand-gravel mixture and the equilibrium approach is used for Exner’s equation. The amour layer is also included in the structure of the model and the surface grain size distribution is also allowed to evolve. The model simulates bank slides that enable channel widening. Models predictions were tested against a flume experiment where a static armour layer was developed under conditions of sediment starvations and general good agreements were found: the model predicted adequately the sediment transport, grain size of transported material, final armour grain size distribution and bed elevation.

  17. Rare earth, major, and trace element composition of Monterey and DSDP chert and associated host sediment: Assessing the influence of chemical fractionation during diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R.W.; Buchholtz ten Brink, Marilyn R.; Gerlach, David C.; Russ III, G. Price; Jones, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Chert and associated host sediments from Monterey Formation and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) sequences were analyzed in order to assess chemical behavior during diagenesis of biogenic sediments. The primary compositional contrast between chert and host sediment is a greater absolute SiO2 concentration in chert, often with final SiO2 ≥ 98 wt%. This contrast in SiO2 (and SiAl">SiAl) potentially reflects precursor sediment heterogeneity, diagenetic chemical fractionation, or both. SiO2 concentrations and SiAl">SiAl ratios in chert are far greater than in modern siliceous oozes, however and often exceed values in acid-cleaned diatom tests. Compositional contrasts between chert and host sediment are also orders-of-magnitude greater than between multiple samples of the host sediment. Calculations based on the initial composition of adjacent host, observed porosity reductions from host to chert and a postulated influx of pure SiO2, construct a chert composition which is essentially identical to observed SiO2 values in chert. Thus, precursor heterogeneity does not seem to be the dominant factor influencing the current chert composition for the key elements of interest. In order to assess the extent of chemical fractionation during diagenesis, we approximate the precursor composition by analyzing host sediments adjacent to the chert.The SiO2 concentration contrast seems caused by biogenic SiO2 dissolution and transport from the local adjacent host sediment and subsequent SiO2reprecipitation in the chert. Along with SiO2, other elements are often added (with respect to Al) to Monterey and DSDP chert during silicification, although absolute concentrations decrease. The two Monterey quartz chert nodules investigated, in contrast to the opal-CT and quartz chert lenses, formed primarily by extreme removal of carbonate and phosphate, thereby increasing relative SiO2 concentrations. DSDP chert formed by both carbonate/phosphate dissolution and SiO2 addition from

  18. Geomorphology and sedimentology of badlands system in the southwest coastline of Castle Araya, Sucre State, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Antonio Nuñez Ravelo

    2017-03-01

    Diffraction x-ray (XRD, assigned to the Departmental Management Exploration PDVSA-INTEVEP. Being used for analysis brand PANalytical diffractometer X'Pert model equipped with a curved crystal monochromator graphite (Cu Ka radiation and operated by the X-Pert Data collector LTU PW3240 / 92 (version 2.2b software, applying a range scanning of 5 ° θ 45 ° θ. For all rock and θ 2 ° to 35 ° θ clay minerals for less than 2 microns (<2μ fraction. As to biochemical properties, the organic carbon were analyzed on the floor (COs using in method Wlakley and Black, reported by Arrieche and Pacheco (sf and Toledo (2008, and content of organic matter (MO by the conventional factor Vammelen, referred to by Navarro (2007 and Toledo (2008 and checked against the proposal by PALMAVEN (1992 qualitative scale In general, you have to cliff erosion affected by the retrograde type badlands, It consists of a material silt loam, total analysis rocks which shows an abundance of clay (52%, silicon oxide (28%, calcium carbonate (18%, plagioclase (5%, iron sulfide (5% and iron carbonate (2 %, meanwhile, clays analysis lesser fraction two microns shows as predominant: Kaolinite (47%, Illite (39%, Chlorite (14%, and Smectic (1%. This is a dispersive and expansive regolith, with very low organic matter content, which favors the occurrence of current washout, soil and collapse of rock, possibly detonated from the slight increase in rainfall recorded between July and November, as well as the steep terrain, which has generated a decrease of apical contour, estimated at 1.31 m * year-1.

  19. Baryonic matter and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We summarize recent developments in identifying the ground state of dense baryonic matter and beyond. The topics include deconfinement from baryonic matter to quark matter, a diquark mixture, topological effect coupled with chirality and density, and inhomogeneous chiral condensates.

  20. Front Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HLRC Editor

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Higher Learning Research Communications (HLRC, ISSN: 2157-6254 [Online] is published collaboratively by Walden University (USA, Universidad Andrés Bello (Chile, Universidad Europea de Madrid (Spain and Istanbul Bilgi University (Turkey. Written communication to HLRC should be addressed to the office of the Executive Director at Laureate Education, Inc. 701 Brickell Ave Ste. 1700, Miami, FL 33131, USA. HLRC is designed for open access and online distribution through www.hlrcjournal.com. The views and statements expressed in this journal do not necessarily reflect the views of Laureate Education, Inc. or any of its affiliates (collectively “Laureate”. Laureate does not warrant the accuracy, reliability, currency or completeness of those views or statements and does not accept any legal liability arising from any reliance on the views, statements and subject matter of the journal. Acknowledgements The Guest Editors gratefully acknowledge the substantial contribution of the readers for the blind peer review of essays submitted for this special issue as exemplars of individuals from around the world who have come together in a collective endeavor for the common good: Robert Bringle (Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, US, Linda Buckley (University of the Pacific, US, Guillermo Calleja (Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain, Eva Egron-Polak (International Association of Universities, France, Heather Friesen (Abu Dhabi University, UAE, Saran Gill (National University of Malaysia, Malaysia, Chester Haskell (higher education consultant, US, Kanokkarn Kaewnuch (National Institute for Development Administration, Thailand, Gil Latz (Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, US, Molly Lee (higher education consultant, Malaysia, Deane Neubauer (East-West Center at University of Hawaii, US, Susan Sutton (Bryn Mawr College, US, Francis Wambalaba (United States International University, Kenya, and Richard Winn (higher education

  1. Sedimentology, conodonts and ostracods of the Devonian - Carboniferous strata of the Anseremme railway bridge section, Dinant Basin, Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casier, J.-G.; Mamet, B.; Preat, A.; Sandberg, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Seven major carbonate microfacies are defined in the Devonian - Carboniferous (D/C) strata (50 m) of the Anseremme railway bridge section, south of Dinant. They permit recognition of several levels encompassing the Etroeungt and Hastie??re formations. "Bathymetric" sequences range from open marine, below the storm wave base, to semi-restricted lagoon. This sequence records a shallowing-upward trend of the relative sea level, from environments below the storm wave base to strongly eroded supraticial pre-evaporitic environments. Faunal components (echinoderms, brachiopods...) indicate open-marine domain for the first six microfacies located within the dysphoticeuphotic zone in relatively shallow waters. The textures of the rocks (mudstones to rudstones) associated with lamination characteristics indicate the position of the storm (SWB) and the fair-weather (FWWB) wave bases. Microfacies seven suggests a semi-restricted platform with salinity fluctuations from hypersaline brines to brackish waters. Thus, the boundary of the Etroeungt/Hastie??re formations is marked by an abrupt drop in sea level. Carbonate micro-conglomerates recording an important erosive phase and a sedimentary hiatus. The environment is again open marine in the upper part of the Hastie??re Formation. Our conclusion is that the Anseremme section is not a reliable continuous succession for the study of the D/C boundary. This confirms the VAN STEENWINKEL (1988, 1993 hypothesis based on other arguments. Conodont faunas demonstrate that the Devonian sequence spans the five youngest conodont zones, but that two of these zones are not represented. The Epinette Formation is dated as the youngest part of the Middle expansa Zone. Thus, the boundary with the Late praesulcata Zone probably coincides with the sharp sedimentological change at the base of the Etroeungt Formation, which is interpreted to belong entirely to this zone. The disconformably overlying basal bed 159 of the Hastie??re Formation is dated

  2. Discharge patterns of radionuclides and the influence of early diagenesis in a salt-marsh of the Ribble Estuary, NW England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.E.; Parker, A.; Rae, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Routine discharges of low level liquid radioactive waste from British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) at Sellafield and Springfield have resulted in enhanced levels of radionuclides in sediments of the Ribble Estuary, NW England, UK. The variations in radionuclide concentrations ( 137 Cs, 230 Th, 232 Th, 238 U, 239,240 Pu and 241 Am) with depth were analysed in order to investigate historical discharge trends. The influence of early diagenesis in terms of radionuclide mobility was established by considering geochemical associations of radionuclides through the depth profile. A core from Longton Marsh was analysed by gamma-spectrometry and alpha-spectrometry. Major/trace metal and total organic carbon determinations were also made. Sequential extractions were employed in order to specify radionuclide phase associations. Distinct subsurface maxima were present for 137 Cs, 241 Am and 239,240 Pu with activities as high as 4500 Bq kg -1 for 137 Cs and 800 Bq kg -1 for 241 Am. Thorium-230 and 238 U exhibited complex activity profiles with depth. 137 Cs was found associated predominantly with the residual phase at all depths. Thorium-230 and 239,240 Pu were mainly associated with the organic and sesquioxide phases with some evidence to suggest that plutonium had undergone a phase redistribution below the sediment surface. Caesium-137, 230 Th and 239,240 Pu were deemed useful in terms of establishing core chronologies. (author)

  3. Silicate diagenesis in deep-sea sediments from the Tonga fore-arc (SW Pacific): a strontium and rare earth elements signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitali, F.; Stille, P.; Blanc, G.; Toulkeridis, T.

    2000-01-01

    87 Sr/ 86 Sr isotopic ratios, strontium and Rare Earth Element concentrations obtained on volcano-sedimentary rocks and separated clay mineral and zeolite fractions reveal a formation by pore water-volcanic rock interaction for most of the hydrous silicate minerals of the Site 841 ODP collected from the Tonga fore-arc. Unusual strontium concentrations and isotopic ratios recorded in the Miocene tuffs associated with specific REE patterns indicate that the formation of these hydrous silicates does not follow a simple burial diagenesis model, but was related to the cooling of intruding basaltic sills in the Miocene volcano-sedimentary series. Migration of strontium into the pore water in response to the heat flow induced the formation of Sr-bearing zeolites such as clinoptilolite, heulandite and chabazite. No evidence of any influence of a further thermal pulse in the Eocene rhyolitic tuffs could be found. As recorded by the chemistry of their clay mineral fraction, the rhyolitic tuffs developed a polyphasic diagenetic process, which might have been influenced by a possible circulation of a fluid into structurally weak areas. (authors)

  4. Sedimentary architecture of the distal lower freshwater molasse and its relation to the diagenesis and petrophysical properties demonstrated by the example of the Langenthal boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, B.; Blaesi, H.R.; Platt, N.H.; Mozley, P.S.; Matter, A.

    1990-08-01

    Sedimentary study at outcrop and quarry exposures of distal alluvial deposits in the upper part of the Lower Freshwater Molasse ('Aquitan') has revealed four principal facies. The same facies may also be recognised in boreholes (Langenthal, Weiach, Schafisheim) penetrating the continental succession. These facies make up distinct sediment bodies or 'architectural elements'. Each architectural element may be assigned to a particular depositional setting: Meander Belt RG (MB); Crevasse Splays and Crevasse Channels DFR (CS), Levees and Distal Splays UW (LS), Overbank, Paleosols and Swamps UPS (OPS) and Lacustrine LAK (LAC). Meander belt sandstones in the distal Lower Freshwater Molasse reflect the occurrence of two types of mixed load channels. Architectural modelling permits consideration of the distal Lower Freshwater Molasse in terms of a sandy framework, comprising the channel sandstone bodies, each in contact with their associated crevasse splay and crevasse channel sandstones, and a muddy-silty matrix consisting of interbedded floodplain sediments. Comparison with the morphologies of modern alluvial systems suggests that channel sandstone bodies in the Lower Freshwater Molasse are likely to show greater longitudinal continuity, greater width and a higher degree of interconnectedness in an upstream direction. Conversely, primary depositional porosities and permeabilities of the sandstone units are likely to decrease downstream towards more distal areas in the east and at the northern margin of the basin, although regional differences in tectonic style and diagenesis will also exert a major control on the petrophysical and hydrological properties in any given area. (author) figs., tabs., 54 refs

  5. Fluid phases contemporary with sandstone diagenesis tectonic movements and the activity of the natural nuclear reactors in the Oklo deposit, Republic of Gabon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.

    1979-12-01

    A research contract was agreed between the IAEA and the Centre de Recherches Petrographiques et Geochimiques of Nancy (France) to analyze some aspects of the fluid phases present during diagenesis of the Precambrian Francevillean sandstones of Gabon, which include the Oklo uranium deposit in which because of the geometry of the ore body, the high ore grade, etc., a natural uranium reactor was formed. The investigation was orientated to define some special characteristics of the fluid inclusions and two main methods were applied for this purpose: The Raman spectroscopy (MOLE microsonde) and microthermometric analysis. The main conclusions of the research are the following: 1. The Francevillean sandstones were buried up to a depth of 4-5 km where the corresponding geothermal temperature was of around 240 0 C but during the Oklo nuclear reaction, the fluid temperatures were higher than 450 0 C and in at least one case (Zone II) up to 600 0 C. 2. The tectonic fracturing has favoured the fluid circulation, which was possibly the responsible of the mineral re-concentration after the Oklo nuclear reaction. 3. The diagenetic fluids were essentially aqueous solutions and no sulphur components were identified. 4. The hydrogen presence in a quartz veinlet is surprising and possibly due to water decomposition by strong irradiation

  6. Aspects of the sedimentology of some uranium-bearing sandstones in the Beaufort West area, Cape Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D.I.

    1980-01-01

    The sedimentology of some uranium-bearing sandstones from the Beaufort Group in the Beaufort West area was studied by use of some 116 vertical profiles measured across and adjacent to 14 mineralized deposits. The vertical profiles consist of 91 field sections and 25 borehole logs. The sandstones are usually multistorey and alternate with a mudstone and/or siltstone succession. The vertical profiles basically consist of a succession of facies. Some 19 facies were recognised within the sandstones on the basis of texture and sedimentary structure. The facies transitions within the sandstone sequence were subjected to a one-step Markov chain analysis. The cumulative thickness of uranium mineralization for each sedimentary facies within the sandstone sequence was measured. Some 99 per cent of the total cumulative thickness occurs within the coarser-grained facies (grain sizes in excess of very fine), which suggests that permeability was an important control on the mineralization. The coarser-grained facies, which mostly represent lower point bar or channel bar deposits near the base of each storey, probably acted as suitable aquifers for the transport of uraniferous solutions. Irregularities in the base of each storey may have interrupted the flow of these solutions and allowed sufficient time for precipitation of the uranium. Carbonaceous debris is frequently associated with the mineralized deposits and most likely acted as an indirect reductant for this precipitation. Mineralization decreases upwards in the sandstone sequence and some 40 per cent of the total cumulative thickness is restricted to the initial storey. The horizontally bedded facies contain a high proportion of the total cumulative thickness of mineralization (45 per cent) and this again may be related to a more abundant content of carbonaceous debris

  7. Transition of microbiological and sedimentological features associated with the geochemical gradient in a travertine mound in northern Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Chiya; Yanagawa, Katsunori; Okumura, Tomoyo; Takashima, Chizuru; Harijoko, Agung; Kano, Akihiro

    2016-08-01

    Modern travertines, carbonate deposits in Ca-rich hydrothermal water with high pCO2, often display a changing environment along the water path, with corresponding variability in the microbial communities. We investigated a travertine-bearing hot spring at the Blue Pool in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. The thermal water of 62 °C with high H2S (200 μM) and pCO2 ( 1 atm) developed a travertine mound 70 m wide. The concentrations of the gas components H2S and CO2, decrease immediately after the water is discharged, while the dissolved oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation increase in the downstream direction. Responding to the geochemical gradient in the water, the surface biofilms change color from white to pink, light-green, dark-green, and brown as the water flows from the vent; this corresponds to microbial communities characterized by chemolithoautotrophs (Halothiobacillaceae), purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae), Anaerolineaceae, and co-occurrence of green non-sulfur bacteria (Chloroflexales)-Cyanobacteria, and green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiales), respectively. In an environment with a certain level of H2S (> 1 μM), sulfur digestion and anoxygenic photosynthesis can be more profitable than oxygenic photosynthesis by Cyanobacteria. The precipitated carbonate mineral consists of aragonite and calcite, with the proportion of aragonite increasing downstream due to the larger Mg2 +/Ca2 + ratio in the water or the development of thicker biofilm. Where the biofilm is well developed, the aragonite travertines often exhibit laminated structures that were likely associated with the daily metabolism of these bacteria. The microbiological and sedimentological features at the Blue Pool may be the modern analogs of geomicrobiological products in the early Earth. Biofilm of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria had the potential to form ancient stromatolites that existed before the appearance of cyanobacteria.

  8. CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

    2011-04-11

    An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

  9. Integrated Sedimentological Approach to Assess Reservoir Quality and Architecture of Khuff Carbonates: Outcrop Analog, Central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mutsim; Abdullatif, Osman

    2017-04-01

    The Permian to Triassic Khuff carbonate reservoirs (and equivalents) in the Middle East are estimated to contain about 38.4% of the world's natural gas reserves. Excellent exposed outcrops in central Saudi Arabia provide good outcrop equivalents to subsurface Khuff reservoirs. This study conduct high resolution outcrop scale investigations on an analog reservoir for upper Khartam of Khuff Formation. The main objective is to reconstruct litho- and chemo- stratigraphic outcrop analog model that may serve to characterize reservoir high resolution (interwell) heterogeneity, continuity and architecture. Given the fact of the limitation of subsurface data and toolsin capturing interwell reservoir heterogeneity, which in turn increases the value of this study.The methods applied integrate sedimentological, stratigraphic petrographic, petrophysical data and chemical analyses for major, trace and rare earth elements. In addition, laser scanning survey (LIDAR) was also utilized in this study. The results of the stratigraphic investigations revealed that the lithofacies range from mudstone, wackestone, packestone and grainstone. These lithofacies represent environments ranging from supratidal, intertidal, subtidal and shoal complex. Several meter-scale and less high resolution sequences and composite sequences within 4th and 5th order cycles were also recognized in the outcrop analog. The lithofacies and architectural analysis revealed several vertically and laterally stacked sequences at the outcrop as revealed from the stratigraphic sections and the lidar scan. Chemostratigraphy is effective in identifying lithofacies and sequences within the outcrop analog. Moreover, different chemical signatures were also recognized and allowed establishing and correlating high resolution lithofacies, reservoir zones, layers and surfaces bounding reservoirs and non-reservoir zones at scale of meters or less. The results of this high resolution outcrop analog study might help to understand

  10. Sedimentology, eruptive mechanism and facies architecture of basaltic scoria cones from the Auckland Volcanic Field (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly

    2016-09-01

    Scoria cones are a common type of basaltic to andesitic small-volume volcanoes (e.g. 10- 1-10- 5 km3) that results from gas-bubble driven explosive eruptive styles. Although they are small in volume, they can produce complex eruptions, involving multiple eruptive styles. Eight scoria cones from the Quaternary Auckland Volcanic Field in New Zealand were selected to define the eruptive style variability from their volcanic facies architecture. The reconstruction of their eruptive and pyroclastic transport mechanisms was established on the basis of study of their volcanic sedimentology, stratigraphy, and measurement of their pyroclast density, porosity, Scanning Electron Microscopy, 2D particle morphology analysis and Visible and Near Visible Infrared Spectroscopy. Collection of these data allowed defining three end-member types of scoria cones inferred to be constructed from lava-fountaining, transitional fountaining and Strombolian type, and explosive Strombolian type. Using the physical and field-based characteristics of scoriaceous samples a simple generalised facies model of basaltic scoria cones for the AVF is developed that can be extended to other scoria cones elsewhere. The typical AVF scoria cone has an initial phreatomagmatic phases that might reduce the volume of magma available for subsequent scoria cone forming eruptions. This inferred to have the main reason to have decreased cone volumes recognised from Auckland in comparison to other volcanic fields evolved dominantly in dry eruptive condition (e.g. no external water influence). It suggests that such subtle eruptive style variations through a scoria cone evolution need to be integrated into the hazard assessment of a potentially active volcanic field such as that in Auckland.

  11. Sedimentology and preservation of aeolian sediments on steep terrains: Incipient sand ramps on the Atacama coast (northern Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventra, Dario; Rodríguez-López, Juan Pedro; de Boer, Poppe L.

    2017-05-01

    The origin of topographically controlled aeolian landforms in high-relief settings is difficult to synthesize under general models, given the dependence of such accumulations on local morphology. Quaternary sand ramps have been linked to palaeoclimate, regional geomorphology and wind patterns; however, controls on the early development and preservation of such landforms are poorly known. This study describes the morphology and sedimentology of complex sedimentary aprons along steep coastal slopes in the Atacama Desert (Chile). Direct slope accessibility and continuous stratigraphic exposures enable comparisons between active processes and stratigraphic signatures. Stratigraphic facies distribution and its links with patterns of aeolian deposition show that the preservation of wind-laid sediments depends on the morphology and processes of specific slope sectors. The spatial organization of runoff depends on bedrock configuration and directly controls the permanence or erosion of aeolian sediment. The occurrence of either water or mass flows depends on the role of aeolian fines in the rheology of flash floods. In turn, the establishment of a rugged surface topography controlled by patterns of mass-flow deposition creates local accommodation for aeolian fines, sustaining the initial aggradation of a colluvial-aeolian system. By contrast, slopes subject to runoff develop a thin, extensive aeolian mantle whose featureless surface is subject mostly to sediment bypass down- and across-slope; the corresponding stratigraphic record comprises almost exclusively thin debris-flow and sheetflood deposits. Slope morphology and processes are fundamental in promoting or inhibiting aeolian aggradation in mountain settings. Long-term sand-ramp construction depends on climate and regional topography, but the initial development is probably controlled by local geomorphic factors. The observed interactions between wind and topography in the study area may also represent a process

  12. Missoula flood dynamics and magnitudes inferred from sedimentology of slack-water deposits on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Sedimentological study of late Wisconsin, Missoula-flood slack-water sediments deposited along the Columbia and Tucannon Rivers in southern Washington reveals important aspects of flood dynamics. Most flood facies were deposited by energetic flood surges (velocities>6 m/sec) entering protected areas along the flood tract, or flowing up and then directly out of tributary valleys. True still-water facies are less voluminous and restricted to elevations below 230 m. High flood stages attended the initial arrival of the flood wave and were not associated with subsequent hydraulic ponding upslope from channel constrictions. Among 186 flood beds studied in 12 sections, 57% have bioturbated tops, and about half of these bioturbated beds are separated from overlying flood beds by nonflood sediments. A single graded flood bed was deposited at most sites during most floods. Sequences in which 2-9 graded beds were deposited during a single flood are restricted to low elevations. These sequences imply complex, multi-peaked hydrographs in which the first flood surge was generally the largest, and subsequent surges were attenuated by water already present in slack-water areas. Slack-water - sediment stratigraphy suggests a wide range of flood discharges and volumes. Of >40 documented late Wisconsin floods that inundated the Pasco Basin, only about 20 crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. Floods younger than the set-S tephras from Mount St.Helens were generally smaller than earlier floods of late Wisconsin age, although most still crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. These late floods primarily traversed the Cheney-Palouse scabland because stratigraphy of slack-water sediment along the Columbia River implies that the largest flood volumes did not enter the Pasco Basin by way of the Columbia River. 47 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Sedimentological and radiochemical characteristics of marsh deposits from Assateague Island and the adjacent vicinity, Maryland and Virginia, following Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher G.; Marot, Marci E.; Ellis, Alisha M.; Wheaton, Cathryn J.; Bernier, Julie C.; Adams, C. Scott

    2015-09-15

    The effect of tropical and extratropical cyclones on coastal wetlands and marshes is highly variable and depends on a number of climatic, geologic, and physical variables. The impacts of storms can be either positive or negative with respect to the wetland and marsh ecosystems. Small to moderate amounts of inorganic sediment added to the marsh surface during storms or other events help to abate pressure from sea-level rise. However, if the volume of sediment is large and the resulting deposits are thick, the organic substrate may compact causing submergence and a loss in elevation. Similarly, thick deposits of coarse inorganic sediment may also alter the hydrology of the site and impede vegetative processes. Alternative impacts associated with storms include shoreline erosion at the marsh edge as well as potential emergence. Evaluating the outcome of these various responses and potential long-term implications is possible from a systematic assessment of both historical and recent event deposits. A study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey to assess the sedimentological and radiochemical characteristics of marsh deposits from Assateague Island and areas around Chincoteague Bay, Maryland and Virginia, following Hurricane Sandy in 2012. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the surficial sediment of the relict to recent washover fans and back-barrier marshes in the study area, and (2) characterize the sediment of six marsh cores from the back-barrier marshes and a single marsh island core near the mainland. These geologic data will be integrated with other remote sensing data collected along Assateague Island in Maryland and Virginia and assimilated into an assessment of coastal wetland response to storms.

  14. Core Description and a Preliminarily Sedimentology Study of Site 1202D, Leg 195, in the Southern Okinawa Trough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yue Huang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available ODP Site 1202 of Leg 195 was designed primarily for a high-resolution study of the paleoceanography of the Kuroshio Current in the southern Okinawa Trough off NE Taiwan. Four holes were drilled in which Hole 1202D is described in detail in this study for an assessment of core quality for paleoceanography study and understanding of sedimentological features, especially turbidite sedimentation and the sediment provenances during the Late Quaternary in the southern Okinawa Trough. Pelagic mud with insignificant silt or sand layers is observed from the core top down to 133 m (mbsf; Marine Isotope Stages 1-3, but the silt-sand layer ratio (SLR: total thickness of silt and sand layers / 1.5 m of core increases gradually from a value of 50 % between 223 and 279 m, followed by decreases to values 250 _ Slate fragments are commonly found in fine-grained turbidite dominant intervals (160 - 280 m, while mica flakes can be observed in the muds throughout the core. The major detrital components were derived primarily from the Miocene slate belt of the pre-collision accretionary prism of the Central Range in northern Taiwan. The occurrence of volcanics could represent submarine volcanic activity in the active-opening Okinawa Trough back-arc basin off NE Taiwan. Shallow-marine fossils including benthic foraminifers, echinoids, bryozoans and mollusks are also found in the fine-grained turbidite dominant intervals. These fossil assemblages could have been deposited in the shallow shelf and then transported to the depositional site along with voluminous terrigenous materials derived from Taiwan, via submarine channels or by slope failures due to frequent earthquakes induced by plate convergence/collision and extension in the southwestern Okinawa Trough off NE Taiwan. It is concluded that the top 133 m of the core is better suited for paleoceanographic reconstruction.

  15. Conducting compositions of matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Tito (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides conductive compositions of matter, as well as methods for the preparation of the conductive compositions of matter, solutions comprising the conductive compositions of matter, and methods of preparing fibers or fabrics having improved anti-static properties employing the conductive compositions of matter.

  16. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 112, Peru continental margin: Part 2, Sedimentary history and diagenesis in a coastal upwelling environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, E.; von Huene, R.

    1988-10-01

    On the shelf and upper slope off Peru the signal of coastal upwelling productivity and bottom-water oxygen is well preserved in alternately laminated and bioturbated diatomaceous Quaternary sediments. Global sea-level fluctuations are the ultimate cause for these cyclic facies changes. During late Miocene time, coastal upwelling was about 100 km west of the present centers, along the edge of an emergent structure that subsequently subsided to form the modern slope. The sediments are rich in organic carbon, and intense microbially mediated decomposition of organic matter is evident in sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. These processes are accompanied by the formation of diagenetic carbonates, mostly Ca-rich dolomites and Mg-calcites. The downhole isotopic signatures of these carbonate cements display distinct successions that reflect the vertical evolution of the pore fluid environment. From the association of methane gas hydrates, burial depth, and low-chloride interstitial fluids, we suggest an additional process that could contribute to the characteristic chloride depletion in pore fluids of active margins: release of interlayer water from clays without a mineral phase change. The shelf sediments also contain a subsurface brine that stretches for more than 500 km from north to south over the area drilled. The source of the brine remains uncertain, although the composition of the oxygen isotopes suggests dissolution of evaporites by seawater.

  17. Condensed elementary particle matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajantie, K.

    1996-01-01

    Quark matter is a special case of condensed elementary particle matter, matter governed by the laws of particle physics. The talk discusses how far one can get in the study of particle matter by reducing the problem to computations based on the action. As an example the computation of the phase diagram of electroweak matter is presented. It is quite possible that ultimately an antireductionist attitude will prevail: experiments will reveal unpredicted phenomena not obviously reducible to the study of the action. (orig.)

  18. Carbon-isotope stratigraphy from terrestrial organic matter through the Monterey event, Miocene, New Jersey margin (IODP Expedition 313)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Linhao; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Hesselbo, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    documented from oceanic settings (i.e., lack of positive excursion of carbon-isotope values in terrestrial organic matter through the Langhian Stage). Factors that may potentially bias local terrestrial carbon-isotope records include reworking from older deposits, degradation and diagenesis, as well....../or reworking of older woody phytoclasts, but where such processes have occurred they do not readily explain the observed carbon-isotope values. It is concluded that the overall carbon-isotope signature for the exchangeable carbon reservoir is distorted, to the extent that the Monterey event excursion...... is not easily identifiable. The most likely explanation is that phytoclast reworking has indeed occurred in clinoform toe-of-slope facies, but the reason for the resulting relatively heavy carbon-isotope values in the Burdigalian remains obscure....

  19. Coral Patch seamount (NE Atlantic – a sedimentological and megafaunal reconnaissance based on video and hydroacoustic surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wienberg

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study provides new knowledge about the so far largely unexplored Coral Patch seamount which is located in the NE Atlantic Ocean half-way between the Iberian Peninsula and Madeira. For the first time a detailed hydroacoustic mapping (MBES in conjunction with video surveys (ROV, camera sled were performed to describe the sedimentological and biological characteristics of this sub-elliptical ENE-WSW elongated seamount. Video observations were restricted to the southwestern summit area of Coral Patch seamount (water depth: 560–760 m and revealed that this part of the summit is dominated by exposed hard substrate, whereas soft sediment is just a minor substrate component. Although exposed hardgrounds are dominant for this summit area and, thus, offer suitable habitat for settlement by benthic organisms, the benthic megafauna shows rather scarce occurrence. In particular, scleractinian framework-building cold-water corals are apparently rare with very few isolated and small-sized live occurrences of the species Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. In contrast, dead coral framework and coral rubble are more frequent pointing to a higher abundance of cold-water corals on Coral Patch during the recent past. This is even supported by the observation of fishing lines that got entangled with rather fresh-looking coral frameworks. Overall, long lines and various species of commercially important fish were frequently observed emphasising the potential of Coral Patch as an important target for fisheries that may have impacted the entire benthic community. Hydroacoustic seabed classification covered the entire summit of Coral Patch and its northern and southern flanks (water depth: 560–2660 m and revealed extended areas dominated by mixed and soft sediments at the northern flank and to a minor degree at its easternmost summit and southern flank. Nevertheless, these data also predict most of the summit area to be dominated by exposed bedrock

  20. Sedimentology and High Resolution Sequence Stratigraphy of the Middle Jurassic Dhruma Formation Carbonates Outcrops in the Central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Ibrahim; Abdullatif, Osman; Makkawi, Mohammed; Abdulghani, Waleed

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the microfacies and sequence stratigraphic frame work of the Middle Jurassic Dhruma Formation in outcrops in central Saudi Arabia. The study contributes to the efforts to understand and enhance local and regional stratigraphic relationship and correlation of the Jurassic carbonate sequences and their significance to reservoir description and prediction in the subsurcae. The study describes and characterizes the sedimentology, microfacies and the stratigraphy of Dhruma Formation from outcrop sections having a total thickness of 70 m. Detailed microfacies and high-resolution stratigraphical analysis were carried out to determine microfacies, cyclicity, sequences and staking pattern. The study revealed ten lithofacies namely: oolitic grainstone,bioclastic oolitic grainstone, oolitic grapestone, bioclastic grainstone,foraminiferal packstone, echinoderm packstone, peloidal packstone to grainstone,skeletal wackestone to packstone, mudstone, and marlstone.These lithofacies were grouped into five lithofacies associations that deposited on a carbonate ramp setting. The depositional environment ranging from low energy lagoonal setting to high-energy shoals and banks to low energy outer ramp setting. Five high-resolution composite sequences have been defined and each sequence is composed at the bottom of intercalated mudstone/wackestone that passing up into grainstone lithofacies.The composite sequences range in thickness from 7 to 15 m, while the parasequences range from 0.5 to 1.5 m. The composite sequences extend laterally for a distance of more than 350 m. The overall composite section shows a shallowing upward succession of the 4th to the 5th order high-resolution sequences.The dominant lithofacies are the grainy ones, which constitute 30%, 50% and 80% of the studied sections. Furthermore, the parasequences thickness and their bio-components are increasing towards the top. The muddy lithofacies intensively affected the vertical continuity of the

  1. Sedimentology, geochemistry and rock magnetic properties of beach sands in Galapagos Islands - implications for nesting marine turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Vazquez-Gutierrez, F.; Carranza-Edwards, A.

    2007-12-01

    Marine turtles are well known for their navigation ability in the open ocean and fidelity to nesting beaches. Green turtle adult females migrate from foraging areas to island nesting beaches, traveling hundreds or thousands of kilometers each way. The marine turtle breeding in the Galapagos Islands is the Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas agassisi); fairly common throughout the islands but with nesting sites located at Las Bachas (Santa Cruz), Barahona and Quinta Playa (Isabela), Salinas (Baltra), Gardner Bay (Española) and Bartolomé Islet. In order to characterize and to identify the geochemical signature of nesting marine turtle beaches in Galapagos Islands, sedimentological, geochemical and rock magnetic parameters are used. A total of one hundred and twenty sand samples were collected in four beaches to relate compositional characteristics between equivalent areas, these are: Las Bachas, Salinas, Barahona and Quinta Playa. Grain size is evaluated using laser particle analysis (Model Coulter LS 230). Bulk ICP-MS geochemical analysis is performed, following trace elements are analyzed: Al, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Ba, Pb, Fe, Mn, K, Na, Mg, Sr, Ca and Hg; and low-field magnetic susceptibility is measured in all samples at low and high frequencies. Granulometric analysis showed that Barahona and Quinta Playa are characterized for fine grained sands. In contrast, Salinas and Las Bachas exhibit medium to coarse sands. Trace metals concentrations and magnetic susceptibility show different distribution patterns in the beach sands. Calcium is the most abundant element in the samples. In particular, Co, K, and Na show similar concentrations in the four beaches. Las Bachas beach shows highest concentrations of Pb and Hg (maximum values 101.1 and 118.5 mg/kg, respectively), we suggest that the enrichment corresponds to an anthropogenic signal. Salinas beach samples show high concentrations of Fe, V, Cr, Zn, Mn and the highest values of magnetic susceptibility (maximum

  2. Sedimentology and paleoenvironments of a new fossiliferous late Miocene-Pliocene sedimentary succession in the Rukwa Rift Basin, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtelela, Cassy; Roberts, Eric M.; Hilbert-Wolf, Hannah L.; Downie, Robert; Hendrix, Marc S.; O'Connor, Patrick M.; Stevens, Nancy J.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed sedimentologic investigation of a newly identified, fossiliferous Late Neogene sedimentary succession in the Rukwa Rift Basin, southwestern Tanzania. This synrift deposit is a rare and significant new example of a fossiliferous succession of this age in the Western Branch of East Africa Rift System. The unit, informally termed the lower Lake Beds succession, is late Miocene to Pliocene in age based on cross-cutting relationships, preliminary biostratigraphy, and U-Pb geochronology. An angular unconformity separates the lower Lake Beds from underlying Cretaceous and Oligocene strata. Deposition was controlled by rapid generation of accommodation space and increased sediment supply associated with late Cenozoic tectonic reactivation of the Rukwa Rift and synchronous initiation of the Rungwe Volcanic Centre. The lower Lake Beds, which have thus far only been identified in three localities throughout the Rukwa Rift Basin, are characterized by two discrete lithologic members (herein A and B). The lower Member A is a volcanic-rich succession composed mostly of devitrified volcanic tuffs, and volcaniclastic mudstones and sandstones with minor conglomerates. The upper Member B is a siliciclastic-dominated succession of conglomerates, sandstones, mudstones and minor volcanic tuffs. Detailed facies analysis of the lower Lake Beds reveals various distinctive depositional environments that can be grouped into three categories: 1) alluvial fan; 2) fluvial channel; and 3) flood basin environments, characterized by volcanoclastic-filled lakes and ponds, abandoned channel-fills and pedogenically modified floodplains. Member A represents a shallow lacustrine setting filled by tuffaceous sediments, which grade up into a system of alluvial fans and high-energy, proximal gravel-bed braided rivers. An unconformity marks the contact between the two members. Member B shows an upward transition from a high-energy, gravel-bed braided river system to a sandy

  3. Permeability changes due to mineral diagenesis in fractured crust: implications for hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Fabrice Jh.; Rabinowicz, Michel; Boulègue, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    The hydrothermal processes at ridge crests have been extensively studied during the last two decades. Nevertheless, the reasons why hydrothermal fields are only occasionally found along some ridge segments remain a matter of debate. In the present study we relate this observation to the mineral precipitation induced by hydrothermal circulation. Our study is based on numerical models of convection inside a porous slot 1.5 km high, 2.25 km long and 120 m wide, where seawater is free to enter and exit at its top while the bottom is held at a constant temperature of 420°C. Since the fluid circulation is slow and the fissures in which seawater circulates are narrow, the reactions between seawater and the crust achieve local equilibrium. The rate of mineral precipitation or dissolution is proportional to the total derivative of the temperature with respect to time. Precipitation of minerals reduces the width of the fissures and thus percolation. Using conventional permeability versus porosity laws, we evaluate the evolution of the permeability field during the hydrothermal circulation. Our computations begin with a uniform permeability and a conductive thermal profile. After imposing a small random perturbation on the initial thermal field, the circulation adopts a finger-like structure, typical of convection in vertical porous slots thermally influenced by surrounding walls. Due to the strong temperature dependence of the fluid viscosity and thermal expansion, the hot rising fingers are strongly buoyant and collide with the top cold stagnant water layer. At the interface of the cold and hot layers, a horizontal boundary layer develops causing massive precipitation. This precipitation front produces a barrier to the hydrothermal flow. Consequently, the flow becomes layered on both sides of the front. The fluid temperature at the top of the layer remains quite low: it never exceeds a temperature of 80°C, well below the exit temperature of hot vent sites observed at

  4. Soil organic matter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A total of 77 papers were presented and discussed during this symposium, 37 are included in this Volume II. The topics covered in this volume include: biochemical transformation of organic matter in soils; bitumens in soil organic matter; characterization of humic acids; carbon dating of organic matter in soils; use of modern techniques in soil organic matter research; use of municipal sludge with special reference to heavy metals constituents, soil nitrogen, and physical and chemical properties of soils; relationship of soil organic matter and plant metabolism; interaction between agrochemicals and organic matter; and peat. Separate entries have been prepared for those 20 papers which discuss the use of nuclear techniques in these studies

  5. Influence of Chemical, Physical, Biological and Geochemical Processes of Early Diagenesis and Material Exchange Across the Sediment/Seawater Interface in Margin Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kastner, Miriam

    1997-01-01

    .... To this end, we provided high resolution characterizations of sediment microfabric, physical properties, chemistry, mineralogy, and organic matter content as well as theoretical work on smectite interlayer hydration...

  6. Nuclear hydrology and sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airey, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    The applications of isotope techniques to groundwater hydrology, sedimentation and surface water and heavy metal transport are discussed. Reference is made to several Australian studies. These include: a tritium study of the Burdekin Delta, North Queensland; a carbon-14 study of the Mereenie Sandstone aquifer, Alice Springs; groundwater studies in the Great Artesion Basin; uranium daughter product disequilibrium studies; the use of environmental cesium-137 to investigate sediment transport; and a study on the dispersion of water and zinc through the Magela system in the uranium mining areas of the Northern Territory

  7. Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    In the first two of these lectures, I present the evidence for baryonic dark matter and describe possible forms that it may take. The final lecture discusses formation of baryonic dark matter, and sets the cosmological context.

  8. Grammar of the matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the author describes the structure of the matter and presents the families of elementary particles (fermions) and the interaction messengers (bosons) with their properties. He presents the actual status and future trends of research on nuclear matter

  9. Dark matter detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, G.

    1995-01-01

    A fundamental question of astrophysics and cosmology is the nature of dark matter. Astrophysical observations show clearly the existence of some kind of dark matter, though they cannot yet reveal its nature. Dark matter can consist of baryonic particles, or of other (known or unknown) elementary particles. Baryonic dark matter probably exists in the form of dust, gas, or small stars. Other elementary particles constituting the dark matter can possibly be measured in terrestrial experiments. Possibilities for dark matter particles are neutrinos, axions and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). While a direct detection of relic neutrinos seems at the moment impossible, there are experiments looking for baryonic dark matter in the form of Massive Compact Halo Objects, and for particle dark matter in the form of axions and WIMPS. (orig.)

  10. Dence Cold Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavinskiy Alexey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Possible way to create dense cold baryonic matter in the laboratory is discussed. The density of this matter is comparable or even larger than the density of neutron star core. The properties of this matter can be controlled by trigger conditions. Experimental program for the study of properties of dense cold matter for light and heavy ion collisions at initial energy range √sNN~2-3GeV is proposed..

  11. Dark Matter Effective Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We organize the effective (self)interaction terms for complex scalar dark matter candidates which are either an isosinglet, isodoublet or an isotriplet with respect to the weak interactions. The classification has been performed ordering the operators in inverse powers of the dark matter cutoff...... scale. We assume Lorentz invariance, color and charge neutrality. We also introduce potentially interesting dark matter induced flavor-changing operators. Our general framework allows for model independent investigations of dark matter properties....

  12. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  13. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.J.; Chung, D.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Kolb, E.W.; Riotto, A.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may be elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should not be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  14. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may be elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should not be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  15. Matter and Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Karam, P Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In Matter and Energy, readers will learn about the many forms of energy, the wide variety of particles in nature, and Albert Einstein's world-changing realization of how matter can be changed into pure energy. The book also examines the recent discoveries of dark matter and dark energy and the future of the universe.

  16. Silurian deltaic progradation, Tassili n'Ajjer plateau, south-eastern Algeria: Sedimentology, ichnology and sequence stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouder, Hocine; Lüning, Sebastian; Da Silva, Anne-Christine; Abdallah, Hussein; Boulvain, Frédéric

    2018-06-01

    The economic potential for unconventional shale oil and gas production in the Silurian of the Berkine - Ghadames and Illizi basins (BGI) in south-eastern Algeria has been recently confirmed through exploration drilling. The aim of the present paper attempts a better understanding of the Intra-Tassilian depression within the entire Silurian of the Tassili n'Ajjer plateau. The continuous deposits of the Silurian are exposed at the southern margin of the prolific BGI basins, in the Tassili n'Ajjer plateau, offering the chance to understand the sedimentology, ichnology, and to present a detailed sequence stratigraphy framework for the region. The 410 m-thick clastic Silurian sedimentary strata are subdivided into three formations in the context of sequence stratigraphy, namely: (i) the Oued Imihrou Fm. (Llandoverian) overlain by (ii) the Atafaïtafa Fm. (late Llandoverian to Wenlockian), and (iii) the Oued Tifernine Fm. (late Wenlockian to Pridolian). These can be also distinguished across the entire investigated area and laterally traceable over kilometers. Clear cyclic stacking patterns are identified within the four studied sections showing progressively a general trend of thickening- and coarsening-upward, over a complete 2nd-order megasequence (SIL-1 MS). This transgressive-regressive succession suggests deltaic progradation, shallowing and basin infilling as evidenced by numerous diagnostic sedimentary features and trace fossils, largely from eastern-to western-Tassili plateau. Indeed, the wealth of outcrop data in the Silurian siliciclastic succession enables us to distinct thirteen facies (facies A-M), ranging from shallow-to marginal-marine facies, and in turn, grouped into six facies associations (FA1-FA6). The lowermost part of the succession, which is the most prolific sources of hydrocarbons in North Africa, consists of thick organic-rich graptolite-yielding black 'hot' shales and 'lean' shales with sparse bioturbation with small Thalassinoides belonging

  17. Punctuated sediment discharge during early Pliocene birth of the Colorado River: Evidence from regional stratigraphy, sedimentology, and paleontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Rebecca J.; O’Connell, Brennan; McDougall-Reid, Kristin; Homan, Mindy B.

    2018-01-01

    The Colorado River in the southwestern U.S. provides an excellent natural laboratory for studying the origins of a continent-scale river system, because deposits that formed prior to and during river initiation are well exposed in the lower river valley and nearby basinal sink. This paper presents a synthesis of regional stratigraphy, sedimentology, and micropaleontology from the southern Bouse Formation and similar-age deposits in the western Salton Trough, which we use to interpret processes that controlled the birth and early evolution of the Colorado River. The southern Bouse Formation is divided into three laterally persistent members: basal carbonate, siliciclastic, and upper bioclastic members. Basal carbonate accumulated in a tide-dominated marine embayment during a rise of relative sea level between ~ 6.3 and 5.4 Ma, prior to arrival of the Colorado River. The transition to green claystone records initial rapid influx of river water and its distal clay wash load into the subtidal marine embayment at ~ 5.4–5.3 Ma. This was followed by rapid southward progradation of the Colorado River delta, establishment of the earliest through-flowing river, and deposition of river-derived turbidites in the western Salton Trough (Wind Caves paleocanyon) between ~ 5.3 and 5.1 Ma. Early delta progradation was followed by regional shut-down of river sand output between ~ 5.1 and 4.8 Ma that resulted in deposition of marine clay in the Salton Trough, retreat of the delta, and re-flooding of the lower river valley by shallow marine water that deposited the Bouse upper bioclastic member. Resumption of sediment discharge at ~ 4.8 Ma drove massive progradation of fluvial-deltaic deposits back down the river valley into the northern Gulf and Salton Trough.These results provide evidence for a discontinuous, start-stop-start history of sand output during initiation of the Colorado River that is not predicted by existing models for this system. The underlying controls on

  18. Giant Subaqueous Pyroclastic-Flow Deposits Revealed: Sedimentological Revision of the Holocene Outcrops of Izu-Oshima Island, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmi, R.; Yoshida, S.; Nemoto, Y.; Kotake, N.

    2010-12-01

    The early-to-middle Holocene outcrops of Izu-Oshima island, 100 km SSW of Tokyo, comprise sand- to gravel-size pyroclasts, and exhibit undulating layered structures, with each wavelet typically measuring 5-10 m high. These outcrops were traditionally interpreted as exemplary subaerial "ash-fall" deposits in volcanology textbooks (e.g. Schmincke 2006). Our detailed sedimentological analyses, however, have revealed that it is of pyroclastic density-current origin, the majority of which formed in shallow-marine settings. The present study focuses on the outcrops along the western coast of the Island, where the three-dimensional architecture of the outcrops is superbly exposed, and the existing archaeological framework provides a reliable chronostratigraphic control. The outcrops contain abundant compound bedforms, where small bedforms (dunes/antidunes) occur within the larger bedforms. The compound bedforms exhibit four-fold hierarchy (ranks 1 to 4), and bedforms for each scale display dominantly upstream-accreting geometry. The largest scale (Rank 1) of these bedforms show wavy parallel-bedding geometry (each wavelet typically measuring 5-10 m high and 50-100 m wide). We interpreted the large-scale architecture as sediment waves (gigantic antidunes) similar to the one reported from the shallow-marine deposits associated with AD 79 Mt. Vesuvius eruptions (Milia et al. 2008). Moreover, we have identified crustacean burrows and other trace fossils indicative of a nearshore shallow-marine environment. The pervasive occurrence of these fossils throughout the outcrops and abundant water-escape structures also suggests their subaqueous origin. On the other hand, evidence of subaerial deposition (e.g., paleosols and rootlets) or subaerial reworking (e.g., lahar) is absent, except for some spots on several regional unconformities that divide 10’s-m-thick sediment-wave deposits. On some of these unconformities, ribbon- to fan-shaped lava and/or ancient human-dwelling sites

  19. Investigating Interactions between the Silica and Carbon Cycles during Precipitation and Early Diagenesis of Authigenic Clay/Carbonate-Mineral Associations in the Carbonate Rock Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J. A.; Francisca Martinez Ruiz, F.; Sanchez-Roman, M.; Anjos, S.; Bontognali, T. R. R.; Nascimento, G. S.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2017-12-01

    example of this clay/carbonate-mineral association recorded in the Lower Cretaceous Codó Formation, NE Brazil (Bahniuk et al., 2015. Sedimentology, 62, 155-181).

  20. Secretly asymmetric dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Kilic, Can; Swaminathan, Sivaramakrishnan; Trendafilova, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    We study a mechanism where the dark matter number density today arises from asymmetries generated in the dark sector in the early Universe, even though the total dark matter number remains zero throughout the history of the Universe. The dark matter population today can be completely symmetric, with annihilation rates above those expected from thermal weakly interacting massive particles. We give a simple example of this mechanism using a benchmark model of flavored dark matter. We discuss the experimental signatures of this setup, which arise mainly from the sector that annihilates the symmetric component of dark matter.

  1. Dark Matter Caustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, Aravind

    2010-01-01

    The continuous infall of dark matter with low velocity dispersion in galactic halos leads to the formation of high density structures called caustics. Dark matter caustics are of two kinds : outer and inner. Outer caustics are thin spherical shells surrounding galaxies while inner caustics have a more complicated structure that depends on the dark matter angular momentum distribution. The presence of a dark matter caustic in the plane of the galaxy modifies the gas density in its neighborhood which may lead to observable effects. Caustics are also relevant to direct and indirect dark matter searches.

  2. Dark Matter Searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Shigetaka

    2008-01-01

    Recent cosmological as well as historical observations of rotational curves of galaxies strongly suggest the existence of dark matter. It is also widely believed that dark matter consists of unknown elementary particles. However, astrophysical observations based on gravitational effects alone do not provide sufficient information on the properties of dark matter. In this study, the status of dark matter searches is investigated by observing high-energy neutrinos from the sun and the earth and by observing nuclear recoils in laboratory targets. The successful detection of dark matter by these methods facilitates systematic studies of its properties. Finally, the XMASS experiment, which is due to start at the Kamioka Observatory, is introduced

  3. Impeded Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence & Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Johannes Gutenberg University,Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Slatyer, Tracy R. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wang, Xiao-Ping [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence & Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Johannes Gutenberg University,Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Xue, Wei [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-12-12

    We consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario “Impeded Dark Matter”. We demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.

  4. Impeded Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Xue, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario “Impeded Dark Matter”. We demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.

  5. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-02

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  6. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R.; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-01

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  7. Sterile neutrino dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Merle, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This book is a new look at one of the hottest topics in contemporary science, Dark Matter. It is the pioneering text dedicated to sterile neutrinos as candidate particles for Dark Matter, challenging some of the standard assumptions which may be true for some Dark Matter candidates but not for all. So, this can be seen either as an introduction to a specialized topic or an out-of-the-box introduction to the field of Dark Matter in general. No matter if you are a theoretical particle physicist, an observational astronomer, or a ground based experimentalist, no matter if you are a grad student or an active researcher, you can benefit from this text, for a simple reason: a non-standard candidate for Dark Matter can teach you a lot about what we truly know about our standard picture of how the Universe works.

  8. Systematic variations in sinter mineralogy, microtexture and diagenesis in modern siliceous hot springs: Clues for interpreting depositional conditions in ancient deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, V. W.; Farmer, J. D.; Ruff, S. W.; Nunez, J.; Jahnke, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    The deposits of siliceous hydrothermal springs are known to capture and preserve a wide range of microbial fossil information. The recent discovery of hydrothermal silica at Home Plate, Columbia Hills, Mars has once again raised interest in the potential importance of ancient spring sinters as targets for future astrobiological mission to Mars. To create additional context information to support future in situ missions to Mars, we have documented systematic changes in the mineralogy and microtexture of modern siliceous hot spring deposits, observed along gradients in temperature, pH and flow velocity. Specific objectives are to: 1) identify chemical and physical factors that promote early diagenetic transformations of amorphous silica (opal-A), to progressively more ordered and crystalline phases (cristobalite, tridymite and quartz); 2) determine the composition and abundance of minor mineral phases, especially clays, in relationship to pH, temperature and paragenesis; and 3) to assess the usefulness of sinter mineralogy and microtexture in reconstructing the paleoenvironmental records preserved in ancient deposits. Study sites for acidic (pH 2-5) sinters included Nymph Creek, located in the Norris Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Active alkaline (pH 7-10) springs included Rabbit Creek, Steep Cone and Mound Spring located in the Lower Geyser Basin, YNP. Field measurements in active springs included pH, temperature and flow velocity, along with general microfacies assignments. To better constrain types and rates of silica diagenesis, the study also sampled older (Holocene-Pleistocene-aged) deposits. Laboratory analyses included X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), thermal infrared spectroscopy (TIR) and thin section petrography for characterizing sinter microtextures and for placing mineral phases (identified by XRPD and TIR) into a time-ordered diagenetic framework. In analyzing the phyllosilicates present in sinters, we applied clay separation and

  9. Geothermal prospection in the Greater Geneva Basin (Switzerland and France). Impact of diagenesis on reservoir properties of the Upper Jurassic carbonate sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhloufi, Yasin; Rusillon, Elme; Brentini, Maud; Clerc, Nicolas; Meyer, Michel; Samankassou, Elias

    2017-04-01

    Diagenesis of carbonate rocks is known to affect the petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability) of the host rock. Assessing the diagenetic history of the rock is thus essential when evaluating any reservoir exploitation project. The Canton of Geneva (Switzerland) is currently exploring the opportunities for geothermal energy exploitation in the Great Geneva Basin (GGB) sub-surface. In this context, a structural analysis of the basin (Clerc et al., 2016) associated with reservoir appraisal (Brentini et al., 2017) and rock-typing of reservoir bodies of potential interest were conducted (Rusillon et al., 2017). Other geothermal exploitation projects elsewhere (e.g. Bavaria, south Germany, Paris Basin, France) showed that dolomitized carbonate rocks have good reservoir properties and are suitable for geothermal energy production. The objectives of this work are to (1) describe and characterize the dolomitized bodies in the GGB and especially their diagenetic history and (2) quantify the reservoir properties of those bodies (porosity, permeability). Currently, our study focuses on the Upper Jurassic sedimentary bodies of the GGB. Field and well data show that the dolomitization is not ubiquitous in the GGB. Results from the petrographical analyses of the Kimmeridgian cores (Humilly-2) and of field analogues (Jura, Saleve and Vuache mountains) display complex diagenetic histories, dependent of the study sites. The paragenesis exhibits several stages of interparticular calcite cementation as well as different stages of dolomitization and/or dedolomitization. Those processes seem to follow constrained path of fluid migrations through burial, faulting or exhumation during the basin's history. These complex diagenetic histories affected the petrophysical and microstructural properties via porogenesis (conservation of initial porosity, moldic porosity) and/or poronecrosis events. The best reservoir properties appear to be recorded in patch reef and peri

  10. Sedimentological, textural, mineralogical and geochemical study of surface sediments and suspension material in Baia da Ribeira, Angra dos Reis, RJ, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Samuel do Carmo

    1985-01-01

    The geochemistry dispersion of the metals in aquatic environment is related to the physical chemistry proprieties of these elements as to their interaction by sorption on and desorption from solid particles. These interaction must be understood within the environmental dynamic, with its hydrological, sedimentological, chemical, physical and biological processes that may take the toxic elements (stables metals and radionuclides) to the bio alimentary chain. It was observed at the Ribeira Bay, its hydrodynamic behaviour through the suspension material and particulate organic carbon dispersion. And, through the textural, mineralogical and chemical parameters it was observed the behaviour of the geochemistry processes of the sedimentary materials and the influence that they may submit to the metals dispersion. (author)

  11. Sedimentology and Paleoenvironment of Deposition of the Deba-Fulani Member of Pindiga Formation in the Gongola Arm of the Upper Benue Trough, Northeastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Shettima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The sedimentology and paleoenvironment of the Deba-Fulani Member of the Pindiga Formation were investigated on the basis of their grain size distribution. Granulometric analysis has indicated that the samples are generally well to moderately sorted with skewness values ranging from negatively to positively skewed which may indicate influence of both marine and fluvial conditions. Bivariate plot relationships of standard deviation vs. mean, standard deviation vs. skewness, first percentile vs. mean also indicated both fluvial and marine setting for the middle part of the Pindiga Formation member. However, most of the bivariate plot showed dominance of fluvial environment. The probability curve plot shows a prevalence of three-sand population curves which are usually associated with wave processes indicating marine conditions for most part of the Deba-Fulani Member.

  12. Strategies for dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The present status of alternative forms of dark matter, both baryonic and nonbaryonic, is reviewed. Alternative arguments are presented for the predominance of either cold dark matter (CDM) or of baryonic dark matter (BDM). Strategies are described for dark matter detection, both for dark matter that consists of weakly interacting relic particles and for dark matter that consists of dark stellar remnants

  13. High resolution HH-XRF scanning and XRD modelling as a tool in sedimentological analysis - A case study from the Enreca-3 core, Bach Long Vi Island, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Malgorzata; Hemmingsen Schovsbo, Niels; Korte, Christoph; Bryld Wessel Fyhn, Michael

    2017-04-01

    To improve the understanding and interpretation of the depositional environment of a late Oligocene lacustrine organic rich oil-prone source rock succession, 2464 hand held (HH)-XRF measurements were made systematically on the 500 m long, continuous core from the fully cored Enreca-3 well. This core, drilled on the remote Bach Long Vi Island, northern Gulf of Tonkin, offshore Vietnam, represents a deep lake succession alternating between lacustrine pelagic dominated sediments interrupted by hyperpycnal turbidites, high density turbidites and debris flows [1, 2]. From a combined HH-XRF-XRD data set, multivariate data analysis and regression models are used to type the rock and to predict the XRD mineral composition based on HH-XRF composition. The rock types and the modelled mineral composition highlight the geochemical variations of the sediment and allows for direct comparison with sedimentological processes and facies changes. The modeling also depicts the cyclic alteration of rock types that are present on many different scales ranging from centimeters to hundreds of meters [1, 2]. The sedimentological and geochemical variations observed throughout the cored section reflects fluctuating paleoclimate, tectonism and hinterland condition controlling the depositional setting, which may provide a deeper understanding of the deposition of this and similar Paleogene syn-rift succession in the South China Sea region. It allows furthermore the development of a more generalized depositional model relevant for other deep-lacustrine syn-rift basins. [1] Petersen et al. (2014) Journal of Petroleum Geology, 37: 373-389. [2] Hovikoski et al. (2016) Journal of Sedimentary Research, 86(8): 982-1007.

  14. Beach-ridge sedimentology as an archive of terrestrial climate change: Insights from a geochemical and stratigraphic study of the Tijucas Strandplain, southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krask, J. L.; Hein, C. J.; Galy, V.; FitzGerald, D.; Henrique de Fontoura Klein, A.

    2017-12-01

    Whereas millennial-scale variations in climate forcing drives changes in terrestrial processes, which are in turn directly linked to fluvial sediment loads (e.g., weathering and erosion), the impact of decadal- to centennial- scale climate fluctuations on downstream coastal sedimentation patterns and landscape evolution remains unclear. Specifically, the connection between long-term (decades or more) precipitation seasonality and sediment export from river systems has not been established. This study examines the manner in which sub-millennial-scale fluctuations in precipitation over river catchments may be recorded in coastal progradational sedimentary archives. The 5-km wide Tijucas Strandplain (southern Brazil) formed over the last 5800 years through the rapid reworking of sediment discharged from the Tijucas River in a regime of falling sea level. In an overall regime shift from sand- to mud- dominance (linked to a long-term reduction in wave energy caused by bay shoaling) are nearly 70 distinct transitions between shore-parallel sand- and mud- dominated facies. Bulk organic carbon and terrestrial plant-wax fatty acid stable hydrogen (δD) and carbon (δ13C) isotopic measurements from sediments from select sandy and muddy ridges across the plain reveal that these two sedimentological regimes are geochemically distinct. Specifically, waxes from sediments deposited during periods of sandy progradation had δD values, on average, >10 ‰ higher than those from mud-dominated periods, indicating that these sedimentary units reflect different hydroclimatic conditions within the river drainage basin at the time of deposition. Comparison of plant wax isotopic signatures of river, bay, and beach sediments during the current period of mud-dominated progradation reveals a close correlation with earlier periods of mud deposition within the Tijucas Strandplain. Thus, decadal- to centennial- scale sedimentologic transitions within the plain are interpreted to reflect climate

  15. Sedimentology, geochronology and micropaleontology of post- and immediately pre-European Lake Tekapo sediment (based on analysis of core L1395)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, I.J.; Alloway, B.V.; Cochran, U.; Cook, R.A.; Ditchburn, R.G.; Mildenhall, D.C.; Morgenstern, U.; Prior, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    This report details sedimentological, geochronological and micropaleontological research on Lake Tekapo sediment core L1395, extracted by NIWA in November 1991. In addition to assessing the reliability of classical 'varve' counting to determine sedimentation rates, the report outlines various options for dating glacial lake sediments in southern New Zealand, and makes recommendations with respect to planned drilling of nearby Lake Pukaki. An ambitious project was launched in July 2002 within GNS's 'Global Change Through Time' PGST research program (C05X0202) to investigate New Zealand's Holocene climatic record via a deep drill core into Lake Pukaki sediment. Lake Pukaki, a pro-glacial lake similar to Lake Tekapo is located on the eastern side of the Southern Alps adjacent to Mount Cook (Aoraki), and has received ca. 400m of sediment from its catchment since forming ca. 16 k.y. ago. Its sedimentary record, therefore, has the potential to reveal a high resolution record of paleo-climatic fluctuations, provided that the appropriate climatic proxies can be identified and a robust and precise chronology can be established. This report focuses on sedimentological analysis, the principal radiometric methods available for dating lacustrine sediments within a 0-50 k.y. time-frame, and preliminary micropaleontological investigations. Lake Tekapo contains an almost complete record of sedimentation covering the past ca. 16 k.y. and hence also a record of storm events and more subtle changes in climate during that time. However, the temperate climate of the region contrasts with that of many previous lake bed studies in North America and Europe, creating new challenges for deriving robust climate proxies from the sedimentary record. (author). 124 refs., 40 figs., 21 tabs

  16. Stars of strange matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethe, H.A.; Brown, G.E.; Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    We investigate suggestions that quark matter with strangeness per baryon of order unity may be stable. We model this matter at nuclear matter densities as a gas of close packed Λ-particles. From the known mass of the Λ-particle we obtain an estimate of the energy and chemical potential of strange matter at nuclear densities. These are sufficiently high to preclude any phase transition from neutron matter to strange matter in the region near nucleon matter density. Including effects from gluon exchange phenomenologically, we investigate higher densities, consistently making approximations which underestimate the density of transition. In this way we find a transition density ρ tr > or approx.7ρ 0 , where ρ 0 is nuclear matter density. This is not far from the maximum density in the center of the most massive neutron stars that can be constructed. Since we have underestimated ρ tr and still find it to be ∝7ρ 0 , we do not believe that the transition from neutron to quark matter is likely in neutron stars. Moreover, measured masses of observed neutron stars are ≅1.4 M sun , where M sun is the solar mass. For such masses, the central (maximum) density is ρ c 0 . Transition to quark matter is certainly excluded for these densities. (orig.)

  17. Hidden charged dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Tu, Huitzu; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Can dark matter be stabilized by charge conservation, just as the electron is in the standard model? We examine the possibility that dark matter is hidden, that is, neutral under all standard model gauge interactions, but charged under an exact (\\rm U)(1) gauge symmetry of the hidden sector. Such candidates are predicted in WIMPless models, supersymmetric models in which hidden dark matter has the desired thermal relic density for a wide range of masses. Hidden charged dark matter has many novel properties not shared by neutral dark matter: (1) bound state formation and Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation after chemical freeze out may reduce its relic density, (2) similar effects greatly enhance dark matter annihilation in protohalos at redshifts of z ∼ 30, (3) Compton scattering off hidden photons delays kinetic decoupling, suppressing small scale structure, and (4) Rutherford scattering makes such dark matter self-interacting and collisional, potentially impacting properties of the Bullet Cluster and the observed morphology of galactic halos. We analyze all of these effects in a WIMPless model in which the hidden sector is a simplified version of the minimal supersymmetric standard model and the dark matter is a hidden sector stau. We find that charged hidden dark matter is viable and consistent with the correct relic density for reasonable model parameters and dark matter masses in the range 1 GeV ∼ X ∼< 10 TeV. At the same time, in the preferred range of parameters, this model predicts cores in the dark matter halos of small galaxies and other halo properties that may be within the reach of future observations. These models therefore provide a viable and well-motivated framework for collisional dark matter with Sommerfeld enhancement, with novel implications for astrophysics and dark matter searches

  18. Codecaying Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Kuflik, Eric; Ng, Wee Hao

    2016-11-18

    We propose a new mechanism for thermal dark matter freeze-out, called codecaying dark matter. Multicomponent dark sectors with degenerate particles and out-of-equilibrium decays can codecay to obtain the observed relic density. The dark matter density is exponentially depleted through the decay of nearly degenerate particles rather than from Boltzmann suppression. The relic abundance is set by the dark matter annihilation cross section, which is predicted to be boosted, and the decay rate of the dark sector particles. The mechanism is viable in a broad range of dark matter parameter space, with a robust prediction of an enhanced indirect detection signal. Finally, we present a simple model that realizes codecaying dark matter.

  19. Diseases of white matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The diagnosis of white matter abnormalities was revolutionized by the advent of computed tomography (CT), which provided a noninvasive method of detection and assessment of progression of a variety of white matter processes. However, the inadequacies of CT were recognized early, including its relative insensitivity to small foci of abnormal myelin in the brain when correlated with autopsy findings and its inability to image directly white matter diseases of the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, sensitive to the slight difference in tissue composition of normal gray and white matter and to subtle increase in water content associated with myelin disorders, is uniquely suited for the examination of white matter pathology. Its clinical applications include the evaluation of the normal process of myelination in childhood and the various white matter diseases, including disorders of demyelination and dysmyelination

  20. Detecting dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Roger L.

    2000-01-01

    Dark matter is one of the most pressing problems in modern cosmology and particle physic research. This talk will motivate the existence of dark matter by reviewing the main experimental evidence for its existence, the rotation curves of galaxies and the motions of galaxies about one another. It will then go on to review the corroborating theoretical motivations before combining all the supporting evidence to explore some of the possibilities for dark matter along with its expected properties. This will lay the ground work for dark matter detection. A number of differing techniques are being developed and used to detect dark matter. These will be briefly discussed before the focus turns to cryogenic detection techniques. Finally, some preliminary results and expectations will be given for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment

  1. Clumpy cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  2. Sedimentología química de los sedimentos miocenos con diatomeas de la Cuenca del Guadalquivir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López García, M. J.

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical data of major elements is used to study the precise lithological composition and the sedimentology of Miocene diatomaceous sediments from 24 sections of the Guadalquivir Basin. Three main episodes (Lower, Middle and Upper, defined on the basis of diatom zones have been studied. They record a highly productive coastal upwelling regime in the area during the Miocene. The wide range of variation of SiO2 (12.1878.00, CaO (1.60-43.73 and Al2O3 (2.76-10.32 contents reflects the important variations of the main components: Opal A, calcite (mainly biogenic and clay minerals-terrigenous components. Biogenic silica has been estimated by using normative calculations after determination of the mineralogical compositions of the samples by means of X-ray diffraction. Maximum and minimum contents in biogenic silica are related to the dominant diatom taxa, the structure of the rock and the geographicallocation in the basin. The ternary diagrams SiO2 biogenic- Al2O3-CaO reveal that the Upper Episode has the highest amounts of clay minerals-terrigenous components. Plots of SiO2 biogenic/CaO versus Al2O3show a relation between the biogenic calcite and the clay-minerals-terrigenous components. The plots of Fe2O3/TiO2 versus Al2O3/ Al2O3+ Fe2O3 show that most of the samples may be interpreted as deposited in a continental margin enviranment. The data obtained fram the slope of linear regressions Fe (y - Al (x are indicative of areas with varying influence of a terrigenous source. The MnO/ Al2O3 ratio is used to estimate rates of sedimentation of the diatomaceous sediments. The range is between 1.7 and 180 mm/103 years, which is consistent with the sedimentation rate values fram sediments formed in coastal upwelling regimes. The rate of sedimentation varies in relation to the structure of the rack, the dominant diatom taxa and the age of the episodes.La composición química de elementos mayores es utilizada para analizar las caracter

  3. Hybrid Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Dark matter can be produced in the early universe via the freeze-in or freeze-out mechanisms. Both scenarios were investigated in references, but the production of dark matters via the combination of these two mechanisms are not addressed. In this paper we propose a hybrid dark matter model where dark matters have two components with one component produced thermally and the other one produced non-thermally. We present for the first time the analytical calculation for the relic abundance of th...

  4. The quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Mannque.

    1980-04-01

    The present status of our understanding of the physics of hadronic (nuclear or neutron) matter under extreme conditions, in particular at high densities is discussed. This is a problem which challenges three disciplines of physics: nuclear physics, astrophysics and particle physics. It is generally believed that we now have a correct and perhaps ultimate theory of the strong interactions, namely quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The constituents of this theory are quarks and gluons, so highly dense matters should be describable in terms of these constituents alone. This is a question that addresses directly to the phenomenon of quark confinement, one of the least understood aspects in particle physics. For nuclear physics, the possibility of a phase change between nuclear matter and quark matter introduces entirely new degrees of freedom in the description of nuclei and will bring perhaps a deeper understanding of nuclear dynamics. In astrophysics, the properties of neutron stars will be properly understood only when the equation of state of 'neutron' matter at densities exceeding that of nuclear matter can be realiably calculated. Most fascinating is the possibility of quark stars existing in nature, not entirely an absurd idea. Finally the quark matter - nuclear matter phase transition must have occured in the early stage of universe when matter expanded from high temperature and density; this could be an essential ingredient in the big-bang cosmology

  5. Soft matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Soft matter (polymers, colloids, surfactants and liquid crystals) are an important class of materials in modern technology. They also form the basis of many future technologies, for example in medical and environmental applications. Soft matter shows complex behaviour between fluids and solids, and used to be a synonym of complex materials. Due to the developments of the past two decades, soft condensed matter can now be discussed on the same sound physical basis as solid condensedmatter. The purpose of this book is to provide an overview of soft matter for undergraduate and graduate students

  6. Searching for dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Three teams of astronomers believe they have independently found evidence for dark matter in our galaxy. A brief history of the search for dark matter is presented. The use of microlensing-event observation for spotting dark matter is described. The equipment required to observe microlensing events and three groups working on dark matter detection are discussed. The three groups are the Massive Compact Halo Objects (MACHO) Project team, the Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres (EROS) team, and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) team. The first apparent detections of microlensing events by the three teams are briefly reported.

  7. Characterization of natural organic matter in bentonite clays for potential use in deep geological repositories for used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Michaela H.M.; McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Simpson, André J.; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied the composition of natural organic matter in bentonite clay. • Biomarker results indicate a predominance of plant-derived organic matter. • Aromatic and aliphatic compounds were observed in NMR spectra. • Degradation ratios suggest that organic matter is highly altered. • The natural organic matter in bentonite clay is predominantly recalcitrant. - Abstract: The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is developing a Deep Geological Repository (DGR) to contain and isolate used nuclear fuel in a suitable rock formation at a depth of approximately 500 m. The design concept employs a multibarrier system, including the use of copper-coated used fuel containers, surrounded by a low-permeability, swelling clay buffer material within a low permeability, stable host rock environment. The natural organic matter (NOM) composition of the bentonite clays being considered for the buffer material is largely uncharacterized at the molecular-level. To gain a better understanding of the NOM in target clays from Wyoming and Saskatchewan, molecular-level methods (biomarker analysis, solid-state 13 C NMR and solution-state 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) were used to elucidate the structure and sources of NOM. Organic carbon content in three commercially available bentonites analyzed was low (0.11–0.41%). The aliphatic lipid distribution of the clay samples analyzed showed a predominance of higher concentration of lipids from vascular plants and low concentrations of lipids consistent with microbial origin. The lignin phenol vanillyl acid to aldehyde ratio (Ad/Al) for the National sample indicated an advanced state of lignin oxidation and NOM diagenesis. The 13 C NMR spectra were dominated by signals in the aromatic and aliphatic regions. The ratio of alkyl/O-alkyl carbon ranged from 7.6 to 9.7, indicating that the NOM has undergone advanced diagenetic alteration. The absence lignin-derived phenols commonly observed in CuO oxidation

  8. Outcrop analogue study of Permocarboniferous geothermal sandstone reservoir formations (northern Upper Rhine Graben, Germany): impact of mineral content, depositional environment and diagenesis on petrophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretz, Achim; Bär, Kristian; Götz, Annette E.; Sass, Ingo

    2016-07-01

    oil and acidic waters led to the dissolution of haematite cements in the lower Permocarboniferous formations. During the Eocene, subsidence of the Upper Rhine Graben porosities and permeabilities of the sandstones of these formations were strongly reduced to 2.5 % and 3.2 × 10-18 m2. The second important influence on reservoir quality is the distinct depositional environment and its influence on early diagenetic processes. In early stage diagenesis, the best influence on reservoir properties exhibits a haematite cementation. It typically occurs in eolian sandstones of the Kreuznach Formation (Upper Permocarboniferous) and is characterized by grain covering haematite coatings, which are interpreted to inhibit cementation, compaction and illitization of pore space during burial. Eolian sandstones taken from outcrops and reservoir depths exhibit the highest porosities (16.4; 12.3 %) and permeabilities (2.0 × 10-15; 8.4 × 10-16 m2). A third important influence on reservoir quality is the general mineral composition and the quartz content which is the highest in the Kreuznach Formation with 73.8 %. Based on the integrated study of depositional environments and diagenetic processes, reservoir properties of the different Permocarboniferous formations within the northern Upper Rhine Graben and their changes with burial depth can be predicted with satisfactory accuracy. This leads to a better understanding of the reservoir quality and enables an appropriate well design for exploration and exploitation of these geothermal resources.

  9. Sedimentological and geochemical investigations to understand source of sediments and processes of recent past in Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Shabnam; Tiwari, Anoop Kumar; Nayak, G. N.; Bejugam, Purnima

    2018-03-01

    Three sediment cores collected from GL-1, V-1(Vetehiya) and L-6 lakes of Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica were studied for sediment components (sand, silt, clay, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, TOC/TN ratio and biogenic silica), major elements (Aluminium, Iron and Manganese) and trace metals (Chromium, Zinc, Lead, Cobalt, Cadmium and Nickel). High sand content in all the three cores revealed the release of coarser sediments through mechanical weathering in fluvio-glacial environment. Relatively, high biogenic silica along with high total organic carbon associated with high clay in some sections indicated high primary productivity due to the warming and exposure of the lakes to the ice-melt water influx. TOC/TN ratio for all the cores was found to be < 10 which indicated that the major source of organic matter was autochthonous. Metals were found to be strongly associated with clay and organic carbon in core V-1, with sand and clay in core L-6 while, with silt and organic matter in core GL-1 indicating their role in regulating the distribution of metals. Cadmium in lake GL-1 was found to be associated with total organic carbon and showed largely biogenic origin, while, Cd and Pb in lakes L-6 and V-1 were found to be of anthropogenic origin. All the other metals showed signatures of lithogenic origin.

  10. Dark matter and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ``cold`` and ``hot`` non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ``seeds`` that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  11. Dark matter and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between cold'' and hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  12. Superball dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kusenko, A

    1999-01-01

    Supersymmetric models predict a natural dark-matter candidate, stable baryonic Q-balls. They could be copiously produced in the early Universe as a by-product of the Affleck-Dine baryogenesis. I review the cosmological and astrophysical implications, methods of detection, and the present limits on this form of dark matter.

  13. Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    De Paolis, F.; Jetzer, Ph.; Ingrosso, G.; Roncadelli, M.

    1997-01-01

    Reasons supporting the idea that most of the dark matter in galaxies and clusters of galaxies is baryonic are discussed. Moreover, it is argued that most of the dark matter in galactic halos should be in the form of MACHOs and cold molecular clouds.

  14. Dark matter detection - II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the mysterious missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of today's particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world-wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  15. Dark matter and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the Ω = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ''cold'' and ''hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ''seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed

  16. Matter in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-01-01

    We explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, where a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU(N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU(N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.

  17. CONFERENCE: Quark matter 88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Maurice

    1988-01-01

    The 'Quark Matter' Conference caters for physicists studying nuclear matter under extreme conditions. The hope is that relativistic (high energy) heavy ion collisions allow formation of the long-awaited quark-gluon plasma, where the inter-quark 'colour' force is no longer confined inside nucleon-like dimensions

  18. Dark matter detection - I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the mysterious missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of today's particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world-wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  19. Dark matter detection - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of todays particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the Universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the Universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world- wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  20. Asymptotically Safe Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for dark matter (DM) interactions in which the interaction strength is asymptotically safe. In models of this type, the coupling strength is small at low energies but increases at higher energies, and asymptotically approaches a finite constant value. The resulting...... searches are the primary ways to constrain or discover asymptotically safe dark matter....

  1. Asymmetric dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, David E.; Luty, Markus A.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a simple class of models in which the relic density of dark matter is determined by the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. In these models a B-L asymmetry generated at high temperatures is transferred to the dark matter, which is charged under B-L. The interactions that transfer the asymmetry decouple at temperatures above the dark matter mass, freezing in a dark matter asymmetry of order the baryon asymmetry. This explains the observed relation between the baryon and dark matter densities for the dark matter mass in the range 5-15 GeV. The symmetric component of the dark matter can annihilate efficiently to light pseudoscalar Higgs particles a or via t-channel exchange of new scalar doublets. The first possibility allows for h 0 →aa decays, while the second predicts a light charged Higgs-like scalar decaying to τν. Direct detection can arise from Higgs exchange in the first model or a nonzero magnetic moment in the second. In supersymmetric models, the would-be lightest supersymmetric partner can decay into pairs of dark matter particles plus standard model particles, possibly with displaced vertices.

  2. Inelastic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David; Weiner, Neal

    2001-01-01

    Many observations suggest that much of the matter of the universe is nonbaryonic. Recently, the DAMA NaI dark matter direct detection experiment reported an annual modulation in their event rate consistent with a WIMP relic. However, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) Ge experiment excludes most of the region preferred by DAMA. We demonstrate that if the dark matter can only scatter by making a transition to a slightly heavier state (Δm∼100 keV), the experiments are no longer in conflict. Moreover, differences in the energy spectrum of nuclear recoil events could distinguish such a scenario from the standard WIMP scenario. Finally, we discuss the sneutrino as a candidate for inelastic dark matter in supersymmetric theories

  3. Baryonic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uson, Juan M.

    2000-01-01

    Many searches for baryonic dark matter have been conducted but, so far, all have been unsuccessful. Indeed, no more than 1% of the dark matter can be in the form of hydrogen burning stars. It has recently been suggested that most of the baryons in the universe are still in the form of ionized gas so that it is possible that there is no baryonic dark matter. Although it is likely that a significant fraction of the dark matter in the Milky Way is in a halo of non-baryonic matter, the data do not exclude the possibility that a considerable amount, perhaps most of it, could be in a tenuous halo of diffuse ionized gas

  4. Macro Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, David M; Lynn, Bryan W.

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter is a vital component of the current best model of our universe, $\\Lambda$CDM. There are leading candidates for what the dark matter could be (e.g. weakly-interacting massive particles, or axions), but no compelling observational or experimental evidence exists to support these particular candidates, nor any beyond-the-Standard-Model physics that might produce such candidates. This suggests that other dark matter candidates, including ones that might arise in the Standard Model, should receive increased attention. Here we consider a general class of dark matter candidates with characteristic masses and interaction cross-sections characterized in units of grams and cm$^2$, respectively -- we therefore dub these macroscopic objects as Macros. Such dark matter candidates could potentially be assembled out of Standard Model particles (quarks and leptons) in the early universe. A combination of earth-based, astrophysical, and cosmological observations constrain a portion of the Macro parameter space; ho...

  5. Dark matter universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-06

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  6. Sedimentology and stratigraphy of the middle Eocene Guara carbonate platform near Arguis, South-West Pyrenean foreland: Implications for basin physiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyghe, D.; Castelltort, S.; Serra-Kiel, J.; Filleaudeau, P.-Y.; Emmanuel, L.; Mouthereau, F.; Renard, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Pyrenees results from the collision between Spain and Europe and developed between the upper Cretaceous (Santonian) and the Miocene. Its foreland basins are characterised by a thick fill of detrital and carbonate sediments. The diversity of Eocene deposits in the southern Pyrenean foreland basin is of particular use in facies sedimentology due to their exceptional outcropping quality and well established stratigraphic framework and has been taken as type examples of many different sedimentary environments. Most studies have concerned facies sedimentology of detrital series in turbiditic environments, meandering and braided rivers, alluvial fans, and deltas. In contrast, the Eocene carbonate series have attracted less attention. The marine Guara limestones are a formation of lower to middle Eocene age deposited on the southern border of the western Pyrenean foreland basin (Jaca basin). They were deposited as a retrogradational carbonate platform dominated by large benthic foraminifers near or at the flexural forebulge of the foreland basin as the Pyrenean orogen developed. This formation represents the last episode of carbonate platform in the Pyrenees and remains poorly studied. In the present work our aim is to provide a detailed facies analysis and physiographic reconstructions of the Guara carbonate platform. This is crucial to unravel the respective influences of tectonics, climate and rheology of the lithosphere on the foreland basin tectonic and stratigraphic development, and it brings new constraints on the paleoenvironments and paleogeography during the Lutetian, i.e. at the beginning of the major phase of activity of the Pyrenean orogenesis. Two outcrops were studied in the Sierras Marginales at the localities of Arguis and Lusera. The Lusera section once restored in its initial position is located to the North of the Arguis section in a basinward direction such that comparing time-equivalent facies between these two sections helps us reconstructing

  7. Exothermic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Saraswat, Prashant; Harnik, Roni; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism for dark matter to explain the observed annual modulation signal at DAMA/LIBRA which avoids existing constraints from every other dark matter direct detection experiment including CRESST, CDMS, and XENON10. The dark matter consists of at least two light states with mass ∼few GeV and splittings ∼5 keV. It is natural for the heavier states to be cosmologically long-lived and to make up an O(1) fraction of the dark matter. Direct detection rates are dominated by the exothermic reactions in which an excited dark matter state downscatters off of a nucleus, becoming a lower energy state. In contrast to (endothermic) inelastic dark matter, the most sensitive experiments for exothermic dark matter are those with light nuclei and low threshold energies. Interestingly, this model can also naturally account for the observed low-energy events at CoGeNT. The only significant constraint on the model arises from the DAMA/LIBRA unmodulated spectrum but it can be tested in the near future by a low-threshold analysis of CDMS-Si and possibly other experiments including CRESST, COUPP, and XENON100.

  8. Activites of the radioisotopes division of IPR-CDTN-NUCLEBRAS in the studies of sedimentology and hidric polution. Atividades da divisao de radioisotopos do IPR-CDTN-NUCLEBRAS nos estudos de sedimentologia e poluicao hidrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aun, P E

    1979-07-01

    This work describes, in a very general way, the utilization of fluorescent and radioactive tracers in sedimentological studies. It presents the specific applications of those tracers in following the motion of sediments in suspension and in the bottom. The paper describes in short the labelling, detection and analysis techniques, as well as several actual applications of those techniques by the Radioisotopes Division of Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear-CDTN-NUCLEBRAS. (author).

  9. Dark matter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  10. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and inferred flow dynamics from the July 2015 block-and-ash flow deposits at Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macorps, Elodie; Charbonnier, Sylvain J.; Varley, Nick R.; Capra, Lucia; Atlas, Zachary; Cabré, Josep

    2018-01-01

    The July 2015 block-and-ash flow (BAF) events represent the first documented series of large-volume and long-runout BAFs generated from sustained dome collapses at Volcán de Colima. This eruption is particularly exceptional at this volcano due to (1) the large volume of BAF material emplaced (0.0077 ± 0.001 km3), (2) the long runout reached by the associated BAFs (max. 10 km), and (3) the short period ( 18 h) over which two main long-sustained dome collapse events occurred (on 10 and 11 July, respectively). Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the 2015 BAF deposits exposed in the southern flank of the volcano based on lithofacies description, grain size measurements and clast componentry allowed the recognition of three main deposit facies (i.e., valley-confined, overbank and ash-cloud surge deposits). Correlations and lithofacies variations inside three main flow units from both the valley-confined and overbank deposits left from the emplacement of the second series of BAFs on 11 July provide detailed information about: (1) the distribution, volumes and sedimentological characteristics of the different units; (2) flow parameters (i.e., velocity and dynamic pressure) and mobility metrics as inferred from associated deposits; and (3) changes in the dynamics of the different flows and their material during emplacement. These data were coupled with geomorphic analyses to assess the role of the topography in controlling the behaviour and impacts of the successive BAF pulses on the volcano flanks. Finally, these findings are used to propose a conceptual model for transport and deposition mechanisms of the July 2015 BAFs at Volcán de Colima. In this model, deposition occurs by rapid stepwise aggradation of successive BAF pulses. Flow confinement in a narrow and sinuous channel enhance the mobility and runout of individual channelized BAF pulses. When these conditions occur, the progressive valley infilling from successive sustained dome-collapse events promote the

  11. Integrated sedimentological and ichnological characteristics of a wave-dominated, macrotidal coast: a case study from the intertidal shoreface of the Dongho coast, southwest Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byong Cheon; Chang, Tae Soo

    2018-04-01

    Generalized coastal facies models invariably assume that tidal flats and intertidally exposed shorefaces along macrotidal coasts are tide-dominated. Recent advances in coastal sedimentology, however, have revealed that wave-dominated macrotidal flats also occur in a wide range of coastal settings, in particular where tidal modulation forces the lateral translation of the wave-affected zone across the tidally exposed shoreface with the rising tide. Despite tidal modulation, the depositional character in the latter case (abundant storm deposits) exhibits a high degree of similarity with conventional subtidal shorefaces, implying that it is inherently difficult to distinguish between the two coastal systems in the rock record. In the present study, integrated sedimentological and ichnological data from the Dongho coast, which is located along the southwest coast of Korea, provide valuable information for the establishment of facies criteria that can assist in the recognition of such coastal deposits. In fact, the sedimentary character of the study area, which is dominated by an abundance of wave-formed structures, resembles that generally associated with subtidal shorefaces. In addition, the depositional processes responsible for sediment accumulation are, in the present case, also strongly influenced by pronounced seasonal variations in wave energy. In this context, the study has revealed a number of major features that appear to be characteristic of wave-dominated intertidal flats and shorefaces: (1) firmground muds may be encountered on the beach face, where intense swash-backwash motions are dominant; (2) the thickness of storm deposits decreases landward, reflecting the progressive decrease in wave energy; (3) ichnologically, there is an offshore shift in the dominance of trace fossils from the Skolithos ichnofacies, including Ophiomorpha, Thalassinoides and Psilonichnus, to a proximal expression of the Cruziana ichnofacies, which includes Siphonichnus and

  12. Spatiotemporal sedimentological and petrophysical characterization of El Gueria reservoir (Ypresian) in sFAX and Gulf of Gabes Basins (SE-Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhem, Kassabi; Zahra, Njahi; Ménendez, Béatriz; Salwa, Jeddi; Jamel, Touir

    2017-06-01

    El Gueria carbonate Formation (Ypresian) in Tunisia is a proven hydrocarbon reservoir. In the Gulf of Gabes, El Gueria reservoir consists mainly of a nummulitic limestone which is developed in an inner shelf environment. In order to characterize the depositional facies evolution and the petrophysical parameters, and to understand the origin of heterogeneity of El Gueria reservoir, we firstly conducted a sedimentological and a sequence stratigraphy study of this Formation in more than 10 wells especially in P1, then we established a detailed petrophysical study of El Gueria reservoir in P1, P3c and P7d cores. Based on lithostratigraphic and gamma ray correlations of an important number of wells in the study area, a detailed sedimentological study has been established. This latter shows that: (i): The Ypresien deposits are deposited in an inner shelf (El Gueria Formation) in the south and in an outer shelf (Boudabbous Formation) in the north of the study area with the form of horsts and grabens, (ii): 3 distinct members and 7 principal facies within El Gueria Formation have been distinguished. The coupling of data logging and data of the P1 core shows that the El Gueria deposits include 10 transgressive-regressive depositional sequences, while showing from bottom to top a broad regressive tendancy from a subtidal domain during the early Ypresian to an intertidal domain during the middle Ypresian reaching the supratidal environnement during the late Ypresian-early Lutetian. The petrophysical parameters (porosity and permeability) of El Gueria reservoir vary in time and space (laterally and vertically variation) following the deposit environment variation. Particularly, the porosity variation is controlled by eustatic cycles so that high porosities are linked with transgressive phases and low porosities with regressive phases. In addition, the vertical evolution of porosity through the El Gueria reservoir varies following the (i) deposit environments, (ii) type and

  13. Superstorm Sandy-related Morphologic and Sedimentologic Changes in an Estuarine System: Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor Estuary, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miselis, J. L.; Ganju, N. K.; Navoy, A.; Nicholson, R.; Andrews, B.

    2013-12-01

    Despite the well-recognized ecological importance of back-barrier estuaries, the role of storms in their geomorphic evolution is poorly understood. Moreover, the focus of storm impact assessments is often the ocean shorelines of barrier islands rather than the exchange of sediment from barrier to estuary. In order to better understand and ultimately predict short-term morphologic and sedimentologic changes in coastal systems, a comprehensive research approach is required but is often difficult to achieve given the diversity of data required. An opportunity to use such an approach in assessing the storm-response of a barrier-estuary system occurred when Superstorm Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, New Jersey on 29 October 2012. Since 2011, the US Geological Survey has been investigating water circulation and water-quality degradation in Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor (BBLEH) Estuary, the southern end of which is approximately 25 kilometers north of the landfall location. This effort includes shallow-water geophysical surveys to map the bathymetry and sediment distribution within BBLEH, airborne topo-bathymetric lidar surveys for mapping the shallow shoals that border the estuary, and sediment sampling, all of which have provided a recent picture of the pre-storm estuarine geomorphology. We combined these pre-storm data with similar post-storm data from the estuary and pre- and post-storm topographic data from the ocean shoreline of the barrier island to begin to understand the response of the barrier-estuary system. Breaches in the barrier island resulted in water exchange between the estuary and the ocean, briefly reducing residence times in the northern part of the estuary until the breaches were closed. Few morphologic changes in water depths greater than 1.5 m were noted. However, morphologic changes observed in shallower depths along the eastern shoreline of the estuary are likely related to overwash processes. In general, surficial estuarine sediments

  14. Physics of condensed matter

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Prasanta K

    2012-01-01

    Physics of Condensed Matter is designed for a two-semester graduate course on condensed matter physics for students in physics and materials science. While the book offers fundamental ideas and topic areas of condensed matter physics, it also includes many recent topics of interest on which graduate students may choose to do further research. The text can also be used as a one-semester course for advanced undergraduate majors in physics, materials science, solid state chemistry, and electrical engineering, because it offers a breadth of topics applicable to these majors. The book be

  15. Light, Matter, and Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    Interaction of light and matter produces the appearance of materials. To deal with the immense complexity of nature, light and matter is modelled at a macroscopic level in computer graphics. This work is the first to provide the link between the microscopic physical theories of light and matter...... of a material and determine the contents of the material. The book is in four parts. Part I provides the link between microscopic and macroscopic theories of light. Part II describes how to use the properties of microscopic particles to compute the macroscopic properties of materials. Part III illustrates...

  16. QED coherence in matter

    CERN Document Server

    Preparata, Giuliano

    1995-01-01

    Up until now the dominant view of condensed matter physics has been that of an "electrostatic MECCANO" (erector set, for Americans). This book is the first systematic attempt to consider the full quantum-electrodynamical interaction (QED), thus greatly enriching the possible dynamical mechanisms that operate in the construction of the wonderful variety of condensed matter systems, including life itself.A new paradigm is emerging, replacing the "electrostatic MECCANO" with an "electrodynamic NETWORK," which builds condensed matter through the long range (as opposed to the "short range" nature o

  17. Nuclear matter revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negele, J.W.; Zabolitzky, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    It is stated that at the Workshop on Nuclear and Dense Matter held at the University of Illinois in May 1977 significant progress was reported that largely resolves many of the questions raised in this journal Vol. 6, p.149, 1976. These include perturbative versus variational methods as applied to nuclear matter, exact solutions for bosons, what is known as the fermion 'homework problem', and various other considerations regarding nuclear matter, including the use of variational methods as opposed to perturbation theory. (15 references) (U.K.)

  18. Dark matter: the astrophysical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of dark matter is one of the most urgent problems in cosmology. I describe the astrophysical case for dark matter, from both an observational and a theoretical perspective. This overview will therefore focus on the observational motivations rather than the particle physics aspects of dark matter constraints on specific dark matter candidates. First, however, I summarize the astronomical evidence for dark matter, then I highlight the weaknesses of the standard cold dark matter model (LCDM) to provide a robust explanation of some observations. The greatest weakness in the dark matter saga is that we have not yet identified the nature of dark matter itself

  19. A mixing-model approach to quantifying sources of organic matter to salt marsh sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. M.; Meile, C. D.

    2010-12-01

    can alter endmember characteristics over time, we investigate the effect of early diagenesis on chosen parameters, an analysis that entails an assessment of the organic matter age distribution. Thus, estimates of the relative contributions of phytoplankton, C3 and C4 plants to bulk sediment organic matter depend not only on environmental characteristics that impact reactivity, but also on sediment mixing processes.

  20. Matter-antimatter and matter-matter interactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Antonio Carlos Fontes dos

    2002-01-01

    This article presents some of the recent experimental advances on the study on antimatter-matter and matter-matter interactions, and some of the subtle differences stimulated a great theoretical efforts for explanation of the results experimentally observed

  1. Little composite dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Reuven; Perez, Gilad; Weiler, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    We examine the dark matter phenomenology of a composite electroweak singlet state. This singlet belongs to the Goldstone sector of a well-motivated extension of the Littlest Higgs with T -parity. A viable parameter space, consistent with the observed dark matter relic abundance as well as with the various collider, electroweak precision and dark matter direct detection experimental constraints is found for this scenario. T -parity implies a rich LHC phenomenology, which forms an interesting interplay between conventional natural SUSY type of signals involving third generation quarks and missing energy, from stop-like particle production and decay, and composite Higgs type of signals involving third generation quarks associated with Higgs and electroweak gauge boson, from vector-like top-partners production and decay. The composite features of the dark matter phenomenology allows the composite singlet to produce the correct relic abundance while interacting weakly with the Higgs via the usual Higgs portal coupling [Formula: see text], thus evading direct detection.

  2. Inflatable Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed "inflatable dark matter," in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early Universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many, otherwise, well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context. Thermal relics that would, otherwise, be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the nonthermal abundance of grand unified theory or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ∼MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the standard model.

  3. Dark matter search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernabei, R.

    2003-01-01

    Some general arguments on the particle Dark Matter search are addressed. The WIMP direct detection technique is mainly considered and recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized. (author)

  4. Mind Over Matter: Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Guide and Series / Methamphetamine Mind Over Matter: Methamphetamine (Meth) Print Order Free Publication in: English Spanish ... paranoia, aggressiveness, and hallucinations. The Brain's Response to Methamphetamine Hi, my name's Sara Bellum. Welcome to my ...

  5. Matter Tracking Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Matter Tracking Information System (MTIS) principle function is to streamline and integrate the workload and work activity generated or addressed by our 300 plus...

  6. Lectures on dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seljak, U.

    2001-01-01

    These lectures concentrate on evolution and generation of dark matter perturbations. The purpose of the lectures is to present, in a systematic way, a comprehensive review of the cosmological parameters that can lead to observable effects in the dark matter clustering properties. We begin by reviewing the relativistic linear perturbation theory formalism. We discuss the gauge issue and derive Einstein's and continuity equations for several popular gauge choices. We continue by developing fluid equations for cold dark matter and baryons and Boltzmann equations for photons, massive and massless neutrinos. We then discuss the generation of initial perturbations by the process of inflation and the parameters of that process that can be extracted from the observations. Finally we discuss evolution of perturbations in various regimes and the imprint of the evolution on the dark matter power spectrum both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime. (author)

  7. Prevention Research Matters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Prevention Research Matters is a series of one-on-one interviews with researchers from 26 university prevention research centers across the country. Their work focuses on preventing and controlling chronic diseases like obesity, cancer, and heart disease.

  8. Dynamics of interstellar matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, F.D.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the dynamics of interstellar matter is presented, considering the basic equations of fluid flow, plane waves, shock waves, spiral structure, thermal instabilities and early star cocoons. (B.R.H.)

  9. Lectures on dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seljak, U [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2001-11-15

    These lectures concentrate on evolution and generation of dark matter perturbations. The purpose of the lectures is to present, in a systematic way, a comprehensive review of the cosmological parameters that can lead to observable effects in the dark matter clustering properties. We begin by reviewing the relativistic linear perturbation theory formalism. We discuss the gauge issue and derive Einstein's and continuity equations for several popular gauge choices. We continue by developing fluid equations for cold dark matter and baryons and Boltzmann equations for photons, massive and massless neutrinos. We then discuss the generation of initial perturbations by the process of inflation and the parameters of that process that can be extracted from the observations. Finally we discuss evolution of perturbations in various regimes and the imprint of the evolution on the dark matter power spectrum both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime. (author)

  10. Dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R [Dipto. di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and INFN, sez. Roma2, Rome (Italy)

    2003-08-15

    Some general arguments on the particle Dark Matter search are addressed. The WIMP direct detection technique is mainly considered and recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized. (author)

  11. Investigation of water-soluble organic matter extracted from shales during leaching experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaling; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.; Horsfield, Brian

    2017-04-01

    The huge volumes and unknown composition of flowback and produced waters cause major public concerns about the environmental and social compatibility of hydraulic fracturing and the exploitation of gas from unconventional reservoirs. Flowback and produced waters contain not only residues of fracking additives but also chemical species that are dissolved from the shales themselves during fluid-rock interaction. Knowledge of the composition, size and structure of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as well as the main controls on the release of DOC are a prerequisite for a better understanding of these interactions and its effects on composition of flowback and produced water. Black shales from four different geological settings and covering a maturity range Ro = 0.3-2.6% were extracted with deionized water. The DOC yields were found to decrease rapidly with increasing diagenesis and remain low throughout catagenesis. Four DOC fractions have been qualitatively and quantitatively characterized using size-exclusion chromatography. The concentrations of individual low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) decrease with increasing maturity of the samples except for acetate extracted from the overmature Posidonia shale, which was influenced by hydrothermal brines. The oxygen content of the shale organic matter also shows a significant influence on the release of organic acids, which is indicated by the positive trend between oxygen index (OI) and the concentrations of formate and acetate. Based on our experiments, both the properties of the organic matter source and the thermal maturation progress of the shale organic matter significantly influence the amount and quality of extracted organic compounds during the leaching experiments.

  12. Soft Active Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, M. C.; Joanny, J. -F.; Ramaswamy, S.; Liverpool, T. B.; Prost, J.; Rao, Madan; Simha, R. Aditi

    2012-01-01

    In this review we summarize theoretical progress in the field of active matter, placing it in the context of recent experiments. Our approach offers a unified framework for the mechanical and statistical properties of living matter: biofilaments and molecular motors in vitro or in vivo, collections of motile microorganisms, animal flocks, and chemical or mechanical imitations. A major goal of the review is to integrate the several approaches proposed in the literature, from semi-microscopic t...

  13. DARK MATTER: Optical shears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence for dark matter continues to build up. Last year (December 1993, page 4) excitement rose when the French EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) and the US/Australia MACHO collaborations reported hints that small inert 'brown dwarf stars could provide some of the Universe's missing matter. In the 1930s, astronomers first began to suspect that there is a lot more to the Universe than meets the eye

  14. Charming dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Thomas; Kirk, Matthew; Lenz, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    We have considered a model of Dark Minimal Flavour Violation (DMFV), in which a triplet of dark matter particles couple to right-handed up-type quarks via a heavy colour-charged scalar mediator. By studying a large spectrum of possible constraints, and assessing the entire parameter space using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), we can place strong restrictions on the allowed parameter space for dark matter models of this type.

  15. Dynamics of Soft Matter

    CERN Document Server

    García Sakai, Victoria; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of Soft Matter: Neutron Applications provides an overview of neutron scattering techniques that measure temporal and spatial correlations simultaneously, at the microscopic and/or mesoscopic scale. These techniques offer answers to new questions arising at the interface of physics, chemistry, and biology. Knowledge of the dynamics at these levels is crucial to understanding the soft matter field, which includes colloids, polymers, membranes, biological macromolecules, foams, emulsions towards biological & biomimetic systems, and phenomena involving wetting, friction, adhesion, or micr

  16. Matter-antimatter Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omnes, R.

    1973-01-01

    The possible existence of antimatter on a large scale in the universe is evaluated. As a starting point, an attempt was made to understand the origin of matter as being essentially analogous to the origin of backgound thermal radiation. Several theories and models are examined, with particular emphasis on nucleon-antinucleon interactions at intermediate energies. Data also cover annihilation interaction with the matter-antimatter boundary to produce the essential fluid motion known as coalesence.

  17. Matter and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effenberger, R.

    1974-09-01

    The author summarizes some of the many questions and answers which have been raised over the years regarding the nature of matter, the origin of its forms and the associated concept of cosmology including the formation of the universe, our place in it and its course of evolution. An examination of the development of the classical concept of matter and its subsequent transformations within the space-time fields of relativity and quantum theory is also presented

  18. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The author both reviews and makes the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that (i) there are no dark-matter candidates within the open-quotes standard modelclose quotes of particle physics, (ii) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics, and (iii) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for open-quotes new physics.close quotes The compelling candidates are a very light axion (10 -6 --10 -4 eV), a light neutrino (20--90 eV), and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. The author briefly mentions more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos. 119 refs

  19. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ''new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10 -6 eV--10 -4 eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos

  20. Soil organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The nature, content and behaviour of the organic matter, or humus, in soil are factors of fundamental importance for soil productivity and the development of optimum conditions for growth of crops under diverse temperate, tropical and arid climatic conditions. In the recent symposium on soil organic matter studies - as in the two preceding ones in 1963 and 1969 - due consideration was given to studies involving the use of radioactive and stable isotopes. However, the latest symposium was a departure from previous efforts in that non-isotopic approaches to research on soil organic matter were included. A number of papers dealt with the behaviour and functions of organic matter and suggested improved management practices, the use of which would contribute to increasing agricultural production. Other papers discussed the turnover of plant residues, the release of plant nutrients through the biodegradation of organic compounds, the nitrogen economy and the dynamics of transformation of organic forms of nitrogen. In addition, consideration was given to studies on the biochemical transformation of organic matter, characterization of humic acids, carbon-14 dating and the development of modern techniques and their impact on soil organic matter research

  1. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10[sup [minus]6] eV--10[sup [minus]4] eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  2. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  3. Rare earth elements and neodymium isotopes in sedimentary organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freslon, Nicolas; Bayon, Germain; Toucanne, Samuel; Bermell, Sylvain; Bollinger, Claire; Chéron, Sandrine; Etoubleau, Joel; Germain, Yoan; Khripounoff, Alexis; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; Rouget, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    (inferred from the analysis of local surface seawater). A notable exception is the case of organic matter (OM) fractions leached from cold seep sediment samples, which sometimes exhibit εNd values markedly different from both terrigenous and surface seawater signatures. This suggests that a significant fraction of organic compounds in these sediments may be derived from chemosynthetic processes, recycling pore water REE characterized by a distinct isotopic composition. Overall, our results confirm that organic matter probably plays an important role in the oceanic REE budget, through direct scavenging and remineralization within the water column. Both the high REE abundances and the shape of shale-normalized patterns for leached SOM also suggest that OM degradation in sub-surface marine sediments during early diagenesis could control, to a large extent, the distribution of REE in pore waters. Benthic fluxes of organic-bound REE could hence substantially contribute to the exchange processes between particulates and seawater that take place at ocean margins. Neodymium isotopes could provide useful information for tracing the origin (terrestrial versus marine) and geographical provenance of organic matter, with potential applications in paleoceanography. In particular, future studies should further investigate the potential of Nd isotopes in organic compounds preserved in sedimentary records for reconstructing past variations of surface ocean circulation.

  4. Quaternary base-level drops and trigger mechanisms in a closed basin: Geomorphic and sedimentological studies of the Gastre Basin, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilmes, Andrés; Veiga, Gonzalo D.; Ariztegui, Daniel; Castelltort, Sébastien; D'Elia, Leandro; Franzese, Juan R.

    2017-04-01

    Evaluating the role of tectonics and climate as possible triggering mechanisms of landscape reconfigurations is essential for paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this study an exceptional receptive closed Quaternary system of Patagonia (the Gastre Basin) is described, and examined in order to analyze factors triggering base-level drops. Based on a geomorphological approach, which includes new tectonic geomorphology investigations combined with sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis, three large-scale geomorphological systems were identified, described and linked to two major lake-level highstands preserved in the basin. The results indicate magnitudes of base-level drops that are several orders of magnitude greater than present-day water-level fluctuations, suggesting a triggering mechanism not observed in recent times. Direct observations indicating the occurrence of Quaternary faults were not recorded in the region. In addition, morphometric analyses that included mountain front sinuosity, valley width-height ratio, and fan apex position dismiss tectonic fault activity in the Gastre Basin during the middle Pleistocene-Holocene. Therefore, we suggest here that upper Pleistocene climate changes may have been the main triggering mechanism of base-level falls in the Gastre Basin as it is observed in other closed basins of central Patagonia (i.e., Carri Laufquen Basin).

  5. Sedimentology, geochemistry, pollution status and ecological risk assessment of some heavy metals in surficial sediments of an Egyptian lagoon connecting to the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, Ghada F; Draz, Suzanne E O; El-Sadaawy, Manal M; Moneer, Abeer A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial distribution of heavy metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cr, Mn, Zn and Fe) was studied on Lake Edku's surface sediments in relation to sedimentology and geochemistry characteristics and their contamination status on the ecological system. Lake Edku's sediments were dominated by sandy silt and silty sand textures and were enriched with carbonate content (9.83-58.46%). Iron and manganese were the most abundant heavy metals with ranges of 1.69 to 8.06 mg g(-1) and 0.88 to 3.27 mg g(-1), respectively. Cobalt and nickel showed a harmonic distribution along the studied sediments. The results were interpreted by the statistical means. The heavy metal pollution status and their ecological risk in Lake Edku was evaluated using the sediment quality guidelines and the contamination assessment methods (geoaccumulation, pollution load and potential ecological risk indices, enrichment factor, contamination degree as well as effect range median (ERM) and probable effect level (PEL) quotients). Amongst the determined heavy metals, zinc had the most ecological risk. Overall, the heavy metals in surface sediments showed ecological effect range from moderate to considerable risk, specially, in the stations in front of the seawater and in drain sources that had the highest toxic priority.

  6. Nitrogen isotopes from terrestrial organic matter as a new paleoclimatic proxy for pre-quaternary time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramoy, romain; Schnyder, johann; thuy Nguyen Tu, thanh; Yans, johan; Storme, jean yves; Sebilo, mathieu; Derenne, sylvie; Jacob, jérémy; Baudin, françois

    2014-05-01

    Marine and lacustrine sedimentary organic matter is often dominated by algal-bacterial production. Its nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15Norg) is frequently used to reconstruct biogeochemical processes involved in the nitrogen cycle, such as N utilization by organisms (e.g. Altabet et al., 1995), denitrification and diagenesis processes (e.g. Altabet et al., 1995; Sebilo et al., 2003; Gälman et al., 2009) or to evidence N sources variability (e.g. Hodell and Schelske, 1998; Vreca and Muri, 2006) . However, all these parameters and processes make N isotopic signals in marine and lacustrine environments often very complex to interpret. After pioneer studies, Mariotti et al. (1981), Austin and Vitousek (1998), Amundson et al. (2003), Swap et al. (2004), and Liu and Wang (2008) have shown that the δ15Norg of modern or quaternary terrestrial plants seem to be positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with precipitations. Therefore, δ15Norg of terrestrial OM might be a better record for paleoclimatic studies than δ15Norg of sedimentary OM dominated by algal-bacterial production. Recently, promising organic nitrogen isotopic data (δ15Norg) have been published on lignites from the Dieppe-Hampshire Basin (Paleocene-Eocene transition, Normandy (Storme et al., 2012). Authors suggest that the δ15Norg recorded local paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental conditions. Following these results, the aim of this work is to test the use of stable nitrogen isotopes in terrestrial OM as a new paleoclimatic marker for pre-quaternary geological series. Does δ15Norg constitute a valuable tool to reconstruct past climates? What are the limits in the use of this proxy and possible methodological bias related to organic sources or diagenetic processes? To address these questions, δ15Norg must be measured in samples from periods associated with large and well documented climate change. We therefore selected a Liassic continental sedimentary succession from

  7. Imperfect Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander, E-mail: l.mirzagholi@physik.uni-muenchen.de, E-mail: alexander.vikman@lmu.de [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Theresienstr. 37, Munich, D-80333 Germany (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models.

  8. Entropy, matter, and cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigogine, I; Géhéniau, J

    1986-09-01

    The role of irreversible processes corresponding to creation of matter in general relativity is investigated. The use of Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensors together with conformal (Minkowski) coordinates suggests that this creation took place in the early universe at the stage of the variation of the conformal factor. The entropy production in this creation process is calculated. It is shown that these dissipative processes lead to the possibility of cosmological models that start from empty conditions and gradually build up matter and entropy. Gravitational entropy takes a simple meaning as associated to the entropy that is necessary to produce matter. This leads to an extension of the third law of thermodynamics, as now the zero point of entropy becomes the space-time structure out of which matter is generated. The theory can be put into a convenient form using a supplementary "C" field in Einstein's field equations. The role of the C field is to express the coupling between gravitation and matter leading to irreversible entropy production.

  9. Imperfect Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models

  10. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto, E-mail: aguirre@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: alberto.diez@fisica.ugto.mx [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  11. Imperfect Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models.

  12. WISPy cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Cadamuro, Davide; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches - exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques - can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  13. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Min Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1D. After the U(1D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3→2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  14. Thermal Properties of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachan, Joe

    2018-02-01

    The ancient Greeks believed that all matter was composed of four elements: earth, water, air, and fire. By a remarkable coincidence (or perhaps not), today we know that there are four states of matter: solids (e.g. earth), liquids (e.g. water), gasses (e.g. air) and plasma (e.g. ionized gas produced by fire). The plasma state is beyond the scope of this book and we will only look at the first three states. Although on the microscopic level all matter is made from atoms or molecules, everyday experience tells us that the three states have very different properties. The aim of this book is to examine some of these properties and the underlying physics.

  15. Asymmetric Higgsino dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kfir; Efrati, Aielet; Grossman, Yuval; Nir, Yosef; Riotto, Antonio

    2012-08-03

    In the supersymmetric framework, prior to the electroweak phase transition, the existence of a baryon asymmetry implies the existence of a Higgsino asymmetry. We investigate whether the Higgsino could be a viable asymmetric dark matter candidate. We find that this is indeed possible. Thus, supersymmetry can provide the observed dark matter abundance and, furthermore, relate it with the baryon asymmetry, in which case the puzzle of why the baryonic and dark matter mass densities are similar would be explained. To accomplish this task, two conditions are required. First, the gauginos, squarks, and sleptons must all be very heavy, such that the only electroweak-scale superpartners are the Higgsinos. With this spectrum, supersymmetry does not solve the fine-tuning problem. Second, the temperature of the electroweak phase transition must be low, in the (1-10) GeV range. This condition requires an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  16. Cerebral white matter hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, R.B.; Shields, W.D.; Sankar, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the MR imaging findings in children with cerebral white matter hypoplasia (CWMH). The MR studies of four children, aged 3-7 y (mean age, 2.3 y) with a diagnosis of CWMH were reviewed. In all cases multiplanar T1-weighted and T2-weighted spin-echo images were obtained. All children had similar histories of severe developmental delay and nonprogressive neurologic deficits despite normal gestational and birth histories. In two cases there was a history of maternal cocaine abuse. Autopsy correlation was available in one child. The MR images of all four children demonstrated diffuse lack of white matter and enlarged ventricles but normal-appearing gray matter. The corpus callosum, although completely formed, was severely thinned. There was no evidence of gliosis or porencephaly, and the distribution of myelin deposition was normal for age in all cases. Autopsy finding in one child correlated exactly with the MR finding

  17. Dark matter from unification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Tuominen, Kimmo; Virkajärvi, Jussi Tuomas

    2013-01-01

    We consider a minimal extension of the Standard Model (SM), which leads to unification of the SM coupling constants, breaks electroweak symmetry dynamically by a new strongly coupled sector and leads to novel dark matter candidates. In this model, the coupling constant unification requires...... eigenstates of this sector and determine the resulting relic density. The results are constrained by available data from colliders and direct and indirect dark matter experiments. We find the model viable and outline briefly future research directions....... the existence of electroweak triplet and doublet fermions singlet under QCD and new strong dynamics underlying the Higgs sector. Among these new matter fields and a new right handed neutrino, we consider the mass and mixing patterns of the neutral states. We argue for a symmetry stabilizing the lightest mass...

  18. Matter and memory

    CERN Document Server

    Bergson, Henri

    1991-01-01

    Since the end of the last century," Walter Benjamin wrote, "philosophy has made a series of attempts to lay hold of the 'true' experience as opposed to the kind that manifests itself in the standardized, denatured life of the civilized masses. It is customary to classify these efforts under the heading of a philosophy of life. Towering above this literature is Henri Bergson's early monumental work, Matter and Memory."Along with Husserl's Ideas and Heidegger's Being and Time, Bergson's work represents one of the great twentieth-century investigations into perception and memory, movement and time, matter and mind. Arguably Bergson's most significant book, Matter and Memory is essential to an understanding of his philosophy and its legacy.This new edition includes an annotated bibliography prepared by Bruno Paradis.Henri Bergson (1859-1941) was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1927. His works include Time and Free Will, An Introduction to Metaphysics, Creative Evolution, and The Creative Mind.

  19. Interacting hot dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Davidson, S.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the viability of a light particle (∼30eV neutrino) with strong self-interactions as a dark matter candidate. The interaction prevents the neutrinos from free-streaming during the radiation-dominated regime so galaxy-sized density perturbations can survive. Smaller scale perturbations are damped due to neutrino diffusion. We calculate the power spectrum in the imperfect fluid approximation, and show that it is damped at the length scale one would estimate due to neutrino diffusion. The strength of the neutrino-neutrino coupling is only weakly constrained by observations, and could be chosen by fitting the power spectrum to the observed amplitude of matter density perturbations. The main shortcoming of our model is that interacting neutrinos cannot provide the dark matter in dwarf galaxies. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Interacting warm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ m α ρ e β form, where ρ m and ρ e are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w m and w e of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used

  1. Neutrons for probing matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, F. Ed.; Mazzucchetti, D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors tell the story of the French Orphee reactor located in Saclay from the decision to build it in the seventies, to its commissioning in 1980, to its upgrading in the nineties and to its today's operating life. As early as its feasibility studies Orphee has been designed as a dual-purpose reactor: scientific research for instance in crystallography and magnetism, and industrial uses like neutron radiography, silicon doping or radionuclide production. This book is divided into 4 parts: 1) the neutron: an explorer of the matter, 2) the Orphee reactor: a neutron source, 3) the adventurers of the matter: Leon Brillouin laboratory's staff, and 4) the perspectives for neutrons

  2. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Isihara, A

    2007-01-01

    More than a graduate text and advanced research guide on condensed matter physics, this volume is useful to plasma physicists and polymer chemists, and their students. It emphasizes applications of statistical mechanics to a variety of systems in condensed matter physics rather than theoretical derivations of the principles of statistical mechanics and techniques. Isihara addresses a dozen different subjects in separate chapters, each designed to be directly accessible and used independently of previous chapters. Topics include simple liquids, electron systems and correlations, two-dimensional

  3. Differences in bitumen and kerogen-bound fatty acid fractions during diagenesis and early catagenesis in a maturity series of New Zealand coals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glombitza, Clemens; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Horsfield, Brian

    2016-01-01

    network. Application of the carbon preference index for fatty acids (CPIFA) of bitumen and kerogen-bound acids revealed a linear correlation to the Tmax maturity parameter. This shows that the CPIFA has a clear relation to thermal stability and, thus, reactivity of the buried organic matter....... The difference in slopes of CPIFA vs. Tmax for short and long chain as well as bitumen and kerogen-bound acids may indicate their different degradation susceptibilities. The short chain fatty acids of the bitumen show the highest susceptibility whereas the kerogen-bound long chain fatty acids seem to be most...

  4. Artificial maturation of an immature sulfur- and organic matter-rich limestone from the Ghareb Formation, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, M.P.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; De Leeuw, J. W.; Lewan, M.D.; Damste, J.S.S.

    1998-01-01

    An immature (Ro=0.39%), S-rich (S(org)/C = 0.07), organic matter-rich (19.6 wt. % TOC) limestone from the Ghareb Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in Jordan was artificially matured by hydrous pyrolysis (200, 220 ..., 300??C; 72 h) to study the effect of progressive diagenesis and early catagenesis on the amounts and distributions of hydrocarbons, organic sulfur compounds and S-rich geomacromolecules. The use of internal standards allowed the determination of absolute amounts. With increasing thermal maturation, large amounts of alkanes and alkylthiophenes with predominantly linear carbon skeletons are generated from the kerogen. The alkylthiophene isomer distributions do not change significantly with increasing thermal maturation, indicating the applicability of alkylthiophenes as biomarkers at relatively high levels of thermal maturity. For a given carbon skeleton, the saturated hydrocarbon, alkylthiophenes and alkylbenzo[b]thiophenes are stable forms at relatively high temperatures, whereas the alkylsulfides are not stable. The large amount of alkylthiophenes produced relative to the alkanes may be explained by the large number of monosulfide links per carbon skeleton. These results are in good agreement with those obtained previously for an artificial maturation series of an immature S-rich sample from the Gessoso-solfifera Formation.An immature (Ro = 0.39%), S-rich (Sorg/C = 0.07), organic matter-rich (19.6 wt.% TOC) limestone from the Ghareb Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in Jordan was artificially matured by hydrous pyrolysis (200, 220, ..., 300??C; 72 h) to study the effect of progressive diagenesis and early catagenesis on the amounts and distributions of hydrocarbons, organic sulfur compounds and S-rich geomacromolecules. The use of internal standards allowed the determination of absolute amounts. With increasing thermal maturation, large amounts of alkanes and alkylthiophenes with predominantly linear carbon skeletons are generated from the kerogen. The

  5. Sedimentology, Mineralogy, Morphology, and Characterization of Purple Non-Sulfur Bacteria Communities from Modern Hypersaline Microbial Mats in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Colon, B. J.; Rivera-Lopez, E. O.; Ramirez-Martinez, W. R.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Perez-Valentin, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial mats are organosedimentary structures which house complex guilds of microbial communities, held together by a gelatinous exopolymeric substance (EPS). This biofilm contributes to the formation of laminations by binding and trapping sediments, as well as in-situ organomineralization. Microbial mats commonly thrive in extreme habitats, such as the hypersaline environments, which have been studied throughout several coastal regions in the Caribbean. This project aims to study the morphology, sedimentology, and mineralogy of five different modern hypersaline microbial mats from Puerto Rico and Anegada that have not yet been studied, to assess their differences/similarities. At the same time, we intent to isolate and characterize purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB), which is an anoxyphototrophic microorganism that contributes to the pink pigmentation observed in the second layer of a typical microbial mat. Different layers within each mat were separated, dissected and dissolved to remove all organic material. The resulting sediment was then analyzed mineralogically using X-ray diffraction, and used to make petrographic thin sections. To isolate PNSB candidates, serial dilutions followed by filtration were performed to extracted sections from the pink layer of each mat. The samples were planted in Petri dishes with marine media and placed in Anaerobic Jars. Colonies Descriptions, Gram stain and molecular analysis using 16S rDNA gene was performed. Preliminary results show a diversity of mat morphologies throughout the ponds, similar to what has been observed in other hypersaline ponds and marshes in the Caribbean. Sedimentary analysis shows that the mats from Puerto Rico have similar allochthonous material (e.g. Halimeda sp. fragments). Microcodium fabrics, conoform structures, and hemispheroidal morphologies were observed as well. In Anegada, lithified microbialites were observed in the Red Pond location. Mineralogically, all samples were similar except for the

  6. Sedimentologic and paleoclimatic reconstructions of carbonate factory evolution in the Alborz Basin (northern Iran) indicate a global response to Early Carboniferous (Tournaisian) glaciations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar Abadi, Mehrdad; Kulagina, Elena I.; Voeten, Dennis F. A. E.; Boulvain, Frédéric; Da Silva, Anne-Christine

    2017-03-01

    The Lower Carboniferous Mobarak Formation records the development of a storm-sensitive pervasive carbonate factory on the southern Paleo-Tethyan passive margin following the opening of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean into the Alborz Basin along the northern margin of Gondwana. Its depositional facies encompass inner ramp peritidal environments, peloidal to crinoidal shoals, storm to fair-weather influenced mid-ramps, proximal to distal shell beds and low energy outer ramps. Sedimentological analyses and foraminiferal biostratigraphy reveal four events affecting carbonate platform evolution in the Alborz Basin during the Lower Carboniferous: (1) A transgression following global temperature rise in the Early Tournaisian (middle Hastarian) caused the formation of thick-bedded argillaceous limestones. This interval correlates with Early Tournaisian nodular to argillaceous limestones in the Moravia Basin (Lisen Formation, Czech Republic), the Dinant Basin (Pont d'Arcole Formation, Belgium), and at the Rhenish Slate Mountains (Lower Alum shale, Germany). (2) Late Hastarian-early Ivorian glaciations previously identified in Southern Gondwana but had not yet recognized in Northern Gondwana were recorded through a sequence boundary. (3) During the Late Tournaisian-Early Visean?, a differential block faulting regime along the basin's margin caused uplift of the westernmost parts of the Alborz Basin and resulted in subsidence in the eastern part of the central basin. This tectonically controlled shift in depositional regime caused vast sub-aerial exposure and brecciation preserved in the top of the Mobarak Formation in the western portion of the Central Alborz Basin. (4) Tectonic activity coinciding with a progressive, multiphase sea level drop caused indirectly by the Viséan and Serpukhovian glaciations phases ultimately led to the stagnation of the carbonate factory. Paleothermometry proxies, the presence of foraminiferal taxa with a northern Paleo-Tethyan affinity and evidence for

  7. Sedimentological techniques applied to the hydrology of the Atlantic coastal plain in South Carolina and Georgia near the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falls, F.W.; Baum, J.S.; Edwards, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    Potential for migration of contaminants in ground water under the Savannah River from South Carolina into Georgia near the US Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is located in the inner Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina and is underlain by 200 to more than 300 meters of permeable, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated sediments of Cretaceous and Tertiary age. The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, is evaluating ground-water flow through the Coastal Plain sediments in the area. Preliminary hydrologic studies conducted to provide the data needed for digital modeling of the ground-water flow system identified the need for more extensive investigation into the influence of the geologic complexities on that flow system. The Coastal Plain physiographic province in South Carolina and Georgia is comprised of a complex wedge of fluvial, deltaic, and marine sedimentary deposits locally modified by faulting. Several techniques commonly used in petroleum basin analysis (sequence stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, detailed core description, and geophysical well log analysis), were used together with water-level measurements, aquifer-test data, and geochemical data to identify six regional aquifers. Hydraulic conductivity distribution maps within each of these aquifers were constructed using textural analysis of core materials, aquifer test data, and depositional system reconstruction. Sedimentological techniques were used to improve understanding of the depositional system and the ground-water flow system dynamics, and to help focus research in areas where additional hydrologic, geologic, and aquifer-test data are needed

  8. New insights on lithofacies architecture, sedimentological characteristics and volcanological evolution of pre-caldera (> 22 ka), multi-phase, scoria- and spatter-cones at Somma-Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparice, Domenico; Scarpati, Claudio; Perrotta, Annamaria; Mazzeo, Fabio Carmine; Calvert, Andrew T.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2017-11-01

    Pre-caldera (> 22 ka) lateral activity at Somma-Vesuvius is related to scoria- and spatter-cone forming events of monogenetic or polygenetic nature. A new stratigraphic, sedimentological, textural and lithofacies investigation was performed on five parasitic cones (Pollena cones, Traianello cone, S. Maria a Castello cone and the recently found Terzigno cone) occurring below the Pomici di Base (22 ka) Plinian products emplaced during the first caldera collapse at Somma-Vesuvius. A new Ar/Ar age of 23.6 ± 0.3 ka obtained for the Traianello cone as well as the absence of a paleosol or reworked material between the S. Maria a Castello cone and the Pomici di Base deposits suggest that such cone-forming eruptions occurred near the upper limit of the pre-caldera period (22-39 ky). The stratigraphy of three of these eccentric cones (Pollena cones and Traianello cone) exhibits erosion surfaces, exotic tephras, volcaniclastic layers, paleosols, unconformity and paraconformity between superimposed eruptive units revealing their multi-phase, polygenetic evolution related to activation of separate vents and periods of quiescence. Such eccentric cones have been described as composed of scoria deposits and pure effusive lavas by previous authors. Lavas are here re-interpreted as welded horizons (lava-like) composed of coalesced spatter fragments whose pyroclastic nature is locally revealed by relicts of original fragments and remnants of clast outlines. These welded horizons show, locally, rheomorphic structures allowing to define them as emplaced as clastogenic lava flows. The lava-like facies is transitional, upward and downward, to less welded facies composed of agglutinated to unwelded spatter horizons in which clasts outlines are increasingly discernible. Such textural characteristics and facies variation are consistent with a continuous fall deposition of Hawaiian fire-fountains episodes alternated with Strombolian phases emplacing loose scoria deposits. High enrichment

  9. Sedimentology of Hirnantian glaciomarine deposits in the Balkan Terrane, western Bulgaria: Fixing a piece of the north peri-Gondwana jigsaw puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatalov, Athanas

    2017-04-01

    Glaciomarine deposits of late Hirnantian age in the western part of the Palaeozoic Balkan Terrane have persistent thickness ( 7 m) and lateral uniformity in rock colour, bedding pattern, lithology, and sedimentary structures. Four lithofacies are distinguished from base to top: lonestone-bearing diamictites, interbedded structureless mudstones, crudely laminated diamictites, and finely laminated mudstones. The diamictites are clast-poor to clast-rich comprising muddy to sandy varieties. Their compositional maturity is evidenced by the very high amount of detrital quartz compared to the paucity of feldspar and unstable lithic grains. Other textural components include extraclasts derived from the local Ordovician basement, mudstone intraclasts, and sediment aggregates. Turbate structures, grain lineations, and soft sediment deformation of the matrix below larger grains are locally observed. Sedimentological analysis reveals that deposition occurred in an ice-intermediate to ice-distal, poorly agitated shelf environment by material supplied from meltwater buoyant plumes and rain-out from ice-rafted debris. Remobilization by mass-flow processes (cohesive debris flows and slumps) was an important mechanism particularly for the formation of massive diamictites. The glaciomarine deposits represent a typical deglaciation sequence reflecting retreat of the ice front (grounded or floating ice sheet), relative sea-level rise and gradually reduced sedimentation rate with increasing contribution from suspension fallout. This sequence was deposited on the non-glaciated shelf of the intracratonic North Gondwana platform along the southern margin of the Rheic Ocean. The Hirnantian strata of the Balkan Terrane can be correlated with similar glaciomarine deposits known from peri-Gondwana terranes elsewhere in Europe showing clear 'Armorican affinity'. Several lines of evidence suggest that the provenance of siliciclastic material was associated mainly with sedimentary recycling of

  10. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronological and sedimentological study of the Simao Basin, Yunnan: Implications for the Early Cenozoic evolution of the Red River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Yan, Maodu; Fang, Xiaomin; Song, Chunhui; Zhang, Weilin; Zan, Jinbo; Zhang, Zhiguo; Li, Bingshuai; Yang, Yongpeng; Zhang, Dawen

    2017-10-01

    The paleo-Red River is suggested to have been a continental-scale drainage system connecting the Tibetan Plateau to the South China Sea. However, the evolution of the paleo-Red River is still under debate. This study presents new results from sedimentological analyses and detrital zircon U-Pb geochronologic data from fluvial sedimentary rocks of Paleocene to Oligocene age of the Simao Basin to constrain the nature of the paleo-drainage system of the Red River. The detrital zircon U-Pb results reveal multiple age groups at 190-240 Ma, 260-280 Ma, 450-540 Ma, 1700-1900 Ma and 2400-2600 Ma for the Paleocene to late Eocene Denghei Formation (Fm.), but only one conspicuous peak at 220-240 Ma for the late Eocene-Oligocene Mengla Fm. Provenance analyses illustrate that the former likely had source areas that included the Hoh-Xil, Songpan-Ganzi, northern Qiangtang, Yidun and western Yangtze Terranes, which are consistent with the catchments of the Upper and Lower Jinshajiang Segments, whereas the latter mainly transported material from a limited number of sources, such as the Lincang granitic intrusions west of the Simao Basin. Integrated with available detrital zircon U-Pb geochronologic and paleogeographic data, our study suggests the existence of a paleo-Red River during the Paleocene to late Eocene that was truncated and lost its northern sources after approximately 35 Ma, due to left-lateral strike-slip faulting of the Ailao Shan-Red River and clockwise rotation of the Lanping-Simao Terrane.

  11. Interacting dark matter disguised as warm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, Celine; Riazuelo, Alain; Hansen, Steen H.; Schaeffer, Richard

    2002-01-01

    We explore some of the consequences of dark-matter-photon interactions on structure formation, focusing on the evolution of cosmological perturbations and performing both an analytical and a numerical study. We compute the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and matter power spectrum in this class of models. We find, as the main result, that when dark matter and photons are coupled, dark matter perturbations can experience a new damping regime in addition to the usual collisional Silk damping effect. Such dark matter particles (having quite large photon interactions) behave like cold dark matter or warm dark matter as far as the cosmic microwave background anisotropies or matter power spectrum are concerned, respectively. These dark-matter-photon interactions leave specific imprints at sufficiently small scales on both of these two spectra, which may allow us to put new constraints on the acceptable photon-dark-matter interactions. Under the conservative assumption that the abundance of 10 12 M · galaxies is correctly given by the cold dark matter, and without any knowledge of the abundance of smaller objects, we obtain the limit on the ratio of the dark-matter-photon cross section to the dark matter mass σ γ-DM /m DM -6 σ Th /(100 GeV)≅6x10 -33 cm 2 GeV -1

  12. Energy Matters, July 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, E.

    1999-07-09

    This issue of Energy Matters focuses on selling an energy-efficient project to management. There are also articles on combined heat and power systems, inspecting steam traps for efficient system, root cause failure analysis on AC induction motors, and performance optimization tips.

  13. Little composite dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Reuven; Perez, Gilad; Weiler, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    We examine the dark matter phenomenology of a composite electroweak singlet state. This singlet belongs to the Goldstone sector of a well-motivated extension of the Littlest Higgs with T-parity. A viable parameter space, consistent with the observed dark matter relic abundance as well as with the various collider, electroweak precision and dark matter direct detection experimental constraints is found for this scenario. T-parity implies a rich LHC phenomenology, which forms an interesting interplay between conventional natural SUSY type of signals involving third generation quarks and missing energy, from stop-like particle production and decay, and composite Higgs type of signals involving third generation quarks associated with Higgs and electroweak gauge boson, from vector-like top-partners production and decay. The composite features of the dark matter phenomenology allows the composite singlet to produce the correct relic abundance while interacting weakly with the Higgs via the usual Higgs portal coupling λ _{ {DM}}˜ O(1%), thus evading direct detection.

  14. Matter: the fundamental particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Landua, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    "The largest particle physics centre in the world is located in Europe. It straddles the Franco-Swiss border, near Geneva. At CERN - the European Organisation for Nuclear Research , which is focused on the science of nuclear matter rather than on the exploitation of atomic energy - there are over 6 500 scientists." (1 page)

  15. Why Philosophy Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The motives of philosophers tend to be personal. Philosophy has mattered politically as part of continuing political debates. Its effects on politics, religion and the development of the sciences have been evident. Philosophy has been supposed to have special educational value, from its contents or from the benefits of its methods and arguments.…

  16. with dark matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-16

    Nov 16, 2012 ... November 2012 physics pp. 1271–1274. Radiative see-saw formula in ... on neutrino physics, dark matter and all fermion masses and mixings. ... as such, high-energy accelerators cannot directly test the underlying origin of ...

  17. The Birth of Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    To mark the World Year of Physics, the Physics Section of the University of Geneva is organising a series of lectures for the uninitiated. Each lecture will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de Musique de Genève, of how these signals from the farthest reaches of the Universe can be used to create 'cosmic music'. The fourth lecture in the series, entitled 'The Birth of Matter', will take place on Tuesday 3 May 2005 and will be given by CERN's theoretical physicist, John Ellis. Where does matter come from? Where do the structures that surround us, such as galaxies, come from? Are we living in a world of invisible matter? Why is the universe so old and so big? John Ellis will show how elementary particle physics and, in particular, the LHC under construction at CERN, can answer these questions. The Birth of Matter Professor John Ellis Tuesday 3 May, starting 8.00 p.m. Main Auditorium...

  18. The Birth of Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    To mark the World Year of Physics, the Physics Section of the University of Geneva is organising a series of lectures for the uninitiated. Each lecture will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de Musique de Genève, of how these signals from the farthest reaches of the Universe can be used to create "cosmic music". The fourth lecture in the series, entitled "The Birth of Matter", will take place on Tuesday 3 May 2005 and will be given by CERN's theoretical physicist, John Ellis. Where does matter come from? Where do the structures that surround us, such as galaxies, come from? Are we living in a world of invisible matter? Why is the universe so old and so big? John Ellis will show how elementary particle physics and, in particular, the LHC under construction at CERN, can answer these questions. The Birth of Matter Professor John Ellis Tuesday 3 May, starting 8.00 p.m. Main Audito...

  19. Exceptional composite dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo [Universite Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, Institut de Physique Theorique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Carmona, Adrian [CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Chala, Mikael [Universitat de Valencia y IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-15

    We study the dark matter phenomenology of non-minimal composite Higgs models with SO(7) broken to the exceptional group G{sub 2}. In addition to the Higgs, three pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons arise, one of which is electrically neutral. A parity symmetry is enough to ensure this resonance is stable. In fact, if the breaking of the Goldstone symmetry is driven by the fermion sector, this Z{sub 2} symmetry is automatically unbroken in the electroweak phase. In this case, the relic density, as well as the expected indirect, direct and collider signals are then uniquely determined by the value of the compositeness scale, f. Current experimental bounds allow one to account for a large fraction of the dark matter of the Universe if the dark matter particle is part of an electroweak triplet. The totality of the relic abundance can be accommodated if instead this particle is a composite singlet. In both cases, the scale f and the dark matter mass are of the order of a few TeV. (orig.)

  20. The origin of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.

    2004-01-01

    The author presents the issue of how matter triumphed over anti-matter in the formation of the universe. Theories focus on the nature of asymmetry that might have created an excess of matter over anti-matter. Sakharov and Kuzmin listed 3 conditions that must be met for baryogenesis to take place. First the baryon number must not be conserved: there must be some interactions that change the number of baryons, baryon-number violation can rise from an interaction between quarks and leptons. Secondly, 2 symmetries that relate particles to antiparticles must be violated. The CP violation in Kaon decay is too weak to create enough baryon asymmetry, so physicists believe that larger sources of CP violation await discovery. Thirdly, there must be the loss of thermal equilibrium of the universe. In thermal equilibrium, baryons are decaying but inverse processes are also taking place, quarks are fusing to form baryons, rates being equal no baryon asymmetry is generated. But if thermal equilibrium is broken, to say temperature is decreasing, at a certain temperature a pair of quarks will no longer have enough energy to produce a heavy particle which generates baryon asymmetry. (A.C.)

  1. Elliott on Mind Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maattanen, Pentti

    2000-01-01

    Argues that David Elliott's conception of the human mind presented in his book "Music Matters" is not coherent. Outlines three alternatives to Elliott's theory of mind. Suggests that the principles associated with the pragmatism of Charles Sanders Pierce would complement Elliott's ideas in his book. (CMK)

  2. Simplified Dark Matter Models

    OpenAIRE

    Morgante, Enrico

    2018-01-01

    I review the construction of Simplified Models for Dark Matter searches. After discussing the philosophy and some simple examples, I turn the attention to the aspect of the theoretical consistency and to the implications of the necessary extensions of these models.

  3. Condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The condensed matter physics research in the Physics Department of Risoe National Laboratory is predominantly experimental utilising diffraction of neutrons and x-rays. The research topics range from studies of structure, excitations and phase transitions in model systems to studies of ion transport, texture and recrystallization kinetics with a more applied nature. (author)

  4. 6d Conformal matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotto, Michele Del; Heckman, Jonathan J.; Tomasiello, Alessandro; Vafa, Cumrun

    2015-01-01

    A single M5-brane probing G, an ADE-type singularity, leads to a system which has G×G global symmetry and can be viewed as “bifundamental” (G,G) matter. For the A N series, this leads to the usual notion of bifundamental matter. For the other cases it corresponds to a strongly interacting (1,0) superconformal system in six dimensions. Similarly, an ADE singularity intersecting the Hořava-Witten wall leads to a superconformal matter system with E 8 ×G global symmetry. Using the F-theory realization of these theories, we elucidate the Coulomb/tensor branch of (G,G ′ ) conformal matter. This leads to the notion of fractionalization of an M5-brane on an ADE singularity as well as fractionalization of the intersection point of the ADE singularity with the Hořava-Witten wall. Partial Higgsing of these theories leads to new 6d SCFTs in the infrared, which we also characterize. This generalizes the class of (1,0) theories which can be perturbatively realized by suspended branes in IIA string theory. By reducing on a circle, we arrive at novel duals for 5d affine quiver theories. Introducing many M5-branes leads to large N gravity duals.

  5. States of Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak Dhar. States of Matter. Deepak Dhar. Keywords. Solid, liquid, gas, glasses, powders. D Dhar is a theoretical physicist at the Tata. Institute of Funamental. Research, Mumbai. His research interests are mainly in the area of non- equilibrium statistical physics. All of us have read about solid, liquid and gaseous.

  6. The Dark Matter Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    1. Introduction; 2. Early history of the dark matter hypothesis; 3. The stability of disk galaxies: the dark halo solutions; 4. Direct evidence: extended rotation curves of spiral galaxies; 5. The maximum disk: light traces mass; 6. Cosmology and the birth of astroparticle physics; 7. Clusters

  7. Template Composite Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drach, Vincent; Hietanen, Ari; Pica, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We present a non perturbative study of SU(2) gauge theory with two fundamental Dirac flavours. We discuss how the model can be used as a template for composite Dark Matter (DM). We estimate one particular interaction of the DM candidate with the Standard Model : the interaction through photon...

  8. Little composite dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balkin, Reuven; Weiler, Andreas [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, First Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Perez, Gilad [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel)

    2018-02-15

    We examine the dark matter phenomenology of a composite electroweak singlet state. This singlet belongs to the Goldstone sector of a well-motivated extension of the Littlest Higgs with T-parity. A viable parameter space, consistent with the observed dark matter relic abundance as well as with the various collider, electroweak precision and dark matter direct detection experimental constraints is found for this scenario. T-parity implies a rich LHC phenomenology, which forms an interesting interplay between conventional natural SUSY type of signals involving third generation quarks and missing energy, from stop-like particle production and decay, and composite Higgs type of signals involving third generation quarks associated with Higgs and electroweak gauge boson, from vector-like top-partners production and decay. The composite features of the dark matter phenomenology allows the composite singlet to produce the correct relic abundance while interacting weakly with the Higgs via the usual Higgs portal coupling λ{sub DM} ∝ O(1%), thus evading direct detection. (orig.)

  9. Dark matter axions '96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikivie, P.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses why axions have been postulated to exist, what cosmology implies about their presence as cold dark matter in the galactic halo, how axions might be detected in cavities wherein strong magnetic fields stimulate their conversion into photons, and relations between axions' energy spectra and galactic halos' properties

  10. Condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is a summary of condensed matter physics in Brazil. It discusses as well, the perspectives and financing evolved in this research area for the next decade. It is specially concerned with semiconductors, magnetic materials, superconductivity, polymers, glasses, crystals ceramics, statistical physics, magnetic resonance and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (A.C.A.S.)

  11. Matter and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effenberger, R.

    1975-07-01

    The author looks empirically at the processes by which the various forms of matter, the chemical elements, come into existence. In doing so he examines unification within relativity and quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear structure, the quantum idea as a unifying concept, particle physics and finally nucleosynthesis and a viable nucleosynthetic theory

  12. Soft Matter Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Borsali, Redouane

    2008-01-01

    Progress in basic soft matter research is driven largely by the experimental techniques available. Much of the work is concerned with understanding them at the microscopic level, especially at the nanometer length scales that give soft matter studies a wide overlap with nanotechnology. This 2 volume reference work, split into 4 parts, presents detailed discussions of many of the major techniques commonly used as well as some of those in current development for studying and manipulating soft matter. The articles are intended to be accessible to the interdisciplinary audience (at the graduate student level and above) that is or will be engaged in soft matter studies or those in other disciplines who wish to view some of the research methods in this fascinating field. Part 1 contains articles with a largely (but, in most cases, not exclusively) theoretical content and/or that cover material relevant to more than one of the techniques covered in subsequent volumes. It includes an introductory chapter on some of t...

  13. Dibaryons and nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besliu, C.; Popa, L.; Popa, V.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss some recent ideas concerning the structure and the properties of the dibaryonic resonances, with special emphasis on their behaviour when produced in dense nuclear matter. Some features of their de-excitation mechanism and consequent experimentally identifiable signatures are predicted. (Author)

  14. Dark matter and its detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Xiaojun; Qin Bo

    2011-01-01

    We first explain the concept of dark matter,then review the history of its discovery and the evidence of its existence. We describe our understanding of the nature of dark matter particles, the popular dark matter models,and why the weakly interacting massive particles (called WIMPs) are the most attractive candidates for dark matter. Then we introduce the three methods of dark matter detection: colliders, direct detection and indirect detection. Finally, we review the recent development of dark matter detection, including the new results from DAMA, CoGent, PAMELA, ATIC and Fermi. (authors)

  15. Sedimentology and Reservoir Characteristics of Early Cretaceous Fluvio-Deltaic and Lacustrine Deposits, Upper Abu Gabra Formation, Sufyan Sub-basin, Muglad Rift Basin, Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Mohamed; Abdullatif, Osman; Hariri, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    Sufyan Sub-basin is an East-West trending Sub-basin located in the northwestern part of the Muglad Basin (Sudan), in the eastern extension of the West and Central Africa Rift System (WCARS). The Early Cretaceous Abu Gabra Formation considered as the main source rock in the Muglad Basin. In Sufyan Sub-basin the Early Cretaceous Upper Abu Gabra Formation is the main oil-producing reservoir. It is dominated by sandstone and shales deposited in fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine environment during the first rift cycle in the basin. Depositional and post-depositional processes highly influenced the reservoir quality and architecture. This study investigates different scales of reservoir heterogeneities from macro to micro scale. Subsurface facies analysis was analyzed based on the description of six conventional cores from two wells. Approaches include well log analysis, thin sections and scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations, grain-size, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the Abu Gabra sandstone. The cores and well logs analyses revealed six lithofacies representing fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine depositional environment. The sandstone is medium to coarse-grained, poorly to moderately sorted and sub-angular to subrounded, Sub-feldspathic arenite to quartz arenite. On macro-scale, reservoir quality varies within Abu Gabra reservoir where it shows progressive coarsening upward tendencies with different degrees of connectivity. The upper part of the reservoir showed well connected and amalgamated sandstone bodies, the middle to lower parts, however, have moderate to low sandstone bodies' connectivity and amalgamation. On micro-scale, sandstone reservoir quality is directly affected by textures and diagenesis.The XRD and SEM analyses show that kaolinite and chlorite clay are the common clay minerals in the studied samples. Clay matrix and quartz overgrowth have significantly reduced the reservoir porosity and permeability, while the dissolution of feldspars

  16. The role of sedimentology, oceanography, and alteration on the δ56Fe value of the Sokoman Iron Formation, Labrador Trough, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raye, Urmidola; Pufahl, Peir K.; Kyser, T. Kurtis; Ricard, Estelle; Hiatt, Eric E.

    2015-09-01

    The Sokoman Formation is a ca. 100-m-thick succession of interbedded iron formation and fine-grained siliciclastics deposited at 1.88 Ga. Accumulation occurred on a dynamic paleoshelf where oxygen stratification, coastal upwelling of hydrothermally derived Fe and Si, microbial processes, tide and storm currents, diagenesis, and low-grade prehnite-pumpellyite metamorphism controlled lithofacies character and produced complex associations of multigenerational chert, hematite, magnetite, greenalite, stilpnomelane and Fe carbonate. Hematite-rich facies were deposited along suboxic segments of the coastline where photosynthetic oxygen oases impinged on the seafloor. Hematitic, cross-stratified grainstones were formed by winnowing and reworking of freshly precipitated Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide and opal-A by waves and currents into subaqueous dunes. Magnetite-rich facies contain varying proportions of greenalite and stilpnomelane and record deposition in anoxic middle shelf environments beneath an oxygen chemocline. Minor negative Ce anomalies in hematitic facies, but prominent positive Ce and Eu anomalies and high LREE/HREE ratios in magnetite-rich facies imply the existence of a weakly oxygenated surface ocean above anoxic bottom waters. The Fe isotopic composition of 31 whole rock (-0.46 ⩽ δ56Fe ⩽ 0.47‰) and 21 magnetite samples (-0.29 ⩽ δ56Fe ⩽ 0.22‰) from suboxic and anoxic lithofacies was controlled primarily by the physical oceanography of the paleoshelf. Despite low-grade metamorphism recorded by the δ18O values of paragenetically related quartz and magnetite, the Sokoman Formation preserves a robust primary Fe isotopic signal. Coastal upwelling is interpreted to have affected the isotopic equilibria between Fe2+aq and Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide in open marine versus coastal environments, which controlled the Fe isotopic composition of lithofacies. Unlike previous work that focuses on microbial and abiotic fractionation processes with little regard for

  17. U-Pb SHRIMP ages of volcanic zircons from the Merrions and Turondale Formations, New South Wales, and the early devonian time-scale: a biostratigraphic and sedimentological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packham, G.H.

    2003-01-01

    U-Pb ages for volcanic zircons from the Lower Devonian Turondale and Merrions Formations initially dated by Jagodzinski and Black (1999) have been recalculated by Compston (2000, 2001). The Turondale, Waterbeach and Merrions Formations are, in ascending stratigraphic order, three of the Lower Devonian deep-water formations of the Hill End Trough. The recent discovery of a Lochkovian conodont fauna of the delta zone in derived limestone blocks from the uppermost beds of the Turondale Formation has established a maximum age for that horizon. The principal lithological assemblages of the formations are volcanic (megaturbidite and lavas), epiclastic turbidites and essentially hemipelagic lithologies. The mean zircon ages, determined by Sensitive High-Resolution Ion MicroProbe (SHRIMP), suggest a long duration for the Merrions Formation, 615 m thick and 91% volcanic, and a very much shorter interval for the upper two-thirds of the Turondale Formation, 360 m thick and 34% volcanic, plus the intervening non-volcanic Waterbeach Formation, 512 m thick. A sedimentological model based on scaled depositional rates for the facies has been used to estimate the relative accumulation rates and durations of the succession from the base of the Turondale Formation to the top of the Merrions Formation The model indicates that the Merrions Formation accumulated in a much shorter time than the interval from the top of the lower Turondale Formation to the base of the Merrions Formation. The analytical uncertainties of the Jagodzinski and Black (1999) zircon ages are large enough to be compatible with the sedimentological model, but the smaller analytical uncertainties calculated by Compston (2000, 2001) fall far from the scaled sedimentological model. Grouping together of the lower Merrions Formation and lower Turondale Formation zircon dates in Compston (2000) for a single mid-Lochkovian age is in conflict with the biostratigraphic and sedimentological evidence available and the derived

  18. Non-baryonic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkes, I.

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses the nature of the dark matter and the possibility of the detection of non-baryonic dark matter in an underground experiment. Among the useful detectors the low temperature bolometers are considered in some detail. (author)

  19. Is old organic matter simple organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, Naoise; Lerch, Thomas; Pouteau, Valérie; Mora, Philippe; Changey, Fréderique; Kätterer, Thomas; Herrmann, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Bare fallow soils that have been deprived of fresh carbon inputs for prolonged periods contain mostly old, stable organic carbon. In order to shed light on the nature of this carbon, the functional diversity profiles (MicroResp™, Biolog™ and enzyme activity spectra) of the microbial communities of long-term barefallow soils were analysed and compared with those of the microbial communities from their cultivated counterparts. The study was based on the idea that microbial communities adapt to their environment and that therefore the catabolic and enzymatic profiles would reflect the type of substrates available to the microbial communities. The catabolic profiles suggested that the microbial communities in the long-term bare-fallow soil were exposed to a less diverse range of substrates and that these substrates tended to be of simpler molecular forms. Both the catabolic and enzyme activity profiles suggested that the microbial communities from the long-term bare-fallow soils were less adapted to using polymers. These results do not fit with the traditional view of old, stable carbon being composed of complex, recalcitrant polymers. An energetics analysis of the substrate use of the microbial communities for the different soils suggested that the microbial communities from the long-term bare-fallow soils were better adapted to using readily oxidizable,although energetically less rewarding, substrates. Microbial communities appear to adapt to the deprivation of fresh organic matter by using substrates that require little investment.

  20. Direct search for dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Dark matter is hypothetical matter which does not interact with electromagnetic radiation. The existence of dark matter is only inferred from gravitational effects of astrophysical observations to explain the missing mass component of the Universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles are currently the most popular candidate to explain the missing mass component. I review the current status of experimental searches of dark matter through direct detection using terrestrial detectors.

  1. Particle Dark Matter: An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roszkowski, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Dark matter in the Universe is likely to be made up of some new, hypothetical particle which would be a part of an extension of the Standard Model of particle physics. In this overview, I will first briefly review well motivated particle candidates for dark matter. Next I will focus my attention on the neutralino of supersymmetry which is the by far most popular dark matter candidate. I will discuss some recent progress and comment on prospects for dark matter detection.

  2. Topological hierarchy matters — topological matters with superlattices of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jing; Kou Su-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators/superconductors are new states of quantum matter with metallic edge/surface states. In this paper, we review the defects effect in these topological states and study new types of topological matters — topological hierarchy matters. We find that both topological defects (quantized vortices) and non topological defects (vacancies) can induce topological mid-gap states in the topological hierarchy matters after considering the superlattice of defects. These topological mid-gap states have nontrivial topological properties, including the nonzero Chern number and the gapless edge states. Effective tight-binding models are obtained to describe the topological mid-gap states in the topological hierarchy matters. (topical review)

  3. Flipped dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.; Hagelin, J.S.; Kelley, S.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Olive, K.A.

    1988-08-04

    We study candidates for dark matter in a minimal flipped SU(5) x U(1) supersymmetric GUT. Since the model has no R-parity, spin-1/2 supersymmetric partners of conventional particles mix with other neutral fermions including neutrinos, and can decay into them. The lighest particle which is predominantly a gaugino/higgsino mixture decays with a lifetime tau/sub chi/ approx. = 1-10/sup 9/ s. The model contains a scalar 'flaton' field whose coherent oscillations decay before cosmological nucleosynthesis, and whose pseudoscalar partner contributes negligibly to ..cap omega.. if it is light enough to survive to the present epoch. The fermionic 'flatino' partner of the flaton has a lifetime tau/sub PHI/ approx. = 10/sup 28/-10/sup 34/ yr and is a viable candiate for metastable dark matter with ..cap omega.. < or approx. 1.

  4. Deuterium in organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straaten, C.M. van der.

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain an insight in the processes governing the macroclimate on earth, a knowledge is required of the behaviour of climates in the past. It is well known that D/H ratio of rain varies with temperature determined by latitude as well as by season. Because land plants use this water during the assimilation process, it is expected that the D/H variations are propagated in the organic plant matter. The D/H palaeoclimatic method has therefore been applied to peat to distinguish between the chemical constituents and trace the stable hydrogen fraction in the organic matter. The relation between the hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation and climatic factors such as the temperature have also been studied. (Auth.)

  5. A matter of quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Quarks are understood to interact through the 'colour' force, carried by gluons. Under normal conditions these quarks are confined - frozen together in 'colourless' states such as protons, neutrons and other strongly interacting particles. However if the quarks are compressed tightly together and/or are 'heated' by increasing their energy, they should eventually break loose from their colour bonds to form a new kind of matter – the so-called quark-gluon plasma. Although QGP has not yet been synthesized in the Laboratory, it was most likely the stuff of the Universe 10 -5 second after the Big Bang. Thus the search for this 'new' matter is attracting a growing number of physicists, theorists and experimenters from both the particle physics and nuclear physics fields

  6. Hyperons in dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dapo, Haris

    2009-01-28

    The hyperon-nucleon YN low momentum effective interaction (V{sub low} {sub k}) allows for an extensive study of the behavior of hyperons in dense matter, together with an investigation of effects of the presence of hyperons on dense matter. The first step towards this goal is the construction of the matrix elements for the hyperon-nucleon low momentum potential. In order to assess the different properties of hyperons within these potentials we calculate the hyperon single-particle potentials in the Hartree-Fock approximation for all of the interactions. Their dependence on both momentum and density, is studied. The single-particle potentials are then used to determine the chemical potential of hyperons in neutron stars. For nucleonic properties, the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} can be used with the caveat that the calculation of the ground-state energy of symmetric nuclear matter does not correctly reproduce the properties of matter at saturation. With the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} one is unable to reach the densities needed for the calculation of neutron star masses. To circumvent this problem we use two approaches: in the first one, we parametrize the entire nucleonic sector. In the second one, we replace only the three-body force. The former will enable us to study neutron star masses, and the latter for studying the medium's response to the external probe. In this thesis we take the external probe to be the neutrino. By combining this parametrization with the YN V{sub low} {sub k} potential, we calculate the equation of state of equilibrated matter. Performing the calculation in the Hartree-Fock approximation at zero temperature, the concentrations of all particles are calculated. From these we can ascertain at which densities hyperons appear for a wide range of parameters. Finally, we calculate the masses of neutron stars with these concentrations. For the calculation of the medium's response to an external probe, we replace the three

  7. Hyperons in dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dapo, Haris

    2009-01-01

    The hyperon-nucleon YN low momentum effective interaction (V low k ) allows for an extensive study of the behavior of hyperons in dense matter, together with an investigation of effects of the presence of hyperons on dense matter. The first step towards this goal is the construction of the matrix elements for the hyperon-nucleon low momentum potential. In order to assess the different properties of hyperons within these potentials we calculate the hyperon single-particle potentials in the Hartree-Fock approximation for all of the interactions. Their dependence on both momentum and density, is studied. The single-particle potentials are then used to determine the chemical potential of hyperons in neutron stars. For nucleonic properties, the nucleon-nucleon V low k can be used with the caveat that the calculation of the ground-state energy of symmetric nuclear matter does not correctly reproduce the properties of matter at saturation. With the nucleon-nucleon V low k one is unable to reach the densities needed for the calculation of neutron star masses. To circumvent this problem we use two approaches: in the first one, we parametrize the entire nucleonic sector. In the second one, we replace only the three-body force. The former will enable us to study neutron star masses, and the latter for studying the medium's response to the external probe. In this thesis we take the external probe to be the neutrino. By combining this parametrization with the YN V low k potential, we calculate the equation of state of equilibrated matter. Performing the calculation in the Hartree-Fock approximation at zero temperature, the concentrations of all particles are calculated. From these we can ascertain at which densities hyperons appear for a wide range of parameters. Finally, we calculate the masses of neutron stars with these concentrations. For the calculation of the medium's response to an external probe, we replace the three-body force with a density-dependent interaction. This

  8. Compressed Baryonic Matter of Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Baryonic matter in the core of a massive and evolved star is compressed significantly to form a supra-nuclear object, and compressed baryonic matter (CBM) is then produced after supernova. The state of cold matter at a few nuclear density is pedagogically reviewed, with significant attention paid to a possible quark-cluster state conjectured from an astrophysical point of view.

  9. Normal matter storage of antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs

  10. Hadrons in dense matter. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buballa, M.; Noerenberg, W.; Schaefer, B.J.; Wambach, J.

    2000-03-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Elementary hadronic reactions, Delta dynamics in nuclei, in-medium s-wave ππ-correlations, strangeness in hot and dense matter, medium modifications of vector mesons and dilepton production, medium modifications of charmonium, thermal properties of hot and dense hadronic matter, nuclear matter, spectral functions and QCD sum rules

  11. Dark Matter Searches at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Terashi, Koji; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will present dark matter searches at the LHC in the PIC2017 conference. The main emphasis is placed on the direct dark matter searches while the interpretation of searches for SUSY and invisible Higgs signals for the dark matter is also presented.

  12. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Marder, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    This Second Edition presents an updated review of the whole field of condensed matter physics. It consolidates new and classic topics from disparate sources, teaching not only about the effective masses of electrons in semiconductor crystals and band theory, but also about quasicrystals, dynamics of phase separation, why rubber is more floppy than steel, granular materials, quantum dots, Berry phases, the quantum Hall effect, and Luttinger liquids.

  13. Baryonic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Both canonical primordial nucleosynthesis constraints and large-scale structure measurements, as well as observations of the fundamental cosmological parameters, appear to be consistent with the hypothesis that the universe predominantly consists of baryonic dark matter (BDM). The arguments for BDM to consist of compact objects that are either stellar relics or substellar objects are reviewed. Several techniques for searching for halo BDM are described.

  14. Matter in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two theories of matter in general relativity, the fluid theory and the kinetic theory, were studied. Results include: (1) a discussion of various methods of completing the fluid equations; (2) a method of constructing charged general relativistic solutions in kinetic theory; and (3) a proof and discussion of the incompatibility of perfect fluid solutions in anisotropic cosmologies. Interpretations of NASA gravitational experiments using the above mentioned results were started. Two papers were prepared for publications based on this work.

  15. Nuclear matter theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negele, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Recent advances in variational and perturbative theories are surveyed which offer genuine promise that nuclear matter will soon become a viable tool for investigating nuclear interactions. The basic elements of the hypernetted chain expansion for Jastrow variational functions are briefly reviewed, and comparisons of variational and perturbative results for a series of increasingly complicated systems are presented. Prospects for investigating realistic forces are assessed and the unresolved, open problems are summarized

  16. Dark Matter remains obscure

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabio Capello

    2011-01-01

    It is one of the hidden secrets that literally surround the Universe. Experiments have shown no result so far because trying to capture particles that do not seem to interact with ordinary matter is no trivial exercise. The OSQAR experiment at CERN is dedicated to the search for axions, one of the candidates for Dark Matter. For its difficult challenge, OSQAR counts on one of the world’s most powerful magnets borrowed from the LHC. In a recent publication, the OSQAR collaboration was able to confirm that no axion signal appears out of the background. In other words: the quest is still on.   The OSQAR experiment installed in the SM18 hall. (Photo by F. Capello) The OSQAR “Light Shining Through a Wall” experiment was officially launched in 2007 with the aim of detecting axions, that is, particles that might be the main components of Dark Matter. OSQAR uses the powerful LHC dipole magnet to intensify the predicted photon-axion conversions in the presence of strong m...

  17. Dark matter in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormendy, J.; Knapp, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    Until recently little more was known than that dark matter appears to exist; there was little systematic information about its properties. Only in the past several years was progress made to the point where dark matter density distributions can be measured. For example, with accurate rotation curves extending over large ranges in radius, decomposing the effects of visible and dark matter to measure dark matter density profiles can be tried. Some regularities in dark matter behaviour have already turned up. This volume includes review and invited papers, poster papers, and the two general discussions. (Auth.)

  18. Dark Matter Detection: Current Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerib, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    Overwhelming observational evidence indicates that most of the matter in the Universe consists of non-baryonic dark matter. One possibility is that the dark matter is Weakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) that were produced in the early Universe. These relics could comprise the Milky Way's dark halo and provide evidence for new particle physics, such as Supersymmetry. This talk focuses on the status of current efforts to detect dark matter by testing the hypothesis that WIMPs exist in the galactic halo. WIMP searches have begun to explore the region of parameter space where SUSY particles could provide dark matter candidates.

  19. Integrated petrophysical and sedimentological study of the Middle Miocene Nullipore Formation (Ras Fanar Field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt): An approach to volumetric analysis of reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afife, Mohamed M.; Sallam, Emad S.; Faris, Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to integrate sedimentological, log and core analyses data of the Middle Miocene Nullipore Formation at the Ras Fanar Field (west central Gulf of Suez, Egypt) to evaluate and reconstruct a robust petrophysical model for this reservoir. The Nullipore Formation attains a thickness ranging from 400 to 980 ft and represents a syn-rift succession of the Middle Miocene marine facies. It consists of coralline-algal-reefal limestone, dolomitic limestone and dolostone facies, with few clay and anhydrite intercalations. Petrographically, seven microfacies types (MF1 to MF7) have been recognized and assembled genetically into three related facies associations (FA1 to FA3). These associations accumulated in three depositional environments: 1) peritidal flat, 2) restricted lagoon, and 3) back-shoal environments situated on a shallow inner ramp (homoclinal) setting. The studied rocks have been influenced by different diagenetic processes (dolomitization, cementation, compaction, authigenesis and dissolution), which led to diminishing and/or enhancing the reservoir quality. Three superimposed 3rd-order depositional sequences are included in the Nullipore succession displaying both retrogradational and aggradational packages of facies. Given the hydrocarbon potential of the Nullipore Formation, conventional well logs of six boreholes and core analyses data from one of these wells (RF-B12) are used to identify electrofacies zones of the Nullipore Formation. The Nullipore Formation has been subdivided into three electrofacies zones (the Nullipore-I, Nullipore-II, and Nullipore-III) that are well-correlated with the three depositional sequences. Results of petrographical studies and log analyses data have been employed in volumetric calculations to estimate the amount of hydrocarbon-in-place and then the ultimate recovery of the Nullipore reservoir. The volumetric calculations indicate that the total volume of oil-in-place is 371 MMSTB at 50% probability (P50), whereas

  20. Sedimentological, mineralogical, and geochemical results from surface sediments and the sediment record from Site 2 of the ICDP drilling project at Lake Towuti, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasberg, A. K.; Melles, M.; Wennrich, V.; Vogel, H.; Just, J.; Russell, J. M.; Bijaksana, S.; Morlock, M.; Opitz, S.

    2017-12-01

    More than 1000 m of sediment core were recovered in spring 2015 from three different drill sites in tropical Lake Towuti (2.5°S, 121°E), Indonesia, during the Towuti Drilling Project (TDP) of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). Furthermore, a set of 84 lake surface sediment samples, distributed over the entire lake, was collected in order to better understand modern sedimentary processes. The surface samples were investigated for physical, chemical, mineralogical, and biological properties at the University of Cologne (UoC), Germany. On the sediment cores macro- and microscopical lithological descriptions, line-scan imaging, logging of physical properties (MSCL), and subsampling was conducted at the National Lacustrine Core Facility of the University of Minnesota, USA, in November 2015 and January 2016. Afterwards, the archive core halves and 672 subsamples of TDP Site 2 were shipped to the UoC for X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) scanning and sedimentological, geochemical, and mineralogical analyses, respectively, supplemented by visible to near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIR) at Brown University, USA. The data from the surface samples evidence that allochthonous sedimentation in Lake Towuti today is dominated by fluvial supply from five distinguishable source areas: (i) the Mahalona River to the north, which drains lakes Mahalona and Matano, (ii) inlets around the village of Timampu to the northwest, (iii) the Loeha River to the east, (iv) the Lengke River to the south, and (v) the Lemo-Lemo River to the northeast of Lake Towuti. Of these, source areas (ii) and (iii) as well as (iv) and (v) have similar geochemical compositions, respectively. In addition, the lake sedimentation is significantly influenced by gravitational sediment supply from steep slopes as well as lake-internal gravitational and density-driven processes. The uppermost 41 m of sediment core 2A consist of pelagic sediments (totaling 11 m) and event layers from mass movement