WorldWideScience

Sample records for matrix organic light

  1. Laminated active matrix organic light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyu; Sun, Runguang

    2008-02-01

    Laminated active matrix organic light-emitting device (AMOLED) realizing top emission by using bottom-emitting organic light-emitting diode (OLED) structure was proposed. The multilayer structure of OLED deposited in the conventional sequence is not on the thin film transistor (TFT) backplane but on the OLED plane. The contact between the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode of TFT backplane and metal cathode of OLED plane is implemented by using transfer electrode. The stringent pixel design for aperture ratio of the bottom-emitting AMOLED, as well as special technology for the top ITO electrode of top-emitting AMOLED, is unnecessary in the laminated AMOLED.

  2. Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (AMOLED) Environmental Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, George A.

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the limited environmental testing of the AMOLED display performed as an engineering evaluation by The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)-specifically. EMI. Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. The AMOLED display is an active-matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology. The testing provided an initial understanding of the technology and its suitability for space applications. Relative to light emitting diode (LED) displays or liquid crystal displays (LCDs), AMOLED displays provide a superior viewing experience even though they are much lighter and smaller, produce higher contrast ratio and richer colors, and require less power to operate than LCDs. However, AMOLED technology has not been demonstrated in a space environment. Therefore, some risks with the technology must be addressed before they can be seriously considered for human spaceflight. The environmental tests provided preliminary performance data on the ability of the display technology to handle some of the simulated induced space/spacecraft environments that an AMOLED display will see during a spacecraft certification test program. This engineering evaluation is part of a Space Act Agreement (SM) between The NASA/JSC and Honeywell International (HI) as a collaborative effort to evaluate the potential use of AMOLED technology for future human spaceflight missions- both government-led and commercial. Under this SM, HI is responsible for doing optical performance evaluation, as well as temperature and touch screen studies. The NASA/JSC is responsible for performing environmental testing comprised of EMI, Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. Additionally, as part of the testing, limited optical data was acquired to assess performance as the display was subjected to the induced environments. The NASA will benefit from this engineering evaluation by understanding AMOLED suitability for future use in space as well as becoming a smarter buyer (or developer) of the technology. HI benefits

  3. Organic thin-film transistor arrays for active-matrix organic light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyun; Moon, Hyunsik; Kim, Do H.; Koo, Bon-Won; Jeong, Eun-Jeong; Lee, Bang-Lin; Kim, Joo-Young; Lee, Eunkyung; Hahn, Kook-Min; Han, Jeong-Seok; Park, Jung-Il; Seon, Jong-Baek; Kim, Jung-Woo; Chun, Young-Tea; Kim, Sangyeol; Kang, Sung K.

    2007-09-01

    We developed an active matrix organic light-emitting diodes (AMOLEDs) on a glass using two organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) and a capacitor in a pixel. OTFTs switching-arrays with 64 scan lines and 64 (RGB) data lines were designed and fabricated to drive OLED arrays. In this study, OTFT devices have bottom contact structures with an ink-jet printed polymer semiconductor and an organic insulator as a gate dielectric. The width and length of the switching OTFT is 500μm and 10μm, respectively and the driving OTFT has 900μm channel width with the same channel length. The characteristics of the OTFTs were examined using test cells around display area. On/off ratio, mobility, on-current of switching OTFT and on-current of driving OTFT were 10 6, 0.1 cm2/V-sec, order of 8μA and over 70 μA respectively. These properties were enough to drive the AMOLEDs over 60 Hz frame rate. AMOLEDs composed of the OTFT switching arrays and OLEDs made by deposition of small molecule materials were fabricated and driven to make moving images, successfully.

  4. Energy-recycling pixel for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Che-Yu; Cho, Ting-Yi; Chen, Yen-Yu; Yang, Chih-Jen; Meng, Chao-Yu; Yang, Chieh-Hung; Yang, Po-Chuan; Chang, Hsu-Yu; Hsueh, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Chung-Chih; Lee, Si-Chen

    2007-06-01

    The authors report a pixel structure for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays that has a hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell inserted between the driving polycrystalline Si thin-film transistor and the pixel OLED. Such an active-matrix OLED pixel structure not only exhibits a reduced reflection (and thus improved contrast) compared to conventional OLEDs but also is capable of recycling both incident photon energies and internally generated OLED radiation. Such a feature of energy recycling may be of use for portable/mobile electronics, which are particularly power aware.

  5. Low-Voltage, Low-Power, Organic Light-Emitting Transistors for Active Matrix Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, M. A.; Liu, B.; Donoghue, E. P.; Kravchenko, I.; Kim, D. Y.; So, F.; Rinzler, A. G.

    2011-04-01

    Intrinsic nonuniformity in the polycrystalline-silicon backplane transistors of active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays severely limits display size. Organic semiconductors might provide an alternative, but their mobility remains too low to be useful in the conventional thin-film transistor design. Here we demonstrate an organic channel light-emitting transistor operating at low voltage, with low power dissipation, and high aperture ratio, in the three primary colors. The high level of performance is enabled by a single-wall carbon nanotube network source electrode that permits integration of the drive transistor and the light emitter into an efficient single stacked device. The performance demonstrated is comparable to that of polycrystalline-silicon backplane transistor-driven display pixels.

  6. Solution-Processed Organic Thin-Film Transistor Array for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Chihiro; Hata, Takuya; Chuman, Takashi; Ishizuka, Shinichi; Yoshizawa, Atsushi

    2013-05-01

    We developed a 3-in. organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) array with an ink-jetted organic semiconductor. All layers except electrodes were fabricated by solution processes. The OTFT performed well without hysteresis, and the field-effect mobility in the saturation region was 0.45 cm2 V-1 s-1, the threshold voltage was 3.3 V, and the on/off current ratio was more than 106. We demonstrated a 3-in. active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) display driven by the OTFT array. The display could provide clear moving images. The peak luminance of the display was 170 cd/m2.

  7. A flexible organic active matrix circuit fabricated using novel organic thin film transistors and organic light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Gutiérrez-Heredia, Gerardo

    2010-10-04

    We present an active matrix circuit fabricated on plastic (polyethylene naphthalene, PEN) and glass substrates using organic thin film transistors and organic capacitors to control organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The basic circuit is fabricated using two pentacene-based transistors and a capacitor using a novel aluminum oxide/parylene stack (Al2O3/ parylene) as the dielectric for both the transistor and the capacitor. We report that our circuit can deliver up to 15 μA to each OLED pixel. To achieve 200 cd m-2 of brightness a 10 μA current is needed; therefore, our approach can initially deliver 1.5× the required current to drive a single pixel. In contrast to parylene-only devices, the Al2O 3/parylene stack does not fail after stressing at a field of 1.7 MV cm-1 for >10 000 s, whereas \\'parylene only\\' devices show breakdown at approximately 1000 s. Details of the integration scheme are presented. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. A flexible organic active matrix circuit fabricated using novel organic thin film transistors and organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Heredia, G.; González, L. A.; Alshareef, H. N.; Gnade, B. E.; Quevedo-López, M.

    2010-11-01

    We present an active matrix circuit fabricated on plastic (polyethylene naphthalene, PEN) and glass substrates using organic thin film transistors and organic capacitors to control organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The basic circuit is fabricated using two pentacene-based transistors and a capacitor using a novel aluminum oxide/parylene stack (Al2O3/parylene) as the dielectric for both the transistor and the capacitor. We report that our circuit can deliver up to 15 µA to each OLED pixel. To achieve 200 cd m-2 of brightness a 10 µA current is needed; therefore, our approach can initially deliver 1.5× the required current to drive a single pixel. In contrast to parylene-only devices, the Al2O3/parylene stack does not fail after stressing at a field of 1.7 MV cm-1 for >10 000 s, whereas 'parylene only' devices show breakdown at approximately 1000 s. Details of the integration scheme are presented.

  9. Colorimetric characterization models based on colorimetric characteristics evaluation for active matrix organic light emitting diode panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Rui; Xu, Haisong; Tong, Qingfen

    2012-10-20

    The colorimetric characterization of active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) panels suffers from their poor channel independence. Based on the colorimetric characteristics evaluation of channel independence and chromaticity constancy, an accurate colorimetric characterization method, namely, the polynomial compensation model (PC model) considering channel interactions was proposed for AMOLED panels. In this model, polynomial expressions are employed to calculate the relationship between the prediction errors of XYZ tristimulus values and the digital inputs to compensate the XYZ prediction errors of the conventional piecewise linear interpolation assuming the variable chromaticity coordinates (PLVC) model. The experimental results indicated that the proposed PC model outperformed other typical characterization models for the two tested AMOLED smart-phone displays and for the professional liquid crystal display monitor as well.

  10. Novel Digital Driving Method Using Dual Scan for Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myoung Hoon; Choi, Inho; Chung, Hoon-Ju; Kim, Ohyun

    2008-11-01

    A new digital driving method has been developed for low-temperature polycrystalline silicon, transistor-driven, active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AM-OLED) displays by time-ratio gray-scale expression. This driving method effectively increases the emission ratio and the number of subfields by inserting another subfield set into nondisplay periods in the conventional digital driving method. By employing the proposed modified gravity center coding, this method can be used to effectively compensate for dynamic false contour noise. The operation and performance were verified by current measurement and image simulation. The simulation results using eight test images show that the proposed approach improves the average peak signal-to-noise ratio by 2.61 dB, and the emission ratio by 20.5%, compared with the conventional digital driving method.

  11. Thermal analysis of high intensity organic light-emitting diodes based on a transmission matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiangfei; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2011-12-01

    We use a general transmission matrix formalism to determine the thermal response of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) under high currents normally encountered in ultra-bright illumination conditions. This approach, based on Laplace transforms, facilitates the calculation of transient coupled heat transfer in a multi-layer composite characteristic of OLEDs. Model calculations are compared with experimental data on 5 cm × 5 cm green and red-emitting electrophosphorescent OLEDs under various current drive conditions. This model can be extended to study other complex optoelectronic structures under a wide variety of conditions that include heat removal via conduction, radiation, and convection. We apply the model to understand the effects of using high-thermal- conductivity substrates, and the transient thermal response under pulsed-current operation.

  12. Driving technology for improving motion quality of active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongbin; Kim, Minkoo; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Seung-Ryeol; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports transient response characteristics of active-matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays for mobile applications. This work reports that the rising responses look like saw-tooth waveform and are not always faster than those of liquid crystal displays. Thus, a driving technology is proposed to improve the rising transient responses of AMOLED based on the overdrive (OD) technology. We modified the OD technology by combining it with a dithering method because the conventional OD method cannot successfully enhance all the rising responses. Our method can improve all the transitions of AMOLED without modifying the conventional gamma architecture of drivers. A new artifact is found when OD is applied to certain transitions. We propose an optimum OD selection method to mitigate the artifact. The implementation results show the proposed technology can successfully improve motion quality of scrolling texts as well as moving pictures in AMOLED displays.

  13. Separated Carbon Nanotube Macroelectronics for Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yue; Zhang, Jialu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Pochiang; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-02-01

    Active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) display holds great potential for the next generation visual technologies due to its high light efficiency, flexibility, lightweight, and low-temperature processing. However, suitable thin-film transistors (TFTs) are required to realize the advantages of AMOLED. Pre-separated, semiconducting enriched carbon nanotubes are excellent candidates for this purpose because of their excellent mobility, high percentage of semiconducting nanotubes, and room-temperature processing compatibility. Here we report, for the first time, the demonstration of AMOLED displays driven by separated nanotube thin-film transistors (SN-TFTs) including key technology components such as large-scale high-yield fabrication of devices with superior performance, carbon nanotube film density optimization, bilayer gate dielectric for improved substrate adhesion to the deposited nanotube film, and the demonstration of monolithically integrated AMOLED display elements with 500 pixels driven by 1000 SN-TFTs. Our approach can serve as the critical foundation for future nanotube-based thin-film display electronics.

  14. Low Power, Red, Green and Blue Carbon Nanotube Enabled Vertical Organic Light Emitting Transistors for Active Matrix OLED Displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Liu, B. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Donoghue, E. P. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Kim, D. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; So, Franky [University of Florida, Gainesville; Rinzler, A. G. [University of Florida, Gainesville

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors are potential alternatives to polycrystalline silicon as the semiconductor used in the backplane of active matrix organic light emitting diode displays. Demonstrated here is a light-emitting transistor with an organic channel, operating with low power dissipation at low voltage, and high aperture ratio, in three colors: red, green and blue. The single-wall carbon nanotube network source electrode is responsible for the high level of performance demonstrated. A major benefit enabled by this architecture is the integration of the drive transistor, storage capacitor and light emitter into a single device. Performance comparable to commercialized polycrystalline-silicon TFT driven OLEDs is demonstrated.

  15. Stretchable active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display using printable elastic conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroyoshi; Maeda, Hiroki; Fukushima, Takanori; Aida, Takuzo; Hata, Kenji; Someya, Takao

    2009-06-01

    Stretchability will significantly expand the applications scope of electronics, particularly for large-area electronic displays, sensors and actuators. Unlike for conventional devices, stretchable electronics can cover arbitrary surfaces and movable parts. However, a large hurdle is the manufacture of large-area highly stretchable electrical wirings with high conductivity. Here, we describe the manufacture of printable elastic conductors comprising single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) uniformly dispersed in a fluorinated rubber. Using an ionic liquid and jet-milling, we produce long and fine SWNT bundles that can form well-developed conducting networks in the rubber. Conductivity of more than 100Scm-1 and stretchability of more than 100% are obtained. Making full use of this extraordinary conductivity, we constructed a rubber-like stretchable active-matrix display comprising integrated printed elastic conductors, organic transistors and organic light-emitting diodes. The display could be stretched by 30-50% and spread over a hemisphere without any mechanical or electrical damage.

  16. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (OLED)-XL life test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Ghosh, Amalkumar P.; Prache, Olivier

    2008-04-01

    OLED displays have been known to exhibit high levels of performance with regards to contrast, response time, uniformity, and viewing angle, but a lifetime improvement has been perceived to be essential for broadening the applications of OLED's in the military and in the commercial market. As a result of this need, the US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to improve the lifetime of OLED displays. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications, and RDECOM CERDEC NVESD ran life tests on these displays, finding over 200% lifetime improvement for the XL devices over the standard displays. Early results were published at the 2007 SPIE Defense and Security Symposium. Further life testing of XL and standard devices at ambient conditions and at high temperatures will be presented this year along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems: where good fits are made, and where further development might be needed. This is a continuation of the paper "Life test results of OLED-XL long-life devices for use in active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays for head mounted applications" presented at SPIE DSS in 2007.

  17. Substrate patterning for passive matrix organic light-emitting devices by photolithography processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Yu, Jun-sheng; Lin, Hui; Lou, Shuang-ling; Jiang, Ya-dong

    2007-12-01

    The fabrication technology of high resolution substrate pattern for organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) was discussed in the paper. Surface morphology and crystallization properties of ITO films and the shape of photolithography pattern were investigated. Experimental results show that three factors including deposition pressure, flow ratio of argon to oxygen and annealing temperature greatly influence the conductance of ITO film.. Some attempts about designing photomask were enumerated and the reverse taper angle separator was successfully fabricated with image reversal process.

  18. Voltage Drop Compensation Method for Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang-moo; Ryu, Do-hyung; Kim, Keum-nam; Choi, Jae-beom; Kim, Byung-hee; Berkeley, Brian

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the conventional voltage drop compensation methods are reviewed and the novel design and driving scheme, the advanced power de-coupled (aPDC) driving method, is proposed to effectively compensate the voltage IR drop of active matrix light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. The advanced PDC driving scheme can be applied to general AMOLED pixel circuits that have been developed with only minor modification or without requiring modification in pixel circuit. A 14-in. AMOLED panel with the aPDC driving scheme was fabricated. Long range uniformity (LRU) of the 14-in. AMOLED panel was improved from 43% without the aPDC driving scheme, to over 87% at the same brightness by using the scheme and the layout complexity of the panel with new design scheme is less than that of the panel with the conventional design scheme.

  19. Light cone matrix product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, Matthew B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  20. The Matrix Organization Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gattiker, Urs E.; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives a short overview of matrix structure and technology management. It outlines some of the characteristics and also points out that many organizations may actualy be hybrids (i.e. mix several ways of organizing to allocate resorces effectively).......This paper gives a short overview of matrix structure and technology management. It outlines some of the characteristics and also points out that many organizations may actualy be hybrids (i.e. mix several ways of organizing to allocate resorces effectively)....

  1. The Matrix Organization Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gattiker, Urs E.; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives a short overview of matrix structure and technology management. It outlines some of the characteristics and also points out that many organizations may actualy be hybrids (i.e. mix several ways of organizing to allocate resorces effectively).......This paper gives a short overview of matrix structure and technology management. It outlines some of the characteristics and also points out that many organizations may actualy be hybrids (i.e. mix several ways of organizing to allocate resorces effectively)....

  2. Enhanced Pixel-Driving Circuits for Active-Matrix Organic-Light-Emitting Diode Displays with Large Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sang Ho; Choi, Sung Wook; Shin, Hong Jae; Kwack, Kae Dal; Kim, Tae Whan

    2005-03-01

    Enhanced pixel-driving circuits for active-matrix organic-light-emitting diode (AM-OLED) displays with large sizes and highly uniform brightnesses were designed for system on panel. The driving method used the pre-charge functions of the data for a highly uniform brightness during a short time to program the current. The currents of the designed pixel-driving circuits were not significantly affected by variations in the threshold voltages, or by the mobilities of the driving thin-film transistors. These results indicate that the proposed pixel-driving circuits hold promise for potential applications in AM-OLED displays with large sizes and highly uniform brightnesses.

  3. New Driving Scheme to Improve Hysteresis Characteristics of Organic Thin Film Transistor-Driven Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Takei, Tatsuya; Fujisaki, Yoshihide; Fukagawa, Hirohiko; Suzuki, Mitsunori; Motomura, Genichi; Sato, Hiroto; Tokito, Shizuo; Fujikake, Hideo

    2011-02-01

    A new driving scheme for an active-matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display was developed to prevent the picture quality degradation caused by the hysteresis characteristics of organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). In this driving scheme, the gate electrode voltage of a driving-OTFT is directly controlled through the storage capacitor so that the operating point for the driving-OTFT is on the same hysteresis curve for every pixel after signal data are stored in the storage capacitor. Although the number of OTFTs in each pixel for the AMOLED display is restricted because OTFT size should be large enough to drive organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) due to their small carrier mobility, it can improve the picture quality for an OTFT-driven flexible OLED display with the basic two transistor-one capacitor circuitry.

  4. Embedded Touch Sensing Circuit Using Mutual Capacitance for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Ju; Seok, Su-Jeong; Park, Sang-Ho; Kim, Ohyun

    2011-03-01

    We propose and simulate an embedded touch sensing circuit for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. The circuit consists of three thin-film transistors (TFTs), one fixed capacitor, and one variable capacitor. AMOLED displays do not have a variable capacitance characteristic, so we realized a variable capacitor to detect touches in the sensing pixel by exploiting the change in the mutual capacitance between two electrodes that is caused by touch. When a dielectric substance approaches two electrodes, the electric field is shunted so that the mutual capacitance decreases. We use the existing TFT process to form the variable capacitor, so no additional process is needed. We use advanced solid-phase-crystallization TFTs because of their stability and uniformity. The proposed circuit detects multi-touch points by a scanning process.

  5. Time-Domain Quaternary-Weighted Pulse Width Modulation Driving Method for Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Sang; Kuk, Seung-Hee; Han, Min-Koo

    2008-03-01

    We proposed a new digital driving method and its pixel structure for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays employing time-domain quaternary-weighted pulse width modulation. In the new digital driving method, the luminance of AMOLED displays is accurately determined by averaging photon flux to the desired level over a frame period. The proposed pixel was verified by spice simulation and the output linearity between the grayscale and the OLED current was successfully achieved. In the proposed digital driving pixel, the timing margin was increased and the effect on luminance of AMOLED displays by the troublesome variation of the thin-film transistors (TFTs) was suppressed without additional compensation schemes.

  6. A New Low Temperature Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Film Transistor Pixel Circuit for Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ching-Lin; Lin, Yi-Yan; Chang, Jyu-Yu; Sun, Bo-Jhang; Liu, Yan-Wei

    2010-06-01

    This study presents one novel compensation pixel design and driving method for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays that use low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs) with a voltage feed-back method and the simulation results are proposed and verified by SPICE simulator. The measurement and simulation of LTPS TFT characteristics demonstrate the good fitting result. The proposed circuit consists of four TFTs and two capacitors with an additional signal line. The error rates of OLED anode voltage variation are below 0.3% under the threshold voltage deviation of driving TFT (ΔVTH = ±0.33 V). The simulation results show that the pixel design can improve the display image non-uniformity by compensating the threshold voltage deviation of driving TFT and the degradation of OLED threshold voltage at the same time.

  7. 3.4-Inch Quarter High Definition Flexible Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Display with Oxide Thin Film Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Kaoru; Chida, Akihiro; Okano, Tatsuya; Sugisawa, Nozomu; Inoue, Tatsunori; Seo, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Oikawa, Yoshiaki; Miyake, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Jun; Yamazaki, Shunpei; Eguchi, Shingo; Katayama, Masahiro; Sakakura, Masayuki

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we report a 3.4-in. flexible active matrix organic light emitting display (AMOLED) display with remarkably high definition (quarter high definition: QHD) in which oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) are used. We have developed a transfer technology in which a TFT array formed on a glass substrate is separated from the substrate by physical force and then attached to a flexible plastic substrate. Unlike a normal process in which a TFT array is directly fabricated on a thin plastic substrate, our transfer technology permits a high integration of high performance TFTs, such as low-temperature polycrystalline silicon TFTs (LTPS TFTs) and oxide TFTs, on a plastic substrate, because a flat, rigid, and thermally-stable glass substrate can be used in the TFT fabrication process in our transfer technology. As a result, this technology realized an oxide TFT array for an AMOLED on a plastic substrate. Furthermore, in order to achieve a high-definition AMOLED, color filters were incorporated in the TFT array and a white organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was combined. One of the features of this device is that the whole body of the device can be bent freely because a source driver and a gate driver can be integrated on the substrate due to the high mobility of an oxide TFT. This feature means “true” flexibility.

  8. Image quality affected by diffraction of aperture structure arrangement in transparent active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Mao-Hsiu; Jeng, Wei-de; Huang, Ting-Wei; Lo, Kuo-Lung; Ou-Yang, Mang

    2015-10-01

    Transparent display is one of the main technologies in next-generation displays, especially for augmented reality applications. An aperture structure is attached on each display pixel to partition them into transparent and black regions. However, diffraction blurs caused by the aperture structure typically degrade the transparent image when the light from a background object passes through finite aperture window. In this paper, the diffraction effect of an active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display (AMOLED) is studied. Several aperture structures have been proposed and implemented. Based on theoretical analysis and simulation, the appropriate aperture structure will effectively reduce the blur. The analysis data are also consistent with the experimental results. Compared with the various transparent aperture structure on AMOLED, diffraction width (zero energy position of diffraction pattern) of the optimize aperture structure can be reduced 63% and 31% in the x and y directions in CASE 3. Associated with a lenticular lens on the aperture structure, the improvement could reach to 77% and 54% of diffraction width in the x and y directions. Modulation transfer function and practical images are provided to evaluate the improvement of image blurs.

  9. Matrix Embedded Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.; Freund, F. T.

    2016-05-01

    In the matrix of minerals such as olivine, a redox reaction of the low-z elements occurs. Oxygen is oxidized to the peroxy state while the low-Z-elements become chemically reduced. We assign them a formula [CxHyOzNiSj]n- and call them proto-organics.

  10. Effect of transparent film desiccant on the lifetime of top-emitting active matrix organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Duk; Cho, Yoon-Hyung; Kim, Won-Jong; Oh, Min Ho; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Zang, Dong Sik

    2007-03-01

    The effects of a transparent film desiccant on the lifetime of top-emitting active matrix organic light emitting diodes (AMOLEDs) were investigated. The transparent film desiccants were prepared by mixing solutions dispersed with calcium oxide powders and ultraviolet-curable resins. As the solid content in the solutions increased from 15to30wt%, the average particle size increased from 107to240nm, whereas the transmittance of the films decreased from 98% to 80% in the visible range. The devices encapsulated with the transparent film desiccants which contained 20wt% CaO exhibited no dark spots and 97% of the initial luminance, even after being stored for over 500h at 70°C and 90% relative humidity. Also, the operational lifetime of these devices was 1850h, ten times longer than that of a device without desiccant. These results confirmed that the transparent film desiccants, which absorbed the moisture that penetrated into the devices, could be applied to the encapsulation of top-emitting AMOLEDs.

  11. A High-Performance Current-Mode Source Driver IC for Mobile Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Il-Hun; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we describe two types of 8-bit current-mode driver ICs with a small area and good performance for applications high accuracy current-mode digital-to-analog converters (DACs), and improved channel-to-channel uniformity for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. One uses the proposed current steering DAC (type A), which is an improved architecture of a binary-weighted DAC, and the other uses a DAC that is a combination of a thermometer-decoded of the DAC and a binary-weighted type. The measured results show that the peak integral nonlinearity (INL) is within ±0.5 the least significant bit (LSB), the peak differential nonlinearity (DNL) is within ±0.5 LSB, and the nonuniformity of output current among channels and chips is within ±0.5 LSB. The size of the driver IC is 15,820 ×1,500 µm2 and the total power consumption of the current-mode driver IC is less than 9 mW when the display has full-white pattern with a luminance of 150 cd/m2. The chip area and power consumption with the proposed current DAC are reduced by 26 and 10%, respectively, compared with those of conventional driver ICs with a fully binary-weighted DAC.

  12. Investigation of Pattern-Induced Brightness Non-uniformity in Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Bo; Park, Hye-Hyang; Kwon, Ohseob; Kim, Moojin; Lee, Ki-Yong; Park, Yongwoo; Choi, JongHyun; Yu, CheolHo; Kim, Hye-Dong; Kim, Sung Chul; Chung, Ho-Kyoon

    2008-01-01

    We recently improved the brightness non-uniformity in active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) regarding non-uniform laser energy distribution by applying a “shot mixing” technique in sequential lateral solidification (SLS) method. Although the new SLS technique was employed, another brightness non-uniformity that appeared as oblique lines on AMOLED panels became a crucial issue. In this work, we attempted to investigate the origins of the non-uniformity. Our systematic analysis on the oblique lines revealed that the line type non-uniformity was attributed to both the SLS process and the thin-film transistor (TFT) fabrication processes. In particular, we found that such oblique patterns might be related to moiré patterns that appear when primary grain boundaries aligned in a repetitive pattern is placed over other repetitive TFT patterns such as metal lines. We adopted a method to diminish the moiré pattern type non-uniformity by applying top emission TFT structure.

  13. Structural Characterization of Sputtered Silicon Thin Films after Rapid Thermal Annealing for Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugiraneza, Jean de Dieu; Miyahira, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Akinori; Chen, Yi; Okada, Tatsuya; Noguchi, Takashi; Itoh, Taketsugu

    2010-12-01

    The microcrystalline phase obtained by adopting a two-step rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process for rf-sputtered silicon films deposited on thermally durable glass was characterized. The optical properties, surface morphology, and internal stress of the annealed Si films are investigated. As the thermally durable glass substrate allows heating of the deposited films at high temperatures, micro-polycrystalline silicon (micro-poly-Si) films of uniform grain size with a smooth surface and a low internal stress could be obtained after annealing at 750 °C. The thermal stress in the Si films was 100 times lower than that found in the films deposited on conventional glass. Uniform grains with an average grain size of 30 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the films annealed at 800 °C. These micro-poly-Si films have potential application for fabrication of uniform and reliable thin film transistors (TFTs) for large scale active-matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays.

  14. Threshold-Voltage-Shift Compensation and Suppression Method Using Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Transistors for Large Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyonghwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2012-03-01

    A threshold-voltage-shift compensation and suppression method for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays fabricated using a hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) backplane is proposed. The proposed method compensates for the threshold voltage variation of TFTs due to different threshold voltage shifts during emission time and extends the lifetime of the AMOLED panel. Measurement results show that the error range of emission current is from -1.1 to +1.7% when the threshold voltage of TFTs varies from 1.2 to 3.0 V.

  15. Improvement in Brightness Uniformity by Compensating for the Threshold Voltages of Both the Driving Thin-Film Transistor and the Organic Light-Emitting Diode for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ching-Lin; Lai, Hui-Lung; Chang, Jyu-Yu

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel pixel design and driving method for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AM-OLED) displays using low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs). The proposed threshold voltage compensation circuit, which comprised five transistors and two capacitors, has been verified to supply uniform output current by simulation work using the automatic integrated circuit modeling simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis (AIM-SPICE) simulator. The driving scheme of this voltage programming method includes four periods: precharging, compensation, data input, and emission. The simulated results demonstrate excellent properties such as low error rate of OLED anode voltage variation (<1%) and high output current. The proposed pixel circuit shows high immunity to the threshold voltage deviation characteristics of both the driving poly-Si TFT and the OLED.

  16. Amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O Thin Film Transistor Current-Scaling Pixel Electrode Circuit for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charlene; Abe, Katsumi; Fung, Tze-Ching; Kumomi, Hideya; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze application of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin film transistors (a-InGaZnO TFTs) to current-scaling pixel electrode circuit that could be used for 3-in. quarter video graphics array (QVGA) full color active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AM-OLEDs). Simulation results, based on a-InGaZnO TFT and OLED experimental data, show that both device sizes and operational voltages can be reduced when compare to the same circuit using hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFTs. Moreover, the a-InGaZnO TFT pixel circuit can compensate for the drive TFT threshold voltage variation (ΔVT) within acceptable operating error range.

  17. Driving Method for Compensating Reliability Problem of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Transistors and Image Sticking Phenomenon in Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min-Seok; Jo, Yun-Rae; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a driving method for compensating the electrical instability of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors (TFTs) and the luminance degradation of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices for large active matrix OLED (AMOLED) displays. The proposed driving method senses the electrical characteristics of a-Si:H TFTs and OLEDs using current integrators and compensates them by an external compensation method. Threshold voltage shift is controlled a using negative bias voltage. After applying the proposed driving method, the measured error of the maximum emission current ranges from -1.23 to +1.59 least significant bit (LSB) of a 10-bit gray scale under the threshold voltage shift ranging from -0.16 to 0.17 V.

  18. Driving Method Compensating for the Hysteresis of Polycrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Transistors for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myoung-Hoon; Kim, Ohyun; Kim, Byeong-Koo; Chung, Hoon-Ju

    2009-05-01

    A new driving method for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays is proposed and evaluated. The pixel structure of the proposed driving method is composed of three thin-film transistors (TFTs) and one capacitor. It inserts black data into display images to reset driving TFTs for the purpose of maintaining constant electrical characteristics of driving TFTs. The proposed driving scheme is less sensitive to the hysteresis of low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) TFTs than the conventional pixel structure with two TFTs and one capacitor, and this scheme can virtually eliminate the recoverable residual image that occurs owing to the hysteresis characteristics of LTPS TFTs. In the proposed driving scheme, black data are inserted into displayed images so that the motion image quality is improved.

  19. Transparent Pixel Circuit with Threshold Voltage Compensation Using ZnO Thin-Film Transistors for Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ik-Seok; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2009-03-01

    A transparent pixel circuit with a threshold voltage compensating scheme using ZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) for active-matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is proposed. This circuit consists of five n-type ZnO TFTs and two capacitors and can compensate for the threshold voltage variation of ZnO TFTs in real time. From simulation results, the maximum deviation of the emission current of the pixel circuit with a threshold voltage variation of ±1 V is determined to be less than 10 nA. From measurement results, it is verified that the maximum deviation of measured emission currents with measurement position in a glass substrate is less than 15 nA in a higher current range, and the deviation of emission current with time is less than 3%.

  20. Source Driver Channel Reduction Schemes Employing Corresponding Pixel Alignments for Current Programming Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soon-Kwang; Oh, Du-Hwan; Jeong, Seok-Hee; Park, Young-Ju; Kim, Byeong-Koo; Ha, Yong-Min; Jang, Jin

    2008-03-01

    We propose two types of novel scheme for reducing the number of output channels of driver-integrated circuit (D-IC) for the current programming compensation pixel structures of active-matrix organic light-emitting diodes (AMOLEDs). One is a 2:1 data demultiplexing technique that can reduce the number of output channels of D-IC by half. The proposed second scheme is a vertically aligned red (R), green (G), and blue (B) subpixel scheme instead of a horizontally aligned R-G-B subpixel one, which is regarded as the conventional pixel alignment scheme. We have also successfully implemented these schemes in a 2.4-in.-sized QCIF + (176 × RGB × 220) AMOLED using p-type excimer laser annealing (ELA) low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) technology and evaluated key performance characteristics.

  1. Current-Sensing and Voltage-Feedback Driving Method for Large-Area High-Resolution Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Hai‑Jung; Choi, Byong‑Deok; Chung, Ho‑Kyoon; Kwon, Oh‑Kyong

    2006-05-01

    There is the problem of picture quality nonuniformity due to thin film transistor (TFT) characteristic variations throughout a panel of large-area high-resolution active matrix organic light emitting diodes. The current programming method could solve this issue, but it also requires very long charging time of a data line at low gray shades. Therefore, we propose a new driving method and a pixel circuit with emission-current sensing and feedback operation in order to resolve these problems. The proposed driving method and pixel circuit successfully compensate threshold voltage and mobility variations of TFTs and overcome the data line charging problem. Simulation results show that emission current deviations of the proposed driving method are less than 1.7% with ± 10.0% mobility and ± 0.3 V threshold voltage variations of pixel-driving TFTs, which means the proposed driving method is applicable to large-area high-resolution applications.

  2. Doped and non-doped organic light-emitting diodes based on a yellow carbazole emitter into a blue-emitting matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Choukri, H; Forget, S; Chenais, S; Castex, M C; Geffroy, B; Ades, D; Siove, A; Choukri, Hakim; Fischer, Alexis; Forget, Sebastien; Chenais, Sebastien; Castex, Marie-Claude; Geffroy, Bernard; Ades, Dominique; Siove, Alain

    2007-01-01

    A new carbazole derivative with a 3,3'-bicarbazyl core 6,6'-substituted by dicyanovinylene groups (6,6'-bis(1-(2,2'-dicyano)vinyl)-N,N'-dioctyl-3,3'-bicarbazyl; named (OcCz2CN)2, was synthesized by carbonyl-methylene Knovenagel condensation, characterized and used as a component of multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Due to its -donor-acceptor type structure, (OcCz2CN)2 was found to emit a yellow light at max=590 nm (with the CIE coordinates x=0.51; y = 0.47) and was used either as a dopant or as an ultra-thin layer in a blue-emitting matrix of 4,4'-bis(2,2'-diphenylvinyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (DPVBi). DPVBi (OcCz2CN)2-doped structure exhibited, at doping ratio of 1.5 weight %, a yellowish-green light with the CIE coordinates (x = 0.31; y = 0.51), an electroluminescence efficiency EL=1.3 cd/A, an external quantum efficiency ext= 0.4 % and a luminance L= 127 cd/m2 (at 10 mA/cm2) whereas for non-doped devices utilizing the carbazolic fluorophore as a thin n...

  3. Improvement in Brightness Uniformity by Compensating for the Threshold Voltages of Both the Driving Thin-Film Transistor and the Organic Light-Emitting Diode for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel pixel circuit design and driving method for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AM-OLED displays that use low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs as driving element. The automatic integrated circuit modeling simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis (AIM-SPICE simulator was used to verify that the proposed pixel circuit, which comprises five transistors and one capacitor, can supply uniform output current. The voltage programming method of the proposed pixel circuit comprises three periods: reset, compensation with data input, and emission periods. The simulated results reflected excellent performance. For instance, when ΔVTH=±0.33 V, the average error rate of the OLED current variation was low (<0.8%, and when ΔVTH_OLED=+0.33 V, the error rate of the OLED current variation was 4.7%. Moreover, when the I×R (current × resistance drop voltage of a power line was 0.3 V, the error rate of the OLED current variation was 5.8%. The simulated results indicated that the proposed pixel circuit exhibits high immunity to the threshold voltage deviation of both the driving poly-Si TFTs and OLEDs, and simultaneously compensates for the I×R drop voltage of a power line.

  4. High-performance single-crystalline arsenic-doped indium oxide nanowires for transparent thin-film transistors and active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Chiang; Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Haitian; Ha, Young-geun; Wu, Chao; Sukcharoenchoke, Saowalak; Fu, Yue; Liu, Jun; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-11-24

    We report high-performance arsenic (As)-doped indium oxide (In(2)O(3)) nanowires for transparent electronics, including their implementation in transparent thin-film transistors (TTFTs) and transparent active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. The As-doped In(2)O(3) nanowires were synthesized using a laser ablation process and then fabricated into TTFTs with indium-tin oxide (ITO) as the source, drain, and gate electrodes. The nanowire TTFTs on glass substrates exhibit very high device mobilities (approximately 1490 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), current on/off ratios (5.7 x 10(6)), steep subthreshold slopes (88 mV/dec), and a saturation current of 60 microA for a single nanowire. By using a self-assembled nanodielectric (SAND) as the gate dielectric, the device mobilities and saturation current can be further improved up to 2560 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 160 microA, respectively. All devices exhibit good optical transparency (approximately 81% on average) in the visible spectral range. In addition, the nanowire TTFTs were utilized to control green OLEDs with varied intensities. Furthermore, a fully integrated seven-segment AMOLED display was fabricated with a good transparency of 40% and with each pixel controlled by two nanowire transistors. This work demonstrates that the performance enhancement possible by combining nanowire doping and self-assembled nanodielectrics enables silicon-free electronic circuitry for low power consumption, optically transparent, high-frequency devices assembled near room temperature.

  5. Effects of neutral particle beam on nano-crystalline silicon thin films, with application to thin film transistor backplane for flexible active matrix organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Nyoung; Song, Byoung Chul; Lee, Dong Hyeok [Dept. of Display and Semiconductor Physics, Korea University, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Suk Jae; Lee, Bonju [National Fusion Research Institute, 52, Yuseong-Gu, Deajeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, MunPyo, E-mail: goodmoon@korea.ac.kr [Dept. of Display and Semiconductor Physics, Korea University, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-01

    A novel deposition process for nano-crystalline silicon (nc-Si) thin films was developed using neutral beam assisted chemical vapor deposition (NBaCVD) technology for the application of the thin film transistor (TFT) backplane of flexible active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED). During the formation of a nc-Si thin film, the energetic particles enhance nano-sized crystalline rather microcrystalline Si in thin films. Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) affects the crystallinity in two ways: (1) NPB energy enhances nano-crystallinity through kinetic energy transfer and chemical annealing, and (2) heavier NPB (such as Ar) induces damage and amorphization through energetic particle impinging. Nc-Si thin film properties effectively can be changed by the reflector bias. As increase of NPB energy limits growing the crystalline, the performance of TFT supports this NPB behavior. The results of nc-Si TFT by NBaCVD demonstrate the technical potentials of neutral beam based processes for achieving high stability and reduced leakage in TFT backplanes for AMOLEDs.

  6. Novel Driving Method for Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Switchable Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays for Emission and Programming Time Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Hai-Jung; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2012-03-01

    A novel driving method for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) switchable active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is proposed to extend emission time and data programming time during 3D display operation. The proposed pixel consists of six thin-film transistors (TFTs) and two capacitors, and the aperture ratio of the pixel is 45.8% under 40-in. full-high-definition television condition. By increasing emission time and programming time, the flicker problem can be reduced and the lifetime of AMOLED displays can be extended owing to the decrease in emission current density. Simulation results show that the emission current error range from -0.4 to 1.6% is achieved when the threshold voltage variation of driving TFTs is in the range from -1.0 to 1.0 V, and the emission current error is 1.0% when the power line IR-drop is 2.0 V.

  7. A Novel LTPS-TFT Pixel Circuit to Compensate the Electronic Degradation for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Fan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel pixel driving circuit for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED displays with low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs is studied. The proposed compensation pixel circuit is driven by voltage programming scheme, which is composed of five TFTs and one capacitor, and has been certified to provide uniform output current by the Automatic Integrated Circuit Modeling Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (AIM-SPICE simulator. The results of simulation show excellent performance, such as the low average error rate of OLED current variation (<0.5% and the low average nonuniformity of OLED current variation (<0.8% while the shift of threshold voltage of the driving poly-Si TFT and the OLED are both in the worst case ( V for TFT and  V for OLED. The proposed pixel circuit shows high immunity to the threshold voltage deviation of both the driving poly-Si TFT and the OLED.

  8. Organic Thin Film Electroluminescent Passive Matrix Display

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Long life green-emitting matrix display based on organic light-emitting diode is reported. The pixel number is 96×60, equivalent pixel size 0.4×0.4 mm2, and the pixel gap 0.1 mm. An image with no crosstalk between pixels is obtained. The average luminance of these pixels at duty cycle of 1/64 is 100 cd/m2, and the power consumption is 0.6 W. The dark room contrast of 1:100 is achieved without using a polarization filter.

  9. Pixel structures to compensate nonuniform threshold voltage and mobility of polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors using subthreshold current for large-size active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jun-Seok; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2014-01-01

    We propose pixel structures for large-size and high-resolution active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays using a polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplane. The proposed pixel structures compensate the variations of the threshold voltage and mobility of the driving TFT using the subthreshold current. The simulated results show that the emission current error of the proposed pixel structure B ranges from -2.25 to 2.02 least significant bit (LSB) when the variations of the threshold voltage and mobility of the driving TFT are ±0.5 V and ±10%, respectively.

  10. Efficient organic light emitting-diodes (OLEDs)

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yi-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Following two decades of intense research globally, the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has steadily emerged as the ultimate display technology of choice for the coming decades. Portable active matrix OLED displays have already become prevalent, and even large-sized ultra-high definition 4K TVs are being mass-produced. More exotic applications such as wearable displays have been commercialized recently. With the burgeoning success in displays, researchers are actively bringing the technology forward into the exciting solid-state lighting market. This book presents the knowledge needed for

  11. ORGANIC LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (OLED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aririguzo Marvis Ijeaku

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED is a device composed of an organic layer that emits lights in response to an electrical current. Organic light emitting diodes have advanced tremendously over the past decades. The different manufacturing processes of the OLED itself to several advantages over flat panel displays made with LCD technology which includes its light weight and flexible plastic substrates, wider viewing angles, improved brightness, better power efficiency and quicker response time. However, its drawbacks include shorter life span, poor color balance, poor outdoor performance, susceptibility to water damage etc.The application of OLEDs in electronics is on the increase on daily basics from cameras to cell phones to OLED televisions, etc. Although OLEDs provides prospects for thinner, smarter, lighter and ultraflexible electronics displays, however, due to high cost of manufacturing, it is not yet widely used.

  12. Organic light emitting diode with light extracting electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry

    2017-04-18

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (20), a first electrode (12), an emissive active stack (14), and a second electrode (18). At least one of the first and second electrodes (12, 18) is a light extracting electrode (26) having a metallic layer (28). The metallic layer (28) includes light scattering features (29) on and/or in the metallic layer (28). The light extracting features (29) increase light extraction from the organic light emitting diode (10).

  13. Project-matrix models of marketing organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutić Dragutin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike theory and practice of corporation organization, in marketing organization numerous forms and contents at its disposal are not reached until this day. It can be well estimated that marketing organization today in most of our companies and in almost all its parts, noticeably gets behind corporation organization. Marketing managers have always been occupied by basic, narrow marketing activities as: sales growth, market analysis, market growth and market share, marketing research, introduction of new products, modification of products, promotion, distribution etc. They rarely found it necessary to focus a bit more to different aspects of marketing management, for example: marketing planning and marketing control, marketing organization and leading. This paper deals with aspects of project - matrix marketing organization management. Two-dimensional and more-dimensional models are presented. Among two-dimensional, these models are analyzed: Market management/products management model; Products management/management of product lifecycle phases on market model; Customers management/marketing functions management model; Demand management/marketing functions management model; Market positions management/marketing functions management model. .

  14. Mueller matrix decomposition for polarized light assessment of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Nirmalya; Wood, Michael F G; Li, Shu-hong; Weisel, Richard D; Wilson, Brian C; Li, Ren-Ke; Vitkin, I Alex

    2009-03-01

    The Mueller matrix represents the transfer function of an optical system in its interactions with polarized light and its elements relate to specific biologically or clinically relevant properties. However, when many optical polarization effects occur simultaneously, the resulting matrix elements represent several "lumped" effects, thus hindering their unique interpretation. Currently, no methods exist to extract these individual properties in turbid media. Here, we present a novel application of a Mueller matrix decomposition methodology that achieves this objective. The methodology is validated theoretically via a novel polarized-light propagation model, and experimentally in tissue simulating phantoms. The potential of the approach is explored for two specific biomedical applications: monitoring of changes in myocardial tissues following regenerative stem cell therapy, through birefringence-induced retardation of the light's linear and circular polarizations, and non-invasive blood glucose measurements through chirality-induced rotation of the light's linear polarization. Results demonstrate potential for both applications.

  15. How to get the Matrix Organization to Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burton, Richard M.; Obel, Børge; Håkonsson, Dorthe Døjbak

    2015-01-01

    Many organizations, both public and private, are changing their structure to a complex matrix in order to meet the growing complexity in the world in which they operate. Often, those organizations struggle to obtain the benefits of a matrix organization. In this article, we discuss how to get...... a matrix to work, taking a multi-contingency perspective. We translate the matrix concept for designers and managers who are considering a matrix organization and argue that three factors are critical for its success: (1) Strong purpose: Only choose the matrix structure if there are strong reasons...

  16. Matrix light and pixel light: optical system architecture and requirements to the light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinger, Benno; Timinger, Andreas L.

    2015-09-01

    Modern Automotive headlamps enable improved functionality for more driving comfort and safety. Matrix or Pixel light headlamps are not restricted to either pure low beam functionality or pure high beam. Light in direction of oncoming traffic is selectively switched of, potential hazard can be marked via an isolated beam and the illumination on the road can even follow a bend. The optical architectures that enable these advanced functionalities are diverse. Electromechanical shutters and lens units moved by electric motors were the first ways to realize these systems. Switching multiple LED light sources is a more elegant and mechanically robust solution. While many basic functionalities can already be realized with a limited number of LEDs, an increasing number of pixels will lead to more driving comfort and better visibility. The required optical system needs not only to generate a desired beam distribution with a high angular dynamic, but also needs to guarantee minimal stray light and cross talk between the different pixels. The direct projection of the LED array via a lens is a simple but not very efficient optical system. We discuss different optical elements for pre-collimating the light with minimal cross talk and improved contrast between neighboring pixels. Depending on the selected optical system, we derive the basic light source requirements: luminance, surface area, contrast, flux and color homogeneity.

  17. Pixel-Level Digital-to-Analog Conversion Scheme with Compensation of Thin-Film-Transistor Variations for Compact Integrated Data Drivers of Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Sang-Gyu; Choi, Byong-Deok

    2011-03-01

    The previous pixel-level digital-to-analog-conversion (DAC) scheme that implements a part of a DAC in a pixel circuit turned out to be very efficient for reducing the peripheral area of an integrated data driver fabricated with low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS TFTs). However, how the pixel-level DAC can be compatible with the existing pixel circuits including compensation schemes of TFT variations and IR drops on supply rails, which is of primary importance for active matrix organic light emitting diodes (AMOLEDs) is an issue in this scheme, because LTPS TFTs suffer from random variations in their characteristics. In this paper, we show that the pixel-level DAC scheme can be successfully used with the previous compensation schemes by giving two examples of voltage- and current-programming pixels. The previous pixel-level DAC schemes require additional two TFTs and one capacitor, but for these newly proposed pixel circuits, the overhead is no more than two TFTs by utilizing the already existing capacitor. In addition, through a detailed analysis, it has been shown that the pixel-level DAC can be expanded to a 4-bit resolution, or be applied together with 1:2 demultiplexing driving for 6- to 8-in. diagonal XGA AMOLED display panels.

  18. Pixel-Level Digital-to-Analog Conversion Scheme for Compact Data Drivers of Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Low-Temperature Polycrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae-Wook Kim,; Byong-Deok Choi,

    2010-03-01

    This paper shows that a part of a digital-to-analog conversion (DAC) function can be included in a pixel circuit to save the circuit area of an integrated data driver fabricated with low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs). Because the pixel-level DAC can be constructed by two TFTs and one small capacitor, the pixel circuit does not become markedly complex. The design of an 8-bit DAC, which combines a 6-bit resistor-string-based DAC and a 2-bit pixel-level DAC for a 4-in. diagonal VGA format active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED), is shown in detail. In addition, analysis results are presented, revealing that the 8-bit DAC scheme including a 2-bit pixel-level DAC with 1:3 demultiplexing can be applied to very high video formats, such as XGA, for a 3 to 4-in. diagonal AMOLED. Even for a 9- to 12-in. diagonal AMOLED, the proposed scheme can still be applied to the XGA format, even though no demultiplexing is allowed. The total height of the proposed 8-bit DAC is approximately 960 μm, which is almost one-half of that of the previous 6-bit resistor-string-based DAC.

  19. 4.0-inch Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Display Integrated with Driver Circuits Using Amorphous In-Ga-Zn-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors with Suppressed Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Hiroki; Sasaki, Toshinari; Noda, Kousei; Ito, Shunichi; Sasaki, Miyuki; Endo, Yuta; Yoshitomi, Shuhei; Sakata, Junichiro; Serikawa, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Shunpei

    2010-03-01

    We have newly developed a 4.0-in. quarter video graphics array (QVGA) active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) display integrated with gate and source driver circuits using amorphous In-Ga-Zn-oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). Focusing on a passivation layer in an inverted staggered bottom gate structure, the threshold voltage of the TFTs can be controlled to have “normally-off” characteristics with suppressed variation by using a SiOx layer formed by sputtering with a low hydrogen content. In addition, small subthreshold swing S/S of 0.19 V/decade, high field-effect mobility µFE of 11.5 cm2 V-1 s-1, and threshold voltage Vth of 1.27 V are achieved. The deposition conditions of the passivation layer and other processes are optimized, and variation in TFT characteristics is suppressed, whereby high-speed operation in gate and source driver circuits can be achieved. Using these driver circuits, the 4.0-in. QVGA AMOLED display integrated with driver circuits can be realized.

  20. An 8-bit Data Driving Scheme Based on Two-Step Digital-to-Analog Conversion for Integrated Data Drivers of Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Wook; Choi, Byong-Deok

    2012-03-01

    The two-step digital-to-analog conversion (DAC) scheme has been reported to be very area-efficient for thin-film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) data driver ICs, but it is not as well suited as it is for polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) TFT integrated circuits. The charge redistribution in the two-step DAC process requires an operational amplifier in principle, which is most challenging for poly-Si TFT circuits. The proposed two-step DAC for active-matrix organic light-emitting diodes (AMOLEDs) makes the operational amplifier unnecessary by appropriately exploiting the preexisting capacitors in the pixel to compensate for the characteristic variations of TFTs. Moreover, the second-step DAC occurs at the same time as threshold voltage compensation, and it does not require additional time. By thoroughly analyzing area efficiency depending on the resolution decomposition between the first- and second-step DACs, we found that 5-bit coarse plus 3-bit fine DACs are best in terms of circuit area. When we designed a layout of the proposed 8-bit DAC on the basis of the 4 µm design rules, the DAC circuit area is no more than 72×637 µm2, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the most compact to date.

  1. Inorganic-organic hybrid white light phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Sheng; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2016-11-03

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have brought about a revolution in lighting and display. A very hot field in recent years has been to develop white-light phosphors, aiming to achieve better colour stability, better reproducibility, and a simpler fabrication process for LEDs and OLEDs. This feature article reviews the development of inorganic-organic hybrid white-light phosphors, including coordination compounds of small organic molecules, organically templated inorganic compounds (phosphates, borates, sulfides, halides), metal-functionalized organic polymers, and organically coated nanoparticles.

  2. Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiang, Joseph John

    2007-07-17

    Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction include a light-scattering medium disposed adjacent thereto. The light-scattering medium has a light scattering anisotropy parameter g in the range from greater than zero to about 0.99, and a scatterance parameter S less than about 0.22 or greater than about 3.

  3. Data Covariances from R-Matrix Analyses of Light Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, G.M., E-mail: ghale@lanl.gov; Paris, M.W.

    2015-01-15

    After first reviewing the parametric description of light-element reactions in multichannel systems using R-matrix theory and features of the general LANL R-matrix analysis code EDA, we describe how its chi-square minimization procedure gives parameter covariances. This information is used, together with analytically calculated sensitivity derivatives, to obtain cross section covariances for all reactions included in the analysis by first-order error propagation. Examples are given of the covariances obtained for systems with few resonances ({sup 5}He) and with many resonances ({sup 13}C ). We discuss the prevalent problem of this method leading to cross section uncertainty estimates that are unreasonably small for large data sets. The answer to this problem appears to be using parameter confidence intervals in place of standard errors.

  4. Matrix Organizational Structure and Its Effects Upon Education Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, James R.

    Applying matrix organizational structure to the organization of special education services is the focus of this paper. Beginning with a list of ways in which educational organizations differ from business or military organizations, the author warns that educators must be cautious when transferring organizational structures from other disciplines…

  5. Surface functionalization of metal organic frameworks for mixed matrix membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albenze, Erik; Lartey, Michael; Li, Tao; Luebke, David R.; Nulwala, Hunaid B.; Rosi, Nathaniel L.; Venna, Surendar R.

    2017-03-21

    Mixed Matrix Membrane (MMM) are composite membranes for gas separation and comprising a quantity of inorganic filler particles, in particular metal organic framework (MOF), dispersed throughout a polymer matrix comprising one or more polymers. This disclosure is directed to MOF functionalized through addition of a pendant functional group to the MOF, in order to improve interaction with a surrounding polymer matrix in a MMM. The improved interaction aids in avoiding defects in the MMM due to incompatible interfaces between the polymer matrix and the MOF particle, in turn increasing the mechanical and gas separation properties of the MMM. The disclosure is also directed to a MMM incorporating the surface functionalized MOF.

  6. Principles of phosphorescent organic light emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaev, Boris; Baryshnikov, Gleb; Agren, Hans

    2014-02-07

    Organic light-emitting device (OLED) technology has found numerous applications in the development of solid state lighting, flat panel displays and flexible screens. These applications are already commercialized in mobile phones and TV sets. White OLEDs are of especial importance for lighting; they now use multilayer combinations of organic and elementoorganic dyes which emit various colors in the red, green and blue parts of the visible spectrum. At the same time the stability of phosphorescent blue emitters is still a major challenge for OLED applications. In this review we highlight the basic principles and the main mechanisms behind phosphorescent light emission of various classes of photofunctional OLED materials, like organic polymers and oligomers, electron and hole transport molecules, elementoorganic complexes with heavy metal central ions, and clarify connections between the main features of electronic structure and the photo-physical properties of the phosphorescent OLED materials.

  7. Organ-specific chemotactic factors present in lung extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerra, R F; Nathanson, S D

    1989-05-01

    The preferential colonization of a distant organ by a circulating tumor cell (organ specific metastasis) may be regulated by chemotactic factors present within the extracellular matrix of the host organ. Organ-specific extracellular matrix was prepared from murine kidney and lung by high salt extraction and DNAase/RNAase digestion. A soluble protein fraction (S2) from each of the matricies was obtained by 4 M guanidine extraction and was tested for organ-specific chemotactic activity in a modified Boyden chamber. The lung colonizing B16-F10 and B16-BL6 tumor cell lines demonstrated organ-specific motility only toward the lung extract. The low metastasizing B16 parental line and liver colonizing B16-L4b line showed no preference for either lung or kidney. The lung activity resolves into five fractions by gel filtration chromatography, with the highest activity eluting at Mr approximately 71,000. Chemotactic factors present in lung extracellular matrix may regulate the preferential colonization of an organ by stimulating the migration of tumor cells in a specific manner. These factors may be released during the degradation of the extracellular matrix.

  8. Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-28

    MOT-OOO1AF I Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters Prepared by DI Jeffrey C. Buchholz E L ri: 8 James P. Stec OCT C "t989 Mary C...Schutte Micro -Optics Technologies, Inc. 8608 University Green #5 Middleton, WI 53562 28 September 1989 D,:?UqflON SA2". N’.’ _ Disuibunon Uanu-ted Contract...Title Report Date Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters 28 September 1989 Authors Jeffrey C. Buchholz, James P. Stec, Mary C. Schutte

  9. Flexible, light trapping substrates for organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonseok; Berger, Jana; Tang, Zheng; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Lasagni, Andrés Fabián; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Micro-structured organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices on polyethylene terephthalate substrates are produced using direct laser interference patterning (DLIP). The performance of organic solar cells on these substrates is improved by a factor of 1.16, and a power conversion efficiency of 7.70% is achieved. We show that a shorter spatial period of the pattern allows for a stronger light trapping effect in solar cell, as it leads to a longer light path. Moreover, since the patterned structures are located on the outside of the fully encapsulated OPV devices, there are no problems with the roughness induced shunts.

  10. Light Emitting Transistors of Organic Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2009-03-01

    Organic light emitting transistors (OLETs) are attracting considerable interest as a novel function of organic field effect transistors (OFETs). Besides a smallest integration of light source and current switching devices, OLETs offer a new opportunity in the fundamental research on organic light emitting devices. The OLET device structure allows us to use organic single crystals, in contrast to the organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), the research of which have been conducted predominantly on polycrystalline or amorphous thin films. In the case of OFETs, use of single crystals have produced a significant amount of benefits in the studies of pursuit for the highest performance limit of FETs, intrinsic transport mechanism in organic semiconductors, and application of the single crystal transistors. The study on OLETs have been made predominantly on polycrystalline films or multicomponent heterojunctions, and single crystal study is still limited to tetracene [1] and rubrene [2], which are materials with relatively high mobility, but with low photoluminescence efficiency. In this paper, we report fabrication of single crystal OLETs of several kinds of highly luminescent molecules, emitting colorful light, ranging from blue to red. Our strategy is single crystallization of monomeric or oligomeric molecules, which are known to have a very high photoluminescence efficiency. Here we report the result on single crystal LETs of rubrene (red), 4,4'-bis(diphenylvinylenyl)-anthracene (green), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophene-2-yl)benzene (AC5) (green), and 1,3,6,8-tetraphenylpyrene (TPPy) (blue), all of which displayed ambipolar transport as well as peculiar movement of voltage controlled movement of recombination zone, not only from the surface of the crystal but also from the edges of the crystals, indicting light confinement inside the crystal. Realization of ambipolar OLET with variety of single crystals indicates that the fabrication method is quite versatile to various light

  11. Light trapping for flexible organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonseok; Berger, Jana; Will, Paul-Anton; Soldera, Marcos; Glatz, Bernhard; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Taretto, Kurt; Fery, Andreas; Lasagni, Andrés. Fabián.; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2016-09-01

    Here we investigate light trapping substrates and electrodes for enhancing the performance of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Their power conversion efficiency (PCE) can be improved by a factor of 1.16 using laser patterned PET substrates and by a factor of 1.13 using commercial, structured display films. Furthermore, we prepare light trapping electrodes using as flexible conductive polymer with embedded TiO2 nanoparticles, improving the PCE by a factor of 1.08 as compared to a neat polymer electrode. However, nano-imprinted conductive polymer electrodes does not provide light trapping effect due to the small size (50 nm) of the structures. Moreover flexible OPV devices, integrating the above light trapping elements, show non-degraded performance after bending tests.

  12. Organic bistable light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liping; Liu, Jie; Pyo, Seungmoon; Yang, Yang

    2002-01-01

    An organic bistable device, with a unique trilayer structure consisting of organic/metal/organic sandwiched between two outmost metal electrodes, has been invented. [Y. Yang, L. P. Ma, and J. Liu, U.S. Patent Pending, U.S. 01/17206 (2001)]. When the device is biased with voltages beyond a critical value (for example 3 V), the device suddenly switches from a high-impedance state to a low-impedance state, with a difference in injection current of more than 6 orders of magnitude. When the device is switched to the low-impedance state, it remains in that state even when the power is off. (This is called "nonvolatile" phenomenon in memory devices.) The high-impedance state can be recovered by applying a reverse bias; therefore, this bistable device is ideal for memory applications. In order to increase the data read-out rate of this type of memory device, a regular polymer light-emitting diode has been integrated with the organic bistable device, such that it can be read out optically. These features make the organic bistable light-emitting device a promising candidate for several applications, such as digital memories, opto-electronic books, and recordable papers.

  13. Passive Matrix Organic Electroluminescent Display for 3G Cellular Phone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The major features of the display technologies for 3G cellular phone are reviewed. The comparison between their potential candidates for 3G cellular phone is given, and a detailed discussion is made on passive matrix organic electroluminescent display technology. A novel method to improve display contrast ratio is presented. Finally several 3G phone set prototypes with OLED display panels are given as well as the market forecast

  14. Light extraction enhancement from organic light-emitting diodes with randomly scattered surface fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dong-Ying; Shi, Xiao-Bo; Gao, Chun-Hong; Cai, Shi-Duan; Jin, Yue; Liao, Liang-Sheng, E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A combination of scattering layer and roughened substrate is used for light extraction from OLEDs. • The scattering layer is readily achieved by spin-coating the TiO{sub 2} sol. • The enhancement relying scattering depends on the size of TiO{sub 2} nano particles. • With the light extraction techniques the uniform emission is achieved. - Abstract: A combination of a scattering medium layer and a roughened substrate was proposed to enhance the light extraction efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Comparing with a reference OLED without any scattering layer, 65% improvement in the forward emission has been achieved with a scattering layer formed on an intentionally roughened external substrate surface of the OLED by spin-coating a sol–gel fabricated matrix containing well dispersed titania (TiO{sub 2}) particles. Such a combination method not only demonstrated efficient extraction of the light trapped in the glass substrate but also achieved homogenous emission from the OLED panel. The proposed technique, convenient and inexpensive, is believed to be suitable for the large area OLED production in lighting applications.

  15. Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes for lighting applications by sand-blasting substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuming; Kwok, Hoi Sing

    2010-01-04

    Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by scattering the light is one of the effective methods for large-area lighting applications. In this paper, we present a very simple and cost-effective method to rough the substrates and hence to scatter the light. By simply sand-blasting the edges and back-side surface of the glass substrates, a 20% improvement of forward efficiency has been demonstrated. Moreover, due to scattering effect, a constant color over all viewing angles and uniform light pattern with Lambertian distribution has been obtained. This simple and cost-effective method may be suitable for mass production of large-area OLEDs for lighting applications.

  16. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Driven by Organic Transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡远川; 董桂芳; 王立铎; 梁琰; 邱勇

    2004-01-01

    Organic thin-film field-effect transistors (OTFTs) with pentacene as the semiconductor have been fabricated for driving an organic light-emitting diode (OLED). The driving circuit includes two OTFTs and one storage capacitor. The field-effect mobility of the transistors in the driving circuit is more than 0.3 cm2/Vs, and the on/off ratio is larger than 104. The light-emission area of the OLED is 0. 04mm2 and the brightness is larger than 400cd/m2 when the selected line voltage, data line voltage and drive voltage all are -40 V. The responding characteristics and holding characteristics are also researched when the selected line voltage and the date line voltage are changed.

  17. Matrix theory interpretation of discrete light cone quantization string worldsheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignani; Orland; Paniak; Semenoff

    2000-10-16

    We study the null compactification of type-IIA string perturbation theory at finite temperature. We prove a theorem about Riemann surfaces establishing that the moduli spaces of infinite-momentum-frame superstring worldsheets are identical to those of branched-cover instantons in the matrix-string model conjectured to describe M theory. This means that the identification of string degrees of freedom in the matrix model proposed by Dijkgraaf, Verlinde, and Verlinde is correct and that its natural generalization produces the moduli space of Riemann surfaces at all orders in the genus expansion.

  18. Extracellular matrix assembly and organization during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Andrew; Jessen, Jason R

    2010-03-01

    Zebrafish gastrulation entails morphogenetic cell movements that shape the body plan and give rise to an embryo with defined anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. Regulating these cell movements are diverse signaling pathways and proteins including Wnts, Src-family tyrosine kinases, cadherins, and matrix metalloproteinases. While our knowledge of how these proteins impact cell polarity and migration has advanced considerably in the last decade, almost no data exist regarding the organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) during zebrafish gastrulation. Here, we describe for the first time the assembly of a fibronectin (FN) and laminin containing ECM in the early zebrafish embryo. This matrix was first detected at early gastrulation (65% epiboly) in the form of punctae that localize to tissue boundaries separating germ layers from each other and the underlying yolk cell. Fibrillogenesis increased after mid-gastrulation (80% epiboly) coinciding with the period of planar cell polarity pathway-dependent convergence and extension cell movements. We demonstrate that FN fibrils present beneath deep mesodermal cells are aligned in the direction of membrane protrusion formation. Utilizing antisense morpholino oligonucleotides, we further show that knockdown of FN expression causes a convergence and extension defect. Taken together, our data show that similar to amphibian embryos, the formation of ECM in the zebrafish gastrula is a dynamic process that occurs in parallel to at least a portion of the polarized cell behaviors shaping the embryonic body plan. These results provide a framework for uncovering the interrelationship between ECM structure and cellular processes regulating convergence and extension such as directed migration and mediolateral/radial intercalation. 2009 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Organic matrix composite protective coatings for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, Harry W.; George, Pete

    1995-01-01

    Successful use of composites in low earth orbit (LEO) depends on their ability to survive long-term exposure to atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation, charged particle radiation, thermal cycling, and micrometeoroid and space debris. The AO environment is especially severe for unprotected organic matrix composites surfaces in LEO. Ram facing unprotected graphite/epoxy flown on the 69-month Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission lost up to one ply of thickness (5 mils) resulting in decreased mechanical properties. The expected AO fluence of the 30 year Space Station Alpha mission is approximately 20 times that seen on LDEF. This exposure would result in significant material loss of unprotected ram facing organic matrix composites. Several protective coatings for composites were flown on LDEF including anodized aluminum, vacuum deposited coatings, a variety of thermal control coatings, metalized Teflon, and leafing aluminum. Results from the testing and analysis of the coated and uncoated composite specimens flown on LDEF's leading and trailing edges provide the baseline for determining the effectiveness of protectively coated composites in LEO. In addition to LDEF results, results from shuttle flight experiments and ground based testing will be discussed.

  20. Organic light emitting diode with light extracting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Songwei

    2016-06-14

    A light extraction substrate includes a glass substrate having a first surface and a second surface. A light extraction layer is formed on at least one of the surfaces. The light extraction layer is a coating, such as a silicon-containing coating, incorporating nanoparticles.

  1. Magnetoelectroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence, Joseph E; Manolopoulos, David E; Hore, P J

    2016-01-01

    The magnetoelectroluminescence of conjugated organic polymer films is widely accepted to arise from a polaron pair mechanism, but their magnetoconductance is less well understood. Here we derive a new relationship between the experimentally measurable magnetoelectroluminescence and magnetoconductance and the theoretically calculable singlet yield of the polaron pair recombination reaction. This relationship is expected to be valid regardless of the mechanism of the magnetoconductance, provided the mobilities of the free polarons are independent of the applied magnetic field (i.e., provided one discounts the possibility of spin-dependent transport). We also discuss the semiclassical calculation of the singlet yield of the polaron pair recombination reaction for materials such as poly(2,5-dioctyloxy-paraphenylene vinylene) (DOO-PPV), the hyperfine fields in the polarons of which can be extracted from light-induced electron spin resonance measurements. The resulting theory is shown to give good agreement with ex...

  2. Light-like Big Bang singularities in string and matrix theories

    CERN Document Server

    Craps, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Important open questions in cosmology require a better understanding of the Big Bang singularity. In string and matrix theories, light-like analogues of cosmological singularities (singular plane wave backgrounds) turn out to be particularly tractable. We give a status report on the current understanding of such light-like Big Bang models, presenting both solved and open problems.

  3. Organic/Organic' heterojunctions: organic light emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Neal R; Wang, Weining; Alloway, Dana M; Placencia, Diogenes; Ratcliff, Erin; Brumbach, Michael

    2009-05-19

    Heterojunctions created from thin films of two dissimilar organic semiconductor materials [organic/organic' (O/O') heterojunctions] are an essential component of organic light emitting diode displays and lighting systems (OLEDs, PLEDs) and small molecule or polymer-based organic photovoltaic (solar cell) technologies (OPVs). O/O' heterojunctions are the site for exciton formation in OLEDs, and the site for exciton dissociation and photocurrent production in OPVs. Frontier orbital energy offsets in O/O' heterojunctions establish the excess free energy controlling rates of charge recombination and formation of emissive states in OLEDs and PLEDs. These energy offsets also establish the excess free energy which controls charge separation and the short-circuit photocurrent (J(SC) ) in OPVs, and set the upper limit for the open-circuit photopotential (V(OC) ). We review here how these frontier orbital energy offsets are determined using photoemission spectroscopies, how these energies change as a function of molecular environment, and the influence of interface dipoles on these frontier orbital energies. Recent examples of heterojunctions based on small molecule materials are shown, emphasizing those heterojunctions which are of interest for photovoltaic applications. These include heterojunctions of perylenebisimide dyes with trivalent metal phthalocyanines, and heterojunctions of titanyl phthalocyanine with C(60) , and with pentacene. Organic solar cells comprised of donor/acceptor pairs of each of these last three materials confirm that the V(OC) scales with the energy offsets between the HOMO of the donor and LUMO of the acceptor ($E_{{\\rm HOMO}^{\\rm D} } - E_{{\\rm LUMO}^{\\rm A} }$).

  4. White organic light-emitting devices with mixed interfaces between light emitting layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Gu; Kee, In Seo; Shim, Hong Shik; Ko, Ick Hwan; Lee, Soonil; Koh, Ken Ha

    2007-06-01

    White organic light-emitting devices with mixed interfaces between emitting layers (MI-EML WOLEDs) showed luminance and efficiency as large as 26213cd/m2 and 9.85cd/A. Efficiencies of MI-EML WOLEDs were about 1.5 times better than those of conventional three-EML WOLEDs for luminance of 1000-5000cd/m2, and their half-decay lifetime showed 3.1 times improvement. Note that if the authors operate typical active-matrix mobile-phone displays based on combination of WOLED and color filters to produce standard white emission for high definition televisions and illumination sources, MI-EML WOLEDs will have advantages of 25% less power consumption and 2.8 times longer lifetime over conventional three-EML WOLEDs.

  5. Homogeneously embedded Pt nanoclusters on amorphous titania matrix as highly efficient visible light active photocatalyst material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Vipul; Kumar, Suneel; Krishnan, Venkata, E-mail: vkn@iitmandi.ac.in

    2016-08-15

    A novel and facile technique, based on colloidal synthesis route, has been utilized for the preparation of homogeneously embedded Pt nanoclusters on amorphous titania matrix. The material has been thoroughly characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, powder x-ray diffraction, optical and Raman spectroscopic techniques to understand the morphology, structure and other physical characteristics. The photocatalytic activity of the material under visible light irradiation was demonstrated by investigations on the degradation of two organic dyes (methylene blue and rhodamine B). In comparison to other Pt−TiO{sub 2} based nanomaterials (core-shell, doped nanostructures, modified nanotubes, decorated nanospheres and binary nanocomposites), the embedded Pt nanoclusters on titania was found to be highly efficient for visible light active photocatalytic applications. The enhanced catalytic performance could be attributed to the efficient charge separation and decreased recombination of the photo generated electrons and holes at the Pt-titania interface and the availability of multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces due to homogeneous embedment of Pt nanoclusters on amorphous titania. In essence, this work illustrates that homogeneous embedment of noble metal nanoparticles/nanoclusters on semiconductor metal oxide matrices can lead to tuning of the photophysical properties of the final material and eventually enhance its photocatalytic activity. - Highlights: • Homogeneously embedded Pt nanoclusters on amorphous titania matrix has been prepared. • Facile low temperature colloidal synthesis technique has been used. • Enhanced catalytic performance could be observed. • Work can pave way for tuning photocatalytic activity of composite materials.

  6. Organic light-emitting diodes: High-throughput virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Shuzo; Shizu, Katsuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Computer networks, trained with data from delayed-fluorescence materials that have been successfully used in organic light-emitting diodes, facilitate the high-speed prediction of good emitters for display and lighting applications.

  7. Mueller matrix coherent measurement with non-separable classical light

    CERN Document Server

    Töppel, Falk; Marquardt, Christoph; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Quantum approaches relying, e.g., on entanglement, have been proposed as a tool to increase the efficiency of optical measurements. In particular polarimetry, which requires at least four polarization measurements, can be done in one measurement with an entangled state. Here we consider classical beams of light that possess quantum-like properties such as inseparability. We show that the use of such classical entanglement for polarimetry can bring an outstanding advantage, comparable to the one of a quantum state, over classical measurements.

  8. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of organic matrix degradation in nanofilled resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Nahórny, Sídnei; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2013-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of light curing unit (LCU) type, mouthwashes, and soft drink on chemical degradation of a nanofilled resin composite. Samples (80) were divided into eight groups: halogen LCU, HS--saliva (control); HPT--Pepsi Twist®; HLC--Listerine®; HCP--Colgate Plax®; LED LCU, LS--saliva (control); LPT--Pepsi Twist®; LLC--Listerine®; LCP--Colgate Plax®. The degree of conversion analysis and the measure of the peak area at 2,930 cm-1 (organic matrix) of resin composite were done by Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy (baseline, after 7 and 14 days). The data were subjected to multifactor analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a 95% confidence followed by Tukey's HSD post-hoc test. The DC ranged from 58.0% (Halogen) to 59.3% (LED) without significance. Differences in the peak area between LCUs were found after 7 days of storage in S and PT. A marked increase in the peak intensity of HLC and LLC groups was found. The soft-start light-activation may influence the chemical degradation of organic matrix in resin composite. Ethanol contained in Listerine® Cool Mint mouthwash had the most significant degradation effect. Raman spectroscopy is shown to be a useful tool to investigate resin composite degradation.

  9. High efficient light-emittingdiodes using polystyrene as matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    High efficient polymer light-emitting diodes(PLEDs) were obtained by using a blend of conjugatedpolymer G-PF, a copolymer of fluorene and thiophene, andpolystyrene (PS). The maximum electroluminescent (EL)efficiency of the device is 12 cd/A when G-PF/PS weight ratiois at 80/20, while that of pure G-PF device is 6.5 cd/A. Studieson photoluminescence and electroluminescence of the blendsindicate that inter-chain interactions were tremendouslysuppressed due to the dilution effect. However, after PS con-centration exceeds 20% the EL efficiency of the devices de-creases with further increase of PS concentration. This maybe due to the decrease of the recombination probability ofelectrons and holes with the excessive addition of PS insulator.

  10. A Review of Irradiation Effects on Organic-Matrix Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, N.J.

    1993-06-01

    This review assesses the data base on epoxy and polyimide matrix insulation to determine whether organic electric insulation systems can be used in the toroidal field (TF) magnets of next generation fusion devices such as ITER* and TPX*. Owing to the difficulties of testing insulation under fusion reactor conditions, there is a considerable mismatch between the ITER requirements and the data that are currently available. For example, nearly all of the high-dose (5 x 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 8} Gy) data obtained on epoxy and polyimide matrix insulation employed gamma irradiation, electron irradiation, or reactor irradiation with a fast neutron fluence far below 10{sup 23}/m{sup 2}, the fluence expected for the insulation at the TF magnets, as set forth in ITER conceptual design documents. Also, the neutron spectrum did not contain a very high energy (E {ge} 5 MeV) component. Such data underestimate the actual damage that would be obtained with the neutron fluence and spectrum expected at a TF magnet. Experiments on a polyimide (Kapton) indicate that gamma or electron doses or mixed gamma and neutron reactor doses would have to be downgraded by a factor of up to ten to simulate fusion neutron doses. Even when neutrons did constitute a significant portion of the total dose, B-containing E-glass reinforcement was often used; therefore, excess damage from the {sup 10}B + n {yields} {sup 7}Li + {alpha} reaction occurred near the glass-epoxy interface. This problem can easily be avoided by substituting B-free glass (R, S, or T types).

  11. Axial-Current Matrix Elements in Light Nuclei from Lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, Martin [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Shanahan, Phiala E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Tiburzi, Brian C. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Wagman, Michael L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Winter, Frank T. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Beane, Silas [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Chang, Emmanuel [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Davoudi, Zohreh; Detmold, William [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Orginos, Konstantinos [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    I present results from the first lattice QCD calculations of axial-current matrix elements in light nuclei, performed by the NPLQCD collaboration. Precision calculations of these matrix elements, and the subsequent extraction of multi-nucleon axial-current operators, are essential in refining theoretical predictions of the proton-proton fusion cross section, neutrino-nucleus cross sections and $\\beta\\beta$-decay rates of nuclei. In addition, they are expected to shed light on the phenomenological quenching of $g_A$ that is required in nuclear many-body calculations.

  12. Tunable transport mean free path of light in xerogel matrixes embedded with polystyrene spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, B P J; Amaro, M; Nunes-Pereira, E J; Belsley, M

    2008-01-01

    Xerogel matrices, made by sol-gel techniques, are embedded with polystyrene spheres to promote multiple scattering of light. Varying the concentration of the spheres inside the matrix allows one to adjust the transport mean free path of light inside the material. Coherent backscattering measurements show that a range of transport mean free paths from 90 to 600 nm is easily achieved. The determination of the matrix refractive index permits a direct comparison to multiple scattering and Mie theory. Such tunable diffusive sol-gel samples can be further optimized as random laser materials.

  13. Axial-Current Matrix Elements in Light Nuclei from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Savage, Martin J; Tiburzi, Brian C; Wagman, Michael L; Winter, Frank; Beane, Silas R; Chang, Emmanuel; Davoudi, Zohreh; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    I present results from the first lattice QCD calculations of axial-current matrix elements in light nuclei, performed by the NPLQCD collaboration. Precision calculations of these matrix elements, and the subsequent extraction of multi-nucleon axial-current operators, are essential in refining theoretical predictions of the proton-proton fusion cross section, neutrino-nucleus cross sections and $\\beta\\beta$-decay rates of nuclei. In addition, they are expected to shed light on the phenomenological quenching of $g_A$ that is required in nuclear many-body calculations.

  14. Effect of spin-coating process on the performance of passive-matrix organic light-emitting display%旋涂方式对有机发光显示屏发光均匀性及性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘南柳; 艾娜; 胡典钢; 余树福; 彭俊彪; 曹镛; 王坚

    2011-01-01

    By improving the spin-coating process during the deposition of hole transport layer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene-sulfonate)(PEDOT:PSS),high efficient monochrome passive-matrix organic light-emitting display is fabricated.The PEDOT:PSS film is spin-coated with a two-step spin-coating process,in which the substrate is turned 180° during the spin-coating,forcing the piled-up materials to move reversely.By introducing the second spin-coating step,the film thickness difference between single and double lines significantly reduces,leading to a more uniform light emission and a larger fill factor for the 3.81 cm monochrome polymer light-emitting diode display.Green light-emitting display with a peak current efficiency of 17 cd/A is successfully fabricated,and the efficiency is improved by 40 percent compared with that made by traditional spin-coating method.A 3.81 cm 96×64 full color display with a current efficiency of 1.25 cd/A is also successfully made.%采用旋转涂布法制备空穴传输层聚二氧乙基噻吩/聚对苯乙烯磺酸过程中,设置高低转速相结合的方式,调转基片方向实施二次旋涂干燥成膜,有效改善了材料因基片开口设计而引起的单双行薄膜厚度不均匀现象.由于增加了功能层薄膜的均匀性,从而改善了显示屏的整体发光均匀性与发光效率.改进工艺后制备的绿光显示屏电流效率提高了近40%,并得到了电流效率达1.25cd/A的96×64的3.81cm全彩高分子发光点阵显示屏,发光亮度提高了近25%.

  15. Optical-Fiber-Matrix Exposure Using Light-Emitting-Diode Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Toshiyuki; Mirumachi, Naofumi; Ooshima, Yuki

    2007-09-01

    A new projection exposure method without using reticles was proposed, and the feasibility of printing arbitrary patterns was investigated. The preparation of expensive reticles is not favorable for the small-volume production of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), optomechanical systems, and their components. On the other hand, long turnaround time (TAT) becomes a fatal bottleneck preventing the rapid follow-up of various design changes. As a countermeasure, we previously proposed a new exposure method named optical-fiber-matrix exposure. In this method, patterns are delineated by superimposing light spots from an optical-fiber matrix, and expensive reticles are not necessary. Therefore, patterns are easily changeable by controlling the pattern delineation program. However, in the previous method, light rays from one intensive lamp were divided and switched using small mechanical shutters placed at each fiber entrance, and the shutters were not sufficiently reliable. For this reason, violet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were used in this research in place of the lamp source and mechanical shutters, and the light or dark state at each optical fiber end was controlled using a microcomputer that switched each LED attached to each fiber entrance one by one. Since the illuminance of each LED was different, LEDs with approximately the same illuminance were selectively used, and each illuminance was adjusted to be uniform by inserting an individual color filter. Thus, the widths of patterns printed by scanning different fiber elements were homogenized. Since line-and-space patterns and various alphabet patterns were successfully printed, the feasibility of fabricating a large-scale optical-fiber matrix was also investigated. An optical-fiber line matrix composed of more than 330 fibers was fabricated without including any gaps between neighbor fibers. There will probably be no fatal problems to enlarge the matrix scale. Although the exposure speed should be improved

  16. Characterization of mode group transfer matrix in multimode couplers using spatial light modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepniak, G.; Bunge, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, spatial light modulation is applied to investigate the selective mode properties of multimode fibers (MMF) and MMF couplers. Spatial light modulator is applied only on the MMF input to excite a selected linearly polarized eigenmode of the MMF. At the system output the impulse and frequency response is studied. By an additional time separation of mode groups achieved during propagation in the MMF, a mode group to mode group transfer matrix of the MMF coupler can be obtained.

  17. T-matrix computations of light scattering by red blood cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Annika M. K.; Alsholm, Peter; Karlsson, Anders; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    The electromagnetic far field, as well as near field, originating from light interaction with a red blood cell (RBC) volume equivalent spheroid, were analyzed utilizing T-matrix theory. This method is a powerful tool which enables the influence of cell shape on the angular distribution of scattered light to be studied. General observations were that the three-dimensional shape, as well as optical thickness apparent to the incident field, affect the forward scattering. The ba...

  18. Diamond xenolith and matrix organic matter in the Sutter's Mill meteorite measured by C-XANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Zolensky, Michael E.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Rahman, Zia; Jenniskens, Peter; Cody, George D.

    2014-11-01

    The Sutter's Mill (SM) meteorite fell in El Dorado County, California, on April 22, 2012. This meteorite is a regolith breccia composed of CM chondrite material and at least one xenolithic phase: oldhamite. The meteorite studied here, SM2 (subsample 5), was one of three meteorites collected before it rained extensively on the debris site, thus preserving the original asteroid regolith mineralogy. Two relatively large (10 μm sized) possible diamond grains were observed in SM2-5 surrounded by fine-grained matrix. In the present work, we analyzed a focused ion beam (FIB) milled thin section that transected a region containing these two potential diamond grains as well as the surrounding fine-grained matrix employing carbon and nitrogen X-ray absorption near-edge structure (C-XANES and N-XANES) spectroscopy using a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) (Beamline 5.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). The STXM analysis revealed that the matrix of SM2-5 contains C-rich grains, possibly organic nanoglobules. A single carbonate grain was also detected. The C-XANES spectrum of the matrix is similar to that of insoluble organic matter (IOM) found in other CM chondrites. However, no significant nitrogen-bearing functional groups were observed with N-XANES. One of the possible diamond grains contains a Ca-bearing inclusion that is not carbonate. C-XANES features of the diamond-edges suggest that the diamond might have formed by the CVD process, or in a high-temperature and -pressure environment in the interior of a much larger parent body.

  19. Coral biomineralization: A focus on intra-skeletal organic matrix and calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falini, Giuseppe; Fermani, Simona; Goffredo, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    In the recent years several papers and some reviews have dealt with characterization, localization and influence on the precipitation of calcium carbonate, of the organic matrix from scleractinian corals. In fact, it has been well established that coral calcification is a biological controlled process orchestrated in space and time by the organism also trough the secretion of organic matrix molecules because it has been well established that coral calcification is a biological controlled process, and thus is orchestrated in space and time by the organism also through the secretion of organic matrix molecules. In this review is presented a scientific path on the biomineralization of corals having as focusing point the intra-skeletal organic matrix, the molecules that are associated with mineral (aragonite). The review starts with a an overview on coral tissue, skeleton and tissue skeleton interface, describes the intra-skeletal organic matrix putting attention mainly on the proteins associated to aragonite and finally describes the in vivo and in vitro calcium carbonate precipitation experiments carried out aimed to evaluate the role of the organic matrix. The last paragraph reports studies on the role of the organic matrix in controlling calcification when corals are subject ocean acidification effects. The readers are expected to find a source of inspiration for new studies on the biomineralization of corals that are organic matrix addressed and merge diverse scientific disciplines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of proteinaceous components of the organic matrix of endoskeletal sclerites from the alcyonarian Lobophytum crassum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Isa, Y; Takemura, A; Uehara, T

    2006-03-01

    The mesoglea of alcyonarians is occupied by an abundance of minute calcitic sclerites. The sclerites of the alcyonarian Lobophytum crassum contain a water-soluble organic matrix comprising 0.48% of the sclerite weight and a water-insoluble fraction comprising 1.15% of the sclerite weight. Analysis of proteinaceous components in the soluble fraction shows a particularly high content of aspartic acid, followed by alanine, glycine, and glutamate. Aspartic acid, glycine, alanine, and glutamate are the most abundant residues in the insoluble fraction. In both cases, the fractions show the highest concentration of aspartic acid from the total proteins. In an in vitro assay, we show that the matrix proteins extracted from the calcitic sclerites induce the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate prior to its transformation into the calcitic crystalline form. We also show scanning electron micrographs of the rhombohedral calcite crystals used as template, the protein imprinted with these crystals. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both matrices shows the protein fractions at 67 and 48 kDa. The soluble matrix shows two additional faint bands. Both fractions stain for a carbohydrate at 67 kDa, indicating a glycoprotein at this molecular weight. A newly derived protein sequence was subjected to bioinformatics analysis involving identification of similarities to other acidic proteins. The identification of these proteins in alcyonarian endoskeletal sclerites emphasizes the fundamental importance of such acidic proteins and sheds more light on the functions of these proteins in the processes of biocalcification.

  1. Hydrogel patterning by diffusion through the matrix and subsequent light-triggered chemical immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zheyi; Zhang, Yu; Kootala, Sujit; Hilborn, Jöns; Ossipov, Dmitri A

    2015-01-21

    A novel approach to hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel with a chemical gradient of the matrix-linked bisphosphonate (BP) groups is presented. The method consists of two steps, including initial generation of physical gradient patterns of BPs by diffusion of BP acrylamide reagent into HA matrix carrying thiol groups and subsequent chemical immobilization of the BP groups by UV light-triggered thiol-ene addition reaction. This gradient hydrogel permits spatial three-dimensional regulation of secondary interactions of different molecules with the polymer matrix. In particular, graded amounts of cytochrome c (cyt c) were reversibly absorbed in the hydrogel, thus enabling the subsequent spatially controlled release of the therapeutic protein. The obtained patterned hydrogel acts also as a unique reactor in which peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of a substrate is determined by spatial position of the enzyme (cyt c) in the matrix resulting in a range of product concentrations. As an example, matrix template-assisted oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetarmethylbenzydine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2 occurs simultaneously at different rates within the gradient hydrogel. Moreover, calcium binding to the gradient HABP hydrogel reflects the pattern of immobilized BP groups eventually leading to the graded biomineralization of the matrix. This approach opens new possibilities for use of hydrogels as dynamic models for biologic three-dimensional structures such as extracellular matrix.

  2. Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases in the murine zymosan-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volman, T.J.H.; Goris, R.J.A.; Lomme, R.M.L.M.; Groot, J. de; Verhofstad, A.A.J.; Hendriks, T.

    2004-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated as mediators of tissue damage in several inflammatory diseases. Since the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is thought to result from systemic inflammation, overactivation of MMPs could contribute to the organ damage observed. The

  3. Stage-structured matrix models for organisms with non-geometric development times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Birt; Richard M. Feldman; David M. Cairns; Robert N. Coulson; Maria Tchakerian; Weimin Xi; James M. Guldin

    2009-01-01

    Matrix models have been used to model population growth of organisms for many decades. They are popular because of both their conceptual simplicity and their computational efficiency. For some types of organisms they are relatively accurate in predicting population growth; however, for others the matrix approach does not adequately model...

  4. Periodically arranged colloidal gold nanoparticles for enhanced light harvesting in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsafaei, Mina; Fernandes Cauduro, André Luis; Kunstmann-Olsen, Casper

    2016-01-01

    , which makes it possible to improve the light absorption and charge extraction in the device’s active layer. Here, periodically arranged colloidal gold nanoparticles are demonstrated experimentally and theoretically to improve light absorption and thus enhance the efficiency of organic solar cells....... Surface-ordered gold nanoparticle arrangements are integrated at the bottom electrode of organic solar cells. The resulting optical interference and absorption effects are numerically investigated in bulk hetero-junction solar cells based on the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) and Transfer Matrix...... Method (TMM) and as a function of size and periodicity of the plasmonic arrangements. In addition, light absorption enhancement in the organic active layer is investigated experimentally following integration of the nanoparticle arrangements. The latter are fabricated using a lithography-free stamping...

  5. Designing matrix organizations that work: Lessons from the P&G case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Jean Degen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The matrix organization concept emerged from the US aerospace industry in the 1960s and was adopted by many companies in the early 1970s. In the late 1970s and early 1980s many companies were experiencing trouble with its operation and many argued like Peters & Waterman in their bestseller In search of excellence in 1982 (p. 306 that the matrix was too complex to work properly. Galbraith (2009, p. 10-14 explains that the reason for the problems were that the matrix in these organizations was wrongly adopted, hastily installed, and inappropriately implemented. He explains that adopting a matrix structure requires a collaborative organization form, proper power, and accountability distribution, complementing changes to the information systems, planning and budgeting process, the performance evaluation and bonus system, and so on. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate why companies adopted the matrix, what problems they had, the solutions for these problems based on Galbraith (2009 and other authors like Davis & Lawrence (1977, and the state of the art of matrix structure design today like the P&G front-back hybrid matrix organization. To illustrate the historical evolution of organization structure to the simple matrix and then to more complex matrix organizations we used the P&G case (Piskorski & Spadini 2007.

  6. Light trapping in thin film organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Tang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A major issue in organic solar cells is the poor mobility and recombination of the photogenerated charge carriers. The active layer has to be kept thin to facilitate charge transport and minimize recombination losses. However, optical losses due to inefficient light absorption in the thin active layers can be considerable in organic solar cells. Therefore, light trapping schemes are critically important for efficient organic solar cells. Traditional light trapping schemes for thick solar cells need to be modified for organic thin film solar cells in which coherent optics and wave effects play a significant role. In this review, we discuss the light trapping schemes for organic thin film solar cells, which includes geometric engineering of the structure of the solar cell at the micro and nanoscale, plasmonic structures, and more.

  7. Colour tuning in white hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckbauer, Jochen; Brasser, Catherine; Findlay, Neil J.; Edwards, Paul R.; Wallis, David J.; Skabara, Peter J.; Martin, Robert W.

    2016-10-01

    White hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated by combining a novel organic colour converter with a blue inorganic LED. An organic small molecule was specifically synthesised to act as down-converter. The characteristics of the white colour were controlled by changing the concentration of the organic molecule based on the BODIPY unit, which was embedded in a transparent matrix, and volume of the molecule and encapsulant mixture. The concentration has a critical effect on the conversion efficiency, i.e. how much of the absorbed blue light is converted into yellow light. With increasing concentration the conversion efficiency decreases. This quenching effect is due to aggregation of the organic molecule at higher concentrations. Increasing the deposited amount of the converter does not increase the yellow emission despite more blue light being absorbed. Degradation of the organic converter was also observed during a period of 15 months from LED fabrication. Angular-dependent measurements revealed slight deviation from a Lambertian profile for the blue and yellow emission peaks leading to a small change in ‘whiteness’ with emission angle. Warm white and cool white light with correlated colour temperatures of 2770 K and 7680 K, respectively, were achieved using different concentrations of the converter molecule. Although further work is needed to improve the lifetime and poor colour rendering, these hybrid LEDs show promising results as an alternative approach for generating white LEDs compared with phosphor-based white LEDs.

  8. Bipolar Host Materials for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2016-02-01

    It is important to balance holes and electrons in the emitting layer of organic light-emitting diodes to maximize recombination efficiency and the accompanying external quantum efficiency. Therefore, the host materials of the emitting layer should transport both holes and electrons for the charge balance. From this perspective, bipolar hosts have been popular as the host materials of thermally activated delayed fluorescent devices and phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes. In this review, we have summarized recent developments of bipolar hosts and suggested perspectives of host materials for organic light-emitting diodes.

  9. Selective scattering polymer dispersed liquid crystal film for light enhancement of organic light emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinghua; McGraw, Greg; Ma, Ruiqing; Brown, Julie; Yang, Deng-Ke

    2017-02-20

    We developed a novel light enhancing film for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) based on polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC). In the film, the liquid crystal droplets are unidirectionally aligned along the film normal direction and exhibit selective scattering. The film scatters light emitted only in directions with large incident angles but not light emitted in directions with small incident angles. When the light is scattered, it changes propagation direction and exits the OLED. The PDLC film reduces the total internal reflection and thus can significantly increase the light efficiency of the OLED.

  10. EDITORIAL Light-induced material organization Light-induced material organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainos, Nikos; Rode, Andrei V.

    2010-12-01

    Light-induced material organization extends over a broad area of research, from photon momentum transfer to atoms, molecules and particles, serving the basis for optical trapping, and expands into the laser-induced changes of material properties through photopolymerization, photodarkening, and materials ablation. Relevant phenomena are observed over many orders of magnitude of light intensity, from a few kW cm-2 for the optical trapping of living cells to 1014 W cm-2 encountered in femtosecond laser micromachining and micro-explosion. Relevant interactions reveal a rich palette of novel phenomena in the solid state, from subtle excitations and material organization to phase transformations, non-equilibrium and transient states. The laser-induced material modifications relate to changes in the crystal structure and the molecular bonding, phase transitions in liquid state, ablation and plasma production associated with extreme pressure and temperature conditions towards entirely new states of matter. The underlying physical mechanisms form the foundations for micro-engineering photonic and other functional devices and lead the way to relevant applications. At the same time, they hold the potential for creating non-equilibrium material states and a range of fundamentally new products not available by other means. The fundamental understanding of both materials nature and functional behaviour will ultimately yield novel devices and improved performance in several fields. The far reaching goals of these studies relate to the development of new methods and technologies for micro- and nano-fabrication, not only offering a significant reduction of cost, but also expanding the fabrication capabilities into unexplored areas of biophotonics and nanotechnology. This special issue of Journal of Optics presents some very recent and exciting advances in the field of materials manipulation by laser beams, aiming to underline its current trends. In optical trapping research we

  11. RT-MATRIX: Measuring Total Organic Carbon by Photocatalytic Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inevitably accumulate in enclosed habitats such as the International Space Station and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as a result of human metabolism, material off-gassing, and leaking equipment. Some VOCs can negatively affect the quality of the crew's life, health, and performance; and consequently, the success of the mission. Air quality must be closely monitored to ensure a safe living and working environment. Currently, there is no reliable air quality monitoring system that meets NASA's stringent requirements for power, mass, volume, or performance. The ultimate objective of the project -- the development of a Real-Time, Miniaturized, Autonomous Total Risk Indicator System (RT.MATRIX).is to provide a portable, dual-function sensing system that simultaneously determines total organic carbon (TOC) and individual contaminants in air streams.

  12. Complexity of matrix organization and problems caused by its inadequate implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janićijević Nebojša

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix organization model is a sophisticated structure intended to combine both the efficiency and effectiveness of the functional and the product/service/customer/area dimensions. From the moment it was introduced in practice, this organizational architecture was accepted with enthusiasm, because it represented a complex organizational response adequate to the conditions which most of the companies in the world have been facing since 1970s. Although matrix organization is not a novelty, it is still a controversial model of organization design. The aim of this paper is to provide a deeper insight into the causes and effects of organizational misfits which appear in the implementation phase of three-dimensional matrix organization, as well as to offer some practical recommendations for managers on how to improve their capacities for successful management of complex matrix organization architecture in their organizations.

  13. Nanoantennas for enhanced light trapping in transparent organic solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Voroshilov, Pavel M; Belov, Pavel A

    2014-01-01

    We propose a light-trapping structure offering a significant enhancement of photovoltaic absorption in transparent organic solar cells operating at infrared while the visible light transmission keeps sufficiently high. The main mechanism of light trapping is related with the excitation of collective oscillations of the metal nanoantenna arrays, characterized by advantageous field distribution in the volume of the solar cell. It allows more than triple increase of infrared photovoltaic absorption.

  14. Towards fully spray coated organic light emitting devices

    OpenAIRE

    GILISSEN, Koen; STRYCKERS, Jeroen; Manca, Jean; DEFERME, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Pi-conjugated polymer light emitting devices have the potential to be the next generation of solid state lighting. In order to achieve this goal, a low cost, efficient and large area production process is essential. Polymer based light emitting devices are generally deposited using techniques based on solution processing e.g.: spin coating, ink jet printing. These techniques are not well suited for cost-effective, high throughput, large area mass production of these organic devices. Ultrasoni...

  15. Modeling nanostructure-enhanced light trapping in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Jost

    A promising approach for improving the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells (OSCs) is by incorporating nanostructures in their thin film architecture to improve the light absorption in the device’s active polymer layers. Here, we present a modelling framework for the prediction....... Diffraction by fractal metallic supergratings. Optics Express, 15(24), 15628–15636 (2007) [3] Goszczak, A. J. et al. Nanoscale Aluminum dimples for light trapping in organic thin films (submitted)...

  16. Organic light emitting diode with surface modification layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basil, John D.; Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry; Arbab, Mehran; Marietti, Gary J.

    2017-09-12

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (12) having a first surface (14) and a second surface (16), a first electrode (32), and a second electrode (38). An emissive layer (36) is located between the first electrode (32) and the second electrode (38). The organic light emitting diode (10) further includes a surface modification layer (18). The surface modification layer (18) includes a non-planar surface (30, 52).

  17. Controlling light in scattering media noninvasively using the photo-acoustic transmission-matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Chaigne, T; Boccara, A C; Fink, M; Bossy, E; Gigan, S

    2013-01-01

    Optical wavefront-shaping has emerged as a powerful tool to manipulate light in strongly scattering media. It enables diffraction-limited focusing and imaging at depths where conventional microscopy techniques fail. However, while most wavefront-shaping works to-date exploited direct access to the target or implanted probes, the challenge is to apply it non-invasively inside complex samples. Ultrasonic-tagging techniques have been recently demonstrated but these require a sequential point-by- point acquisition, a major drawback for imaging applications. Here, we introduce a novel approach to non-invasively measure the optical transmission-matrix inside a scattering medium, exploiting the photo-acoustic effect. Our approach allows for the first time to simultaneously discriminate, localize, and selectively focus light on multiple targets inside a scattering sample, as well as to recover and exploit the scattering medium properties. Combining the powerful approach of the transmission-matrix with the advantages ...

  18. Removal of fluorescence and ultraviolet absorbance of dissolved organic matter in reclaimed water by solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Chao; Wang, Wenlong; He, Tao; Hu, Hongying; Du, Ye; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Storing reclaimed water in lakes is a widely used method of accommodating changes in the consumption of reclaimed water during wastewater reclamation and reuse. Solar light serves as an important function in degrading pollutants during storage, and its effect on dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated in this study. Solar light significantly decreased the UV254 absorbance and fluorescence (FLU) intensity of reclaimed water. However, its effect on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) value of reclaimed water was very limited. The decrease in the UV254 absorbance intensity and FLU excitation-emission matrix regional integration volume (FLU volume) of reclaimed water during solar light irradiation was fit with pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. The decrease of UV254 absorbance was much slower than that of the FLU volume. Ultraviolet light in solar light had a key role in decreasing the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity during solar light irradiation. The light fluence-based removal kinetic constants of the UV254 and FLU intensity were independent of light intensity. The peaks of the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity with an apparent molecular weight (AMW) of 100Da to 2000Da decreased after solar irradiation, whereas the DOC value of the major peaks did not significantly change.

  19. Syndecans as receptors and organizers of the extracellular matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Gopal, Sandeep; Couchman, John

    2009-01-01

    and signalling molecules, such as protein kinases. Some aspects of syndecan signalling are understood but much remains to be learned. The functions of syndecans in regulating cell adhesion and extracellular matrix assembly are described here. Evidence from null mice suggests that syndecans have roles......, the collagens and glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix are prominent. Frequently, they do so in conjunction with other receptors, most notably the integrins. For this reason, they are often referred to as "co-receptors". However, just as with integrins, syndecans can interact with actin-associated proteins...

  20. University Organization. A Matrix Analysis of the Academic Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, James L.

    Using the latest research instruments, including questionnaires, interviews, factor analysis, and matrix construction, the present restraints on professorial effectiveness and the contributions of departmental and university structures to professorial malaise is examined for the purpose of improving ways that administrators can increase faculty…

  1. White and Red Organic Light Emitting Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHOW Tahsin J.; CHIU Ching-Wen; TSAI Mu-Lin

    2004-01-01

    Derivatives of 2,3-(1,4-dialkoxyaceno)norbornadiene underwent ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) upon the catalysis of a ruthenium complex to afford the corresponding polymers. The polymeric materials containing anthracene chromophores emit white electro-luminescence, which can be fabricated into light-emitting diodes (LED). The broad emission band is composed of a blue emission from anthracene and a red emission from aggregates. A single layer device, ITO/polymer/Ca/Al, can be turned on at 7V and exhibits maximum intensity 427 cd/m2 at 15 V. A double layer device, ITO/polymer/TPBI/Mg:Ag (TPBI = (2,2′,2"-(1,3,5-benzenetriyl)-tris(1-phenyl-1H-benzimidazole)) displayed blue light with turn-on voltage 6 V and maximal intensity 930 cd/m2 at 15 V.Derivatives of bisindolylmaleimide were found to form amorphous solid films which exhibit intensive red luminescence. The property of forming glasses can be ascribed to the nonplanar geometry of these molecules. LED devices were fabricated by a layer of pure dye sandwiched between two charge transporting films. The yellow emission spectrum of the devices utilizing Alq (tris(8-hydoxyquinolinato)aluminum) contains a green component from Alq. Pure red emissions can be achieved by replacing Alq with TPBI. Typical devices can be turned on at ~3 V with maximal intensity 2000 cd/m2. White color devices are under current investigation, in which the green Alq layer is replaced by its blue derivative (bis(2-methyl-8-hydoxyquinolinato)(phenolato)aluminum).

  2. Organic light emitting diodes with structured electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S.; Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen G.

    2012-12-04

    A cathode that contain nanostructures that extend into the organic layer of an OLED has been described. The cathode can have an array of nanotubes or a layer of nanoclusters extending out from its surface. In another arrangement, the cathode is patterned and etched to form protruding nanostructures using a standard lithographic process. Various methods for fabricating these structures are provided, all of which are compatible with large-scale manufacturing. OLEDs made with these novel electrodes have greatly enhanced electron injection, have good environmental stability.

  3. Light-emission from in-situ grown organic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2011-01-01

    Organic crystalline nanofibers made from phenylene-based molecules exhibit a wide range of extraordinary optical properties such as intense, anisotropic and polarized luminescence that can be stimulated either optically or electrically, waveguiding and random lasing. For lighting and display...... of morphological characterization and demonstrate how appropriate biasing with an AC gate voltage enables electroluminescence from these in-situ grown organic nanostructures....

  4. Organic Light-Emitting Transistors: Materials, Device Configurations, and Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congcong; Chen, Penglei; Hu, Wenping

    2016-03-09

    Organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) represent an emerging class of organic optoelectronic devices, wherein the electrical switching capability of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and the light-generation capability of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are inherently incorporated in a single device. In contrast to conventional OFETs and OLEDs, the planar device geometry and the versatile multifunctional nature of OLETs not only endow them with numerous technological opportunities in the frontier fields of highly integrated organic electronics, but also render them ideal scientific scaffolds to address the fundamental physical events of organic semiconductors and devices. This review article summarizes the recent advancements on OLETs in light of materials, device configurations, operation conditions, etc. Diverse state-of-the-art protocols, including bulk heterojunction, layered heterojunction and laterally arranged heterojunction structures, as well as asymmetric source-drain electrodes, and innovative dielectric layers, which have been developed for the construction of qualified OLETs and for shedding new and deep light on the working principles of OLETs, are highlighted by addressing representative paradigms. This review intends to provide readers with a deeper understanding of the design of future OLETs.

  5. Inert matrix fuel neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and transient behavior in a light water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, W. J.; Todosow, M.; Meyer, M. K.; Pasamehmetoglu, K. O.

    2006-06-01

    Currently, commercial power reactors in the United States operate on a once-through or open cycle, with the spent nuclear fuel eventually destined for long-term storage in a geologic repository. Since the fissile and transuranic (TRU) elements in the spent nuclear fuel present a proliferation risk, limit the repository capacity, and are the major contributors to the long-term toxicity and dose from the repository, methods and systems are needed to reduce the amount of TRU that will eventually require long-term storage. An option to achieve a reduction in the amount, and modify the isotopic composition of TRU requiring geological disposal is 'burning' the TRU in commercial light water reactors (LWRs) and/or fast reactors. Fuel forms under consideration for TRU destruction in light water reactors (LWRs) include mixed-oxide (MOX), advanced mixed-oxide, and inert matrix fuels. Fertile-free inert matrix fuel (IMF) has been proposed for use in many forms and studied by several researchers. IMF offers several advantages relative to MOX, principally it provides a means for reducing the TRU in the fuel cycle by burning the fissile isotopes and transmuting the minor actinides while producing no new TRU elements from fertile isotopes. This paper will present and discuss the results of a four-bundle, neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and transient analyses of proposed inert matrix materials in comparison with the results of similar analyses for reference UOX fuel bundles. The results of this work are to be used for screening purposes to identify the general feasibility of utilizing specific inert matrix fuel compositions in existing and future light water reactors. Compositions identified as feasible using the results of these analyses still require further detailed neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and transient analysis study coupled with rigorous experimental testing and qualification.

  6. Polarized light imaging in biomedicine: emerging Mueller matrix methodologies for bulk tissue assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Sanaz; Vitkin, Alex

    2015-06-01

    Polarized light point measurements and wide-field imaging have been studied for many years in an effort to develop accurate and information-rich tissue diagnostic methods. However, the extensive depolarization of polarized light in thick biological tissues has limited the success of these investigations. Recently, advances in technology and conceptual understanding have led to a significant resurgence of research activity in the promising field of bulk tissue polarimetry. In particular, with the advent of improved measurement, analysis, and interpretation methods, including Mueller matrix decomposition, new diagnostic avenues, such as quantification of microstructural anisotropy in bulk tissues, have been enabled. Further, novel technologies have improved the speed and the accuracy of polarimetric instruments for ex vivo and in vivo diagnostics. In this paper, we review some of the recent progress in tissue polarimetry, provide illustrative application examples, and offer an outlook to the future of polarized light imaging in bulk biological tissues.

  7. Lectures on light nonlinear and quantum optics using the density matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Rand, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    This book bridges the gap between introductory quantum mechanics and the research front of modern optics and scientific fields that make use of light. While suitable as a reference for the specialist in quantum optics, it also targets non-specialists from other disciplines who need to understand light and its uses in research. It introduces a single analytic tool, the density matrix, to analyze complex optical phenomena encountered in traditional as well as cross-disciplinary research. It moves swiftly in a tight sequence from elementary to sophisticated topics in quantum optics, including optical tweezers, laser cooling, coherent population transfer, optical magnetism, electromagnetically induced transparency, squeezed light, and cavity quantum electrodynamics. A systematic approach starts with the simplest systems—stationary two-level atoms—then introduces atomic motion, adds more energy levels, and moves on to discuss first-, second-, and third-order coherence effects that are the basis for analyzing n...

  8. Predicting partitioning of volatile organic compounds from air into plant cuticular matrix by quantum chemical descriptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on theoretical linear solvation energy relationship and quantum chemical descriptors computed by AM1 Hamiltonian, a new model is developed to predict the partitioning of some volatile organic compounds between the plant cuticular matrix and air.

  9. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  10. Light Regimes Shape Utilization of Extracellular Organic C and N in a Cyanobacterial Biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, Rhona K.; Mayali, Xavier; Boaro, Amy A.; Zemla, Adam; Everroad, R. Craig; Nilson, Daniel; Weber, Peter K.; Lipton, Mary; Bebout, Brad M.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P.

    2016-06-28

    the use of EOM.

    IMPORTANCECyanobacteria are globally distributed primary producers, and the fate of their fixed C influences microbial biogeochemical cycling. This fate is complicated by cyanobacterial degradation and assimilation of organic matter, but because cyanobacteria are assumed to be poor competitors for organic matter consumption, regulation of this process is not well tested. In mats and biofilms, this is especially relevant because cyanobacteria produce an extensive organic extracellular matrix, providing the community with a rich source of nutrients. Light is a well-known regulator of cyanobacterial metabolism, so we characterized the effects of light availability on the incorporation of organic matter. Using stable isotope tracing at the single-cell level, we quantified photoautotroph assimilation under different metabolic conditions and integrated the results with proteomics to elucidate metabolic status. We found that cyanobacteria effectively compete for organic matter in the light and the dark and that nutrient requirements and community interactions contribute to cycling of extracellular organic matter.

  11. Light Regimes Shape Utilization of Extracellular Organic C and N in a Cyanobacterial Biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, Rhona K.; Mayali, Xavier; Boaro, Amy A.; Zemla, Adam; Everroad, R. Craig; Nilson, Daniel; Weber, Peter K.; Lipton, Mary; Bebout, Brad M.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P.

    2016-06-28

    >IMPORTANCECyanobacteria are globally distributed primary producers, and the fate of their fixed C influences microbial biogeochemical cycling. This fate is complicated by cyanobacterial degradation and assimilation of organic matter, but because cyanobacteria are assumed to be poor competitors for organic matter consumption, regulation of this process is not well tested. In mats and biofilms, this is especially relevant because cyanobacteria produce an extensive organic extracellular matrix, providing the community with a rich source of nutrients. Light is a well-known regulator of cyanobacterial metabolism, so we characterized the effects of light availability on the incorporation of organic matter. Using stable isotope tracing at the single-cell level, we quantified photoautotroph assimilation under different metabolic conditions and integrated the results with proteomics to elucidate metabolic status. We found that cyanobacteria effectively compete for organic matter in the light and the dark and that nutrient requirements and community interactions contribute to cycling of extracellular organic matter.

  12. Organic Thin Film Devices for Displays and Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Oliver J.; Krause, Ralf; Paetzold, Ralph

    Organic materials can be used for fabrication of, e.g., electronic circuits, solar cells, light sensors, memory cells and light emitting diodes. Especially organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are increasingly attractive because of their huge market potential. The feasibility of efficient OLEDs was first shown in 1987 [3]. Only about ten years later the first product, a display for car radios, entered the market. Today monochrome and full colour OLED-displays can be found in many applications replacing established flat panel display technologies like TFT-LCDs. This substitution is a consequence of the outstanding attributes of OLED technology: Organic light emitting displays are self-emissive, thin, video capable and in addition they show a wide temperature operation range and allow a viewing angle of nearly 180 degree in conjunction with a low power consumption. As performance has steadily increased over the last years, today OLEDs are also under investigation as next generation light source. In contrast to inorganic LEDs, they can be built as flat 2-dimensional light sources that are lightweight, colour tunable, and potentially cheap. This will open up new degrees of freedom in design leading also to completely new applications. In this contribution we will have a brief view on the history of organic electroluminescent materials before we introduce the basic principles of OLEDs with a focus on the physical processes leading to light generation in thin organic films. Along with an overview of different concepts and technologies used to build OLEDs, the current status of OLED development will be illustrated. The last part focuses on the challenges that have to be overcome to enable a sustainable success in the display and lighting markets.

  13. Light scattering by optically anisotropic scatterers: T-matrix theory for radial and uniform anisotropies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, A D; Reshetnyak, V Yu; Sluckin, T J

    2002-05-01

    We extend the T-matrix approach to light scattering by spherical particles to some simple cases in which the scatterers are optically anisotropic. Specifically, we consider cases in which the spherical particles include radially and uniformly anisotropic layers. We find that in both cases the T-matrix theory can be formulated using a modified T-matrix ansatz with suitably defined modes. In a uniformly anisotropic medium we derive these modes by relating the wave packet representation and expansions of electromagnetic field over spherical harmonics. The resulting wave functions are deformed spherical harmonics that represent solutions of the Maxwell equations. We present preliminary results of numerical calculations of the scattering by spherical droplets. We concentrate on cases in which the scattering is due only to the local optical anisotropy within the scatterer. For radial anisotropy we find that nonmonotonic dependence of the scattering cross section on the degree of anisotropy can occur in a regime to which both the Rayleigh and semiclassical theories are inapplicable. For uniform anisotropy the cross section is strongly dependent on the angle between the incident light and the optical axis, and for larger droplets this dependence is nonmonotonic.

  14. Manipulation of spontaneous emission dynamics of organic dyes in the porous silicon matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhal, Abhinandan; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The control of the spontaneous emission (SE) rate of dye molecules (4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-p-dimethylaminostyryl-4H-pyran (DCM) and Coumarin 523 (C523)) embedded in the Porous Silicon (PS) matrix has been studied using picosecond resolved fluorescence decay and polarization studies. We have shown that the SE rates of the two organic dyes embedded in the PS matrix depend on the relative positions of the emission maxima of the dyes with respect to electronic band gap energy of the PS matrix. We have also explored that the electronic band gap of the host PS matrix can easily be tuned by partial oxidation of the PS and the nature of SE of the embedded dyes can be tuned accordingly. The demonstrated retardation or enhancement of the spontaneous photon emission may enable the application of fluorescent organic molecules in PS matrix in several quantum optical devices including the realization of single photon sources.

  15. Light extraction enhancement of organic light-emitting diodes using aluminum zinc oxide embedded anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Ming; Lin, Bo-Ting; Zeng, Yin-Xing; Lin, Wei-Ming; Wu, Wen-Tuan

    2014-12-15

    Aluminum zinc oxide (AZO) has been embedded onto indium tin oxide (ITO) anode to enhance the light extraction from an organic light-emitting diode (OLED). The embedded AZO provides deflection and scattering interfaces on the newly generated AZO/organics and AZO/ITO interfaces rather than the conventional ITO/organic interface. The current efficiency of AZO embedded OLEDs was enhanced by up to 64%, attributed to the improved light extraction by additionally created reflection and scattering of emitted light on the AZO/ITO interfaces which was roughed in AZO embedding process. The current efficiency was found to increase with the increasing AZO embedded area ratio, but limited by the accompanying increases in haze and electrical resistance of the AZO embedded ITO film.

  16. Optical Properties and Aging of Light Absorbing Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Lin, P.; Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Kathmann, S. M.; Wise, M.; Caylor, R.; Imholt, F.; Selimovic, V.; Shilling, J.

    2016-12-01

    The light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA), commonly referred to as "brown carbon (BrC)", has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its potential to affect atmospheric radiation balance, especially in the ultraviolet region and thus impact photochemical processes. A growing amount of data has indicated that BrC is prevalent in the atmosphere, which has motivated numerous laboratory and field studies; however, our understanding of the relationship between the chemical composition and optical properties of BrC remains limited. We conducted chamber experiments to investigate the effect of various VOC precursors, NOx concentrations, photolysis time and relative humidity (RH) on the light absorption of selected secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Light absorption of chamber generated SOA samples, especially aromatic SOA, was found to increase with NOx concentration, at moderate RH, and for the shortest photolysis aging times. The highest mass absorption coefficients (MAC) value is observed from toluene SOA products formed under high NOx conditions at moderate RH, in which nitro-aromatics were previously identified as the major light absorbing compounds. BrC light absorption is observed to decrease with photolysis time, correlated with a decline of the organonitrate fraction of SOA. SOA formed from mixtures of aromatics and isoprene absorb less visible and UV light than SOA formed from aromatic precursors alone on a mass basis. The inherent changes in chemical compositions and the relationship with the light absorption will be discussed in detail.

  17. Magic frequencies in atom-light interaction for precision probing of the density matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Givon, Menachem; Waxman, Amir; David, Tal; Groswasser, David; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2013-01-01

    We analyze theoretically and experimentally the existence of a {\\it magic frequency} for which the absorption of a linearly polarized light beam by vapor alkali atoms is independent of the population distribution among the Zeeman sub-levels and the angle between the beam and a magnetic field. The phenomenon originates from a peculiar cancelation of the contributions of higher moments of the atomic density matrix, and is described using the Wigner-Eckart theorem and inherent properties of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. One important application is the robust measurement of the hyperfine population.

  18. In-depth, high-accuracy proteomics of sea urchin tooth organic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Matthias

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The organic matrix contained in biominerals plays an important role in regulating mineralization and in determining biomineral properties. However, most components of biomineral matrices remain unknown at present. In sea urchin tooth, which is an important model for developmental biology and biomineralization, only few matrix components have been identified. The recent publication of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome sequence rendered possible not only the identification of genes potentially coding for matrix proteins, but also the direct identification of proteins contained in matrices of skeletal elements by in-depth, high-accuracy proteomic analysis. Results We identified 138 proteins in the matrix of tooth powder. Only 56 of these proteins were previously identified in the matrices of test (shell and spine. Among the novel components was an interesting group of five proteins containing alanine- and proline-rich neutral or basic motifs separated by acidic glycine-rich motifs. In addition, four of the five proteins contained either one or two predicted Kazal protease inhibitor domains. The major components of tooth matrix were however largely identical to the set of spicule matrix proteins and MSP130-related proteins identified in test (shell and spine matrix. Comparison of the matrices of crushed teeth to intact teeth revealed a marked dilution of known intracrystalline matrix proteins and a concomitant increase in some intracellular proteins. Conclusion This report presents the most comprehensive list of sea urchin tooth matrix proteins available at present. The complex mixture of proteins identified may reflect many different aspects of the mineralization process. A comparison between intact tooth matrix, presumably containing odontoblast remnants, and crushed tooth matrix served to differentiate between matrix components and possible contributions of cellular remnants. Because LC-MS/MS-based methods directly

  19. Concave-hemisphere-patterned organic top-light emitting device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Slootsky, Michael; Lunt, Richard

    2015-06-09

    A first device is provided. The first device includes an organic light emitting device, which further comprises a first electrode, a second electrode, and an organic emissive layer disposed between the first and second electrode. Preferably, the second electrode is more transparent than the first electrode. The organic emissive layer has a first portion shaped to form an indentation in the direction of the first electrode, and a second portion shaped to form a protrusion in the direction of the second electrode. The first device may include a plurality of organic light emitting devices. The indentation may have a shape that is formed from a partial sphere, a partial cylinder, a pyramid, or a pyramid with a mesa, among others. The protrusions may be formed between adjoining indentations or between an indentation and a surface parallel to the substrate.

  20. Giant enhancement of light emission from Au nanocrystals into a porous matrix integrated with silicon platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Alexandre; de Aguiar, Marina Rodrigues; Kubota, Lauro T

    2009-04-01

    Integration of metal nanoparticle-dielectric films with silicon technology is emerging as a promising candidate for sub-wavelength optoelectronics and correlated devices. A giant enhancement of the luminescence intensity of gold nanocrystals directly prepared on a nanoporous template of anodized aluminium oxide is evaluated herewith, for the first time in literature, as a favourable substrate for integrating silicon-based optoelectronics. The size and lateral separation between adjacent particles are controlled by the geometry of the dielectric matrix and on-chip-integration is achieved during the nanoparticle growth, requiring no further steps. A more pronounced photoresponse is observed with embedded nanocrystals as small as 12 nm and the high emission is attributed to the light confinement associated to the increase of the local field effect on the surface plasmon hybridization waves. The demonstrated ability to control the assemble of the nanocrystals and the intense light emission indicate that the embedded gold nanostructures have a high potential for plasmonic device applications.

  1. New Optoelectronic Technology Simplified for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED)

    OpenAIRE

    Andre F. S. Guedes; Vilmar P. Guedes; Simone Tartari; Mônica L. Souza; Idaulo J. Cunha

    2014-01-01

    The development of Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED), using an optically transparent substrate material and organic semiconductor materials, has been widely utilized by the electronic industry when producing new technological products. The OLED are the base Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), PEDOT, and Polyaniline, PANI, were deposited in Indium Tin Oxide, ITO, and characterized by UV-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Optical Parameters (OP) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). In addition,...

  2. Optical Characteristics of Porous Glasses Matrix and Its Light-conducted Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Li-ping; CHEN Yong-xi; LI Ying-xia; LEI Jia-heng; LIU Wei; XIONG Hong-chao

    2004-01-01

    The optical properties of matrix of porous glasses and phase-separated glasses were investigated by visible spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The experimental results show that, both the porous glasses and phase-separated glasses have very good light transmission in visible light region that wavelenth is longer than 560nm. The micropores of porous glasses and the boron-rich phase of phase-separated glasses have strong Rayleigh scatter effects on the visible light, the largest scatter occurrs at 360-370nm; the thicker the glasses, the larger the light scattering. Thus, the pore size distribution and the size of heterogeneous micro zone in boron-rich phase of phase-separated glasses can be measured. After coupled into porours glasses, the most intense absorption of hydrated ions of [Co(H2O)6]2+ shifts from 508nm to 515nm. The production of the most intense absorption and the red shift were owed to Jahn-Teller effect of octahedral field formed by six H2O molecular and perturbation effect resulted by microporous of porous glasses for its physics-chemical circumstance. As a result, the porous glasses are perfect optical function materials in visible region, which can be assembled by chemical method.

  3. Toward inkjet printing of small molecule organic light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, H.; Coenen, M.J.J.; Slaats, M.W.L.; Ren, M.; Lu, W.; Kuijpers, C.J.; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal evaporation is the current standard for the manufacture of small molecule organic light emitting diodes (smOLEDs), but it requires vacuum process, complicated shadow masks and is inefficient in material utilization, resulting in high cost of ownership. As an alternative, wet solution deposit

  4. Organic Materials Degradation in Solid State Lighting Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdan Mehr, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis the degradation and failure mechanisms of organic materials in the optical part of LED-based products are studied. The main causes of discoloration of substrate/lens in remote phosphor of LED-based products are also comprehensively investigated. Solid State Lighting (SSL) technology i

  5. Organic light emitting diodes with spin polarized electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arisi, E.; Bergenti, I.; Dediu, V.; Loi, M.A.; Muccini, M.; Murgia, M.; Ruani, G.; Taliani, C.; Zamboni, R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrical and optical properties of Alq3 based organic light emitting diodes with normal and spin polarized electrodes are presented. Epitaxial semitransparent highly spin polarized La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 were used as hole injector, substituting the traditional indium tin oxide electrode. A comparison of e

  6. Toward inkjet printing of small molecule organic light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, H.; Coenen, M.J.J.; Slaats, M.W.L.; Ren, M.; Lu, W.; Kuijpers, C.J.; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal evaporation is the current standard for the manufacture of small molecule organic light emitting diodes (smOLEDs), but it requires vacuum process, complicated shadow masks and is inefficient in material utilization, resulting in high cost of ownership. As an alternative, wet solution deposit

  7. Organic Materials Degradation in Solid State Lighting Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdan Mehr, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis the degradation and failure mechanisms of organic materials in the optical part of LED-based products are studied. The main causes of discoloration of substrate/lens in remote phosphor of LED-based products are also comprehensively investigated. Solid State Lighting (SSL) technology

  8. The skeletal organic matrix from Mediterranean coral Balanophyllia europaea influences calcium carbonate precipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Goffredo

    Full Text Available Scleractinian coral skeletons are made mainly of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite. The mineral deposition occurs in a biological confined environment, but it is still a theme of discussion to what extent the calcification occurs under biological or environmental control. Hence, the shape, size and organization of skeletal crystals from the cellular level through the colony architecture, were attributed to factors as diverse as mineral supersaturation levels and organic mediation of crystal growth. The skeleton contains an intra-skeletal organic matrix (OM of which only the water soluble component was chemically and physically characterized. In this work that OM from the skeleton of the Balanophyllia europaea, a solitary scleractinian coral endemic to the Mediterranean Sea, is studied in vitro with the aim of understanding its role in the mineralization of calcium carbonate. Mineralization of calcium carbonate was conducted by overgrowth experiments on coral skeleton and in calcium chloride solutions containing different ratios of water soluble and/or insoluble OM and of magnesium ions. The precipitates were characterized by diffractometric, spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The results showed that both soluble and insoluble OM components influence calcium carbonate precipitation and that the effect is enhanced by their co-presence. The role of magnesium ions is also affected by the presence of the OM components. Thus, in vitro, OM influences calcium carbonate crystal morphology, aggregation and polymorphism as a function of its composition and of the content of magnesium ions in the precipitation media. This research, although does not resolve the controversy between environmental or biological control on the deposition of calcium carbonate in corals, sheds a light on the role of OM, which appears mediated by the presence of magnesium ions.

  9. Light Trapping: Light Manipulation in Organic Photovoltaics (Adv. Sci. 7/2016)

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Qing‐Dong; Li, Yan‐Qing; Tang, Jian‐Xin

    2016-01-01

    Light manipulation is becoming a general strategy for further enhancing the performance of organic photovoltaic cells. In article 1600123, various light trapping schemes are reviewed from the viewpoint of plasmonic and photonic resonances, addressing the external antireflection coatings, substrate geometry‐induced trapping, the role of electrode design in optical enhancement, as well as optically modifying charge extraction and photoactive layers by Jian‐Xin Tang and co‐workers.

  10. Inkjet printing the three organic functional layers of two-colored organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coenen, Michiel J.J., E-mail: Michiel.Coenen@tmc.nl [Holst Centre, PO BOX 8550, 5605 KN Eindhoven (Netherlands); Slaats, Thijs M.W.L.; Eggenhuisen, Tamara M. [Holst Centre, PO BOX 8550, 5605 KN Eindhoven (Netherlands); Groen, Pim [Holst Centre, PO BOX 8550, 5605 KN Eindhoven (Netherlands); Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-05-29

    Inkjet printing allows for the roll-2-roll fabrication of organic electronic devices at an industrial scale. In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication of two-colored organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) in which three adjacent organic device layers were inkjet printed from halogen free inks. The resulting devices demonstrate the possibilities offered by this technique for the fabrication of OLEDs for signage and personalized electronics. - Highlights: • Two-colored organic light emitting diodes with 3 inkjet printed device layers were fabricated. • All materials were printed from halogen free inks. • Inkjet printing of emissive materials is suitable for signage applications.

  11. Recent Progress toward white organic light emitting diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Yu-Tai

    2004-01-01

    An efficient and stable white organic light emitting diode (WOLED) is highly desirable in potential applications such as lighting, background light source, and full color display.A series of highly fluorescent dyes based on a dipyrazolopyridine skeleton,1,7-diphenyl-l,7-dihydrodipyrazolo[3,4-b,4′,3′-e]pyridine, were synthesized and evaluated as emitting as well as charge-transporting material in the fabrication of electroluminescent devices.Several of the blue derivatives are found to be useful as the source of blue emission in fabricating bright white-emitting devices. The choice of dopants, cathode materials, electron-transporting materials as well as the device configurations greatly affect the emission profile, efficiencies, as well as the device lifetime. The latest progress in achieving a more efficient, color stable, durable white light device will be discussed.

  12. The nuclear matrix and the regulation of chromatin organization and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie, J R

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear DNA is organized into loop domains, with the base of the loop being bound to the nuclear matrix. Loops with transcriptionally active and/or potentially active genes have a DNase I-sensitive chromatin structure, while repressed chromatin loops have a condensed configuration that is essentially invisible to the transcription machinery. Core histone acetylation and torsional stress appear to be responsible for the generation and/or maintenance of the open potentially active chromatin loops. The transcriptionally active region of the loop makes several dynamic attachments with the nuclear matrix and is associated with core histones that are dynamically acetylated. Histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase, which catalyze this rapid acetylation and deacetylation, are bound to the nuclear matrix. Several transcription factors are components of the nuclear matrix. Histone acetyltransferase, deacetylase, and transcription factors may contribute to the dynamic attachment of the active chromatin domains with the nuclear matrix at sites of ongoing transcription.

  13. Study on Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Devices Containing Negative Refractive Index Dielectric Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Hong-xin; LI Li-xin

    2009-01-01

    A new structure containing negative refractive index dielectric layer(NRIDL) is introduced into microcavity.The properties of the new microcavity organic light-emitting devices(MOLEDs) are investigated.In the experiment,the transfer matrix method is adopted.The dependence of reflectance and transmittance on the refractive index and thickness of NRIDL are analyzed in detail.Compared with the electroluminescence spectra of non-NRIDL diodes,the line widths of the spectra of the MOLEDs are narrower and all the peaks enhance.The results show that the new structure is beneficial to improve the performance and reduce the thickness of microcavity devices.

  14. Light trapping in a 30-nm organic photovoltaic cell for efficient carrier collection and light absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Banerjee, Ashish; Osgood, Richard M; Englund, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We describe surface patterning strategies that permit high photon-collection efficiency together with high carrier-collection efficiency in an ultra-thin planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cell. Optimized designs reach up to 50% photon collection efficiency in a P3HT layer of only 30 nm, representing a 3- to 5-fold improvement over an unpatterned cell of the same thickness. We compare the enhancement of light confinement in the active layer with an ITO top layer for TE and TM polarized light, and demonstrate that the light absorption can increase by a factor of 2 due to a gap-plasmon mode in the active layer.

  15. Light absorption by organic carbon from wood combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosols affect the radiative balance of the Earth by absorbing and scattering light. While BC is highly absorbing, some organic compounds also have significant absorption, which is greater at near-ultraviolet and blue wavelengths. To the extent that OC absorbs visible light, it may be a non-negligible contributor to direct aerosol radiative forcing.

    In this work, we examine absorption by primary OC emitted from solid fuel pyrolysis. We provide absorption spectra of this material, which can be related to the imaginary refractive index. This material has polar character but is not fully water-soluble: more than 92% was extractable by methanol or acetone, compared with 73% for water and 52% for hexane. Water-soluble organic carbon contributed to light absorption at both ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. However, a larger portion came from organic carbon that is extractable only by methanol. The spectra of water-soluble organic carbon are similar to others in the literature. We compared spectra for material generated with different wood type, wood size and pyrolysis temperature. Higher wood temperature is the main factor creating organic aerosol with higher absorption, causing about a factor of four increase in mass-normalized absorption at visible wavelengths. A simple model suggests that, despite the absorption, both high-temperature and low-temperature carbon have negative climate forcing over a surface with average albedo.

  16. Light-induced vibration in the hearing organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl; Fridberger, Anders

    2014-08-04

    The exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing organs is attributed to an active process, where force produced by sensory cells boost sound-induced vibrations, making soft sounds audible. This process is thought to be local, with each section of the hearing organ capable of amplifying sound-evoked movement, and nearly instantaneous, since amplification can work for sounds at frequencies up to 100 kHz in some species. To test these fundamental precepts, we developed a method for focally stimulating the living hearing organ with light. Light pulses caused intense and highly damped mechanical responses followed by traveling waves that developed with considerable delay. The delayed response was identical to movements evoked by click-like sounds. This shows that the active process is neither local nor instantaneous, but requires mechanical waves traveling from the cochlear base toward its apex. A physiologically-based mathematical model shows that such waves engage the active process, enhancing hearing sensitivity.

  17. Multicolored Nanofiber Based Organic Light-Emitting Transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    With Jensen, Per Baunegaard; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Tavares, Luciana

    For optoelectronic applications, organic semiconductors have several advantages over their inorganic counterparts such as facile synthesis, tunability via synthetic chemistry, and low temperature processing. Self-assembled, molecular crystalline nanofibers are of particular interest as they could...... form ultra-small light-emitters in future nanophotonic applications. Such organic nanofibers exhibit many interesting optical properties including polarized photo- and electroluminescence, waveguiding, and emission color tunability. We here present a first step towards a multicolored, electrically...... driven device by combining nanofibers made from two different molecules, parahexaphenylene (p6P) and 5,5´-Di-4-biphenyl-2,2´-bithiophene (PPTTPP), which emits blue and green light, respectively. The organic nanofibers are implemented on a bottom gate/bottom contact field-effect transistor platform using...

  18. Multicolored Nanofiber Based Organic Light-Emitting Transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    With Jensen, Per Baunegaard; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Tavares, Luciana

    For optoelectronic applications, organic semiconductors have several advantages over their inorganic counterparts such as facile synthesis, tunability via synthetic chemistry, and low temperature processing. Self-assembled, molecular crystalline nanofibers are of particular interest as they could...... form ultra-small light-emitters in future nanophotonic applications. Such organic nanofibers exhibit many interesting optical properties including polarized photo- and electroluminescence, waveguiding, and emission color tunability. We here present a first step towards a multicolored, electrically...... driven device by combining nanofibers made from two different molecules, parahexaphenylene (p6P) and 5,5´-Di-4-biphenyl-2,2´-bithiophene (PPTTPP), which emits blue and green light, respectively. The organic nanofibers are implemented on a bottom gate/bottom contact field-effect transistor platform using...

  19. Phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with high efficiency and brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-11-12

    An organic light emitting device including a) an anode; b) a cathode; and c) an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode, the emissive layer comprising an organic host compound and a phosphorescent compound exhibiting a Stokes Shift overlap greater than 0.3 eV. The organic light emitting device may further include a hole transport layer disposed between the emissive layer and the anode; and an electron transport layer disposed between the emissive layer and the cathode. In some embodiments, the phosphorescent compound exhibits a phosphorescent lifetime of less than 10 .mu.s. In some embodiments, the concentration of the phosphorescent compound ranges from 0.5 wt. % to 10 wt. %.

  20. A proteinaceous organic matrix regulates carbonate mineral production in the marine teleost intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Kevin L.; LeMoine, Christophe M. R.; Pelin, Adrian; Corradi, Nicolas; Warren, Wesley C.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Marine teleost fish produce CaCO3 in their intestine as part of their osmoregulatory strategy. This precipitation is critical for rehydration and survival of the largest vertebrate group on earth, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate this reaction are unknown. Here, we isolate and characterize an organic matrix associated with the intestinal precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta). Toadfish precipitates were purified using two different methods, and the associated organic matrix was extracted. Greater than 150 proteins were identified in the isolated matrix by mass spectrometry and subsequent database searching using an O. beta transcriptomic sequence library produced here. Many of the identified proteins were enriched in the matrix compared to the intestinal fluid, and three showed no substantial homology to any previously characterized protein in the NCBI database. To test the functionality of the isolated matrix, a micro-modified in vitro calcification assay was designed, which revealed that low concentrations of isolated matrix substantially promoted CaCO3 production, where high concentrations showed an inhibitory effect. High concentrations of matrix also decreased the incorporation of magnesium into the forming mineral, potentially providing an explanation for the variability in magnesium content observed in precipitates produced by different fish species. PMID:27694946

  1. A proteinaceous organic matrix regulates carbonate mineral production in the marine teleost intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Kevin L.; Lemoine, Christophe M. R.; Pelin, Adrian; Corradi, Nicolas; Warren, Wesley C.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Marine teleost fish produce CaCO3 in their intestine as part of their osmoregulatory strategy. This precipitation is critical for rehydration and survival of the largest vertebrate group on earth, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate this reaction are unknown. Here, we isolate and characterize an organic matrix associated with the intestinal precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta). Toadfish precipitates were purified using two different methods, and the associated organic matrix was extracted. Greater than 150 proteins were identified in the isolated matrix by mass spectrometry and subsequent database searching using an O. beta transcriptomic sequence library produced here. Many of the identified proteins were enriched in the matrix compared to the intestinal fluid, and three showed no substantial homology to any previously characterized protein in the NCBI database. To test the functionality of the isolated matrix, a micro-modified in vitro calcification assay was designed, which revealed that low concentrations of isolated matrix substantially promoted CaCO3 production, where high concentrations showed an inhibitory effect. High concentrations of matrix also decreased the incorporation of magnesium into the forming mineral, potentially providing an explanation for the variability in magnesium content observed in precipitates produced by different fish species.

  2. Green laser light irradiation enhances differentiation and matrix mineralization of osteogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merigo, Elisabetta; Bouvet-Gerbettaz, Sebastien; Boukhechba, Florian; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Fornaini, Carlo; Rochet, Nathalie

    2016-02-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) in both infrared and visible light is a therapeutic tool ever more proposed in clinical practice in different fields. The effect of near infrared LLLT has been described in a growing number of scientific publications related to bone tissue healing, both in vitro and in vivo. More recently, green visible light using potassium-titanyl-phosphate KTiOPO4 (KTP, 532 nm) laser has been proposed in dermatology, urology, oral and maxillofacial surgery but has never been tested on bone tissue. The aim of the present work was to perform a preliminary in vitro study to analyze the effects of KTP laser, on the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Using a power meter the first step of this study aimed to evaluate the real power emitted by the KTP laser device and the amount of energy absorbed by culture medium and plastic in order to calculate the appropriate irradiation parameters for cultured cells. Primary bone marrow stromal cells prepared from C57BL/6 mice were cultured and induced to differentiate in the osteogenic lineage in the presence or in the absence of KTP LLLT at a fluence of 4 J/cm(2) three times a week. Specific staining of the cells and the extracellular matrix, microscopic analysis as well as quantitative RT-PCR were used to assess cell proliferation and differentiation. We show here that KTP LLLT enhances the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells and the mineralization of their extracellular matrix. Our results highlight that this LLLT experimental protocol with green light (KTP, 532 nm) at 4 J/cm(2) has a positive effect on the osteogenic differentiation of murine bone marrow stromal cells. These preliminary results could be used as a basis to further investigate the effect of this KTP laser protocol on bone tissue engineering models in vivo and in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Iterative linearized density matrix propagation for modeling coherent excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, P; Coker, D F

    2010-11-14

    Rather than incoherent hopping between chromophores, experimental evidence suggests that the excitation energy transfer in some biological light harvesting systems initially occurs coherently, and involves coherent superposition states in which excitation spreads over multiple chromophores separated by several nanometers. Treating such delocalized coherent superposition states in the presence of decoherence and dissipation arising from coupling to an environment is a significant challenge for conventional theoretical tools that either use a perturbative approach or make the Markovian approximation. In this paper, we extend the recently developed iterative linearized density matrix (ILDM) propagation scheme [E. R. Dunkel et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 114106 (2008)] to study coherent excitation energy transfer in a model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light harvesting complex from green sulfur bacteria. This approach is nonperturbative and uses a discrete path integral description employing a short time approximation to the density matrix propagator that accounts for interference between forward and backward paths of the quantum excitonic system while linearizing the phase in the difference between the forward and backward paths of the environmental degrees of freedom resulting in a classical-like treatment of these variables. The approach avoids making the Markovian approximation and we demonstrate that it successfully describes the coherent beating of the site populations on different chromophores and gives good agreement with other methods that have been developed recently for going beyond the usual approximations, thus providing a new reliable theoretical tool to study coherent exciton transfer in light harvesting systems. We conclude with a discussion of decoherence in independent bilinearly coupled harmonic chromophore baths. The ILDM propagation approach in principle can be applied to more general descriptions of the environment.

  4. Nano-photonic light trapping near the Lambertian limit in organic solar cell architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rana; Timmons, Erik

    2013-09-09

    A critical step to achieving higher efficiency solar cells is the broad band harvesting of solar photons. Although considerable progress has recently been achieved in improving the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells, these cells still do not absorb upto ~50% of the solar spectrum. We have designed and developed an organic solar cell architecture that can boost the absorption of photons by 40% and the photo-current by 50% for organic P3HT-PCBM absorber layers of typical device thicknesses. Our solar cell architecture is based on all layers of the solar cell being patterned in a conformal two-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal architecture. This results in very strong diffraction of photons- that increases the photon path length in the absorber layer, and plasmonic light concentration near the patterned organic-metal cathode interface. The absorption approaches the Lambertian limit. The simulations utilize a rigorous scattering matrix approach and provide bounds of the fundamental limits of nano-photonic light absorption in periodically textured organic solar cells. This solar cell architecture has the potential to increase the power conversion efficiency to 10% for single band gap organic solar cells utilizing long-wavelength absorbers.

  5. Accurate optical simulation of nano-particle based internal scattering layers for light outcoupling from organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egel, Amos; Gomard, Guillaume; Kettlitz, Siegfried W.; Lemmer, Uli

    2017-02-01

    We present a numerical strategy for the accurate simulation of light extraction from organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) comprising an internal nano-particle based scattering layer. On the one hand, the light emission and propagation through the OLED thin film system (including the scattering layer) is treated by means of rigorous wave optics calculations using the T-matrix formalism. On the other hand, the propagation through the substrate is modeled in a ray optics approach. The results from the wave optics calculations enter in terms of the initial substrate radiation pattern and the bidirectional reflectivity distribution of the OLED stack with scattering layer. In order to correct for the truncation error due to a finite number of particles in the simulations, we extrapolate the results to infinitely extended scattering layers. As an application example, we estimate the optimal particle filling fraction for an internal scattering layer in a realistic OLED geometry. The presented treatment is designed to emerge from electromagnetic theory with as few additional assumptions as possible. It could thus serve as a baseline to validate faster but approximate simulation approaches.

  6. Efficient light-emitting diodes based on nanocrystalline perovskite in a dielectric polymer matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangru; Tan, Zhi-Kuang; Di, Dawei; Lai, May Ling; Jiang, Lang; Lim, Jonathan Hua-Wei; Friend, Richard H; Greenham, Neil C

    2015-04-08

    Electroluminescence in light-emitting devices relies on the encounter and radiative recombination of electrons and holes in the emissive layer. In organometal halide perovskite light-emitting diodes, poor film formation creates electrical shunting paths, where injected charge carriers bypass the perovskite emitter, leading to a loss in electroluminescence yield. Here, we report a solution-processing method to block electrical shunts and thereby enhance electroluminescence quantum efficiency in perovskite devices. In this method, a blend of perovskite and a polyimide precursor dielectric (PIP) is solution-deposited to form perovskite nanocrystals in a thin-film matrix of PIP. The PIP forms a pinhole-free charge-blocking layer, while still allowing the embedded perovskite crystals to form electrical contact with the electron- and hole-injection layers. This modified structure reduces nonradiative current losses and improves quantum efficiency by 2 orders of magnitude, giving an external quantum efficiency of 1.2%. This simple technique provides an alternative route to circumvent film formation problems in perovskite optoelectronics and offers the possibility of flexible and high-performance light-emitting displays.

  7. Light absorption of organic aerosol from pyrolysis of corn stalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghua; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C.

    2016-11-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) can absorb solar radiation in the low-visible and ultra-violet wavelengths thereby modifying radiative forcing. Agricultural waste burning emits a large quantity of organic carbon in many developing countries. In this work, we improved the extraction and analysis method developed by Chen and Bond, and extended the spectral range of OC absorption. We examined light absorbing properties of primary OA from pyrolysis of corn stalk, which is a major type of agricultural wastes. Light absorption of bulk liquid extracts of OA was measured using a UV-vis recording spectrophotometer. OA can be extracted by methanol at 95%, close to full extent, and shows polar character. Light absorption of organic aerosol has strong spectral dependence (Absorption Ångström exponent = 7.7) and is not negligible at ultra-violet and low-visible regions. Higher pyrolysis temperature produced OA with higher absorption. Imaginary refractive index of organic aerosol (kOA) is 0.041 at 400 nm wavelength and 0.005 at 550 nm wavelength, respectively.

  8. Printable candlelight-style organic light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, J. H.; Singh, M.; Song, W. C.; Liu, S. H.

    2017-06-01

    Candles or oil lamps are currently the most friendly lighting source to human eyes, physiology, ecosystems, artifacts, environment, and night skies due to their blue light-less emission. Candle light also exhibits high light-quality that provides visual comfort. However, they are relatively low in power efficacy (0.3 lm/W), making them energy-wasting, besides having problems like scorching hot, burning, catching fire, flickering, carbon blacking, oxygen consuming, and release of green house gas etc. In contrast, candlelight organic light-emitting diode (OLED) can be made blue-hazard free and energy-efficient. The remaining challenges are to maximize its light-quality and enable printing feasibility, the latter of which would pave a way to cost-effective manufacturing. We hence demonstrate herein the design and fabrication of a candlelight OLED via wet-process. From retina protection perspective, its emission is 13, 12 and 8 times better than those of the blue-enriched white CFL, LED and OLED. If used at night, it is 9, 6 and 4 times better from melatonin generation perspective.

  9. Synthesis and design of organic light-emitting devices containing lanthanide-cored complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Gregory D.; Carlson, Brenden; Lawson, Rhys; Rowe, Daniel; Allen, Kolby; Dalton, Larry; Jiang, Xuezhong; Kim, Joo H.; Jen, Alex K.

    2004-02-01

    There is a considerable interest in the use of metal centered materials as a light source in the growing field of organic light emitting devices (OLED's). In these devices, a polymeric host matrix containing either a carbazole type polymer or polyfluorene derivatives is used to help facilitate energy transfer to the luminophore. We have shown that by using a gadolinium complex that consist of three equivalents of a chelated dibenzoylmethane b-diketone ligand and one equivalent of a phenanthroline type ligand as a component in the host matrix, the performance of a double layer type OLED is improved. We have studied OLED systems that contain tris chelated europium compounds that contain three equivalents of partially fluorinated β-diketone type ligands and an equivalent of a phenanthroline type ligand. In these devices, the external efficiency has shown a 30-fold increase. We have also shown there is an increase for Osmium based OLED's that use the gadolinium complex as part of the polymer matrix. In these devices, the maximum quantum efficiency increased from 2.1% to a value of 3.8%.

  10. Evaluation of inorganic and organic light-emitting diode displays for signage application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pratibha; Kwok, Harry

    2006-08-01

    High-brightness, inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been successfully utilized for edge-lighting of large displays for signage. Further interest in solid-state lighting technology has been fueled with the emergence of small molecule and polymer-based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this paper, edgelit inorganic LED-based displays and state-of-the-art OLED-based displays are evaluated on the basis of electrical and photometric measurements. The reference size for a signage system is assumed to be 600 mm x 600mm based on the industrial usage. With the availability of high power light-emitting diodes, it is possible to develop edgelit signage systems of the standard size. These displays possess an efficacy of 18 lm/W. Although, these displays are environmentally friendly and efficient, they suffer from some inherent limitations. Homogeneity of displays, which is a prime requirement for illuminated signs, is not accomplished. A standard deviation of 3.12 lux is observed between the illuminance values on the surface of the display. In order to distribute light effectively, reflective gratings are employed. Reflective gratings aid in reducing the problem but fail to eliminate it. In addition, the overall cost of signage is increased by 50% with the use of these additional components. This problem can be overcome by the use of a distributed source of light. Hence, the organic-LEDs are considered as a possible contender. In this paper, we experimentally determine the feasibility of using OLEDs for signage applications and compare their performance with inorganic LEDs. Passive matrix, small-molecule based, commercially available OLEDs is used. Design techniques for implementation of displays using organic LEDs are also discussed. It is determined that tiled displays based on organic LEDs possess better uniformity than the inorganic LED-based displays. However, the currently available OLEDs have lower light-conversion efficiency and higher costs than the

  11. Self-organizing traffic lights at multiple-street intersections

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Traffic light coordination is a complex problem. In this paper, we extend previous work on an abstract model of city traffic to allow for multiple street intersections. We test a self-organizing method in our model, showing that it is close to theoretical optima and superior to a traditional method of traffic light coordination. Abstract: The elementary cellular automaton following rule 184 can mimic particles flowing in one direction at a constant speed. This automaton can therefore model highway traffic. In a recent paper, we have incorporated intersections regulated by traffic lights to this model using exclusively elementary cellular automata. In such a paper, however, we only explored a rectangular grid. We now extend our model to more complex scenarios employing an hexagonal grid. This extension shows first that our model can readily incorporate multiple-way intersections and hence simulate complex scenarios. In addition, the current extension allows us to study and evaluate the behavior of two...

  12. A Jones matrix formalism for simulating 3D Polarised Light Imaging of brain tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, Miriam; De Raedt, Hans; Reckfort, Julia; Amunts, Katrin; Axer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The neuroimaging technique 3D Polarised Light Imaging (3D-PLI) provides a high-resolution reconstruction of nerve fibres in human post-mortem brains. The orientations of the fibres are derived from birefringence measurements of histological brain sections assuming that the nerve fibres - consisting of an axon and a surrounding myelin sheath - are uniaxial birefringent and that the measured optic axis is oriented in direction of the nerve fibres (macroscopic model). Although experimental studies support this assumption, the molecular structure of the myelin sheath suggests that the birefringence of a nerve fibre can be described more precisely by multiple optic axes oriented radially around the fibre axis (microscopic model). In this paper, we compare the use of the macroscopic and the microscopic model for simulating 3D-PLI by means of the Jones matrix formalism. The simulations show that the macroscopic model ensures a reliable estimation of the fibre orientations as long as the polarimeter does not resolve ...

  13. Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omary, Mohammad A

    2013-11-12

    Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

  14. Heterogeneous visible light photocatalysis for selective organic transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Xianjun; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Jincai

    2014-01-07

    The future development of chemistry entails environmentally friendly and energy sustainable alternatives for organic transformations. Visible light photocatalysis can address these challenges, as reflected by recent intensive scientific endeavours to this end. This review covers state-of-the-art accomplishments in visible-light-induced selective organic transformations by heterogeneous photocatalysis. The discussion comprises three sections based on the photocatalyst type: metal oxides such as TiO2, Nb2O5 and ZnO; plasmonic photocatalysts like nanostructured Au, Ag or Cu supported on metal oxides; and polymeric graphitic carbon nitride. Finally, recent strides in bridging the gap between photocatalysis and other areas of catalysis will be highlighted with the aim of overcoming the existing limitations of photocatalysis by developing more creative synthetic methodologies.

  15. Visible Light Communication System Using an Organic Bulk Heterojunction Photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina de Dios

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A visible light communication (VLC system using an organic bulk heterojunction photodetector (OPD is presented. The system has been successfully proven indoors with an audio signal. The emitter consists of three commercial high-power white LEDs connected in parallel. The receiver is based on an organic photodetector having as active layer a blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM. The OPD is opto-electrically characterized, showing a responsivity of 0.18 A/W and a modulation response of 790 kHz at −6 V.

  16. Visible Light Induced Organic Transformations Using Metal-Organic-Frameworks (MOFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhaohui; García, Hermenegildo

    2017-08-22

    With the aim of developing renewable energy based processes, researchers are paying increasing interest to light induced organic transformations. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of micro-/mesoporous hybrid materials, are recently emerging as a new type of photoactive materials for organic syntheses due to their unique structural characteristics. In this Review, we summarized the recent applications of MOFs as photocatalysts for light induced organic transformations, including (1) oxidation of alcohols, amines, alkene, alkanes and sulfides; (2) hydroxylation of aromatic compounds like benzene; (3) activation of the C-H bonds to construct new C-C or C-X bonds; (4) atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). This Review starts with general background information of using MOFs in photocatalysis, followed by a description of light induced organic transformations promoted by photoactive inorganic nodes and photocatalytic active ligands in MOFs, respectively. Thereafter, the use of MOFs as multifunctional catalysts for light induced organic transformations via an efficient merge of the metal/ligand/guest based catalysis where the photocatalytic activity of MOFs plays a key role are discussed. Finally, the limitations, challenges and the future perspective of the application of MOFs for light induced organic transformations were addressed. The objective of this Review is to serve as a starting point for other researchers to get into this largely unexplored field. It is also our goal to stimulate intensive research in this field for rational designing of MOF materials to overcome their current limitations in photocatalysis, which can lead to more creative visible-light-induced organic transformations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A Light Scattering Layer for Internal Light Extraction of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Silver Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keunsoo; Shin, Jin-Wook; Park, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Jonghee; Joo, Chul Woong; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Cho, Doo-Hee; Lim, Jong Tae; Oh, Min-Cheol; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Moon, Jaehyun

    2016-07-13

    We propose and fabricate a random light scattering layer for light extraction in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with silver nanodots, which were obtained by melting silver nanowires. The OLED with the light scattering layer as an internal light extraction structure was enhanced by 49.1% for the integrated external quantum efficiency (EQE). When a wrinkle structure is simultaneously used for an external light extraction structure, the total enhancement of the integrated EQE was 65.3%. The EQE is maximized to 65.3% at a current level of 2.0 mA/cm(2). By applying an internal light scattering layer and wrinkle structure to an OLED, the variance in the emission spectra was negligible over a broad viewing angle. Power mode analyses with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations revealed that the use of a scattering layer effectively reduced the waveguiding mode while introducing non-negligible absorption. Our method offers an effective yet simple approach to achieve both efficiency enhancement and spectral stability for a wide range of OLED applications.

  18. Optical Properties and Aging of Light Absorbing Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Wise, Matthew E.; Caylor, Ryan; Imholt, Felisha; Selimovic, Vanessa; Shilling, John E.

    2016-10-14

    The light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA), commonly referred to as “brown carbon (BrC)”, has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its potential to affect atmospheric radiation balance, especially in the ultraviolet region and thus impact photochemical processes. A growing amount of data has indicated that BrC is prevalent in the atmosphere, which has motivated numerous laboratory and field studies; however, our understanding of the relationship between the chemical composition and optical properties of BrC remains limited. We conducted chamber experiments to investigate the effect of various VOC precursors, NOx concentrations, photolysis time and relative humidity (RH) on the light absorption of selected secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Light absorption of chamber generated SOA samples, especially aromatic SOA, was found to increase with NOx concentration, at moderate RH, and for the shortest photolysis aging times. The highest mass absorption coefficients (MAC) value is observed from toluene SOA products formed under high NOx conditions at moderate RH, in which nitro-aromatics were previously identified as the major light absorbing compounds. BrC light absorption is observed to decrease with photolysis time, correlated with a decline of the organonitrate fraction of SOA. SOA formed from mixtures of aromatics and isoprene absorb less visible and UV light than SOA formed from aromatic precursors alone on a mass basis. However, the mixed-SOA absorption was underestimated when optical properties were predicted using a two-product SOA formation model, as done in many current climate models. Further investigation, including analysis on detailed mechanisms, are required to explain the discrepancy.

  19. Standard Master Matrix for Light-Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Standards, E706(0)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This master matrix standard describes a series of standard practices, guides, and methods for the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel (PV) and support structure steels throughout a pressure vessel's service life (Fig. 1). Some of these are existing ASTM standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are proposed ASTM standards. General requirements of content and consistency are discussed in Section 6 . More detailed writers' and users' information, justification, and specific requirements for the nine practices, ten guides, and three methods are provided in Sections 3-5. Referenced documents are discussed in Section 2. The summary-type information that is provided in Sections 3 and 4 is essential for establishing proper understanding and communications between the writers and users of this set of matrix standards. It was extracted from the referenced documents, Section 2 and references (1-106) for use by individual writers and users. 1...

  20. The Evolution of Light Stress Proteins in Photosynthetic Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Adamska

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The Elip (early light-inducible protein family in pro- and eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms consists of more than 100 different stress proteins. These proteins accumulate in photosynthetic membranes in response to light stress and have photoprotective functions. At the amino acid level, members of the Elip family are closely related to light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding (Cab antenna proteins of photosystem I and II, present in higher plants and some algae. Based on their predicted secondary structure, members of the Elip family are divided into three groups: (a one-helix Hlips (high light-induced proteins, also called Scps (small Cab-like proteins or Ohps (one-helix proteins; (b two-helix Seps (stress-enhanced proteins; and (c three-helix Elips and related proteins. Despite having different physiological functions it is believed that eukaryotic three-helix Cab proteins evolved from the prokaryotic Hlips through a series of duplications and fusions. In this review we analyse the occurrence of Elip family members in various photosynthetic prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and discuss their evolutionary relationship with Cab proteins.

  1. Fabrication of natural DNA-containing organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Eliot F.; Spaeth, Hans D.; Steckl, Andrew J.; Grote, James G.

    2011-09-01

    The process of creating natural DNA-containing bio-organic light emitting diodes is a fascinating journey from salmon fish to the highly-efficient BiOLED. DNA from salmon sperm is used as a high-performance electron blocking layer, to enhance the efficiency of the BiOLED over its conventional OLED counterpart. An overview of the BiOLED fabrication process and its key steps are presented in this paper.

  2. Structural organization and dynamics of exopolysaccharide matrix and microcolonies formation by Streptococcus mutans in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, J; Koo, H

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the structural organization and dynamics of exopolysaccharides (EPS) matrix and microcolonies formation by Streptococcus mutans during the biofilm development process. Biofilms of Strep. mutans were formed on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA) discs in the presence of glucose or sucrose (alone or mixed with starch). At specific time points, biofilms were subjected to confocal fluorescence imaging and computational analysis. EPS matrix was steadily formed on sHA surface in the presence of sucrose during the first 8 h followed by a threefold biomass increase between 8 and 30 h of biofilm development. The initial formation and further development of three-dimensional microcolony structure occurred concomitantly with EPS matrix synthesis. Tridimensional renderings showed EPS closely associated with microcolonies throughout the biofilm development process forming four distinct domains (i) between sHA surface and microcolonies, (ii) within, (iii) covering and (iv) filling the spaces between microcolonies. The combination of starch and sucrose resulted in rapid formation of elevated amounts of EPS matrix and faster assembly of microcolonies by Strep. mutans, which altered their structural organization and susceptibility of the biofilm to acid killing (vs sucrose-grown biofilms; P matrix and microcolonies provide a more precise examination of the structural organization of biofilms than labelling bacteria alone, which could be a useful approach to elucidate the exact mechanisms by which Strep. mutans influences oral biofilm formation and possibly identify novel targets for effective antibiofilm therapies.

  3. Tuning the Microcavity of Organic Light Emitting Diodes by Solution Processable Polymer-Nanoparticle Composite Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preinfalk, Jan B; Schackmar, Fabian R; Lampe, Thomas; Egel, Amos; Schmidt, Tobias D; Brütting, Wolfgang; Gomard, Guillaume; Lemmer, Uli

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we present a simple method to tune and take advantage of microcavity effects for an increased fraction of outcoupled light in solution-processed organic light emitting diodes. This is achieved by incorporating nonscattering polymer-nanoparticle composite layers. These tunable layers allow the optimization of the device architecture even for high film thicknesses on a single substrate by gradually altering the film thickness using a horizontal dipping technique. Moreover, it is shown that the optoelectronic device parameters are in good agreement with transfer matrix simulations of the corresponding layer stack, which offers the possibility to numerically design devices based on such composite layers. Lastly, it could be shown that the introduction of nanoparticles leads to an improved charge injection, which combined with an optimized microcavity resulted in a maximum luminous efficacy increase of 85% compared to a nanoparticle-free reference device.

  4. MATRIX-VBS Condensing Organic Aerosols in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Konstas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  5. Light Focusing and Two-Dimensional Imaging Through Scattering Media using the Photoacoustic Transmission-Matrix with an Ultrasound Array

    CERN Document Server

    Chaigne, Thomas; Katz, Ori; Bossy, Emmanuel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    We implement the photoacoustic transmission-matrix approach on a two-dimensional photoacoustic imaging system, using a 15 MHz linear ultrasound array. Using a black leaf skeleton as a complex absorbing structure, we demonstrate that the photoacoustic transmission-matrix approach allows to reveal structural features that are invisible in conventional photoacoustic images, as well as to selectively control light focusing on absorbing targets, leading to a local enhancement of the photoacoustic signal.

  6. Structurally Integrated Photoluminescence-Based Lactate Sensor Using Organic Light Emitting Devices (OLEDs) as the Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Chengliang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Multianalyte bio(chemical) sensors are extensively researched for monitoring analytes in complex systems, such as blood serum. As a step towards developing such multianalyte sensors, we studied a novel, structurally integrated, organic light emitting device (OLED)-based sensing platform for detection of lactate. Lactate biosensors have attracted numerous research efforts, due to their wide applications in clinical diagnosis, athletic training and food industry. The OLED-based sensor is based on monitoring the oxidation reaction of lactate, which is catalyzed by the lactate oxidase (LOX) enzyme. The sensing component is based on an oxygen-sensitive dye, Platinum octaethyl porphyrin (PtOEP), whose photoluminescence (PL) lifetime τ decreases as the oxygen level increases. The PtOEP dye was embedded in a thin film polystyrene (PS) matrix; the LOX was dissolved in solution or immobilized in a sol-gel matrix. τ was measured as a function of the lactate concentration; as the lactate concentration increases, τ increases due to increased oxygen consumption. The sensors performance is discussed in terms of the detection sensitivity, dynamic range, and response time. A response time of ~32 sec was achieved when the LOX was dissolved in solution and kept in a closed cell. Steps towards development of a multianalyte sensor array using an array of individually addressable OLED pixels were also presented.

  7. Matrix formalism for light propagation and absorption in thick textured optical sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenlohr, Johannes; Tucher, Nico; Höhn, Oliver; Hauser, Hubert; Peters, Marius; Kiefel, Peter; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a simulation formalism for determining the Optical Properties of Textured Optical Sheets (OPTOS). Our matrix-based method allows for the computationally-efficient calculation of non-coherent light propagation and absorption in thick textured sheets, especially solar cells, featuring different textures on front and rear side that may operate in different optical regimes. Within the simulated system, the angular power distribution is represented by a vector. This light distribution is modified by interaction with the surfaces of the textured sheets, which are described by redistribution matrices. These matrices can be calculated for each individual surface texture with the most appropriate technique. Depending on the feature size of the texture, for example, either ray- or wave-optical methods can be used. The comparison of the simulated absorption in a sheet of silicon for a variety of surface textures, both with the results from other simulation techniques and experimentally measured data, shows very good agreement. To demonstrate the versatility of this newly-developed approach, the absorption in silicon sheets with a large-scale structure (V-grooves) at the front side and a small-scale structure (diffraction grating) at the rear side is calculated. Moreover, with minimal computational effort, a thickness parameter variation is performed.

  8. Metal–organic framework based mixed matrix membranes: a solution for highly efficient CO2 capture?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seoane, B.; Coronas, J.; Gascon, I.; Benavides, M.E.; Karvan, O.; Caro, J.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2015-01-01

    The field of metal–organic framework based mixed matrix membranes (M4s) is critically reviewed, with special emphasis on their application in CO2 capture during energy generation. After introducing the most relevant parameters affecting membrane performance, we define targets in terms of selectivity

  9. ECOS E-MATRIX Methane and Volatile Organic Carbon (VOC) Emissions Best Practices Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisien, Lia [The Environmental Council Of The States, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-01-31

    This final scientific/technical report on the ECOS e-MATRIX Methane and Volatile Organic Carbon (VOC) Emissions Best Practices Database provides a disclaimer and acknowledgement, table of contents, executive summary, description of project activities, and briefing/technical presentation link.

  10. Study of photochemical transformations of organic azides by matrix isolation techniques and quantum chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsan, N P [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-12-31

    Results of investigations of organic azide photochemistry in inert gas matrices and the most important spectroscopic studies of the last decade, which formed the basis for the modern views on the photochemistry of azides, are analysed. The unique potential of the matrix isolation technique for the reliable identification of reaction intermediates is demonstrated.

  11. Measurement of the Time-Resolved Reflection Matrix for Enhancing Light Energy Delivery into a Scattering Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngwoon; Hillman, Timothy R.; Choi, Wonjun; Lue, Niyom; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; So, Peter T. C.; Choi, Wonshik; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    Multiple scatterings occurring in a turbid medium attenuate the intensity of propagating waves. Here, we propose a method to efficiently deliver light energy to the desired target depth in a scattering medium. We measure the time-resolved reflection matrix of a scattering medium using coherent time-gated detection. From this matrix, we derive and experimentally implement an incident wave pattern that optimizes the detected signal corresponding to a specific arrival time. This leads to enhanced light delivery at the target depth. The proposed method will lay a foundation for efficient phototherapy and deep-tissue in vivo imaging in the near future. PMID:24483661

  12. Deterministic light focusing in space and time through multiple scattering media with a Time-Resolved Transmission Matrix approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mounaix, Mickael; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We report a method to characterize the propagation of an ultrashort pulse of light through a multiple scattering medium by measuring its time-resolved transmission matrix. This method is based on the use of a spatial light modulator together with a coherent time-gated detection of the transmitted speckle field. Using this matrix, we demonstrate the focusing of the scattered pulse at any arbitrary position in space and time after the medium. Our approach opens new perspectives for both fundamental studies and applications in imaging and coherent control in disordered media.

  13. Patternless light outcoupling enhancement method for top-emission organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doo-Hoon; Lee, Ho-Nyeon

    2016-11-01

    An increase of 65% in the luminous flux of a top-emission organic light-emitting diode (TE-OLED) was obtained by fabricating a stacked N,N‧-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N‧-bis(phenyl)benzidine (NPB) (0.2 µm)/CaF2 (2.5 µm) light outcoupling layer on the TE-OLED. The high-refractive-index NPB layer extracted the trapped light energy in the TE-OLED for input into the light outcoupling layer and protected the top cathode of the TE-OLED from damage due to the CaF2 layer. The surface morphology of the CaF2 layer had an irregular shape consisting of randomly dispersed pyramids; the irregular structure scattered the waveguide mode energy into air. By combining the effects of the NPB and CaF2 layers, the external quantum efficiency of the TE-OLED was increased significantly. The light outcoupling layer can be fabricated using a thermal evaporation process without patterning and, hence, provides a practical solution for the enhancement of TE-OLED light outcoupling using a patternless fabrication process.

  14. Light organization of small particles by multiple scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Zhi Hong

    Optical manipulation is of broad interest in physics, chemistry, and biology. In the literature, most of the studies are focused on the optical trapping on a single object. In this thesis, we investigated the light-induced interaction of a collection of particles. The light-induced interaction between small particles was studied by a hierarchy of methods including the dipole theory, the multiple scattering and Maxwell stress tensor formalism, and the finite-difference-time-domain method. We showed that the multiple scattering between small particles could induce a binding mechanism to stabilize optically organized structures, but at the same time induced an intrinsic unbinding mechanism. The stability of optically organized structure was studied and a concept of "optical density" was introduced to gauge the destabilizing effect. We found that light-induced forces could bind dielectric spheres into extended structures through two mechanisms, each with its own length scale which could be adjusted by the configuration of the external light source. By manipulating the commensurability of the two length scales, these two mechanisms cooperated to bind a large number of spheres. When the two length scales became incommensurate for some particular incident angle, the competition between the two mechanisms led to modulated structures and other complex phenomena such as re-entrant stability. We searched for the possibility for stabilizing larger clusters. For this purpose, we found that circularly polarized light bound dielectric spheres into large-scale two-dimensional hexagonal lattice and multiple scattering also induced a rotation of optically bound structures. We searched for configurations that could induce optical trapping by field enhancement. Enhanced transmission on perforated metallic film system was studied. Surface modes bound on multi perforated perfect metal plate system were analytical solved and related to different high transmittance modes. Near

  15. Measuring the Complexity of Self-Organizing Traffic Lights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Zubillaga

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We apply measures of complexity, emergence, and self-organization to an urban traffic model for comparing a traditional traffic-light coordination method with a self-organizing method in two scenarios: cyclic boundaries and non-orientable boundaries. We show that the measures are useful to identify and characterize different dynamical phases. It becomes clear that different operation regimes are required for different traffic demands. Thus, not only is traffic a non-stationary problem, requiring controllers to adapt constantly; controllers must also change drastically the complexity of their behavior depending on the demand. Based on our measures and extending Ashby’s law of requisite variety, we can say that the self-organizing method achieves an adaptability level comparable to that of a living system.

  16. Simulations of charge transport in organic light emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, S J

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, two approaches to the modelling of charge transport in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are presented. The first is a drift-diffusion model, normally used when considering conventional crystalline inorganic semiconductors (e.g. Si or lll-V's) which have well defined energy bands. In this model, electron and hole transport is described using the current continuity equations and the drift-diffusion current equations, and coupled to Poisson's equation. These equations are solved with the appropriate boundary conditions, which for OLEDs are Schottky contacts; carriers are injected by thermionic emission and tunnelling. The disordered nature of the organic semiconductors is accounted for by the inclusion of field-dependent carrier mobilities and Langevin optical recombination. The second approach treats the transport of carriers in disordered organic semi-conductors as a hopping process between spatially and energetically disordered sites. This method has been used previously to account for th...

  17. Dielectric nanostructures for broadband light trapping in organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Raman, Aaswath

    2011-09-15

    Organic bulk heterojunction solar cells are a promising candidate for low-cost next-generation photovoltaic systems. However, carrier extraction limitations necessitate thin active layers that sacrifice absorption for internal quantum efficiency or vice versa. Motivated by recent theoretical developments, we show that dielectric wavelength-scale grating structures can produce significant absorption resonances in a realistic organic cell architecture. We numerically demonstrate that 1D, 2D and multi-level ITO-air gratings lying on top of the organic solar cell stack produce a 8-15% increase in photocurrent for a model organic solar cell where PCDTBT:PC71BM is the organic semiconductor. Specific to this approach, the active layer itself remains untouched yet receives the benefit of light trapping by nanostructuring the top surface below which it lies. The techniques developed here are broadly applicable to organic semiconductors in general, and enable partial decoupling between active layer thickness and photocurrent generation. © 2011 Optical Society of America.

  18. Soluble silk-like organic matrix in the nacreous layer of the bivalve Pinctada maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Mouriès, Lucilia; Almeida, Maria-José; Ribeiro, Cristina; Peduzzi, Jean; Barthélemy, Michel; Milet, Christian; Lopez, Evelyne

    2002-10-01

    Nacre organic matrix has been conventionally classified as both 'water-soluble' and 'water-insoluble', based on its solubility in aqueous solutions after decalcification with acid or EDTA. Some characteristics (aspartic acid-rich, silk-fibroin-like content) were specifically attributed to either one or the other. The comparative study on the technique of extraction (extraction with water alone vs. demineralization with EDTA) presented here, seems to reveal that this generally accepted classification may need to be reconsidered. Actually, the nondecalcified soluble organic matrix, extracted in ultra-pure water, displays many of the characteristics of what until now has been called 'insoluble matrix'. We present the results obtained on this extract and on a conventional EDTA-soluble matrix, with various characterization methods: fractionation by size-exclusion and anion-exchange HPLC, amino acid analysis, glycosaminoglycan and calcium quantification, SDS/PAGE and FTIR spectroscopy. We propose that the model for the interlamellar matrix sheets of nacre given by Nakahara [In: Biomineralization and Biological Metal Accumulation, Westbroek, P. & deJong, E.W., eds, (1983) pp. 225-230. Reidel, Dordrecht, Holland] and Weiner and Traub [Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B (1984) 304, 425-434] may no longer be valid. The most recent model, proposed by Levi-Kalisman et al. [J. Struct. Biol. (2001) 135, 8-17], seemed to be more in accordance with our findings.

  19. Very low color-temperature organic light-emitting diodes for lighting at night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Pin-Chu; Chen, Szu-Hao; Shen, Shih-Ming; Chen, Chien-Chih; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Tien

    2011-12-01

    Light sources with low color temperature (CT) are essential for their markedly less suppression effect on the secretion of melatonin, and high power efficiency is crucial for energy-saving. To provide visual comfort, the light source should also have a reasonably high color rendering index (CRI). In this report, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of low CT and high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes. The best resultant device exhibits a CT of 1,880 K, much lower than that of incandescent bulbs (2,000-2,500 K) and even as low as that of candles, (1,800-2,000 K), a beyond theoretical limit external quantum efficiency 22.7 %, and 36.0 lm/W at 100 cd/m 2. The high efficiency of the proposed device may be attributed to its interlayer, which helps effectively distribute the entering carriers into the available recombination zones.

  20. Ultrastrong light-matter coupling in electrically doped microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzeo, M., E-mail: marco.mazzeo@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Genco, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gambino, S. [NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN, Istituto Italiano Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Lecce (Italy); Ballarini, D.; Mangione, F.; Sanvitto, D. [NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Di Stefano, O.; Patanè, S.; Savasta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d' Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Gigli, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN, Istituto Italiano Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-06-09

    The coupling of the electromagnetic field with an electronic transition gives rise, for strong enough light-matter interactions, to hybrid states called exciton-polaritons. When the energy exchanged between light and matter becomes a significant fraction of the material transition energy an extreme optical regime called ultrastrong coupling (USC) is achieved. We report a microcavity embedded p-i-n monolithic organic light emitting diode working in USC, employing a thin film of squaraine dye as active layer. A normalized coupling ratio of 30% has been achieved at room temperature. These USC devices exhibit a dispersion-less angle-resolved electroluminescence that can be exploited for the realization of innovative optoelectronic devices. Our results may open the way towards electrically pumped polariton lasers.

  1. Efficient Light Extraction from Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Plasmonic Scattering Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothberg, Lewis

    2012-11-30

    Our project addressed the DOE MYPP 2020 goal to improve light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to 75% (Core task 6.3). As noted in the 2010 MYPP, “the greatest opportunity for improvement is in the extraction of light from [OLED] panels”. There are many approaches to avoiding waveguiding limitations intrinsic to the planar OLED structure including use of textured substrates, microcavity designs and incorporating scattering layers into the device structure. We have chosen to pursue scattering layers since it addresses the largest source of loss which is waveguiding in the OLED itself. Scattering layers also have the potential to be relatively robust to color, polarization and angular distributions. We note that this can be combined with textured or microlens decorated substrates to achieve additional enhancement.

  2. The influence of fibrous elastomer structure and porosity on matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Wu, Katherine; Mauck, Robert L; Burdick, Jason A

    2010-12-22

    Fibrous scaffolds are finding wide use in the field of tissue engineering, as they can be designed to mimic many native tissue properties and structures (e.g., cardiac tissue, meniscus). The influence of fiber alignment and scaffold architecture on cellular interactions and matrix organization was the focus of this study. Three scaffolds were fabricated from the photocrosslinkable elastomer poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), with changes in fiber alignment (non-aligned (NA) versus aligned (AL)) and the introduction of a PEO sacrificial polymer population to the AL scaffold (composite (CO)). PEO removal led to an increase in scaffold porosity and maintenance of scaffold anisotropy, as evident through visualization, mechanical testing, and mass loss studies. Hydrated scaffolds possessed moduli that ranged between ∼3-240 kPa, failing within the range of properties (<300 kPa) appropriate for soft tissue engineering. CO scaffolds were completely degraded as early as 16 days, whereas NA and AL scaffolds had ∼90% mass loss after 21 days when monitored in vitro. Neonatal cardiomyocytes, used as a representative cell type, that were seeded onto the scaffolds maintained their viability and aligned along the surface of the AL and CO fibers. When implanted subcutaneously in rats, a model that is commonly used to investigate in vivo tissue responses to biomaterials, CO scaffolds were completely integrated at 2 weeks, whereas ∼13% and ∼16% of the NA and AL scaffolds, respectively remained acellular. However, all scaffolds were completely populated with cells at 4 weeks post-implantation. Polarized light microscopy was used to evaluate the collagen elaboration and orientation within the scaffold. An increase in the amount of collagen was observed for CO scaffolds and enhanced alignment of the nascent collagen was observed for AL and CO scaffolds compared to NA scaffolds. Thus, these results indicate that the scaffold architecture and porosity are important considerations in

  3. The influence of fibrous elastomer structure and porosity on matrix organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L Ifkovits

    Full Text Available Fibrous scaffolds are finding wide use in the field of tissue engineering, as they can be designed to mimic many native tissue properties and structures (e.g., cardiac tissue, meniscus. The influence of fiber alignment and scaffold architecture on cellular interactions and matrix organization was the focus of this study. Three scaffolds were fabricated from the photocrosslinkable elastomer poly(glycerol sebacate (PGS, with changes in fiber alignment (non-aligned (NA versus aligned (AL and the introduction of a PEO sacrificial polymer population to the AL scaffold (composite (CO. PEO removal led to an increase in scaffold porosity and maintenance of scaffold anisotropy, as evident through visualization, mechanical testing, and mass loss studies. Hydrated scaffolds possessed moduli that ranged between ∼3-240 kPa, failing within the range of properties (<300 kPa appropriate for soft tissue engineering. CO scaffolds were completely degraded as early as 16 days, whereas NA and AL scaffolds had ∼90% mass loss after 21 days when monitored in vitro. Neonatal cardiomyocytes, used as a representative cell type, that were seeded onto the scaffolds maintained their viability and aligned along the surface of the AL and CO fibers. When implanted subcutaneously in rats, a model that is commonly used to investigate in vivo tissue responses to biomaterials, CO scaffolds were completely integrated at 2 weeks, whereas ∼13% and ∼16% of the NA and AL scaffolds, respectively remained acellular. However, all scaffolds were completely populated with cells at 4 weeks post-implantation. Polarized light microscopy was used to evaluate the collagen elaboration and orientation within the scaffold. An increase in the amount of collagen was observed for CO scaffolds and enhanced alignment of the nascent collagen was observed for AL and CO scaffolds compared to NA scaffolds. Thus, these results indicate that the scaffold architecture and porosity are important

  4. A review on organic spintronic materials and devices: II. Magnetoresistance in organic spin valves and spin organic light emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rugang Geng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the preceding review paper, Paper I [Journal of Science: Advanced Materials and Devices 1 (2016 128–140], we showed the major experimental and theoretical studies on the first organic spintronic subject, namely organic magnetoresistance (OMAR in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs. The topic has recently been of renewed interest as a result of a demonstration of the magneto-conductance (MC that exceeds 1000% at room temperature using a certain type of organic compounds and device operating condition. In this report, we will review two additional organic spintronic devices, namely organic spin valves (OSVs where only spin polarized holes exist to cause magnetoresistance (MR, and spin organic light emitting diodes (spin-OLEDs where both spin polarized holes and electrons are injected into the organic emissive layer to form a magneto-electroluminescence (MEL hysteretic loop. First, we outline the major advances in OSV studies for understanding the underlying physics of the spin transport mechanism in organic semiconductors (OSCs and the spin injection/detection at the organic/ferromagnet interface (spinterface. We also highlight some of outstanding challenges in this promising research field. Second, the first successful demonstration of spin-OLEDs is reviewed. We also discuss challenges to achieve the high performance devices. Finally, we suggest an outlook on the future of organic spintronics by using organic single crystals and aligned polymers for the spin transport layer, and a self-assembled monolayer to achieve more controllability for the spinterface.

  5. Link predication based on matrix factorization by fusion of multi class organizations of the network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Pengfei; Cai, Fei; Feng, Yiding; Wang, Wenjun

    2017-08-21

    Link predication aims at forecasting the latent or unobserved edges in the complex networks and has a wide range of applications in reality. Almost existing methods and models only take advantage of one class organization of the networks, which always lose important information hidden in other organizations of the network. In this paper, we propose a link predication framework which makes the best of the structure of networks in different level of organizations based on nonnegative matrix factorization, which is called NMF (3) here. We first map the observed network into another space by kernel functions, which could get the different order organizations. Then we combine the adjacency matrix of the network with one of other organizations, which makes us obtain the objective function of our framework for link predication based on the nonnegative matrix factorization. Third, we derive an iterative algorithm to optimize the objective function, which converges to a local optimum, and we propose a fast optimization strategy for large networks. Lastly, we test the proposed framework based on two kernel functions on a series of real world networks under different sizes of training set, and the experimental results show the feasibility, effectiveness, and competitiveness of the proposed framework.

  6. Screen-printed passive matrix displays based on light-emitting polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birnstock, J.; Blassing, J.; Hunze, A.; Scheffel, M.; Sto{ss}el, M.; Heuser, K.; Wittmann, G.; Worle, J.; Winnacker, A.

    2001-06-11

    Due to their outstanding properties, e.g., good contrast, wide viewing angle, low power consumption, and self-emission organic light-emitting (OLE) displays on the basis of conjugated polymers are on the verge of commercialization. Two major disadvantages of the current processing technique for the polymers{emdash}spin coating{emdash}are the material waste and the difficulties involved in patterning multichrome or even full-color displays. Therefore, we investigated the screen-printing technique for the production of OLE displays. In this letter, we present performance data and images of screen-printed OLE diodes. They are already comparable to spin-coated ones. We observed luminance of 10000 cd/m2 at 8 V and peak efficiencies exceeding 10 cd/A for green diodes. These data indicate that printed organic displays have the potential to replace {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} spin-coated devices. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  7. New Optoelectronic Technology Simplified for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre F. S. Guedes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED, using an optically transparent substrate material and organic semiconductor materials, has been widely utilized by the electronic industry when producing new technological products. The OLED are the base Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, PEDOT, and Polyaniline, PANI, were deposited in Indium Tin Oxide, ITO, and characterized by UV-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Vis, Optical Parameters (OP and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In addition, the thin film obtained by the deposition of PANI, prepared in perchloric acid solution, was identified through PANI-X1. The result obtained by UV-Vis has demonstrated that the Quartz/ITO/PEDOT/PANI-X1 layer does not have displacement of absorption for wavelengths greaters after spin-coating and electrodeposition. Thus, the spectral irradiance of the OLED informed the irradiance of 100 W/m2, and this result, compared with the standard Light Emitting Diode (LED, has indicated that the OLED has higher irradiance. After 1000 hours of electrical OLED tests, the appearance of nanoparticles visible for images by SEM, to the migration process of organic semiconductor materials, was present, then. Still, similar to the phenomenon of electromigration observed in connections and interconnections of microelectronic devices, the results have revealed a new mechanism of migration, which raises the passage of electric current in OLED.

  8. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Nakanishi, Hidekazu Nakayama, Kazuo Yamaguchi, Andres J Garcia and Yasuhiro Horiike

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods for the off–on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs of three disulfide compounds containing (i a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (PEG, (ii nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA and (iii hepta(ethylene glycol (EG7. Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag sequences in its Ni2+-ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG7 underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII7–10 to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin—a major serum protein—was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII7-10 was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  9. Focus Issue: Organic light-emitting diodes-status quo and current developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Emil J W; Koch, Norbert

    2011-11-01

    The guest editors introduce the Optics Express Energy Express supplement Focus Issue, "Organic Light-Emitting Diodes," which includes six invited articles addressing the challenges of light outcoupling and light management in OLEDs.

  10. Numerical model of multilayer organic light-emitting devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yue; Rao Hai-Bo

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model of multilayer organic light-emitting devices is presented in this article.This model is based on the drift-diffusion equations which include charge injection,transport,space charge effects,trapping,heterojunction interface and recombination process.The device structure in the simulation is ITO/CuPc(20 nm)/NPD(40 nm)/Alq3(60 nm)/LiF/Al.There are two heterojunctions which should be dealt with in the simulation.The Ⅰ-Ⅴ characteristics,carrier distribution and recombination rate of a device are calculated.The simulation results and measured data are in good agreement.

  11. Capturing triplet emission in white organic light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [Faculty of EHSE, School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2011-08-15

    The state-of-the art in the white organic light emitting devices (WOLEDs) is reviewed for further developments with a view to enhance the capture of triplet emission. In particular, applying the new exciton-spin-orbit-photon interaction operator as a perturbation, rates of spontaneous emission are calculated in a few phosphorescent materials and compared with experimental results. For iridium based phosphorescent materials the rates agree quite well with the experimental results. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. T-matrix computations of light scattering by red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, A M; Alsholm, P; Karlsson, A; Andersson-Engels, S

    1998-05-01

    The electromagnetic far field, as well as the near field, originating from light interaction with a red blood cell (RBC)volume-equivalent spheroid, was analyzed by utilizing theT-matrix theory. This method is a powerful tool thatmakes it possible to study the influence of cell shape on the angulardistribution of scattered light. General observations were that thethree-dimensional shape, as well as the optical thickness apparent tothe incident field, affects the forward scattering. Thebackscattering was influenced by the shape of the surface facing theincident beam. Furthermore sphering as well as elongation of anoblate RBC into a volume-equivalent sphere or a prolate spheroid, respectively, was theoretically modeled to imitate physiologicalphenomena caused, e.g., by heat or the increased shear stress offlowing blood. Both sphering and elongation were shown to decreasethe intensity of the forward-directed scattering, thus yielding lowerg factors. The sphering made the scattering patternindependent of azimuthal scattering angle phi(s), whereas the elongation induced more apparent phi(s)-dependent patterns. The lightscattering by a RBC volume-equivalent spheroid was thus found to behighly influenced by the shape of the scattering object. Anear-field radius r(nf) was evaluated as thedistance to which the maximum intensity of the total near field haddecreased to 2.5 times that of the incident field. It was estimatedto 2-24.5 times the maximum radius of the scattering spheroid, corresponding to 12-69 mum. Because the near-field radiuswas shown to be larger than a simple estimation of the distance betweenthe RBC's in whole blood, the assumption of independent scattering, frequently employed in optical measurements on whole blood, seemsinappropriate. This also indicates that one cannot extrapolate theresults obtained from diluted blood to whole blood by multiplying witha simple concentration factor.

  13. Model for Triplet State Engineering in Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Prodhan, Suryoday; Ramasesha, S

    2014-01-01

    Engineering the position of the lowest triplet state (T1) relative to the first excited singlet state (S1) is of great importance in improving the efficiencies of organic light emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. We have carried out model exact calculations of substituted polyene chains to understand the factors that affect the energy gap between S1 and T1. The factors studied are backbone dimerisation, different donor-acceptor substitutions and twisted geometry. The largest system studied is an eighteen carbon polyene which spans a Hilbert space of about 991 million. We show that for reverse intersystem crossing (RISC) process, the best system involves substituting all carbon sites on one half of the polyene with donors and the other half with acceptors.

  14. Specifics and Challenges to Flexible Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Aleksandrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several recent developments in material science and deposition methods for flexible organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs are surveyed. The commonly used plastic substrates are compared, according to their mechanical, optical, thermal, and chemical properties. Multilayer electrode structures, used as transparent electrodes, replacing conventional indium tin oxide (ITO are presented and data about their conductivity, transparency, and bending ability are provided. Attention is paid to some of the most popular industrial processes for flexible OLEDs manufacturing, such as roll-to-roll printing, inkjet printing, and screen printing. Main specifics and challenges, related to the foils reliability, mechanical stability of the transparent electrodes, and deposition and patterning of organic emissive films, are discussed.

  15. Characterization of the proteinaceous skeletal organic matrix from the precious coral Corallium konojoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Karl, Kristian; Nonaka, Masanori; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese red and pink corals are known to be precious because of their commercial value resulting from their use in ornaments, jewelry, and medicine. Precious corals are very interesting models for biomineralization studies and possess two different skeletal structures: an axial skeleton and an endoskeleton (sclerites). Although it has long been known that the organic matrix proteins existing in coral skeletons are critical for the oriented precipitation of CaCO3 crystals, these proteins in moderate deep-sea Japanese precious corals remain uncharacterized. Therefore, in this study, we performed skeletal whole proteome analyses using 1D and 2D electrophoresis, nano-LC, and MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. We identified a total of 147 functional coral skeletal organic matrix proteins (120 from the sclerites and 36 from the axial skeleton), including two calcium-binding calmodulin. Among the organic matrix proteins identified, nine key proteins are highly typical and common in both skeletons. Strong glycosylation activity, which is essential for skeletal formation in calcifying organisms, was detected in both skeletons. This work demonstrates unique biomineralization-related proteins in precious corals and provides the first description of the major proteinaceous components of CaCO3 minerals in precious corals, enabling the comparative investigation of biocalcification in other octocorals.

  16. A Jones matrix formalism for simulating three-dimensional polarized light imaging of brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, M; Michielsen, K; De Raedt, H; Reckfort, J; Amunts, K; Axer, M

    2015-10-06

    The neuroimaging technique three-dimensional polarized light imaging (3D-PLI) provides a high-resolution reconstruction of nerve fibres in human post-mortem brains. The orientations of the fibres are derived from birefringence measurements of histological brain sections assuming that the nerve fibres—consisting of an axon and a surrounding myelin sheath—are uniaxial birefringent and that the measured optic axis is oriented in the direction of the nerve fibres (macroscopic model). Although experimental studies support this assumption, the molecular structure of the myelin sheath suggests that the birefringence of a nerve fibre can be described more precisely by multiple optic axes oriented radially around the fibre axis (microscopic model). In this paper, we compare the use of the macroscopic and the microscopic model for simulating 3D-PLI by means of the Jones matrix formalism. The simulations show that the macroscopic model ensures a reliable estimation of the fibre orientations as long as the polarimeter does not resolve structures smaller than the diameter of single fibres. In the case of fibre bundles, polarimeters with even higher resolutions can be used without losing reliability. When taking the myelin density into account, the derived fibre orientations are considerably improved. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Emerging Transparent Conducting Electrodes for Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze-Bin Song

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs have attracted much attention in recent years as next generation lighting and displays, due to their many advantages, including superb performance, mechanical flexibility, ease of fabrication, chemical versatility, etc. In order to fully realize the highly flexible features, reduce the cost and further improve the performance of OLED devices, replacing the conventional indium tin oxide with better alternative transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs is a crucial step. In this review, we focus on the emerging alternative TCE materials for OLED applications, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs, metallic nanowires, conductive polymers and graphene. These materials are selected, because they have been applied as transparent electrodes for OLED devices and achieved reasonably good performance or even higher device performance than that of indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Various electrode modification techniques and their effects on the device performance are presented. The effects of new TCEs on light extraction, device performance and reliability are discussed. Highly flexible, stretchable and efficient OLED devices are achieved based on these alternative TCEs. These results are summarized for each material. The advantages and current challenges of these TCE materials are also identified.

  18. Enhanced Light Scattering of Secondary Organic Aerosols by Multiphase Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Li, Junling; Liggio, John; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa; Liu, Qifan; Guo, Yucong; Tong, Shengrui; Li, Jiangjun; Peng, Chao; Jing, Bo; Wang, Dong; Fu, Pingqing

    2017-02-07

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) plays a pivotal role in visibility and radiative forcing, both of which are intrinsically linked to the refractive index (RI). While previous studies have focused on the RI of SOA from traditional formation processes, the effect of multiphase reactions on the RI has not been considered. Here, we investigate the effects of multiphase processes on the RI and light-extinction of m-xylene-derived SOA, a common type of anthropogenic SOA. We find that multiphase reactions in the presence of liquid water lead to the formation of oligomers from intermediate products such as glyoxal and methylglyoxal, resulting in a large enhancement in the RI and light-scattering of this SOA. These reactions will result in increases in light-scattering efficiency and direct radiative forcing of approximately 20%-90%. These findings improve our understanding of SOA optical properties and have significant implications for evaluating the impacts of SOA on the rapid formation of regional haze, global radiative balance, and climate change.

  19. Highly Bright White Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ A highly bright white organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was realized by using a highly bright blue emitting layer, 1,7-diphenyl-4-biphenyl-3,5-dimethyl-l,7-dihydrodipyrazolo[3,4-b;4',3'-e]pyridine (PAP-Ph), together with a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped Alq [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum (Ⅲ)] layer to provide the blue, red and green emission for color mixing. With appropriate thickness control, the white-light OLED has a performance that reaches 24700 cd/m2 at 15 V, 1.93 lm/W at 6.5 V, and >300 cd/m2 at 7.7 mA/em2. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the emitted light vary in a very small range, from (0.35, 0.34) to (0.34, 0.35), when forward voltages change from 6 to 12 V.

  20. Highly Bright White Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KO; C.; W.

    2001-01-01

    A highly bright white organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was realized by using a highly bright blue emitting layer, 1,7-diphenyl-4-biphenyl-3,5-dimethyl-l,7-dihydrodipyrazolo[3,4-b;4',3'-e]pyridine (PAP-Ph), together with a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped Alq [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum (Ⅲ)] layer to provide the blue, red and green emission for color mixing. With appropriate thickness control, the white-light OLED has a performance that reaches 24700 cd/m2 at 15 V, 1.93 lm/W at 6.5 V, and >300 cd/m2 at 7.7 mA/em2. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the emitted light vary in a very small range, from (0.35, 0.34) to (0.34, 0.35), when forward voltages change from 6 to 12 V.  ……

  1. Mammary epithelial cell: Influence of extracellular matrix composition and organization during development and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine T.; Dembo, Micah; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Stromal–epithelial interactions regulate mammary gland development and are critical for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The extracellular matrix, which is a proteinaceous component of the stroma, regulates mammary epithelial growth, survival, migration and differentiation through a repertoire of transmembrane receptors, of which integrins are the best characterized. Integrins modulate cell fate by reciprocally transducing biochemical and biophysical cues between the cell and the extracellular matrix, facilitating processes such as embryonic branching morphogenesis and lactation in the mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal responses to regulate processes including branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation. Malignant transformation of the breast is also associated with significant matrix remodeling and a progressive stiffening of the stroma that can enhance mammary epithelial cell growth, perturb breast tissue organization, and promote cell invasion and survival. In this review, we discuss the role of stromal–epithelial interactions in normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell behavior. We specifically focus on how dynamic modulation of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix elicit a dialogue with the mammary epithelium through transmembrane integrin receptors to influence tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis and malignant transformation. PMID:17719831

  2. Candlelight style organic light-emitting diode: a plausibly human-friendly safe night light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Hsieh, Chun-Yu; Chen, Po-Wei; Kumar, Sudhir; Hong, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Candles emit sensationally warm light with a very low color temperature, comparatively most suitable for use at night. In response to the need for such a human-friendly night light, we demonstrate the employment of a high number of candlelight complementary organic emitters to generate and mimic candlelight based on organic light emitting diode (OLED). One resultant candlelight style OLED shows a very-high color rendering index (CRI), with an efficacy at least 300 times that of a candle or at least two times that of an incandescent bulb. The device can be fabricated, for example, by using four candlelight complementary emitters: red, yellow, green, and sky-blue phosphorescent dyes. These dyes, in the present system, can be vacuum deposited into two emission layers that are separated by a nanolayer of carrier modulation material that is used to maximize very high CRI and energy efficiency. A nano carrier modulation layer also played a significant role in maintaining the low blue emission and high-red emission, the low color temperature of device was obtained. Importantly, a romantic sensation giving and supposedly physiologically friendly candlelight style emission can hence be driven by electricity in lieu of hydrocarbon burning and greenhouse gas-releasing candles that were invented 5000 years ago.

  3. Organic semiconductor heterojunction and its application in organic light-emitting diodes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongge

    2016-09-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have drawn increasing attention as the next generation displays and lighting sources. High efficiency and long lifetime are necessary for OLEDs in practical applications. In conventional OLEDs, the charge carriers are directly injected into the organic transport layers from electrodes, the injection barriers between the organic transport layers and electrodes are unavoidable due to the mismatch between the work function of metal electrode and the energy level of charge-transport layer, which greatly affects the performance of fabricated OLEDs. Furthermore, tandem OLEDs, which are fabricated by vertically connecting several individual electroluminescent (EL) units together in series via an appropriate charge generation layer (CGL) with the entire device driven by a single power source can significantly enhance current efficiency and stability, but their performance is strongly dependent on the used CGL, especially the power efficiency is difficult to enhance due to the increase of working voltage. Recently we found that organic semiconductor heterojunctions show efficient charge generation effect and as CGL, not only double the luminance and current efficiency, but also greatly improve the power efficiency, which is difficult in tandem OLEDs based on conventional CGLs. We also realized electrode-independent charge injection by using organic semiconductor heterojuncrions as injectors in OLEDs, and obtained comparable electroluminescent (EL) performance with that of conventional OLEDs. Here, we report the results of tandem OLEDs based on organic semiconductor heterojunctions as CGL and OLEDs using organic semiconductor heterojunctions as injectors, and discuss this working mechanism in detail.

  4. The role of an organic matrix during the formation of siliceous scales in the heliozoon Actinophrys sol (actinophryida, protista).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, P J; Patterson, D J

    1993-07-25

    Actinophrys sol is a freshwater heliozoon which has trophic and encysted body forms. During encystment, siliceous scales are laid down in silica deposition vesicles. The scales form one layer of a multi-layered cyst wall. Scale production is described using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. Silica is laid down on an organic matrix which is visible prior to silicification and after removal of silica with hydrofluoric acid. Actinophrys sol can be cultured under silica impoverished conditions, with the result that the siliceous plates are absent. The cysts continue to form but are fragile. Silica is not a prerequisite for the processes of encystment and cyst formation. Copyright © 1993 Gustav Fischer Verlag · Stuttgart · Jena · New York. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  5. Stabilization of chloro-organics using organophilic bentonite in a cement-blast furnace slag matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, R; Maffucci, L; Santoro, L; Glasser, F P

    2001-01-01

    The application of cement-based stabilisation/solidification treatment to organic-containing wastes is made difficult by the adverse effect of organics on cement hydration. The use of organophilic clays as pre-solidification adsorbents of the organic compounds can reduce this problem because of the high adsorption power of these clays and their compatibility with the cementitious matrix. This work presents an investigation of the effect on hydration kinetics, physico-mechanical properties and leaching behaviour of cement-based solidified waste forms containing 2-chlorophenol and 1-chloronapthalene adsorbed on organophilic bentonites. These were prepared by cation exchange with benzyldimethyloctadecylammonium chloride and trimethyloctadecylammonium chloride. The binder was a 30% pozzolanic cement, 70% granulated blast furnace slag mixture. Several binder-to-bentonite ratios and different concentrations of the organics on the bentonite were used. Kinetics of hydration were studied by measurement of chemically bound water and by means of thermal and calorimetric analyses. Microstructure and other physico-mechanical properties of the solidified forms were studied by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and unconfined compressive strength measurement. Leaching was checked by two different leaching tests: one dynamic, on monolithic samples, and the other static, on powdered samples. This study indicates that the incorporation of the organic-loaded bentonite in the binder matrix causes modifications in the hardened samples by altering cement hydration. The effects of the two organic contaminants are differentiated.

  6. Recent advances in light outcoupling from white organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gather, Malte C.; Reineke, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been successfully introduced to the smartphone display market and have geared up to become contenders for applications in general illumination where they promise to combine efficient generation of white light with excellent color quality, glare-free illumination, and highly attractive designs. Device efficiency is the key requirement for such white OLEDs, not only from a sustainability perspective, but also because at the high brightness required for general illumination, losses lead to heating and may, thus, cause rapid device degradation. The efficiency of white OLEDs increased tremendously over the past two decades, and internal charge-to-photon conversion can now be achieved at ˜100% yield. However, the extraction of photons remains rather inefficient (typically <30%). Here, we provide an introduction to the underlying physics of outcoupling in white OLEDs and review recent progress toward making light extraction more efficient. We describe how structures that scatter, refract, or diffract light can be attached to the outside of white OLEDs (external outcoupling) or can be integrated close to the active layers of the device (internal outcoupling). Moreover, the prospects of using top-emitting metal-metal microcavity designs for white OLEDs and of tuning the average orientation of the emissive molecules within the OLED are discussed.

  7. Organic semiconductor heterojunctions and its application in organic light-emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Dongge

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the most important aspects of organic semiconductor heterojunctions, including the basic concepts and electrical properties. It comprehensively discusses the application of organic semiconductor heterojunctions as charge injectors and charge generation layers in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Semiconductor heterojunctions are the basis for constructing high-performance optoelectronic devices. In recent decades, organic semiconductors have been increasingly used to fabricate heterojunction devices, especially in OLEDs, and the subject has attracted a great deal of attention and evoked many new phenomena and interpretations in the field. This important application is based on the low dielectric constant of organic semiconductors and the weak non-covalent electronic interactions between them, which means that they easily form accumulation heterojunctions. As we know, the accumulation-type space charge region is highly conductive, which is an important property for high...

  8. THE COMPLEX ORGANIZATION OF EUKARYOTIC CELL NUCLEUS (III: THE NUCLEAR MATRIX AND THE NUCLEAR LAMINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian S. Cimpeanu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A large variety of nuclear fibrous proteins (such as actin, myosin, lamin B, transcription factors, topoisomerases, etc represent constitutive elements of complex structures present in the eukaryotic nuclei: the nuclear matrix and the nuclear lamina, repectively. These nuclear compartments, with fibrous network-like structure, play crucialroles in structural organization of nuclei, chromatin remodeling, DNA transcription, signals transduction, cell cycle regulation, embryonic development and other nuclear basic processes.

  9. An Investigation of the Distribution of Power and Leader Effectiveness in Matrix Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Multimethod Matrix," Psychological Bulletin, 56: 81-105 (April 1959). Cartwright , Dorwin . "Influence, Leadership, Control," Handbook of Organizations, edited...and Kaplan, 1950; Stotland, 1959). Definitions also vary in the extent to which they restrict power to interpersonal relationships ( Cartwright , 1959... Cartwright , 1959; Dansereau et al., 1975; Yukl, 1981; Yukl, 1989a). This perspective focuses on dyadic processes and perceptions rather than on the qualities

  10. Insights into the structure and composition of the peritubular dentin organic matrix and the lamina limitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertassoni, Luiz Eduardo; Stankoska, Katerina; Swain, Michael Vincent

    2012-02-01

    Dentin is a mineralized dental tissue underlying the outer enamel that has a peculiar micro morphology. It is composed of micrometer sized tubules that are surrounded by a highly mineralized structure, called peritubular dentin (PTD), and embedded in a collagen-rich matrix, named intertubular dentin. The PTD has been thought to be composed of a highly mineralized collagen-free organic matrix with unknown composition. Here we tested the hypothesis that proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, two important organic structural features found in dentin, are key participants in the microstructure and composition of the PTD. To test this hypothesis dentin blocks were demineralized with 10 vol% citric acid for 2 min and either digested with 1mg/ml TPCK-treated trypsin with 0.2 ammonium bicarbonate at pH 7.9 (TRY) or 0.1 U/mL C-ABC with 50mM Tris, 60mM sodium acetate and 0.02% bovine serum albumin at pH 8.0 (C-ABC). TRY is known to cleave the protein core of dentin proteoglycans, whereas C-ABC is expected to selectively remove glycosaminoglycans. All specimens were digested for 48 h in 37°C, dehydrated in ascending grades of acetone, immersed in HMDS, platinum coated and imaged using an FE-SEM. Images of demineralized dentin revealed a meshwork of noncollagenous fibrils protruding towards the tubule lumen following removal of the peritubular mineral and confirmed the lack of collagen in the peritubular matrix. Further, images revealed that the peritubular organic network originates from a sheet-like membrane covering the entire visible length of tubule, called lamina limitans. Confirming our initial hypothesis, after the digestion with C-ABC the organic network appeared to vanish, while the lamina limitans was preserved. This suggests that glycosaminoglycans are the main component of the PTD organic network. Following digestion with TRY, both the organic network and the lamina limitans disappeared, thus suggesting that the lamina limitans may be primarily composed of

  11. Thin film Encapsulations of Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Fa-Ta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various encapsulated films for flexible organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs were studied in this work, where gas barrier layers including inorganic Al2O3 thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition, organic Parylene C thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition, and their combination were considered. The transmittance and water vapor transmission rate of the various organic and inorgabic encapsulated films were tested. The effects of the encapsulated films on the luminance and current density of the OLEDs were discussed, and the life time experiments of the OLEDs with these encapsulated films were also conducted. The results showed that the transmittance are acceptable even the PET substrate were coated two Al2O3 and Parylene C layers. The results also indicated the WVTR of the PET substrate improved by coating the barrier layers. In the encapsulation performance, it indicates the OLED with Al2O3 /PET, 1 pair/PET, and 2 pairs/PET presents similarly higher luminance than the other two cases. Although the 1 pair/PET encapsulation behaves a litter better luminance than the 2 pairs/PET encapsulation, the 2 pairs/PET encapsulation has much better life time. The OLED with 2 pairs/PET encapsulation behaves near double life time to the 1 pair encapsulation, and four times to none encapsulation.

  12. Modeling self-organizing traffic lights with elementary cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    There have been several highway traffic models proposed based on cellular automata. The simplest one is elementary cellular automaton rule 184. We extend this model to city traffic with cellular automata coupled at intersections using only rules 184, 252, and 136. The simplicity of the model offers a clear understanding of the main properties of city traffic and its phase transitions. We use the proposed model to compare two methods for coordinating traffic lights: a green-wave method that tries to optimize phases according to expected flows and a self-organizing method that adapts to the current traffic conditions. The self-organizing method delivers considerable improvements over the green-wave method. For low densities, the self-organizing method promotes the formation and coordination of platoons that flow freely in four directions, i.e. with a maximum velocity and no stops. For medium densities, the method allows a constant usage of the intersections, exploiting their maximum flux capacity. For high dens...

  13. A role for topographic cues in the organization of collagenous matrix by corneal fibroblasts and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamichos, Dimitrios; Funderburgh, Martha L; Hutcheon, Audrey E K; Zieske, James D; Du, Yiqin; Wu, Jian; Funderburgh, James L

    2014-01-01

    Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) and corneal stromal stem cells (CSSC) each secrete and organize a thick stroma-like extracellular matrix in response to different substrata, but neither cell type organizes matrix on tissue-culture polystyrene. This study compared cell differentiation and extracellular matrix secreted by these two cell types when they were cultured on identical substrata, polycarbonate Transwell filters. After 4 weeks in culture, both cell types upregulated expression of genes marking differentiated keratocytes (KERA, CHST6, AQP1, B3GNT7). Absolute expression levels of these genes and secretion of keratan sulfate proteoglycans were significantly greater in CSSC than HCF. Both cultures produced extensive extracellular matrix of aligned collagen fibrils types I and V, exhibiting cornea-like lamellar structure. Unlike HCF, CSSC produced little matrix in the presence of serum. Construct thickness and collagen organization was enhanced by TGF-ß3. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the polycarbonate membrane revealed shallow parallel grooves with spacing of 200-300 nm, similar to the topography of aligned nanofiber substratum which we previously showed to induce matrix organization by CSSC. These results demonstrate that both corneal fibroblasts and stromal stem cells respond to a specific pattern of topographical cues by secreting highly organized extracellular matrix typical of corneal stroma. The data also suggest that the potential for matrix secretion and organization may not be directly related to the expression of molecular markers used to identify differentiated keratocytes.

  14. A role for topographic cues in the organization of collagenous matrix by corneal fibroblasts and stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Karamichos

    Full Text Available Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF and corneal stromal stem cells (CSSC each secrete and organize a thick stroma-like extracellular matrix in response to different substrata, but neither cell type organizes matrix on tissue-culture polystyrene. This study compared cell differentiation and extracellular matrix secreted by these two cell types when they were cultured on identical substrata, polycarbonate Transwell filters. After 4 weeks in culture, both cell types upregulated expression of genes marking differentiated keratocytes (KERA, CHST6, AQP1, B3GNT7. Absolute expression levels of these genes and secretion of keratan sulfate proteoglycans were significantly greater in CSSC than HCF. Both cultures produced extensive extracellular matrix of aligned collagen fibrils types I and V, exhibiting cornea-like lamellar structure. Unlike HCF, CSSC produced little matrix in the presence of serum. Construct thickness and collagen organization was enhanced by TGF-ß3. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the polycarbonate membrane revealed shallow parallel grooves with spacing of 200-300 nm, similar to the topography of aligned nanofiber substratum which we previously showed to induce matrix organization by CSSC. These results demonstrate that both corneal fibroblasts and stromal stem cells respond to a specific pattern of topographical cues by secreting highly organized extracellular matrix typical of corneal stroma. The data also suggest that the potential for matrix secretion and organization may not be directly related to the expression of molecular markers used to identify differentiated keratocytes.

  15. Magnetic field effect in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedermeier, Ulrich

    2009-12-14

    The discovery of a magnetic field dependent resistance change of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) in the year 2003 has attracted considerable scientific and industrial research interest. However, despite previous progress in the field of organic spin-electronics, the phenomenon of the ''organic magnetoresistance (OMR) effect'' is not yet completely understood. In order to improve the understanding of the microscopic mechanisms which ultimately cause the OMR effect, experimental investigations as well as theoretical considerations concerning the OMR are addressed in this thesis. In polymer-based OLED devices the functional dependencies of the OMR effect on relevant parameters like magnetic field, operating voltage, operating current and temperature are investigated. Based on these results, previously published models for potential OMR mechanisms are critically analyzed and evaluated. Finally, a concept for the OMR effect is favored which suggests magnetic field dependent changes of the spin state of electron-hole pairs as being responsible for changes in current flow and light emission in OLEDs. In the framework of this concept it is possible to explain all results from own measurements as well as results from literature. Another important finding made in this thesis is the fact that the value of the OMR signal in the investigated OLED devices can be enhanced by appropriate electrical and optical conditioning processes. In particular, electrical conditioning causes a significant enhancement of the OMR values, while at the same time it has a negative effect on charge carrier transport and optical device characteristics. These results can be explained by additional results from charge carrier extraction measurements which suggest that electrical conditioning leads to an increase in the number of electronic trap states inside the emission layer of the investigated OLED devices. The positive influence of trap states on the OMR effect is

  16. Passive strain-induced matrix synthesis and organization in shape-specific, cartilaginous neotissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBarb, Regina F; Paschos, Nikolaos K; Abeug, Reedge; Makris, Eleftherios A; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2014-12-01

    Tissue-engineered musculoskeletal soft tissues typically lack the appropriate mechanical robustness of their native counterparts, hindering their clinical applicability. With structure and function being intimately linked, efforts to capture the anatomical shape and matrix organization of native tissues are imperative to engineer functionally robust and anisotropic tissues capable of withstanding the biomechanically complex in vivo joint environment. The present study sought to tailor the use of passive axial compressive loading to drive matrix synthesis and reorganization within self-assembled, shape-specific fibrocartilaginous constructs, with the goal of developing functionally anisotropic neotissues. Specifically, shape-specific fibrocartilaginous neotissues were subjected to 0, 0.01, 0.05, or 0.1 N axial loads early during tissue culture. Results found the 0.1-N load to significantly increase both collagen and glycosaminoglycan synthesis by 27% and 67%, respectively, and to concurrently reorganize the matrix by promoting greater matrix alignment, compaction, and collagen crosslinking compared with all other loading levels. These structural enhancements translated into improved functional properties, with the 0.1-N load significantly increasing both the relaxation modulus and Young's modulus by 96% and 255%, respectively, over controls. Finite element analysis further revealed the 0.1-N uniaxial load to induce multiaxial tensile and compressive strain gradients within the shape-specific neotissues, with maxima of 10.1%, 18.3%, and -21.8% in the XX-, YY-, and ZZ-directions, respectively. This indicates that strains created in different directions in response to a single axis load drove the observed anisotropic functional properties. Together, results of this study suggest that strain thresholds exist within each axis to promote matrix synthesis, alignment, and compaction within the shape-specific neotissues. Tailoring of passive axial loading, thus, presents

  17. Carbon Nanotube Driver Circuit for 6 × 6 Organic Light Emitting Diode Display

    KAUST Repository

    Zou, Jianping

    2015-06-29

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is expected to be a very promising material for flexible and transparent driver circuits for active matrix organic light emitting diode (AM OLED) displays due to its high field-effect mobility, excellent current carrying capacity, optical transparency and mechanical flexibility. Although there have been several publications about SWNT driver circuits, none of them have shown static and dynamic images with the AM OLED displays. Here we report on the first successful chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown SWNT network thin film transistor (TFT) driver circuits for static and dynamic AM OLED displays with 6 × 6 pixels. The high device mobility of ~45 cm2V−1s−1 and the high channel current on/off ratio of ~105 of the SWNT-TFTs fully guarantee the control capability to the OLED pixels. Our results suggest that SWNT-TFTs are promising backplane building blocks for future OLED displays.

  18. Matrix production and organization by endothelial colony forming cells in mechanically strained engineered tissue constructs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicky de Jonge

    Full Text Available AIMS: Tissue engineering is an innovative method to restore cardiovascular tissue function by implanting either an in vitro cultured tissue or a degradable, mechanically functional scaffold that gradually transforms into a living neo-tissue by recruiting tissue forming cells at the site of implantation. Circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs are capable of differentiating into endothelial cells as well as a mesenchymal ECM-producing phenotype, undergoing Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal-transition (EndoMT. We investigated the potential of ECFCs to produce and organize ECM under the influence of static and cyclic mechanical strain, as well as stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1. METHODS AND RESULTS: A fibrin-based 3D tissue model was used to simulate neo-tissue formation. Extracellular matrix organization was monitored using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. ECFCs produced collagen and also elastin, but did not form an organized matrix, except when cultured with TGFβ1 under static strain. Here, collagen was aligned more parallel to the strain direction, similar to Human Vena Saphena Cell-seeded controls. Priming ECFC with TGFβ1 before exposing them to strain led to more homogenous matrix production. CONCLUSIONS: Biochemical and mechanical cues can induce extracellular matrix formation by ECFCs in tissue models that mimic early tissue formation. Our findings suggest that priming with bioactives may be required to optimize neo-tissue development with ECFCs and has important consequences for the timing of stimuli applied to scaffold designs for both in vitro and in situ cardiovascular tissue engineering. The results obtained with ECFCs differ from those obtained with other cell sources, such as vena saphena-derived myofibroblasts, underlining the need for experimental models like ours to test novel cell sources for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  19. Organic oxide/Al composite cathode in small molecular organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Fuh-Shun; Tsai, Zen-Jay; Wen, Ten-Chin; Wu, Ching-In; Chung, Chia-Tin

    2006-07-01

    This study addresses the feasibility of using an organic oxide/Al composite cathode to fabricate the small molecular organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). A supplementary organic buffer film is placed at the interface between the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) and the organic oxide/Al complex layers. Incorporating the rubrene/poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (PEGDE) buffer layers into the composite cathode structure markedly improves the performance of devices. The luminous efficiencies of Alq3-based OLEDs biased at ˜100mA /cm2 are 4.8 and 5.1cd/A for rubrene (50Å)/PEGDE (15Å)/Al and rubrene (50Å)/PEGDE (15Å)/LiF (5Å)/Al cathode devices, and 1.3 and 3.8cd/A for devices with Al and LiF (5Å)/Al cathodes, respectively.

  20. Understanding and predicting the orientation of heteroleptic phosphors in organic light-emitting materials (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tobias D.; Jurow, Matthew; Mayr, Christian; Lampe, Thomas; Djurovic, Peter I.; Thompson, Mark E.; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have made tremendous progress in recent years. The internal quantum efficiency was continuously improved and is nowadays close to the ideal value of unity in state-of-the-art OLEDs. However, still only a small fraction of the internally generated power can be used for lighting aspects as most of the light is captured inside the device due to low outcoupling factors of typically 25%. One promising approach to increase this limiting factor is using an anisotropic orientation of the dye molecules. In particular, horizontal orientation of transition dipole vectors (TDV) of the emitting species is a powerful tool to improve the efficiency of OLEDs. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms for emitter orientation of heteroleptic phosphors, we compared the anisotropy factor of emissive guest/host systems prepared by thermal evaporation using different Ir-complexes incorporating coumarin and phenylpyridin based ligands. These molecules exhibit similar high permanent dipole moments and electrostatic surface potentials but differ in their molecular structure. Interestingly, only molecules with both aromatic and aliphatic ligands show non-isotropic distributions of their TDVs when co-deposited with a matrix material. From these findings we conclude that molecular orientation of heteroleptic Ir-complexes occurs instantaneously at the surface of the growing film and is driven by chemical interactions with the surrounding media, i.e. the vacuum and the aromatic matrix side. Furthermore, it is possible to predict the anisotropy factor for arbitrary molecular orientation with a mathematical model taking into account the geometrical distribution of the TDV on the molecules.

  1. Modeling nanostructure-enhanced light trapping in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Jost

    A promising approach for improving the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells (OSCs) is by incorporating nanostructures in their thin film architecture to improve the light absorption in the device’s active polymer layers. Here, we present a modelling framework for the prediction...... of optical and plasmonic field enhancement by nanostructures in (or close to) the active layers and electrodes in OSCs. We incorporate finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations alongside semi- analytical approaches, as the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) and mode-coupling theory. Our simulation......-compatible method for non-periodic electrode structuring by pores of controlled dimensions, formed through anodic oxidation of sputter-deposited high-purity aluminium films [3]. [1] Kluge, C., et al. Multi-periodic nanostructures for photon control. Optics Express, 22 (S5), A1363. (2014) [2] Skigin, D., et al...

  2. Kinetics of transient electroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Manju; Kumar, Pankaj; Chand, Suresh; Brahme, Nameeta; Kher, R. S.; Khokhar, M. S. K.

    2008-08-01

    Mathematical simulation on the rise and decay kinetics of transient electroluminescence (EL) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is presented. The transient EL is studied with respect to a step voltage pulse. While rising, for lower values of time, the EL intensity shows a quadratic dependence on (t - tdel), where tdel is the time delay observed in the onset of EL, and finally attains saturation at a sufficiently large time. When the applied voltage is switched off, the initial EL decay shows an exponential dependence on (t - tdec), where tdec is the time when the voltage is switched off. The simulated results are compared with the transient EL performance of a bilayer OLED based on small molecular bis(2-methyl 8-hydroxyquinoline)(triphenyl siloxy) aluminium (SAlq). Transient EL studies have been carried out at different voltage pulse amplitudes. The simulated results show good agreement with experimental data. Using these simulated results the lifetime of the excitons in SAlq has also been calculated.

  3. Light absorption by organic carbon from wood combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosols affect the radiative balance of the Earth by absorbing and scattering light. While black carbon (BC is highly absorbing, some organic carbon (OC also has significant absorption, especially at near-ultraviolet and blue wavelengths. To the extent that OC absorbs visible light, it may be a non-negligible contributor to positive direct aerosol radiative forcing. Quantification of that absorption is necessary so that radiative-transfer models can evaluate the net radiative effect of OC.

    In this work, we examine absorption by primary OC emitted from solid fuel pyrolysis. We provide absorption spectra of this material, which can be related to the imaginary refractive index. This material has polar character but is not fully water-soluble: more than 92% was extractable by methanol or acetone, compared with 73% for water and 52% for hexane. Water-soluble OC contributes to light absorption at both ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. However, a larger portion of the absorption comes from OC that is extractable only by methanol. Absorption spectra of water-soluble OC are similar to literature reports. We compare spectra for material generated with different wood type, wood size and pyrolysis temperature. Higher wood temperature is the main factor creating OC with higher absorption; changing wood temperature from a devolatilizing state of 210 °C to a near-flaming state of 360 °C causes about a factor of four increase in mass-normalized absorption at visible wavelengths. A clear-sky radiative transfer model suggests that, despite the absorption, both high-temperature and low-temperature OC result in negative top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing over a surface with an albedo of 0.19 and positive radiative forcing over bright surfaces. Unless absorption by real ambient aerosol is higher than that measured here, it probably affects global average clear-sky forcing very little, but could be important in energy balances over bright

  4. Spectral-distortion-free light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes using nanoscale photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Yong Sub; Nyun Kim, Kyu; Hwang, Ju Hyun; Hwee Park, Cheol; Jung, Sun-Gyu; Park, Young Wook; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Despite their generally good performance, photonic crystal (PC)-based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) encounter a serious spectral distortion problem. In this study, we obtained spectral-distortion-free PC-based OLEDs by lowering the pitch (period of the PC) to less than a half the emission wavelength, using a simple and scalable nanoscale process of laser interference lithography. The demonstrated OLEDs with 200 nm pitch-size nanoscale periodic hole arrays exhibited negligible changes in the Internal Commission on Illumination 1931 color coordinate of Δ (0.0104, 0.0078) and a peak wavelength of Δ0 nm (relative to the reference), while maintaining the function of the internal light extraction layer, manifested as a 23% enhancement of the external quantum efficiency (EQE). The enhancement of the EQE reached 85% after incorporating a micro-lens array. The improved light extraction, spectral-distortion-free characteristic, and excellent color stability over a broad range of viewing angles were successfully derived by performing finite difference time domain simulations.

  5. Escaped and Trapped Emission of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Shi-Xiong; WU Zhao-Xin; ZHAO Xuan-Ke; HOU Xun

    2012-01-01

    By locating the emitters around the first and second antinode of the metal electrode, the escaped and trapped emission of small molecule based bottom emission organic light-emitting diodes is investigated by using an integrating sphere, a fiber spectrometer and a glass hemisphere. It is found that the external coupling ratio by locating the emitters at the second antinode (at a distance of 220 nm from the cathode) is 70%, which is higher than that of an emitter at the first antinode (60 nm from the cathode) in theory and experiment. Extending the "half-space" dipole model by taking the dipole radiation pattern into account, we also calculate the optical coupling efficiency for the emitter at both the first and second antinode. Our experimental and theoretical results will benefit the optimization of device structures for the higher out-coupling efficiency.%By locating the emitters around the first and second antinode of the metal electrode,the escaped and trapped emission of small molecule based bottom emission organic light-emitting diodes is investigated by using an integrating sphere,a fiber spectrometer and a glass hemisphere.It is found that the external coupling ratio by locating the emitters at the second antinode (at a distance of 220 nm from the cathode) is 70%,which is higher than that of an emitter at the first antinode (60nm from the cathode) in theory and experiment.Extending the "half-space" dipole model by taking the dipole radiation pattern into account,we also calculate the optical coupling efficiency for the emitter at both the first and second antinode.Our experimental and theoretical results will benefit the optimization of device structures for the higher out-coupling efficiency.

  6. Methodology for matrix support: interfaces between Occupational Therapy and the health care organizing tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone de Pádua Ayresb

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses matrix support as a tool for transforming the ways of organizing health care,particularly concerning primary care. To this end, it conceptualizes the subject and reflects on the growing roleof the Occupational Therapist in matrix teams since the creation of the Centers of Support for Family HealthCare (NASF by the Brazilian Health Agency. Moreover, it discusses the issues raised during the workshopon “Teamwork and matrix support in Primary Health Care” held in October 2011, at the Primary Health CareSymposium of the XII Brazilian Congress and IX Latin American Congress of Occupational Therapy. It introducesreflections on the challenges encountered in the practice of matrix support in the everyday work in the NASFs.It was possible to observe that the obstacles found have been impairing workers’ activities; nevertheless, what isvalued in this article is the importance of the identification of these obstacles as the first step to overcome them,as well as the occupational therapist’s role as one of the actors of the transformations needed.

  7. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  8. Organic xenobiotics removal in constructed wetlands, with emphasis on the importance of the support matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dordio, A V; Carvalho, A J P

    2013-05-15

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) are increasingly popular as an efficient and economical alternative to conventional wastewater treatment processes for removal, among other pollutants, of organic xenobiotics. In CWs, pollutants are removed through the concerted action of their components, whose contribution can be maximized by careful selection of those components. Specifically for non-biodegradable organic pollutants, the materials used as support matrix of CWs can play a major role through sorption phenomena. In this review the role played by such materials in CWs is examined with special focus on the amount of research that has been conducted to date on their sorption properties relatively to organic compounds. Where available, the reports on the utilization of some of those materials on pilot or full-scale CWs are also recognized. Greatest interest has been directed to cheaper and widely available materials. Among these, clays are generally regarded as efficient sorbents, but materials originated from agricultural wastes have also gained recent popularity. Most available studies are lab-scale batch sorption experiments, whereas assays performed in full-scale CWs are still scarce. However, the available lab-scale data points to an interesting potential of many of these materials for experimentation as support matrix of CWs targeted for organic xenobiotics removal.

  9. Organic light sources look forward to optimize the photosynthesis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattori, Valeria; Williams, J. A. Gareth; Murphy, Lisa; Cocchi, Massimo; Kalinowski, Jan

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a series of organic LEDs that exploit the monomer and excimer emissions from single phosphor dopant emitters. These organic LEDs were found to be effective in the simultaneous creation of blue and red emission bands essential for plant growth. By varying the concentration of novel phosphorescent dopants selected from a series of newly synthesized platinum complexes [Pt L22-25Cl], we have manufactured the blue-biased LEDs [with the Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE) coordinates ( x, y) (0.27, 0.37)] and the red-biased LEDs [CIE coordinates (0.53, 0.38)], at a high luminance of ≈500 cd/m 2 and with external electroluminescence (EL) quantum efficiency of 15-18% photon/electron (→ power efficiency 8-12 lm/W). The EL spectrum most suitable for the action spectrum of photosynthesis yield was that of a device incorporating 20 wt.% content of [Pt L23Cl]. This LED yielded photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) approaching 10 μmol s -1 W -1 of the electrical power, a value which significantly exceeds that for the professional lamps used commonly for horticultural lighting.

  10. Inkjet printed polymer light-emitting devices fabricated by thermal embedding of semiconducting polymer nanospheres in an inert matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisslthaler, Evelin; Sax, Stefan; Scherf, Ullrich; Mauthner, Gernot; Moderegger, Erik; Landfester, Katharina; List, Emil J. W.

    2008-05-01

    An aqueous dispersion of semiconducting polymer nanospheres was used to fabricate polymer light-emitting devices by inkjet printing in an easy-to-apply process with a minimum feature size of 20μm. To form the devices, the electroluminescent material was printed on a nonemitting polystyrene matrix layer and embedded by thermal annealing. The process allows the printing of light-emitting thin-film devices without extensive optimization of film homogeneity and thickness of the active layer. Optical micrographs of printed device arrays, electroluminescence emission spectra, and I /V characteristics of printed ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PS/SPN/Al devices are presented.

  11. Efficient separation of conjugated polymers using a water soluble glycoprotein matrix: from fluorescence materials to light emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, Netta; Wildeman, Jurjen; Mentovich, Elad D; Schnitzler, Tobias; Belgorodsky, Bogdan; Prusty, Deepak K; Rimmerman, Dolev; Herrmann, Andreas; Richter, Shachar

    2014-03-01

    Optically active bio-composite blends of conjugated polymers or oligomers are fabricated by complexing them with bovine submaxilliary mucin (BSM) protein. The BSM matrix is exploited to host hydrophobic extended conjugated π-systems and to prevent undesirable aggregation and render such materials water soluble. This method allows tuning the emission color of solutions and films from the basic colors to the technologically challenging white emission. Furthermore, electrically driven light emitting biological devices are prepared and operated.

  12. Matrix Organization and Merit Factor Evaluation as a Method to Address the Challenge of Finding a Polymer Material for Roll Coated Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Eva; Livi, Francesco; Hagemann, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The results presented demonstrate how the screening of 104 light-absorbing low band gap polymers for suitability in roll coated polymer solar cells can be accomplished through rational synthesis according to a matrix where 8 donor and 13 acceptor units are organized in rows and columns. Synthesis...... of all the polymers corresponding to all combinations of donor and acceptor units is followed by characterization of all the materials with respect to molecular weight, electrochemical energy levels, band gaps, photochemical stability, carrier mobility, and photovoltaic parameters. The photovoltaic...... silver comb back electrode structure. The matrix organization enables fast identification of active layer materials according to a weighted merit factor that includes more than simply the power conversion efficiency and is used as a method to identify the lead candidates. Based on several characteristics...

  13. Structural characterization of PTX3 disulfide bond network and its multimeric status in cumulus matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inforzato, Antonio; Rivieccio, Vincenzo; Morreale, Antonio P; Bastone, Antonio; Salustri, Antonietta; Scarchilli, Laura; Verdoliva, Antonio; Vincenti, Silvia; Gallo, Grazia; Chiapparino, Caterina; Pacello, Lucrezia; Nucera, Eleonora; Serlupi-Crescenzi, Ottaviano; Day, Anthony J; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; De Santis, Rita; Salvatori, Giovanni

    2008-04-11

    PTX3 is an acute phase glycoprotein that plays key roles in resistance to certain pathogens and in female fertility. PTX3 exerts its functions by interacting with a number of structurally unrelated molecules, a capacity that is likely to rely on its complex multimeric structure stabilized by interchain disulfide bonds. In this study, PAGE analyses performed under both native and denaturing conditions indicated that human recombinant PTX3 is mainly composed of covalently linked octamers. The network of disulfide bonds supporting this octameric assembly was resolved by mass spectrometry and Cys to Ser site-directed mutagenesis. Here we report that cysteine residues at positions 47, 49, and 103 in the N-terminal domain form three symmetric interchain disulfide bonds stabilizing four protein subunits in a tetrameric arrangement. Additional interchain disulfide bonds formed by the C-terminal domain cysteines Cys(317) and Cys(318) are responsible for linking the PTX3 tetramers into octamers. We also identified three intrachain disulfide bonds within the C-terminal domain that we used as structural constraints to build a new three-dimensional model for this domain. Previously it has been shown that PTX3 is a key component of the cumulus oophorus extracellular matrix, which forms around the oocyte prior to ovulation, because cumuli from PTX3(-/-) mice show defective matrix organization. Recombinant PTX3 is able to restore the normal phenotype ex vivo in cumuli from PTX3(-/-) mice. Here we demonstrate that PTX3 Cys to Ser mutants, mainly assembled into tetramers, exhibited wild type rescue activity, whereas a mutant, predominantly composed of dimers, had impaired functionality. These findings indicate that protein oligomerization is essential for PTX3 activity within the cumulus matrix and implicate PTX3 tetramers as the functional molecular units required for cumulus matrix organization and stabilization.

  14. Study of Nanostructured Polymeric Composites Used for Organic Light Emitting Diodes and Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Nang Dinh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric nanocomposite films from PEDOT and MEH-PPV embedded with surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles for the hole transport layer and emission layer were prepared, respectively, for organic emitting diodes (OLEDs. The composite of MEH-PPV+nc-TiO2 was used for organic solar cells (OSCs. The characterization of these nanocomposites and devices showed that electrical (I-V characteristics and spectroscopic (photoluminescent properties of conjugate polymers were enhanced by the incorporation of nc-TiO2 in the polymers. The organic light emitting diodes made from the nanocomposite films would exhibit a larger photonic efficiency and a longer lasting life. For the organic solar cells made from MEH-PPV+nc-TiO2 composite, a fill factor reached a value of about 0.34. Under illumination by light with a power density of 50 mW/cm2, the photoelectrical conversion efficiency was about 0.15% corresponding to an open circuit voltage Voc = 0.126 V and a shortcut circuit current density Jsc = 1.18 mA/cm2.

  15. Gas transport in metal organic framework–polyetherimide mixed matrix membranes: The role of the polyetherimide backbone structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegde, Maruti; Shahid, S.; Norder, Ben; Dingemans, Theo J.; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.

    2015-01-01

    We report on how the morphology of the polymer matrix, i.e. amorphous vs. semi-crystalline, affects the gas transport properties in a series of mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) using Cu3(BTC)2 as the metal organic framework (MOF) filler. The aim of our work is to demonstrate how incorporation of

  16. Gas transport in metal organic framework–polyetherimide mixed matrix membranes: The role of the polyetherimide backbone structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegde, Maruti; Shahid, Salman; Norder, Ben; Dingemans, Theo J.; Nijmeijer, Kitty

    2015-01-01

    We report on how the morphology of the polymer matrix, i.e. amorphous vs. semi-crystalline, affects the gas transport properties in a series of mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) using Cu3(BTC)2 as the metal organic framework (MOF) filler. The aim of our work is to demonstrate how incorporation of Cu3(BT

  17. Study of natural organic dyes as active material for fabrication of organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Juárez, A.; Castillo, D.; Guaman, A.; Espinosa, S.; Obregón, D.

    2016-09-01

    The scientific community and some sectors of industry have been working with organic dyes for successful applications in OLED's, OSC's, however, most of the used dyes and pigments are synthetic. In this work is investigated the use of natural dyes for its application in organic light emitting diodes, some of the studied species are chili, blackberry, guayacan flower, cochinilla, tree tomato, capuli, etc. In this study the dyes are deposited by direct deposition and SOL-GEL process doped with the natural organic dye, both methods show good performance and lower fabrication costs for dye extraction, this represents a new alternative for the fabrication of OLED devices with low requirements in technology. Most representative results are presented for Dactylopius Coccus Costa (cochinilla) and raphanus sativus' skin.

  18. Organic light emitting device architecture for reducing the number of organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrade, Brian; Esler, James

    2011-10-18

    An organic light emitting device is provided. The device includes an anode and a cathode. A first emissive layer is disposed between the anode and the cathode. The first emissive layer includes a first non-emitting organic material, which is an organometallic material present in the first emissive layer in a concentration of at least 50 wt %. The first emissive layer also includes a first emitting organic material. A second emissive layer is disposed between the first emissive layer and the cathode, preferably, in direct contact with the first emissive layer. The second emissive material includes a second non-emitting organic material and a second emitting organic material. The first and second non-emitting materials, and the first and second emitting materials, are all different materials. A first non-emissive layer is disposed between the first emissive layer and the anode, and in direct contact with the first emissive layer. The first non- emissive layer comprises the first non-emissive organic material.

  19. The dentin organic matrix - limitations of restorative dentistry hidden on the nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertassoni, Luiz E; Orgel, Joseph P.R.; Antipova, Olga; Swain, Michael V [IIT; (Sydney)

    2012-07-25

    The prevention and treatment of dental caries are major challenges occurring in dentistry. The foundations for modern management of this dental disease, estimated to affect 90% of adults in Western countries, rest upon the dependence of ultrafine interactions between synthetic polymeric biomaterials and nanostructured supramolecular assemblies that compose the tooth organic substrate. Research has shown, however, that this interaction imposes less than desirable long-term prospects for current resin-based dental restorations. Here we review progress in the identification of the nanostructural organization of the organic matrix of dentin, the largest component of the tooth structure, and highlight aspects relevant to understating the interaction of restorative biomaterials with the dentin substrate. We offer novel insights into the influence of the hierarchically assembled supramolecular structure of dentin collagen fibrils and their structural dependence on water molecules. Secondly, we review recent evidence for the participation of proteoglycans in composing the dentin organic network. Finally, we discuss the relation of these complexly assembled nanostructures with the protease degradative processes driving the low durability of current resin-based dental restorations. We argue in favour of the structural limitations that these complexly organized and inherently hydrated organic structures may impose on the clinical prospects of current hydrophobic and hydrolyzable dental polymers that establish ultrafine contact with the tooth substrate.

  20. The dentin organic matrix – limitations of restorative dentistry hidden on the nanometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertassoni, Luiz E.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.; Antipova, Olga; Swain, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of dental caries are major challenges occurring in dentistry. The foundations for modern management of this dental disease, estimated to affect 90% of adults in Western countries, rest upon the dependence of ultrafine interactions between synthetic polymeric biomaterials and nanostructured supramolecular assemblies that compose the tooth organic substrate. Research has shown, however, that this interaction imposes less than desirable long-term prospects for current resin-based dental restorations. Here we review progress in the identification of the nanostructural organization of the organic matrix of dentin, the largest component of the tooth structure, and highlight aspects relevant to understating the interaction of restorative biomaterials with the dentin substrate. We offer novel insights into the influence of the hierarchically assembled supramolecular structure of dentin collagen fibrils and their structural dependence on water molecules. Secondly, we review recent evidence for the participation of proteoglycans in composing the dentin organic network. Finally, we discuss the relation of these complexly assembled nanostructures with the protease degradative processes driving the low durability of current resin-based dental restorations. We argue in favour of the structural limitations that these complexly organized and inherently hydrated organic structures may impose on the clinical prospects of current hydrophobic and hydrolyzable dental polymers that establish ultrafine contact with the tooth substrate. PMID:22414619

  1. Light scattering by horizontally oriented particles: Symmetry properties of the phase matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenier, J.W.; Muñoz, O.; Muinonen, K.; Penttilä, A.; Lindqvist, H.; Nousiainen, T.; Videen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Using elementary symmetry considerations, we present seven symmetry relations for the phase matrix of horizontally oriented particles. These relations have a wide range of validity and hold for all directions of incident and scattered electromagnetic radiation.

  2. No-relationship Between Impossibility of Faster-Than-Light Quantum Communication and Distinction of Ensembles with the Same Density Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chuan; LONG Gui-Lu; SUN Yang

    2005-01-01

    It has been claimed in the literature that impossibility of faster-than-light quantum communication has an origin of indistinguishability of ensembles with the same density matrix. We show that the two concepts are not related.We argue that even with an ideal single-atom-precision measurement, it is generally impossible to produce two ensembles with exactly the same density matrix; or to produce ensembles with the same density matrix, classical communication is necessary. Hence the impossibility of faster-than-light communication does not imply the indistinguishability of ensembles with the same density matrix.

  3. Effective field theory as a limit of R-matrix theory for light nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Gerald M.; Brown, Lowell S.; Paris, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    We study the zero channel radius limit of Wigner's R-matrix theory for two cases and show that it corresponds to nonrelativistic effective quantum field theory. We begin with the simple problem of single-channel np elastic scattering in the 1S0 channel. The dependence of the R-matrix width g2 and level energy Eλ on the channel radius a for fixed scattering length a0 and effective range r0 is determined. It is shown that these quantities have a simple pole for a critical value of the channel radius, ap=ap(a0,r0). The 3H(d ,n)4He reaction cross section, analyzed with a two-channel effective field theory in the previous paper [Phys. Rev. C 89, 014622 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevC.89.014622], is then examined using a two-channel, single-level R-matrix parametrization. The resulting S matrix is shown to be identical in these two representations in the limit that R-matrix channel radii are taken to zero. This equivalence is established by giving the relationship between the low-energy constants of the effective field theory (couplings gc and mass m*) and the R-matrix parameters (reduced width amplitudes γc and level energy Eλ). An excellent three-parameter fit to the observed astrophysical factor S¯ is found for "unphysical" values of the reduced widths, γc2<0.

  4. Effective field theory as a limit of R-matrix theory for light nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Hale, Gerald M; Paris, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    We study the zero channel radius limit of Wigner's R-matrix theory for two cases, and show that it corresponds to non-relativistic effective quantum field theory. We begin with the simple problem of single-channel n-p elastic scattering in the 1S0 channel. The dependence of the R matrix width and level energy on the channel radius, "a" for fixed scattering length a0 and effective range r0 is determined. It is shown that these quantities have a simple pole for a critical value of the channel radius. The 3H(d,n)4He reaction cross section, analyzed with a two-channel effective field theory in the previous paper, is then examined using a two-channel, single-level R-matrix parametrization. The resulting S matrix is shown to be identical in these two representations in the limit that R-matrix channel radii are taken to zero. This equivalence is established by giving the relationship between the low-energy constants of the effective field theory (couplings and mass) and the R-matrix parameters (reduced width amplitu...

  5. Organization of the lamin scaffold in the internal nuclear matrix of normal and transformed hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboro, Paola; D'Arrigo, Cristina; Repaci, Erica; Patrone, Eligio; Balbi, Cecilia

    2010-04-01

    Nuclear lamins are among the more abundant proteins making up the internal nuclear matrix, but very little is known about their structure in the nucleoplasm. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we demonstrate the organization of lamins in the nuclear matrix isolated from rat hepatocytes for the first time. Lamin epitopes are arrayed both in locally ordered clusters and in quasi-regular rows. Fourier filtering of the images demonstrates that the epitopes are placed at the nodes and halfway between the nodes of square or rhombic lattices that are about 50 nm on each side, as well as along rows at regular approximately 25-nm intervals. In addition, we have compared this structure with that of the internal nuclear matrix isolated from persistent hepatocyte nodules. In transformed hepatocytes, the islands of lamin lattice are lost, and only a partial regularity in the rows of gold particles remains. We suggest that orthogonal lattice assembly might be an intrinsic property of lamin molecules, and that the disassembly may be triggered by simple molecular events such as phosphorylation. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intense, hyperthermal source of organic radicals for matrix-isolation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Friderichsen, Anders V.; Nandi, Sreela; Ellison, G. Barney; David, Donald E.; McKinnon, J. Thomas; Lindeman, Theodore G.; Dayton, David C.; Nimlos, Mark R.

    2003-06-01

    We have incorporated a pulsed, hyperthermal nozzle with a cryostat to study the matrix-isolated infrared spectroscopy of organic radicals. The radicals are produced by pyrolysis in a heated, narrow-bore (1-mm-diam) SiC tube and then expanded into the cryostat vacuum chamber. The combination of high nozzle temperature (up to 1800 K) and near-sonic flow velocities (on the order of 104cm s-1) through the length of the 2 cm tube allows for high yield of radicals (approximately 1013 radicals pulse-1) and low residence time (on the order of 10 μs) in the nozzle. We have used this hyperthermal nozzle/matrix isolation experiment to observe the IR spectra of complex radicals such as allyl radical (CH2CHCH2), phenyl radical (C6H5), and methylperoxyl radical (CH3OO). IR spectra of samples produced with a hyperthermal nozzle are remarkably clean and relatively free of interfering radical chemistry. By monitoring the unimolecular thermal decomposition of allyl ethyl ether in the nozzle using matrix IR spectroscopy, we have derived the residence time (τnozzle) of the gas pulse in the nozzle to be around 30 μs.

  7. Matrix approach for modeling of emission from multilayer spin-polarized light-emitting diodes and lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fördös, Tibor; Postava, Kamil; Jaffrès, Henri; Pištora, Jaromír

    2014-06-01

    Spin-polarized light sources such as the spin-polarized light-emitting diodes (spin-LEDs) and spin-polarized lasers (spin-lasers) are prospective devices in which the radiative recombination of spin-polarized carriers results in emission of circularly polarized photons. The main goal of this article is to model emitted radiation and its polarization properties from spin-LED and spin-controlled vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (spin-VCSEL) solid-state structures. A novel approach based on 4 × 4 transfer matrix formalism is derived for modeling of the interaction of light with matter in active media of resonant multilayer anisotropic structure and enables magneto-optical effects. Quantum transitions, which result in photon emission, are described using general Jones source vectors.

  8. Tuning Light Emission of a Pressure-Sensitive Silicon/ZnO Nanowires Heterostructure Matrix through Piezo-phototronic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengxiao; Pan, Caofeng; Zhang, Taiping; Li, Xiaoyi; Liang, Renrong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-28

    Based on white light emission at silicon (Si)/ZnO hetrerojunction, a pressure-sensitive Si/ZnO nanowires heterostructure matrix light emitting diode (LED) array is developed. The light emission intensity of a single heterostructure LED is tuned by external strain: when the applied stress keeps increasing, the emission intensity first increases and then decreases with a maximum value at a compressive strain of 0.15-0.2%. This result is attributed to the piezo-phototronic effect, which can efficiently modulate the LED emission intensity by utilizing the strain-induced piezo-polarization charges. It could tune the energy band diagrams at the junction area and regulate the optoelectronic processes such as charge carriers generation, separation, recombination, and transport. This study achieves tuning silicon based devices through piezo-phototronic effect.

  9. Optimized Performances of Thick Film Organic Lighting-Emitting Diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiu-Ru; ZHANG Zhi-Qiang; MA Dong-Ge; SUN Run-Guang

    2008-01-01

    @@ The performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with thick film is optimized.The alternative vana-dium oxide (V2O5) and N,N'-di(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N'-diphenyl-benzidine (NPB) layers are used to enhance holes in the emissive region, and 4,7-dipheny-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) doped 8-tris-hydroxyquinoline alu-minium (Alq3) is used to enhance electrons is the emissive region, thus ITO/V2O5 (8nm)/NPB (52nm)/V2O5 (8nm)/NPB (52 nm)/Alq3 (30 and 45 nm)/Alq3:Bphen (30wt%, 30 and 45 nm)/LiF (1 nm)/Al (120nm) devices are fabricated.The thick-film devices show the turn-on voltage of about 3 V and the maximal power efficiency of 4.51m/W, which is 1.46 times higher than the conventional thin-film OLEDs.

  10. Kinetics of transient electroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Manju; Brahme, Nameeta [School of Studies in Physics, Pt. Ravishanker Shukla University, Raipur (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the) 492010 (India); Kumar, Pankaj; Chand, Suresh [Center for Organic Electronics, National Physical Laboratory, Dr K S Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Kher, R S [Department of Physics, Government Science PG College, Bilaspur (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the) 495006 (India); Khokhar, M S K [Department of Rural Technology, GuruGhasidas University Bilaspur (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the) 495009 (India)], E-mail: manjushukla2003@gmail.com

    2008-08-21

    Mathematical simulation on the rise and decay kinetics of transient electroluminescence (EL) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is presented. The transient EL is studied with respect to a step voltage pulse. While rising, for lower values of time, the EL intensity shows a quadratic dependence on (t - t{sub del}), where t{sub del} is the time delay observed in the onset of EL, and finally attains saturation at a sufficiently large time. When the applied voltage is switched off, the initial EL decay shows an exponential dependence on (t - t{sub dec}), where t{sub dec} is the time when the voltage is switched off. The simulated results are compared with the transient EL performance of a bilayer OLED based on small molecular bis(2-methyl 8-hydroxyquinoline)(triphenyl siloxy) aluminium (SAlq). Transient EL studies have been carried out at different voltage pulse amplitudes. The simulated results show good agreement with experimental data. Using these simulated results the lifetime of the excitons in SAlq has also been calculated.

  11. AC-driven organic light emission devices with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, So-Yeon; Yu, SeGi

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated alternating current (AC)-driven organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs), with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) incorporated within the emission layer. With CNT incorporation, the brightness of the OLEDs was substantially improved, and the turn-on voltage was reduced by at least a factor of five. Furthermore, the current levels of the CNT-incorporated OLEDs were lower than that of the reference device. A roughly 70% decrease in the current level was obtained for a CNT concentration of 0.03 wt%. This was accomplished by keeping the concentration of CNTs low and the length of CNTs short, which helped to suppress the percolation networking of CNTs within the emitting layer. Strong local electric fields near the end-tips of CNTs and micro-capacitors formed by dispersed CNTs might have caused this high brightness and these low currents. CNT incorporation in the emitting layer can improve the characteristics of AC-driven OLEDs, which are considered to be one of the candidates for flat panel displays and lightning devices.

  12. DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-24

    DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes Eliot F. Gomez1, Vishak Venkatraman1, James G. Grote2 & Andrew J. Steckl1...45433-7707 USA. We report on the use of nucleic acid bases (NBs) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). NBs are small molecules that are the basic...polymer has been a frequent natural material integrated in electronic devices. DNA has been used in organic light - emitting diodes (OLEDs)4,5,7–14

  13. Histomorphometry of the organic matrix of the femur in ovariectomized rats treated with sodium alendronate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Tanios Haddad

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of two different concentrations of sodium alendronate on the quantity of organic matrix in the femur of rats with estrogen suppression caused by ovariectomy.METHODS: Sixty-days-old Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus were subjected to bilateral laparotomy to remove the ovaries. The animals were divided into a control group, in which they only underwent laparotomy; an ovariectomized group (OVX; an ovariectomized group treated with 1 mg/kg of alendronate (OVX 1 mg; and an ovariectomized group treated with 2 mg/kg of alendronate (OVX 2 mg. The rats received alendronate twice a week for 90 days. The left femur was then removed, fixed and processed for embedding in paraffin. Semi-serial sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin were used to determine the area occupied by organic bone matrix, by means of image analysis software. The animals' weights were obtained at the beginning and end of the experiment.RESULTS: The ovariectomized animals and those treated with 1 mg/kg of alendronate presented significant increases in body weight (p 0.05 to that of the non-ovariectomized control animals (2,04,800 ± 9590, which indicates that this medication had a preventive effect with regard to bone mass loss.CONCLUSION: The higher concentration of the medication, administered twice a week for 90 days, was more effective than the dose of 1 mg/kg over the same period.

  14. Matrix protected organic matter in a river dominated margin: A possible mechanism to sequester terrestrial organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Ralph N.; Goñi, Miguel A.

    2008-06-01

    The provenance of organic matter in surface sediments from the northern Gulf of Mexico was investigated by analyzing the compositions of lipid biomarkers ( n-alkanes, fatty acids, sterols) liberated after a series of chemical treatments designed to remove different organo-mineral matrix associations (i.e. freely extractable, base-hydrolyzable, unhydrolyzable). Bulk analyses of the organic matter (carbon content, carbon:nitrogen ratios, stable and radiocarbon isotopic analyses) were also performed on the intact sediments and their non-hydrolyzable, demineralized residue. We found recognizable lipids from distinct sources, including terrestrial vascular plants, bacteria and marine algae and zooplankton, within each of the isolated fractions. Based on the lipid signatures and bulk compositions, the organic matter within the unhydrolyzable fractions appeared to be the most diagenetically altered, was the oldest in age, and had the highest abundance of terrigenous lipids. In contrast, the base-hydrolyzable fraction was the most diagentically unaltered, had the youngest ages and was most enriched in N and marine lipids. Our results indicate that fresh, autochthonous organic matter is the most important contributor to base-hydrolyzable lipids, whereas highly altered allochthonous sources appear to be predominant source of unhydrolyzable lipids in the surface sediments from the Atchafalaya River shelf. Overall, the lipid biomarker signatures of intact sediments were biased towards the autochthonous source because many of the organic compounds indicative of degraded, terrigenous sources were protected from extraction and saponification by organo-mineral matrices. It is only after these protective matrices were removed by treatment with HCl and HF that these compounds became evident.

  15. Manipulating the Local Light Emission in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes by using Patterned Self-Assembled Monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, S.G.J.; Hal, P.A. van; Biggelaar, T.J.M. van den; Smits, E.C.P.; Boer, B. de; Kemerink, M.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    2008-01-01

    In organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), interface dipoles play an important role in the process of charge injection from the metallic electrode into the active organic layer.[1,2] An oriented dipole layer changes the effective work function of the electrode because of its internal electric field.

  16. Evaluation of light extraction efficiency for the light-emitting diodes based on the transfer matrix formalism and ray-tracing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingbo, An; Li, Wang; Hongxi, Lu; Zhiguo, Yu; Lei, Liu; Xin, Xi; Lixia, Zhao; Junxi, Wang; Jinmin, Li

    2016-06-01

    The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of the light-emitting diodes can be calculated by the ratio of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) and the light extraction efficiency (LEE). The EQE can be measured experimentally, but the LEE is difficult to calculate due to the complicated LED structures. In this work, a model was established to calculate the LEE by combining the transfer matrix formalism and an in-plane ray tracing method. With the calculated LEE, the IQE was determined and made a good agreement with that obtained by the ABC model and temperature-dependent photoluminescence method. The proposed method makes the determination of the IQE more practical and conventional. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos.11574306, 61334009), the China International Science and Technology Cooperation Program (No. 2014DFG62280), and the National High Technology Program of China (No. 2015AA03A101).

  17. The effect of Diel temperature and light cycles on the growth of nannochloropsis oculata in a photobioreactor matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tamburic

    Full Text Available A matrix of photobioreactors integrated with metabolic sensors was used to examine the combined impact of light and temperature variations on the growth and physiology of the biofuel candidate microalgal species Nannochloropsis oculata. The experiments were performed with algal cultures maintained at a constant 20 °C versus a 15 °C to 25 °C diel temperature cycle, where light intensity also followed a diel cycle with a maximum irradiance of 1920 µmol photons m(-2 s(-1. No differences in algal growth (Chlorophyll a were found between the two environmental regimes; however, the metabolic processes responded differently throughout the day to the change in environmental conditions. The variable temperature treatment resulted in greater damage to photosystem II due to the combined effect of strong light and high temperature. Cellular functions responded differently to conditions before midday as opposed to the afternoon, leading to strong hysteresis in dissolved oxygen concentration, quantum yield of photosystem II and net photosynthesis. Overnight metabolism performed differently, probably as a result of the temperature impact on respiration. Our photobioreactor matrix has produced novel insights into the physiological response of Nannochloropsis oculata to simulated environmental conditions. This information can be used to predict the effectiveness of deploying Nannochloropsis oculata in similar field conditions for commercial biofuel production.

  18. Application of variational reduced-density-matrix theory to organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidofalvi, Gergely; Mazziotti, David A

    2005-03-01

    Variational calculation of the two-electron reduced-density matrix (2-RDM), using a new first-order algorithm [D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 213001 (2004)], is applied to medium-sized organic molecules. The calculations reveal systematic trends in the accuracy of the energy with well-known chemical concepts such as hybridization, electronegativity, and atomic size. Furthermore, correlation energies from hydrocarbon chains indicate that the calculation of the 2-RDM subject to two-positivity conditions is size extensive, that is, the energy grows linearly with the number of electrons. Because organic molecules have a well-defined set of functional groups, we employ the trends in energy accuracy of the functional groups to design a correction to the 2-RDM energy for an arbitrary organic molecule. We apply the 2-RDM calculations with the functional-group correction to a large set of organic molecules with different functional groups. Energies with millihartree accuracy are obtained both at equilibrium and nonequilibrium geometries.

  19. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillermo Bazan; Alexander Mikhailovsky

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop the fundamental understanding and practical techniques for enhancement of Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes (PhOLEDs) performance by utilizing radiative decay control technology. Briefly, the main technical goal is the acceleration of radiative recombination rate in organometallic triplet emitters by using the interaction with surface plasmon resonances in noble metal nanostructures. Increased photonic output will enable one to eliminate constraints imposed on PhOLED efficiency by triplet-triplet annihilation, triplet-polaron annihilation, and saturation of chromophores with long radiative decay times. Surface plasmon enhanced (SPE) PhOLEDs will operate more efficiently at high injection current densities and will be less prone to degradation mechanisms. Additionally, introduction of metal nanostructures into PhOLEDs may improve their performance due to the improvement of the charge transport through organic layers via multiple possible mechanisms ('electrical bridging' effects, doping-like phenomena, etc.). SPE PhOLED technology is particularly beneficial for solution-fabricated electrophosphorescent devices. Small transition moment of triplet emitters allows achieving a significant enhancement of the emission rate while keeping undesirable quenching processes introduced by the metal nanostructures at a reasonably low level. Plasmonic structures can be introduced easily into solution-fabricated PhOLEDs by blending and spin coating techniques and can be used for enhancement of performance in existing device architectures. This constitutes a significant benefit for a large scale fabrication of PhOLEDs, e.g. by roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Besides multieexciton annihilation, the power efficacy of PhOLEDs is often limited by high operational bias voltages required for overcoming built-in potential barriers to injection and transport of electrical charges through a device. This problem is

  20. Fish otolith biomineralization process: first investigations about organic matrix and growth of Triglidae (Scorpaeniformes otoliths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Montanini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Otolith formation involves rhythmic variations in the deposition and size of organic matrix framework and carbonate crystals, resulting in the formation of macroscopic translucent and opaque rings and microscopic zonations (growth increments (Morales Nin, 2000. As in most biominerals, the otolith matrix forms only 2-3 % of its weight, but it is admitted that it has a considerable importance in the otolith crystallization processes of nucleation, growth, orientation and growth control. The goal of this study is to characterize the matrix protein composition in the otoliths of Triglidae (Scorpaeniformes as a first step to understand molecular mechanisms of otolith formation according to biology and ecology of the species. In particular 500 sagittal otoliths from six gurnard species were analysed: Chelidonichthys cuculus, C. lucerna, Eutrigla gurnardus, Lepidotrigla cavillone, L. dieuzeidei and Trigloporus lastoviza. Protein contents were estimated by Bradford method and the urea 8 M extracts were loaded into a polyacrylamide gel, separated by SDS page and detected by Silver staining (Sigma followed the protocol of Borelli et al. (2001 with some modifications regarding protein precipitation that was enhanced by using TCA, trichloroacetic acid, 100% w/v. The urea soluble fractions revealed a unique large band around 50-55 kDa. Another common clear band was visible at the top of the separating gel (proteins >300/350 kDa unable to enter into the pores of polyacrylamide gels (12%. The complexity of the protein mixtures was investigated by 2-D electrophoresis (Gel TGX 4-20%; proteins were separated on the basis of both isoelectric point (pI and molecular size. A common protein pattern of 50-75 kDa were found in all gurnards showing a similar composition of organic matter even if the 2-D maps of otolith samples showed specie-specific variation in acid protein fractions in all the pairwise comparison. This result confirmed that the amino acid composition

  1. Organic matrix based slow release fertilizer enhances plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinod K; Singh, Rana P

    2011-09-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the effect of organic matrix based slow release fertilizers (SRFs) on plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield of Brassica juncea L. cv, pusa bold. The agro-waste materials like cow dung, clay soil, neem leaves and rice bran were mixed together in 2:2:1:1 ratio and used as organic matrix for the immobilization of chemical fertilizer nutrients with commercial grade saresh (Acacia gum, 15% solution) as binder. Different fertilizer treatments were organic matrix based slow release fertilizers, SRF-I (542.0 kg ha(-1)); SRF-II (736.5 kg ha(-1)) and chemical fertilizer combinations, boron (3 kg ha(-1))+sulphur (15 kg ha(-1))+nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1)) and boron (3 kg ha(-1)) + sulphur (15 kg ha(-1))+nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1))+phosphorus (15 kg ha(-1))+potassium (100 kg ha(-1)). Organic matrix based SRF-II released ammonium up to 50-d in wetsoil under laboratory conditions which showed maximum retention of the nutrients. Avery significant increase in plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield was recorded in organic matrix based SRF-II applied plants. The maximum percent increase in biomass production was observed with organic matrix based SRF-II (increase of 65.8% in root fresh weight, 38.0% in root dry weight, 45.9% in leaf fresh weight plant(-1) and 27.5 % in leaf dry weight plant(-1) in 60-d old plants). It also increased the acquisition and assimilation of nitrate from the plant's rhizosphere which was evident by 45.6% increase in nitrate, 27.5% in nitrite and 11.7% in nitrate reductase activity (NRA) in leaves of 45-d old plants over control. The organic matrix based SRF-II significantly increased the seed yield by 28% in Indian mustard. Cost analysis revealed thatthis formulation is cost effective as it is based on agro waste materials.

  2. A rapid excitation-emission matrix fluorometer utilizing supercontinuum white light and acousto-optic tunable filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenbo [Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, BC Cancer Agency Research Center, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, 835 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E8 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of British Columbia, KAIS 5500, 2332 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Wu, Zhenguo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan, E-mail: hzeng@bccrc.ca [Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, BC Cancer Agency Research Center, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, 835 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E8 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Scanning speed and coupling efficiency of excitation light to optic fibres are two major technical challenges that limit the potential of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectrometer for on-line applications and in vivo studies. In this paper, a novel EEM system, utilizing a supercontinuum white light source and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs), was introduced and evaluated. The supercontinuum white light, generated by pumping a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with an 800 nm femtosecond laser, was efficiently coupled into a bifurcated optic fiber bundle. High speed EEM spectral scanning was achieved using AOTFs both for selecting excitation wavelength and scanning emission spectra. Using calibration lamps (neon and mercury argon), wavelength deviations were determined to vary from 0.18 nm to −0.70 nm within the spectral range of 500–850 nm. Spectral bandwidth for filtered excitation light broadened by twofold compared to that measured with monochromatic light between 650 nm and 750 nm. The EEM spectra for methanol solutions of laser dyes were successfully acquired with this rapid fluorometer using an integration time of 5 s.

  3. Architecture of the organic matrix in the sternal CaCO3 deposits of Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Isopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabritius, Helge; Walther, Paul; Ziegler, Andreas

    2005-05-01

    Before the molt terrestrial isopods resorb calcium from the posterior cuticle and store it in large deposits within the first four anterior sternites. In Porcellio scaber the deposits consist of three structurally distinct layers consisting of amorphous CaCO3 (ACC) and an organic matrix that consists of concentric and radial elements. It is thought that the organic matrix plays a role in the structural organization of deposits and in the stabilization of ACC, which is unstable in vitro. In this paper, we present a thorough analysis of the ultrastructure of the organic matrix in the CaCO3 deposits using high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The spherules and the homogeneous layer contain an elaborate organic matrix with similar structural organization consisting of concentric reticules and radial strands. The decalcification experiments reveal an inhomogeneous solubility of ACC within the spherules probably caused by variations in the stabilizing properties of matrix components. The transition between the three layers can be explained by changes in the number of spherule nucleation sites.

  4. Monitoring organic loading to swimming pools by fluorescence excitation–emission matrix with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seredynska-Sobecka, Bozena; Stedmon, Colin; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Excitation–Emission Matrix spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis was employed to monitor water quality and organic contamination in swimming pools. The fluorescence signal of the swimming pool organic matter was low but increased slightly through the day. The analysis...... loading in swimming pool water. The fluorescence at 420nm gradually increased during opening hours and represented material accumulating through the day....

  5. Optical coupling of flexible microstructured organic light sources for automotive applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melpignano, P.; Sinesi, S.; Rotaris, G.; Antonipieri, M.; Cicoira, F.; Loi, M.A.; Muccini, M.; Zamboni, R.; Gale, M.T.; Westenhöfer, S.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we report on modelling and processing of customised optical patterns coupled with microstructured large area organic light emitting device (OLED) sources for automotive lighting. Different approaches for the optical control of the light emitted from an OLED are discussed and compared

  6. Evolution of nacre: biochemistry and proteomics of the shell organic matrix of the cephalopod Nautilus macromphalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Benjamin; Marin, Frédéric; Marie, Arul; Bédouet, Laurent; Dubost, Lionel; Alcaraz, Gérard; Milet, Christian; Luquet, Gilles

    2009-06-15

    In mollusks, one of the most widely studied shell textures is nacre, the lustrous aragonitic layer that constitutes the internal components of the shells of several bivalves, a few gastropods,and one cephalopod: the nautilus. Nacre contains a minor organic fraction, which displays a wide range of functions in relation to the biomineralization process. Here, we have biochemically characterized the nacre matrix of the cephalopod Nautilus macromphalus. The acid-soluble matrix contains a mixture of polydisperse and discrete proteins and glycoproteins, which interact with the formation of calcite crystals. In addition, a few bind calcium ions. Furthermore, we have used a proteomic approach,which was applied to the acetic acid-soluble and -insoluble shell matrices, as well as to spots obtained after 2D gel electrophoresis. Our data demonstrate that the insoluble and soluble matrices, although different in their bulk monosaccharide and amino acid compositions, contain numerous shared peptides. Strikingly, most of the obtained partial sequences are entirely new. A few only partly match with bivalvian nacre proteins.Our findings have implications for knowledge of the long-term evolution of molluskan nacre matrices.

  7. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Capasso, Ilaria; Lavorgna, Marino [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Liguori, Barbara; Caputo, Domenico [Department of Chemical, Materials and Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Iannace, Salvatore [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples, Italy and IMAST SCRAL, Piazza Bovio 22 Napoli 80133 (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a “meringue” type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (∼500 Kg/m{sup 3}) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the “meringue” approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  8. Characterization of organic matrix components of pearl oyster ,Pinctada fucata and their implications in shell formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mollusks make their shells by biomineralization using Ca2+ and CO32- from natural environment.In molluscan shells,two types of CaCO3 crystal which are aragonite and calcite form the species-dependent microstructures.It is believed that shell organic matrices act for control of the crystal types and microstructures.Shell of Pinetada fucata is divided into aragonitic nacreous layer and calcitic prismtic layer.In the recent years,several novel matrix components have been identified in pearl oyster shells by subsequent solubilization of the insoluble matrix,even in the nacreous layer which abounds in the data.In them,we focused our attention on a component,of which the N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined,and attempted cloning genes encoding it.As a result,several clones with typical sequence for the ORF (open reading frame) region were identified and the amino acid sequences were deduced.Further analysis of northern hybridization clarified the tissue specific expressions of the transcripts of the identified genes.

  9. Readability dependence on lithography conditions for printing code marks using a squared optical fiber matrix and light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Jun; Kato, Kazuhide; Iwasaki, Jun-ya; Horiuchi, Toshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    The direct readability of code marks printed using a new exposure system was investigated. In the new exposure system, code-mark patterns were printed using LEDs as exposure sources and squared optical-fiber ends as code-mark elements. A 10 × 10 fiber matrix was fabricated, and light emitted from each LED was led to each fiber. Because gaps appeared between the code-mark cells, a long exposure time was adopted, and the gaps between cells were eliminated by giving an overdose of light. After code-mark patterns were stably printed, their readability was investigated using a commercial code-mark reader. It was found that all the printed code marks were readable without errors. In concrete, same 100 identical marks printed on a wafer were readable. Moreover, six kinds of marks were repeatedly detected more than 100 times with no reading errors.

  10. Analysis of the proteinaceous components of the organic matrix of calcitic sclerites from the soft coral Sinularia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2013-01-01

    An organic matrix consisting of a protein-polysaccharide complex is generally accepted as an important medium for the calcification process. While the role this "calcified organic matrix" plays in the calcification process has long been appreciated, the complex mixture of proteins that is induced and assembled during the mineral phase of calcification remains uncharacterized in many organisms. Thus, we investigated organic matrices from the calcitic sclerites of a soft coral, Sinularia sp., and used a proteomic approach to identify the functional matrix proteins that might be involved in the biocalcification process. We purified eight organic matrix proteins and performed in-gel digestion using trypsin. The tryptic peptides were separated by nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC) and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) - time-of-flight-time-of-flight (TOF-TOF) mass spectrometer. Periodic acid Schiff staining of an SDS-PAGE gel indicated that four proteins were glycosylated. We identified several proteins, including a form of actin, from which we identified a total of 183 potential peptides. Our findings suggest that many of those peptides may contribute to biocalcification in soft corals.

  11. Analysis of the proteinaceous components of the organic matrix of calcitic sclerites from the soft coral Sinularia sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Azizur Rahman

    Full Text Available An organic matrix consisting of a protein-polysaccharide complex is generally accepted as an important medium for the calcification process. While the role this "calcified organic matrix" plays in the calcification process has long been appreciated, the complex mixture of proteins that is induced and assembled during the mineral phase of calcification remains uncharacterized in many organisms. Thus, we investigated organic matrices from the calcitic sclerites of a soft coral, Sinularia sp., and used a proteomic approach to identify the functional matrix proteins that might be involved in the biocalcification process. We purified eight organic matrix proteins and performed in-gel digestion using trypsin. The tryptic peptides were separated by nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI - time-of-flight-time-of-flight (TOF-TOF mass spectrometer. Periodic acid Schiff staining of an SDS-PAGE gel indicated that four proteins were glycosylated. We identified several proteins, including a form of actin, from which we identified a total of 183 potential peptides. Our findings suggest that many of those peptides may contribute to biocalcification in soft corals.

  12. Organic Light Emitting Device as a fluorescence spectroscopy's light source : one step towards the lab-on-a-chip device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camou, S.; Kitamura, M.; Gouy, Jean-Philippe; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko; Fujii, Teruo

    2003-02-01

    Many papers were recently dedicated to the lab-on-a-chip applications, where all the basic elements should be integrated directly onto the microchip. The fluorescence spectroscopy is mostly used as a detection method due to its high reliability and sensitivity, but requires light source and photo-detector. For the first time, we then propose to use Organic material Light Emitting Diode (OLED) to supply a light source for the optical detection based on fluorescence spectroscopy. By combining this OLED with micro-fluidic channels patterned in PDMS layer, the integration of light source on the chip is then achieved. First, the ability of Organic Material to excite fluorescent response from dye is demonstrated. Then, some configurations are described in order to decrease the major drawbacks that have to be solved before applying such kind of devices.

  13. Light, stress and herbivory : from photoprotection to trophic interactions using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model organism

    OpenAIRE

    Frenkel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the most important process for nearly all life on earth. Photosynthetic organisms capture and transfer light energy from the sun into chemical energy which in turn provides a resource base for heterotrophic organisms. Natural light regimes are irregular and vary over magnitudes. At a certain light intensity, metabolic processes cannot keep up with the electron flow produced by the primary photoreactions, and thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced. ROS are highly rea...

  14. Large-area, flexible imaging arrays constructed by light-charge organic memories

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Zhang; Ti Wu; Yunlong Guo; Yan Zhao; Xiangnan Sun; Yugeng Wen; Gui Yu; Yunqi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Existing organic imaging circuits, which offer attractive benefits of light weight, low cost and flexibility, are exclusively based on phototransistor or photodiode arrays. One shortcoming of these photo-sensors is that the light signal should keep invariant throughout the whole pixel-addressing and reading process. As a feasible solution, we synthesized a new charge storage molecule and embedded it into a device, which we call light-charge organic memory (LCOM). In LCOM, the functionalities ...

  15. Lipocalins Are Required for Apical Extracellular Matrix Organization and Remodeling in Caenorhabiditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman-Rubinsky, Rachel; Cohen, Jennifer D; Sundaram, Meera V

    2017-08-25

    A lipid and glycoprotein-rich apical extracellular matrix (aECM) or glycocalyx lines exposed membranes in the body, and is particularly important to protect narrow tube integrity. Lipocalins ("fat cups") are small, secreted, cup-shaped proteins that bind and transport lipophilic cargo and are often found in luminal or aECM compartments such as mammalian plasma, urine, or tear film. Although some lipocalins can bind known aECM lipids and/or matrix metalloproteinases, it is not known if and how lipocalins affect aECM structure due to challenges in visualizing the aECM in most systems. Here we show that two C. elegans lipocalins, LPR-1 and LPR-3, have distinct functions in the pre-cuticular glycocalyx of developing external epithelia. LPR-1 moves freely through luminal compartments, while LPR-3 stably localizes to a central layer of the membrane-anchored glycocalyx, adjacent to the transient zona pellucida domain protein LET-653. Like LET-653 and other C. elegans glycocalyx components, these lipocalins are required to maintain the patency of the narrow excretory duct tube, and also affect multiple aspects of later cuticle organization. lpr-1 mutants cannot maintain a continuous excretory duct apical domain and have misshapen cuticle ridges (alae) and abnormal patterns of cuticular surface lipid staining. lpr-3 mutants cannot maintain a passable excretory duct lumen, properly degrade the eggshell, or shed old cuticle during molting, and they lack cuticle barrier function. Based on these phenotypes, we infer that both LPR-1 and LPR-3 are required to build a properly organized aECM, while LPR-3 additionally is needed for aECM clearance and remodeling. The C. elegans glycocalyx provides a powerful system, amenable to both genetic analysis and live imaging, for investigating how lipocalins and lipids impact aECM structure. Copyright © 2017, Genetics.

  16. Regulation of extracellular matrix organization by BMP signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbie D Schultz

    Full Text Available In mammals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP pathway signaling is important for the growth and homeostasis of extracellular matrix, including basement membrane remodeling, scarring, and bone growth. A conserved BMP member in Caenorhabditis elegans, DBL-1, regulates body length in a dose-sensitive manner. Loss of DBL-1 pathway signaling also results in increased anesthetic sensitivity. However, the physiological basis of these pleiotropic phenotypes is largely unknown. We created a DBL-1 over-expressing strain and show that sensitivity to anesthetics is inversely related to the dose of DBL-1. Using pharmacological, genetic analyses, and a novel dye permeability assay for live, microwave-treated animals, we confirm that DBL-1 is required for the barrier function of the cuticle, a specialized extracellular matrix. We show that DBL-1 signaling is required to prevent animals from forming tail-entangled aggregates in liquid. Stripping lipids off the surface of wild-type animals recapitulates this phenotype. Finally, we find that DBL-1 signaling affects ultrastructure of the nematode cuticle in a dose-dependent manner, as surface lipid content and cuticular organization are disrupted in animals with genetically altered DBL-1 levels. We propose that the lipid layer coating the nematode cuticle normally prevents tail entanglement, and that reduction of this layer by loss of DBL-1 signaling promotes aggregation. This work provides a physiological mechanism that unites the DBL-1 signaling pathway roles of not only body size regulation and drug responsiveness, but also the novel Hoechst 33342 staining and aggregation phenotypes, through barrier function, content, and organization of the cuticle.

  17. Liquid crystal-based Mueller matrix spectral imaging polarimetry for parameterizing mineral structural organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladish, James C; Duncan, Donald D

    2017-01-20

    Herein, we discuss the remote assessment of the subwavelength organizational structure of a medium. Specifically, we use spectral imaging polarimetry, as the vector nature of polarized light enables it to interact with optical anisotropies within a medium, while the spectral aspect of polarization is sensitive to small-scale structure. The ability to image these effects allows for inference of spatial structural organization parameters. This work describes a methodology for revealing structural organization by exploiting the Stokes/Mueller formalism and by utilizing measurements from a spectral imaging polarimeter constructed from liquid crystal variable retarders and a liquid crystal tunable filter. We provide results to validate the system and then show results from measurements on a mineral sample.

  18. Planar cell polarity proteins differentially regulate extracellular matrix organization and assembly during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Michael R; Mundell, Nathan A; Sawyer, Leah M; Dunlap, Julie A; Jessen, Jason R

    2013-11-01

    Zebrafish gastrulation cell movements occur in the context of dynamic changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and require the concerted action of planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins that regulate cell elongation and mediolateral alignment. Data obtained using Xenopus laevis gastrulae have shown that integrin-fibronectin interactions underlie the formation of polarized cell protrusions necessary for PCP and have implicated PCP proteins themselves as regulators of ECM. By contrast, the relationship between establishment of PCP and ECM assembly/remodeling during zebrafish gastrulation is unclear. We previously showed that zebrafish embryos carrying a null mutation in the four-pass transmembrane PCP protein vang-like 2 (vangl2) exhibit increased matrix metalloproteinase activity and decreased immunolabeling of fibronectin. These data implicated for the first time a core PCP protein in the regulation of pericellular proteolysis of ECM substrates and raised the question of whether other zebrafish PCP proteins also impact ECM organization. In Drosophila melanogaster, the cytoplasmic PCP protein Prickle binds Van Gogh and regulates its function. Here we report that similar to vangl2, loss of zebrafish prickle1a decreases fibronectin protein levels in gastrula embryos. We further show that Prickle1a physically binds Vangl2 and regulates both the subcellular distribution and total protein level of Vangl2. These data suggest that the ability of Prickle1a to impact fibronectin organization is at least partly due to effects on Vangl2. In contrast to loss of either Vangl2 or Prickle1a function, we find that glypican4 (a Wnt co-receptor) and frizzled7 mutant gastrula embryos with disrupted non-canonical Wnt signaling exhibit the opposite phenotype, namely increased fibronectin assembly. Our data show that glypican4 mutants do not have decreased proteolysis of ECM substrates, but instead have increased cell surface cadherin protein expression and increased intercellular

  19. Organic chemistry: Light opens pathways for nickel catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John J.; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    The report of a light-activated catalyst that generates usually inaccessible nickel intermediates provides a general strategy that might allow elusive catalytic reactions to be realized. See Letter p.330

  20. Modeling of light scattering by biconcave and deformed red blood cells with the invariant imbedding T-matrix method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The invariant imbedding T-matrix method (II-TM) is employed to simulate the optical properties of normal biconcave and deformed red blood cells (RBCs). The phase matrix elements of a RBC model computed with the II-TM are compared with their counterparts computed with the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method. As expected, the DDA results approach the II-TM results with an increase in the number of dipoles per incident wavelength. Computationally, the II-TM is faster than the DDA when multiple RBC orientations are considered. For a single orientation, the DDA is comparable with or even faster than the II-TM because the DDA efficiently converges for optically soft particles; however, the DDA method demands significantly more computer memory than the II-TM. After the applicability of the II-TM is numerically confirmed, a comparison is conducted of the optical properties of oxygenated and deoxygenated RBCs and of normal and deformed RBCs. The spectral variations of RBCs' optical properties are investigated in the wavelength range from 0.25 to 1.0 μm. Furthermore, the statistically averaged phase matrix of spheres and biconcave RBCs are compared. Conducted numerical simulations suggest the applicability of the II-TM for the inverse light scattering analysis and radiative transfer simulations in blood.

  1. Tunable organic photocatalysts for visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Sprick, Reiner Sebastian; Jiang, Jia-Xing; Bonillo, Baltasar; Ren, Shijie; Ratvijitvech, Thanchano; Guiglion, Pierre; Zwijnenburg, Martijn A.; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2015-01-01

    Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water offers an abundant, clean fuel source, but it is challenging to produce photocatalysts that use the solar spectrum effectively. Many hydrogen-evolving photocatalysts are active in the ultraviolet range, but ultraviolet light accounts for only 3% of the energy available in the solar spectrum at ground level. Solid-state crystalline photocatalysts have light absorption profiles that are a discrete function of their crystalline phase and that are not...

  2. Soft lithography microlens fabrication and array for enhanced light extraction from organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Wai Y.; Park, Joong-Mok; Gan, Zhengqing; Constant, Kristen P.; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth; ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-06-03

    Provided are microlens arrays for use on the substrate of OLEDs to extract more light that is trapped in waveguided modes inside the devices and methods of manufacturing same. Light extraction with microlens arrays is not limited to the light emitting area, but is also efficient in extracting light from the whole microlens patterned area where waveguiding occurs. Large microlens array, compared to the size of the light emitting area, extract more light and result in over 100% enhancement. Such a microlens array is not limited to (O)LEDs of specific emission, configuration, pixel size, or pixel shape. It is suitable for all colors, including white, for microcavity OLEDs, and OLEDs fabricated directly on the (modified) microlens array.

  3. A Jones matrix formalism for simulating three-dimensional polarized light imaging of brain tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menzel, M.; Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.; Reckfort, J.; Amunts, K.; Axer, M.

    2015-01-01

    The neuroimaging technique three-dimensional polarized light imaging (3D-PLI) provides a high-resolution reconstruction of nerve fibres in human post-mortem brains. The orientations of the fibres are derived from birefringence measurements of histological brain sections assuming that the nerve

  4. Ultrasonic spray coating polymer and small molecular organic film for organic light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shihao; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Letian; Xie, Wenfa

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasonic spray coating process (USCP) with high material -utilization, low manufacture costs and compatibility to streamline production has been attractive in researches on photoelectric devices. However, surface tension exists in the solvent is still a huge obstacle to realize smooth organic film for organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) by USCP. Here, high quality polymer anode buffer layer and small molecular emitting layer are successfully realized through USCP by introducing extra-low surface tension diluent and surface tension control method. The introduction of low surface tension methyl alcohol is beneficial to the formation of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) films and brings obvious phase separation and improved conductivity to PEDOT:PSS film. Besides, a surface tension control method, in which new stable tension equilibrium is built at the border of wetting layer, is proposed to eliminate the effect of surface tension during the solvent evaporation stage of ultrasonic spray coating the film consists of 9,9-Spirobifluoren-2-yl-diphenyl-phosphine oxide doped with 10 wt% tris [2-(p -tolyl) pyridine] iridium (III). A smooth and homogenous small molecular emitting layer without wrinkles is successfully realized. The effectiveness of the ultrasonic spray coating polymer anode buffer layer and small molecular emitting layer are also proved by introducing them in OLEDs.

  5. Ultrasonic spray coating polymer and small molecular organic film for organic light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shihao; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Letian; Xie, Wenfa

    2016-11-22

    Ultrasonic spray coating process (USCP) with high material -utilization, low manufacture costs and compatibility to streamline production has been attractive in researches on photoelectric devices. However, surface tension exists in the solvent is still a huge obstacle to realize smooth organic film for organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) by USCP. Here, high quality polymer anode buffer layer and small molecular emitting layer are successfully realized through USCP by introducing extra-low surface tension diluent and surface tension control method. The introduction of low surface tension methyl alcohol is beneficial to the formation of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) films and brings obvious phase separation and improved conductivity to PEDOT:PSS film. Besides, a surface tension control method, in which new stable tension equilibrium is built at the border of wetting layer, is proposed to eliminate the effect of surface tension during the solvent evaporation stage of ultrasonic spray coating the film consists of 9,9-Spirobifluoren-2-yl-diphenyl-phosphine oxide doped with 10 wt% tris [2-(p -tolyl) pyridine] iridium (III). A smooth and homogenous small molecular emitting layer without wrinkles is successfully realized. The effectiveness of the ultrasonic spray coating polymer anode buffer layer and small molecular emitting layer are also proved by introducing them in OLEDs.

  6. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K.; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T.; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-04-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed.

  7. The Metadistrict as the Territorial Strategy: From Set Theory and a Matrix Organization Model Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Contò

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this proposal is to explore a new concept of 'Metadistrict' to be applied in a region of Southern Italy – Apulia ‐ in order to analyze the impact that the activation of a special network between different sector chains and several integrated projects may have for revitalizing the local economy; an important role is assigned to the network of relationships and so to the social capital. The Metadistrict model stems from the Local Action Groups and the Integrated Projects of Food Chain frameworks. It may represent a crucial driver of the rural economy through the realization of sector circuits connected to the concept of multi‐functionality in agriculture, that is Network of the Territorial Multi‐functionality. It was formalized by making use of a set of theories and of a Matrix Organization Model. The adoption of the Metadistrict perspective as the territorial strategy may play a key role to revitalize the primary sector, through the increase of economic and productive opportunities due to the implementation of a common and shared strategy and organization.

  8. Supramolecularly self-organized nanomaterials: A voyage from inorganic particles to organic light-harvesting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotto, Alessandro

    In 2009 the U.S. National Science Foundation announced the realignment of the Chemistry Divisions introducing the new interdisciplinary program of "Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry." This statement officially recognizes a field of studies that has already seen the publication of many thousands of works in the past 20 years. Nanotechnology and supramolecular chemistry can be found in the most diverse disciplines, from biology to engineering, to physics. Furthermore, many technologies rely on nanoscale dimensions for more than one component. Nanomaterials and technologies are on the market with a range of applications from composite materials, to electronics, to medicine, to sensing and more. This thesis will introduce a variety of studies and applications of supramolecular chemistry to form nanoscale photonic materials from soft matter. We will first illustrate a method to synthesize metallic nanoparticles using plasmids DNA as a mold. The circular DNA functions as a sacrificial template to shape the particles into narrowly monodispersed nanodiscs. Secondly, we will describe the synthesis of a highly fluorinated porphyrin derivative and how the fluorines improve the formation of ultra thin films when the porphyrin is blended with fullerene C60. Finally, we will show how to increase the short-circuit current in a solar cell built with an internal parallel tandem light harvesting design. A blend of phthalocyanines, each with a decreasing optical band gap, is supramolecularly self-organized with pyridyl-C60 within thin films. The different band gaps of the single phthalocyanines capture a wider segment of the solar spectrum increasing the overall efficiency of the device. In conclusion, we have presented a number of studies for the preparation of inorganic and organic nanomaterials and their application in supramolecularly organized photonic devices.

  9. Hole injection enhancement in organic light emitting devices using plasma treated graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesuraj, P. Justin; Parameshwari, R.; Kanthasamy, K.; Koch, J.; Pfnür, H.; Jeganathan, K.

    2017-03-01

    The hole injection layer (HIL) with high work function (WF) is desirable to reduce the injection barrier between anode and hole transport layer in organic light emitting devices (OLED). Here, we report a novel approach to tune the WF of graphene oxide (GO) using oxygen and hydrogen plasma treatment and its hole injection properties in OLEDs. The mild exposure of oxygen plasma on GO (O2-GO) significantly reduces the injection barrier by increasing the WF of anode (4.98 eV) through expansion of Csbnd O bonds. In contrast, the hole injection barrier was drastically increased for hydrogen plasma treated GO (H2-GO) layers as the WF is lowered by the contraction of Csbnd O bond. By employing active O2-GO as HIL in OLEDs found to exhibit superior current efficiency of 4.2 cd/A as compared to 3.3 cd/A for pristine GO. Further, the high injection efficiency of O2-GO infused hole only device can be attributed to the improved energy level matching. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to correlate the WF of HIL infused anode towards the enhanced performance of OLEDs with their capricious content of Csbnd O in GO matrix.

  10. Carbon nanotube sheets as transparent charge injectors in organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher; Zhang, Mei; Ovalle, Raquel; Trivedi, Krutarth; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Lee, Sergey; Baughman, Ray; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized for their potential in many applications ranging from high strength materials and fibers to true nanoscale electronics. Recently a method for making strong and transparent CNT sheets has been developed, producing free-standing multiwall nanotube sheets which are easy to process [1]. Their mechanical and electrical properties allow them to meet the needs of a wide range of applications, particularly in optoelectronics. We show here the potential for using these thin, flexible CNT sheets in the development of flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays. The high transparency of the sheets, the high degree of orientation of tubes and the high work function of the material make them suitable hole injectors for typical hole transport materials used in OLEDs and polymeric LEDs (PLEDs). We show that CNT sheets can be used as anodes for both PLEDs and molecular OLEDs. We also introduce a method for producing inverted OLEDs on existing drive electronics for active matrix displays and a design for a transparent display using CNT sheets as both the electron and hole injector. [1] M. Zhang, S. Fang, A. Zakhidov, S. Lee, A. Aliev, C. Williams, K. Atkinson, R. Baughman, Science 309, 1215 (2005)

  11. Modifying the organic/electrode interface in Organic Solar Cells (OSCs) and improving the efficiency of solution-processed phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Teng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Organic semiconductors devices, such as, organic solar cells (OSCs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have drawn increasing interest in recent decades. As organic materials are flexible, light weight, and potentially low-cost, organic semiconductor devices are considered to be an alternative to their inorganic counterparts. This dissertation will focus mainly on OSCs and OLEDs. As a clean and renewable energy source, the development of OSCs is very promising. Cells with 9.2% power conversion efficiency (PCE) were reported this year, compared to < 8% two years ago. OSCs belong to the so-called third generation solar cells and are still under development. While OLEDs are a more mature and better studied field, with commercial products already launched in the market, there are still several key issues: (1) the cost of OSCs/OLEDs is still high, largely due to the costly manufacturing processes; (2) the efficiency of OSCs/OLEDs needs to be improved; (3) the lifetime of OSCs/OLEDs is not sufficient compared to their inorganic counterparts; (4) the physics models of the behavior of the devices are not satisfactory. All these limitations invoke the demand for new organic materials, improved device architectures, low-cost fabrication methods, and better understanding of device physics. For OSCs, we attempted to improve the PCE by modifying the interlayer between active layer/metal. We found that ethylene glycol (EG) treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT: PSS) improves hole collection at the metal/polymer interface, furthermore it also affects the growth of the poly(3- hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blends, making the phase segregation more favorable for charge collection. We then studied organic/inorganic tandem cells. We also investigated the effect of a thin LiF layer on the hole-collection of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C70-based small molecular OSCs. A

  12. [Nuclear protein matrix from giant nuclei of Chironomus plumosus determinates polythene chromosome organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, M S; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    Giant nuclei from salivary glands of Chironomus plumosus were treated in situ with detergent, 2 M NaCl and nucleases in order to reveal residual nuclear matrix proteins (NMP). It was shown, that preceding stabilization of non-histone proteins with 2 mM CuCl2 allowed to visualize the structure of polythene chromosomes at every stage of the extraction of histones and DNA. Stabilized NPM of polythene chromosomes maintains their morphology and banding patterns, which is observed by light and electron microscopy, whereas internal fibril net or residual nucleoli are not found. In stabilized NPM of polythene chromosomes, topoisomerase IIalpha and SMC1 retain their localization that is typical of untreated chromosomes. NPM of polythene chromosomes also includes sites of DNA replication, visualized with BrDU incubation, and some RNA-components. So, we can conclude that structure of NPM from giant nuclei is equal to NPM from normal interphase nuclei, and that morphological features of polythene chromosomes depend on the presence of NMP.

  13. Periodically arranged colloidal gold nanoparticles for enhanced light harvesting in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsafaei, Mina; Fernandes Cauduro, André Luis; Kunstmann-Olsen, Casper

    of thinner devices without compromising light absorption. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally investigate periodically arranged colloidal gold nanoparticles in organic solar cells, and demonstrate the use of such nanostructures to improve the light absorption in and thus the efficiency...... nanostructures as well as the period of the periodical arrangements in organic bulk hetero-junction solar cells. In addition, we investigate experimentally the light absorption enhancement in the organic active layer by incorporating surface-ordered gold nanoparticle arrangements at the bottom of the organic...... active layer. The latter are fabricated with a lithography-free stamp technique, creating a centimeter scaled area with defined inter-particle spacing. Our study presents the light harvesting ability of template-assisted nanoparticle assemblies in organic solar cells and as the approach is easily...

  14. Manipulating the local light emission in organic light-emitting diodes by using patterned self-assembled monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, Simon G. J.; van Hal, Paul A.; van den Biggelaar, Ton J. M.; Smits, Edsger C. P.; de Boer, Bert; Kemerink, Martijn; Janssen, Rene A. J.; de Leeuw, Dago M.

    2008-01-01

    Patterned organic light-emitting diodes are fabricated by using microcontactDrinted self-assembled monolayers on a gold anode (see background figure). Molecules with dipole moments in opposite directions result in an increase or a decrease of the local work function (foreground picture), providing a

  15. Red Light-Emitting-Diode Based on an Organic Salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟瑞平; 徐洪光; 徐春祥; 张俊祥; 何国华; 崔一平

    2003-01-01

    A novel organic salt trans-4-[P-(N-ethyl-N-(hydroxylethyl)-amino) styryl]-N-methylpyridiniumtetraphenylborate (abbreviated as ASPT) has been employed as an active layer in an organic electroluminescent device. Bright red emission with high quantum efficiency has been obtained. The brightness of the ASPT device is one order magnitude higher than that of Alqs devices at about 12 V. The device shows high thermal stability because of the ionic interaction within the organic salt molecules. It is assumed that the high performance of such a device is related to the formation of dipole moments in the ASPT layer.

  16. Red Light-Emitting-Diode Based on an Organic Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Rui-Ping; Xu, Hong-Guang; Xu, Chun-Xiang; Zhang, Jun-Xiang; He, Guo-Hua; Cui, Yi-Ping

    2003-06-01

    A novel organic salt trans-4-[P-(N-ethyl-N-(hydroxylethyl)-amino) styryl]-N-methylpyridinium tetraphenylborate (abbreviated as ASPT) has been employed as an active layer in an organic electroluminescent device. Bright red emission with high quantum efficiency has been obtained. The brightness of the ASPT device is one order magnitude higher than that of Alq3 devices at about 12 V. The device shows high thermal stability because of the ionic interaction within the organic salt molecules. It is assumed that the high performance of such a device is related to the formation of dipole moments in the ASPT layer.

  17. Electroluminescence property of organic light emitting diode (OLED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özdemir, Orhan; Kavak, Pelin; Saatci, A. Evrim; Gökdemir, F. Pınar; Menda, U. Deneb; Can, Nursel; Kutlu, Kubilay [Yıldız Technical University, Department of Physics, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Tekin, Emine; Pravadalı, Selin [National Metrology Instıtute of Turkey (TUBİTAK-UME), Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2013-12-16

    Transport properties of electrons and holes were investigated not only in a anthracene-containing poly(p-phenylene-ethynylene)- alt - poly(p-phenylene-vinylene) (PPE-PPV) polymer (AnE-PVstat) light emitting diodes (OLED) but also in an ITO/Ag/polymer/Ag electron and ITO/PEDOT:PSS/polymer/Au hole only devices. Mobility of injected carriers followed the Poole-Frenkel type conduction mechanism and distinguished in the frequency range due to the difference of transit times in admittance measurement. Beginning of light output took place at the turn-on voltage (or flat band voltage), 1.8 V, which was the difference of energy band gap of polymer and two barrier offsets between metals and polymer.

  18. Screening metal-organic framework-based mixed-matrix membranes for CO2/CH4 separations

    OpenAIRE

    Keskin, Seda; Eruçar, İlknur

    2011-01-01

    1 Screening Metal Organic Framework-based Mixed Matrix Membranes for CO2/CH4 Separations Ilknur Erucar† and Seda Keskin‡* †Department of Computational Sciences and Engineering, Koç University, 34450, Istanbul, Turkey ‡Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Koç University, 34450, Istanbul, Turkey Submitted to Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. Abstract In this study, the challenge of selecting metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as filler particles in high performance mixe...

  19. Exact matrix treatment of an osmotic ensemble model of adsorption and pressure induced structural transitions in metal organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lawrence J; Manos, George

    2016-03-14

    Here we present an exactly treated quasi-one dimensional statistical mechanical osmotic ensemble model of pressure and adsorption induced breathing structural transformations of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The treatment uses a transfer matrix method. The model successfully reproduces the gas and pressure induced structural changes which are observed experimentally in MOFs. The model treatment presented here is a significant step towards analytical statistical mechanical treatments of flexible metal-organic frameworks.

  20. Poynting vector in transfer-matrix formalism for the calculation of light absorption profile in stratified isotropic optical media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deparis, Olivier

    2011-10-15

    In spite of the fact that solutions to Maxwell's equations in stratified isotropic optical media are well known, it appears that an explicit expression of the Poynting vector flux spatial evolution inside such a medium has not been derived so far. Based on exact electromagnetic field solutions in the transfer-matrix formalism, I derive such an expression and show that, due to the presence of counterpropagating waves in the medium, an additional contribution to the flux appears that exists only in optically absorbing layers and arises from the interference between these waves. Based on this theory, the concept of incremental absorption is introduced for the calculation of the light absorption profile along the stratification direction. As an illustration of this concept, absorption profiles in a Si-based thin-film tandem solar cell are predicted at typical wavelengths.

  1. Influence of the matrix properties on the performances of Er-doped Si nanoclusters light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrera, Alessia; Iacona, Fabio; Franzò, Giorgia; Miritello, Maria; Lo Savio, Roberto; Castagna, Maria Eloisa; Coffa, Salvatore; Priolo, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the properties of light emitting devices whose active layer consists of Er-doped Si nanoclusters (nc) generated by thermal annealing of Er-doped SiOx layers prepared by magnetron cosputtering. Differently from a widely used technique such as plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, sputtering allows to synthesize Er-doped Si nc embedded in an almost stoichiometric oxide matrix, so as to deeply influence the electroluminescence properties of the devices. Relevant results include the need for an unexpected low Si excess for optimizing the device efficiency and, above all, the strong reduction of the influence of Auger de-excitation, which represents the main nonradiative path which limits the performances of such devices and their application in silicon nanophotonics.

  2. Laboratory measurements of the light scattering properties of bentonite clay particles embedded in a cylindrical polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Ankur; Ahmed, Gazi A.; Das, Gautam; Karak, Niranjan; Boruah, Ratan; Choudhury, Amarjyoti

    2013-05-01

    The volume scattering function and degree of linear polarization of randomly oriented bentonite clay particles were investigated as a function of scattering angle at 543.5 nm, 594.5 nm and 632.8 nm incident laser wavelengths by using a detector array-incorporated laboratory light scattering setup. Readings were taken in steps of 1° from an angle of 10° to 170° and each detector was separated from the next one by an angle of 10°. A transparent cylindrical polymer matrix made of cycloaliphatic amine-cured thermosetting epoxy resin was used to hold the scattering samples in front of the laser beam. For background correction the measurements were taken in differential mode.

  3. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  4. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  5. Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix Regional Integration to Quantify Spectra for Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Westerhoff, P.; Leenheer, J.A.; Booksh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water and soil. However, interpreting the >10,000 wavelength-dependent fluorescence intensity data points represented in EEMs has posed a significant challenge. Fluorescence regional integration, a quantitative technique that integrates the volume beneath an EEM, was developed to analyze EEMs. EEMs were delineated into five excitation-emission regions based on fluorescence of model compounds, DOM fractions, and marine waters or freshwaters. Volumetric integration under the EEM within each region, normalized to the projected excitation-emission area within that region and dissolved organic carbon concentration, resulted in a normalized region-specific EEM volume (??i,n). Solid-state carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra, and EEMs were obtained for standard Suwannee River fulvic acid and 15 hydrophobic or hydrophilic acid, neutral, and base DOM fractions plus nonfractionated DOM from wastewater effluents and rivers in the southwestern United States. DOM fractions fluoresced in one or more EEM regions. The highest cumulative EEM volume (??T,n = ????i,n) was observed for hydrophobic neutral DOM fractions, followed by lower ??T,n values for hydrophobic acid, base, and hydrophilic acid DOM fractions, respectively. An extracted wastewater biomass DOM sample contained aromatic protein- and humic-like material and was characteristic of bacterial-soluble microbial products. Aromatic carbon and the presence of specific aromatic compounds (as indicated by solid-state 13C NMR and FTIR data) resulted in EEMs that aided in differentiating wastewater effluent DOM from drinking water DOM.

  6. Proteins from the organic matrix of core-top and fossil planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, L. L.; Brew, K.

    1990-08-01

    Organic constituents isolated from the tests (shells) of six species of core-top planktonic foraminifera, ranging in age between 2 and 4 Ka BP, consist of a heterogeneous mixture of proteins and polypeptides. At least seven discrete polypeptides are present as indicated by reverse phase HPLC and by gel electrophoresis. High percentages of aspartic acid and glutamic acid characterize one class of protein, while glycine, serine, and alanine-rich proteins dominate in a second class. Similar HPLC Chromatographie elution profiles are observed for all species analyzed, varying only in intensity of the peaks and in amino acid composition from species to species. The approximate molecular weights of two major fossil proteins ranged between 50,000 and 70,000 daltons. A comparison of 2-4 and 300 Ka Bp samples shows that while most of the polypeptides are present in both samples, some acidic polypeptides are not present in the older sample. These data suggest that some of the acidic polypeptides may be more soluble than other fractions and are lost more quickly from the test. The remaining hydrophobic, possibly more insoluble, polypeptides may be preserved in much older specimens and may be useful in tracing phylogeny of the planktonic foraminifera. Amino acid analyses of total test extracts before and after dialysis demonstrate that some acidic amino acids, particularly aspartic acid, and possibly peptides less than 6000-8000 daltons are lost during dialysis. Although a large percentage of these components are undoubtedly from the original organic matrix, at this point adsorbed components cannot be ruled out. These data caution against the use of total amino acid compositions in biogeochemical studies.

  7. The quantitative nuclear matrix proteome as a biochemical snapshot of nuclear organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Rudolf; Riede, Julia; Hegermann, Jan; Wuerch, Andreas; Eimer, Stefan; Dengjel, Joern; Mittler, Gerhard

    2014-09-05

    The nuclear matrix (NM) is an operationally defined structure of the mammalian cell nucleus that resists stringent biochemical extraction procedures applied subsequent to nuclease-mediated chromatin digestion of intact nuclei. This comprises removal of soluble biomolecules and chromatin by means of either detergent (LIS: lithium diiodosalicylate) or high salt (AS: ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride) treatment. So far, progress toward defining bona fide NM proteins has been hindered by the problem of distinguishing them from copurifying abundant contaminants and extraction-method-intrinsic precipitation artifacts. Here, we present a highly improved NM purification strategy, adding a FACS sorting step for efficient isolation of morphologically homogeneous lamin B positive NM specimens. SILAC-based quantitative proteome profiling of LIS-, AS-, or NaCl-extracted matrices versus the nuclear proteome together with rigorous statistical filtering enables the compilation of a high-quality catalogue of NM proteins commonly enriched among the three different extraction methods. We refer to this set of 272 proteins as the NM central proteome. Quantitative NM retention profiles for 2381 proteins highlight elementary features of nuclear organization and correlate well with immunofluorescence staining patterns reported in the Human Protein Atlas, demonstrating that the NM central proteome is significantly enriched in proteins exhibiting a nuclear body as well as nuclear speckle-like morphology.

  8. Controlled Synthesis of Organic/Inorganic van der Waals Solid for Tunable Light-Matter Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lin; Liu, Xinfeng; Cong, Chunxiao; Wu, Chunyang; Wu, Di; Chang, Tay Rong; Wang, Hong; Zeng, Qingsheng; Zhou, Jiadong; Wang, Xingli; Fu, Wei; Yu, Peng; Fu, Qundong; Najmaei, Sina; Zhang, Zhuhua; Yakobson, Boris I; Tay, Beng Kang; Zhou, Wu; Jeng, Horng Tay; Lin, Hsin; Sum, Tze Chien; Jin, Chuanhong; He, Haiyong; Yu, Ting; Liu, Zheng

    2015-12-16

    High-quality organic and inorganic van der Waals (vdW) solids are realized using methylammonium lead halide (CH3 NH3 PbI3 ) as the organic part (organic perovskite) and 2D inorganic monolayers as counterparts. By stacking on various 2D monolayers, the vdW solids exhibit dramatically different light emissions. Futhermore, organic/h-BN vdW solid arrays are patterned for red-light emission. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Influence of Energy Level Matching on Device Performances of Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chen; ZOU Xue-cheng; YIN Sheng

    2004-01-01

    Through experiments and computer simulation, the influence of the energy levels of organic materials and electrode materials in the organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) on the device performances is discussed. Results show that the device performances are influenced by not only the carrier injection barriers at the electrode interface but also the barriers at the organic heterojunction interface. This result is helpful to the selection of the organic materials and their arrangement in the optimal design of OLEDs.

  10. Integrable light-cone lattice discretizations from the universal R-matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Meneghelli, C

    2015-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a more general scheme for constructing integrable lattice regularisations of integrable quantum field theories. Considering the affine Toda theories as examples, we show how to construct such lattice regularisations using the representation theory of quantum affine algebras. This requires us to clarify in particular the relations between the light-cone approach to integrable lattice models and the representation theory of quantum affine algebras. Both are found to be related in a very natural way, suggesting a general scheme for the construction of generalised Baxter Q-operators. One of the main difficulties we need to deal with is coming from the infinite-dimensionality of the relevant families of representations. It is handled by means of suitable renormalisation prescriptions defining what may be called the modular double of quantum affine algebras. This framework allows us to give a representation-theoretic proof of finite-difference equations generalising the Baxter equation.

  11. A Study of Impact Response of Electrified Organic Matrix Composites (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    temperature across the thickness of the carbon fiber polymer matrix composite plate due to an electric current passing in the carbon fibers. A long...unidirectional carbon fiber polymer matrix composite plate that carries a DC current I in the fiber direction. Assume that the ratio of the thickness, h , to...the minimum temperature, minT , is at the surface, 2z h= ± . Moreover, a strong temperature gradient appears in carbon fiber polymer matrix composite plates

  12. Using Organic Light-Emitting Electrochemical Thin-Film Devices to Teach Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevian, Hannah; Muller, Sean; Rudmann, Hartmut; Rubner, Michael F.

    2004-01-01

    Materials science can be taught by applying organic light-emitting electrochemical thin-film devices and in this method students were allowed to make a light-emitting device by spin coating a thin film containing ruthenium (II) complex ions onto a glass slide. Through this laboratory method students are provided with the opportunity to learn about…

  13. Organic Single-Crystal Light-Emitting Transistor Coupling with Optical Feedback Resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Sawabe, Kosuke; Imakawa, Masaki; Maruyama, Kenichi; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Takenobu, Taishi

    2012-01-01

    Organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) are of great research interest because they combine the advantage of the active channel of a transistor that can control the luminescence of an in-situ light-emitting diode in the same device. Here we report a novel single-crystal OLET (SCLET) that is coupl

  14. Excited states structure and processes: Understanding organic light-emitting diodes at the molecular level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuai, Zhigang, E-mail: zgshuai@tsinghua.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Organic OptoElectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Peng, Qian, E-mail: qpeng@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Science (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100190 Beijing (China)

    2014-04-01

    Photo- or electro-excited states in polyatomic molecules, aggregates, and conjugated polymers are at the center of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). These can decay radiatively or non-radiatively, determining the luminescence quantum efficiency of molecular materials. According to Kasha’s rule, light-emission is dictated by the lowest-lying excited state. For conjugated polymers, the electron correlation effect can lead the lowest-lying excited state to the even-parity 2A{sub g} state which is non-emissive. To understand the nature of the low-lying excited state structure, we developed the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) theory and its symmetrization scheme for quantum chemistry applied to calculate the excited states structure. We found there are three types of 1B{sub u}/2A{sub g} crossover behaviors: with electron correlation strength U, with bond length alternation, and with conjugation length. These directly influence the light-emitting property. For the electro-excitation, carriers (electron and hole) are injected independently, forming both singlet and triplet excited bound states with statistically 25% and 75% portions, respectively. We found that the exciton formation rate can depend on spin manifold, and for conjugated polymers, the singlet exciton can have larger formation rate leading to the internal electroluminescence quantum efficiency larger than the 25% spin statistical limit. It is originated from the interchain electron correlation as well as intrachain lattice relaxation. For the dipole allowed emissive state, the radiative decay process via either spontaneous emission or stimulated emission can be computed from electronic structure plus vibronic couplings. The challenging issue lies in the non-radiative decay via non-adiabatic coupling and/or spin–orbit coupling. We developed a unified correlation function formalism for the excited state radiative and non-radiative decay rates. We emphasized the low-frequency mode mixing

  15. Excitation Emission Matrix Spectra (EEMS) of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Produced during Microbial Incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, N.; Nelson, N. B.; Parsons, R.

    2013-12-01

    The chromophoric or light-absorbing fraction of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is present ubiquitously in natural waters and has a significant impact on ocean biogeochemistry, affecting photosynthesis and primary production as well direct and indirect photochemical reactions (Siegel et al., 2002; Nelson et al., 2007). It has been largely researched in the past few decades, however the exact chemical composition remains unknown. Instrumental methods of analysis including simultaneous excitation-emission fluorescence spectra have allowed for further insight into source and chemical composition. While certain excitation-emission peaks have been associated with ';marine' sources, they have not been exclusively linked to bacterial production of CDOM (Coble, 1996; Zepp et al., 2004). In this study, ';grazer diluted' seawater samples (70% 0.2μm filtered water; 30% whole water) were collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) site in the Sargasso Sea (31° 41' N; 64° 10' W) and incubated with an amendment of labile dissolved organic carbon (10μM C6H12O6), ammonium (1μM NH4Cl) and phosphate (0.1μM K2HPO4) to facilitate bacterial production. These substrates and concentrations have been previously shown to facilitate optimum bacterial and CDOM production (Nelson et al., 2004). Sample depths were chosen at 1m and 200m as water at these depths has been exposed to UV light (the Subtropical Mode Water at 200m has been subducted from the surface) and therefore has low initial concentrations of CDOM. After the samples were amended, they were incubated at in-situ temperatures in the dark for 72 hours, with bacteria counts, UV-Vis absorption and EEMS measurements taken at 6-8 hour intervals. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements were collected daily. For the surface water experiment specific bacteria populations were investigated using Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis. Results showed a clear production of bacteria and production of CDOM, which

  16. Genomic organization and sequences of immunoglobulin light chain genes in a primitive vertebrate suggest coevolution of immunoglobulin gene organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1989-01-01

    The genomic organization and sequence of immunoglobulin light chain genes in Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate, have been characterized. Light chain variable (VL) and joining (JI) segments are separated by 380 nucleotides and together with the single constant region exon (CI), occupy less than 2.7 kb, the closest linkage described thus far for a rearranging gene system. The VL segment is flanked by a characteristic recombination signal sequence possessing a 12 nucleotide spacer; the recombination signal sequence flanking the JL segment is 23 nucleotides. The VL genes, unlike heavy chain genes, possess a typical upstream regulatory octamer as well as conserved enhancer core sequences in the intervening sequence separating JL and CL. Restriction mapping and genomic Southern blotting are consistent with the presence of multiple light chain gene clusters. There appear to be considerably fewer light than heavy chain genes. Heavy and light chain clusters show no evidence of genomic linkage using field inversion gel electrophoresis. The findings of major differences in the organization and functional rearrangement properties of immunoglobulin genes in species representing different levels of vertebrate evolution, but consistent similarity in the organization of heavy and light chain genes within a species, suggests that these systems may be coevolving. Images PMID:2511000

  17. See the light: electrophysiological characterization of the Bolwig organ's light response of Calliphora vicina 3rd instar larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnemann, Axel; Niederegger, Senta; Hanslik, Ulrike; Heinzel, H-G; Spiess, Roland

    2010-11-01

    The anatomy and development of the larval cyclorraphous Diptera visual system is well established. It consists of the internal Bolwig organ (BO), and the associated nerve connecting it to the brain. The BO contributes to various larval behaviors but was never electrophysiologically characterized. We recorded extracellulary from the Bolwig nerve of 3rd instar Calliphora vicina larvae to quantify the sensory response caused by BO stimulation with light stimuli of different wavelengths, intensities and directions. Consistent with previous behavioral experiments we found the BO most sensitive to white and green, followed by blue, yellow, violet and red light. The BO showed a phasic-tonic response curve. Increasing light intensity produced a sigmoid response curve with an approximate threshold of 0.0105 nW/cm(2) and a dynamic range from 0.105 nW/cm(2) to 52.5 nW/cm(2). No differences exist between feeding and wandering larvae which display opposed phototaxis. This excludes reduced BO sensitivity from causing the switch in behavior. Correlating to the morphology of the BO frontal light evoked the maximal reaction, while lateral light reduced the neural response asymmetrically: Light applied ipsilaterally to the recorded BO always produced a stronger response than when applied from the contralateral side. This implies that phototacic behavior is based on a tropotactic mechanism.

  18. Achieving High Performance in AC-Field Driven Organic Light Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David L; Smith, Gregory M; Dun, Chaochao; Cui, Yue

    2016-04-11

    Charge balance in organic light emitting structures is essential to simultaneously achieving high brightness and high efficiency. In DC-driven organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), this is relatively straight forward. However, in the newly emerging, capacitive, field-activated AC-driven organic devices, charge balance can be a challenge. In this work we introduce the concept of gating the compensation charge in AC-driven organic devices and demonstrate that this can result in exceptional increases in device performance. To do this we replace the insulator layer in a typical field-activated organic light emitting device with a nanostructured, wide band gap semiconductor layer. This layer acts as a gate between the emitter layer and the voltage contact. Time resolved device characterization shows that, at high-frequencies (over 40 kHz), the semiconductor layer allows for charge accumulation in the forward bias, light generating part of the AC cycle and charge compensation in the negative, quiescent part of the AC cycle. Such gated AC organic devices can achieve a non-output coupled luminance of 25,900 cd/m(2) with power efficiencies that exceed both the insulator-based AC devices and OLEDs using the same emitters. This work clearly demonstrates that by realizing balanced management of charge, AC-driven organic light emitting devices may well be able to rival today's OLEDs in performance.

  19. Cherenkov and Scintillation Light Separation in Organic Liquid Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Caravaca, J; Land, B J; Yeh, M; Gann, G D Orebi

    2016-01-01

    The CHErenkov / Scintillation Separation experiment (CHESS) has been used to demonstrate the separation of Cherenkov and scintillation light in both linear alkylbenzene (LAB) and LAB with 2g/L of PPO as a fluor (LAB/PPO). This is the first such demonstration for the more challenging LAB/PPO cocktail and improves on previous results for LAB. A time resolution of 338 +/- 12 ps FWHM results in an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov photons in LAB/PPO of 70 +/- 3% and 63 +/- 8% for time- and charge-based separation, respectively, with scintillation contamination of 36 +/- 5% and 38 +/- 4%. LAB/PPO data is consistent with a rise time of 0.75 +/- 0.25 ns.

  20. Measuring the pollutant transport capacity of dissolved organic matter in complex matrixes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, L.; Alsberg, T.; Odham, G.

    2003-01-01

    were used and evaluated, head-space solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME), enhanced solubility (ES) and fluorescence quenching (FQ). It was concluded that for samples with complex matrixes it was possible to measure the net effect of the DOM binding capacity and the salting out effect of the matrix...

  1. Towards developing a tandem of organic solar cell and light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Faculty of EHS, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    It is proposed here to design a tandem of organic solar cell (OSC) and white organic light emitting diode (WOLED) which can generate power in the day time from the sun and provide lighting at night. With the advancement of chemical technology, such device is expected to be very-cost effective and reasonably efficient. A device thus fabricated has the potential of meeting the world's sustainable domestic and commercial power and lighting needs (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Effects of low-energy CO2 laser irradiation and the organic matrix on inhibition of enamel demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C Y; Jordan, T H; Dederich, D N; Wefel, J S

    2000-09-01

    In the past two decades, accumulated evidence has clearly demonstrated the inhibitory effects of laser irradiation on enamel demineralization, but the exact mechanisms of these effects remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low-energy CO2 laser irradiation on demineralization of both normal human enamel and human enamel with its organic matrix removed. Twenty-four human molars were collected, cleaned, and cut into two halves. One half of each tooth was randomly selected and its lipid and protein content extracted. The other half of each tooth was used as the matched control. Each tooth half had two window areas. All the left windows were treated with a low-energy laser irradiation, whereas the right windows served as the non-laser controls. After caries-like lesion formation in a pH-cycling environment, microradiographs of tooth sections were taken for quantification of demineralization. The mean mineral losses (with standard deviation) of the enamel control, the lased enamel, the non-organic enamel control, and the lased non-organic enamel subgroups were 3955 (1191), 52(49), 4565(1311), and 1191 (940), respectively. A factorial ANOVA showed significant effects of laser irradiation (p = 0.0001), organic matrix (p = 0.0125), and the laser-organic matrix interaction (p = 0.0377). The laser irradiation resulted in a greater than 98% reduction in mineral loss, but the laser effect dropped to about 70% when the organic matrix in the enamel was removed. The results suggest that clinically applicable CO2 laser irradiation may cause an almost complete inhibition of enamel demineralization.

  3. Photon management in solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes: a review of light outcoupling micro- and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomard, Guillaume; Preinfalk, Jan B.; Egel, Amos; Lemmer, Uli

    2016-07-01

    To allow a greater acceptance in the display and lighting markets, organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology is currently the subject of intensive research efforts aimed at manufacturing cost-effective devices with higher efficiencies. In this regard, strategies matured in the field of photonics and nanophotonics can be applied for photon management purposes to improve the outcoupling of the generated light and to control the emission pattern. In this review, we report on the recent experimental and numerical advances to pursue those goals by highlighting the example of bottom-emitting devices. The cases of periodical micro- and nanostructures, as well as of stochastic ensembles that can be easily implemented using printing techniques, are covered herein. It is shown that beyond the sole optical properties, such additional elements can simultaneously improve the electrical characteristics of solution-processed OLEDs, and thus enable an optimization of the devices at different levels.

  4. Emission properties of an organic light-emitting diode patterned by a photoinduced autostructuration process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, C.; Fiorini-Debuisschert, C.; Hassiaoui, I.; Rocha, L.; Raimond, P.; Nunzi, J.-M.

    2005-11-01

    The photoluminescence properties of a periodically structured organic light-emitting diode are presented. Patterning is achieved using an original single-step autostructuration technique based on photoinduced effects in azo-polymer films. We show that single beam laser irradiation can lead to the induction of regular two-dimensional surface relief gratings. The waveguide properties of these microstructures as well as their effect on the emission properties of a light-emitting material are studied. We demonstrate a new straightforward technique to improve external light emission efficiency by outcoupling part of the light that was initially guided into the different diode layers.

  5. Organic light emitting field effect transistors based on an ambipolar p-i-n layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorano, V.; Bramanti, A.; Carallo, S.; Cingolani, R.; Gigli, G.

    2010-03-01

    A bottom contact/top gate ambipolar "p-i-n" layered light emitting field effect transistor with the active medium inserted between two doped transport layers, is reported. The doping profile results crucial to the capability of emitting light, as well as to the electrical characteristics of the device. In this sense, high output current at relative low applied gate/drain voltage and light emission along the whole large area transistor channel are observed, putting the basis to full integration of organic light emitting field effect transistors in planar complex devices.

  6. Direct photocatalysis for organic synthesis by using plasmonic-metal nanoparticles irradiated with visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qi; Jaatinen, Esa; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in direct-use plasmonic-metal nanoparticles (NPs) as photocatalysts to drive organic synthesis reactions under visible-light irradiation have attracted great interest. Plasmonic-metal NPs are characterized by their strong interaction with visible light through excitation of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Herein, we review recent developments in direct photocatalysis using plasmonic-metal NPs and their applications. We focus on the role played by the LSPR of the metal NPs in catalyzing organic transformations and, more broadly, the role that light irradiation plays in catalyzing the reactions. Through this, the reaction mechanisms that these light-excited energetic electrons promote will be highlighted. This review will be of particular interest to researchers who are designing and fabricating new plasmonic-metal NP photocatalysts by identifying important reaction mechanisms that occur through light irradiation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. JRC GMO-Matrix: a web application to support Genetically Modified Organisms detection strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Petrillo, Mauro; Bonfini, Laura; Gatto, Francesco; Rosa, Sabrina; Patak, Alexandre; Kreysa, Joachim

    2014-12-30

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the current state of the art technique for DNA-based detection of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). A typical control strategy starts by analyzing a sample for the presence of target sequences (GM-elements) known to be present in many GMOs. Positive findings from this "screening" are then confirmed with GM (event) specific test methods. A reliable knowledge of which GMOs are detected by combinations of GM-detection methods is thus crucial to minimize the verification efforts. In this article, we describe a novel platform that links the information of two unique databases built and maintained by the European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, one containing the sequence information of known GM-events and the other validated PCR-based detection and identification methods. The new platform compiles in silico determinations of the detection of a wide range of GMOs by the available detection methods using existing scripts that simulate PCR amplification and, when present, probe binding. The correctness of the information has been verified by comparing the in silico conclusions to experimental results for a subset of forty-nine GM events and six methods. The JRC GMO-Matrix is unique for its reliance on DNA sequence data and its flexibility in integrating novel GMOs and new detection methods. Users can mine the database using a set of web interfaces that thus provide a valuable support to GMO control laboratories in planning and evaluating their GMO screening strategies. The platform is accessible at http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmomatrix/ .

  8. Volatile organic compounds over Eastern Himalaya, India: temporal variation and source characterization using Positive Matrix Factorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sarkar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A first ever study on the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs has been made over a Himalayan high altitude station in India. A total of 18 VOCs (mono aromatics-BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, non-BTEX substituted aromatics and halocarbon have been measured over Darjeeling (27.01° N, 88.15° E, 2200 m a.s.l. in the eastern Himalaya in India during the period of July 2011–June 2012. The annual average concentration of the sum of 18 target VOCs (TVOC was 376.3 ± 857.2 μg m−3. Monoaromatics had the highest contribution (72% followed by other substituted aromatics (22% and halocarbon (6% compounds. Toluene was the most abundant VOC in the atmosphere of Darjeeling with the contribution of ~37% to TVOC followed by benzene (~21%, ethylbenzene (~9% and xylenes (~6%. TVOC concentrations were highest during the postmonsoon season with minimum solar radiation and lowest during the premonsoon season with maximum solar radiation. Anthropogenic activities related mainly to tourists like diesel and gasoline emissions, biomass and coal burning, use of solvent and solid waste emissions were almost equal in both the seasons. Seasonal variation in TVOCs over Darjeeling was mainly governed by the incoming solar radiation rather than the emission sources. Source apportionment study using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF model indicated that major fraction of (~60% TVOC were contributed by diesel and gasoline exhausts followed by solvent evaporation (18% and other sources. Diesel exhaust was also found to have the maximum potential in tropospheric ozone formation. The atmospheric loading of BTEX over Darjeeling was found to be comparable with several Indian metro cities and much higher than other cities around the world.

  9. Light as a trigger and a probe of the internal dynamics of living organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Rajendra; Brizhik, Larissa; Del Giudice, Emilio; Finelli, Filomena; Popp, Fritz-Albert; Schlebusch, Klauss-Peter

    2010-12-01

    It has been reported that the colors perceived behind closed eyes provide an indication of the psychophysical state of a subject. We discuss this phenomenon in the light of recently developed approaches to living organisms, based on the interplay between matter organization, biochemistry and electrodynamics. "When there is no energy, there is no color, no shape, no life." Caravaggio (1571-1610).

  10. Organic single-crystal light-emitting field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hotta, Shu; Yamao, Takeshi; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Takenobu, Taishi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Growth and characterisation of single crystals constitute a major field of materials science. In this feature article we overview the characteristics of organic single-crystal light-emitting field-effect transistors (OSCLEFETs). The contents include the single crystal growth of organic semiconductor

  11. Light sensors based on organic phototransistors with absorption-enhancing nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge Walther, Anders; Linnet, Jes; Albrektsen, Ole

    lithography (EBL) we have fabricated organic field effect transistors (OFETs) with arrays of silver NPs under the organic thin-film. Experimentally, the optical extinction of light incident on arrays of NPs has been measured by reflectance spectroscopy. The results have been compared to the predictions of Mie...

  12. Natural evolution inspired design of light trapping structure in thin film organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Yu, Shuangcheng; Chen, Wei; Sun, Cheng

    2013-09-01

    Light trapping has been developed to effectively enhance the efficiency of the thin film solar cell by extending the pathlength for light interacting with the active materials. Searching for optimal light trapping design requires a delicate balance among all the competing physical processes, including light refraction, reflection, and absorption. The existing design methods mainly depend on engineers' intuition to predefine the topology of the light-trapping structure. However, these methods are not capable of handling the topological variation in reaching the optimal design. In this work, a systematic approach based on Genetic Algorithm is introduced to design the scattering pattern for effective light trapping. Inspired by natural evolution, this method can gradually improve the performance of light trapping structure through iterative procedures, producing the most favorable structure with minimized reflection and substantial enhancement in light absorption. Both slot waveguide based solar cell and a more realistic organic solar with a scattering layer consisting of nano-scale patterned front layer is optimized to maximize absorption by strongly coupling incident sun light into the localized photonic modes supported by the multilayer system. Rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) is implemented to evaluate the absorbance. The optimized slot waveguide cell achieves a broadband absorption efficiency of 48.1% and more than 3-fold increase over the Yablonovitch limit and the optimized realistic organic cell exhibits nearly 50% average absorbance over the solar spectrum with short circuit current density five times larger than the control case using planar ITO layer.

  13. Organic light emitting devices synthesis, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Müllen, Klaus; Mllen, Klaus; Mü Llen, Klaus; Mullen, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    This high-class book reflects a decade of intense research, culminating in excellent successes over the last few years. The contributions from both academia as well as the industry leaders combine the fundamentals and latest research results with application know-how and examples of functioning displays. As a result, all the four important aspects of OLEDs are covered: - syntheses of the organic materials - physical theory of electroluminescence and device efficiency - device conception and construction - characterization of both materials and devices. The whole is naturally rounded off with a look at what the future holds in store. The editor, Klaus Muellen, is director of the highly prestigious MPI for polymer research in Mainz, Germany, while the authors include Nobel Laureate Alan Heeger, one of the most notable founders of the field, Richard Friend, as well as Ching Tang, Eastman Kodak's number-one OLED researcher, known throughout the entire community for his key publications.

  14. Organic Light-Emitting Device Based on Terbium Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ying; Deng Zhenbo; Xu Denghui; Xiao Jing; Wang Ruifen

    2005-01-01

    A new rare earth complex Tb(p-MBA)3phen was synthesized, which is first used as an emitting material in organic electroluminescence. By doping it into the conjugated polymer PVK, single-layer and double-layer devices were fabricated with structures: device 1: ITO/PVK∶ Tb(p-MBA)3phen/Al; device 2∶ ITO/PVK: Tb(p-MBA)3phen/AlQ/LiF/Al. The characteristics of these devices have been investigated. The emission of PVK is completely restrained, and only the pure green emission from Tb3+ can be observed in electroluminescence. The optimized device 2 has better monochromatic characteristics with the maximal brightness of 152 cd · m-2 at the voltage of 20 V.

  15. Active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) performance and life test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Draper, Russell S.; Ghosh, Amalkumar; Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor; Ali, Tariq; Khayrullin, Ilyas

    2011-06-01

    The US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. Through research and development programs from 2007 to 2010 with the US Government, eMagin made additional improvements in OLED life and developed the first SXGA (1280 X 1024 triad pixels) OLED microdisplay. US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life and performance tests on these displays, publishing results at the 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010 SPIE Defense and Security Symposia1,2,3,4. Life and performance tests have continued through 2010, and this data will be presented along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems: where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  16. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) performance and life test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellowes, David A.; Botkin, Michael E.; Draper, Russell S.; Coletta, Jason

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. Through Research and Development programs from 2007 to 2012 with the U.S. Government, eMagin made additional improvements in OLED life and developed the first SXGA (1280 X 1024 with triad pixels) and WUXGA (1920 X 1200 with triad pixels) OLED microdisplays. US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life and performance tests on these displays, publishing results at the 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2007 SPIE Defense, Security and Sensing Symposia. Life and performance tests have continued through 2013, and this data will be presented along with a comparison to previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems, where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  17. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED)-XL performance and life test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Draper, Russell S.; Lum, Alden K.; Ghosh, Amalkumar P.; Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor

    2009-05-01

    The US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life tests on these displays, finding over 200% lifetime improvement for the OLED-XL devices over the standard OLED displays, publishing results at the 2007 and 2008 SPIE Defense and Security Symposia1,2. In 2008, eMagin Corporation made additional improvements on the lifetime of their displays and developed the first SXGA (1280 × 1024 triad pixels) OLED microdisplay. A summary of the life and performance tests run at CERDEC NVESD will be presented along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems: where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  18. Preparation of organic light-emitting diode using coal tar pitch, a low-cost material, for printable devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Yamaoka

    Full Text Available We have identified coal tar pitch, a very cheap organic material made from coal during the iron-making process, as a source from which could be obtained emissive molecules for organic light-emitting diodes. Coal tar pitch was separated by simple dissolution in organic solvent, and subsequent separation by preparative thin-layer chromatography was used to obtain emissive organic molecules. The retardation factor of preparative thin-layer chromatography played a major role in deciding the emission characteristics of the solution as photoluminescence spectra and emission-excitation matrix spectra could be controlled by modifying the solution preparation method. In addition, the device characteristics could be improved by modifying the solution preparation method. Two rounds of preparative thin-layer chromatography separation could improve the luminance of organic light-emitting diodes with coal tar pitch, indicating that less polar components are favorable for enhancing the luminance and device performance. By appropriate choice of the solvent, the photoluminescence peak wavelength of separated coal tar pitch could be shifted from 429 nm (cyclohexane to 550 nm (chloroform, and consequently, the optical properties of the coal tar pitch solution could be easily tuned. Hence, the use of such multicomponent materials is advantageous for fine-tuning the net properties at a low cost. Furthermore, an indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrenesulfonate/coal tar pitch/LiF/Al system, in which the emissive layer was formed by spin-coating a tetrahydrofuran solution of coal tar pitch on the substrate, showed a luminance of 176 cd/m(2. In addition, the emission spectrum of coal tar pitch was narrowed after the preparative thin-layer chromatography process by removing the excess emissive molecules.

  19. Preparation of organic light-emitting diode using coal tar pitch, a low-cost material, for printable devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Miki; Asami, Shun-Suke; Funaki, Nayuta; Kimura, Sho; Yingjie, Liao; Fukuda, Takeshi; Yamashita, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We have identified coal tar pitch, a very cheap organic material made from coal during the iron-making process, as a source from which could be obtained emissive molecules for organic light-emitting diodes. Coal tar pitch was separated by simple dissolution in organic solvent, and subsequent separation by preparative thin-layer chromatography was used to obtain emissive organic molecules. The retardation factor of preparative thin-layer chromatography played a major role in deciding the emission characteristics of the solution as photoluminescence spectra and emission-excitation matrix spectra could be controlled by modifying the solution preparation method. In addition, the device characteristics could be improved by modifying the solution preparation method. Two rounds of preparative thin-layer chromatography separation could improve the luminance of organic light-emitting diodes with coal tar pitch, indicating that less polar components are favorable for enhancing the luminance and device performance. By appropriate choice of the solvent, the photoluminescence peak wavelength of separated coal tar pitch could be shifted from 429 nm (cyclohexane) to 550 nm (chloroform), and consequently, the optical properties of the coal tar pitch solution could be easily tuned. Hence, the use of such multicomponent materials is advantageous for fine-tuning the net properties at a low cost. Furthermore, an indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/coal tar pitch/LiF/Al system, in which the emissive layer was formed by spin-coating a tetrahydrofuran solution of coal tar pitch on the substrate, showed a luminance of 176 cd/m(2). In addition, the emission spectrum of coal tar pitch was narrowed after the preparative thin-layer chromatography process by removing the excess emissive molecules.

  20. Validation efforts for the neutronics of a plutonium erbium zirconium oxide inert matrix light water reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paratte, J. M.; Chawla, R.; Früh, R.; Joneja, O. P.; Pelloni, S.; Pralong, C.

    1999-08-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) neutronics codes and cross-section libraries need further qualification when used for the calculation of inert matrix fuel (IMF) cells. Three types of validation efforts have been undertaken for the PuO 2-Er 2O 3-ZrO 2 IMF concept under development at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Firstly, the PSI calculational scheme, based on the BOXER code and its data library, has been applied to the analysis of a range of LWR experiments with PuO 2-UO 2 fuel, conducted earlier at PSI's PROTEUS facility. The generally good agreement obtained between calculated and measured parameters gives confidence in the ability of the employed calculational scheme to correctly modelize Pu-containing fuel cells. Secondly, reactivity effects of various burnable poisons in a ZrO 2 matrix were measured in the CROCUS reactor of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology at Lausanne. Modelling these experiments with BOXER resulted in satisfactory prediction of measured reactivity ratios (relative to a soluble-boron standard) for most of the experimental rods employed. This was particularly the case for experiments with erbium, as well as with mixtures of erbium and europium (the latter being used to simulate the effects of overlapping resonances, as would be expected in the case of a Pu-Er IMF). Finally, as there are no experimental results available from power reactors employing IMFs, the validation of burnup calculations (at the cell level) has been based on results obtained in the framework of an international benchmark exercise on the physics of LWRs employing IMFs. Certain discrepancies in calculated parameters have been observed in this context, several of which can be attributed to specific differences in cross-section libraries.

  1. Visible Light-Induced Carbonylation Reactions with Organic Dyes as the Photosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jin-Bao; Qi, Xinxin; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-09-08

    Dyes can CO do it: Organic dyes and pigments are usually applied in textile dyeing, which can be dated back to the Neolithic period. Interestingly, the possibility to use organic dyes as photoredox catalysts has also been noticed by organic chemists and applied in organic synthesis. Carbonylation reactions as a powerful procedure in carbonyl-containing compound preparation have also been studied. In this manuscript, the recent achievements in using organic dyes as visible-light sensitizers in carbonylation chemistry are summarized and discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Obstructor A Organizes Matrix Assembly at the Apical Cell Surface to Promote Enzymatic Cuticle Maturation in Drosophila*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Yanina-Yasmin; Riedel, Dietmar; Behr, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and maturation of the apical extracellular matrix (aECM) is crucial for protecting organisms, but underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Epidermal cells secrete proteins and enzymes that assemble at the apical cell surface to provide epithelial integrity and stability during developmental growth and upon tissue damage. We analyzed molecular mechanisms of aECM assembly and identified the conserved chitin-binding protein Obst-A (Obstructor A) as an essential regulator. We show in Drosophila that Obst-A is required to coordinate protein and chitin matrix packaging at the apical cell surface during development. Secreted by epidermal cells, the Obst-A protein is specifically enriched in the apical assembly zone where matrix components are packaged into their highly ordered architecture. In obst-A null mutant larvae, the assembly zone is strongly diminished, resulting in severe disturbance of matrix scaffold organization and impaired aECM integrity. Furthermore, enzymes that support aECM stability are mislocalized. As a biological consequence, cuticle architecture, integrity, and function are disturbed in obst-A mutants, finally resulting in immediate lethality upon wounding. Our studies identify a new core organizing center, the assembly zone that controls aECM assembly at the apical cell surface. We propose a genetically conserved molecular mechanism by which Obst-A forms a matrix scaffold to coordinate trafficking and localization of proteins and enzymes in the newly deposited aECM. This mechanism is essential for maturation and stabilization of the aECM in a growing and remodeling epithelial tissue as an outermost barrier. PMID:25737451

  3. Drosophila convoluted/dALS is an essential gene required for tracheal tube morphogenesis and apical matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Lianna E; Yu, Marcus; Nelson, Kevin S; Laprise, Patrick; Tepass, Ulrich; Beitel, Greg J

    2009-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) control cell and organism growth through evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways. The mammalian acid-labile subunit (ALS) is a secreted protein that complexes with IGFs to modulate their activity. Recent work has shown that a Drosophila homolog of ALS, dALS, can also complex with and modulate the activity of a Drosophila IGF. Here we report the first mutations in the gene encoding dALS. Unexpectedly, we find that these mutations are allelic to a previously described mutation in convoluted (conv), a gene required for epithelial morphogenesis. In conv mutants, the tubes of the Drosophila tracheal system become abnormally elongated without altering tracheal cell number. conv null mutations cause larval lethality, but do not disrupt several processes required for tracheal tube size control, including septate junction formation, deposition of a lumenal/apical extracellular matrix, and lumenal secretion of Vermiform and Serpentine, two putative matrix-modifying proteins. Clearance of lumenal matrix and subcellular localization of clathrin also appear normal in conv mutants. However, we show that Conv/dALS is required for the dynamic organization of the transient lumenal matrix and normal structure of the cuticle that lines the tracheal lumen. These and other data suggest that the Conv/dALS-dependent tube size control mechanism is distinct from other known processes involved in tracheal tube size regulation. Moreover, we present evidence indicating that Conv/dALS has a novel, IGF-signaling independent function in tracheal morphogenesis.

  4. Control of a White Organic Light Emitting Diode emission parameters using a single doped RGB active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, D. [Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais e i3N – Instituto de Nanoestruturas, Nanomodelação e Nanofabricação, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus da Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pinto, A.; Califórnia, A.; Gomes, J. [CeNTI – Centro de Nanotecnologia, Materiais Técnicos, Funcionais e Inteligentes, Rua Fernando Mesquita 2785, 4760-034 Vila Nova de Famalicão (Portugal); Pereira, L., E-mail: luiz@ua.pt [Departmento de Física e i3N – Instituto de Nanoestruturas, Nanomodelação e Nanofabricação, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • A simple WOLED for Solid State Lighting is proposed with high color stability. • Energy transfer and electroluminescence dynamics of a single RGB layer for WOLEDs. • White shade modulation and stability over large emitting areas and applied voltages. - Abstract: Solid State Lighting technologies based on Organic Light Emitting Diodes, became an interesting focus due to their unique properties. The use of a unique RGB active layer for white emission, although simple in theory, shows difficulty to stabilize both CIE coordinates and color modulation. In this work, a WOLED using a simple RGB layer, was developed achieving a high color stability and shade modulation. The RGB matrix comprises a blue host material NPB, doped with two guests, a green (Coumarin 153) and a red (DCM1) in low concentrations. The RGB layer carrier dynamics allows for the white emission in low device complexity and high stability. This was also shown independent of the white shade, obtained through small changes in the red dopant resulting in devices ranging from warm to cool white i.e. an easy color tuning. A detailed analysis of the opto-electrical behavior is made.

  5. Integration of Organic Light Emitting Diodes and Organic Photodetectors for Lab-on-a-Chip Bio-Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Williams

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip (LoC technologies have allowed for the efficient separation and manipulation of various biomaterials, including many diagnostically relevant species. Organic electronics have similarly enjoyed a great deal of research, resulting in tiny, highly efficient, wavelength-selective organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs and organic photodetectors (OPDs. We consider the blend of these technologies for rapid detection and diagnosis of biological species. In the ideal system, optically active or fluorescently labelled biological species can be probed via light emission from OLEDs, and their subsequent light emission can be detected with OPDs. The relatively low cost and simple fabrication of the organic electronic devices suggests the possibility of disposable test arrays. Further, with full integration, the finalized system can be miniaturized and made simple to use. In this review, we consider the design constraints of OLEDs and OPDs required to achieve fully organic electronic optical bio-detection systems. Current approaches to integrated LoC optical sensing are first discussed. Fully realized OLED- and OPD-specific photoluminescence detection systems from literature are then examined, with a specific focus on their ultimate limits of detection. The review highlights the enormous potential in OLEDs and OPDs for integrated optical sensing, and notes the key avenues of research for cheap and powerful LoC bio-detection systems.

  6. Matrix formalism for calculation of the light beam intensity in stratified multilayered films, and its use in the analysis of emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, K; Ishida, H

    1990-06-01

    Matrix formulation to describe the light propagation in stratified multilayered films has been extended to a system with phase incoherence. Several equations for the reflectance, transmittance, and light beam intensity in the film system are derived from the formulation. Some formulas previously proposed are corrected in reference to the present method. The beam intensity description is used for the calculation of light emissive power from multilayered films having a temperature gradient. It is found that the equations derived here are exactly equivalent to those derived from the radiative transfer equation. However, the present method is more tractable, and can be readily used for a film system with any number of layers.

  7. The organization of the wall filaments and characterization of the matrix structures of Toxoplasma gondii cyst form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemgruber, Leandro; Lupetti, Pietro; Martins-Duarte, Erica S; De Souza, Wanderley; Vommaro, Rossiane C

    2011-12-01

    The encystation process is a key step in Toxoplasma gondii life cycle, allowing the parasite to escape from the host immune system and the transmission among the hosts. A detailed characterization of the formation and structure of the cyst stage is essential for a better knowledge of toxoplasmosis. Here we isolated cysts from mice brains and analysed the cyst wall structure and cyst matrix organization using different electron microscopy techniques. Images obtained showed that the cyst wall presented a filamentous aspect, with circular openings on its surface. The filaments were organized in two layers: a compact one, facing the exterior of the whole cyst and a more loosen one, facing the matrix. Within the cyst wall, we observed tubules and a large number of vesicles. The cyst matrix presented vesicles of different sizes and tubules, which were organized in a network connecting the bradyzoites to each other and to the cyst wall. Large vesicles, with a granular material in their lumen of glycidic nature were observed. Similar vesicles were also found associated with the posterior pole of the bradyzoites and in proximity to the cyst wall. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. MATRIX-VBS (v1.0): implementing an evolving organic aerosol volatility in an aerosol microphysics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2017-02-01

    The gas-particle partitioning and chemical aging of semi-volatile organic aerosol are presented in a newly developed box model scheme, where its effect on the growth, composition, and mixing state of particles is examined. The volatility-basis set (VBS) framework is implemented into the aerosol microphysical scheme MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state), which resolves mass and number aerosol concentrations and in multiple mixing-state classes. The new scheme, MATRIX-VBS, has the potential to significantly advance the representation of organic aerosols in Earth system models by improving upon the conventional representation as non-volatile particulate organic matter, often also with an assumed fixed size distribution. We present results from idealized cases representing Beijing, Mexico City, a Finnish forest, and a southeastern US forest, and investigate the evolution of mass concentrations and volatility distributions for organic species across the gas and particle phases, as well as assessing their mixing state among aerosol populations. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the intermediate-volatility range, while they remain in the particle phase in the low-volatility range. Their volatility distribution at any point in time depends on the applied emission factors, oxidation by OH radicals, and temperature. We also compare against parallel simulations with the original scheme, which represented only the particulate and non-volatile component of the organic aerosol, examining how differently the condensed-phase organic matter is distributed across the mixing states in the model. The results demonstrate the importance of representing organic aerosol as a semi-volatile aerosol, and explicitly calculating the partitioning of organic species between the gas and particulate phases.

  9. MATRIX-VBS (v1.0): Implementing an Evolving Organic Aerosol Volatility in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2017-01-01

    The gas-particle partitioning and chemical aging of semi-volatile organic aerosol are presented in a newly developed box model scheme, where its effect on the growth, composition, and mixing state of particles is examined. The volatility-basis set (VBS) framework is implemented into the aerosol microphysical scheme MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state), which resolves mass and number aerosol concentrations and in multiple mixing-state classes. The new scheme, MATRIX-VBS, has the potential to significantly advance the representation of organic aerosols in Earth system models by improving upon the conventional representation as non-volatile particulate organic matter, often also with an assumed fixed size distribution. We present results from idealized cases representing Beijing, Mexico City, a Finnish forest, and a southeastern US forest, and investigate the evolution of mass concentrations and volatility distributions for organic species across the gas and particle phases, as well as assessing their mixing state among aerosol populations. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the intermediate-volatility range, while they remain in the particle phase in the low-volatility range. Their volatility distribution at any point in time depends on the applied emission factors, oxidation by OH radicals, and temperature. We also compare against parallel simulations with the original scheme, which represented only the particulate and non-volatile component of the organic aerosol, examining how differently the condensed-phase organic matter is distributed across the mixing states in the model. The results demonstrate the importance of representing organic aerosol as a semi-volatile aerosol, and explicitly calculating the partitioning of organic species between the gas and particulate phases.

  10. The ginsenoside derivative 20(S)-protopanaxadiol inhibits solar ultraviolet light-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eungmin; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Kim, Jong-Eun; Yang, Hee; Oh, Deok-Kun; Yoon Park, Jung Han; Yoon Park, Dalius; Kim, Hee Jung; Rhee, Young Kyoung; Lee, Ki Won

    2017-04-05

    Ginsenosides are major pharmacologically active compounds present in ginseng (Panax ginseng). Among the ginsenosides, 20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (GPPD) and ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1) have previously been reported to exhibit anti-wrinkle effects. In this study, 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (20(S)-PPD), an aglycone derivative of the Rb1 metabolite was investigated for its anti-wrinkle benefit and compared to GPPD and Rb1. The anti-wrinkle effect of 20(S)-PPD during solar UV light was investigated using a human skin equivalent model and human keratinocytes. 20(S)-PPD attenuated solar UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression to a greater extent than GPPD and Rb1. 20(S)-PPD treatment modulated MMP-1 mRNA expression and the transcriptional activity of activator protein (AP)-1, a major transcription factor of MMP-1. Two upstream signaling pathways for AP-1, the MEK1/2-ERK1/2-p90(RSK) and MEK3/6-p38 pathways, were also suppressed. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential of 20(S)-PPD for further development as a preventative agent for sunlight-induced skin wrinkle. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis of visible light emitting self assembled Ge nanocrystals embedded within a SiO{sub 2} matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Hernandez, A.; De Moure-Flores, F.; Quinones-Galvan, J. G.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Melendez-Lira, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, A.P. 14740, C.P. 07300, Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico); Rangel-Kuoppa, V. T. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Plach, Thomas [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Zapata-Torres, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria IPN, Calzada Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico); Hernandez-Hernandez, L. A. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edificio 9 U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C.P. 07730 (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    As-grown light emitting self-assembled Ge nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) embedded in a SiO{sub 2} matrix were produced via a sequential deposition process of SiO{sub 2}/Ge/SiO{sub 2} layers employing a reactive radio frequency sputtering technique. Obtained Ge-NCs show a crystallographic phase, the proportion, size, quality, and specific orientation of which are determined by the oxygen partial pressure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicate that the size distribution of Ge-NCs is reduced and centered on about 8 nm when higher oxygen partial pressure is employed; the formation of Ge-NCs is corroborated by transmission electron microscopy measurements, and their sizes are consistent with estimates from PL measurements. Resistivity measurements are explained by a near neighbors hopping process, with specific features depending on the Ge-NCs' size. The features of PL and resistivity measurements indicate that there is no appreciable dependence of the number of interfacial defects on the oxygen partial pressure.

  12. Synthesis of visible light emitting self assembled Ge nanocrystals embedded within a SiO2 matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Hernández, A.; Rangel-Kuoppa, V. T.; Plach, Thomas; De Moure-Flores, F.; Quiñones-Galván, J. G.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Zapata-Torres, M.; Hernández-Hernández, L. A.; Meléndez-Lira, M.

    2012-02-01

    As-grown light emitting self-assembled Ge nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) embedded in a SiO2 matrix were produced via a sequential deposition process of SiO2/Ge/SiO2 layers employing a reactive radio frequency sputtering technique. Obtained Ge-NCs show a crystallographic phase, the proportion, size, quality, and specific orientation of which are determined by the oxygen partial pressure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicate that the size distribution of Ge-NCs is reduced and centered on about 8 nm when higher oxygen partial pressure is employed; the formation of Ge-NCs is corroborated by transmission electron microscopy measurements, and their sizes are consistent with estimates from PL measurements. Resistivity measurements are explained by a near neighbors hopping process, with specific features depending on the Ge-NCs' size. The features of PL and resistivity measurements indicate that there is no appreciable dependence of the number of interfacial defects on the oxygen partial pressure.

  13. Self-Organization of Light in Optical Media with Competing Nonlinearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maucher, F; Pohl, T; Skupin, S; Krolikowski, W

    2016-04-22

    We study the propagation of light beams through optical media with competing nonlocal nonlinearities. We demonstrate that the nonlocality of competing focusing and defocusing nonlinearities gives rise to self-organization and stationary states with stable hexagonal intensity patterns, akin to transverse crystals of light filaments. Signatures of this long-range ordering are shown to be observable in the propagation of light in optical waveguides and even in free space. We consider a specific form of the nonlinear response that arises in atomic vapor upon proper light coupling. Yet, the general phenomenon of self-organization is a generic consequence of competing nonlocal nonlinearities, and may, hence, also be observed in other settings.

  14. Geometric light trapping with a V-trap for efficient organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Soo Jin

    2013-03-14

    The efficiency of today’s most efficient organic solar cells is primarily limited by the ability of the active layer to absorb all the sunlight. While internal quantum efficiencies exceeding 90% are common, the external quantum efficiency rarely exceeds 70%. Light trapping techniques that increase the ability of a given active layer to absorb light are common in inorganic solar cells but have only been applied to organic solar cells with limited success. Here, we analyze the light trapping mechanism for a cell with a V-shape substrate configuration and demonstrate significantly improved photon absorption in an 5.3%-efficient PCDTBT:PC70BM bulk heterojunction polymer solar cell. The measured short circuit current density improves by 29%, in agreement with model predictions, and the power conversion efficiency increases to 7.2%, a 35% improvement over the performance in the absence of a light trap.

  15. Multiscale Micro-Nano Nested Structures: Engineered Surface Morphology for Efficient Light Escaping in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Dong, Xiaoxuan; Zhou, Yun; Su, Wenming; Chen, Xiaolian; Zhu, Yufu; Shen, Su

    2015-12-01

    Various micro-to-nanometer scale structures are extremely attractive for light escaping in organic light-emitting diodes. To develop and optimize such structures, an innovative approach was demonstrated for the first time to fabricate multiscale micro-nano nested structures by photolithography with a well-designed mask pattern followed by a controllable thermal reflow process. The experimental and theoretical characterizations verify that these unique nested structures hold the capability of light concentration, noticeable low haze, and efficient antireflection. As a proof-of-concept, the incorporation of this pattern onto the glass substrate efficiently facilitates light escaping from the device, resulting in current efficiency 1.60 times and external quantum efficiency 1.63 times that of a control flat device, respectively. Moreover, compared to a hexagonally arranged microlens array and quasi-random biomimetic moth eye nanostructures, the nested structures proposed here can magically tune the spatial emission profile to comply with the Lambertian radiation pattern. Hence, this novel structure is expected to be of great potential in related ubiquitous optoelectronic applications and provide scientific inspiration to other novel multiscale micro-nanostructure research.

  16. Tissue phenotype depends on reciprocal interactions between the extracellular matrix and the structural organization of the nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelie' vre, S.A.; Weaver, V.M.; Nickerson, J.A.; Larabell, C.A.; Bhaumik, A.; Petersen, O.W.; Bissell, M.J.

    1998-08-14

    What determines the nuclear organization within a cell and whether this organization itself can impose cellular function within a tissue remains unknown. To explore the relationship between nuclear organization and tissue architecture and function, we used a model of human mammary epithelial cell acinar morphogenesis. When cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane (rBM), HMT-3522 cells form polarized and growth-arrested tissue-like acini with a central lumen and deposit an endogenous BM. We show that rBM-induced morphogenesis is accompanied by relocalization of the nuclear matrix proteins NuMA, splicing factor SRm160, and cell cycle regulator Rb. These proteins had distinct distribution patterns specific for proliferation, growth arrest, and acini formation, whereas the distribution of the nuclear lamina protein, lamin B, remained unchanged. NuMA relocalized to foci, which coalesced into larger assemblies as morphogenesis progressed. Perturbation of histone acetylation in the acini by trichostatin A treatment altered chromatin structure, disrupted NuMA foci, and induced cell proliferation. Moreover, treatment of transiently permeabilized acini with a NuMA antibody led to the disruption of NuMA foci, alteration of histone acetylation, activation of metalloproteases, and breakdown of the endogenous BM. These results experimentally demonstrate a dynamic interaction between the extracellular matrix, nuclear organization, and tissue phenotype. They further show that rather than passively ref lecting changes in gene expression, nuclear organization itself can modulate the cellular and tissue phenotype.

  17. Near-infrared organic light-emitting diodes for biosensing with high operating stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takahiko; Nakanotani, Hajime; Hara, Shigeo; Hirohata, Toru; Adachi, Chihaya

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate highly stable NIR organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on a system using excitonic energy transfer from thermally activated delay fluorescence molecules to NIR fluorophores. The NIR OLEDs showed an electroluminescence peak at 780 nm and robust operational stability with 2% loss of the initial radiant flux after 1000 h under a constant current density of 10 mA/cm2. The variation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation can be detected using the NIR OLEDs as a light source.

  18. Effect of Heat Treatment on Luminescent Properties of White Organic Light Emitting Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Juan; HUA Yu-lin; WANG Chang-sheng; XIONG Shao-zhen

    2004-01-01

    The white organic light emitting device (OLED) with single-structure using a polymer blend as the light emitting layer is fabricated. Heat treatment is used to control the ratio between the intensities of main electroluminescent spectral peaks. The electroluminescent spectrum of our device is quite similar to that of white inorganic LED produced by Nichia Corporation after being annealed, and its turn-on voltage can be decreased by 1 V.

  19. Photoinduced reactions between Pb3O4 and organic dyes in aqueous solution under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yangen; Long, Jinlin; Gu, Quan; Lin, Huaxiang; Lin, Huan; Wang, Xuxu

    2012-12-03

    Pb(3)O(4) could react with organic dyes in aqueous solution under visible light irradiation, in which Pb(3)O(4) was transformed into Pb(3)(CO(3))(2)(OH)(2) along with oxidation of the organic dyes. Cu(2+) has considerable effect on the reaction. In the presence of Cu(2+), MO (20 ppm) and RhB (10(-5) mol L(-1)) were completely degraded under visible light within 6 and 20 min, respectively, while both Pb(3)O(4) and Cu(2+) keep almost stable during photodegradation. The mechanisms of the reactions with and without Cu(2+) ions were studied. The photochemical system of Pb(3)O(4) cooperating with Cu(2+) ions is probably used for the treatment of organic pollutants in water under visible light.

  20. Enhanced light emission from top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes by optimizing surface plasmon polariton losses

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Cornelius; Wieczorek, Martin; Gather, Malte C; Hofmann, Simone; Reineke, Sebastian; Leo, Karl; Scholz, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate enhanced light extraction for monochrome top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The enhancement by a factor of 1.2 compared to a reference sample is caused by the use of a hole transport layer (HTL) material possessing a low refractive index (1.52). The low refractive index reduces the in-plane wave vector of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excited at the interface between the bottom opaque metallic electrode (anode) and the HTL. The shift of the SPP dispersion relation decreases the power dissipated into lost evanescent excitations and thus increases the outcoupling efficiency, although the SPP remains constant in intensity. The proposed method is suitable for emitter materials owning isotropic orientation of the transition dipole moments as well as anisotropic, preferentially horizontal orientation, resulting in comparable enhancement factors. Furthermore, for sufficiently low refractive indices of the HTL material, the SPP can be modeled as a propagating plane wave within ot...

  1. Uric Acid Spherulites in the Reflector Layer of Firefly Light Organ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, King-Siang; Sheu, Hwo-Shuenn; Hua, Tzu-En; Kang, Mei-Hua; Li, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background In firefly light organs, reflector layer is a specialized tissue which is believed to play a key role for increasing the bioluminescence intensity through reflection. However, the nature of this unique tissue remains elusive. In this report, we investigated the role, fine structure and nature of the reflector layer in the light organ of adult Luciola cerata. Principal Findings Our results indicated that the reflector layer is capable of reflecting bioluminescence, and contains abundant uric acid. Electron microscopy (EM) demonstrated that the cytosol of the reflector layer's cells is filled with densely packed spherical granules, which should be the uric acid granules. These granules are highly regular in size (∼700 nm in diameter), and exhibit a radial internal structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that an intense single peak pattern with a d-spacing value of 0.320 nm is specifically detected in the light organ, and is highly similar to the diffraction peak pattern and d-spacing value of needle-formed crystals of monosodium urate monohydrate. However, the molar ratio evaluation of uric acid to various cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+) in the light organ deduced that only a few uric acid molecules were in the form of urate salts. Thus, non-salt uric acid should be the source of the diffraction signal detected in the light organ. Conclusions In the light organ, the intense single peak diffraction signal might come from a unique needle-like uric acid form, which is different from other known structures of non-salt uric acid form. The finding of a radial structure in the granules of reflector layer implies that the spherical uric acid granules might be formed by the radial arrangement of needle-formed packing matter. PMID:23441187

  2. Optical Interference Effects by Metal Cathode in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhao-Xin; WANG Li-Duo; QIU Yong

    2004-01-01

    The dependence of light intensities of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) on the distance of emission zone to metal cathode is investigated numerically. The investigation is based on the half-space optical model that accounts for optical interference effects of metal cathode. We find that light intensities of OLEDs are functions of the distance of emission zone from the metal cathode because of the effect of interference of the metal cathode.This interference leads to an optimal location of emission zone in OLEDs for the maximum of light intensities.Optimal locations of emission zone are numerically shown in various emitting colour OLEDs with different metal cathodes and these results are expected to give insight into the preparation of high efficiency full colour or white light OLEDs.

  3. Multichromophoric organic molecules encapsulated in polymer nanoparticles for artificial light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Santanu; Jana, Bikash; Patra, Amitava

    2015-03-16

    We designed a self-assembled multichromophoric organic molecular arrangement inside polymer nanoparticles for light-harvesting antenna materials. The self-assembled molecular arrangement of quaterthiophene molecules was found to be an efficient light-absorbing antenna material, followed by energy transfer to Nile red (NR) dye molecules, which was confined in polymer nanoparticles. The efficiency of the antenna effect was found to be 3.2 and the effective molar extinction coefficient of acceptor dye molecules was found to be enhanced, which indicates an efficient light-harvesting system. Based on this energy-transfer process, tunable photo emission and white light emission has been generated with 14 % quantum yield. Such self-assembled oligothiophene-NR systems encapsulated in polymer nanoparticles may open up new possibilities for fabrication of artificial light harvesting system.

  4. Organic Matter Detection on Mars by Pyrolysis-FTIR: An Analysis of Sensitivity and Mineral Matrix Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Peter R.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2016-11-01

    Returning samples from Mars will require an effective method to assess and select the highest-priority geological materials. The ideal instrument for sample triage would be simple in operation, limited in its demand for resources, and rich in produced diagnostic information. Pyrolysis-Fourier infrared spectroscopy (pyrolysis-FTIR) is a potentially attractive triage instrument that considers both the past habitability of the sample depositional environment and the presence of organic matter that may reflect actual habitation. An important consideration for triage protocols is the sensitivity of the instrumental method. Experimental data indicate pyrolysis-FTIR sensitivities for organic matter at the tens of parts per million level. The mineral matrix in which the organic matter is hosted also has an influence on organic detection. To provide an insight into matrix effects, we mixed well-characterized organic matter with a variety of dry minerals, to represent the various inorganic matrices of Mars samples, prior to analysis. During pyrolysis-FTIR, serpentinites analogous to those on Mars indicative of the Phyllocian Era led to no negative effects on organic matter detection; sulfates analogous to those of the Theiikian Era led, in some instances, to the combustion of organic matter; and palagonites, which may represent samples from the Siderikian Era, led, in some instances, to the chlorination of organic matter. Any negative consequences brought about by these mineral effects can be mitigated by the correct choice of thermal extraction temperature. Our results offer an improved understanding of how pyrolysis-FTIR can perform during sample triage on Mars.

  5. Switching Thin Films of Azobenzene-Containing Metal-Organic Frameworks with Visible Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kai; Knebel, Alexander; Zhao, Fangli; Bléger, David; Caro, Jürgen; Heinke, Lars

    2017-04-24

    Stimuli-responsive molecules change their properties when exposed to external signals, such as light, and enable the preparation of smart materials. UV light, which often destroys organic materials, is typically required for activating the desired response of photoswitchable compounds, significantly limiting the potential applications of light-operated smart materials. Herein, we present the first metal-organic framework (MOF), which enables reversible modulation of key properties upon irradiation with visible light only. The fluorinated azobenzene side groups in the MOF structure can be reversibly switched between the trans and cis state by green and violet light, avoiding UV light. It was demonstrated that the uptake of guest molecules by these MOF films can be switched in a fully remote-controlled way. The membrane separation of hydrogen/hydrocarbon mixtures was investigated. The light-induced changes of the MOF pore size result in the switching of the permeation and of the selection factor. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A review on organic spintronic materials and devices: I. Magnetic field effect on organic light emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rugang Geng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic spintronics is an emerging and potential platform for future electronics and display due to the intriguing properties of organic semiconductors (OSCs. For the past decade, studies have focused on three types of organic spintronic phenomena: (i magnetic field effect (MFE in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs, where spin mixing between singlet and triplet polaron pairs (PP can be influenced by an external magnetic field leading to organic magnetoresistive effect (OMAR; (ii magnetoresistance (MR in organic spin valves (OSVs, where spin injection, transport, manipulation, and detection have been demonstrated; and (iii magnetoelectroluminescence (MEL bipolar OSVs or spin-OLEDs, where spin polarized electrons and holes are simultaneously injected into the OSC layer, leading to the dependence of electroluminescence intensity on relative magnetization of the electrodes. In this first of two review papers, we present major experimental results on OMAR studies and current understanding of OMAR using several spin dependent processes in organic semiconductors. During the discussion, we highlight some of the outstanding challenges in this promising research field. Finally, we provide an outlook on the future of organic spintronics.

  7. Photophysical processes and light extraction in organic light emitting devices; Photophysikalische Prozesse und Lichtextraktion in organischen Leuchtdioden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, Nils Andre

    2008-11-10

    Alq{sub 3} is the most commonly used material for electron transport and as an emission layer in organic LEDs. However many of its photophysical properties are still unknown. The phosphorescence - known as a low temperature effect - was measured at room temperature for the first time. A new experimental method is presented to identify and characterize a new molecular conversion process into an unknown dark state. This conversion process represents an additional fundamental energy loss channel which is especially important for the development of organic lasers. A physically intuitive model was developed, which allows the calculation of light emission from OLEDs. In addition, a new method for the quantification of optical losses in OLEDs based on an dipole approach has been implemented and verified experimentally. The use of OLEDs was demonstrated for the first time in a chemical sensor, which is based on the detection of the surface plasmon resonance. (orig.)

  8. Molecular Cloning, Expression and Genome Organization of Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) Matrix Metalloproteinase-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the course of studying pathogenesis of enteric septicemia of catfish, we noted that channel catfish matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene was up-regulated after Edwardsiella ictaluri infection. In this study, we cloned, sequenced using the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method and cha...

  9. Impact of Fluorescent Lighting on Oxidation of Model Wine Solutions Containing Organic Acids and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant-Preece, Paris; Barril, Celia; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Clark, Andrew C

    2017-03-22

    Previous studies have provided evidence that light exposure can increase oxygen consumption in wine and that the photodegradation of iron(III) tartrate could contribute to this process. In the present study, model wine solutions containing iron(III) and various organic acids, either alone or combined, were stored in sealed clear glass wine bottles and exposed to light from fluorescent lamps. Dissolved oxygen was monitored, and afterward the organic acid degradation products were determined and the capacity of the solutions to bind sulfur dioxide, the main wine preservative, was assessed. In the dark controls, little or no dissolved oxygen was consumed and the organic acids were stable. In the irradiated solutions, dissolved oxygen was consumed at a rate that was dependent on the specific organic acid present, and the latter were oxidized to various carbonyl compounds. For the solutions containing tartaric acid, malic acid, and/or citric acid, irradiation increased their sulfur dioxide-binding capacity.

  10. Emitter Orientation as a Key Parameter in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tobias D.; Lampe, Thomas; Sylvinson, Daniel M. R.; Djurovich, Peter I.; Thompson, Mark E.; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    The distinct preferential alignment, i.e., horizontal orientation with respect to the substrate plane, of the optical transition dipole moment vectors (TDMVs) of organic dye molecules is of paramount importance for extracting the internally generated power of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to the outside world. This feature is one of the most promising approaches for the enhancement of the electrical efficacy in state-of-the-art OLEDs, as their internal quantum efficiencies are already close to the ultimate limit. If one can achieve complete horizontal orientation of the TDMVs, it is possible to increase the efficiency by at least 50% because alignment strongly influences the power dissipation into the different optical modes present in such a thin-film device. Thus, this feature of organic light-emitting molecules can lead to advanced performance for future applications. Therefore, we present here a review of recent achievements, ongoing research, and future tasks in this particular area of organic electronics.

  11. A large-area, flexible pressure sensor matrix with organic field-effect transistors for artificial skin applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Takao; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Iba, Shingo; Kato, Yusaku; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Takayasu

    2004-07-01

    It is now widely accepted that skin sensitivity will be very important for future robots used by humans in daily life for housekeeping and entertainment purposes. Despite this fact, relatively little progress has been made in the field of pressure recognition compared to the areas of sight and voice recognition, mainly because good artificial "electronic skin" with a large area and mechanical flexibility is not yet available. The fabrication of a sensitive skin consisting of thousands of pressure sensors would require a flexible switching matrix that cannot be realized with present silicon-based electronics. Organic field-effect transistors can substitute for such conventional electronics because organic circuits are inherently flexible and potentially ultralow in cost even for a large area. Thus, integration of organic transistors and rubber pressure sensors, both of which can be produced by low-cost processing technology such as large-area printing technology, will provide an ideal solution to realize a practical artificial skin, whose feasibility has been demonstrated in this paper. Pressure images have been taken by flexible active matrix drivers with organic transistors whose mobility reaches as high as 1.4 cm2/V·s. The device is electrically functional even when it is wrapped around a cylindrical bar with a 2-mm radius.

  12. High light induced changes in organization, protein profile and function of photosynthetic machinery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nama, Srilatha; Madireddi, Sai Kiran; Devadasu, Elsin Raju; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2015-11-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas (C.) reinhardtii is used as a model organism to understand the efficiency of photosynthesis along with the organization and protein profile of photosynthetic apparatus under various intensities of high light exposure for 1h. Chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence induction, OJIPSMT transient was decreased with increase in light intensity indicating the reduction in photochemical efficiency. Further, circular dichroism studies of isolated thylakoids from high light exposed cells showed considerable change in the pigment-pigment interactions and pigment-proteins interactions. Furthermore, the organization of supercomplexes from thylakoids is studied, in which, one of the hetero-trimer of light harvesting complex (LHC) II is affected significantly in comparison to other complexes of LHC's monomers. Also, other supercomplexes, photosystem (PS)II reaction center dimer and PSI complexes are reduced. Additionally, immunoblot analysis of thylakoid proteins revealed that PSII core proteins D1 and D2 were significantly decreased during high light treatment. Similarly, the PSI core proteins PsaC, PsaD and PsaG were drastically changed. Further, the LHC antenna proteins of PSI and PSII were differentially affected. From our results it is clear that LHCs are damaged significantly, consequently the excitation energy is not efficiently transferred to the reaction center. Thus, the photochemical energy transfer from PSII to PSI is reduced. The inference of the study deciphers the structural and functional changes driven by light may therefore provide plants/alga to regulate the light harvesting capacity in excess light conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Asymmetric synthesis of amino acid precursors in interstellar complex organics by circularly polarized light

    OpenAIRE

    Takano, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Kaneko, Takeo; Marumo, Katsumi; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2007-01-01

    The asymmetric synthesis of amino acid precursors from complex organics have been performed. A gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide, ammonia and water (molecules which are among those identified in the interstellar medium) was irradiated with 3.0 MeV protons to obtain amino acid precursors within high-molecular-weight complex organics of up to 3,000 Da. The amino acid precursor products synthesized were then irradiated with right (R-) or left (L-) ultraviolet circularly polarized light (UV-CPL)...

  14. Highly Efficient, Simplified, Solution-Processed Thermally Activated Delayed-Fluorescence Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Cho, Himchan; Jeong, Su-Hun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-27

    Highly efficient, simplified, solution-processed thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes can be realized by using pure-organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters and a multifunctional buffer hole-injection layer, in which high EQE (≈24%) and current efficiency (≈73 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated. High-efficiency fluorescence red-emitting and blue-emitting devices can also be fabricated in this manner.

  15. Molecularly controlled interfacial layer strategy toward highly efficient simple-structured organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-Hee; Choi, Mi-Ri; Woo, Seong-Hoon; Min, Sung-Yong; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2012-03-15

    A highly efficient simplified organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with a molecularly controlled strategy to form near-perfect interfacial layer on top of the anode is demonstrated. A self-organized polymeric hole injection layer (HIL) is exploited increasing hole injection, electron blocking, and reducing exciton quenching near the electrode or conducting polymers; this HIL allows simplified OLED comprised a single small-molecule fluorescent layer to exhibits a high current efficiency (∼20 cd/A).

  16. Light climate and dissolved organic carbon concentration influence species-specific changes in fish zooplanktivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidel, Brian C.; Baglini, Katherine; Jones, Stuart E.; Kelly, Patrick T.; Solomon, Christopher T.; Zwart, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in lakes reduces light penetration and limits fish production in low nutrient lakes, reportedly via reduced primary and secondary production. Alternatively, DOC and light reductions could influence fish by altering their visual feeding. Previous studies report mixed effects of DOC on feeding rates of zooplanktivorous fish, but most investigators tested effects of a single concentration of DOC against clear-water, turbid, or algal treatments. We used a controlled laboratory study to quantify the effects of a DOC gradient (3–19 mg L−1) on average light climate and the zooplankton feeding rate of 3 common, north temperate fishes. Light availability, which was inversely related to DOC concentration, had a positive and linear effect on zooplankton consumption by juvenile largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), explaining 22% and 28% of the variation in consumption, respectively. By contrast, zooplankton feeding rates by fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were best predicted by a nonlinear, negative influence of light (R2 = 0.13). In bluegill feeding trials we found a general trend for positive selection of larger zooplankton (Cladocera and Chaoboridae); however, the light climate did not influence the selection of prey type. Largemouth bass selected for larger-bodied zooplankton, with weak evidence that selectivity for large Cladocera changed from negative to neutral selection based on electivity values across the light gradient. Our results suggest that the effect of DOC on the light climate of lakes may directly influence fish zooplanktivory and that this influence may vary among fish species.

  17. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  18. Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy of Monolithic Two-Color Light-Emitting Diodes Using an InGaN-Based Light Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damilano, Benjamin; Kim-Chauveau, Hyonju; Frayssinet, Eric; Brault, Julien; Hussain, Sakhawat; Lekhal, Kaddour; Vennéguès, Philippe; De Mierry, Philippe; Massies, Jean

    2013-09-01

    Monolithic InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using a light converter fully grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy are demonstrated. The light converter, consisting of 10-40 InGaN/GaN quantum wells, is grown first, followed by a violet pump LED. The structure and growth conditions of the pump LED are specifically adapted to avoid thermal degradation of the light converter. Electroluminescence analysis shows that part of the pump light is absorbed by the light converter and reemitted at longer wavelength. Depending on the emission wavelength of the light converter, different LED colors are achieved. In particular, for red-emitting light converters, a color temperature of 2100 K corresponding to a tint between warm white and candle light is demonstrated.

  19. Metal-Organic Frameworks to Metal/Metal Oxide Embedded Carbon Matrix: Synthesis, Characterization and Gas Sorption Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Jen Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Three isostructural metal-organic frameworks, (MOFs, [Fe(OH(1,4-NDC] (1, [Al(OH(1,4-NDC] (2, and [In(OH(1,4-NDC] (3 have been synthesized hydrothermally by using 1,4-naphthalene dicarboxylate (1,4-NDC as a linker. The MOFs were characterized using various techniques and further used as precursor materials for the synthesis of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles inserted in a carbon matrix through a simple thermal conversion method. The newly synthesized carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and BET analysis. The results showed that the MOF-derived carbon composite materials maintained the morphology of the original MOF upon carbonization, and confirmed the insertion of metal/metal oxide particles in the carbon matrix.

  20. Transmutation Performance Analysis for Inert Matrix Fuels in Light Water Reactors and Computational Neutronics Methods Capabilities at INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Pope; Samuel E. Bays; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; Mehdi Asgari; Benoit Forget

    2009-05-01

    The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF, thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCmCf, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu. The results of this infinite lattice assembly-wise study using SCALE 5.1 indicate that it may be feasible to recycle TRU in this manner using an otherwise typical PWR assembly without violating peaking factor limits.

  1. Advances in phosphors based on organic materials for light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kashma; Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Vinod; Swart, Hendrik C.

    2016-01-01

    A brief overview is presented in the light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on purely organic materials. Organic LEDs are of great interest to the research community because of their outstanding properties and flexibility. Comparison between devices made using different organic materials and their derivatives with respect to synthetic protocols, characterizations, quantum efficiencies, sensitivity, specificity and their applications in various fields have been discussed. This review also discusses the essential requirement and scientific issues that arise in synthesizing cost-effective and environmental friendly organic LEDs diodes based on purely organic materials. This mini review aims to capture and convey some of the key current developments in phosphors formed by purely organic materials and highlights some possible future applications. Hence, this study comes up with a widespread discussion on the various contents in a single platform. Also, it offers avenues for new researchers for futuristic development in the area.

  2. The ultra-structural organization of the elastic network in the intra- and inter-lamellar matrix of the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, J; Elliott, D M; Costi, J J

    2017-08-01

    The inter-lamellar matrix (ILM)-located between adjacent lamellae of the annulus fibrosus-consists of a complex structure of elastic fibers, while elastic fibers of the intra-lamellar region are aligned predominantly parallel to the collagen fibers. The organization of elastic fibers under low magnification, in both inter- and intra-lamellar regions, was studied by light microscopic analysis of histologically prepared samples; however, little is known about their ultrastructure. An ultrastructural visualization of elastic fibers in the inter-lamellar matrix is crucial for describing their contribution to structural integrity, as well as mechanical properties of the annulus fibrosus. The aims of this study were twofold: first, to present an ultrastructural analysis of the elastic fiber network in the ILM and intra-lamellar region, including cross section (CS) and in-plane (IP) lamellae, of the AF using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and second, to -compare the elastic fiber orientation between the ILM and intra-lamellar region. Four samples (lumbar sheep discs) from adjacent sections (30μm thickness) of anterior annulus were partially digested by a developed NaOH-sonication method for visualization of elastic fibers by SEM. Elastic fiber orientation and distribution were quantified relative to the tangential to circumferential reference axis. Visualization of the ILM under high magnification revealed a dense network of elastic fibers that has not been previously described. Within the ILM, elastic fibers form a complex network, consisting of different size and shape fibers, which differed to those located in the intra-lamellar region. For both regions, the majority of fibers were oriented near 0° with respect to tangential to circumferential (TCD) direction and two minor symmetrical orientations of approximately±45°. Statistically, the orientation of elastic fibers between the ILM and intra-lamellar region was not different (p=0.171). The present study used

  3. Light Absorption and Energy Transfer in the Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Tihana; Ostroumov, Evgeny E; Anna, Jessica M; van Grondelle, Rienk; Govindjee; Scholes, Gregory D

    2017-01-25

    The process of photosynthesis is initiated by the capture of sunlight by a network of light-absorbing molecules (chromophores), which are also responsible for the subsequent funneling of the excitation energy to the reaction centers. Through evolution, genetic drift, and speciation, photosynthetic organisms have discovered many solutions for light harvesting. In this review, we describe the underlying photophysical principles by which this energy is absorbed, as well as the mechanisms of electronic excitation energy transfer (EET). First, optical properties of the individual pigment chromophores present in light-harvesting antenna complexes are introduced, and then we examine the collective behavior of pigment-pigment and pigment-protein interactions. The description of energy transfer, in particular multichromophoric antenna structures, is shown to vary depending on the spatial and energetic landscape, which dictates the relative coupling strength between constituent pigment molecules. In the latter half of the article, we focus on the light-harvesting complexes of purple bacteria as a model to illustrate the present understanding of the synergetic effects leading to EET optimization of light-harvesting antenna systems while exploring the structure and function of the integral chromophores. We end this review with a brief overview of the energy-transfer dynamics and pathways in the light-harvesting antennas of various photosynthetic organisms.

  4. Passivation of organic light emitting diode anode grid lines by pulsed Joule heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janka, M.; Gierth, R.; Rubingh, J.E.; Abendroth, M.; Eggert, M.; Moet, D.J.D.; Lupo, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the self-aligned passivation of a current distribution grid for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) anode using a pulsed Joule heating method to align the passivation layer accurately on the metal grid. This method involves passing an electric current through the grid to cure a polymer

  5. Patterning of Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diode (FOLED) stack using an ultrafast laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandamparambil, R.; Fledderus, H.; Steenberge, G.V.; Dietzel, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    A femtosecond laser has been successfully utilized for patterning thin Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diode (FOLED) structures of individual layer thickness around 100nm. The authors report in this paper a step-like ablation behavior at the layer interfaces which accounts for a local removal of ent

  6. Patterning of Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diode (FOLED) stack using an ultrafast laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandamparambil, R.; Fledderus, H.; Steenberge, G.V.; Dietzel, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    A femtosecond laser has been successfully utilized for patterning thin Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diode (FOLED) structures of individual layer thickness around 100nm. The authors report in this paper a step-like ablation behavior at the layer interfaces which accounts for a local removal of ent

  7. Organization of the Bacterial Light-Harvesting Apparatus Rationalized by Exciton Transport Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Harel, Elad

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the process by which energy from sunlight drives cellular metabolism, relies on a unique organization of light-harvesting and reaction center complexes. Recently, the organization of light-harvesting LH2 complexes and dimeric reaction center-light harvesting I-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) core complexes in membranes of purple non-sulfur bacteria was revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM)1. Here, we report that the structure of LH2 and its organization within the membrane can be largely rationalized by a simple physical model that relies primarily on exciton transfer optimization. The process through which the light-harvesting complexes transfer excitation energy has been recognized to incorporate both coherent and incoherent processes mediated by the surrounding protein environment. Using the Haken-Strobl model, we show that the organization of the complexes in the membrane can be almost entirely explained by simple electrostatic considerations and that quantum effects act primarily to enforce robust...

  8. Patterning of Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diode (FOLED) stack using an ultrafast laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandamparambil, R.; Fledderus, H.; Steenberge, G.V.; Dietzel, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    A femtosecond laser has been successfully utilized for patterning thin Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diode (FOLED) structures of individual layer thickness around 100nm. The authors report in this paper a step-like ablation behavior at the layer interfaces which accounts for a local removal of

  9. Device Optimization and Transient Electroluminescence Studies of Organic light Emitting Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lijuan Zou

    2003-08-05

    Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are among the most promising for flat panel display technologies. They are light, bright, flexible, and cost effective. And while they are emerging in commercial product, their low power efficiency and long-term degradation are still challenging. The aim of this work was to investigate their device physics and improve their performance. Violet and blue OLEDs were studied. The devices were prepared by thermal vapor deposition in high vacuum. The combinatorial method was employed in device preparation. Both continuous wave and transient electroluminescence (EL) were studied. A new efficient and intense UV-violet light emitting device was developed. At a current density of 10 mA/cm{sup 2}, the optimal radiance R could reach 0.38 mW/cm{sup 2}, and the quantum efficiency was 1.25%. using the delayed EL technique, electron mobilities in DPVBi and CBP were determined to be {approx} 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/Vs and {approx} 10{sup -4} cm{sup 2}/Vs, respectively. Overshoot effects in the transient El of blue light emitting devices were also observed and studied. This effect was attributed to the charge accumulation at the organic/organic and organic/cathode interfaces.

  10. High current density in light-emitting transistors of organic single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takenobu, Taishi; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    We measured the external electroluminescence quantum efficiency (eta(ext)) in light-emitting field-effect transistors (LETs) made of organic single crystals and found that, in the ambipolar transport region, eta(ext) is not degraded up to several hundreds A/cm(2) current-density range, which is 2 or

  11. Multi-color light-emitting transistors composed of organic single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yomogida, Yohei; Sakai, Hayato; Sawabe, Kosuke; Gocho, Shota; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya; Hasobe, Taku; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Takenobu, Taishi

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel concept for multi-color light emission from an ambipolar organic single-crystal transistor using natural optical waveguides, the self-absorption effect, Davydov splitting and the unique alignment of the transition dipole moments. We used 9,10-bis(2,2-diphenylvinyl)-anthracene singl

  12. Passivation of organic light emitting diode anode grid lines by pulsed Joule heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janka, M.; Gierth, R.; Rubingh, J.E.; Abendroth, M.; Eggert, M.; Moet, D.J.D.; Lupo, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the self-aligned passivation of a current distribution grid for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) anode using a pulsed Joule heating method to align the passivation layer accurately on the metal grid. This method involves passing an electric current through the grid to cure a polymer

  13. Surface plasmon polariton generation by light scattering off aligned organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsen, Esben; Søndergaard, Thomas; Fiutowski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Leakage radiation spectroscopy has been applied to study surface plasmon polariton (SPP) generation by light scattered off aligned organic nanofibers deposited on a thin silver film. The efficiency of SPP generation was studied by angularly resolved leakage radiation spectroscopy as a function...

  14. Highly efficient multilayer organic pure blue light emitting diodes with substituted carbazoles compounds in the emitting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, A [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers (LPL, CNRS), Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Chenais, S [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers (LPL, CNRS), Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Forget, S [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers (LPL, CNRS), Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Castex, M-C [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers (LPL, CNRS), Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Ades, D [Biomateriaux et Polymeres de Specialite (BPS/B2OA, CNRS), Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, Villetaneuse/Faculte de Medecine Lariboisiere-St Louis, Universite Paris 7, 75010 Paris (France); Siove, A [Biomateriaux et Polymeres de Specialite (BPS/B2OA, CNRS), Institut Galilee, Universite Paris 13, Villetaneuse/Faculte de Medecine Lariboisiere-St Louis, Universite Paris 7, 75010 Paris (France); Denis, C [Laboratoire Cellules et Composants, CEA/LITEN/DSEN, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Maisse, P [Laboratoire Cellules et Composants, CEA/LITEN/DSEN, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Geffroy, B [Laboratoire Cellules et Composants, CEA/LITEN/DSEN, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-03-07

    Bright blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on 1, 4, 5, 8, N-pentamethylcarbazole (PMC) and on dimer of N-ethylcarbazole (N, N'-diethyl-3, 3'-bicarbazyl) (DEC) as emitting layers or as dopants in a 4, 4'-bis(2, 2'-diphenylvinyl)-1, 1'-biphenyl (DPVBi) matrix are described. Pure blue light with the CIE coordinates (x = 0.153, y = 0.100), electroluminescence efficiency {eta}{sub EL} of 0.4 cd A{sup -1}, external quantum efficiency {eta}{sub ext} of 0.6% and luminance L of 236 cd m{sup -2} (at 60 mA cm{sup -2}) were obtained with PMC as an emitter and the 2, 9-dimethyl-4, 7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenantroline (BCP) as a hole-blocking material in five-layer emitting devices. The highest efficiencies {eta}{sub EL} of 4.7 cd A{sup -1} and {eta}{sub ext} = 3.3% were obtained with a four-layer structure and a DPVBi DEC-doped active layer (CIE coordinates x = 0.158, y = 0.169, {lambda}{sub peak} = 456 nm). The {eta}{sub ext} value is one the highest reported at this wavelength for blue OLEDs and is related to an internal quantum efficiency up to 20%.

  15. Highly efficient multilayer organic pure blue light emitting diodes with substituted carbazoles compounds in the emitting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, A.; Chénais, S.; Forget, S.; Castex, M.-C.; Adès, D.; Siove, A.; Denis, C.; Maisse, P.; Geffroy, B.

    2006-03-01

    Bright blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on 1, 4, 5, 8, N-pentamethylcarbazole (PMC) and on dimer of N-ethylcarbazole (N, N'-diethyl-3, 3'-bicarbazyl) (DEC) as emitting layers or as dopants in a 4, 4'-bis(2, 2'-diphenylvinyl)-1, 1'-biphenyl (DPVBi) matrix are described. Pure blue light with the CIE coordinates (x = 0.153, y = 0.100), electroluminescence efficiency ηEL of 0.4 cd A-1, external quantum efficiency ηext of 0.6% and luminance L of 236 cd m-2 (at 60 mA cm-2) were obtained with PMC as an emitter and the 2, 9-dimethyl-4, 7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenantroline (BCP) as a hole-blocking material in five-layer emitting devices. The highest efficiencies ηEL of 4.7 cd A-1 and ηext = 3.3% were obtained with a four-layer structure and a DPVBi DEC-doped active layer (CIE coordinates x = 0.158, y = 0.169, λpeak = 456 nm). The ηext value is one the highest reported at this wavelength for blue OLEDs and is related to an internal quantum efficiency up to 20%.

  16. Highly efficient multilayer organic pure-blue-light emitting diodes with substituted carbazoles compounds in the emitting layer

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, A; Chenais, S; Castex, M C; Siove, A; Ades, D; Geffroy, B; Denis, C; Maisse, P; Fischer, Alexis; Forget, Sebastien; Chenais, Sebastien; Castex, Marie-Claude; Siove, Alain; Ades, Dominique; Geffroy, Bernard; Denis, Christine; Maisse, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Bright blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on 1,4,5,8,N-pentamethylcarbazole (PMC) and on dimer of N-ethylcarbazole (N,N'-diethyl-3,3'-bicarbazyl) (DEC) as emitting layers or as dopants in a 4,4'-bis(2,2'-diphenylvinyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (DPVBi) matrix are described. Pure blue-light with the C.I.E. coordinates x = 0.153 y = 0.100, electroluminescence efficiency \\eta_{EL} of 0.4 cd/A, external quantum efficiency \\eta_{ext.} of 0.6% and luminance L of 236 cd/m2 (at 60 mA/cm2) were obtained with PMC as an emitter and the 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenantroline (BCP) as a hole-blocking material in five-layer emitting devices. The highest efficiencies \\eta_{EL.} of 4.7 cd/A, and \\eta_{ext} = 3.3% were obtained with a four-layer structure and a DPVBi DEC-doped active layer (CIE coordinates x = 0.158, y=0.169, \\lambda_{peak} = 456 nm). The \\eta_{ext.} value is one the highest reported at this wavelength for blue OLEDs and is related to an internal quantum efficiency up to 20%.

  17. Cadherin-Based Intercellular Adhesions Organize Epithelial Cell-Matrix Traction Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Mertz, Aaron F; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Goldstein, Jill; Rosowski, Kathryn R; Niessen, Carien M; Marchetti, M Cristina; Dufresne, Eric R; Horsley, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Cell--cell and cell-matrix adhesions play essential roles in the function of tissues. There is growing evidence for the importance of crosstalk between these two adhesion types, yet little is known about the impact of these interactions on the mechanical coupling of cells to the extracellular-matrix (ECM). Here, we combine experiment and theory to reveal how intercellular adhesions modulate forces transmitted to the ECM. In the absence of cadherin-based adhesions, primary mouse keratinocytes within a colony appear to act independently, with significant traction forces extending throughout the colony. In contrast, with strong cadherin-based adhesions, keratinocytes in a cohesive colony localize traction forces to the colony periphery. Through genetic or antibody-mediated loss of cadherin expression or function, we show that cadherin-based adhesions are essential for this mechanical cooperativity. A minimal physical model in which cell--cell adhesions modulate the physical cohesion between contractile cells is ...

  18. Exploiting Poly(ethylene glycol as a Matrix for Liquid-Phase Organic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim D. Janda

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Soluble polymer-supported chemistry is a technology that allows the blending of the benefits of polymer-supported synthesis and solution-phase chemistry. Herein, we describe our recent efforts in this area targeted at exploring the scope of poly(ethylene glycol (PEG as the matrix. Specifically we describe the use of PEG as a support for triphenyl phosphine and for the Stille reaction.

  19. Reducing the Matrix Effect in Organic Cluster SIMS Using Dynamic Reactive Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hua; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic reactive ionization (DRI) utilizes a reactive molecule, HCl, which is doped into an Ar cluster projectile and activated to produce protons at the bombardment site on the cold sample surface with the presence of water. The methodology has been shown to enhance the ionization of protonated molecular ions and to reduce salt suppression in complex biomatrices. In this study, we further examine the possibility of obtaining improved quantitation with DRI during depth profiling of thin films. Using a trehalose film as a model system, we are able to define optimal DRI conditions for depth profiling. Next, the strategy is applied to a multilayer system consisting of the polymer antioxidants Irganox 1098 and 1010. These binary mixtures have demonstrated large matrix effects, making quantitative SIMS measurement not feasible. Systematic comparisons of depth profiling of this multilayer film between directly using GCIB, and under DRI conditions, show that the latter enhances protonated ions for both components by 4- to 15-fold, resulting in uniform depth profiling in positive ion mode and almost no matrix effect in negative ion mode. The methodology offers a new strategy to tackle the matrix effect and should lead to improved quantitative measurement using SIMS.

  20. Optical properties and aging of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Wise, Matthew; Caylor, Ryan; Imholt, Felisha; Selimovic, Vanessa; Shilling, John E.

    2016-10-01

    The light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA) commonly referred to as "brown carbon" (BrC) has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its potential to affect atmospheric radiation balance, especially in the ultraviolet region and thus impact photochemical processes. A growing amount of data has indicated that BrC is prevalent in the atmosphere, which has motivated numerous laboratory and field studies; however, our understanding of the relationship between the chemical composition and optical properties of BrC remains limited. We conducted chamber experiments to investigate the effect of various volatile organic carbon (VOC) precursors, NOx concentrations, photolysis time, and relative humidity (RH) on the light absorption of selected secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Light absorption of chamber-generated SOA samples, especially aromatic SOA, was found to increase with NOx concentration, at moderate RH, and for the shortest photolysis aging times. The highest mass absorption coefficient (MAC) value is observed from toluene SOA products formed under high-NOx conditions at moderate RH, in which nitro-aromatics were previously identified as the major light-absorbing compounds. BrC light absorption is observed to decrease with photolysis time, correlated with a decline of the organic nitrate fraction of SOA. SOA formed from mixtures of aromatics and isoprene absorb less visible (Vis) and ultraviolet (UV) light than SOA formed from aromatic precursors alone on a mass basis. However, the mixed SOA absorption was underestimated when optical properties were predicted using a two-product SOA formation model, as done in many current climate models. Further investigation, including analysis on detailed mechanisms, are required to explain the discrepancy.

  1. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  2. Novel Strategy for Photopatterning Emissive Polymer Brushes for Organic Light Emitting Diode Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A light-mediated methodology to grow patterned, emissive polymer brushes with micron feature resolution is reported and applied to organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays. Light is used for both initiator functionalization of indium tin oxide and subsequent atom transfer radical polymerization of methacrylate-based fluorescent and phosphorescent iridium monomers. The iridium centers play key roles in photocatalyzing and mediating polymer growth while also emitting light in the final OLED structure. The scope of the presented procedure enables the synthesis of a library of polymers with emissive colors spanning the visible spectrum where the dopant incorporation, position of brush growth, and brush thickness are readily controlled. The chain-ends of the polymer brushes remain intact, affording subsequent chain extension and formation of well-defined diblock architectures. This high level of structure and function control allows for the facile preparation of random ternary copolymers and red–green–blue arrays to yield white emission. PMID:28691078

  3. A randomly nano-structured scattering layer for transparent organic light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jin Woo; Shin, Jin-Wook; Cho, Doo-Hee; Moon, Jaehyun; Joo, Chul Woong; Park, Seung Koo; Hwang, Joohyun; Cho, Nam Sung; Lee, Jonghee; Han, Jun-Han; Chu, Hye Yong; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2014-09-21

    A random scattering layer (RSL) consisting of a random nano-structure (RNS) and a high refractive index planarization layer (HRI PL) is suggested and demonstrated as an efficient internal light-extracting layer for transparent organic light emitting diodes (TOLEDs). By introducing the RSL, a remarkable enhancement of 40% and 46% in external quantum efficiency (EQE) and luminous efficacy (LE) was achieved without causing deterioration in the transmittance. Additionally, with the use of the RSL, the viewing angle dependency of EL spectra was reduced to a marginal degree. The results were interpreted as the stronger influence of the scattering effect over the microcavity. The RSL can be applied widely in TOLEDs as an effective light-extracting layer for extracting the waveguide mode of confined light at the indium tin oxide (ITO)/OLED stack without introducing spectral changes in TOLEDs.

  4. The Impact of Goal Setting and Empowerment on Governmental Matrix Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Cooper. Business Reasearch Methods. Homewood IL: Irwin, Inc., 1991. Fayol , Henri . "General Principles of Management," in Clasics of Organization...the worker who is most qualified, the individual worker is able to apply their unique qualifications to the greater good of the organization. Henri ... Fayol believed that allowing the individual to exercise their skills to the greater good of the organization promotes self-esteem and initiative in the

  5. Frustrated total internal reflection in organic light-emitting diodes employing sphere cavity embedded in polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peifen

    2016-02-01

    The light extraction efficiency of top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is numerically investigated employing the finite-difference time-domain method. The periodic nanostructures formed by embedding the sphere arrays in polystyrene (PS) are placed on top of OLED to frustrate the total internal reflection at the interface between OLED and free space. These nanostructures serve as an intermediate medium to extract the light out of OLED devices. Efficiently coupling both evanescent waves and propagation waves into spheres and subsequently extracting these light waves out of the sphere is key to achieving high extraction efficiency. By tuning the thickness of PS layer, both of the in-coupling efficiency and out-coupling efficiency are optimized for achieving high light extraction efficiency. Thicker PS layer results in higher in-coupling efficiency in sphere while the thinner PS layer leads to higher out-coupling efficiency. Thus the maximum light extraction is a trade-off between the in-coupling efficiency and out-coupling efficiency. The study shows that light extraction efficiency of 89% can be achieved by embedding 0.90 μm TiO2 sphere in 0.30 μm PS layer with optimized in-coupling efficiency, out-coupling efficiency and cavity effect.

  6. Visible-light driven photocatalytic activity of β-indium sulfide (In2S3) quantum dots embedded in Nafion matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, R.; Warrier, Anita R.; Vijayan, C.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity of highly stable β-indium sulfide (In2S3) quantum dots embedded in Nafion matrix. β-indium sulfide (In2S3) quantum dots (6-10 nm) embedded in Nafion matrix with strong quantum confinement were synthesized by a simple chemical route. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum shows a large blue shift (˜1 eV) which can be controlled by the reaction temperature and time. Strong broadband photoluminescence is observed in the blue, green and red regions of the emission spectrum with variation in particle size and stoichiometry of the quantum dots. Photocatalytic activity measurements show that these hybrid membranes synthesized with equimolar precursors of In and S show paramount photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation, with the degradation of Rhodamine-6G dyes up to 95% within 90 min. The photocatalytic membranes are tested for reusable and stable operation.

  7. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes on Solution-Processed Graphene Transparent Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junbo

    2010-01-26

    Theoretical estimates indicate that graphene thin films can be used as transparent electrodes for thin-film devices such as solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes, with an unmatched combination of sheet resistance and transparency. We demonstrate organic light-emitting diodes with solution-processed graphene thin film transparent conductive anodes. The graphene electrodes were deposited on quartz substrates by spincoating of an aqueous dispersion of functionalized graphene, followed by a vacuum anneal step to reduce the sheet resistance. Small molecular weight organic materials and a metal cathode were directly deposited on the graphene anodes, resulting in devices with a performance comparable to control devices on indium-tin-oxide transparent anodes. The outcoupling efficiency of devices on graphene and indium-tin-oxide is nearly identical, in agreement with model predictions. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  8. AC-driven light emission from in situ grown organic nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuhai; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; de Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina; Madsen, Morten; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2012-06-01

    In-situ grown organic nanofibers have been prepared on metal electrodes patterned by electron beam lithography. A systematic investigation shows that the light emission from these nanofibers driven by an AC gate voltage depends nonlinearly on the amplitude of the AC gate voltage and linearly on the frequency of the gate voltage, which indicates that a model involving thermally assisted charge-carrier tunneling can be applied. The photoluminescence spectra of parahexaphenylene (p6P) and α-sexithiophene (6T) nanofibers illustrate that the emission color of the in-situ grown nanofibers can be tuned by depositing two types of discontinuous organic layers on the same platform. Electroluminescence from two nanofiber thin films suggests that the relative light emission contribution from the two organic molecules can be varied by changing, e.g., the nominal thickness of the two materials.

  9. The impact of organic coatings on light scattering by sodium chloride particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Ezell, Michael J.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2011-08-01

    Light scattering by airborne particles plays a major role in visibility degradation and climate change. The composition and structure of particles in air can be complex, so that predictions of light scattering a priori have significant uncertainties. We report here studies of light scattering by NaCl, a model for airborne salt particles from the ocean and alkaline lakes, with and without an organic coating formed from the low volatility products of the reaction of α-pinene with ozone at room temperature at 1 atm in air. Light scattering at 450, 550 and 700 nm was measured using an integrating nephelometer on particles whose size distribution was independently determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For comparison, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) of a known size and dioctylphthalate (DOP) particles generated with a narrow size distribution were also studied. The measured values were compared to those calculated using Mie theory. Although excellent agreement between experiment and theory was found for the PSL and DOP particles, there were large discrepancies for a polydisperse NaCl sample. These were traced to errors in the size distribution measurements. Despite the use of 85Kr neutralizers, the Boltzmann charge equilibrium distribution assumption used to derive particle size distributions from SMPS data was shown not to be valid, leading to an overestimate of the concentration of larger particles and their contribution to light scattering. Correcting for this, the combination of experiments and theory show that as salt takes up low volatility organics in the atmosphere and the geometric mean diameter increases, the effect on light scattering may be reasonably approximated from the change in size distribution under conditions where the organic coating is small relative to the core size. However, for a given particle diameter, light scattering decreases as the relative contribution of the organic component increases. Thus, light scattering by

  10. Exact matrix treatment of statistical mechanical lattice model of adsorption induced gate opening in metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lawrence J.; Manos, George

    2015-05-01

    Here we present a statistical mechanical lattice model which is exactly solvable using a matrix method and allows treatment of adsorption induced gate opening structural transformations of metal-organic frameworks which are nanoporous materials with exceptional adsorption properties. Modelling of these structural changes presents a serious theoretical challenge when the solid and gas species are treated in an even handed way. This exactly solvable model complements other simulation based approaches. The methodology presented here highlights the competition between the potential for adsorption and the energy required for structural transition as a driving force for the features in the adsorption isotherms.

  11. Preparation of organic light-emitting diode using coal tar pitch, a low-cost material, for printable devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamaoka, Miki; Asami, Shun-Suke; Funaki, Nayuta; Kimura, Sho; Yingjie, Liao; Fukuda, Takeshi; Yamashita, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We have identified coal tar pitch, a very cheap organic material made from coal during the iron-making process, as a source from which could be obtained emissive molecules for organic light-emitting diodes...

  12. Hybrid resonant organic-inorganic nanostructures for novel light emitting devices and solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agranovich, Vladimir M. [Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Science, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chemistry Department, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas (United States); Rupasov, Valery I. [ANTEOS, Inc., Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 01545 (United States); Silvestri, Leonardo [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    The energy transfer from an inorganic layer to an organic component of resonant hybrid organic/inorganic nanos-tructures can be used for creation of new type of LED. We mentioned the problem of electrical pumping which has to be solved. As was first suggested in 1979 by Dexter the transfer energy in opposite direction from organic part of nanostructure to semiconductor layer can be used for the creation of new type of solar cells. In this note we stress the importance of the idea by Dexter for photovoltaics and solar cells. We argue that the organic part in such hybrid structures can play a role of an effective organic collector of the light energy (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Biofilm assembly becomes crystal clear – filamentous bacteriophage organize the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix into a liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Patrick R.; Jennings, Laura K.; Michaels, Lia A.; Sweere, Johanna M.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Parks, William C.; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen associated with many types of chronic infection. At sites of chronic infection, such as the airways of people with cystic fibrosis (CF), P. aeruginosa forms biofilm-like aggregates. These are clusters of bacterial cells encased in a polymer-rich matrix that shields bacteria from environmental stresses and antibiotic treatment. When P. aeruginosa forms a biofilm, large amounts of filamentous Pf bacteriophage (phage) are produced. Unlike most phage that typically lyse and kill their bacterial hosts, filamentous phage of the genus Inovirus, which includes Pf phage, often do not, and instead are continuously extruded from the bacteria. Here, we discuss the implications of the accumulation of filamentous Pf phage in the biofilm matrix, where they interact with matrix polymers to organize the biofilm into a highly ordered liquid crystal. This structural configuration promotes bacterial adhesion, desiccation survival, and antibiotic tolerance – all features typically associated with biofilms. We propose that Pf phage make structural contributions to P. aeruginosa biofilms and that this constitutes a novel form of symbiosis between bacteria and bacteriophage.

  14. Vitamin D and calcium supplementation for three years in postmenopausal osteoporosis significantly alters bone mineral and organic matrix quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, E P; Gamsjaeger, S; Hassler, N; Fahrleitner-Pammer, A; Dobnig, H; Stepan, J J; Pavo, I; Eriksen, E F; Klaushofer, K

    2017-02-01

    Prospective, controlled clinical trials in postmenopausal osteoporosis typically compare effects of an active drug with placebo in addition to vitamin D and calcium supplementation in both treatment arms. While clinical benefits are documented, the effect of this supplementation in the placebo arm and in clinical practice on bone material composition properties is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate these bone quality indices (specifically mineral/matrix, nanoporosity, glycosaminoglycan content, mineral maturity/crystallinity, and pyridinoline content) in patients that either received long-term vitamin D (400-1200IU) and calcium (1.0-1.5g) supplementation, or did not. We have analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy the bone forming trabecular surfaces of iliac crest in pre-treatment samples of a teriparatide study and the endpoint biopsies of the control arm obtained from the HORIZON trial. In general, the mineral/matrix ratio and the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content was higher while nanoporosity, (a surrogate for tissue water content), the mineral maturity/crystallinity (MMC) and the pyridinoline (Pyd) content was lower in patients without long-term supplementation. Moreover, all indices were significantly dependent on tissue age. In conclusion, vitamin D and calcium supplementation is associated with altered mineral and organic matrix properties.

  15. Biofilm assembly becomes crystal clear – filamentous bacteriophage organize the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix into a liquid crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R. Secor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen associated with many types of chronic infection. At sites of chronic infection, such as the airways of people with cystic fibrosis (CF, P. aeruginosa forms biofilm-like aggregates. These are clusters of bacterial cells encased in a polymer-rich matrix that shields bacteria from environmental stresses and antibiotic treatment. When P. aeruginosa forms a biofilm, large amounts of filamentous Pf bacteriophage (phage are produced. Unlike most phage that typically lyse and kill their bacterial hosts, filamentous phage of the genus Inovirus, which includes Pf phage, often do not, and instead are continuously extruded from the bacteria. Here, we discuss the implications of the accumulation of filamentous Pf phage in the biofilm matrix, where they interact with matrix polymers to organize the biofilm into a highly ordered liquid crystal. This structural configuration promotes bacterial adhesion, desiccation survival, and antibiotic tolerance – all features typically associated with biofilms. We propose that Pf phage make structural contributions to P. aeruginosa biofilms and that this constitutes a novel form of symbiosis between bacteria and bacteriophage.

  16. UV and RIR matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition of organic MEH-PPV films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Papantonalis, M.R.; Auyeung, R.C.Y.

    2004-01-01

    were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible absorbance and photoluminescence. Photoluminescent material was deposited by RIR-MAPLE and 248-nm MAPLE, while the RIR-PLD and 193-nm-MAPLE depositions displayed the smoothest surfaces but did not show photoluminescence. (C) 2003......-PLD). For the first time resonant infrared matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) was successfully demonstrated on a luminescent polymer system. In addition to this, an excimer laser has been used for UV-MAPLE depositions at 193 and 248-nm irradiation. Films deposited onto NaCl and quartz substrates...

  17. Light Manipulation for Organic Optoelectronics Using Bio-inspired Moth's Eye Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Ou, Qing-Dong; Chen, Jing-De; Shen, Su; Tang, Jian-Xin; Li, Yan-Qing; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-02-01

    Organic-based optoelectronic devices, including light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and solar cells (OSCs) hold great promise as low-cost and large-area electro-optical devices and renewable energy sources. However, further improvement in efficiency remains a daunting challenge due to limited light extraction or absorption in conventional device architectures. Here we report a universal method of optical manipulation of light by integrating a dual-side bio-inspired moth's eye nanostructure with broadband anti-reflective and quasi-omnidirectional properties. Light out-coupling efficiency of OLEDs with stacked triple emission units is over 2 times that of a conventional device, resulting in drastic increase in external quantum efficiency and current efficiency to 119.7% and 366 cd A-1 without introducing spectral distortion and directionality. Similarly, the light in-coupling efficiency of OSCs is increased 20%, yielding an enhanced power conversion efficiency of 9.33%. We anticipate this method would offer a convenient and scalable way for inexpensive and high-efficiency organic optoelectronic designs.

  18. Large-area, flexible imaging arrays constructed by light-charge organic memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wu, Ti; Guo, Yunlong; Zhao, Yan; Sun, Xiangnan; Wen, Yugeng; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi

    2013-01-01

    Existing organic imaging circuits, which offer attractive benefits of light weight, low cost and flexibility, are exclusively based on phototransistor or photodiode arrays. One shortcoming of these photo-sensors is that the light signal should keep invariant throughout the whole pixel-addressing and reading process. As a feasible solution, we synthesized a new charge storage molecule and embedded it into a device, which we call light-charge organic memory (LCOM). In LCOM, the functionalities of photo-sensor and non-volatile memory are integrated. Thanks to the deliberate engineering of electronic structure and self-organization process at the interface, 92% of the stored charges, which are linearly controlled by the quantity of light, retain after 20000 s. The stored charges can also be non-destructively read and erased by a simple voltage program. These results pave the way to large-area, flexible imaging circuits and demonstrate a bright future of small molecular materials in non-volatile memory. PMID:23326636

  19. Stacking multiple connecting functional materials in tandem organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Deng-Ke; Jiang, Nan; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Tandem device is an important architecture in fabricating high performance organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. The key element in making a high performance tandem device is the connecting materials stack, which plays an important role in electric field distribution, charge generation and charge injection. For a tandem organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with a simple Liq/Al/MoO3 stack, we discovered that there is a significant current lateral spreading causing light emission over an extremely large area outside the OLED pixel when the Al thickness exceeds 2 nm. This spread light emission, caused by an inductive electric field over one of the device unit, limits one’s ability to fabricate high performance tandem devices. To resolve this issue, a new connecting materials stack with a C60 fullerene buffer layer is reported. This new structure permits optimization of the Al metal layer in the connecting stack and thus enables us to fabricate an efficient tandem OLED having a high 155.6 cd/A current efficiency and a low roll-off (or droop) in current efficiency. PMID:28225028

  20. Red light sensitive heterojunction organic field-effect transistors based on neodymium phthalocyanine as photosensitive layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Wenli; Tang, Yu [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, South Tianshui Road 222#, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yao, Bo [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, South Tianshui Road 222#, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Department of Physics, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China); Zhou, Maoqing; Luo, Xiao; Li, Yao; Zhong, Junkang; Sun, Lei [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, South Tianshui Road 222#, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Peng, Yingquan, E-mail: yqpeng@lzu.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, South Tianshui Road 222#, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, South Tianshui Road 222#, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-08-31

    Compared with organic photodiodes, photoresponsive organic field-effect transistors (photOFETs) exhibit higher sensitivity and lower noise. The performance of photOFETs based on conventional single layer structure is generally poor due to the low carrier mobility of the active channel materials. We demonstrate a high performance photOFET operating in red light with a structure of C60/neodymium phthalocyanine (NdPc{sub 2}) planar heterojunction. PhotOFETs based on single-layer NdPc{sub 2} and C60/NdPc{sub 2} heterojunction (denoted as NdPc{sub 2}-photOFETs and C60/NdPc{sub 2}-photOFETs, respectively) were fabricated and characterized. It is concluded that the photOFETs with heterojunction structure showed superior performance compared to that of single layer photOFETs. And for red light with a wavelength of 655 nm, C60/NdPc{sub 2}-photOFETs exhibited a large photoresponsivity of ~ 0.8 A/W, which is approximately 62 times larger than that of NdPc{sub 2}-photOFETs under the same conditions. The high performance of C60/NdPc{sub 2}-photOFETs is attributed to its high light absorption coefficient, high exciton dissociation efficiency and high carrier mobility. - Highlights: • The mobility of light-sensitive organic materials is generally low. • We fabricated C60/NdPc{sub 2} photoresponsive organic field-effect transistors (photOFETs). • The performance of C60/NdPc{sub 2} photOFETs is superior than single-layer NdPc{sub 2} photOFETs. • C60/NdPc{sub 2} photOFETs exhibited a large photoresponsivity of ~ 0.8 A/W for red light.

  1. STUDY OF DEGRADATION MECHANISM AND PACKAGING OF ORGANIC LIGHT EMITTING DEVICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Xu

    2003-01-01

    Organic Light Emitting Devices (OLED) have attracted much attention recently, for their applications in future Flat Panel Displays and lighting products. However, their fast degradation remained a major obstacle to their commercialization. Here we present a brief summary of our studies on both extrinsic and intrinsic causes for the fast degradation of OLEDs. In particular, we focus on the origin of the dark spots by "rebuilding" cathodes, which confirms that the growth of dark spots occurs primarily due to cathode delamination. In the meantime, we recapture the findings from the search for suitable OLED packaging materials, in particular polymer composites, which provide both heat dissipation and moisture resistance, in addition to electrical insulation.

  2. Interface modification and material synthesis of organic light-emitting diodes using plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rongqing; Ou, Qiongrong; Yang, Cheng; He, Kongduo; Yang, Xilu; Zhong, Shaofeng; plasma application Team

    2015-09-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), due to their unique properties of solution processability, compatibility with flexible substrates and with large-scale printing technology, attract huge interest in the field of lighting. The integration of plasma technology into OLEDs provides a new route to improve their performance. Here we demonstrate the modification of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) work function by plasma treatment, synthesis of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials using plasma grafting (polymerisation), and multi-layer solution processing achieved by plasma cross-linking.

  3. Optical Characterization of Organic Light-Emitting Thin Films in the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectral Ranges

    CERN Document Server

    Montereali, R M; Nichelatti, E; Di Pompeo, F; Segreto, E; Canci, N; Cavanna, F

    2012-01-01

    The spectrophotometric characterization of high efficiency, optically-active samples such as light-emitting organic bulks and thin films can be problematic because their broad-band luminescence is detected together with the monochromatic transmitted and reflected signals, hence perturbing measurements of optical transmittance and reflectance at wavelengths within the photoexcitation band. As a matter of fact, most commercial spectrophotometers apply spectral filtering before the light beam reaches the sample, not after it. In this Report, we introduce and discuss the method we have developed to correct photometric spectra that are perturbed by photoluminescence.

  4. Light-based theranostics using hybrid structures derived from biological and organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankayala, Raviraj; Burns, Joshua M.; Mac, Jenny T.; Anvari, Bahman

    2016-09-01

    We have engineered hybrid nanostructures derived from erythrocytes, which can be doped with various near infrared (NIR) organic chromophores, including the FDA-approved indocyanine green (ICG). We refer to these vesicles as NIR erythrocyte-mimicking transducers (NETs), as they are capable of generating heat, reactive oxygen species (ROS) or emit fluorescence light. We present preliminary results that demonstrate the effectiveness of NETs for fluorescence imaging and photodynamic therapeutic destruction of breast cancer cells, upon photo-excitation using NIR light. These hybrid nanostructures present a promising platform with theranostic capability for future biomedical clinical applications.

  5. Spatial organization and mechanical properties of the pericellular matrix on chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLane, Louis T; Chang, Patrick; Granqvist, Anna; Boehm, Heike; Kramer, Anthony; Scrimgeour, Jan; Curtis, Jennifer E

    2013-03-05

    A voluminous polymer coat adorns the surface of many eukaryotic cells. Although the pericellular matrix (PCM) often extends several microns from the cell surface, its macromolecular structure remains elusive. This massive cellular organelle negotiates the cell's interaction with surrounding tissue, influencing important processes such as cell adhesion, mitosis, locomotion, molecular sequestration, and mechanotransduction. Investigations of the PCM's architecture and function have been hampered by the difficulty of visualizing this invisible hydrated structure without disrupting its integrity. In this work, we establish several assays to noninvasively measure the ultrastructure of the PCM. Optical force probe assays show that the PCM of rat chondrocyte joint (RCJ-P) cells easily reconfigures around optically manipulated microparticles, allowing the probes to penetrate into rather than compress the matrix. We report distinct changes in forces measured from PCMs treated with exogenous aggrecan, illustrating the assay's potential to probe proteoglycan distribution. Measurements reveal an exponentially increasing osmotic force in the PCM arising from an inherent concentration gradient. With this result, we estimate the variation of the PCM's mesh size (correlation length) to range from ∼100 nm at the surface to 500 nm at its periphery. Quantitative particle exclusion assays confirm this prediction and show that the PCM acts like a sieve. These assays provide a much-needed tool to study PCM ultrastructure and its poorly defined but important role in fundamental cellular processes. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  7. Genetic Background is a Key Determinant of Glomerular Extracellular Matrix Composition and Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randles, Michael J; Woolf, Adrian S; Huang, Jennifer L; Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Price, Karen L; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Collinson, Sophie; Denny, Thomas; Knight, David; Mironov, Aleksandr; Starborg, Toby; Korstanje, Ron; Humphries, Martin J; Long, David A; Lennon, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Glomerular disease often features altered histologic patterns of extracellular matrix (ECM). Despite this, the potential complexities of the glomerular ECM in both health and disease are poorly understood. To explore whether genetic background and sex determine glomerular ECM composition, we investigated two mouse strains, FVB and B6, using RNA microarrays of isolated glomeruli combined with proteomic glomerular ECM analyses. These studies, undertaken in healthy young adult animals, revealed unique strain- and sex-dependent glomerular ECM signatures, which correlated with variations in levels of albuminuria and known predisposition to progressive nephropathy. Among the variation, we observed changes in netrin 4, fibroblast growth factor 2, tenascin C, collagen 1, meprin 1-α, and meprin 1-β. Differences in protein abundance were validated by quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, and the collective differences were not explained by mutations in known ECM or glomerular disease genes. Within the distinct signatures, we discovered a core set of structural ECM proteins that form multiple protein-protein interactions and are conserved from mouse to man. Furthermore, we found striking ultrastructural changes in glomerular basement membranes in FVB mice. Pathway analysis of merged transcriptomic and proteomic datasets identified potential ECM regulatory pathways involving inhibition of matrix metalloproteases, liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, notch, and cyclin-dependent kinase 5. These pathways may therefore alter ECM and confer susceptibility to disease.

  8. Degradation of cardiac myosin light chain kinase by matrix metalloproteinase-2 contributes to myocardial contractile dysfunction during ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ling; Zheng, Yan-Jun; Gu, Shan-Shan; Tan, Ji-Liang; Paul, Christian; Wang, Yi-Gang; Yang, Huang-Tian

    2014-12-01

    Although ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction is associated with a prominent decrease in myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity, the underlying mechanisms have not yet been fully clarified. Phosphorylation of ventricular myosin light chain 2 (MLC-2v) facilitates actin-myosin interactions and enhances contractility, however, its level and regulation by cardiac MLC kinase (cMLCK) and cMLC phosphatase (cMLCP) in I/R hearts are debatable. In this study, the levels and/or effects of MLC-2v phosphorylation, cMLCK, cMLCP, and proteases during I/R were determined. Global myocardial I/R-suppressed cardiac performance in isolated rat hearts was concomitant with decreases of MLC-2v phosphorylation, myofibrillar Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase activity, and cMLCK content, but not cMLCP proteins. Consistently, simulated I/R in isolated cardiomyocytes inhibited cell shortening, Ca(2+) transients, MLC-2v phosphorylation, and myofilament sensitivity to Ca(2+). These observations were reversed by cMLCK overexpression, while the specific cMLCK knockdown by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) had the opposite effect. Moreover, the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, a zinc-dependent endopeptidase) reversed IR-decreased cMLCK, MLC-2v phosphorylation, myofibrillar Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase activity, myocardial contractile function, and myofilament sensitivity to Ca(2+), while the inhibition or knockdown of cMLCK by ML-9 or specific shRNA abolished MMP-2 inhibition-induced cardioprotection. Finally, the co-localization in cardiomyocytes and interaction in vivo of MMP-2 and cMLCK were observed. Purified recombinant rat cMLCK was concentration- and time-dependently degraded by rat MMP-2 in vitro, and this was prevented by the inhibition of MMP-2. These findings reveal that the I/R-activated MMP-2 leads to the degradation of cMLCK, resulting in a reduction of MLC-2v phosphorylation, and myofibrillar Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase activity, which subsequently suppresses

  9. Preliminary evaluation of discomfort glare from organic light-emitting diode and edge-lit light-emitting diode lighting panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xi; Freyssinier, Jean Paul; Narendran, Nadarajah; Bullough, John D

    2017-05-01

    The organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is an area light source, and its primary competing technology is the edge-lit light-emitting diode (LED) panel. Both technologies are similar in shape and appearance, but there is little understanding of how people perceive discomfort glare (DG) from area sources. The objective of this study was to evaluate the DG of these two technologies under similar operating conditions. Additionally, two existing DG models were compared to evaluate the correlation between predicted values and observed values. In an earlier study, we found no statistically significant difference in human response in terms of DG between OLED and edge-lit LED panels when the two sources produced the same luminous stimulus. The range of testing stimulus was expanded to test different panel luminances at three background illuminations. The results showed no difference in perceived glare between the panels, and, as the background illumination increased, the perceived glare decreased. In other words, both appeared equally glary beyond a certain luminance and background illumination. We then compared two existing glare models with the observed values and found that one model showed a good estimation of how humans perceive DG. That model was further modified to increase its power.

  10. Preliminary evaluation of discomfort glare from organic light-emitting diode and edge-lit light-emitting diode lighting panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xi; Freyssinier, Jean Paul; Narendran, Nadarajah; Bullough, John D.

    2017-05-01

    The organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is an area light source, and its primary competing technology is the edge-lit light-emitting diode (LED) panel. Both technologies are similar in shape and appearance, but there is little understanding of how people perceive discomfort glare (DG) from area sources. The objective of this study was to evaluate the DG of these two technologies under similar operating conditions. Additionally, two existing DG models were compared to evaluate the correlation between predicted values and observed values. In an earlier study, we found no statistically significant difference in human response in terms of DG between OLED and edge-lit LED panels when the two sources produced the same luminous stimulus. The range of testing stimulus was expanded to test different panel luminances at three background illuminations. The results showed no difference in perceived glare between the panels, and, as the background illumination increased, the perceived glare decreased. In other words, both appeared equally glary beyond a certain luminance and background illumination. We then compared two existing glare models with the observed values and found that one model showed a good estimation of how humans perceive DG. That model was further modified to increase its power.

  11. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Matrix Diffusion of Dissolved Organic Carbon Carbon-14 in Southern Nevada Fractured-rock Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyatt [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) is used to estimate groundwater ages by comparing the DIC 14C content in groundwater in the recharge area to the DIC 14C content in the downgradient sampling point. However, because of chemical reactions and physical processes between groundwater and aquifer rocks, the amount of DIC 14C in groundwater can change and result in 14C loss that is not because of radioactive decay. This loss of DIC 14C results in groundwater ages that are older than the actual groundwater ages. Alternatively, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C in groundwater does not react chemically with aquifer rocks, so DOC 14C ages are generally younger than DIC 14C ages. In addition to chemical reactions, 14C ages may also be altered by the physical process of matrix diffusion. The net effect of a continuous loss of 14C to the aquifer matrix by matrix diffusion and then radioactive decay is that groundwater appears to be older than it actually is. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure matrix diffusion coefficients for DOC 14C in volcanic and carbonate aquifer rocks from southern Nevada. Experiments were conducted using bromide (Br-) as a conservative tracer and 14C-labeled trimesic acid (TMA) as a surrogate for groundwater DOC. Outcrop samples from six volcanic aquifers and five carbonate aquifers in southern Nevada were used. The average DOC 14C matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 2.9 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was approximately the same at 1.7 x 10-7 cm2/s. The average Br- matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 10.4 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was less at 6.5 x 10-7 cm2/s. Carbonate rocks exhibited greater variability in

  12. MATRIX-VBS: implementing an evolving organic aerosol volatility in an aerosol microphysics model

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2016-01-01

    We have implemented an existing aerosol microphysics scheme into a box model framework and extended it to represent gas-particle partitioning and chemical ageing of semi-volatile organic aerosols. We then applied this new research tool to investigate the effects of semi-volatile organic species on the growth, composition and mixing state of aerosol particles in case studies representing several different environments. The volatility-basis set (VBS) framework is implemented into the aerosol mi...

  13. The hyaluronan and proteoglycan link proteins: Organizers of the brain extracellular matrix and key molecules for neuronal function and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oohashi, Toshitaka; Edamatsu, Midori; Bekku, Yoko; Carulli, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The hyaluronan and proteoglycanbinding link protein (Hapln) is a key molecule in the formation and control of hyaluronan-based condensed perineuronal matrix in the adult brain. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the role of Haplns in the formation and control of two distinct types of perineuronal matrices, one for "classical" PNN and the other for the specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) at the node of Ranvier in the central nervous system (CNS). We introduce the structural components of each ECM organization including the basic concept of supramolecular structure named "HLT model". We furthermore summarize the developmental and physiological role of perineuronal ECMs from the studies of Haplns and related molecules. Finally, we also discuss the potential mechanism modulating PNNs in the adult CNS. This layer of organized matrices may exert a direct effect via core protein or sugar moiety from the structure or by acting as a binding site for biologically active molecules, which are important for neuronal plasticity and saltatory conduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopy of Reactive Organic Molecules of Relevance to Interstellar Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopff, Laura A.; Nolan, Alex M.; Kreifels, Terese A.; Draxler, Thomas W.; Esselman, Brian J.; Burrmann, Nicola J.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2010-11-01

    Matrix isolation, the process of trapping a molecule in an inert gas at low temperature, provides a means for studying highly reactive intermediates, such as carbenes or radicals. Reactive species can be characterized by IR, UV-vis and/or EPR spectroscopy. Comparison of experimental and computed spectral data, as well as chemical reactivity, is used for structural assignment Triplet propynylidene is proposed to exist in the interstellar medium (ISM), due to the detection of a higher-energy isomers via rotational spectroscopy. Currently, we are exploring the structural and photochemical effects of varying substituents on the propynylidne system. A diazo precursor has been synthesized and photolyzed to produce dimethylpropynylidene in an argon matrix. A photochemical hydrogen shift to produce 1-penten-3-yne has been observed through infrared spectroscopy. Cyanocarbons are known to be abundant in the ISM and the atmosphere of Titan, however matrixisolation studies have not yet been carried out for a significant number of these compounds. Photolysis of 3-cyano-3-methyldiazirine should yield methylcyanocarbene, one of the simplest species in this family. Another molecule of interest is l-HC4N, which has been detected in the ISM, but has not yet been matrix-isolated and characterized. The study of arylcarbenes is vital to understanding the chemistry of carbon-rich environments, such as discharges, interstellar clouds, and circumstellar envelopes. The identification of small, sulfur containing molecules, and the identification of aromatics in the ISM make future thiophene and benzothiophene detections a real possibility. Studies on 2- and 3-diazomethyl substituted benzothiophenes are underway to assess their photochemical reactivity and potential for forming benzothiophene carbenes. Macrocylic polyynes are proposed to be involved in carbon condensation via the ring coalescence and annealing model to produce graphitic sheets or fullerenes. To simplify a complex system we

  15. Mixed-organic-cation perovskite photovoltaics for enhanced solar-light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellet, Norman; Gao, Peng; Gregori, Giuliano; Yang, Tae-Youl; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad K; Maier, Joachim; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite APbX3 pigments, such as methylammonium lead iodide, have recently emerged as excellent light harvesters in solid-state mesoscopic solar cells. An important target for the further improvement of the performance of perovskite-based photovoltaics is to extend their optical-absorption onset further into the red to enhance solar-light harvesting. Herein, we show that this goal can be reached by using a mixture of formamidinium (HN=CHNH3 (+), FA) and methylammonium (CH3 NH3 (+), MA) cations in the A position of the APbI3 perovskite structure. This combination leads to an enhanced short-circuit current and thus superior devices to those based on only CH3 NH3 (+). This concept has not been applied previously in perovskite-based solar cells. It shows great potential as a versatile tool to tune the structural, electrical, and optoelectronic properties of the light-harvesting materials.

  16. A New Distyrylarylene Derivative Used as Blue Light Emitter in Organic Electroluminescent Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑新友; 朱文清; 等

    2002-01-01

    A new blue electroluminescent material,distyrylarylene(DSA)derivative,4,4'-bis[2,2-(1-naphthyl,phenyl)vinyl]-1,1-biphenyl(NPVBi)is designed and synthesized.The DSA derivative shows better thermal stability because of its high glass transition temperature.A blue organic light emitting diode(OLED0with the structure ITO/TPD/NPVBi/Alq/LiF/Al is studied.The electroluminescent(EL0spectrum of the OLED exhibits that light emission originates from NPVBi with a peak at 460nm,its Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage(CIE)color coordinates are x=0.16,y=0.15,and showing independence of CIE color coordinates on current density.The new DSA derivative is expectable as a new candidate for blue light emitter in OLEDs.

  17. Textured micrometer scale templates as light managing fabrication platform for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Sumit; Ho, Kai-Ming; Park, Joong-Mok; Nalwa, Kanwar Singh; Leung, Wai Y.

    2016-07-26

    A three-dimensional, microscale-textured, grating-shaped organic solar cell geometry. The solar cells are fabricated on gratings to give them a three-dimensional texture that provides enhanced light absorption. Introduction of microscale texturing has a positive effect on the overall power conversion efficiency of the devices. This grating-based solar cell having a grating of pre-determined pitch and height has shown improved power-conversion efficiency over a conventional flat solar cell. The improvement in efficiency is accomplished by homogeneous coverage of the grating with uniform thickness of the active layer, which is attributed to a sufficiently high pitch and low height of the underlying gratings. Also the microscale texturing leads to suppressed reflection of incident light due to the efficient coupling of the incident light into modes that are guided in the active layer.

  18. Molecular-scale simulation of electroluminescence in a multilayer white organic light-emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mesta, Murat; Carvelli, Marco; de Vries, Rein J;

    2013-01-01

    we show that it is feasible to carry out Monte Carlo simulations including all of these molecular-scale processes for a hybrid multilayer organic light-emitting diode combining red and green phosphorescent layers with a blue fluorescent layer. The simulated current density and emission profile......In multilayer white organic light-emitting diodes the electronic processes in the various layers--injection and motion of charges as well as generation, diffusion and radiative decay of excitons--should be concerted such that efficient, stable and colour-balanced electroluminescence can occur. Here...... are shown to agree well with experiment. The experimental emission profile was obtained with nanometre resolution from the measured angle- and polarization-dependent emission spectra. The simulations elucidate the crucial role of exciton transfer from green to red and the efficiency loss due to excitons...

  19. Direct visualization and modeling of carrier distribution in organic light emitting transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashiko, Yasuhiro; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8552 (Japan); Iwamoto, Mitsumasa, E-mail: iwamoto@pe.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8552 (Japan); Weis, Martin [Institute of Electronics and Photonics, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, Bratislava 81219 (Slovakia)

    2014-03-03

    By using microscopic electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement, we studied the carrier distribution in the channel of organic light emitting transistors with an active layer of poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole). EFISHG signals were clearly observed in the point where the electroluminescence is generated. Results suggested that the highest enhancement of the electric field is on zero-potential position in the channel, which represents the meeting point of electrons and holes and is an origin of the electroluminescence. The transmission line model analysis of the carrier distribution of the channel supported this conclusion. - Highlights: • Carrier distribution in organic light emitting transistor channel was determined. • Second-harmonic generation images were clearly observed in the emission region. • A transmission line model well accounted for the observed carrier behavior.

  20. Surface reconstruction of abdominal organs using laparoscopic structured light for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Jeremy D.; Keller, Kurtis; Fuchs, Henry

    2002-03-01

    Creation of accurate surface models of abdominal organs is essential for many developing technologies in medicine and surgery. One application we are working towards is augmented reality (AR) visualization for laparoscopic surgery. Our current system meets some, but not all, of the requirements. We use two custom built laparoscopes, a custom built miniature projector, a standard camera, and a standard video capture and processing card to implement a laparoscopic structured light range acquisition system. We will briefly show the custom hardware but will emphasize the structured light depth extraction techniques used for the unique properties of surfaces inside the body, particularly dealing with specular reflections. In early experiments, we studied the effectiveness of our algorithm in highly specular environments by creating range images acquired from fresh animal organs. These experiments used a large projector, open abdomens, and offline image processing. We report the results of experiments using our miniature projector, and on line processing.

  1. Luminescent Enhancement of Heterostructure Organic Light-Emitting Devices Based on Aluminum Quinolines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Sheng Yu; Lu Li; Ya-Dong Jiang; Xing-Qiao Ji; Tao Wang

    2007-01-01

    High performance organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) have been investigated by using fluorescent bis (2-methyl-8-quinolinolato)(para-phenyl-phenolato)aluminum(BAlq) as an emissive layer on the performance of multicolor devices consisting of N, N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N,N'diphenyI-l,l'-biphenyI-4,4'-diamine (NPB) as hole transport layer. The results show that the performance of heterostructure blue light-emitting device composed of 8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq3) as an electron transport layer has been dramatically enhanced. In the case of high performance heterostructure devices, the electroluminescent spectra has been perceived to vary strongly with the thickness of the organic layers due to the different recombination region, which indicates that various color devices composed of identical components could be implemented by changing the film thickness of different functional layers.

  2. Strong light absorption of self-organized 3-D nanospike arrays for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rui; Ching, Kwong-Lung; Lin, Qingfeng; Leung, Siu-Fung; Arcrossito, Diaz; Fan, Zhiyong

    2011-11-22

    Three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructures have been widely explored for efficient light trapping; however, many of the nanostructure fabrication processes reported have high cost and/or limited scalability. In this work, self-organized 3-D Al nanospike arrays were successfully fabricated on thin Al foils with controlled nanospike geometry such as height and pitch. Thereafter, photovoltaic materials of a-Si and CdTe thin films were conformally deposited on the nanospikes structures thus forming 3-D nanostructures with strong light absorption over a broad wavelength range and photon incident angle. Specifically, 100 nm-thick CdTe film on nanospikes showed 97% peak absorption, and up to 95% day-integrated sunlight absorption. These results indicate that self-organized 3-D Al nanospike arrays can serve as lightweight and low cost substrates for cost-effective thin film photovoltaics.

  3. A customized light sheet microscope to measure spatio-temporal protein dynamics in small model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Rieckher

    Full Text Available We describe a customizable and cost-effective light sheet microscopy (LSM platform for rapid three-dimensional imaging of protein dynamics in small model organisms. The system is designed for high acquisition speeds and enables extended time-lapse in vivo experiments when using fluorescently labeled specimens. We demonstrate the capability of the setup to monitor gene expression and protein localization during ageing and upon starvation stress in longitudinal studies in individual or small groups of adult Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. The system is equipped to readily perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, which allows monitoring protein recovery and distribution under low photobleaching conditions. Our imaging platform is designed to easily switch between light sheet microscopy and optical projection tomography (OPT modalities. The setup permits monitoring of spatio-temporal expression and localization of ageing biomarkers of subcellular size and can be conveniently adapted to image a wide range of small model organisms and tissue samples.

  4. Patterning of flexible organic light emitting diode (FOLED) stack using an ultrafast laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandamparambil, Rajesh; Fledderus, Henri; Van Steenberge, Geert; Dietzel, Andreas

    2010-04-12

    A femtosecond laser has been successfully utilized for patterning thin Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diode (FOLED) structures of individual layer thickness around 100nm. The authors report in this paper a step-like ablation behavior at the layer interfaces which accounts for a local removal of entire layers. Various surface analyzing techniques are used to investigate the morphologies and chemical compositions within and in the vicinity of the ablation areas. This study opens a new avenue in selectively ablating different layers from a multilayer stack on flexible substrates using fs lasers allowing post deposition structuring of large area flexible organic electronic devices.

  5. Study on scalable Coulombic degradation for estimating the lifetime of organic light-emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wenwen; Hou Xun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710119 (China); Wu Zhaoxin; Liang Shixiong; Jiao Bo; Zhang Xinwen; Wang Dawei [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Photonics Technology for Information of ShaanXi Province, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Chen Zhijian; Gong Qihuang, E-mail: zhaoxinwu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-04-20

    The luminance decays of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are investigated with initial luminance of 1000 to 20 000 cd m{sup -2} through a scalable Coulombic degradation and a stretched exponential decay. We found that the estimated lifetime by scalable Coulombic degradation deviates from the experimental results when the OLEDs work with high initial luminance. By measuring the temperature of the device during degradation, we found that the higher device temperatures will lead to instabilities of organic materials in devices, which is expected to result in the difference between the experimental results and estimation using the scalable Coulombic degradation.

  6. Optical properties of organic-silicon photonic crystal nanoslot cavity light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Jay; Lin, Chun-Chi; Wu, Yu-Shu; Wang, Likarn; Na, Neil

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically study a dielectric photonic crystal nanoslot cavity immersed in an organic fluid containing near-infrared dyes by means of a full rate equation model including the complete cavity QED effects. Based on the modeling results, we numerically design an organic-silicon cavity light source in which its mode volume, quality factor, and far-field emission pattern are optimized for energy-efficient, high-speed applications. Dye quantum efficiency improved by two orders of magnitude and 3dB modulation bandwidth of a few hundred GHz can be obtained.

  7. Efficient inverted organic light-emitting devices by amine-based solvent treatment (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Myoung Hoon; Choi, Kyoung-Jin; Jung, Eui Dae

    2015-10-01

    The efficiency of inverted polymer light-emitting diodes (iPLEDs) were remarkably enhanced by introducing spontaneously formed ripple-shaped nanostructure of ZnO (ZnO-R) and amine-based polar solvent treatment using 2-methoxyethanol and ethanolamine (2-ME+EA) co-solvents on ZnO-R. The ripple-shape nanostructure of ZnO layer fabricated by solution process with optimal rate of annealing temperature improves the extraction of wave guide modes inside the device structure, and 2-ME+EA interlayer enhances the electron injection and hole blocking and reduces exciton quenching between polar solvent treated ZnO-R and emissive layer. As a result, our optimized iPLEDs show the luminous efficiency (LE) of 61.6 cd A-1, power efficiency (PE) of 19.4 lm W-1 and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 17.8 %. This method provides a promising method, and opens new possibilities for not only organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) but also other organic optoelectronic devices such as organic photovoltaics, organic thin film transistors, and electrically driven organic diode laser.

  8. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R; Bianchi, F; Blumstengel, S; Christodoulou, C; Ovsyannikov, R; Kobin, B; Moudgil, K; Barlow, S; Hecht, S; Marder, S R; Henneberger, F; Koch, N

    2015-04-15

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach.

  9. Activation of Organic Photovoltaic Light Detectors Using Bend Leakage from Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Matthew J; Willis, Matthew S; Kumar, Pankaj; Holdsworth, John L; Bezuidenhout, Henco; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick; Dastoor, Paul C

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the detection and subsequent utilization of leaked light from bends in a silica optical fiber using organic photovoltaic detectors. The optic power lost by single mode and multimode silica optical fibers was calibrated for bend radii between 1 and 7 mm for 532 and 633 nm light, exhibiting excellent agreement with previous theoretical solutions. The spatial location of maximum power leakage on the exterior of the fiber was found to exist in the same plane as the fiber, with a 10° offset from the normal. Two different organic photovoltaic detectors fabricated using a poly(3-hexylthiophene):indene-C60-bisadduct donor-acceptor blend cast from chloroform and chlorobenzene were fabricated to detect the leaked light. The two detectors exhibited different photovoltaic performances, predominantly due to different active layer thicknesses. Both devices showed sensitivity to leakage light, exhibiting voltages between 200 and 300 mV in response to leaked light from the fiber. The temporal responses of the devices were observed to differ, with a rise time from 10% to 90% of maximum voltage of 1430 μs for the chlorobenzene device, and a corresponding rise time of 490 μs for the higher performing chloroform device. The two OPVs were used to simultaneously detect leaked light from induced bends in the optical fiber, with the differing temporal profiles employed to create a unique time-correlated detection signal with enhanced security. The delay between detection of each OPV voltage could be systematically varied, allowing for either a programmable and secure single detection signal or triggering of multiple events with variable time resolution. The results reported in this study present exciting avenues toward the deployment of this simple and noninvasive optical detection system in a range of different applications.

  10. A Comparison Between Magnetic Field Effects in Excitonic and Exciplex Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin Tiras, Kevser; Wang, Yifei; Harmon, Nicholas J.; Wohlgenannt, Markus; Flatte, Michael E.

    In flat-panel displays and lighting applications, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been widely used because of their efficient light emission, low-cost manufacturing and flexibility. The electrons and holes injected from the anode and cathode, respectively, form a tightly bound exciton as they meet at a molecule in organic layer. Excitons occur as spin singlets or triplets and the ratio between singlet and triplet excitons formed is 1:3 based on spin degeneracy. The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of fluorescent-based OLEDs is limited 25% because only singlet excitons contribute the light emission. To overcome this limitation, thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) materials have been introduced in the field of OLEDs. The exchange splitting between the singlet and triplet states of two-component exciplex systems is comparable to the thermal energy in TADF materials, whereas it is usually much larger in excitons. Reverse intersystem crossing occurs from triplet to singlet exciplex state, and this improves the IQE. An applied small magnetic field can change the spin dynamics of recombination in TADF blends. In this study, magnetic field effects on both excitonic and exciplex OLEDs will be presented and comparison similarities and differences will be made.

  11. Light-Directed Dynamic Chirality Inversion in Functional Self-Organized Helical Superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Li, Quan

    2016-02-24

    Helical superstructures are widely observed in nature, in synthetic polymers, and in supramolecular assemblies. Controlling the chirality (the handedness) of dynamic helical superstructures of molecular and macromolecular systems by external stimuli is a challenging task, but is of great fundamental significance with appealing morphology-dependent applications. Light-driven chirality inversion in self-organized helical superstructures (i.e. cholesteric, chiral nematic liquid crystals) is currently in the limelight because inversion of the handedness alters the chirality of the circularly polarized light that they selectively reflect, which has wide potential for application. Here we discuss the recent developments toward inversion of the handedness of cholesteric liquid crystals enabled by photoisomerizable chiral molecular switches or motors. Different classes of chiral photoresponsive dopants (guests) capable of conferring light-driven reversible chirality inversion of helical superstructures fabricated from different nematic hosts are discussed. Rational molecular designs of chiral molecular switches toward endowing handedness inversion to the induced helical superstructures of cholesteric liquid crystals are highlighted. This Review is concluded by throwing light on the challenges and opportunities in this emerging frontier, and it is expected to provide useful guidelines toward the development of self-organized soft materials with stimuli-directed chirality inversion capability and multifunctional host-guest systems.

  12. Organic Photocatalytic Cyclization of Polyenes: A Visible-Light-Mediated Radical Cascade Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongbo; Li, Han; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Ming-Tian; Cheng, Jin-Pei; Luo, Sanzhong

    2015-10-12

    A visible-light-mediated, organic photocatalytic stereoselective radical cascade cyclization of polyprenoids is described. The desired cascade cyclization products are achieved in good yields and high stereoselectivities with eosin Y as photocatalyst in hexafluoro-2-propanol. The catalyst system is also suitable for 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, which require only catalytic amounts of LiBr to promote the formation of the corresponding enols.

  13. Hybrid silicon nanocrystal-organic light-emitting devices for infrared electroluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Anthony, Rebecca; Kortshagen, Uwe R; Holmes, Russell J

    2010-04-14

    We demonstrate hybrid inorganic-organic light-emitting devices with peak electroluminescence (EL) at a wavelength of 868 nm using silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs). An external quantum efficiency of 0.6% is realized in the forward-emitted direction, with emission originating primarily from the SiNCs. Microscopic characterization indicates that complete coverage of the SiNCs on the conjugated polymer hole-transporting layer is required to observe efficient EL.

  14. Different effects of energy dependent irradiation of red and green lights on proliferation of human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani Soltani, Samereh; Babaee, Abdolreza; Shojaei, Mohammad; Salehinejad, Parvin; Seyedi, Fatemeh; JalalKamali, Mahshid; Nematollahi-Mahani, Seyed Noureddin

    2016-02-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LED) have recently been introduced as a potential factor for proliferation of various cell types in vitro. Nowadays, stem cells are widely used in regenerative medicine. Human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal (hUCM) cells can be more easily isolated and cultured than adult mesenchymal stem cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of red and green lights produced by LED on the proliferation of hUCM cells. hUCM cells were isolated from the umbilical cord, and light irradiation was applied at radiation energies of 0.318, 0.636, 0.954, 1.59, 3.18, 6.36, 9.54, and 12.72 J/cm(2). Irradiation of the hUCM cells shows a significant (p cell number as compared to controls after 40 h. In addition, cell proliferation on days 7, 14, and 21 in irradiated groups were significantly (p red and green lights irradiation to promote proliferation of hUCM cells in vitro. The energy applied to the cells through LED irradiation is an effective factor with paradoxical alterations. Green light inserted a much profound effect at special dosages than red light.

  15. Organic Light-Emitting Devices (OLEDS) and Their Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang Li

    2003-12-12

    Organic Light-Emitting Devices (OLEDs), both small molecular and polymeric have been studied extensively since the first efficient small molecule OLED was reported by Tang and VanSlyke in 1987. Burroughes' report on conjugated polymer-based OLEDs led to another track in OLED development. These developments have resulted in full color, highly efficient (up to {approx} 20% external efficiency 60 lm/W power efficiency for green emitters), and highly bright (> 140,000 Cd/m{sup 2} DC, {approx}2,000,000 Cd/m{sup 2} AC), stable (>40,000 hr at 5 mA/cm{sup 2}) devices. OLEDs are Lambertian emitters, which intrinsically eliminates the view angle problem of liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Thus OLEDs are beginning to compete with the current dominant LCDs in information display. Numerous companies are now active in this field, including large companies such as Pioneer, Toyota, Estman Kodak, Philipps, DuPont, Samsung, Sony, Toshiba, and Osram, and small companies like Cambridge Display Technology (CDT), Universal Display Corporation (UDC), and eMagin. The first small molecular display for vehicular stereos was introduced in 1998, and polymer OLED displays have begun to appear in commercial products. Although displays are the major application for OLEDs at present, they are also candidates for nest generation solid-state lighting. In this case the light source needs to be white in most cases. Organic transistors, organic solar cells, etc. are also being developed vigorously.

  16. Organic Polymer Dots as Photocatalysts for Visible Light-Driven Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Fernández-Terán, Ricardo; Zhang, Lei; Fernandes, Daniel L A; Tian, Lei; Chen, Hong; Tian, Haining

    2016-09-26

    For the first time, organic semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) based on poly[(9,9'-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(1,4-benzo-{2,1',3} thiadiazole)] (PFBT) and polystyrene grafting with carboxyl-group-functionalized ethylene oxide (PS-PEG-COOH) are introduced as a photocatalyst towards visible-light-driven hydrogen generation in a completely organic solvent-free system. With these organic Pdots as the photocatalyst, an impressive initial rate constant of 8.3 mmol h(-1)  g(-1) was obtained for visible-light-driven hydrogen production, which is 5-orders of magnitude higher than that of pristine PFBT polymer under the same catalytic conditions. Detailed kinetics studies suggest that the productive electron transfer quench of the excited state of Pdots by an electron donor is about 40 %. More importantly, we also found that the Pdots can tolerate oxygen during catalysis, which is crucial for further application of this material for light-driven water splitting.

  17. Receptors for /sup 3/H-octopamine in the adult firefly light organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemzadeh, H.; Hollingworth, R.M.; Voliva, A.

    1985-08-05

    /sup 3/H-Octopamine binds reversibly and with high affinity to sites on adult firefly light organ membranes. The binding is characterized by multiple affinities. Scatchard analysis supported a two site binding model with a tentative Kd value of about 1 nM for the high affinity component. The more abundant lower affinity site had a Kd value of about 60 nM. Guanyl nucleotides (Gpp(NH)p and GTP) greatly reduced the apparent number of octopamine binding sites. Competition studies with known octopaminergic agonists including the formamidine pesticides chlordimeform (CDM) and N-demethylchlordimeform (DCDM) showed the following rank order of potencies in displacing octopamine: DCDM > octopamine = synephrine > naphazoline > clonidine > CDM. It was also observed that phentolamine was much more active than propranolol in antagonizing OA-binding. These relative activities are similar to the abilities of the same compounds to alter adenylate cyclase activity in light organ homogenates. Together with the effect of GTP on binding, these results suggest that the binding sites are functional octopamine receptors of the light organ. 27 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Large magnetic field effects in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Reenen, S.; Kersten, S. P.; Wouters, S. H. W.; Cox, M.; Janssen, P.; Koopmans, B.; Bobbert, P. A.; Kemerink, M.

    2013-09-01

    Large negative magnetoconductance (MC) of ˜12% is observed in electrochemically doped polymer light-emitting diodes at sub-band-gap bias voltages (Vbias). Simultaneously, a positive magnetoefficiency (Mη) of 9% is observed at Vbias = 2 V. At higher bias voltages, both the MC and Mη diminish while a negative magnetoelectroluminescence (MEL) appears. The negative MEL effect is rationalized by triplet-triplet annihilation that leads to delayed fluorescence, whereas the positive Mη effect is related to competition between spin mixing and exciton formation leading to an enhanced singlet:triplet ratio at nonzero magnetic field. The resultant reduction in triplet exciton density is argued to reduce detrapping of polarons in the recombination zone at low-bias voltages, explaining the observed negative MC. Regarding organic magnetoresistance, this study provides experimental data to verify existing models describing magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors, which contribute to better understanding hereof. Furthermore, we present indications of strong magnetic field effects related to interactions between trapped carriers and excitons, which specifically can be studied in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Regarding light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs), this work shows that delayed fluorescence from triplet-triplet annihilation substantially contributes to the electroluminescence and the device efficiency.

  19. Highly efficient non-doped blue organic light emitting devices based on anthracene–pyridine derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykir, Gulcin; Tekin, Emine; Atalar, Taner; Türksoy, Figen

    2013-12-02

    Four different 2-(10-aryl)anthracen-9-yl)pyridine derivatives 5a–d were synthesized via the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction. Photo-physical characteristics of these materials having strong electron donating or electron withdrawing groups were explored. Multilayer small molecule organic light emitting diodes without any dopant were fabricated in the following sequence: Indium tin oxide/4,4′-bis(N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino)biphenyl (50 nm)/5a–d (30 nm)/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (30 nm)/LiF/Al. The electroluminescent property of the device fabricated with 5d as an emitter exhibited a high external quantum efficiency of 3.80% (at around 1 mA/cm{sup 2}) with Commission Internationale De L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.14, 0.25). - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of 2-(10-aryl)anthracen-9-yl)pyridine derivatives • Thermal, photophysical and electrochemical properties of anthracene derivatives • Emitters from blue to greenish blue for organic light emitting device applications • Organic light emitting device fabrication and characterization of 2-(10-aryl)anthracen-9-yl)pyridine derivatives.

  20. A study on matrix assisted pulsed evaporation (MAPLE) of organic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matei, Andreea; Canulescu, Stela; Constantinescu, Catalin

    2012-01-01

    Organic films can be produced either by MAPLE or directly by PLD (Pulsed laser deposition). For a reasonable deposition rate of ng/cm2 per pulse for film production by MAPLE a fluence of 1-1.5 J/cm2 is required at the laser wavelength of 355 nm, while the fluence can be considerably lower at 248 ...

  1. Device based on the coupling of an organic light-emitting diode with a photoconductive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Amrani, A. [Universite de Limoges, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, CNRS, UMR 6172, Institut de Recherche XLIM, Departement MINACOM, 123 Av Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Lucas, B. [Universite de Limoges, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, CNRS, UMR 6172, Institut de Recherche XLIM, Departement MINACOM, 123 Av Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France)], E-mail: bruno.lucas@unilim.fr; Moliton, A. [Universite de Limoges, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, CNRS, UMR 6172, Institut de Recherche XLIM, Departement MINACOM, 123 Av Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France)

    2008-02-15

    We have realized a device based on the coupling of an organic light-emitting diode (with tri(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium for light emission) as an input unit with a photoconductive material as an output unit. Various photoconductive materials like pentacene, Cu-phtalocyanine and fullerene were investigated under green light illumination with an emission peak at 550 nm. Photocurrent measurements versus light intensity and bias voltage (applied between two 50 {mu}m distant indium-tin oxide bottom electrodes for the current to flow through the materials) were realized at room temperature a photocurrent gain around 4 is obtained when the materials are subjected to a luminance of about 5000 cd/m{sup 2} and for bias voltage of - 50 V. Besides, it was shown that to obtain a device with a fast photocurrent response by switching the light off and on, it is necessary to apply a bias voltage higher than - 200 V in these conditions, the gain is multiplied by a factor of 3.

  2. Adaptive light-sheet microscopy for long-term, high-resolution imaging in living organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Loïc A; Lemon, William C; Chhetri, Raghav K; Wan, Yinan; Coleman, Michael; Myers, Eugene W; Keller, Philipp J

    2016-12-01

    Optimal image quality in light-sheet microscopy requires a perfect overlap between the illuminating light sheet and the focal plane of the detection objective. However, mismatches between the light-sheet and detection planes are common owing to the spatiotemporally varying optical properties of living specimens. Here we present the AutoPilot framework, an automated method for spatiotemporally adaptive imaging that integrates (i) a multi-view light-sheet microscope capable of digitally translating and rotating light-sheet and detection planes in three dimensions and (ii) a computational method that continuously optimizes spatial resolution across the specimen volume in real time. We demonstrate long-term adaptive imaging of entire developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Drosophila melanogaster embryos and perform adaptive whole-brain functional imaging in larval zebrafish. Our method improves spatial resolution and signal strength two to five-fold, recovers cellular and sub-cellular structures in many regions that are not resolved by non-adaptive imaging, adapts to spatiotemporal dynamics of genetically encoded fluorescent markers and robustly optimizes imaging performance during large-scale morphogenetic changes in living organisms.

  3. Structural Effects in Visible-Light-Responsive Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating ortho-Fluoroazobenzenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Sonia; Goulet-Hanssens, Alexis; Zhao, Fangli; Dikhtiarenko, Alla; Pustovarenko, Alexey; Hecht, Stefan; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek; Bléger, David

    2016-01-11

    The ability to control the interplay of materials with low-energy photons is important as visible light offers several appealing features compared to ultraviolet radiation (less damaging, more selective, predominant in the solar spectrum, possibility to increase the penetration depth). Two different metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were synthesized from the same linker bearing all-visible ortho-fluoroazobenzene photoswitches as pendant groups. The MOFs exhibit different architectures that strongly influence the ability of the azobenzenes to isomerize inside the voids. The framework built with Al-based nodes has congested 1D channels that preclude efficient isomerization. As a result, local light-heat conversion can be used to alter the CO2 adsorption capacity of the material on exposure to green light. The second framework, built with Zr nodes, provides enough room for the photoswitches to isomerize, which leads to a unique bistable photochromic MOF that readily responds to blue and green light. The superiority of green over UV irradiation was additionally demonstrated by reflectance spectroscopy and analysis of digested samples. This material offers promising perspectives for liquid-phase applications such as light-controlled catalysis and adsorptive separation.

  4. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Min [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs’ performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to

  5. Involvement of lipid peroxidation and organic peroxides in UVA-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polte, Tobias; Tyrrell, Rex M

    2004-06-15

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation causes human skin aging and skin cancer at least partially through the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMP-1, the interstitial collagenase, is responsible for the degradation of collagen and is involved in tumor progression in human skin. The present study uses human skin fibroblast cells (FEK4) to investigate the involvement of lipid peroxidation and the role of peroxides as possible mediators in MMP-1 activation by UVA. Preincubation with the antioxidants butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox reduced UVA-dependent MMP-1 upregulation, suggesting that peroxidation of membrane lipids is involved. Blocking the iron-driven generation of lipid peroxides and hydroxyl radicals by different iron chelators led to a decrease in UVA-induced MMP-1 mRNA accumulation. Moreover, modulation of glutathione peroxidase activity by use of the specific inhibitor mercaptosuccinate (MS) or by the depletion of glutathione (using buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine, BSO), enhanced the UVA-dependent MMP-1 response. Finally, UVA irradiation generated a significant increase in intracellular peroxide levels which is augmented by pretreatment of the cells with BSO or MS. Our results demonstrate that lipid peroxidation and the production of peroxides are important events in the signalling pathway of MMP-1 activation by UVA.

  6. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  7. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  8. The dentin organic matrix – limitations of restorative dentistry hidden on the nanometer scale

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of dental caries are major challenges occurring in dentistry. The foundations for modern management of this dental disease, estimated to affect 90% of adults in Western countries, rest upon the dependence of ultrafine interactions between synthetic polymeric biomaterials and nanostructured supramolecular assemblies that compose the tooth organic substrate. Research has shown, however, that this interaction imposes less than desirable long-term prospects for curren...

  9. Light-Emission and Electricity-Generation Properties of Photovoltaic Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Rubrene/DBP Light-Emission and Electron-Donating Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun Soo Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the dependence of the characteristics of photovoltaic organic light-emitting diodes (PVOLEDs on the composition of the light-emission and electron-donating layer (EL-EDL. 5,6,11,12-Tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene: dibenzo{[f,f′]-4,4′,7,7′-tetraphenyl}diindeno[1,2,3-cd:1′,2′,3′-lm]perylene (DBP was used to form the EL-EDL, and C60 was used as an electron-accepting layer (EAL material. A half-gap junction was formed at the EAL/EL-EDL interface. As the rubrene ratio in the EL-EDL increased, the emission spectra became blue-shifted and the light-emission efficiency increased. The highest emission efficiency was achieved with an EL-EDL composed of 95% rubrene and 5% DBP. The short-circuit current decreased as the rubrene content increased up to 50% and then saturated, while the open-circuit voltage was almost unchanged regardless of the rubrene content. The power-conversion efficiency and fill factor increased as the composition of the EL-EDL approached that of pure materials. By controlling the rubrene : DBP ratio, the emission color could be adjusted. The emission efficiency of devices with mixed rubrene/DBP EL-EDLs could be greater than that of either pure rubrene or pure DBP devices. We obtained an overall power-conversion efficiency of 3% and a fill factor greater than 50%.

  10. Optimizing identification of clinically relevant Gram-positive organisms by use of the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElvania Tekippe, Erin; Shuey, Sunni; Winkler, David W; Butler, Meghan A; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2013-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) can be used as a method for the rapid identification of microorganisms. This study evaluated the Bruker Biotyper (MALDI-TOF MS) system for the identification of clinically relevant Gram-positive organisms. We tested 239 aerobic Gram-positive organisms isolated from clinical specimens. We evaluated 4 direct-smear methods, including "heavy" (H) and "light" (L) smears, with and without a 1-μl direct formic acid (FA) overlay. The quality measure assigned to a MALDI-TOF MS identification is a numerical value or "score." We found that a heavy smear with a formic acid overlay (H+FA) produced optimal MALDI-TOF MS identification scores and the highest percentage of correctly identified organisms. Using a score of ≥2.0, we identified 183 of the 239 isolates (76.6%) to the genus level, and of the 181 isolates resolved to the species level, 141 isolates (77.9%) were correctly identified. To maximize the number of correct identifications while minimizing misidentifications, the data were analyzed using a score of ≥1.7 for genus- and species-level identification. Using this score, 220 of the 239 isolates (92.1%) were identified to the genus level, and of the 181 isolates resolved to the species level, 167 isolates (92.2%) could be assigned an accurate species identification. We also evaluated a subset of isolates for preanalytic factors that might influence MALDI-TOF MS identification. Frequent subcultures increased the number of unidentified isolates. Incubation temperatures and subcultures of the media did not alter the rate of identification. These data define the ideal bacterial preparation, identification score, and medium conditions for optimal identification of Gram-positive bacteria by use of MALDI-TOF MS.

  11. Organ heterogeneity of host-derived matrix metalloproteinase expression and its involvement in multiple-organ metastasis by lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, Minoru; Yano, Seiji; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Goto, Hisatsugu; Miki, Toyokazu; Miki, Keisuke; Zhang, Helong; Sone, Saburo

    2002-10-15

    Cancer metastasis is tightly regulated by the interaction of tumor cells and host organ microenvironments. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), produced by both tumor cells and host stromal cells, play a central role in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. We determined whether metastatic potential of lung cancer to multiple organs is dependent solely on the expression of MMPs by tumor cells, using two metastasis models of human lung cancer cell lines expressing various levels of MMPs and a MMP inhibitor (ONO-4817). In the lung metastasis model, tumor cells (PC14, PC14PE6, H226, A549) inoculated i.v. into nude or SCID mice metastasized only in the lung. In the multiple-organ metastasis model, tumor cells (RERF-LC-AI, SBC-3/DOX, H69/VP, which express low levels of MMPs) inoculated i.v. into natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice metastasized into the liver, kidneys, and systemic lymph nodes. Film in situ zymography analysis revealed that the nontumor parenchyma of the lung had no gelatinolytic activity, whereas gelatinolytic activity of the liver and kidney was high and low, respectively. In the lung metastasis model, gelatinolytic activity of lung nodules directly correlated with the in vitro expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by tumor cells. Inhibition of MMP activity by ONO-4817 suppressed lung metastasis by the cell lines that expressed MMPs, but not those that did not express MMP, via the inhibition of MMP activity of lung tumors. In the multiple-organ metastasis model, liver parenchyma, but not liver nodules, showed gelatinolytic activity. The MMP inhibition reduced metastasis to the liver, but not to the kidney or lymph nodes, via inhibition of MMP activity of liver parenchyma. These findings suggest that MMP expression varies among the host organ microenvironments and that stromal MMPs may promote metastasis of lung cancer. Therefore, antimetastatic effects based on MMP inhibition may be dependent on MMPs derived not only from tumor cells but also from organ

  12. Controlled Synthesis of Organic/Inorganic van de Waals Solid for Tunable Light-matter Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Niu, Lin; Cong, Chunxiao; Wu, Chunyang; Wu, Di; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wang, Hong; Zeng, Qingsheng; Zhou, Jiadong; Wang, Xingli; Fu, Wei; Yu, Peng; Fu, Qundong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Yakobson, Boris I; Tay, Beng Kang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Hsin; Sum, Tze Chien; Jin, Chuanhong; He, Haiyong; Yu, Ting; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Van de Waals (vdW) solids, as a new type of artificial materials that consisting of alternative layers bonded by weak interactions, have shed light on fantastic optoelectronic devices. As a result, a large variety of shining vdW devices have been engineered via layer-by-layer stacking of two-dimensional materials, although shadowed by the difficulties of fabrication. Alternatively, direct growth of vdW solids have been proved a scalable and swift way towards vdW solids, reflected by the successful synthesis of graphene/h-BN and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) vertical heterostructures from controlled vapor deposition. Enlightened by it, with a three-step deposition and reaction, we realize high-quality organic and inorganic vdW solids, using methylammonium lead halide as the organic part (organic perovskite) and 2D monolayers inorganic as counterpart. Being a perfect light absorbent, the electrons and holes generated in organic perovskite couple with its inorganic 2D companions, and behave dramaticall...

  13. Colored dissolved organic matter in shallow estuaries: relationships between carbon sources and light attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreich, W.K.; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Pohlman, John; Suttles, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Light availability is of primary importance to the ecological function of shallow estuaries. For example, benthic primary production by submerged aquatic vegetation is contingent upon light penetration to the seabed. A major component that attenuates light in estuaries is colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM is often measured via a proxy, fluorescing dissolved organic matter (fDOM), due to the ease of in situ fDOM sensor measurements. Fluorescence must be converted to CDOM absorbance for use in light attenuation calculations. However, this CDOM–fDOM relationship varies among and within estuaries. We quantified the variability in this relationship within three estuaries along the mid-Atlantic margin of the eastern United States: West Falmouth Harbor (MA), Barnegat Bay (NJ), and Chincoteague Bay (MD/VA). Land use surrounding these estuaries ranges from urban to developed, with varying sources of nutrients and organic matter. Measurements of fDOM (excitation and emission wavelengths of 365 nm (±5 nm) and 460 nm (±40 nm), respectively) and CDOM absorbance were taken along a terrestrial-to-marine gradient in all three estuaries. The ratio of the absorption coefficient at 340 nm (m−1) to fDOM (QSU) was higher in West Falmouth Harbor (1.22) than in Barnegat Bay (0.22) and Chincoteague Bay (0.17). The CDOM : fDOM absorption ratio was variable between sites within West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay, but consistent between sites within Chincoteague Bay. Stable carbon isotope analysis for constraining the source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay yielded δ13C values ranging from −19.7 to −26.1 ‰ and −20.8 to −26.7 ‰, respectively. Concentration and stable carbon isotope mixing models of DOC (dissolved organic carbon) indicate a contribution of 13C-enriched DOC in the estuaries. The most likely source of 13C-enriched DOC for the systems we investigated is Spartina cordgrass. Comparison of

  14. OLED Fundamentals: Materials, Devices, and Processing of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blochwitz-Nimoth, Jan; Bhandari, Abhinav; Boesch, Damien; Fincher, Curtis R.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Gotthold, David W.; Greiner, Mark T.; Kido, Junji; Kondakov, Denis; Korotkov, Roman; Krylova, Valentina A.; Loeser, Falk; Lu, Min-Hao; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Lussem, Bjorn; Moro, Lorenza; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Rostovtsev, Vsevolod V.; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Silverman, Gary; Thompson, Mark E.; Tietze, Max; Tyan, Yuan-Sheng; Weaver, Michael; Xin , Xu; Zeng, Xianghui

    2015-05-26

    What is an organic light emitting diode (OLED)? Why should we care? What are they made of? How are they made? What are the challenges in seeing these devices enter the marketplace in various applications? These are the questions we hope to answer in this book, at a level suitable for knowledgeable non-experts, graduate students and scientists and engineers working in the field who want to understand the broader context of their work. At the most basic level, an OLED is a promising new technology composed of some organic material sandwiched between two electrodes. When current is passed through the device, light is emitted. The stack of layers can be very thin and has many variations, including flexible and/or transparent. The organic material can be polymeric or composed small molecules, and may include inorganic components. The electrodes may consist of metals, metal oxides, carbon nanomaterials, or other species, though of course for light to be emitted, one electrode must be transparent. OLEDs may be fabricated on glass, metal foils, or polymer sheets (though polymeric substrates must be modified to protect the organic material from moisture or oxygen). In any event, the organic material must be protected from moisture during storage and operation. A control circuit, the exact nature of which depends on the application, drives the OLED. Nevertheless, the control circuit should have very stable current control to generate uniform light emission. OLEDs can be designed to emit a single color of light, white light, or even tunable colors. The devices can be switched on and off very rapidly, which makes them suitable for displays or for general lighting. Given the amazing complexity of the technical and design challenges for practical OLED applications, it is not surprising that applications are still somewhat limited. Although organic electroluminescence is more than 50 years old, the modern OLED field is really only about half that age – with the first high

  15. Can Positive Matrix Factorization identify sources of organic trace gases at the continental GAW site Hohenpeissenberg?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Leuchner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available From the rural Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW site Hohenpeissenberg in the pre-alpine area of Southern Germany, a dataset of 24 C2–C8 non-methane hydrocarbons over a period of seven years was analyzed. Receptor modeling was performed by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF and the resulting factors were compared to literature source profiles. Photochemical aging during transport to the relatively remote site violates the PMF prerequisite of mass conservation from source to receptor. However, previous studies showed plausible results with this method at remote sites; the applicability and restrictions of the PMF model to such a remote dataset and the influence of photochemical processing on the interpretability of the results are discussed. A six factor solution showed a high stability and the most plausible results. In addition to biogenic sources and remote sources of very stable compounds – reflecting the continental background – four additional anthropogenic factors were resolved that could be divided into two short- and two long-lived patterns from evaporative sources and incomplete combustion processes, respectively. A method to increase the uncertainty for each individual compound by including photochemical reactivity did not improve the results, but decreased the stability of the model output. The contribution of the different source categories at the site over the entire period was, in decreasing order: remote sources, long-lived evaporative sources, residential heating and long-lived combustion sources, short-lived evaporative sources, short-lived combustion sources, and biogenic sources. Despite a low overall impact, biogenic sources played an important role during summer, in particular in terms of reactivity.

  16. Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopy and Computational Studies of Reactive Organic Molecules of Relevance to Interstellar Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopff, Laura A.; Kreifels, Terese A.; Schaffer, Christopher J.; Haenni, Benjamin C.; Esselman, Brian J.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2011-10-01

    Matrix isolation, the process of trapping a molecule in an inert gas at low temperature, provides a means for studying highly reactive intermediates, such as carbenes or radicals. Reactive species can be characterized by IR, UV-vis and/or EPR spectroscopy. Comparison of experimental and computed spectral data, as well as chemical reactivity, is used for structural assignment. Highly-unsaturated carbon chains are well known compounds in the interstellar medium (ISM). Detection of these molecules relies mostly on radioastronomy, making the detection of the linear HC2nH series difficult. The electronic structure changes from even carbon chain lengths (HC2nH) to odd chain lengths (HC2n+1H), changing from closed shell to open shell species. The odd series further alternate from a diradical character (HC3H) to a localized carbene (HC5H). This poster will present the synthesis and spectroscopy of the HC3H and HC7H species and derivatives. The study of arylcarbenes is vital to understanding the chemistry of carbon-rich environments, such as discharges, interstellar clouds, and circumstellar envelopes. The identification of small, sulfur containing molecules, and the identification of aromatics in the ISM make future thiophene and benzothiophene detections a real possibility. Studies on 2- and 3- diazomethyl substituted benzothiophenes are underway to assess their photochemical reactivity and potential for forming benzothiophene carbenes. Macrocylic polyynes are proposed to be involved in carbon condensation via the ring coalescence and annealing model to produce graphitic sheets or fullerenes. To simplify a complex system we are computationally studying the series of ethynyl-substituted cyclobutadienes and their possible involvement in the build-up of larger carbon containing molecules in the ISM.

  17. Hierarchical self-assembly: Self-organized nanostructures in a nematically ordered matrix of self-assembled polymeric chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeena, Shaikh; Chatterji, Apratim

    2015-03-01

    We report many different nanostructures which are formed when model nanoparticles of different sizes (diameter σn) are allowed to aggregate in a background matrix of semiflexible self-assembled polymeric wormlike micellar chains. The different nanostructures are formed by the dynamical arrest of phase-separating mixtures of micellar monomers and nanoparticles. The different morphologies obtained are the result of an interplay of the available free volume, the elastic energy of deformation of polymers, the density (chemical potential) of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix, and, of course, the ratio of the size of self-assembling nanoparticles and self-avoidance diameter of polymeric chains. We have used a hybrid semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation scheme to obtain the (nonequilibrium) phase diagram of the self-assembled nanostructures. We observe rodlike structures of nanoparticles which get self-assembled in the gaps between the nematically ordered chains, as well as percolating gel-like network of conjoined nanotubes. We also find a totally unexpected interlocked crystalline phase of nanoparticles and monomers, in which each crystal plane of nanoparticles is separated by planes of perfectly organized polymer chains. We identified the condition which leads to such interlocked crystal structure. We suggest experimental possibilities of how the results presented in this paper could be used to obtain different nanostructures in the laboratory.

  18. Hierarchical self-assembly: Self-organized nanostructures in a nematically ordered matrix of self-assembled polymeric chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeena, Shaikh; Chatterji, Apratim

    2015-03-01

    We report many different nanostructures which are formed when model nanoparticles of different sizes (diameter σn) are allowed to aggregate in a background matrix of semiflexible self-assembled polymeric wormlike micellar chains. The different nanostructures are formed by the dynamical arrest of phase-separating mixtures of micellar monomers and nanoparticles. The different morphologies obtained are the result of an interplay of the available free volume, the elastic energy of deformation of polymers, the density (chemical potential) of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix, and, of course, the ratio of the size of self-assembling nanoparticles and self-avoidance diameter of polymeric chains. We have used a hybrid semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation scheme to obtain the (nonequilibrium) phase diagram of the self-assembled nanostructures. We observe rodlike structures of nanoparticles which get self-assembled in the gaps between the nematically ordered chains, as well as percolating gel-like network of conjoined nanotubes. We also find a totally unexpected interlocked crystalline phase of nanoparticles and monomers, in which each crystal plane of nanoparticles is separated by planes of perfectly organized polymer chains. We identified the condition which leads to such interlocked crystal structure. We suggest experimental possibilities of how the results presented in this paper could be used to obtain different nanostructures in the laboratory.

  19. Gray level co-occurrence matrix texture analysis of germinal center light zone lymphocyte nuclei: physiology viewpoint with focus on apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Igor; Pantic, Senka; Basta-Jovanovic, Gordana

    2012-06-01

    In our study we investigated the relationship between conventional morphometric indicators of nuclear size and shape (area and circularity) and the parameters of gray level co-occurrence matrix texture analysis (entropy, homogeneity, and angular second moment) in cells committed to apoptosis. A total of 432 lymphocyte nuclei images from the spleen germinal center light zones (cells in early stages of apoptosis) were obtained from eight healthy male guinea pigs previously immunized with sheep red blood cells (antigen). For each nucleus, area, circularity, entropy, homogeneity, and angular second moment were determined. All measured parameters of gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were significantly correlated with morphometric indicators of nuclear size and shape. The strongest correlation was observed between GLCM homogeneity and nuclear area (p GLCM method may be a powerful tool in evaluation of ultrastructural nuclear changes during early stages of the apoptotic process.

  20. The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Kwang Ohk Cheo

    2003-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either alpha-NPD or DPVBi host l...