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Sample records for mathematics chemistry nuclear

  1. Mathematical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Trinajstić, Nenad; Gutman, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A brief description is given of the historical development of mathematics and chemistry. A path leading to the meeting of these two sciences is described. An attempt is made to define mathematical chemistry, and journals containing the term mathematical chemistry in their titles are noted. In conclusion, the statement is made that although chemistry is an experimental science aimed at preparing new compounds and materials, mathematics is very useful in chemistry, among other things, to produc...

  2. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors

  3. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors. (Auth.)

  4. Mathematics for physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mortimer, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    Mathematics for Physical Chemistry is the ideal supplementary text for practicing chemists and students who want to sharpen their mathematics skills while enrolled in general through physical chemistry courses. This book specifically emphasizes the use of mathematics in the context of physical chemistry, as opposed to being simply a mathematics text. This 4e includes new exercises in each chapter that provide practice in a technique immediately after discussion or example and encourage self-study. The early chapters are constructed around a sequence of mathematical topics, wit

  5. Mathematics for physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mortimer, Robert G

    2005-01-01

    Mathematics for Physical Chemistry, Third Edition, is the ideal text for students and physical chemists who want to sharpen their mathematics skills. It can help prepare the reader for an undergraduate course, serve as a supplementary text for use during a course, or serve as a reference for graduate students and practicing chemists. The text concentrates on applications instead of theory, and, although the emphasis is on physical chemistry, it can also be useful in general chemistry courses. The Third Edition includes new exercises in each chapter that provide practice in a technique immediately after discussion or example and encourage self-study. The first ten chapters are constructed around a sequence of mathematical topics, with a gradual progression into more advanced material. The final chapter discusses mathematical topics needed in the analysis of experimental data.* Numerous examples and problems interspersed throughout the presentations * Each extensive chapter contains a preview, objectives, and ...

  6. Mathematical problems for chemistry students

    CERN Document Server

    Pota, Gyorgy

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical Problems for Chemistry Students has been compiled and written (a) to help chemistrystudents in their mathematical studies by providing them with mathematical problems really occurring in chemistry (b) to help practising chemists to activate their applied mathematical skills and (c) to introduce students and specialistsof the chemistry-related fields (physicists, mathematicians, biologists, etc.) intothe world of the chemical applications.Some problems of the collection are mathematical reformulations of those in the standard textbooks of chemistry, others we

  7. Remedial mathematics for quantum chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, L.; Brouwer, N.; Heck, A.; Buma, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Proper mathematical skills are important for every science course and mathematics-intensive chemistry courses rely on a sound mathematical pre-knowledge. In the first-year quantum chemistry course at this university, it was noticed that many students lack basic mathematical knowledge. To tackle the

  8. Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, K.

    1982-01-01

    The textbook is a Czech-to-German translation of the second revised edition and covers the subject under the headings: general nuclear chemistry, methods of nuclear chemistry, preparative nuclear chemistry, analytical nuclear chemistry, and applied chemistry. The book is especially directed to students

  9. Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matel, L.; Dulanska, S.

    2013-01-01

    This text-book is an introductory text in nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry, aimed on university undergraduate students in chemistry and related disciplines (physics, nuclear engineering). It covers the key aspects of modern nuclear chemistry. The text begins with basic theories in contemporary physics. It relates nuclear phenomena to key divisions of chemistry such as atomic structure, spectroscopy, equilibria and kinetics. It also gives an introduction to sources of ionizing radiation, detection of ionizing radiation, nuclear power industry and accident on nuclear installations as well as basic knowledge's of radiobiology. This book is essential reading for those taking a first course in nuclear chemistry and is a useful companion to other volumes in physical and analytical chemistry. It will also be of use to those new to working in nuclear chemistry or radiochemistry.

  10. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered include: mass asymmetry and total kinetic energy release in the spontaneous fission of 262 105; calculation of spontaneous fission properties of very heavy nuclei - 98 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 106 and 150 less than or equal to N less than or equal to 164; energy losses for 84 Kr ions in nickel, aluminium and titanium; differences in compound nuclei formed with 40 Ar and 84 Kr projectiles; measurement of the energy division vs. mass in highly damped reactions; ambiguities in the inference of precompound emission from excitation function analysis; selective laser one-atom detection of neutral prompt fission fragments; laser induced nuclear polarization - application to the study of spontaneous fission isomers; quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations in the actinide nuclei; high-spin states in 164 Yb; contrasting behavior of h/sub 9/2/ and i/sub 13/2/ bands in 185 Au; multiple band crossings in 164 Er; recoil-distance measurement of lifetimes of rotational states in 164 Dy, lifetimes of ground-band states in 192 Pt and 194 Pt and application of the rotation-alignment model; coulomb excitation of vibrational nuclei with heavy ions; surface structure of deformed nuclei; valency contribution to neutron capture in 32 S; neutron capture cross section of manganese; search for superheavy elements in natural samples by neutron multiplicity counting; and gamma-ray studies on the geochemistry of achondritic meteorites

  11. Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, V.

    1982-01-01

    The author of the book has had 25 years of experience at the Nuclear Chemistry of Prague Technical University. In consequence, the book is intended as a basic textbook for students of this field. Its main objectives are an easily understandable presentation of the complex subject and in spite of the uncertainty which still characterizes the definition and subjects of nuclear chemistry - a systematic classification and logical structure. Contents: 1. Introduction (history and definition); 2. General nuclear chemistry (physical fundamentals, hot atom chemistry, interaction of nuclear radiation with matter, radioactive elements, isotope effects, isotope exchange, chemistry of radioactive trace elements); 3. Methods of nuclear chemistry of nuclear chemistry (radiochemical methods, activation, separation and enrichment chemistry); 4. Preparative nuclear chemistry (isotope production, labelled compounds); 5. Analytival nuclear chemistry; 6. Applied nuclear chemistry (isotope applications in general physical and analytical chemistry). The book is supplemented by an annex with tables, a name catalogue and a subject index which will facilitate access to important information. (RB) [de

  12. Mathematics for quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Jay Martin

    2005-01-01

    This concise volume offers undergraduates an introduction to mathematical formalism in problems of molecular structure and motion. The main topics cover the calculus of orthogonal functions, algebra of vector spaces, and Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation of classical mechanics and applications to molecular motion. Answers to problems. 1966 edition.

  13. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  14. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection

  15. Frontiers in nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.D.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Pujari, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    This book contains articles on the landmarks in nuclear and radiochemistry which takes through scientific history spanning over five decades from the times of Roentgen to the middle of this century. Articles on nuclear fission and back end of the nuclear fuel cycle give an insight into the current status of this subject. Reviews on frontier areas like lanthanides, actinides, muonium chemistry, accelerator based nuclear chemistry, fast radiochemical separations and nuclear medicine bring out the multidisciplinary nature of nuclear sciences. This book also includes an article on environmental radiochemistry and safety. Chapters relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  16. Chemistry and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wet, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The underlying principles of nuclear sciece and technology as based on the two basic phenomena, namely, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, with their relatively large associated energy changes, are outlined. The most important contributions by chemists in the overall historical development are mentioned and the strong position chemistry has attained in these fields is indicated. It is concluded that chemistry as well as many other scientific discplines (apart from general benefits) have largely benefitted from these nuclear developments [af

  17. Introduction to nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieser, K.H.

    1980-01-01

    The study in this book begins with the periodic system of elements (chapter 1). The physical fundamentals necessary to understand nuclear chemistry are dealt with in chapter 2. Chapter 3 and 4 treat the influence of the mass number on the chemical behaviour (isotope effect) and the isotope separation methods thus based on this effect. A main topic is studied in chapter 5, the laws of radioactive decay, a second main topic is dealt with in chapter 8, nuclear reactions. The chemical effects of nuclear reactions are treated on their own chapter 9. Radiochemical reactions which are partly closely linked to the latter are only briefly discussed in chapter 10. The following chapters discuss the various application fields of nuclear chemistry. The large apparatus indispensable for nuclear chemistry is dealt with in a special chapter (chapter 12). Chapter 15 summarizes the manifold applications. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear Chemistry, exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savio, E.; Saucedo, E.

    2002-01-01

    Those exercises have as objective to introduce the student in the basic concepts of nuclear chemistry: a) way of decline b) balances of mass used in nuclear reactions c) how to calculate activities, activity concentrations and specific activity d) radiotracers use in biomedical sciences pharmaceutical

  19. Nuclear chemistry 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macasek, F.

    2009-01-01

    This text-book (electronic book - multi-media CD-ROM) constitutes a course-book - author's collection of lectures. It consists of 9 lectures in which the reader acquaints with the basis of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry: History of nucleus; Atomic nuclei; Radioactivity; Nuclear reactions and nucleogenesis; Isotopism; Ionizing radiation; Radiation measurement; Nuclear energetics; Isotopic indicators. This course-book may be interesting for students, post-graduate students of chemistry, biology, physics, medicine a s well as for teachers, scientific workers and physicians. (author)

  20. Mathematical methods for physical and analytical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Goodson, David Z

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical Methods for Physical and Analytical Chemistry presents mathematical and statistical methods to students of chemistry at the intermediate, post-calculus level. The content includes a review of general calculus; a review of numerical techniques often omitted from calculus courses, such as cubic splines and Newton's method; a detailed treatment of statistical methods for experimental data analysis; complex numbers; extrapolation; linear algebra; and differential equations. With numerous example problems and helpful anecdotes, this text gives chemistry students the mathematical

  1. Nuclear medicine and mathematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroso de Lima, J.J. [Dept. de Biofisica e Proc. de Imagem, IBILI - Faculdade de Medicina, Coimbra (Portugal)

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this review is not to present a comprehensive description of all the mathematical tools used in nuclear medicine, but to emphasize the importance of the mathematical method in nuclear medicine and to elucidate some of the mathematical concepts currently used. We can distinguish three different areas in which mathematical support has been offered to nuclear medicine: Physiology, methodology and data processing. Nevertheless, the boundaries between these areas can be indistinct. It is impossible in a single article to give even an idea of the extent and complexity of the procedures currently usede in nuclear medicine, such as image processing, reconstruction from projections and artificial intelligence. These disciplines do not belong to nuclear medicine: They are already branches of engineering, and my interest will reside simply in revealing a little of the elegance and the fantastic potential of these new `allies` of nuclear medicine. In this review the mathematics of physiological interpretation and methodology are considered together in the same section. General aspects of data-processing methods, including image processing and artificial intelligence, are briefly analysed. The mathematical tools that are most often used to assist the interpretation of biological phenomena in nuclear medicine are considered; these include convolution and deconvolution methods, Fourier analysis, factorial analysis and neural networking. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear medicine and mathematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso de Lima, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this review is not to present a comprehensive description of all the mathematical tools used in nuclear medicine, but to emphasize the importance of the mathematical method in nuclear medicine and to elucidate some of the mathematical concepts currently used. We can distinguish three different areas in which mathematical support has been offered to nuclear medicine: Physiology, methodology and data processing. Nevertheless, the boundaries between these areas can be indistinct. It is impossible in a single article to give even an idea of the extent and complexity of the procedures currently usede in nuclear medicine, such as image processing, reconstruction from projections and artificial intelligence. These disciplines do not belong to nuclear medicine: They are already branches of engineering, and my interest will reside simply in revealing a little of the elegance and the fantastic potential of these new 'allies' of nuclear medicine. In this review the mathematics of physiological interpretation and methodology are considered together in the same section. General aspects of data-processing methods, including image processing and artificial intelligence, are briefly analysed. The mathematical tools that are most often used to assist the interpretation of biological phenomena in nuclear medicine are considered; these include convolution and deconvolution methods, Fourier analysis, factorial analysis and neural networking. (orig.)

  3. Essentials of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arniker, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Theories of nuclear structure, stability, and radioactivity; nuclear reactions including fission, fusion, and reactors; and the applications of radioactivity, are covered. A non-mathematical treatment of the higher concepts are presented. The use of SI units, with cgs equivalents and ample clarifications in the form of worked examples; original examples investigated by the author in the applications of radioactivity; and selected problems are included

  4. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authors, Various

    1971-05-01

    Papers are presented for the following topics: (1) Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Properties - (a) Nuclear Spectroscopy and Radioactivity; (b) Nuclear Reactions and Scattering; (c) Nuclear Theory; and (d) Fission. (2) Chemical and Atomic Physics - (a) Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy; and (b) Hyperfine Interactions. (3) Physical, Inorganic, and Analytical Chemistry - (a) X-Ray Crystallography; (b) Physical and Inorganic Chemistry; (c) Radiation Chemistry; and (d) Chemical Engineering. (4) Instrumentation and Systems Development.

  5. Nuclear Chemistry and Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandevelde, L.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of R and D at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in the field of nuclear chemistry and analytical techniques are summarized. Major achievement in 2001 included the completion of a project on the measurement of critical radionuclides in reactor waste fluxes (the ARIANE project), the radiochemical characterisation of beryllium material originating from the second matrix of the BR2 reactor as well as to a the organisation of a workshop on the analysis of thorium and its isotopes in workplace materials

  6. Radiation chemistry in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Yosuke

    2006-01-01

    The importance of radiation chemistry in the field of nuclear technology including reactor chemistry, spent fuel reprocessing and radioactive high level waste repository, is summarized and, in parallel, our research activity will be briefly presented. (author)

  7. Radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Choppin, Gregory; RYDBERG, JAN; Ekberg, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Radiochemistry or nuclear chemistry is the study of radiation from an atomic and molecular perspective, including elemental transformation and reaction effects, as well as physical, health and medical properties. This revised edition of one of the earliest and best-known books on the subject has been updated to bring into teaching the latest developments in research and the current hot topics in the field. To further enhance the functionality of this text, the authors have added numerous teaching aids, examples in MathCAD with variable quantities and options, hotlinks to relevant text secti

  8. Rapid automated nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Rapid Automated Nuclear Chemistry (RANC) can be thought of as the Z-separation of Neutron-rich Isotopes by Automated Methods. The range of RANC studies of fission and its products is large. In a sense, the studies can be categorized into various energy ranges from the highest where the fission process and particle emission are considered, to low energies where nuclear dynamics are being explored. This paper presents a table which gives examples of current research using RANC on fission and fission products. The remainder of this text is divided into three parts. The first contains a discussion of the chemical methods available for the fission product elements, the second describes the major techniques, and in the last section, examples of recent results are discussed as illustrations of the use of RANC

  9. Nuclear chemistry in the traditional chemistry program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppinger, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional undergraduate program for chemistry majors, especially at institutions devoted solely to undergraduate education, has limited space for 'special topics' courses in areas such as nuclear and radiochemistry. A scheme is proposed whereby the basic topics covered in an introductury radiochemistry course are touched upon, and in some cases covered in detail, at some time during the four-year sequence of courses taken by a chemistry major. (author) 6 refs.; 7 tabs

  10. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    The activities of the nuclear chemistry group at Indiana University during the period September 1, 1983 to August 31, 1984, are summarized. The primary thrust of our research program has continued to be the investigation of damped collision mechanisms at near-barrier energies and of linear momentum and energy transfer in the low-to-intermediate energy regime. In addition, during the past year we have initiated studies of complex fragment emission from highly excited nuclei and have also completed measurements relevant to understanding the origin and propagation of galactic cosmic rays. Equipment development efforts have resulted in significantly improving the resolution and solid-angle acceptance of our detector systems. The experimental program has been carried out at several accelerators including the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC, the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility and the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. Publications and activities are listed

  11. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola, V.E.; Kwiatkowski, K.

    1991-08-01

    During the past year the Nuclear Chemistry Group at Indiana University has concentrated its efforts on (1) the analysis and publication of previous experimental studies and (2) the design and construction of ISiS, a 4π detector for multifragment emission studies. No new experiments were undertaken, rather all of our experimental effort has been directed toward component tests of ISiS, with a goal of beginning measurements with this device in 1992. Research projects that have been largely completed during the last year include: (1) multiple fragment emission studies of the 0.90 and 3.6 GeV 3 He + nat Ag reaction; (2) intermediate-mass-fragment (IMF: 3 ≤ Z ≤ 15) excitation function measurements for the E/A = 20-to-100 MeV 14 N + nat Ag and 197 Au reactions, and (3) particle-particle correlation studies for the determination of space-time relationships energy collisions

  12. Nuclear physics mathematical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, R.; Gervois, A.; Giannoni, M.J.; Levesque, D.; Maille, M.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear physics mathematical methods, applied to the collective motion theory, to the reduction of the degrees of freedom and to the order and disorder phenomena; are investigated. In the scope of the study, the following aspects are discussed: the entropy of an ensemble of collective variables; the interpretation of the dissipation, applying the information theory; the chaos and the universality; the Monte-Carlo method applied to the classical statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics; the finite elements method, and the classical ergodicity [fr

  13. Teaching aids for nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides teachers with a set of resources to use in teaching modern nuclear chemistry in their classrooms. Included in the resources are references to recent articles on nuclear science, some preprints and abstracts of articles, ideas of where to go for help, lab experiments, and a videotape of simulated nuclear reactions

  14. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The activities of the nuclear chemistry program at Indiana University during the period September 1, 1982 to August 31, 1983 are reviewed. As in the past, these investigations have focused on understanding the properties of nucleus-nucleus collisions at low-to-intermediate energies. During the past year new programs have been initiated at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University and the Hollifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge. With the unique beams provided by these accelerators we have extended our previous studies of energy dissipation phenomena into new energy regimes. The MSU measurements, performed with E/A = 15 to 30 MeV 14 N beams, combined with recent results we have obtained at IUCF, have indicated the existence of a saturation in the average amount of linear momentum that can be transferred in nucleus-nucleus collisions. This saturation value is about 140 (MeV/C)/A and occurs at beam energies in the E/A approx. 30 to 50 MeV range for 3 He- to 20 Ne-projectiles. At HHIRF, studies of the 56 Fe + 56 Fe reaction at E/A = 14.6 MeV have provided additional evidence for structure in the energy spectra of projectile-like fragments formed in symmetric collisions. Studies of near-barrier 56 Fe-induced reactions have continued at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC

  15. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    In this report 9 topics of the work of the Nuclear Chemistry Group in 1995 are highlighted. A list of publications and an overview of the international cooperation is given. (orig.). 19 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 2 app

  16. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    In this report 9 topics of the work of the Nuclear Chemistry Group in 1995 are highlighted. A list of publications and an overview of the international cooperation is given. (orig.). 19 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 2 app.

  17. Mathematical challenges from theoretical/computational chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The committee believes that this report has relevance and potentially valuable suggestions for a wide range of readers. Target audiences include: graduate departments in the mathematical and chemical sciences; federal and private agencies that fund research in the mathematical and chemical sciences; selected industrial and government research and development laboratories; developers of software and hardware for computational chemistry; and selected individual researchers. Chapter 2 of this report covers some history of computational chemistry for the nonspecialist, while Chapter 3 illustrates the fruits of some past successful cross-fertilization between mathematical scientists and computational/theoretical chemists. In Chapter 4 the committee has assembled a representative, but not exhaustive, survey of research opportunities. Most of these are descriptions of important open problems in computational/theoretical chemistry that could gain much from the efforts of innovative mathematical scientists, written so as to be accessible introductions to the nonspecialist. Chapter 5 is an assessment, necessarily subjective, of cultural differences that must be overcome if collaborative work is to be encouraged between the mathematical and the chemical communities. Finally, the report ends with a brief list of conclusions and recommendations that, if followed, could promote accelerated progress at this interface. Recognizing that bothersome language issues can inhibit prospects for collaborative research at the interface between distinctive disciplines, the committee has attempted throughout to maintain an accessible style, in part by using illustrative boxes, and has included at the end of the report a glossary of technical terms that may be familiar to only a subset of the target audiences listed above.

  18. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A brief administrative review is given of work in the following areas: investigations of the chemical effects accompanying muon capture in atoms and molecules, quadrupole interaction in metal and semimetal systems using perturbed gamma-ray angular correlation, and nuclear structure research using nuclear reaction spectroscopy. Detailed research reports were published in appropriate places; a publication list is included. 2 figures

  19. Nuclear Chemistry and Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandevelde, L.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of research activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in the field of nuclear analytical techniques are summarized. Major efforts in 1999 went to a project on the qualification of radioanalytical routines for the determination of alpha-emitting nuclides in conditioned radioactive waste; the ARIANE project; and the provision of radiochemical and chemical analytical services to internal and external clients

  20. Nuclear chemistry of transactinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagame, Yuichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    The current status on the nuclear chemistry studies of transactinide elements is reviewed. The production of transactinides in heavy ion reactions is briefly discussed, and nuclear properties on the stability of transactinides are presented. Chemical properties of the trans-actinide elements 104, 105 and 106, and a typical experimental technique used to study these properties on an atom-at-a-time base are introduced. (author)

  1. Nuclear techniques in analytical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Moses, Alfred J; Gordon, L

    1964-01-01

    Nuclear Techniques in Analytical Chemistry discusses highly sensitive nuclear techniques that determine the micro- and macro-amounts or trace elements of materials. With the increasingly frequent demand for the chemical determination of trace amounts of elements in materials, the analytical chemist had to search for more sensitive methods of analysis. This book accustoms analytical chemists with nuclear techniques that possess the desired sensitivity and applicability at trace levels. The topics covered include safe handling of radioactivity; measurement of natural radioactivity; and neutron a

  2. Mathematics applied to nuclear geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.; Nordemann, D.J.R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the powerful auxiliary to nuclear geophysics is the obtention and interpretation of the alpha and gamma radiation spectra. This work discuss, qualitative and quantitative, the lost information problem, motivated by the noise in the process of information codification. The decodification process must be suppield by the appropriate mathematical model on the measure system to recovery the information from nuclear source. (C.D.G.) [pt

  3. Analytical chemistry of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    The second panel on the Analytical Chemistry of Nuclear Materials was organized for two purposes: first, to advise the Seibersdorf Laboratory of the Agency on its future programme, and second, to review the results of the Second International Comparison of routine analysis of trace impurities in uranium and also the action taken as a result of the recommendations of the first panel in 1962. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Summer Schools In Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Sue; Herbert, Mieva; Mantica, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This the report for the 5 year activities for the ACS Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry. The American Chemical Society's Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry were held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and San Jose State University (San Jose, CA) during the award period February 1, 2002 to January 31, 2007. The Summer Schools are intensive, six-week program involving both a lecture component covering fundamental principles of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry and a laboratory component allowing hands-on experience for the students to test many of the basic principles they learn about in lecture. Each site hosted 12 undergraduate students annually, and students received coursework credits towards their undergraduate degrees. Up to 7 student credit hours were earned at San Jose State University, and Brookhaven students received up to 6 college credits through BNL's management partner, SUNY Stony Brook. Funding from the award period covered travel, housing, educational expenses, and student stipends, for the 24 undergraduate participants. Furthermore, funding was also used to cover expenses for lecturers and staff to run the programs at the two facilities. The students were provided with nuclear and radiochemistry training equivalent to a three-hour upper-level undergraduate course along with a two-hour hands-on laboratory experience within the six-week summer period. Lectures were held 5 days per week. Students completed an extensive laboratory sequence, as well as radiation safety training at the start of the Summer Schools. The summer school curriculum was enhanced with a Guest Lecture series, as well as through several one-day symposia and organized field trips to nuclear-related research and applied science laboratories. This enrichment afforded an opportunity for students to see the broader impacts of nuclear science in today's world, and to experience some of the future challenges through formal and informal discussions with

  5. The mathematics of nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewins, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mathematics of nuclear engineering is considered with especial reference to the problems of; the representation of the transformation of matter at the nuclear level by radioactive decay and neutron transmutation, the problem of the distribution of neutrons and other particles as a transport theory problem including some of the approximation methods used in this problem, particularly diffusion theory with particular emphasis on steady-state problems, time-dependent reactor kinetic and control, and the longer term changes involved with the nuclear fuel cycle both within and without the reactor itself. (U.K.)

  6. Department of Nuclear Physical Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulski, J.

    1994-01-01

    The research program at the Department of Nuclear Physical Chemistry of the Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics is described. The Department consist of three laboratories. First - Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Separation Processes on which the activity is concentrated on production and separation of neutron deficient isotopes for medical diagnostic. Recently, the main interest was in 111 In which is a promising tracer for cancer diagnostic. To increase the effectiveness of production of indium 111 In the reaction with deuterons on the enriched cadmium target was carried out instead of the previously used one with alpha particles on natural silver. In the second one - Laboratory of Chemistry and Radiochemistry - the systematic studies of physicochemical properties of transition elements in solutions are carried out. The results of the performed experiments were used for the elaboration of new rapid and selective methods for various elements. Some of these results have been applied for separation of trans actinide elements at U-400 cyclotron of JINR Dubna. The third one laboratory -Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory - conducts continuous monitoring of radioactivity contamination of atmosphere. The investigation of different radionuclides concentration in natural environment, mainly in the forest had been carried out

  7. Chemistry in and from nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, M.

    1989-01-01

    The time, of the realization of nuclear fusion reactor is not clear even now. However, it is generally believed that the nuclear fusion is only one candidate of the big power source for humanbeing. We may be not able to, but our children or grandchildren would be able to see the nuclear fusion reactors. The nuclear fusion development may be the last and biggest technology program for us, so it will take so long leading time. Now, we are in the first stage of this leading time, I think. As being found in the history of every technology, chemistry is essential to develop the fusion nuclear technology. To assure the safety of the nuclear fusion system, chemistry should play the main role. There have been already not a few advanced chemistry initiated by the connected technologies with the nuclear fusion researches. The nuclear fusion needs chemistry and the nuclear fusion leads some of the new phases of chemistry. (author)

  8. Where is the future of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The future potentials of nuclear chemistry as a natural science with a strong orientation towards practical applications has been discussed at this meeting of 45 experts coming from research institutes and laboratories working in the fields of radiochemistry, nuclear chemistry, inorganic and applied chemistry, hot-atom chemistry, radiobiology, and nuclear biology, and from the two nuclear research centres at Juelich and Karlsruhe. The discussion centred around the four main aspects of future work, namely 1. basic research leading to an extension of the periodic table, nuclear reactions, the chemistry of superheavy elements, cosmochemistry; 2. radionuclide technology and activation analysis; 3. nuclear fuel cycle and reprocessing processes together with ultimate disposal methods; 4. radiochemistry in the life sciences, including nuclear chemistry and applications. (HK) [de

  9. Chemistry management system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Katsumi; Maeda, Katsuji

    1998-01-01

    Recently, the chemistry management in the nuclear power plants has been changing from the problem solution to the predictive diagnosis and maintenance. It is important to maintain the integrity of plant operation by an adequate chemistry control. For these reasons, many plant operation data and chemistry analysis data should be collected and treated effectively to evaluate chemistry condition of the nuclear power plants. When some indications of chemistry anomalies occur, quick and effective root cause evaluation and countermeasures should be required. The chemistry management system has been developed as to provide sophisticate chemistry management in the nuclear power plants. This paper introduces the concept and functions of the chemistry management system for the nuclear power plants. (author)

  10. How Well Does A-Level Mathematics Prepare Students for the Mathematical Demands of Chemistry Degrees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Ellie; Bowyer, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    332 undergraduate chemistry students were surveyed in order to establish whether they had found A-level Mathematics and/or Further Mathematics to be good preparation for their degree. Perceptions of both subjects were found to be positive, with more than 80% of participants describing Mathematics or Further Mathematics as good preparation. In…

  11. African Journals Online: Chemistry, Mathematics & Physics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 36 of 36 ... African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences ... statistics, operational research, financial mathematics and about the annexes ... research work in all areas of mathematical sciences and application at all ...

  12. Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry: Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-17

    The chemical behavior of radioactive elements can differ from conventional wisdom because the number of atoms can be unusually small. Kinetic effects and unusual oxidation states are phenomena that make radiochemistry different from conventional analytic chemistry. The procedures developed at Los Alamos are designed to minimize these effects and provide reproducible results over a wide range of sample types. The analysis of nuclear debris has the additional complication of chemical fractionation and the incorporation of environmental contaminants. These are dealt with through the use of three component isotope ratios and the use of appropriate end members.

  13. Transactinide nuclear chemistry at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagame, Y.; Haba, H.; Tsukada, K.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear chemistry study of trans actinide elements in Japan is currently being in progress at JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute). We have developed new experimental apparatuses: a beam-line safety system for the usage of the gas-jet coupled radioactive 248 Cm target chamber, a rotating wheel catcher apparatus for the measurement of α and spontaneous fission decay of the transactinides, MANON (Measurement system for Alpha particles and spontaneous fission events ON line), and an automated rapid chemical separation apparatus based on the high performance liquid chromatography, AIDA (Automated Ion exchange separation system coupled with the Detection apparatus for Alpha spectroscopy). The transactinide nuclei, 261 Rf and 262 Db, have been successfully produced via the reactions of 248 Cm( 18 O,5n) and 248 Cm( 19 F,5n), respectively, and the excitation functions for each reaction have been measured to evaluate the optimum irradiation condition for the production of these nuclei. The maximum cross sections in each reaction were 13 nb at the 18 O beam energy of 94-MeV and 1.5 Nb at the 103-MeV 19 F beam energy. On-line ion exchange experiments of Rf together with the lighter homologues Zr and Hf in the HCl, HNO 3 and HF solutions with AIDA have been carried out, and the results clearly show that the behavior of Rf is typical of the group-4 element. Relativistic molecular orbital calculations of the chloride and nitrate complexes of tetravalent Rf are also being performed to gain an understanding of the complex chemistry. Prospects and some recent experimental results for the nuclear chemistry study of the transactinide elements at JAERI are discussed. (author)

  14. The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.; Gallant, A.; Joiner, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry (http://livingtextbook.orst.edu) is a website, which is a collection of supplemental materials for the teaching of nuclear and radiochemistry. It contains audio-video presentations of the history of nuclear chemistry, tutorial lectures by recognized experts on advanced topics in nuclear and radiochemistry, links to data compilations, articles, and monographs, an audio course on radiochemistry, on-line editions of textbooks, training videos, etc. All content has been refereed. (author)

  15. Analytical chemistry of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed an enormous development in chemical analysis. The rapid progress of nuclear energy, of solid-state physics and of other fields of modern industry has extended the concept of purity to limits previously unthought of, and to reach the new dimensions of these extreme demands, entirely new techniques have been invented and applied and old ones have been refined. Recognizing these facts, the International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Panel on Analytical Chemistry of Nuclear Materials to discuss the general problems facing the analytical chemist engaged in nuclear energy development, particularly in newly developing centre and countries, to analyse the represent situation and to advise as to the directions in which research and development appear to be most necessary. The Panel also discussed the analytical programme of the Agency's laboratory at Seibersdorf, where the Agency has already started a programme of international comparison of analytical methods which may lead to the establishment of international standards for many materials of interest. Refs and tabs

  16. An introduction to serious nuclear accident chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Russell St. John Foreman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of the chemistry occurring inside a nuclear power plant during a serious reactor accident is presented. This includes some aspects of the behavior of nuclear fuel, its cladding, cesium and iodine. This review concentrates on the chemistry of an accident in a water-cooled reactor loaded with uranium dioxide or mixed metal oxide fuel.

  17. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  18. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities

  19. Past and present trends of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matel, L.; Kuruc, J.

    2007-01-01

    This book represents not only the papers and lectures presented on the Seminar at the occasion of forty years of foundation of the Department of Nuclear Chemistry which took place on October 3 - 5, 2006 in Kezmarske Zlaby (High Tatras). It also contains the papers and presentations of post-graduate students and workers of the Department of Nuclear Chemistry as well as colleagues working in different field of nuclear chemistry and radioecology on various workplaces in the Slovak Republic, too. The book contains 17 papers, 15 presentations, photographs and 3 short video recording

  20. Technetium in chemistry and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, E.; Nicolini, M.; Wagner, H.N.

    1983-01-01

    This volume explores the potential of technetium radiopharmaceuticals in clinical nuclear medicine. The authors examine the capabilities of synthetic inorganic chemists to synthesize technetium radiopharmaceuticals and the specific requirements of the nuclear medicine practitioner. Sections cover the chemistry of technetium, the production of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium, and the use of technetium radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine

  1. Mathematics Models in Chemistry--An Innovation for Non-Mathematics and Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Agnes M.; Zurbach, E. Peter

    2004-01-01

    The intention of this article is to present a year-long interdisciplinary course, Mathematical Models in Chemistry. The course is comprised of eleven units, each of which has both a mathematical and a chemical component. A syllabus of the course is given and the format of the class is explained. The interaction of the professors and the content is…

  2. Developments in nuclear power plant water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzetti, K.; Wood, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper illustrates the changing role of water chemistry in current operation of nuclear power plants. Water chemistry was sometimes perceived as the cause of materials problems, such as denting in PWR steam generators and intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWRs. However, starting in the last decade, new chemistry options have been introduced to mitigate stress corrosion cracking and reduce fuel performance concerns. In BWRs and PWRs alike, water chemistry has evolved to successfully mitigate many problems as they have developed. The increasing complexity of the chemistry alternatives, coupled with the pressures to increase output and reduce costs, have demonstrated the need for new approaches to managing plant chemistry, which are addressed in the final part of this paper. (orig.)

  3. Mathematics in Chemistry: Indeterminate Forms and Their Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segurado, Manuel A. P.; Silva, Margarida F. B.; Castro, Rita

    2011-01-01

    The mathematical language and its tools are complementary to the formalism in chemistry, in particular at an advanced level. It is thus crucial, for its understanding, that students acquire a solid knowledge in Calculus and that they know how to apply it. The frequent occurrence of indeterminate forms in multiple areas, particularly in Physical…

  4. Nuclear chemistry and Radiochemistry in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry are very young sciences which developed at an extremely brisk pace within a very short period of time after the discovery of nuclear fission in 1938, and caused profound societal changes. In the United States, nuclear chemistry developed very differently from Germany, where nuclear research initially had been banned after the Second World War. The prime mover in the development in the United States was the Manhattan Project, the construction of the atomic bomb. The counteract the impending shortage of qualified personnel, important institutions have begun to establish training and support programs in the field. The National Laboratories in the United States introduced a National Security Internship Program, while the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tries to promote cooperation, and thus the training of personnel, by launching programs of its own. Yet, a greater shortage of qualified personnel is becoming apparent. The situation of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry in the United States can be summarized in the finding that research at the National Laboratories is very wide ranging. It receives sufficient funds from the DOE. However, the National Laboratories show a very high proportion of elderly personnel, a problem which will have to be corrected in the years to come. This may be helped by the Summer Schools financed by the DOE, though a summer school of six weeks cannot replace a sound training in nuclear chemistry of the kind still to be found in Germany. (orig.) [de

  5. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Highlights were: 1. Fission product release: benchmark calculations for severe nuclear accidents; 2. Thermochemical data for reactor materials and fission products; 3. thermochemical calculations on fuel of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; 4. Formation of organic tellurides during nuclear accidents?; 5. Reaction of tellurium with Zircaloy-4; 6. Transmutation of fission products; 7. The thermal conductivity of high-burnup UO 2 fuel; 8. Tritium retention in graphite. (orig./HP)

  6. Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, R.R.

    1981-05-01

    This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research

  7. Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1981-05-01

    This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  8. Importance of nuclear power for chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotyrkin, J.

    1982-01-01

    Examples are given of the use of ionizing radiations in nuclear chemistry, in radiation cross-linking of polymers. The possibilities are also indicated of applications in the disinfection of wastes, in fertilizer production and packaging, in the production of cellulose and hydrogen. The implementation of the said technologies depends on the solution of a number organizational problems. (J.B.)

  9. Separation chemistry for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Condamines, N.; Cuillerdier, C.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the actinide and Lanthanide extraction chemistry by N,N-dialkylamides and N,N'-tetraalkylamides is given. It includes the extraction equilibria of inorganic acids. The prospects of using these completely incinerable extractants in the nuclear fuels cycle is discussed

  10. Nuclear chemistry research for the safe disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanghaenel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is of key importance for the future sustainable development of nuclear energy. Concepts foresee the isolation of the nuclear waste in deep geological formations. The long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste is dominated by plutonium and the minor actinides. Hence it is essential for the performance assessment of a nuclear waste disposal to understand the chemical behaviour of actinides in a repository system. The aqueous chemistry and thermodynamics of actinides is rather complex in particular due to their very rich redox chemistry. Recent results of our detailed study of the Plutonium and Neptunium redox - and complexation behaviour are presented and discussed. (author)

  11. Chemistry aided nuclear physics studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Even, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the superheavy elements bring several challenges through low production yields, short half-lives, and high background rates. This paper describes the possibilities of chemical separations as techniques to overcome the background problematic and to investigate the nuclear properties of the

  12. An overview of the teaching of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1993-01-01

    Subjective remarks by the author on teaching of nuclear chemistry are presented. A historical overview of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry education and research as well as an outline of their prospects are given. (R.P.)

  13. An ideal teaching program of nuclear chemistry in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenak, T.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that several reports on the common educational problems of nuclear chemistry have been prepared by certain groups of experts from time to time. According to very important statements in these reports, nuclear chemistry and related courses generally do not take sufficient importance in undergraduate chemistry curricula and it was generally proposed that nuclear chemistry and related courses should be introduced into undergraduate chemistry curricula at universities worldwide. Starting from these statements, an ideal program in an undergraduate chemistry curriculum was proposed to be introduced into the undergraduate chemistry program at the Department of Chemistry, Ege University, in Izmir, Turkey during the regular updating of the chemistry curriculum. Thus, it has been believed that this Department of Chemistry has recently gained an ideal teaching program in the field of nuclear chemistry and its applications in scientific, industrial, and medical sectors. In this contribution, the details of this program will be discussed. (author)

  14. Vitrification chemistry and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vitrification of nuclear waste offers unique challenges to the glass technologist. The waste contains 50 or 60 elements, and often varies widely in composition. Most of these elements are seldom encountered in processing commercial glasses. The melter to vitrify the waste must be able to tolerate these variations in composition, while producing a durable glass. This glass must be produced without releasing hazardous radionuclides to the environment during any step of the vitrification process. Construction of a facility to convert the nearly 30 million gallons of high-level nuclear waste at the Savannah River Plant into borosilicate glass began in late 1983. In developing the vitrification process, the Savannah River Laboratory has had to overcome all of these challenges to the glass technologist. Advances in understanding in three areas have been crucial to our success: oxidation-reduction phenomena during glass melting; the reaction between glass and natural wastes; and the causes of foaming during glass melting

  15. Chemistry of nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, E.

    1981-01-01

    In extractive purification of the low-enriched uranium fuel element (UO 2 -particle fuel element with SiC coating) no problems arise in the PUREX-process which have not already been solved when reprocessing LWR-type reactor and breeder fuel elements. Concerning the HTR-type reactor fuel elements containing thorium, there are two process cycles behind the head end; the pure U-235 is reprocessed in the same manner as the low-enriched uranium fuel, and the thorium, which is the bigger fraction, is reprocessed together with U-233 in the same manner as the mixed oxides. Only the CO 2 -off gas system, which contains krypton and carbon 14, leads to difficulties in nuclear waste disposal. (DG) [de

  16. Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, R.R.

    1982-05-01

    This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research

  17. Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

    1982-05-01

    This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  18. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    The INCT 2002 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators

  19. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    The INCT 2002 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators.

  20. Chemistry of nuclear resources, technology, and waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, O.L. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Chemistry is being called on today to obtain useful results in areas that have been found very difficult for it in the past, but new instrumentation and new theories are allowing much progress. The area of hydrolytic phenomena and colloid chemistry, as exemplified by the plutonium polymer problem, is clearly entering a new phase in which it can be studied in a much more controlled and understandable manner. The same is true of the little studied interfacial regions, where so much important chemistry occurs in solvent extraction and other systems. The studies of the adsorption phenomena on clays are an illustration of the new and useful modeling of geochemical phenomena that is now possible. And finally, the chemist is called upon to participate in the developement and evaluation of models for nuclear waste isolation requiring extrapolations of hundreds to hundreds of thousands of years into the future. It is shown that chemistry may be useful in keeping the extrapolations in the shorter time spans, and also in selecting the best materials for containment. 36 figures

  1. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This report describes some of the major research and development programs of the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division during FY 1988. The report includes articles on weapons chemistry, biochemistry and nuclear medicine, nuclear structure and reactions, and the INC Division facilities and laboratories

  2. Research in nuclear chemistry: current status and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.V.R.

    2007-01-01

    Research in nuclear chemistry has seen a huge growth over the last few decades. The large umbrella of nuclear chemistry includes several research areas such as nuclear fission, reactions, spectroscopy, nuclear probes and nuclear analytical techniques. Currently, nuclear chemistry research has extended its horizon into various applications like nuclear medicine, isotopes for understanding physico chemical processes, and addressing environmental and biomedical problems. Tremendous efforts are going on for synthesizing new elements (isotopes), isolating physically or chemically wherever possible and investigating their properties. Theses studies are useful to understand nuclear and chemical properties at extreme ends of instability. In addition, nuclear chemists are making substantial contribution to astrophysics and other related areas. During this talk, a few of the contributions made by nuclear chemistry group of BARC will be discussed and possible future areas of research will be enumerated. (author)

  3. LAMPF nuclear chemistry data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesler, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The LAMPF Nuclear Chemistry Data Acquisition System (DAS) is designed to provide both real-time control of data acquisition and facilities for data processing for a large variety of users. It consists of a PDP-11/44 connected to a parallel CAMAC branch highway as well as to a large number of peripherals. The various types of radiation counters and spectrometers and their connections to the system will be described. Also discussed will be the various methods of connection considered and their advantages and disadvantages. The operation of the system from the standpoint of both hardware and software will be described as well as plans for the future

  4. Nuclear analytical chemistry: recent developments and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent R and D studies on Nuclear Analytical Chemistry utilizing techniques like Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Prompt Gamma-ray NAA (PGNAA), Particle Induced Gamma Ray and X-Ray Emission (PICE/PIXE) for compositional analysis of materials have been summarized. The work includes developments and applications of (i) single comparator NAA, called as k 0 -NAA, (ii) k 0 -based internal monostandard NAA (IM-NAA), (iii) k 0 -based prompt gamma ray NAA (PGNAA) and (iv) instrumental NAA using thermal and epithermal neutrons and (v) PIGE and PIXE methods using proton beam for low Z and medium Z elements, respectively. (author)

  5. American Chemical Society. Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The meeting of the 201st American Chemical Society Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology was comprised from a variety of topics in this field including: nuclear chemistry, nuclear physics, and nuclear techniques for environmental studies. Particular emphasis was given to fundamental research concerning nuclear structure (seven of the nineteen symposia) and studies of airborne particle monitoring and transport (five symposia). 105 papers were presented

  6. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The report is the collection of short communications being the review of the scientific activity of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology - Warsaw in 1997. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics; radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general; radiobiology; nuclear technologies and methods. The annual report of INCT-1997 contains also the general information about INCT as well as the full list of scientific papers being published by the staff in 1997

  7. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    The INCT 2001 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators and nuclear analytical methods

  8. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The report is the collection of short communications being the review of the scientific activity of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology - Warsaw in 1997. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics; radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general; radiobiology; nuclear technologies and methods. The annual report of INCT-1997 contains also the general information about INCT as well as the full list of scientific papers being published by the staff in 1997

  9. Annual Report 2004 of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalik, J; Smulek, W; Godlewska-Para, E [eds.

    2005-06-01

    The INCT 2004 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators, radiobiology and nuclear analytical methods.

  10. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The INCT 2001 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators and nuclear analytical methods.

  11. Annual Report 2004 of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Smulek, W.; Godlewska-Para, E.

    2005-06-01

    The INCT 2004 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators, radiobiology and nuclear analytical methods

  12. Using Mathematical Software to Introduce Fourier Transforms in Physical Chemistry to Develop Improved Understanding of Their Applications in Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tierney C.; Richardson, John N.; Kegerreis, Jeb S.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript presents an exercise that utilizes mathematical software to explore Fourier transforms in the context of model quantum mechanical systems, thus providing a deeper mathematical understanding of relevant information often introduced and treated as a "black-box" in analytical chemistry courses. The exercise is given to…

  13. The chemistry of nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiles, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    About one-fifth of the world's supply of energy is derived from nuclear fission. While this important source of power avoids the environmental and resource problems of most other fuels, and although nuclear accident statistics are much less alarming, no other peacetime technology has evoked such public disquiet and impassioned feeling. Central to dealing with these fears is the management and disposal of radioactive waste. An expert Canadian panel in 1977 recommended permanent disposal of wastes in deep geological formations, providing a basis for subsequent policies and research. In 1988, the Federal Environmental Assessment Review Office (FEARO) appointed a panel to assess the proposed disposal concepts and to recommend government policy. The panel in turn appointed a Scientific Review Group to examine the underlying science. Behind all these issues lay one central question: How well is the chemistry understood? This became the principal concern of Professor Donald Wiles, the senior nuclear chemist of the Scientific Review Group. In this book, Dr. Wiles carefully describes the nature of radioactivity and of nuclear power and discusses in detail the management of radioactive waste by the multi-barrier system, but also takes an unusual approach to assessing the risks. Using knowledge of the chemical properties of the various radionuclides in spent fuel, this book follows each of the important radionuclides as it travels through the many barriers placed in its path. It turns out that only two radionuclides are able to reach the biosphere, and they arrive at the earth's surface only after many thousands of years. A careful analysis of the critical points of the disposal plan emphasizes site rejection criteria and other stages at which particular care must be taken, demonstrating how dangers can be anticipated and putting to rest the fear of nuclear fuel waste and its geological burial

  14. Embedded Mathematics in Chemistry: A Case Study of Students' Attitudes and Mastery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preininger, Anita M.

    2017-02-01

    There are many factors that shape students' attitudes toward science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This exploratory study of high school students examined the effect of enriching chemistry with math on chemistry students' attitudes toward math and careers involving math. To measure student attitudes, a survey was administered before and after the 18-week chemistry class; results from the chemistry class were compared to survey results from students in an elective science class that did not emphasize mathematics. At the end of the 18-week period, only the chemistry students exhibited more positive views toward their abilities in mathematics and careers that involve mathematics, as compared to their views at the outset of the course. To ensure that chemistry mastery was not hindered by the additional emphasis on math, and that mastery on state end-of-course examinations reflected knowledge acquired during the math-intensive chemistry class, a chemistry progress test was administered at the start and end of the term. This exploratory study suggests that emphasizing mathematical approaches in chemistry may positively influence attitudes toward math in general, as well as foster mastery of chemistry content.

  15. Applied mathematical methods in nuclear thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransom, V.H.; Trapp, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Applied mathematical methods are used extensively in modeling of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic behavior. This application has required significant extension to the state-of-the-art. The problems encountered in modeling of two-phase fluid transients and the development of associated numerical solution methods are reviewed and quantified using results from a numerical study of an analogous linear system of differential equations. In particular, some possible approaches for formulating a well-posed numerical problem for an ill-posed differential model are investigated and discussed. The need for closer attention to numerical fidelity is indicated

  16. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    The INCT 1999 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics and nucleonic control systems and accelerators

  17. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-01

    The INCT 1999 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics and nucleonic control systems and accelerators.

  18. Underlying chemistry research for the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Sagert, N.H.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Taylor, P.

    1984-04-01

    This document reviews the underlying chemistry research part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, carried out in the Research Chemistry Branch. This research is concerned with developing the basic chemical knowledge and under-standing required in other parts of the Program. There are four areas of underlying research: Waste Form Chemistry, Solute and Solution Chemistry, Rock-Water-Waste Interactions, and Abatement and Monitoring of Gas-Phase Radionuclides

  19. The Nuclear and Radiochemistry in Chemistry Education Curriculum Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.D.; Missouri University, Columbia, MO; Kleppinger, E.W.

    2005-01-01

    Given the mismatch between supply of and demand for nuclear scientists, education in nuclear and radiochemistry has become a serious concern. The Nuclear and Radiochemistry in Chemistry Education (NRIChEd) Curriculum Project was undertaken to reintroduce the topics normally covered in a one-semester radiochemistry course into the traditional courses of a four-year chemistry major: general chemistry, organic chemistry, quantitative and instrumental analysis, and physical chemistry. NRIChEd uses a three-pronged approach that incorporates radiochemistry topics when related topics in the basic courses are covered, presents special topics of general interest as a vehicle for teaching nuclear and radiochemistry alongside traditional chemistry, and incorporates the use of non-licensed amounts of radioactive substances in demonstrations and student laboratory experiments. This approach seeks not only to reestablish nuclear science in the chemistry curriculum, but to use it as a tool for elucidating fundamental and applied aspects of chemistry as well. Moreover, because of its relevance in many academic areas, nuclear science enriches the chemistry curriculum by encouraging interdisciplinary thinking and problem solving. (author)

  20. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, G.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2)

  1. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  2. Mathematical analysis of compressive/tensile molecular and nuclear structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dayu

    Mathematical analysis in chemistry is a fascinating and critical tool to explain experimental observations. In this dissertation, mathematical methods to present chemical bonding and other structures for many-particle systems are discussed at different levels (molecular, atomic, and nuclear). First, the tetrahedral geometry of single, double, or triple carbon-carbon bonds gives an unsatisfying demonstration of bond lengths, compared to experimental trends. To correct this, Platonic solids and Archimedean solids were evaluated as atoms in covalent carbon or nitrogen bond systems in order to find the best solids for geometric fitting. Pentagonal solids, e.g. the dodecahedron and icosidodecahedron, give the best fit with experimental bond lengths; an ideal pyramidal solid which models covalent bonds was also generated. Second, the macroscopic compression/tension architectural approach was applied to forces at the molecular level, considering atomic interactions as compressive (repulsive) and tensile (attractive) forces. Two particle interactions were considered, followed by a model of the dihydrogen molecule (H2; two protons and two electrons). Dihydrogen was evaluated as two different types of compression/tension structures: a coaxial spring model and a ring model. Using similar methods, covalent diatomic molecules (made up of C, N, O, or F) were evaluated. Finally, the compression/tension model was extended to the nuclear level, based on the observation that nuclei with certain numbers of protons/neutrons (magic numbers) have extra stability compared to other nucleon ratios. A hollow spherical model was developed that combines elements of the classic nuclear shell model and liquid drop model. Nuclear structure and the trend of the "island of stability" for the current and extended periodic table were studied.

  3. Development of Database and Lecture Book for Nuclear Water Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, Wan Young; Kim, U. C.; Na, J. W.; Choi, B. S.; Lee, E. H.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, K. M.; Kim, S. H.; Im, K. S.

    2010-02-01

    In order to establish a systematic and synthetic knowledge system of nuclear water chemistry, we held nuclear water chemistry experts group meetings. We discussed the way of buildup and propagation of nuclear water chemistry knowledge with domestic experts. We obtained a lot of various opinions that made the good use of this research project. The results will be applied to continuous buildup of domestic nuclear water chemistry knowledge database. Lessons in water chemistry of nuclear power plants (NPPs) have been opened in Nuclear Training and education Center, KAERI to educate the new generation who are working and will be working at the department of water chemistry of NPPs. The lessons were 17 and lesson period was from 12th May through 5th November. In order to progress the programs, many water chemistry experts were invited. They gave lectures to the younger generation once a week for 2 h about their experiences obtained during working on water chemistry of NPPs. The number of attendance was 290. The lessons were very effective and the lesson data will be used to make database for continuous use

  4. Chemistry for the nuclear energy of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry - radiochemistry, radiation chemistry and nuclear chemical engineering play a very important role in the nuclear power development. Even at present, the offered technology is well developed, but still several improvements are needed and proposed. These developments concern all stages of the technology; front end, reactor operation (coolant chemistry and installation components decontamination, noble gas release control), back end of fuel cycle, etc. Chemistry for a partitioning and a transmutation is a new challenge for the chemists and chemical engineers. The IV th generation of nuclear reactors cannot be developed without chemical solutions for fuel fabrication, radiation-coolants interaction phenomena understanding and spent fuel/waste treatment technologies elaboration. Radiochemical analytical methods are fundamental for radioecological monitoring of radioisotopes of natural and anthropological origin. This paper addresses just a few subjects and is not a detailed overview of the field, however it illustrates a role of chemistry for a safe and economical nuclear power development. (author)

  5. In-serviceMathematics and Chemistry Teachers’ Preparednessfor Mathematics and Chemistry Courses at the University of Botswana: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesego Tawana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research study’s aim was to track the paths of chemistry and mathematics in-service students studying for a degree at the University of Botswana who seemed to struggle with degree level concepts in their respective programmes despite holding diplomas in their fields. The authors are lecturers of both methodology and content courses in science and mathematics who became concerned about the seeminglyunderpreparedness of most in-service students for degree courses over the years. The study can be located within a social structuralist theoretical perspective where learning is viewed as a social entity, social structure referring to the ways people are interrelated or interdependent within their cultural mores as is the norm in an academic setting. The research team identified four categories of operational challenges that the students are most likely to face as university leaners, namely academic, social and emotional, economic and environmental challenges and these formed the basis on which the data collection process ensued. The qualitative methods paradigm was found to appropriate and the study was conducted within the framework of an action research approach. A qualitative research was relevant to the study because it had the capacity to enable the researchers to identify the cognitive views held by in-service students and the meanings they made of their experiences concerning their studies or the program (Hancock, 2004. The research sought to identify where the identified challenges emanated from with a view to make those involved in the academic paths of these learners to take heed of their problems. The study found that in-service learners are faced with all sorts of problems including lack of accommodation on campus, uncooperative lecturers, the university system which lumps them together with pre-service students making them academic prisoners, large class sizes which render learning a near impossibility for some, and the fast

  6. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

    1984-05-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

  7. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes

  8. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.H.

    1985-04-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1984 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques: development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes. 287 refs

  9. Advanced chemistry management system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Katsuji; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Nagasawa, Katsumi

    2000-01-01

    Chemistry control in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant has a close relationship with radiation field buildup, fuel reliability, integrity of plant components and materials, performance of the water treatment systems and radioactive waste generation. Chemistry management in BWR plants has become more important in order to maintain and enhance plant reliability. Adequate chemistry control and management are also essential to establish, maintain, and enhance plant availability. For these reasons, we have developed the advanced chemistry management system for nuclear power plants in order to effectively collect and evaluate a large number of plant operating and chemistry data. (author)

  10. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of scientific activity of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), Warsaw, in 1995. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (15); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (23); radiobiology (7); nuclear technologies and methods (21); nucleonic control systems (5). The Annual Report of INCT - 1995 contains also a general information about the staff and organization of the Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, thesis and list of projects granted by Polish and international organizations

  11. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    Actual edition of Annual Report is a full review of scientific activities of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), Warsaw, in 1998. The abstracts are presented in the following group of subjects: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies (26); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (25); radiobiology (11); nuclear technologies and methods - process engineering (5); material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics (9); nucleonic control systems (7). The edition also included the list of INCT scientific publications and patents as well as information on conferences organized or co-organized by the INCT in 1998

  12. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of scientific activity of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), Warsaw, in 1995. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (15); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (23); radiobiology (7); nuclear technologies and methods (21); nucleonic control systems (5). The Annual Report of INCT - 1995 contains also a general information about the staff and organization of the Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, thesis and list of projects granted by Polish and international organizations.

  13. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of scientific activity of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), Warsaw, in 1995. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (15); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (23); radiobiology (7); nuclear technologies and methods (21); nucleonic control systems (5). The Annual Report of INCT - 1995 contains also a general information about the staff and organization of the Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, thesis and list of projects granted by Polish and international organizations.

  14. Department of Nuclear Physical Chemistry - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeglewski, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Research in the Department of Nuclear Physical Chemistry concentrates on three main topics: 1. Radiochemistry of transactinide elements; 2. Environmental radioactivity and related problems; 3. Preparation and applications of radioactive isotopes. The investigations on radiochemistry of transactinide elements are carried out in the Laboratory of Chemistry and Radiochemistry. Practical difficulties due to short half-lives and very low cross sections of formation of the superheavy nuclei are being overcome by developing fast and efficient methods of chemical separation, basing mostly on ion-exchange processes which are thoroughly studied via model experiments on lighter homologues of the elements of interest. During the year 2001, work with composite ferrocyanide sorbents was continued, and the efforts resulted in a patent application. The developed ion-exchangers (whose characteristics are constantly checked and improved in the laboratory) can find practical applications in environmental protection as well as in fundamental studies on the most exotic elements: 104 Rf, 105 Db, 106 Sg, 107 Bh, 108 Hs, and more. As to the latter, the discovery in Dubna of the relatively long-lived element 114 (t 1/2 =30s) gives hope that studies on aqueous chemistry of the elements Z =107 would be feasible. In this context, chemical methods of separation and identification of the heaviest elements are necessary to know the behaviour of the whole decay chains, for example: 114 -α-112 -α-110 -α-108 -α-106. The group is contributing its expertise to the top specialist international co-operation, involving the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia, the Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, and three German institutions: the Technical University of Dresden, the University of Mainz, and the GSI Darmstadt. The Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory is following up traces of α, β, and γ radioactive

  15. Department of Nuclear Physical Chemistry - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petelenz, B.

    1999-01-01

    In the Laboratory of Chemistry and Radiochemistry, research on chemistry of the transactinide elements 104(Rf), 105(Db) and 106(Sg) in model systems with their homologs (Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, Mo, and W) was continued, and studies on ion-exchange and extraction behaviour of Tc, Re and Os as homologs of Bh(107) and Hs(108) were started. Basing on the law of periodicity, conditions for separation of superheavy elements Rf, Sg, and Bh were adjusted. A particularly important achievement was participation of our group in the third experiment in the world on aqueous chemistry of Sg, performed in the summer 1998 in GSI Darmstadt. The Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory, was continuing non-stop records of the ground-level atmospheric radioactivity. Besides, Pu content was determined in two-years collection of rainwater samples. An air monitoring station was recently equipped with a prototype γ-spectrometric scintillation system which, modem-coupled with the central server, will be tested in the Laboratory. For ultra-low-background measurements a muonic chamber was designed and made, and new spectrometer's background was recorded in various shielding configurations. Research on α-active and γ-active environmental contaminants in Antarctic samples, supplied by the Institute of Botany of the Jagiellonian University, resulted in an M.Sc. thesis defended in June 1998. Other cooperations of the Laboratory in 1998 have been the following: a) determination of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in wild animals bones (Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Technical University, Budapest, Hungary and Medical Academy, Bialystok, Poland); b) PIXE determinations of trace elements in ASS-500 air filters (Department 2 of the Institute) and mineralogical studies of collected dusts (Institute of Geological Sciences, Jagiellonian University and the Institute of Geography, Pedagogical University, Cracow); c) a-spectrometric determination of radium isotopes in river waters and bottom sediments (Institute of Geography

  16. Nuclear chemistry counting facilities: requirements definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, D.W.; Baker, J.

    1979-01-01

    In an effort to upgrade outdated instrumentation and to take advantage of current and imminent technologies the Nuclear Chemistry Division at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is about to undertake a major upgrade of their low level radiation counting and analysis facilities. It is expected that such a project will make a more coordinated data acquisition and data processing system, reduce manual data handling operations and speed up data processing throughput. Before taking on a systems design it is appropriate to establish a definition of the requirements of the facilities. This report examines why such a project is necessary in the context of the current and projected operations, needs, problems, risks and costs. The authors also address a functional specification as a prelude to a system design and the design constraints implicit in the systems implementation. Technical, operational and economic assessments establish necessary boundary conditions for this discussion. This report also establishes the environment in which the requirements definition may be considered valid. The validity of these analyses is contingent on known and projected technical, scientific and political conditions

  17. Department of Nuclear Physical Chemistry - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeglowski, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In the Laboratory of Chemistry and Radiochemistry, research on chemical properties of super heavy elements Rf, Db and Sg, in model systems with their homologs Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, Mo and W in aqueous solutions, was continued. The main subject of study was sorption of these elements on ion exchange resins, on ferrocyanide sorbents and on liquid anion exchanger Aliquat 336. Simultaneously, experiments on ion exchange behaviour of Tc and Re as homologs of Bh (Z =107) and of Os as that of Hs (Z =108) in the online and offline systems were carried out. Experiments with Hg and Pb as analogs of elements Z=112 and Z=114, started only in 1999, resulted in elaboration of a very fast continuous method for isolation of short-lived (t 1/2 ≥ 3 s) mercury isotopes. The above studies were performed in cooperation with the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia, the Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, the Technical University of Dresden, Germany, the University of Mainz, Germany and the GSI Darmstadt, Germany. The Laboratory of Environmental Radioactivity was continuing two main directions of their activities: weekly reports on continuous monitoring of the ground level air and research on the environmental radioactivity. The results of six years of systematic measurements of long-lived γ-emitters present in the ground level air were the subject of a PhD thesis defended in May 1999. The main project in the Laboratory in 1999 was that on accumulation of Pu, Am, Cm, Sr and Eu isotopes in bones of wild herbivorous animals. Its major part, devoted to the α-emitters, has been completed. Another important research (performed in collaboration with the Nuclear Spectroscopy Department of the Institute) concerned development of a method for determination of high-energy pure β - emitters via measurement of Bremsstrahlung photons produced on a metal absorber of optimised thickness. The Laboratory was also

  18. Report of scientific results 1976. Section nuclear chemistry and reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The report of the section Nuclear Chemistry and Reactor presents the results of R and D in the fields of neutron scattering, radiation damage in solids, reactor chemistry, trace elements research in biomedicine, geochemistry, reactor operation, radioisotope production, and gives a survey of publications and lectures. (HK) [de

  19. An overview of the teaching of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaborg, G.I.

    1990-01-01

    Otto Hahn's book, Applied Radiochemistry, published in 1936, marked the author's entry into this field. Notes concerning a lecture course, An Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry, given during the summer of 1942 at the University of Chicago, as an introduction to the Plutonium Project of the Manhattan District, were widely distributed for use by participants in the Project. Nuclear chemistry courses, undergraduate and graduate, instigated at Berkeley in 1946, were taken by large numbers of students many of who became pioneers in the field. Noteworthy is Friedlander's and Kennedy's 1949 textbook, Introduction to Radiochemistry (and subsequent revisions). These courses and this book serve as typical examples, many other such courses were taught and books published during the intervening years. More recently the Department of Energy Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry (for high school students) at San Jose State University has helped to revive student interest in nuclear chemistry

  20. Accelerators and nuclear reactors as tools in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, L.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics of accelerators and of nuclear reactors - the latter to a lesser extent - are discussed in view of their present and future use in hot atom chemistry research and its applications. (author)

  1. Current status of neutron activation analysis and applied nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of recent scientometric studies of citations and publication data shows the present state of NAA and applied nuclear chemistry as compared to other analytical techniques. (author) 9 refs.; 7 tabs

  2. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1990, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.; Minahan, M.

    1991-06-01

    This report describes some of the major research and development programs of the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division during FY 1990. The report includes articles on weapons chemistry, environmental chemistry, actinide and transition metal chemistry, geochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, biochemistry and nuclear medicine, materials chemistry, and INC Division facilities and laboratories

  3. A Study of Coordination Between Mathematics and Chemistry in the Pre-Technical Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Roger A.

    This research was undertaken to determine whether the mathematics course offered to students taking courses in chemical technology was adequate. Students in a regular class and an experimental class were given mathematics and chemistry pretests and posttests. The experimental class was taught using a syllabus designed to maximize the coherence…

  4. Proceedings of 26. annual academic conference of China Chemical Society--modern nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    26. annual academic conference of China Chemical Society was held in Tianjing, 13-16 July, 2008. This proceedings is about modern nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry, the contents include: new elements and new nuclides; advanced nuclear chemistry; radiochemistry and national security; new radiopharmaceutical chemistry; modern radiological analytical chemistry and large scientific facilities; radiological environmental chemistry and nuclear radioactive waste; actinide chemistry and transactinide chemistry; radiochemistry and cross discipline, etc.

  5. Qualifying works of the Department of nuclear chemistry (1963 - 2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this review qualifying works (theses - bachelor, master, PhD., DrSc., habilitation and inauguration theses) elaborated at the Department of nuclear chemistry, Faculty of Natural Chemistry, Comenius University in Bratislava during forty years (from origin of the Section of Nuclear chemistry in 1963 up to 2006 are presented. During this time, in totally, 3 bachelor theses, 265 master theses, 24 PhD. (CSc.) and 10 PhD. dissertanions, 2 DrSc. dissertanions as well as 8 habilitation and one inauguration these were defended (author)

  6. Research advancements and applications of carboranes in nuclear medicinal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wen; Wei Hongyuan; Luo Shunzhong

    2011-01-01

    Because of their uniquely high thermal and chemical stabilities, carboranes have become a subject of study with high interest in the chemistry of supra molecules, catalysts and radiopharmaceuticals. In recent years, the role of carboranes in nuclear medicinal chemistry has been diversified, from the traditional use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), to the clinical applications in molecular radio imaging and therapy. This paper provides an overview of the synthesis and characterization of carboranes and their applications in nuclear medicinal chemistry, with highlights of recent key advancements in the re- search areas of BNCT and radio imaging. (authors)

  7. Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies in nuclear energy chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, W.Q.; Yuan, L.Y.; Li, Z.J.; Lan, J.H.; Zhao, Y.L.; Chai, Z.F.

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid growth of human demands for nuclear energy and in response to the challenges of nuclear energy development, the world's major nuclear countries have started research and development work on advanced nuclear energy systems in which new materials and new technologies are considered to play important roles. Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies, which have gained extensive attention in recent years, have shown a wide range of application potentials in future nuclear energy system. In this review, the basic research progress in nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for advanced nuclear fuel fabrication, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, nuclear waste disposal and nuclear environmental remediation is selectively highlighted, with the emphasis on Chinese research achievements. In addition, the challenges and opportunities of nanomaterials and nanotechnologies in future advanced nuclear energy system are also discussed. (orig.)

  8. Mainz University, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry. Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, H.O.

    1994-03-01

    The report presents the results achieved by the Institute's five working groups in the following fields: Development of chemical separation processes, chemistry of ultraheavy elements; Developments in instrumentation; Nuclear fission and heavy ion reactions; Nuclear astrophysics, decay characteristics, structure of atoms and nuclei; Environmental pollution analysis. (orig./EF) [de

  9. 5. National Conference on Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuks, L.

    2009-01-01

    Held in Krakow-Przegorzaly (24-27 May 2009) 5. National Conference on Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry focused on the following research topics: (a) radioanalytical methods; (b) environmental studies; (c) radiopharmacy; (d) isotopic effects; (e) nuclear safety. Participants presented 6 plenary lectures, 24 communications and 38 posters

  10. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This annual report is a collection of short communications being a review of scientific activity of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw, Poland in 1994. The papers are gathered into several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (16 papers); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (17 papers); radiobiology (6 papers); nuclear technologies and methods (30 papers). The annual report of INCT-1994 contains also a general information about the Institute, the full list of papers published in 1994, information about Nukleonika - the International Journal of Nuclear Research being edited in INCT, the list of patent granted and patent applications in 1994, information about conferences organized by the Institute, the list of Ph.D. and D.Sc. finished in 1994 as well as the list of research projects and contracts being realized in INCT during 1994.

  11. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology annual report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This annual report is a collection of short communications being a review of scientific activity of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw, Poland in 1994. The papers are gathered into several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (16 papers); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (17 papers); radiobiology (6 papers); nuclear technologies and methods (30 papers). The annual report of INCT-1994 contains also a general information about the Institute, the full list of papers published in 1994, information about Nukleonika - the International Journal of Nuclear Research being edited in INCT, the list of patent granted and patent applications in 1994, information about conferences organized by the Institute, the list of Ph.D. and D.Sc. finished in 1994 as well as the list of research projects and contracts being realized in INCT during 1994

  12. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This annual report is a collection of short communications being a review of scientific activity of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw, Poland in 1994. The papers are gathered into several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (16 papers); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (17 papers); radiobiology (6 papers); nuclear technologies and methods (30 papers). The annual report of INCT-1994 contains also a general information about the Institute, the full list of papers published in 1994, information about Nukleonika - the International Journal of Nuclear Research being edited in INCT, the list of patent granted and patent applications in 1994, information about conferences organized by the Institute, the list of Ph.D. and D.Sc. finished in 1994 as well as the list of research projects and contracts being realized in INCT during 1994.

  13. Nuclear analytical chemistry 5. Tables, nomograms and schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolgyessy, J; Varga, S; Dillinger, P; Kyrs, M

    1976-01-01

    Tables, graphs and nomograms are given on aspects of nuclear analytical chemistry. The tables contain data on physical and chemical units and their conversion, exponential functions, the characteristics of radioactive nuclides, data on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter, data useful in measuring nuclear radiation, in scintillation and semiconductor spectrometry, activation analysis, data on masking reactions of ions in chemical separation, on extraction, ion exchange, accuracy in applying the method of isotope dilution, on radiochemical analysis.

  14. Application of mathematical morphology in discrimination nuclear track images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingxian; Ge Liangquan; Xiao Caijin

    2008-01-01

    Solid nuclear tracks test is an important and usual method in radioactivity test. But how to divide the overlapped tracks is the key of the processing of digital images of the nuclear tracks. Mathematical Morphology is used in processing of digital images of the nuclear tracks. As a result, the method has been programmed by c++ and used in experiments. It is successful in processing of digital images of the nuclear tracks. (authors)

  15. Advances in nuclear chemistry and its applications in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dela Rosa, Alumanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear chemistry was born almost 120 years ago with the discovery of radioactivity by Antoine Henry Becquerel in 1896. Nuclear chemistry is a subfield of chemistry that deals with radioactivity, nuclear reactions and processes, and nuclear properties. The composition of the nucleus and the changes that occur within the nucleus define the properties of the radioisotope and the nuclear reactions and processes it is involved in. Almost six decades ago, nuclear chemistry established its roots in the Philippines under the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission, presently the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The main areas of nuclear chemistry, namely, namely radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, radiation biology, and isotopic chemistry have been studies, and have found applications in food and agriculture, medicine and health, in idustry, and in the protection of the environment. Early work in nuclear chemistry utilized the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) for the production of radioisotopes which were used in either research or direct applications in food and agriculture, health and medicine, and industry. The PRR-1 provided neutrons for the non destructive multi element analysis of various samples using the neutron activation analysis technique. Radioactive materials as sources of ionizing radiation are being used extensively to study the chemical and biological effects of radiation on matter. Current studies involve the irradiation of certain plants and insects causing changes in their DNA which result in mutation for better crop varieties and sterility in insects for quarantine treatment and pest management. Radiation can modify the properties of polymers. Natural polymers such as carrageenan, chitosan and cellulose in abaca and water hyacinth fibers are subjected to gamma irradiation changing their properties and resulting in new products such as wound drressing, hemostatic agents, plant growth promoters, and metal-chelating agents. Radioisotopes are also

  16. Annual report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of the scientific activities of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw in 1996. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (17); Radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods,chemistry in general (20); radiobiology (9); nuclear technologies and methods (28).The last and biggest chapter has been divided in four smaller groups; process engineering; material engineering,structural studies,diagnostics; radiation technologies; nucleonic control systems. The annual report of INCT-1996 contains also a general information of Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, Ph.D. and D.Sc. thesis, a list of projects granted by Polish Committee of Scientific Research and other organizations.

  17. Annual report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of the scientific activities of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw in 1996. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (17); Radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods,chemistry in general (20); radiobiology (9); nuclear technologies and methods (28).The last and biggest chapter has been divided in four smaller groups; process engineering; material engineering,structural studies,diagnostics; radiation technologies; nucleonic control systems. The annual report of INCT-1996 contains also a general information of Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, Ph.D. and D.Sc. thesis, a list of projects granted by Polish Committee of Scientific Research and other organizations

  18. Handbook on process and chemistry on nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Asakura, Toshihide; Adachi, Takeo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; and others

    2001-12-01

    'Wet-type' nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, based on PUREX technology, has wide applicability as the principal reprocessing technology of the first generation, and relating technologies, waste management for example, are highly developed, too. It is quite important to establish a database summarizing fundamental information about the process and the chemistry of 'wet-type' reprocessing, because it contributes to establish and develop fuel reprocessing process and nuclear fuel cycle treating high burn-up UO{sub 2} fuel and spent MOX fuel, and to utilize 'wet-type' reprocessing technology much widely. This handbook summarizes the fundamental data on process and chemistry, which was collected and examined by 'Editing Committee of Handbook on Process and Chemistry of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing', from FY 1993 until FY 2000. (author)

  19. Handbook on process and chemistry on nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Asakura, Toshihide; Adachi, Takeo

    2001-12-01

    'Wet-type' nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, based on PUREX technology, has wide applicability as the principal reprocessing technology of the first generation, and relating technologies, waste management for example, are highly developed, too. It is quite important to establish a database summarizing fundamental information about the process and the chemistry of 'wet-type' reprocessing, because it contributes to establish and develop fuel reprocessing process and nuclear fuel cycle treating high burn-up UO 2 fuel and spent MOX fuel, and to utilize 'wet-type' reprocessing technology much widely. This handbook summarizes the fundamental data on process and chemistry, which was collected and examined by 'Editing Committee of Handbook on Process and Chemistry of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing', from FY 1993 until FY 2000. (author)

  20. Handbook on process and chemistry on nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki (ed.) [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Asakura, Toshihide; Adachi, Takeo (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-12-01

    'Wet-type' nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, based on PUREX technology, has wide applicability as the principal reprocessing technology of the first generation, and relating technologies, waste management for example, are highly developed, too. It is quite important to establish a database summarizing fundamental information about the process and the chemistry of 'wet-type' reprocessing, because it contributes to establish and develop fuel reprocessing process and nuclear fuel cycle treating high burn-up UO{sub 2} fuel and spent MOX fuel, and to utilize 'wet-type' reprocessing technology much widely. This handbook summarizes the fundamental data on process and chemistry, which was collected and examined by 'Editing Committee of Handbook on Process and Chemistry of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing', from FY 1993 until FY 2000. (author)

  1. Fission product chemistry in severe nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-09-01

    A specialist's meeting was held at JRC-Ispra from 15 to 17 January 1990 to review the current understanding of fission-product chemistry during severe accidents in light water reactors. Discussions focussed on the important chemical phenomena that could occur across the wide range of conditions of a damaged nuclear plant. Recommendations for future chemistry work were made covering the following areas: (a) fuel degradation and fission-product release, (b) transport and attenuation processes in the reactor coolant system, (c) containment chemistry (iodine behaviour and core-concrete interactions)

  2. MADNESS applied to density functional theory in chemistry and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fann, G I; Harrison, R J; Beylkin, G; Jia, J; Hartman-Baker, R; Shelton, W A; Sugiki, S

    2007-01-01

    We describe some recent mathematical results in constructing computational methods that lead to the development of fast and accurate multiresolution numerical methods for solving quantum chemistry and nuclear physics problems based on Density Functional Theory (DFT). Using low separation rank representations of functions and operators in conjunction with representations in multiwavelet bases, we developed a multiscale solution method for integral and differential equations and integral transforms. The Poisson equation, the Schrodinger equation, and the projector on the divergence free functions provide important examples with a wide range of applications in computational chemistry, nuclear physics, computational electromagnetic and fluid dynamics. We have implemented this approach along with adaptive representations of operators and functions in the multiwavelet basis and low separation rank (LSR) approximation of operators and functions. These methods have been realized and implemented in a software package called Multiresolution Adaptive Numerical Evaluation for Scientific Simulation (MADNESS)

  3. The Crisis in Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D C

    2005-01-01

    A brief summary of the current status of radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry in the U. S. and abroad will be given. Current and future needs for scientists in these fields, especially in the U. S., will be discussed. Challenges that must be met in order to reverse the ''catastrophic'' downward trend in the numbers of students, faculty, and university programs in radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry will be considered, and some potential ways to reinvigorate and expand relevant university research and educational programs will be suggested

  4. Chemistry programmes at a technological and nuclear centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servian, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The application of chemical principles and techniques have played a major role in the development of nuclear sciences and technology. The discovery of radioactivity, the isolation of radium and polonium, the discovery of artificial radioactivity and nuclear fission and the production of transuranium elements are historical landmarks that show the prominent role performed by chemistry. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the chemistry areas and experimental facilities for programmes of training, research and development, and service that might be designed for implementation at the Centre when appropriate. Though the areas are separately presented for analysis, they are closely related among themselves and also related to other activities of the Centre. (author)

  5. Exploiting prior knowledge of English, Mathematics and Chemistry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores prior knowledge with the view to enhancing the study of French. Juxtaposing sentences in French and English to underscore syntactic differences and similarities, the paper attributes numerical values to nouns and adjectives in French in order to demonstrate the mathematical imbalance and lack of ...

  6. Chemistry of pyroprocessing for nuclear waste transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, J.P. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel is an attractive approach for separating the transuranium (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium because of its simplicity, diversion resistance, and potentially low cost.

  7. Proceedings of the 3rd international symposium on material chemistry in nuclear environment (MATERIAL CHEMISTRY '02)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The volume contains all presented papers during the 3rd International Symposium on Material Chemistry in Nuclear Environment: MATERIAL CHEMISTRY 02 (MC'02), held March 13-15, 2002. The purpose of this symposium is to provide an international forum for the discussion of recent progress in the field of materials chemistry in nuclear environments. This symposium intends to build on the success of the previous symposiums held in Tsukuba in 1992 and 1996. The topics discussed in the symposium MC'02 are Chemical Reaction and Thermodynamics, Degradation Phenomena, New Characterization Technology, Fabrication and New Materials, Composite Materials, Surface Modification, and Computational Science. The 61 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  9. Position paper on main areas of nuclear chemistry research and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear chemistry, with its specialized areas of nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, and radiation chemistry, mainly covers these fields: basic research in nuclear chemistry; actinide chemistry; radioanalysis; nuclear chemistry in the life sciences, geosciences, and cosmic chemistry; radiotracers in technology; nuclear power technology; nuclear waste management; tritium chemistry in fusion technology, and radiation protection and radioecology. In the more than one hundred years of history of this branch of science and technology, which was opened up by the discovery of radioactivity and of the radioelements, pioneering discoveries and developments have been made in many sectors. Far beyond the confines of this area of work, they have achieved overriding importance in applications in many fields of technology and industry and in the life sciences. Research and application in nuclear chemistry continue to be highly relevant to society, ecology, and the economy, and the potential of science and technology in this field in Germany is acknowledged internationally. In the light of this vast area of activity, and against the need to maintain competence in nuclear chemistry for the use of nuclear power, irrespective of the status of this continued use in Germany, nuclear chemistry is indispensable to the solution of future problems. The Nuclear Chemistry Group of the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker therefore uses this position paper to draw attention to the urgent need to keep up and further advance nuclear chemistry applications in a variety of areas of science and technology, also as a public duty of thorough education and research. (orig.) [de

  10. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry of Mainz University. Annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.

    1988-06-01

    Apart from the traditional topics of the institute's five working groups, i.e. rapid separation and exotic nuclei, nuclear structures, nuclear fission, heavy ion reactions, and ecology of radionuclides, the report includes papers investigating into the chemistry of the heaviest elements, papers on nuclear astrophysics, and brief contributions on applied radioactivity in anticipation of further and more detailed ones. Most of the studies are the result of national and international efforts in the sense of modern co-operative research. The report refers to the institute's collaboration with university teams and research institutes. (orig./RB) [de

  11. Nuclear chemistry, the MET Lab, and Nathan Sugarman - A retrospective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of nuclear chemistry will be traced briefly, with special emphasis on the exciting and highly productive period of the war-time Metallurgical Laboratory from 1942 to 1946. In particular, the Fission Product Radiochemistry section at The University of Chicago, which underwent sequential fissions of its own to Oak Ridge and Los Alamos, will provide a major focus. The post-war spread of nuclear chemistry throughout the country and the establishment of the National Laboratories provided the setting for the Golden Age of the field. Throughout this period, the personality and character of Nathan Sugarman was clearly evident. Whether as teacher, researcher, colleague, critic, counselor, friend, or acquaintance, Sug's intelligence, warmth, humor, high standards, and quiet leadership make a lasting impression on a generation of nuclear chemists

  12. Chemistry of cements for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, P.; Glasser, F.P.

    1992-01-01

    In recent times the nuclear industry has thrown up challenges which cannot be met by the application of conventional civil and materials engineering knowledge. The contributions in this volume investigate all aspects of cement performance. The scope of the papers demonstrates the current balance of activities which have as their objective the elucidation of kinetics and immobilization, determining material interactions and of assessing future performance. The papers reflect the varied goals of the sponsors who include national governments, the Commission of the European Communities and the nuclear industries. In six parts attention is paid to the durability of cement and concrete in repository environment; interactions between cement, waste components and ground water; properties and performance of cement materials; leach behavior and mechanisms, diffusional properties of cement and concrete, including porosity-permeability relationships; and thermodynamics of cementitious systems and modelling of cement performance

  13. Nuclear fuel conversion and fabrication chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, R.E.; Norman, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Following irradiation and reprocessing of nuclear fuel, two operations are performed to prepare the fuel for subsequent reuse as fuel: fuel conversion, and fuel fabrication. These operations complete the classical nuclear fuel cycle. Fuel conversion involves generating a solid form suitable for fabrication into nuclear fuel. For plutonium based fuels, either a pure PuO 2 material or a mixed PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel material is generated. Several methods are available for preparation of the pure PuO 2 including: oxalate or peroxide precipitation; or direct denitration. Once the pure PuO 2 is formed, it is fabricated into fuel by mechanically blending it with ceramic grade UO 2 . The UO 2 can be prepared by several methods which include direct denitration. ADU precipitation, AUC precipitation, and peroxide precipitation. Alternatively, UO 2 -PuO 2 can be generated directly using coprecipitation, direct co-denitration, or gel sphere processes. In coprecipitation, uranium and plutonium are either precipitated as ammonium diuranate and plutonium hydroxide or as a mixture of ammonium uranyl-plutonyl carbonate, filtered and dried. In direct thermal denitration, solutions of uranium and plutonium nitrates are heated causing concentration and, subsequently, direct denitration. In gel sphere conversion, solutions of uranium and plutonium nitrate containing additives are formed into spherical droplets, gelled, washed and dried. Refabrication of these UO 3 -PuO 2 starting materials is accomplished by calcination-reduction to UO 2 -PuO 2 followed by pellet fabrication. (orig.)

  14. Chemistry evaluation in French EDF Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Production Division of EDF is comprised of 19 power stations (58 PWR reactors) and 2 national engineering organisations. Nuclear Inspection (IN) is an internal assessment unit of the EDF Nuclear Production Directorate. At the request of the Directorate, it carries out periodic evaluations of all the units of the division. The evaluation of the nuclear sites (EGE: Overall Excellence Assessment) is carried out every 4 years, an intermediate evaluation is also carried out between each EGE. These evaluations are independent of the WANO and IAEA evaluations. Exchanges are carried out between Nuclear Inspection and the other international operators (for example, USA (INPO), England, China...) to share site evaluation methods. These evaluations are carried out by a team of 30 inspectors, reinforced during each evaluation by 10 peers who come from the various French nuclear sites. Nuclear Inspection produces a performance standards document for each FUNCTIONAL AREA, which is based on the requirements of the company. On the whole, 13 areas are evaluated during each inspection, in particular: Management, Operations, Maintenance, Engineering and Chemistry. The area of reactor plant chemistry has been evaluated since 2009. The Chemistry performance standards document is written from the EDF internal requirements and international references. During site evaluations, all the performance standards are assessed for compliance. The Chemistry performance standards document is comprised of 3 topics: Management of plant chemistry, The respect of the chemical and radiochemical specifications, The condition of the laboratories and the sampling lines, measuring equipment, and chemical products. The evaluations carried out make it possible to define strengths and weaknesses which the sites must address. After each evaluation, the assessment is presented to the site management and to the director of EDF Nuclear Production. For 4 years these evaluations have allowed progress to

  15. Coordination chemistry of technetium as related to nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.

    1982-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the area of technetium coordination chemistry during the last five years. The main driving force behind this recent surge of interest in the field has been due to the practical application of technetium-99m in the rapidly growing speciality of nuclear medicine. Technetium-99 is one of the products of nuclear fission reactions, but it was the development of the molybdenum-99-technetium-99m generator about two decades ago that provided the basis for the development of radiopharmaceuticals routinely used in modern diagnostic applications. The chemistry of this element has proven to be quite rich owing to its multiple oxidation states and variable geometry. This can be attributed to its position in the middle of the periodic table. Diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals comprise predominantly III, IV and V oxidation states of Tc and involve a variety of coordination complexes. Even though the chemistry of Tc has been slow to evolve, recent synthetic advances have provided a more scientific basis for the study of a number of compounds with diverse coordination geometries and structures. Ligands with oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur donor atoms have been utilized to elucidate various aspects of the coordination chemistry of Tc. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis has been extensively used to characterize Tc complexes and thus construct a firm foundation for the study of synthetic and mechanistic aspects of the chemistry of this element. (author)

  16. Actinide separation chemistry in nuclear waste streams and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The separation of actinide elements from various waste materials, produced either in nuclear fuel cycles or in past nuclear weapons production, represents a significant issue facing developed countries. Improvements in the efficiencies of the separation processes can be expected to occur as a result of better knowledge of the elements in these complex matrices. The Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA has established a task force of experts in actinide separation chemistry to review current and developing separation techniques and chemical processes. The report consist of eight chapters. In Chapter 1 the importance of actinide separation chemistry in the fields of waste management and its background are summarized.In Chapter 2 the types of waste streams are classified according to their relative importance, by physical form and by source of actinides. The basic data of actinide chemical thermodynamics, such as oxidation states, hydrolysis, complexation, sorption, Gibbs energies of formation, and volatility, were collected and are presented in Chapter 3. Actinide analyses related to separation processes are also mentioned in this chapter. The state of the art of actinide separation chemistry is classified in three groups, including hydrometallurgy, pyrochemical process and process based on fields, and is described in Chapter 4 along with the relationship of kinetics to separations. In Chapter 5 basic chemistry research needs and the inherent limitation on separation processes are discussed. Prioritization of research and development is discussed in Chapter 6 in the context of several attributes of waste management problems. These attributes include: mass or volume of waste; concentration of the actinide in the waste; expected difficulty of treating the wastes; short-term hazard of the waste; long-term hazard of the waste; projected cost of treatment; amount of secondary waste. Based on the priority, recommendations were made for the direction of future research

  17. Actinide separation chemistry in nuclear waste streams and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The separation of actinide elements from various waste materials, produced either in nuclear fuel cycles or in past nuclear weapons production, represents a significant issue facing developed countries. Improvements in the efficiencies of the separation processes can be expected to occur as a result of better knowledge of the elements in these complex matrices. The Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA has established a task force of experts in actinide separation chemistry to review current and developing separation techniques and chemical processes. The report consist of eight chapters. In Chapter 1 the importance of actinide separation chemistry in the fields of waste management and its background are summarized.In Chapter 2 the types of waste streams are classified according to their relative importance, by physical form and by source of actinides. The basic data of actinide chemical thermodynamics, such as oxidation states, hydrolysis, complexation, sorption, Gibbs energies of formation, and volatility, were collected and are presented in Chapter 3. Actinide analyses related to separation processes are also mentioned in this chapter. The state of the art of actinide separation chemistry is classified in three groups, including hydrometallurgy, pyrochemical process and process based on fields, and is described in Chapter 4 along with the relationship of kinetics to separations. In Chapter 5 basic chemistry research needs and the inherent limitation on separation processes are discussed. Prioritization of research and development is discussed in Chapter 6 in the context of several attributes of waste management problems. These attributes include: mass or volume of waste; concentration of the actinide in the waste; expected difficulty of treating the wastes; short-term hazard of the waste; long-term hazard of the waste; projected cost of treatment; amount of secondary waste. Based on the priority, recommendations were made for the direction of future research

  18. Radioanalytical Chemistry for Automated Nuclear Waste Process Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Oleg B.; Grate, Jay W.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    This research program is directed toward rapid, sensitive, and selective determination of beta and alpha-emitting radionuclides such as 99Tc, 90Sr, and trans-uranium (TRU) elements in low activity waste (LAW) processing streams. The overall technical approach is based on automated radiochemical measurement principles, which entails integration of sample treatment and separation chemistries and radiometric detection within a single functional analytical instrument. Nuclear waste process streams are particularly challenging for rapid analytical methods due to the complex, high-ionic-strength, caustic brine sample matrix, the presence of interfering radionuclides, and the variable and uncertain speciation of the radionuclides of interest. As a result, matrix modification, speciation control, and separation chemistries are required for use in automated process analyzers. Significant knowledge gaps exist relative to the design of chemistries for such analyzers so that radionuclides can be quantitatively and rapidly separated and analyzed in solutions derived from low-activity waste processing operations. This research is addressing these knowledge gaps in the area of separation science, nuclear detection, and analytical chemistry and instrumentation. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for sample matrix modification and analyte speciation control and chemistries for rapid and selective separation and preconcentration of target radionuclides from complex sample matrices. In addition, new approaches for quantification of alpha emitters in solution using solid-state diode detectors, as well as improved instrumentation and signal processing techniques for use with solid-state and scintillation detectors, will be developed. New knowledge of the performance of separation materials, matrix modification and speciation control chemistries, instrument configurations, and quantitative analytical approaches will

  19. Enhancing interdisciplinary, mathematics, and physical science in an undergraduate life science program through physical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursell, David P

    2009-01-01

    BIO2010 advocates enhancing the interdisciplinary, mathematics, and physical science components of the undergraduate biology curriculum. The Department of Chemistry and Life Science at West Point responded by developing a required physical chemistry course tailored to the interests of life science majors. To overcome student resistance to physical chemistry, students were enabled as long-term stakeholders who would shape the syllabus by selecting life science topics of interest to them. The initial 2 yr of assessment indicates that students have a positive view of the course, feel they have succeeded in achieving course outcome goals, and that the course is relevant to their professional future. Instructor assessment of student outcome goal achievement via performance on exams and labs is comparable to that of students in traditional physical chemistry courses. Perhaps more noteworthy, both student and instructor assessment indicate positive trends from year 1 to year 2, presumably due to the student stakeholder effect.

  20. Essential concepts and underlying theories from physics, chemistry, and mathematics for "biochemistry and molecular biology" majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ann; Provost, Joseph; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members from around the country. The workshops have focused on developing lists of Core Principles or Foundational Concepts in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, a list of foundational skills, and foundational concepts from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics that all Biochemistry or Molecular Biology majors must understand to complete their major coursework. The allied fields working group created a survey to validate foundational concepts from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics identified from participant feedback at various workshops. One-hundred twenty participants responded to the survey and 68% of the respondents answered yes to the question: "We have identified the following as the core concepts and underlying theories from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics that Biochemistry majors or Molecular Biology majors need to understand after they complete their major courses: 1) mechanical concepts from Physics, 2) energy and thermodynamic concepts from Physics, 3) critical concepts of structure from chemistry, 4) critical concepts of reactions from Chemistry, and 5) essential Mathematics. In your opinion, is the above list complete?" Respondents also delineated subcategories they felt should be included in these broad categories. From the results of the survey and this analysis the allied fields working group constructed a consensus list of allied fields concepts, which will help inform Biochemistry and Molecular Biology educators when considering the ASBMB recommended curriculum for Biochemistry or Molecular Biology majors and in the development of appropriate assessment tools to gauge student understanding of how these concepts relate to biochemistry and molecular biology. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. The role of chemistry in nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Johnson, I.

    1986-01-01

    An accurate description of the chemical state of fission products is required for quick response in assessing the impact of nuclide release during a nuclear accident. The chemical state of the fission products is certain to change in response to their local environment. More specifically, fission products released from fuel will change their composition on contact with high-temperature steam, and these changes will determine their behavior with regard to either transport, deposition, aerosol formation, or reaction with structural components. The local oxygen potential is a key parameter in establishing the chemical state of the fission products and their release and transport mechanisms. Knowledge of the relationship of this parameter and thermal hydraulics is needed for prediction of fission product behavior in degraded core accidents. The behavior of key fission products in various stages of an accident, based on experimental results and appropriate calculations founded on fundamental thermodynamic information, will be discussed

  2. Nuclear analytical techniques applied to forensic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau, Veronica; Montoro, Silvia; Pratta, Nora; Giandomenico, Angel Di

    1999-01-01

    Gun shot residues produced by firing guns are mainly composed by visible particles. The individual characterization of these particles allows distinguishing those ones containing heavy metals, from gun shot residues, from those having a different origin or history. In this work, the results obtained from the study of gun shot residues particles collected from hands are presented. The aim of the analysis is to establish whether a person has shot a firing gun has been in contact with one after the shot has been produced. As reference samples, particles collected hands of persons affected to different activities were studied to make comparisons. The complete study was based on the application of nuclear analytical techniques such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X Ray Electron Probe Microanalysis and Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The essays allow to be completed within time compatible with the forensic requirements. (author)

  3. Radioanalytical Chemistry for Automated Nuclear Waste Process Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Oleg B.; Grate, Jay W.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2003-01-01

    This research program is directed toward rapid, sensitive, and selective determination of beta and alpha-emitting radionuclides such as 99Tc, 90Sr, and trans-uranium (TRU) elements in low activity waste (LAW) processing streams. The overall technical approach is based on automated radiochemical measurement principles. Nuclear waste process streams are particularly challenging for rapid analytical methods due to the complex, high- ionic-strength, caustic brine sample matrix, the presence of interfering radionuclides, and the variable and uncertain speciation of the radionuclides of interest. As a result, matrix modification, speciation control, and separation chemistries are required for use in automated process analyzers. Significant knowledge gaps exist relative to the design of chemistries for such analyzers so that radionuclides can be quantitatively and rapidly separated and analyzed in solutions derived from low-activity waste processing operations. This research is addressing these knowledge gaps in the area of separation science, nuclear detection, and analytical chemistry and instrumentation. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for sample matrix modification and analyte speciation control and chemistries for rapid and selective separation and preconcentration of target radionuclides from complex sample matrices. In addition, new approaches for quantification of alpha emitters in solution using solid state diode detectors, as well as improved instrumentation and signal processing techniques for use with solid-state and scintillation detectors, will be developed. New knowledge of the performance of separation materials, matrix modification and speciation control chemistries, instrument configurations, and quantitative analytical approaches will provide the basis for designing effective instrumentation for radioanalytical process monitoring. Specific analytical targets include 99 Tc, 90Sr and

  4. Mathematic filters and digital processing in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimentein, R.

    1992-01-01

    The mathematic filters used in nuclear medicine were evaluated. Tomographic processing of a Jaszczak phantom, using separately Hanning, Butterworth and Wiener filters were presented. For each type of filter were made simulation, where the cut frequency and extenuation grade values were changed. (C.G.C.)

  5. Mathematical modeling of physical processes in inorganic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    The first part deals with the rapid calculation of steady-state concentration profiles in contactors using the Purex Process. Most of the computer codes simulating the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel generate the steady-state properties by calculating the transient behavior of the contactors. In this study, the author simulates the steady-state concentration profiles directly without first generating the transient behavior. Two computer codes are developed, PUMA (Plutonium-Uranium-Matrix-Algorithm) and PUNE (Plutonium-Uranium-Non-Equilibrium). The first one simulates the steady-state concentration profiles under conditions of equilibrium mass transfer. The second one accounts for deviations from mass transfer equilibrium. The second part of this dissertation shows how to use the classical trajectory method to study the equilibrium and saddle-point geometries of MX n (n = 2-7) molecules. Two nuclear potential functions that have the property of invariance to the operations of the permutation group of nuclei in molecules of the general formula MX n are described. Such potential functions allow equivalent isomers to have equal energies so that various statistical mechanical properties can be simply determined. The first function contains two center interactions between pairs of peripheral atoms and its defined by V(r) = 1/2Σ α k triangle r αμ 2 + Σ α QR αβ -n (n = 1,2...). The second function contains two and three center interactions and is defined by V(Θ) = 1/2Σ α K triangle αμ 2 + 1/2Σ α Qr 0 2 (Θ αμβ - π) 2

  6. TALSPEAK Chemistry in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Mikael; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    The separation of trivalent transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanide ions represents a challenging aspect of advanced nuclear fuel partitioning schemes. The challenge of this separation could be amplified in the context of the AFCI-UREX+1a process, as Np and Pu will accompany the minor actinides to this stage of separation. At present, the baseline lanthanide-actinide separation method is the TALSPEAK (Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorus reagent Extraction from Aqueous complexes) process. TALSPEAK was developed in the late 1960's at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and has been demonstrated at pilot scale. This process relies on the complex interaction between an organic and an aqueous phase both containing complexants for selectively separating the trivalent actinide. The 3 complexing components are: the di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), the lactic acid (HL) and the diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N'',N''-pentaacetic acid (DTPA). In this report we discuss observations on kinetic and thermodynamic features described in the prior literature and describe some results of our ongoing research on basic chemical features of this system. The information presented indicates that the lactic acid buffer participates in the net operation of the TALSPEAK process in a manner that is not explained by existing information on the thermodynamic features if the known Eu(III)-lactate species. (authors)

  7. The role of post accident chemistry data in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, R.W.; Caruthers, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    The NRC instituted the NUREG-0737 requirements as implementation of the Post-TMI Action Plan in October, 1980. Among these requirements was the capability to obtain chemistry samples of the reactor coolant and containment building atmosphere under post accident conditions. The quantitative criteria were, in general, beyond the capabilities of existing plant systems. As a consequence the nuclear industry expended substantial efforts to design and install the post-accident sampling systems necessary to comply with these criteria. With such efforts essentially complete, the task remains to establish the role that data provided by these systems would play in mitigating the consequences of a nuclear plant accident. This role definition must include a characterization of the timing and priority for the post accident chemistry data. This paper defines that role using the Safety Level and Safety Function concepts as a matrix

  8. On the concepts of carrier and specific activity in nuclear chemistry, radioanalytical chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonardi, Mauro L.

    2011-01-01

    At present a IUPAC Project regarding 'Terminology, Quantities and Units concerning Production and Applications of Radionuclides in Radiopharmaceutical and Radioanalytical Chemistry' states that: 'CARRIER is a chemical species - already present in the preparation or intentionally added - which will carry a given radionuclide in its associated species through the radiochemical procedure and/or prevents the radionuclide in its associated species from undergoing non-specific processes due to its low concentration'

  9. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Stenke A.; Hoyle C. R.; Luo B.; Rozanov E.; Groebner J.; Maag L.; Broennimann S.; Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on Earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL, which belongs to a...

  10. Isotope and nuclear chemistry division. Annual report, FY 1987. Progress report, October 1986-September 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, D.W.; Heiken, J.H.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1987 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical weapons diagnostics and research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry

  11. The 40th AAAS Gordon Conference on nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    I am pleased to speak at the Fortieth Gordon Conference on Nuclear Chemistry. I served as Chairman of the first Gordon Conference on Nuclear Chemistry held June 23--27, 1952, at New Hampton, New Hampshire. In my remarks, during which I shall quote from my journal, I shall describe some of the background leading up to the first Gordon Conference on Nuclear Chemistry and my attendance at the first seven Gordon Conferences during the period 1952 through 1958. I shall also quote my description of my appearance as the featured speaker at the Silver Anniversary of the Gordon Research Conferences on December 27, 1956 held at the Commodore Hotel in New York City. I shall begin with reference to my participation in the predecessor to the Gordon Conferences, the Gibson Island Research Conferences 45 years ago, on Thursday, June 20, 1946, as a speaker. This was 15 years after the start of these conferences in 1931. Neil Gordon played a leading role in these conferences, which were named (in 1948) in his honor -- the Gordon Research Conferences -- soon after they were moved to Colby Junior College, New London, New Hampshire in 1947. W. George Parks became Director in 1947, Alexander Cruickshank became Assistant Director in 1947 and Director in 1968

  12. The 40th AAAS Gordon Conference on nuclear chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1991-06-27

    I am pleased to speak at the Fortieth Gordon Conference on Nuclear Chemistry. I served as Chairman of the first Gordon Conference on Nuclear Chemistry held June 23--27, 1952, at New Hampton, New Hampshire. In my remarks, during which I shall quote from my journal, I shall describe some of the background leading up to the first Gordon Conference on Nuclear Chemistry and my attendance at the first seven Gordon Conferences during the period 1952 through 1958. I shall also quote my description of my appearance as the featured speaker at the Silver Anniversary of the Gordon Research Conferences on December 27, 1956 held at the Commodore Hotel in New York City. I shall begin with reference to my participation in the predecessor to the Gordon Conferences, the Gibson Island Research Conferences 45 years ago, on Thursday, June 20, 1946, as a speaker. This was 15 years after the start of these conferences in 1931. Neil Gordon played a leading role in these conferences, which were named (in 1948) in his honor -- the Gordon Research Conferences -- soon after they were moved to Colby Junior College, New London, New Hampshire in 1947. W. George Parks became Director in 1947, Alexander Cruickshank became Assistant Director in 1947 and Director in 1968.

  13. Incorporating nuclear and radiochemistry in the traditional undergraduate chemistry program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.D.; Kleppinger, E.W.

    1994-01-01

    Although many areas of major national need depend critically on professionals trained in nuclear and radiochemistry, there has been a steady decline in both the educational opportunities and student interest in this area. One major factor that has contributed greatly to the lack of student interest in nuclear and radiochemistry is that most undergraduate students in chemistry and other sciences are no longer introduced to these topics. This deficiency in the traditional chemistry curriculum, coupled with the negative public perception towards all things open-quotes nuclear,close quotes has resulted in a serious shortage of individuals with a background in this area. The authors are trying to address this problem by open-quotes educating the educators.close quotes The authors are developing a set of summer workshops to provide faculty from four-year colleges with the curriculum materials, training, and motivation to incorporate these topics on a continuing basis in their traditional undergraduate chemistry curricula. The first series of workshops is scheduled for the summer of 1995

  14. Nuclear forensics and nuclear analytical chemistry - iridium determination in a referred forensic sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, A.K.; Bhadkambekar, C.A.; Tripathi, A.B.R.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Ghosh, P.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear approaches for compositional characterization has bright application prospect in forensic perspective towards assessment of nature and origin of seized material. The macro and micro physical properties of nuclear materials can be specifically associated with a process or type of nuclear activity. Under the jurisdiction of nuclear analytical chemistry as well as nuclear forensics, thrust areas of scientific endeavor like determination of radioisotopes, isotopic and mass ratios, analysis for impurity contents, arriving at chemical forms/species and physical parameters play supporting evidence in forensic investigations. The analytical methods developed for this purposes can be used in international safeguards as well for nuclear forensics. Nuclear material seized in nuclear trafficking can be identified and a profile of the nuclear material can be created

  15. Mathematics, chemistry and science connection as a basis of scientific thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Matúš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific thinking is a basic skill that can support problemsolving of interdisciplinary tasks in science. Our research is leading us to creation of materials and resources that will support this interdisciplinary approach to education. The research includes interviews with high-school teachers of mathematics, chemistry and science, item analysis of extensive testing of knowledge and skills of high school students in chemistry in Czech Republic, follow-up survey of students’ problem-solving processes in tasks requiring the use of combined knowledge of mathematics and chemistry and the creation of educational materials. The article contains a few examples of proposed educational materials. The effectiveness of created materials is verified in high-schools. Students have got the most difficulties applying algebraic calculations in chemistry, using proportions, solving equations, expressing the unknown, the spatial imagination, geometry and stereometry and the resulting arrangement of atoms and shapes of molecules, chemical analytical tasks with logical thinking, interpretation of information from graphs and tables, plotting measured values into graphs and statistical evaluation.

  16. Abstracts Book of 3. All-Polish Conference on Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The development of radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry in Poland have been presented during the 3. All-Polish Conference on Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry held in Kazimierz Dolny in May 2001. The broad range of problems connected with radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry application in environmental protection and quality control, nuclear medicine and radiation protection, radioactive waste processing and many other scientific and everyday problems solution have been extensively presented and discussed

  17. Annual Report 2003 of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The INCT 2003 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies, nucleonic control systems and accelerators.

  18. Annual Report 2003 of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The INCT 2003 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies, nucleonic control systems and accelerators

  19. Saclay Center of Nuclear Studies, Direction of Materials and Nuclear Fuels, Department of Physico-Chemistry, Division of Physical Chemistry. 1968 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Clerc, M.; Le Calve, J.; Bourene, M.; Lesigne, B.; Gillois, M.; Devillers, C.; Arvis, M.; Gilles, L.; Moreau, M.; Sutton, J.; Faraggi, M.; Desalos, J.; Tran Dinh Son; Barat, F.; Hickel, B.; Chachaty, C.; Forchioni, A.; Shiotani, M.; Larher, Y.; Maurice, P.; Le Bail, H.; Nenner, T.

    1969-03-01

    This document is the 1968 annual report of research activities at the Physico-Chemistry Department (Physical Chemistry Division), part of the Directorate of Materials and Nuclear Fuels of the CEA Saclay center of nuclear studies. The report is divided into two main parts: radiolysis and photolysis studies (gaseous phase, condensed phase), and general physico-chemical studies (sorption, molecular jets)

  20. Analytical chemistry needs for nuclear safeguards in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    A fuel reprocessing plant designed to process 1500 tons of light water reactor fuel per year will recover 15 tons of Pu during that time, or approximately 40 to 50 kg of Pu per day. Conventional nuclear safeguards accountability has relied on batch accounting at the head and tail ends of the reprocessing plant with semi-annual plant cleanout to determine in-process holdup. An alternative proposed safeguards system relies on dynamic material accounting whereby in-line NDA and conventional analytical techniques provide indications on a daily basis of SNM transfers into the system and information of Pu holdup within the system. Some of the analytical requirements and problems for dynamic materials accounting in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant are described. Some suggestions for further development will be proposed

  1. Nuclear chemistry fifty years after the discovery of artificial radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefort, M.

    1984-01-01

    In January 1934, the observation and the chemical identification of radiophosphorus as a reaction product in the bombardment of Aluminium by alpha particles have been the first step of a new scientific branch: Nuclear Chemistry. We describe here how this discovery in itself contains the frame of all the development which has followed. It consisted in four stages, each of them being a crucial starting point. The first one is the possibility for a total balance of the nuclear reaction in the exit channels, so that reaction mechanisms can be studied. The second, the most important perhaps, is the opening of nuclear synthesis. Nuclear chemists can now interfere into nuclear matter and instead of staying as observers of the radioactive decays of natural isotopes, they were able to build up a numerous chart of various nuclear species, going step by step further and further away from the nuclear stability conditions. The third aspect of the discovery was the appearance of a new mode of radioactive decay with the production of the first particle an antimater. 50 years later, the instability due to a much larger excess of protons is known to induce the proton emission radioactivity for new species like 109 I or 115 Cs, in the vicinity of proton unstability. Finally, the last point, so fertile for the future, was the observation of a neutron in the exit channel, so that neutron fluxes could result from alpha induced nuclear reactions and became such a strong tool for the production of transuranium elements and for nuclear fission. In the present survey, the wide interest of the second point, i.e. the nuclear synthesis, is emphasized, as well as the huge change in the technical methods

  2. Analytical chemistry in nuclear science and technology: a scientometric mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kademani, B.S.; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Vijai

    2007-01-01

    This paper attempts to analyse quantitatively the growth and development of Analytical Chemistry research in Nuclear Science and Technology in terms of publication output as reflected in International Nuclear Information System (INIS) database (1970-2005). During 1970-2005 a total of 8224 papers were published. There were only seven papers published in 1970. Thereafter, a tremendous explosion of literature was observed in this area. The highest number of papers (636) were published in 1985. The average number of publications published per year was 228.44. United States topped the list with 1811 publications followed by USSR with 1688 publications, Germany with 777 publications, India with 730 publications and Hungary with 519 publications. Authorship and collaboration trend was towards multi-authored papers as 80.3 percent of the papers were collaborative is indicative of the multidisciplinary nature of research activity. The most prolific authors were: B. F. Myasoedov, AN SSSR Moscow Inst. Geokhimii I Analitisheskoi Khimii, Russian Federation with 84 publications, M. Sudersanan, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India with 67 publications, P.Vanura and V. Jedinakova Krizova both from Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Czech Republic with 54 publications each, S. Gangadharan, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India with 47 publications, V.M. Ivanova , M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russian Federation with 45 publications and Yu. A Zolotov Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russian Federation with 40 publications. The journals most preferred by the scientists for publication of papers were : Zhurnal Analiticheskoj Khimii with 713 papers, Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry with 409 papers, Analytical Chemistry Washington with 364 papers, Fresenius' Journal of Analytical Chemistry with 324 papers, Indian Journal of Chemistry, Section A with 251 papers, and Journal of Analytical Chemistry of the USSR with 145 papers. The high

  3. Nuclear chemistry on the Czech Technical University in Prague after introduction of structured study and foundation of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation the author (head of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry) give a short review of history of the Department of Nuclear Chemistry and of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry of the Czech Technical University in Prague. Education in structured study in specialisation of nuclear chemistry in bachelor level, master level, as well as post-graduate study in nuclear chemistry with academic degree PhD. are realised. Some scientific results are presented

  4. IAEA programme on water chemistry in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechaev, A.F.; Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1988-01-01

    The paper reviews the past future efforts of the IAEA, directed to ensure optimal water chemistry regimes in nuclear power plants. Corrosion of structural materials resulting from the interaction of the coolant with the internal surfaces comprising the primary heat transfer and auxiliary circuits of water reactors, creates two main problems. The first is an operational problem resulting in an increase in the core pressure drop or overheating of the fuel elements induced by crud buildup on the fuel cladding. The second problem is related to occupational radiation exposures arising from contamination of out-of-flux surfaces by corrosion products activated in the reactor core. These are the problems of reliability and safety which together with economics could be considered as the 'three whales' of nuclear power. The main goals of international cooperation in reactor water chemistry are: (1) to create a balanced and well-grounded methodological basis for corresponding regulatory and engineering solutions on a national level and (2) to improve 'the models and predictive capability of specialists for conditions that are different from or perhaps just beyond the realm of experience'. Continuing efforts are required to guarantee the highest reliability and safety standards under favorable economic indices of nuclear power plants, and to obtain understanding of such significant potential for solving the remaining problems. (Nogami, K.)

  5. Research on water chemistry in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Sung Ki; Yang, Kyung Rin; Kang, Hi Dong; Koo, Je Hyoo; Hwang, Churl Kew; Lee, Eun Hee; Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Uh Chul; Kim, Joung Soo; Song, Myung Ho; Lee, Deok Hyun; Jeong, Jong Hwan

    1986-12-01

    To prevent the corrosion problems on important components of nuclear power plants, the computerization methods of water chemistry and the analyses of corrosion failures were studied. A preliminary study on the computerization of water chemistry log-sheet data was performed using a personal computer with dBASE-III and LOTUS packages. Recent technical informations on a computerized online chemistry data management system which provides an efficient and thorough method of system-wide monitoring of utility's secondary side chemistry were evaluated for the application to KEPCO's nuclear power plants. According to the evaluation of water chemistry data and eddy current test results, it was likely that S/G tube defect type was pitting. Pitting is believed to result from excess oxygen in make-up and air ingress, sea-water ingress bycondenser leak, and copper in sludge. A design of a corrosion tests apparatus for the tests under simulated operational conditions, such as water chemistry, water flow, high temperature and pressure, etc., of the plant has been completed. The completion of these apparatus will make it possible to do corrosion tests under the conditions mentioned above to find out the cause of corrosion failures, and to device a counter measure to these. The result of corrosion tests with alloy-600 showed that the initiation of pits occurred most severely around 175 deg C which is lower than plant-operation temperature(300 deg C) while their propagation rate had trend to be maximum around 90 deg C. It was conformed that the use of Cu-base alloys in a secondary cooling system accelerates the formation of pits by the leaking of sea-water and expected that the replacement of them can reduce the failures of S/G tubes by pitting. Preliminary works on the examination of pit-formed specimens with bare eyes, a metallurgical microscope and a SEM including EDAX analysis were done for the future use of these techniques to investigate S/G tubes. Most of corrosion products

  6. New horizons for nuclear and radioanalytical chemistry laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear and radiochemistry are reported to suffer from a worldwide depression in support in the academic curriculum. The visibility of nuclear research groups is weak in general as can be illustrated by the low citation impact factors of the nuclear science related journals. Moreover, the use of nuclear techniques over other techniques is often insufficiently justified. Although in many countries a shortage in radiochemists is forecasted to occur by the end of this decade -and ample jobs becoming available-, students in chemistry and physics seem to prefer a career in contemporary sciences such as biotechnology, nanotechnology and genomics. Much of the research in these sciences is related to organic compounds and biomolecules or deals with elements that seemingly have little or no opportunities to be studied using radionuclides and (nuclear) radiation. Laboratories operating nuclear analytical techniques therefore need to use their creativity finding ways for participation in the scientific areas that are booming at the beginning of the 21st century. It requires an open mind on the strengths and weaknesses of existing techniques, and a departure from traditional views on measurement, analysis and even sources for activation. The unique features of using radiotracers and activatable tracers need again to be explored. Some radiochemistry laboratories at large (national) research centers have already converted their traditional technique-oriented research into more problem-oriented research, combining nuclear and complimentary non-nuclear techniques. Smaller laboratories have fewer opportunities for such holistic approaches but there are still a variety of nuclear and radiochemical techniques that fruitfully can be applied in these sciences and which also may turn attention towards the potentials of nuclear research reactor facilities, (nuclear) radiation and radionuclides, contributing to the sustainability of nuclear analytical groups. Advances in radiation

  7. Chemistry technician performance evaluation program Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawver, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Arizona Nuclear Power Project (ANPP), a three-reactor site located 50 miles west of Phoenix, Arizona, has developed and implemented a program for evaluating individual chemistry technician analytical performance on a routine basis. About 45 chemistry technicians are employed at the site, 15 at each operating unit. The technicians routinely perform trace level analyses for impurities of concern to PWRs. Each month a set of blind samples is provided by an outside vendor. The blind samples contain 16 parameters which are matrixed to approximate the PWR's primary and secondary cycles. Nine technicians receive the samples, three from each operating unit, and perform the required analyses. Acceptance criteria for successful performance on the blind parameters is based on the values found in the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Document 83-016, Revision 2, August 1989, Chemistry Quality Control Program. The goal of the program is to have each technician demonstrate acceptable performance on each of 16 analytical parameters. On completion of each monthly set, a summary report of all of the analytical results for the sample set is prepared. From the summary report, analytical bias can be detected, technician performance is documented, and overall laboratory performance can be evaluated. The program has been very successful at satisfying the INPO requirement that the analytical performance of each individual technician should be checked on at least a six-month frequency for all important parameters measured. This paper describes the program as implemented at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station and provides a summary report and trend and bias graphs for illustrative purposes

  8. Chemistry Optimitation of a PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandrich, J.; Ramminger, U.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main objectives for the plant operator of a Nuclear Power Plant is to protect the Steam Generators (SG) during the lifetime of the plant by ensuring a safe and reliable operation. The SGs serve as an important barrier to prevent the spread of contamination out of the primary circuit. One the other hand impurities are accumulated within the SGs leading to extreme chemical and physical conditions. The application of an optimized water chemistry treatment of the secondary side is essential to ensure a good performance of the steam generators. (Author)

  9. Karlsruhe international conference on analytical chemistry in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents 218 abstracts of contributions by researchers working in the analytical chemistry field of nuclear technology. The majority of the papers deal with analysis with respect to process control in fuel reprocessing plants, fission and corrosion product characterization throughout the fuel cycle as well as studies of the chemical composition of radioactive wastes. Great interest is taken in the development and optimization of methods and instrumentation especially for in-line process control. About 3/4 of the papers have been entered into the data base separately. (RB)

  10. The role of NAA in nuclear chemistry education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, G.; Vivier, A.

    2007-01-01

    One of the missions of our Institute is the promotion of basic nuclear teaching for students as well as professional teaching for workers in nuclear industry and research. For nuclear chemistry education, we present here a one day teaching course on radioactive decay and nuclear reactions, and a two or three days course based on reactor irradiation of uranium oxide, instrumental and radiochemical analysis of fission products. In the first experiment, the neutron capture is presented as an example of nuclear reaction; the neutron activation of a silver coin with a Am-Be neutron source, followed by γ-ray spectrometry, is used to identify three radionuclides of silver and to calculate their half-lives. In the second experiment, our teaching reactor is used as a neutron source with a flux about 10 10 n x cm -2 x s -1 at a low thermal power (10 kW). This low flux allows us to irradiate a small uranium sample which is usable for spectrometry after a short cooling time of about two hours. The first day is reserved for instrumental analysis of the fission products and a second day for the radiochemical separation of a fission radionuclides. With these experimental results, the students have to calculate the number of fissions in the irradiated sample. On optional third day for postgraduate students is devoted to the presentation of NAA and some applications as uranium determination by the fission product spectrometry. (author)

  11. Spallation RI beam facility and heavy element nuclear chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagame, Yuichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    An outline of the spallation RI (Radioactive Ion) beam facility is presented. Neutron-rich nuclides are produced in the reaction of high intensity (10-1000 {mu}A) protons with energy of 1.5 GeV and an uranium carbide target. Produced nuclides are ionized in an isotope separator on-line (ISOL) and accelerated by the JAERI tandem and the booster linac. Current progress and a future project on the development of the RI beam facility are given. Studies of transactinide elements, including the synthesis of superheavy elements, nuclear structure far from stability, and RI-probed material science are planned with RI beams. An outlook of the transactinide nuclear chemistry studies using neutron-rich RI beams is described. (author)

  12. Overview. Department of Nuclear Physical Chemistry. Section 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeglowski, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    In the papers presented bellow the activities of the Department of Nuclear Physical Chemistry in 1994 are presented. A further effort was made towards routine production of neutron-deficient isotopes for nuclear medicine - and namely {sup 67} Ga and {sup 139} Ce. Small activities of {sup 111} In were produced by the {alpha} bombardment of Ag target. In order to improve the {sup 111} In production the deuterons reaction with cadmium target was studied. The other field of the Department research is studying of the physicochemical properties of transactinoid elements (104,105, 106). The Department is also engaged in works of the National Network of Early Detection of Radioactive Contamination in Air. In this section, apart of the detail descriptions of mentioned activities, the information about personnel employed in the Department, papers and reports published in 1994, contribution to conferences and grants are also given.

  13. Overview. Department of Nuclear Physical Chemistry. Section 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeglowski, Z [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    In the papers presented bellow the activities of the Department of Nuclear Physical Chemistry in 1994 are presented. A further effort was made towards routine production of neutron-deficient isotopes for nuclear medicine - and namely {sup 67} Ga and {sup 139} Ce. Small activities of {sup 111} In were produced by the {alpha} bombardment of Ag target. In order to improve the {sup 111} In production the deuterons reaction with cadmium target was studied. The other field of the Department research is studying of the physicochemical properties of transactinoid elements (104,105, 106). The Department is also engaged in works of the National Network of Early Detection of Radioactive Contamination in Air. In this section, apart of the detail descriptions of mentioned activities, the information about personnel employed in the Department, papers and reports published in 1994, contribution to conferences and grants are also given.

  14. Evaluation of an Integrated Curriculum in Physics, Mathematics, Engineering, and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichner, Robert

    1997-04-01

    An experimental, student centered, introductory curriculum called IMPEC (for Integrated Mathematics, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry curriculum) is in its third year of pilot-testing at NCSU. The curriculum is taught by a multidisciplinary team of professors using a combination of traditional lecturing and alternative instructional methods including cooperative learning, activity-based class sessions, and extensive use of computer modeling, simulations, and the world wide web. This talk will discuss the research basis for our design and implementation of the curriculum, the qualitative and quantitative methods we have been using to assess its effectiveness, and the educational outcomes we have noted so far.

  15. Introduction to mathematical and informatics methods in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Monot, C.; Legras, B.

    1975-01-01

    Mathematical and statistical methods are widely used in nuclear medicine because of the abundance and precision of the data obtained during morphological and dynamic explorations, and the number and complexity of the calculations involved has led to the use of informatics. Very elaborate techniques may be employed with the help of the computer. In spite of its cost it is closely associated with exploration techniques, especially in conjunction with the scintillation camera. To keep the machine in full-time use and ensure its profitability it is employed in other capacities, for an service management in particular. Each subject is dealt with from its fundamental aspect: nuclear medicine and biomathematics, statistics, informatics; compartment models in nuclear medicine (interpretation of dynamic examinations); quantitive image processing; special computer services (connections with apparatus, service and records management problems) [fr

  16. A Unique Master's Program in Combined Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Chemistry at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarnemark, Gunnar; Allard, Stefan; Ekberg, Christian; Nordlund, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The need for engineers and scientists who can ensure safe and secure use of nuclear energy is large in Sweden and internationally. Chalmers University of Technology is therefore launching a new 2-year master's program in Nuclear Engineering, with start from the autumn of 2009. The program is open to Swedish and foreign students. The program starts with compulsory courses dealing with the basics of nuclear chemistry and physics, radiation protection, nuclear power and reactors, nuclear fuel supply, nuclear waste management and nuclear safety and security. There are also compulsory courses in nuclear industry applications and sustainable energy futures. The subsequent elective courses can be chosen freely but there is also a possibility to choose informal tracks that concentrate on nuclear chemistry or reactor technology and physics. The nuclear chemistry track comprises courses in e.g. chemistry of lanthanides, actinides and transactinides, solvent extraction, radioecology and radioanalytical chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals. The program is finished with a one semester thesis project. This is probably a unique master program in the sense of its combination of deep courses in both nuclear technology and nuclear chemistry.

  17. Use of mathematical modeling in nuclear measurements projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toubon, H.; Menaa, N.; Mirolo, L.; Ducoux, X.; Khalil, R. A.; Chany, P.; Devita, A.

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of nuclear measurement systems is not a new concept. The response of the measurement system is described using a pre-defined mathematical model that depends on a set of parameters. These parameters are determined using a limited set of experimental measurement points e.g. efficiency curve, dose rates... etc. The model that agrees with the few experimental points is called an experimentally validated model. Once these models have been validated, we use mathematical interpolation to find the parameters of interest. Sometimes, when measurements are not practical or are impossible extrapolation is implemented but with care. CANBERRA has been extensively using mathematical modeling for the design and calibration of large and sophisticated systems to create and optimize designs that would be prohibitively expensive with only experimental tools. The case studies that will be presented here are primarily performed with MCNP, CANBERRA's MERCURAD/PASCALYS and ISOCS (In Situ Object Counting Software). For benchmarking purposes, both Monte Carlo and ray-tracing based codes are inter-compared to show models consistency and add a degree of reliability to modeling results. (authors)

  18. Actinide separation chemistry in nuclear waste streams, an OECD Nuclear Energy Agency review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.

    1997-01-01

    The separation of actinide elements from various waste materials, either produced in nuclear fuel cycle or in the past during nuclear weapon production, represent a significant issue facing developed countries. Improvements in the efficiencies of the separation processes can be expected from a better knowledge of the chemistry of these elements in these complex matrices. The Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA has established a task force of experts in actinide chemistry to review the current and developing separation techniques and chemical processes. Recommendations were made for future research and development programs. This article presents briefly the work of the Task Force which will be published soon as an OECD/NEA/NSC Report. (author)

  19. Role of analytical chemistry in the development of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, K.L.

    2012-01-01

    Analytical chemistry is indispensable and plays a pivotal role in the entire gamut of nuclear fuel cycle activities starting from ore refining, conversion, nuclear fuel fabrication, reactor operation, nuclear fuel reprocessing to waste management. As the fuel is the most critical component of the reactor where the fissions take place to produce power, extreme care should be taken to qualify the fuel. For example, in nuclear fuel fabrication, depending upon the reactor system, selection of nuclear fuel has to be made. The fuel for thermal reactors is normally uranium oxide either natural or slightly enriched. For research reactors it can be uranium metal or alloy. The fuel for FBR can be metal, alloy, oxide, carbide or nitride. India is planning an advanced heavy water reactor for utilization of vast resources of thorium in the country. Also research is going on to identify suitable metallic/alloy fuels for our future fast reactors and possible use in fast breeder test reactor. Other advanced fuel materials are also being investigated for thermal reactors for realizing increased performance levels. For example, advanced fuels made from UO 2 doped with Cr 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 are being suggested in LWR applications. These have shown to facilitate pellet densification during sintering and enlarge the pellet grain size. The chemistry of these materials has to be understood during the preparation to the stringent specification. A number of analytical parameters need to be determined as a part of chemical quality control of nuclear materials. Myriad of analytical techniques starting from the classical to sophisticated instrumentation techniques are available for this purpose. Insatiable urge of the analytical chemist enables to devise and adopt new superior methodologies in terms of reduction in the time of analysis, improvement in the measurement precision and accuracy, simplicity of the technique itself etc. Chemical quality control provides a means to ensure that the

  20. Nuclear science in the 20th century. Radiation chemistry and radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Tao; Xu Furong; Zheng Chunkai

    2003-01-01

    The application of nuclear science and technology to chemistry has led to two important subjects, radiation chemistry and radiation processing, which are playing important roles in many aspects of science and society. We review the development and major applications of radiation chemistry and radiation processing, including the basic physical and chemical mechanisms involved

  1. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.H.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry

  2. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

    1987-06-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

  3. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.4--Nuclear chemistry and radiation chemistry sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 24 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fourth one, the content is about Nuclear chemistry and radiation chemistry sub-volume

  4. Nuclear activation analysis work at Analytical Chemistry Division: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, R.; Swain, K.K.; Remya Devi, P.S.; Dalvi, Aditi A.; Ajith, Nicy; Ghosh, M.; Chowdhury, D.P.; Datta, J.; Dasgupta, S.

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear activation analysis using neutron and charged particles is used routinely for analysis and research at Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). Neutron activation analysis at ACD, BARC, Mumbai, India has been pursued since late fifties using Apsara, CIRUS, Dhruva and Critical facility Research reactors, 239 Pu-Be neutron source and neutron generator. Instrumental, Radiochemical, Chemical and Derivative neutron activation analysis approaches are adopted depending on the analyte and the matrix. Large sample neutron activation analysis as well as k 0 -based internal monostandard neutron activation analysis is also used. Charged particle activation analysis at ACD, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata started in late eighties and is being used for industrial applications and research. Proton, alpha, deuteron and heavy ion beams from 224 cm room temperature Variable Energy Cyclotron are used for determination of trace elements, measurement of excitation function, thin layer activation and preparation of endohedral fullerenes encapsulated with radioactive isotopes. Analytical Chemistry Division regularly participates in Inter and Intra laboratory comparison exercises conducted by various organizations including International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the results invariably include values obtained by neutron activation analysis. (author)

  5. High field nuclear magnetic resonance application to polysaccharide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincendon, Marc

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to polysaccharide chemistry using time averaging technique and high fields (100 and 250 MHz). The three methyl signals of methyl cellulose and cellulose triacetate are separated, and the C-6 substituent has been identified. Biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose has been performed using deuterium labelled D-glucose and Acetobacter xylinum. Per-acetylated derivative of bacterial cellulose has been studied by NMR; this study permitted us to determine the quantity of deuterium on each position of the anhydro-glucose unit in the polymer. NMR has also been used to see the anomeric end chain of cellulose and amylose derivatives and to show the fixation of bromine and t-butyl group on the free anomeric end chain of cellulose triacetate. (author) [fr

  6. Annual Report of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    The INCT 2000 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics and nucleonic control systems and accelerators.

  7. Annual Report of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The INCT 2000 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics and nucleonic control systems and accelerators

  8. Water chemistry - one of the key technologies for safe and reliable nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, S.; Otoha, K.; Ishigure, K.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: Water chemistry control is one of the key technologies to establish safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. Continuous and collaborative efforts of plant manufacturers and plant operator utilities have been focused on optimal water chemistry control, for which, a trio of requirements for water chemistry, a) better reliability of reactor structures and fuels, b) lower occupational exposure, and c) fewer radwaste sources, should be simultaneously satisfied. The research committee related to water chemistry of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan has played important roles to enhance improvement in water chemistry control, to share knowledge and experience with water chemistry among plant operators and manufacturers, to establish common technological bases for plant water chemistry and then to transfer them to the next generation related to water chemistry. Furthermore, the committee has tried to contribute to arranging R and D proposals for further improvement in water chemistry control through road map planning

  9. Nuclear Chemistry Institute, Mainz University. Annual Report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, H.O.

    1996-03-01

    The annual report of the Institut fuer Kernchemie addresses inter alia three main research activities. The first belongs to the area of basic research, covering studies in the fields of nuclear fission, chemistry of the super-heavy elements and of heavy-ion reactions extending from the Coulomb barrier to relativistic energies, and nuclear astrophysics in connection with the ''r process''. By means of laser technology, high-precision data could be measured of the ionization energies of berkelium and californium. Studies of atomic clusters in the vacuum of an ionization trap revealed interesting aspects. The second major activity was devoted to the analysis of environmental media, applying inter alia neutron activation analysis and resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). The third activity resulted in the development of novel processes, or the enhancement of existing processes or methods, for applications in basic research work and in environmental analytics. Another item of interest is the summarizing report on the operation of the TRIGA research reactor. (orig./SR) [de

  10. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenke, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; Luo, B.; Rozanov, E.; Gröbner, J.; Maag, L.; Brönnimann, S.; Peter, T.

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size") against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a rapid self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere within a few days after emission, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with an increase in sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of North America and Eurasia to a

  11. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stenke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size" against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a rapid self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere within a few days after emission, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with an increase in sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of North

  12. The importante of physical and mathematical models for nuclear power plants site selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, J.L.P.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of the release of effluents from nuclear installations for the site selection of nuclear power plants is discussed. The main available analysis methods, physical and mathematical, is presented [pt

  13. Many-electron approaches in physics, chemistry and mathematics a multidisciplinary view

    CERN Document Server

    Site, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a broad description of the development and (computational) application of many-electron approaches from a multidisciplinary perspective. In the context of studying many-electron systems Computer Science, Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics are all intimately interconnected. However, beyond a handful of communities working at the interface between these disciplines, there is still a marked separation of subjects. This book seeks to offer a common platform for possible exchanges between the various fields and to introduce the reader to perspectives for potential further developments across the disciplines. The rapid advances of modern technology will inevitably require substantial improvements in the approaches currently used, which will in turn make exchanges between disciplines indispensable. In essence this book is one of the very first attempts at an interdisciplinary approach to the many-electron problem.

  14. Research Data in Core Journals in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Womack

    Full Text Available This study takes a stratified random sample of articles published in 2014 from the top 10 journals in the disciplines of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics, as ranked by impact factor. Sampled articles were examined for their reporting of original data or reuse of prior data, and were coded for whether the data was publicly shared or otherwise made available to readers. Other characteristics such as the sharing of software code used for analysis and use of data citation and DOIs for data were examined. The study finds that data sharing practices are still relatively rare in these disciplines' top journals, but that the disciplines have markedly different practices. Biology top journals share original data at the highest rate, and physics top journals share at the lowest rate. Overall, the study finds that within the top journals, only 13% of articles with original data published in 2014 make the data available to others.

  15. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1985, October 1984-September 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.H.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1985 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiations facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes

  16. Water chemistry technology. One of the key technologies for safe and reliable nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Water chemistry control is one of the key technologies to establish safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. Continuous and collaborative efforts of plant manufacturers and plant operator utilities have been focused on optimal water chemistry control, for which, a trio of requirements for water chemistry should be simultaneously satisfied: (1) better reliability of reactor structures and fuel rods; (2) lower occupational exposure and (3) fewer radwaste sources. Various groups in academia have carried out basic research to support the technical bases of water chemistry in plants. The Research Committee on Water Chemistry of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ), which has now been reorganized as the Division of Water Chemistry (DWC) of AESJ, has played important roles to promote improvements in water chemistry control, to share knowledge about and experiences with water chemistry control among plant operators and manufacturers and to establish common technological bases for plant water chemistry and then to transfer them to the next generation of plant workers engaged in water chemistry. Furthermore, the DWC has tried and succeeded arranging R and D proposals for further improvement in water chemistry control through roadmap planning. In the paper, major achievements in plant technologies and in basic research studies of water chemistry in Japan are reviewed. The contributions of the DWC to the long-term safe management of the damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant until their decommissioning are introduced. (author)

  17. Converting STEM Doctoral Dissertations into Patent Applications: A Study of Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, and Chemical Engineering Dissertations from CIC Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkovich, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral candidates may request short-term embargoes on the release of their dissertations in order to apply for patents. This study examines how often inventions described in dissertations in chemical engineering, chemistry, physics, and mathematics are converted into U.S. patent applications, as well as the relationship between dissertation…

  18. Water chemistry guidance in nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Okada, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Naitoh, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    Water chemistry plays important roles in safe and reliable plant operation which are very critical for future power rate increases as well as aging plant management. Water chemistry control is required to satisfy the need for improved integrity of target materials, and at the same time it must be optimal for all materials and systems in a plant. Optimal water chemistry can be maintained by expert engineers who are knowledgeable about plant water chemistry, who have sufficient experience with plant operation, and whose knowledge is based on fundamental technologies. One of the latest subjects in the field of water chemistry is achieving suitable technical transfers, in which the achievements and experience with plant water chemistry accumulated by experts are successfully transferred to the next generation of engineers. For this purpose, documents on experience with water chemistry are being compiled as the guidance for water chemistry control and water chemistry standards, e.g., standards for chemical analysis procedures and guidance for water chemistry control procedures. This paper introduces the latest activities in Japan in establishing water chemistry guidance involving water chemistry standards, guidance documents and their supporting documents. (orig.)

  19. Mathematical simulation for safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstetter, A.; Raymond, J.R.; Benson, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical models are being developed as part of the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) for assessing the post-closure safety of nuclear waste storage in geologic formations. The objective of this program is to develop the methods and data necessary to determine potential events that might disrupt the integrity of a waste repository and provide pathways for radionuclides to reach the bioshpere, primarily through groundwater transport. Four categories of mathematical models are being developed to assist in the analysis of potential release scenarios and consequences: (1) release scenario analysis models; (2) groundwater flow models; (3) contaminant transport models; and (4) radiation dose models. The development of the release scenario models is in a preliminary stage; the last three categories of models are fully operational. The release scenario models determine the bounds of potential future hydrogeologic changes, including potentially disruptive events. The groundwater flow and contaminant transport models compute the flowpaths, travel times, and concentrations of radionuclides that might migrate from a repository in the event of a breach and potentially reach the biosphere. The dose models compute the radiation doses to future populations. Reference site analyses are in progress to test the models for application to different geologies, including salt domes, bedded salt, and basalt

  20. Сombination of Knowledge of Mathematics and Chemistry in the Study of the Theme “Water Dissociation. Power of Hydrogen” in the Inorganic Chemistry Course

    OpenAIRE

    Melnyk, D. O.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to show effective and convenient way of studying the theme “Water Dissociation. Power of Hydrogen” and facilitate the new material perception by students of pharmaceutical faculty using knowledge of mathematics and chemistry. The correct calculation of pH and ions concentration in solution is necessary for complete perception of the theoretical bases of many disciplines. Using such approach in the study of this theme increases the student's ability to solve the proble...

  1. Application of computer mathematical modeling in nuclear well-logging industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Shaohui

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear well logging techniques have made rapid progress since the first well log calibration facility (the API pits) was dedicated in 1959. Then came the first computer mathematical model in the late 70's. Mathematical modeling can now minimize design and experiment time, as well as provide new information and idea on tool design, environmental effects and result interpretation. The author gives a brief review on the achievements of mathematical modeling on nuclear logging problems

  2. Nuclear chemistry project. Progress report, January 1, 1978--December 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumann, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Research on the nuclear chemistry project is summarized including Coulomb capture of negative muons by atoms and molecules, nuclear structure and spectroscopy, and the preparation and use of radioactive targets both to study the internal electric fields acting on the nuclei of foreign atoms introduced in metallic solids by radioactive decay and determination of nuclear moments by optical hyperfine spectroscopy

  3. Nuclear chemistry and geochemistry research. Carnegie Institute of Technology and Carnegie--Mellon University. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohman, T.P.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented of the activities and results of research in nuclear chemistry, nuclear geochemistry, nuclear cosmochemistry, and other minor areas from 1950 to 1976. A complete listing is given of publications, doctoral dissertations, and reports resulting from the research. A chronological list provides an overview of the activities at any particular time

  4. Nuclear chemistry and geochemistry research. Carnegie Institute of Technology and Carnegie--Mellon University. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohman, T.P.

    1976-05-28

    A summary is presented of the activities and results of research in nuclear chemistry, nuclear geochemistry, nuclear cosmochemistry, and other minor areas from 1950 to 1976. A complete listing is given of publications, doctoral dissertations, and reports resulting from the research. A chronological list provides an overview of the activities at any particular time. (JSR)

  5. Development of chemistry management for Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Kazuaki; Sato, Junichi; Maeda, Katsuji; Nagasawa Katsumi; Hashiura, Sintaro

    2000-01-01

    Onagawa nuclear power plant developed a system for chemistry management of prevention and preservation of power plant. It is able to early detection of data change for prevention of plant. The system supports management of chemical custodian and consists of four parts such as management of water quality of plant , management of liquid waste, management of vapor waste and estimation of performance of chemical equipment. The system has three functions: management of operation, estimation of omen and examination of origin. The function of management of operation supports the routine inspection of chemical custodian by increasing efficiency of analytical and process data collection, practical use of data,, accuracy of data and rapid analysis. Estimation function of omen observes data fetched via online during 24 hr, indicates the small primary change and determines the origins. Examination function of origin supports their quick correspondences at accident and certificates the detailed origins. Histories of development of the system, business systemization, system construction, system functions are explained.The diagram of background of system development, system construction, management functions, verification of analytical data, automatic continuos monitoring diagram, screen of detection of abnormal phenomena, classified diagram of origins for change of water quality in reactor were developed. (S.Y.)

  6. Handbook on process and chemistry of nuclear fuel reprocessing. 3rd edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    The fundamental data on spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and related chemistry was collected and summarized as a new edition of 'Handbook on Process and Chemistry of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing'. The purpose of this handbook is contribution to development of the fuel reprocessing and fuel cycle technology for uranium fuel and mixed oxide fuel utilization. Contents in this book was discussed and reviewed by specialists of science and technology on fuel reprocessing in Japan. (author)

  7. DNA as information: at the crossroads between biology, mathematics, physics and chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Giannerini, Simone; González, Diego L

    2016-03-13

    On the one hand, biology, chemistry and also physics tell us how the process of translating the genetic information into life could possibly work, but we are still very far from a complete understanding of this process. On the other hand, mathematics and statistics give us methods to describe such natural systems-or parts of them-within a theoretical framework. Also, they provide us with hints and predictions that can be tested at the experimental level. Furthermore, there are peculiar aspects of the management of genetic information that are intimately related to information theory and communication theory. This theme issue is aimed at fostering the discussion on the problem of genetic coding and information through the presentation of different innovative points of view. The aim of the editors is to stimulate discussions and scientific exchange that will lead to new research on why and how life can exist from the point of view of the coding and decoding of genetic information. The present introduction represents the point of view of the editors on the main aspects that could be the subject of future scientific debate. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Mathematical model for choosing the nuclear safe matrix compositions for fissile material immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshtein, A.I.; Matyunin, Yu.I.; Poluehktov, P.P.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed for preliminary choice of the nuclear safe matrix compositions for fissile material immobilization. The IBM PC computer software for nuclear safe matrix composition calculations is developed. The limiting concentration of fissile materials in the some used and perspective nuclear safe matrix compositions for radioactive waste immobilization is calculated [ru

  9. Workshop of Advanced Science Research Center, JAERI. Nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry of superheavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Ikezoe, Hiroshi; Nagame, Yuichiro

    2004-03-01

    A liquid drop model predicts that the fission barrier of a nucleus whose atomic number (Z) is larger than 106 disappears, so that such heavier nuclei as Z > 106 cannot exist. The shell effect, however, drastically changes structure of the fission barrier and stabilizes nucleus against fission, predicting the presence of super heavy element (SHE, Z=114-126) with measurable half-life. In the SHE region, a wave function of outermost electron of an atom, which controls chemical properties of an elements, is disturbed or changed by relativistic effects compared to the one from the non-relativistic model. This suggests that the SHEs have different chemical properties from those of lighter elements belonging to the same family. The chemistry of SHEs requires event by event analysis to reveal their chemical properties, thus is called 'atom-at-a-time chemistry'. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been investigating fusion mechanism between heavy nuclei to find out favorable reactions to produce SHE by using JAERI-tandem and booster accelerator. In the JAERI-tandem facility, isotopes of Rf and Db are produced by using actinide targets such as 248 Cm in order to investigate their chemical properties. The present workshop was held in Advanced Science Research Center of JAERI at February 27-28 (2003) in order to discuss current status and future plans for the heavy element research. The workshop also included topics of the radioactive nuclear beam project forwarded by the JAERI-KEK cooperation and the nuclear transmutation facility of J-PARC. Also included is the nuclear fission process as a decay characteristic of heavy elements. There were sixty participants in the workshop including graduate and undergraduate eleven students. We had guests from Germany and Hungary. Through the workshop, we had a common knowledge that researches on SHE in Japan should fill an important role in the world. (author)

  10. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 13: Power Plant Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  11. Present status of water chemistry in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, Ph.; Fiquet, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    As operational experience increases, solutions to mitigate corrosion problems of existing plants are found. They also, hopefully, can solve the corrosion problems for future reactors when materials and design can be modified. Improvement of chemistry solved numerous early problems in PWRs (denting, pitting) and limitated other phenomena such as erosion-corrosion of steels in the secondary circuit. Chemistry has not been successful for other problems such as primary-side cracking of PWRs and has been moderately efficient for stress corrosion cracking or IGA of tubes at the support plate. Based on the experience, several recommendations for an optimum chemistry can be formulated. (author)

  12. Discussion meeting on nuclear-, radio- and radiation chemistry - basics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The following fields have been represented at this meeting: 1. nuclear reactions and properties of the formed products; 2. geo- and cosmochemistry; 3. chemistry of actinides and other radioisotopes; 4. radioanalysis; 5. isotope applications; 6. nuclear fuel cycle. Single papers are listed under appropriate categories. (RB)

  13. IPEN's Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Department - Progress report - 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The biannual progress report of 1995-1996 of IPEN's Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Department - Brazilian organization - introduces the next main topics: neutron activation and radiochemical analysis; nuclear structure and reactions; neutron diffraction; hyperfine interactions; applied physics and instrumentation; publications; academic activities; services; and personnel

  14. IPEN's Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Department - Progress report - 1995-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The biannual progress report of 1995-1996 of IPEN's Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Department - Brazilian organization - introduces the next main topics: neutron activation and radiochemical analysis; nuclear structure and reactions; neutron diffraction; hyperfine interactions; applied physics and instrumentation; publications; academic activities; services; and personnel.

  15. IPEN's Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Department - Progress report - 1995-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The biannual progress report of 1995-1996 of IPEN's Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Department - Brazilian organization - introduces the next main topics: neutron activation and radiochemical analysis; nuclear structure and reactions; neutron diffraction; hyperfine interactions; applied physics and instrumentation; publications; academic activities; services; and personnel.

  16. Coolant circuit water chemistry of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilky, Peter; Doma, Arpad

    1985-01-01

    The numerous advantages of the proper selection of water chemistry parameters including low corrosion rate of the structural materials, hence the low-level activity build-up, depositions, radiation doses were emphasized. Major characteristics of water chemistry applied to the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors including neutral, slightly basic and strong basic ones are discussed. Boric acid is widely used to control reactivity. Primary coolant water chemistry of WWER type reactors which is based on the addition of ammonia and potassium hydroxide to boric acid is compared with that of other reactors. The demineralization of the total condensate of the steam turbines became a general trend in the water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuits. (V.N.)

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Conversion Kinetics during Vitrification of Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokorny, Richard; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jae Hun; Hrma, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    The last part of the high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that has not yet been fully understood, not to mention mathematically modeled, is the cold cap. Cold cap is a layer of dry melter feed, a mixture of the HLW with glass forming and modifying additives. It floats on the pool of molten glass from which it receives the heat necessary for melting. Mathematical modeling of the cold cap solves differential equations that express the mass and energy balances for the feed-to-glass conversion within the cold cap. The feed-to-glass conversion consists of multiple chemical reactions and phase transitions. Reaction enthalpies and mass losses to gases evolved provide an important input for the cold cap modeling. In this study, we measured the kinetics of cold cap reactions using the non-isothermal thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). These thermoanalytical techniques show multiple overlapping peaks, necessitating the development of a deconvolution method for the determination of the kinetics of major reactions needed for cold cap modeling. Assuming that the cold cap reactions are independent, we expressed the overall rate as a sum of rates of individual reactions that we treat as Arrheniustype processes with a power-law based kinetics. Accordingly, we fitted to experimental data the following equation: dx/dT=1/Φ N Σ 1 w i A i (1-x i ) ni exp(-B i /T) (1) where x is the fraction of material reacted, T is temperature, Φ is the heating rate, wi the weight of the i th reaction (the fraction of the total mass loss caused by the i th reaction), Ai is the i th reaction pre-exponential factor, B i is the i th reaction activation energy, and n i is the i th reaction (apparent) reaction order. Because HLW melter feeds contain a large number of constituents, such as oxides, acids, hydroxides, oxyhydrates, and ionic salts, the number of cold cap reactions is very large indeed. For example, hydroxides, oxyhydrates, boric acid, and various

  18. Uranium to Electricity: The Chemistry of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, Frank A.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a series of industrial processes that produce fuel for the production of electricity in nuclear reactors, use the fuel to generate electricity, and subsequently manage the spent reactor fuel. While the physics and engineering of controlled fission are central to the generation of nuclear power, chemistry…

  19. Development of advanced secondary chemistry monitoring system for Korea nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hak; Kim, Chung Tae

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistry control is one of the most important tasks in order to maintain the reliability of plant equipments and extend the operating life of the plant. KEPCO and KOPEC developed a computerized tool for this purpose -ASCMS (advanced secondary chemistry monitoring system) which is able to monitor and diagnose the secondary water chemistry. A prototype system had been installed at KORI 3 nuclear power plant since April 1993 in order to evaluate the system performance. After the implementation of enhancements identified during the testing of the prototype, we have developed the advanced secondary monitoring system, ASCMS which is installed at 5 nuclear power plants and has been under operations since April 1997. The ASCMS comprises PC subsystem designed for data acquisition, data analysis, and data diagnosis. The ASCMS will provide overall information related to steam generator secondary side water chemistry problems and improve plant availability, reduce radiation exposure to workers, and reduce operating and maintenance costs. 6 figs

  20. Research activities at nuclear research institute in water chemistry and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kysela, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Research activities at Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) are presented. They are based on former heavy water reactor program and now on pressurized reactors VVER types which are operated on Czech republic. There is LVR-15 research reactor operated in NRI. The reactor and its experimental facilities is utilized for water chemistry and corrosion studies. NRI services for power plants involve water chemistry optimalization, radioactivity build-up, fuel corrosion and structural materials corrosion tests. (author)

  1. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz University. Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, H.O.

    1993-03-01

    Brief reports summarise the 1992 achievements of the four departments of the Institute relating to the subject areas: Chemistry of most heavy elements, fast separation methods, equipment development, decay properties and structures of nuclei, heavy ion reactions, environmental analytics. The list of publications and lectures of Institute members is given in an annex. (orig.) [de

  2. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz University. Annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, H.O.

    1992-03-01

    Brief reports summarise the 1991 achievements of the four departments of the Institute relating to the subject areas: chemistry of most heavy elements, fast separation methods, equipment development, decay properties and structures of nuclei, heavy ion reactions, environmental analytics. The list of publications and lectures of Institute members is given in an annex. (orig.) [de

  3. Water chemistry experience of nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigure, Kenkichi; Abe, Kenji; Nakajima, Nobuo; Nagao, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1989-01-01

    Japanese LWRs have experienced several troubles caused by corrosions of structural materials in the past ca. 20 years of their operational history, among which are increase in the occupational radiation exposures, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of stainless steel piping in BWR, and steam generator corrosion problems in PWR. These problems arised partly from the improper operation of water chemistry control of reactor coolant systems. Consequently, it has been realized that water chemistry control is one of the most important factors to attain high availability and reliability of LWR, and extensive researches and developments have been conducted in Japan to achieve the optimum water chemistry control, which include the basic laboratory experiments, analyses of plant operational data, loop tests in operating plants and computer code developments. As a result of the continuing efforts, the Japanese LWR plants have currently attained a very high performance in their operation with high availability and low occupational radiation exposures. A brief review is given here on the R and D of water chemistry in Japan. (author)

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in organic chemistry. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschunke, A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are discussed only briefly. The emphasis is laid on developing reader's ability to evaluate resonance spectra. The following topics are covered: principles of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; chemical shift and indirect nuclear spin coupling constants and their relation to the molecular structure; analysis of spectra; and uses for structural analysis and solution of kinetic problems, mainly with regard to organic compounds. Of interest to chemists and graduate students who want to make themselves acquainted with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  5. Handbook on process and chemistry of nuclear fuel reprocessing version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    Aqueous nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, based on PUREX technology, has wide applicability as the principal reprocessing technology of the first generation, and relating technologies, waste management for example, are highly developed, too. It is quite important to establish a database summarizing fundamental information about the process and the chemistry of aqueous reprocessing, because it contributes to establish and develop fuel reprocessing technology and nuclear fuel cycle treating high burn-up UO 2 fuel and spent MOX fuel, and to utilize aqueous reprocessing technology much widely. This handbook is the second edition of the first report, which summarizes the fundamental data on process and chemistry, which was collected and examined by 'Editing Committee of Handbook on Process and Chemistry of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing' from FY 1993 until FY 2000. (author)

  6. The Chemistry Departement of the Institute for Nuclear Physics Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, L.

    1977-01-01

    In 1946, the Institute for Nuclear Physics Research (IKO) in Amsterdam was founded as a typical post World War II effort to cope with the surge in scientific research, primarily in the USA. At present, the Institute encompasses almost 250 workers - including a Philips research group - out of which nearly 30 are members of the Chemistry Department. In the beginning, the investigations dealt with more or less conventional tracerwork using long-lived radionuclides produced in nuclear reactors. This changed rapidly with the synchrocyclotron coming into operation in 1947. The present can be best characterized as a sort of a transition state. Emphasis has been laid upon more typical chemical aspects of the research program: a shift from ''nuclear'' chemistry to ''radio'' chemistry. The future is determined by the 500 MeV linear electron accelerator, dubbed MEA (Medium Energy Accelerator) already under construction. (T.G.)

  7. Operational experience, evolution and developments in water chemistry in Indian Nuclear Power Plants - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Y.S.R.

    2000-01-01

    Lessons learnt from the experiences at nuclear power plants have enriched the understanding of corrosion behaviour in water systems. The need for proper water chemistry control not only during operation but also during fabrication and preoperational tests is clearly seen. It should not be construed that maintenance of proper water chemistry is a panacea for all corrosion and other associated problems. Unless adequate care is taken in selection of material and sound design and fabrication practices are followed, no regime of water chemistry can help in eliminating failure due to corrosion

  8. FOREWORD: Third Nordic Symposium on Computer Simulation in Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaski, K.; Salomaa, M.

    1990-01-01

    These are Proceedings of the Third Nordic Symposium on Computer Simulation in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Mathematics, held August 25-26, 1989, at Lahti (Finland). The Symposium belongs to an annual series of Meetings, the first one of which was arranged in 1987 at Lund (Sweden) and the second one in 1988 at Kolle-Kolle near Copenhagen (Denmark). Although these Symposia have thus far been essentially Nordic events, their international character has increased significantly; the trend is vividly reflected through contributions in the present Topical Issue. The interdisciplinary nature of Computational Science is central to the activity; this fundamental aspect is also responsible, in an essential way, for its rapidly increasing impact. Crucially important to a wide spectrum of superficially disparate fields is the common need for extensive - and often quite demanding - computational modelling. For such theoretical models, no closed-form (analytical) solutions are available or they would be extremely difficult to find; hence one must rather resort to the Art of performing computational investigations. Among the unifying features in the computational research are the methods of simulation employed; methods which frequently are quite closely related with each other even for faculties of science that are quite unrelated. Computer simulation in Natural Sciences is presently apprehended as a discipline on its own right, occupying a broad region somewhere between the experimental and theoretical methods, but also partially overlapping with and complementing them. - Whichever its proper definition may be, the computational approach serves as a novel and an extremely versatile tool with which one can equally well perform "pure" experimental modelling and conduct "computational theory". Computational studies that have earlier been made possible only through supercomputers have opened unexpected, as well as exciting, novel frontiers equally in mathematics (e.g., fractals

  9. Training of personnel for nuclear power at Nuclear Physics Department of Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Comenius University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.; Florek, M.; Chudy, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Science Faculty of the Comenius University in Bratislava established the nuclear physics specialization in 1962. Students enrolled in the study course acquired basic knowledge in mathematics and physics, foundations of the microstructure of matter and experimental methods of nuclear physics and technics. Since 1976 nuclear physics has been a separate study field which from the fourth year of study has its narrow specializations, namely applied nuclear physics, experimental nuclear physics and physics of the atomic nucleus and elementary particles. A change has recently been made in the system of optional lectures with the aim of providing the students with a wider range of knowledge in the physics of nuclear reactors and the use of computer technology and microelectronics in nuclear physics and technology. In 1980 a postgraduate study course was opened oriented to nuclear power and the environment. (E.S.)

  10. Regulatory oversight strategy for chemistry program at Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameswaran; Ram

    2012-09-01

    Chemistry program is one of the essential programs for the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It helps to ensure the necessary integrity, reliability and availability of plant structures, systems and components important to safety. Additionally, the program plays an important role in asset preservation, limiting radiation exposure and environmental protection. A good chemistry program will minimize corrosion of materials, reduce activation products, minimize of the buildup of radioactive material leading to occupational radiation exposure and it helps limit the release of chemicals and radioactive materials to the environment. The legal basis for the chemistry oversight at Canadian NPPs is established by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and its associated regulations. It draws on the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory framework and NPP operating license conditions that include applicable standards such as CAN/CSA N286-05 Management System Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants. This paper focuses on the regulatory oversight strategy used in Canada to assess the performance of chemistry program at the nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensed by CNSC. The strategy consists of a combination of inspection and performance monitoring activities. The activities are further supported from information gathered through staff inspections of cross-cutting areas such as maintenance, corrective-action follow-ups, event reviews and safety related performance indicators. (authors)

  11. Assessment of EPRI water chemistry guidelines for new nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid Richard; Kim Karen; McCree, Anisa; Eaker, Richard; Sawochka, Steve; Giannelli, Joe

    2012-09-01

    Water chemistry control technologies for nuclear power plants have been significantly enhanced over the past few decades to improve material and equipment reliability and fuel performance, and to minimize radionuclide production and transport. Chemistry Guidelines have been developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for currently operating plants and have been intermittently revised over the past twenty-five years for the protection of systems and components and for radiation management. As new plants are being designed for improved safety and increased power production, it is important to ensure that the designs consider implementation of state-of-the-art, industry developed water chemistry controls. In parallel, the industry will need to consider and update water chemistry guidelines as well as plant startup and operational strategies based on the advanced plant designs. EPRI has performed assessments of water chemistry control guidance or assumptions provided in design and licensing documents for several advanced plant designs. These designs include: Westinghouse AP1000 Pressurized Water Reactor AREVA US-EPR Pressurized Water Reactor Mitsubishi Nuclear Energy Systems/Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power APR1400 Pressurized Water Reactor Toshiba Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) General Electric-Hitachi Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) The intent of these assessments was to identify key design differences in each of the new plant designs relative to the current operating fleet and to identify differences in water chemistry specifications or design assumptions provided in design and licensing documents for the plants in comparison to current EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines. This paper provides a summary of the key results of these assessments. The fundamental design and operation of the advanced plants is similar to the currently operating fleet. As such, the new plants are

  12. 9. International symposium on nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The report presents the abstracts of 30 contributions covering mainly photochemical reactions, irradiation of organic chemicals, gamma-radiation in wastewater treatment, PIXE analysis, and some aspects of nuclear spectroscopic instrumentation in radiochemical analysis

  13. MathBrowser: Web-Enabled Mathematical Software with Application to the Chemistry Curriculum, v 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Jack G.

    1997-10-01

    MathSoft: Cambridge, MA, 1996; free via ftp from www.mathsoft.com. The movement to provide computer-based applications in chemistry has come to focus on three main areas: software aimed at specific applications (drawing, simulation, data analysis, etc.), multimedia applications designed to assist in the presentation of conceptual information, and packages to be used in conjunction with a particular textbook at a specific point in the chemistry curriculum. The result is a situation where no single software package devoted to problem solving can be used across a large segment of the curriculum. Adoption of World Wide Web (WWW) technology by a manufacturer of mathematical software, however, has produced software that provides an attractive means of providing a problem-solving resource to students in courses from freshman through senior level.

  14. Chemistry and the development of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amphlett, C.B.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter traces the chemical industry's involvement in the development of the nuclear industry from wartime projects to provide fissile material for bombs to the challenge of producing nuclear power competitively in the post-war period. Skills in the chemical industry have led to the production of new fuels by simpler methods, improvements in reprocessing and advances in the management and storage of radioactive wastes. (UK)

  15. Software design of automatic counting system for nuclear track based on mathematical morphology algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yi; Mao Wanchong

    2010-01-01

    The parameter measurement of nuclear track occupies an important position in the field of nuclear technology. However, traditional artificial counting method has many limitations. In recent years, DSP and digital image processing technology have been applied in nuclear field more and more. For the sake of reducing errors of visual measurement in artificial counting method, an automatic counting system for nuclear track based on DM642 real-time image processing platform is introduced in this article, which is able to effectively remove interferences from the background and noise points, as well as automatically extract nuclear track-points by using mathematical morphology algorithm. (authors)

  16. Water Chemistry Control Technology to Improve the Performance of Nuclear Power Plants for Extended Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Na, J. W.; Lee, E. H.

    2010-07-01

    Ο To Develop the technology to manage the problems of AOA and radiation, corrosion as long term PWR operation. Ο To Establish the advanced water chemical operating systems. - Development of the proper water chemistry guidelines for long term PWR operation. AOA(Axial Offest Anomaly) has been reported in many PWR plants in the world, including Korea, especially in the plants of higher burn-up and longer cycle operation or power up-rate. A test loop has been designed and made by KAERI, in order to investigate and mitigate AOA problems in Korea. This project included the study of hydrodynamic simulation and the modeling about AOA. The analysis of radioactive crud was performed to investigate of NPPs primary water chemical effect on AOA and to reduce the radioactive dose rate. The high temperature measurement system was developed to on-line monitor of water chemistry in nuclear power plants. The effects of various environmental factors such as temperature, pressure, and flow rate on YSZ-based pH electrode were evaluated for ensuring the accuracy of high-temperature pH measurement. The inhibition technology for fouling and SCC of SG tube was evaluated to establish the water chemistry technology of corrosion control of nuclear system. The high temperature and high pressure crevice chemistry analysis test loop was manufactured to develop the water chemistry technology of crevice chemistry control

  17. HMI Department of Nuclear Chemistry and Reactor. Scientific report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The report gives an account of ongoing R and D work in the following fields: 1) Neutron scattering (method development, crystallography); 2) Damage to solids due to radiation (i.a. reactions to failure, atom transport, changes in material properties); 3) Reactor chemistry (solidification products far radioactive wastes; gas/graphite reactions within the first wall of a fusion reactor); 4) Biomedical trace element research (transport and storage of bioelements, trace element analytics); 5) Geochemical reservoir exploration technique (distribution of elements, complexing etc.); 6) Reactor operation, utilization and possible extensions. Furthermore, a survey is given on publications and lectures as well as on correlations with other fields of research. (RB) [de

  18. Primary Water Chemistry Control at Units of Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, J.; Pinter, G. Patek T.; Tilky, P.; Doma, A. [Paks Nuclear Power Plant Co. Ltd., Paks (Hungary); Osz, J. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-03-15

    The primary water chemistry of the four identical units of Paks Nuclear Power Plant has been developed based on Western type PWR units, taking into consideration some Russian modifications. The political changes in the 1990s have also influenced the water chemistry specifications and directions. At PWR units the transition operational modes have been developed while in case of WWER units - in lack of central uniform regulation - this question has become the competence and responsibility of each individual plant. This problem has resulted in separate water chemistry developments with a considerable time delay. The need for lifetime extensions worldwide has made the development of startup and shutdown chemistry procedures extremely important, since they considerably influence the long term and safe operation of plants. The uniformly structured limit value system, the principles applied for the system development, and the logic schemes for actions to be taken are discussed in the paper, both for normal operation and transition modes. (author)

  19. Water Chemistry and Chemistry Monitoring at Thermal and Nuclear Power Plants: Problems and Tasks (Based on Proceedings of Conferences)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, B. M.

    2018-02-01

    In late May-early June 2017, two international science and technology conferences on problems of water chemistry and chemistry monitoring at thermal and nuclear power plants were held. The participants of both the first conference held at OAO VTI and the second conference that took place at NITI formulated the problems of the development of the regulatory base and implementation of promising water treatment technologies and outlined the ways of improving the water chemistry and chemistry monitoring at TPPs and NPPs for the near future. It was pointed out that the new amine-containing VTIAMIN agent developed by OAO VTI had been successfully tested on the power-generating units equipped with steam-gas plants to establish the minimum excess of the film-forming amine in the power-generating unit circuit that ensures the protection of the metal as 5-10 μg/dm3. A flow-injection technique for the analysis of trace concentrations of chlorides was proposed; the technique applied to the condensate of the 1000-MW steam turbine of the NPP power-generating unit yields the results comparable with the results obtained by the ion chromatography and the potentiometric method using the solver electrode. The participants of the conferences were demonstrated new Russian instruments to analyze the water media at the TPPs and NPPs, including the total organic carbon analyzer and the analyzer of mineral impurities in the condensate and feed water, that won a gold medal at the 45th International Exhibition of Inventions held in Geneva this April.

  20. Properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Henry, E.A.; Griffin, H.C.; Lien, O.G. III; Lane, S.M.; Stevenson, P.C.; Yaffe, R.P.; Skarnemark, G.

    1979-09-01

    A review is given of the properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry and includes the techniques used in elemental isolation and current research on the structure of nuclei near 132 Sn, particle emission, and coexisting structure in both neutron-poor and neutron-rich nuclei. 35 references

  1. Development of High Temperature Chemistry Measurement System for Establishment of On-Line Water Chemistry Surveillance Network in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jei Won; Kim, Won Ho; Song, Kyu Seok; Joo, Ki Soo; Choi, Ke Chon; Ha, Yeong Keong; Ahn, Hong Joo; Im, Hee Jung; Maeng, Wan Young

    2010-07-01

    An integrated high-temperature water chemistry sensor (pH, E redox ) was developed for the establishment of the on-line water chemistry surveillance system in nuclear power plants. The basic performance of the integrated sensor was confirmed in high-temperature (280 .deg. C, 150kg/m 2 ) lithium borate solutions by using the relationship between the concentration of lithium ion and pH-E redox values. Especially, the effects of various environmental factors such as temperature, pressure, and flow rate on YSZ-based pH electrode were evaluated for ensuring the accuracy of high-temperature pH measurement. And the relationships between each water chemistry factor (pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity) were induced for enhancing the credibility of water chemistry measurement. In addition, on the basis of the evaluation of a nuclear plant design company, we suggested potential installation positions of the measurement system in a nuclear power plant

  2. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF 3 and dissolved UF 4 , and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC 2 . Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF 4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U 4+ /U 3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  3. HMI Department of Nuclear Chemistry and Reactor. Scientific report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This report depicts in brief the essential issues of R and D work carried out within the various departments of the Institute in 1982. Such are: in the field of 'neutron scatter': observation of critical phenomena with incoherent neutron scatter; in the field of 'radiation damage to solids': irradiation-induced diffusion, nucleation and dissociation in metals and alloys; in the field of 'reactor chemistry': radiation effects in selected crystalline phases of solidificated high-activity wastes; in the field of 'trace elements in bio-medicine': investigation of the biological function of selenium with respect to reproduction as values work on paraplacental exchange of Cd and Pb during pregnancy; in the field of 'geochemistry': investigation of aqueous geochemical systems under hydrothermal pressure and temperature conditions; in the field of 'reactor operation': periods of shutdown owing to faulty operation, expansion planning, utilization for irradiation experiments. The report also includes comprehensive lists of publications and lectures. (RB) [de

  4. A study on the water chemistry in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Sung Ki; Yang, Kyung Rin; Koo Je Hyoo; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Joung Soo; Jang, Soon Shik; Park, Su Hoon; Song, Myung Ho; Jeon, Kyung Soo

    1987-12-01

    Significant corrosion-failures occurring in the important components or facilities in the secondary-side system cause various problems in safety due to the leakage of radioactive substances and consequently induce the reduction of the operational efficiency of the plants. In addition, the replacement of the failed components or facilities results in the tremendous expenses and a long term shutdown. The objective of the research was to ensure the safety and integrity of the plants, to improve the efficiency of the plant operation, and to prevent the shortening of plant life by improving the controlling technique of the water chemistry and minimizing the corrosion-failures in the important components and/or facilities of the plants

  5. HMI Department of Nuclear Chemistry and Reactor. Scientific report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    In the reported year of 1983, R and D work was carried out in the following work groups and fields: 1. 'Neutron scattering' (questions of crystal physics for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering, crystal analysis, development work for the extension of BER-II); 2. 'Damage to solids due to radiation' (reactions to failure, atom transport in irradiated materials under mechanical stress, surface effects, materials development for fusion technology etc.); 3. 'Reactor Chemistry' (development and characterization of solidification products for radioactive wastes, induced activity and corrosion of materials for fusion technology, etc.); 4. 'Trace element research in biomedicine' (transport and storage of bioelements in the organism, and related analyses); 5. 'Geochemistry' (geochemistry of reservoirs, trace element distribution and complexing in geochemically relevant systems). Operational and utilization data are given for the BER-II in tables; scientific publications and lectures made members of the institute and by guests are listed. (RB) [de

  6. General Chemistry Exercises Focused on the Professional Profile on Nuclear Careers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau-González, Maritza; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises; Corona-Hernández, José Ángel; Santamaría-Arbona, María Teresa; Abreu-Díaz, Aidamary

    2016-01-01

    The subject General Chemistry is part of the base curriculum of the nuclear profile careers: Radiochemistry Careers and Engineering on Nuclear Technologies and Energetics. It has as main objectives the complementing, the deep analysis and integration of the basic principles of chemistry as a science, and due to its content, it constitutes an excellent platform to settle inter-subject relationships with those of the nuclear specialties. The aim of this paper is presenting linking examples among the subjects, through exercises that are supported in the Moodle Platform, conceived for the independent work of students, which besides facilitating the consolidation of the received knowledge in high school, and those ones in the first year of the career, allow them to be familiar with the future of their profession. (author)

  7. Twenty years of chemistry associated with the needs and utilization of nuclear reactors at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute of nuclear sciences, Vinca, Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    This publication covers nine review papers on the following topics related to the needs and utilization of nuclear reactors in the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences during previous twenty years: radiochemistry, hot atom chemistry, isotope production, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, chemistry of transuranium elements; liquid radioactive waste processing, purification of reactor coolant water by inorganic ion exchangers, research related to deuterium concentration processes, and chemical dosimetry at the RA reactor [sr

  8. Incorporating nuclear chemistry as an education tool in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum. A description of the curriculum project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppinger, E.W.; Robertson, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    Although many areas of major national need depend critically on professionals trained in nuclear and radiochemistry, educational opportunities and student interest in this area have declined steadily for the last twenty years. One major contributing factor to the lack of student interest is that most students in science and chemistry courses are never introduced to these topics. This deficiency in sciences curricula, coupled with the negative public perception towards all things 'nuclear', has resulted in a serious shortage of individuals with a background in this area. We propose to address this problem by 'educating the educators' - providing faculty from two- and four-year colleges and high school science teachers with the curriculum materials, training, and motivation to incorporate these topics on a continuing basis in their curricula. Two advantages of this approach are; it will generate scientists with a basic understanding of this field and as teachers incorporate nuclear topics, many students will have the opportunity to reflect on the role of science in a technological society. (author)

  9. HMI Department of Nuclear Chemistry and Reactor. Scientific report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The annual report presents the results of the R and D activities in the following fields of work: 1) Neutron scattering (crystals physics, crystal structure and chemical bonding, studies for developments and modifications in the BER-2), 2) Radiation-induced damage to solids (defect reactions, atomic transport, change of mechanical properties of materials, or stability of alloys, development of thermonuclear reactor materials). 3) Reactor chemistry (solidification of radioactive wastes, corrosion and behaviour of gases in graphite). 4) Trace elements and their significance for health and food (transport and accumulation in the organism, development of analytical methods for diagnostic and therapy control purposes). 5) Geochemical prospecting of deposits (element abundance in earth crust or deposits, geochemical indicators, complex forming constants and distribution coefficients in geochemical systems). 6. Neutron scattering II (spectrometer equipment for inelastic neutron scattering experiments in the BER-2). The report also lists publications, lectures, and other scientific literature prepared by HMI members in 1985, and work performed by guest scientists. (RB) [de

  10. Improving the reliability of nuclear reprocessing by application of computers and mathematical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabowitsch, E.; Trauboth, H.

    1982-01-01

    After a brief survey of the present and expected future state of nuclear energy utilization, which should demonstrate the significance of nuclear reprocessing, safety and reliability aspects of nuclear reprocessing plants (NRP) are considered. Then, the principal possibilities of modern computer technology including computer systems architecture and application-oriented software for improving the reliability and availability are outlined. In this context, two information systems being developed at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe (KfK) are briefly described. For design evaluation of certain areas of a large NRP mathematical methods and computer-aided tools developed, used or being designed by KfK are discussed. In conclusion, future research to be pursued in information processing and applied mathematics in support of reliable operation of NRP's is proposed. (Auth.)

  11. Chemistry of fission product iodine under nuclear reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.; Bell, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    The radioisotopes of iodine are generally acknowledged to be the species whose release into the biosphere as a result of a nuclear reactor accident is of the greatest concern. In the course of its release, the fission product is subjected to differing chemical environments; these can alter the physicochemical form of the fission product and thus modify the manner and extent to which release occurs. Both the chemical environments which are characteristic of reactor accidents and their effect in determining physical and chemical form of fission product iodine have been studied extensively, and are reviewed in this report. 76 refs

  12. Iron oxide redox chemistry and nuclear fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobe, D.J.; Lemire, R.J.; Taylor, P.

    1997-04-01

    Solubility and stability data for iron (III) oxides and aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) species are reviewed, and selected values are used to calculate potential-pH diagrams for the iron system at temperatures of 25 and 100 deg C, chloride activities {C1 - } = 10 -2 and 1 mol/kg, total carbonate activity {C T } = 10 -3 mol/kg, and iron(III) oxide/oxyhydroxide solubility products (25 deg C values) K sp = {Fe 3+ }{OH - } 3 = 10 -38.5 , 10 -40 and 10 -42 . The temperatures and anion concentrations bracket the range of conditions expected in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. The three solubility products represent a conservative upper limit, a most probable value, and a minimum credible value, respectively, for the iron oxides likely to be important in controlling redox conditions in a disposal vault for CANDU nuclear reactor fuel. Only in the first of these three cases do the calculated redox potentials significantly exceed values under which oxidative dissolution of the fuel may occur. (author)

  13. Assessment of EPRI water chemistry guidelines for new nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.; Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, California (United States); Eaker, R. [Richard W. Eaker, LLC, Matthews, North Carolina (United States); Giannelli, J.; Tangen, J. [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, New Jersey (United States); Gorman, J.; Marks, C. [Dominion Engineering, Inc., Reston, Virginia (United States); Sawochka, S. [NWT Corp., San Jose, California (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Water chemistry control technologies for nuclear power plants have been significantly enhanced over the past few decades to improve material and equipment reliability and fuel performance, and to minimize radionuclide production and transport. Chemistry Guidelines have been developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for current operating plants and have been intermittently revised over the past twenty-five years for the protection of systems and components and for radiation management. As new plants are being designed for improved safety and increased power production, it is important to ensure that the designs consider implementation of industry approved water chemistry controls. In parallel, the industry will need to consider and develop updated water chemistry guidelines as well as plant startup and operational strategies based on the advanced plant designs. In 2010, EPRI began to assess chemistry control strategies at advanced plants, based on the Design Control Documents (DCDs), Combined Construction and Operating License Applications (COLA), and operating experiences (where they exist) against current Water Chemistry Guidelines. Based on this assessment, differences between planned chemistry operations at new plants and the current Guidelines will be identified. This assessment will form the basis of future activities to address these differences. The project will also assess and provide, as feasible, water chemistry guidance for startup and hot functional testing of the new plants. EPRI will initially assess the GE-Hitachi/Toshiba ABWR and the Westinghouse AP1000 designs. EPRI subsequently plans to assess other plant designs such as the AREVA U.S. EPR, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) U.S. APWR, and GE-Hitachi (GE-H) ESBWR. This paper discusses the 2010 assessments of the ABWR and AP1000. (author)

  14. Assessment of EPRI water chemistry guidelines for new nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Eaker, R.; Giannelli, J.; Tangen, J.; Gorman, J.; Marks, C.; Sawochka, S.

    2010-01-01

    Water chemistry control technologies for nuclear power plants have been significantly enhanced over the past few decades to improve material and equipment reliability and fuel performance, and to minimize radionuclide production and transport. Chemistry Guidelines have been developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for current operating plants and have been intermittently revised over the past twenty-five years for the protection of systems and components and for radiation management. As new plants are being designed for improved safety and increased power production, it is important to ensure that the designs consider implementation of industry approved water chemistry controls. In parallel, the industry will need to consider and develop updated water chemistry guidelines as well as plant startup and operational strategies based on the advanced plant designs. In 2010, EPRI began to assess chemistry control strategies at advanced plants, based on the Design Control Documents (DCDs), Combined Construction and Operating License Applications (COLA), and operating experiences (where they exist) against current Water Chemistry Guidelines. Based on this assessment, differences between planned chemistry operations at new plants and the current Guidelines will be identified. This assessment will form the basis of future activities to address these differences. The project will also assess and provide, as feasible, water chemistry guidance for startup and hot functional testing of the new plants. EPRI will initially assess the GE-Hitachi/Toshiba ABWR and the Westinghouse AP1000 designs. EPRI subsequently plans to assess other plant designs such as the AREVA U.S. EPR, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) U.S. APWR, and GE-Hitachi (GE-H) ESBWR. This paper discusses the 2010 assessments of the ABWR and AP1000. (author)

  15. Aspects of chemistry in management of radioactive liquid wastes from nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeotikar, R.G.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear energy is the only source available to the mankind to fulfill the continuous and ever increasing demand of energy. The public acceptance and popularity of nuclear energy depends to a large extent on management of radioactive waste. The nuclear waste management demands eco-friendly process/systems. This article highlights the sources of different types of radioactive liquid wastes generated in the nuclear installation and their treatment process. The radioactive liquid waste is classified mainly into three categories based on activity levels e.g. low, intermediate and high level. The management of radioactive liquid waste is very critical because of its 'mobility and liquid' nature. Secondly the liquid wastes have wide range of activity and chemistry spectrum and their volumes are also different. Hence the methods for management of different types of liquid wastes are also different. Mostly the treatment and conditioning processes are chemical processes. The chemistry involved in the treatment and conditioning of these wastes, problems related with chemistry for each processes and efforts to solve these problems, aspects of adoption on plant scale, etc., have been discussed in this article. (author)

  16. Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Eringen, A Cemal

    2013-01-01

    Continuum Physics: Volume 1 - Mathematics is a collection of papers that discusses certain selected mathematical methods used in the study of continuum physics. Papers in this collection deal with developments in mathematics in continuum physics and its applications such as, group theory functional analysis, theory of invariants, and stochastic processes. Part I explains tensor analysis, including the geometry of subspaces and the geometry of Finsler. Part II discusses group theory, which also covers lattices, morphisms, and crystallographic groups. Part III reviews the theory of invariants th

  17. Essential Concepts and Underlying Theories from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics for "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ann; Provost, Joseph; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A.; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members from around the country. The workshops have focused on developing lists of Core Principles or Foundational Concepts in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, a list of foundational skills, and foundational concepts from Physics, Chemistry,…

  18. Underlying mechanism in the water chemistry of nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, G.N.

    1978-01-01

    The equilibrium between dissolved hydrogen and oxygen in the molecular decomposition of water, and the equilibrium between hydrogen ions and hydroxyl ions in the ionic dissociation of water, both constitute important underlying mechanisms in the corrosion behaviour of water. The two equilibria, and the rates of the reactions involved in water and steam, will be compared and contrasted as a function of temperature, pressure and radiation. The effects of the equilibria on the hydrolysis and solubility of ferrous and ferric ions, and the ions of other metals, will be discussed in relation to the control of conditions in the coolant circuits of nuclear reactors. A third mechanism to discussed is the electrochemical exchange reactions that can contribute to the contamination of circuits. (author)

  19. Chemistry research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikis, A.C.; Garisto, F.; Lemire, R.J.; Paquette, J.; Sagert, N.H.; Saluja, P.P.S.; Sunder, S.; Taylor, P.

    1988-01-01

    This publication reviews chemical research in support of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The overall objective of this research is to develop the fundamental understanding required to demonstrate the suitability of waste immobilization media and processes, and to develop the chemical information required to predict the long-term behaviour of radionuclides in the geosphere after the waste form and the various engineered barriers containing it have failed. Key studies towards the above objective include experimental and theoretical studies of uranium dioxide oxidation/dissolution; compilation of thermodynamic databases and an experimental program to determine unavailable thermodynamic data; studies of hydrothermal alteration of minerals and radionuclide interactions with such minerals; and a study examining actinide colloid formation, as well as sorption of actinides on groundwater colloids

  20. Proceedings of BARC golden jubilee year DAE-BRNS topical symposium on role of analytical chemistry in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, K.K.; Venkataramani, B.

    2007-01-01

    Among the various disciplines in Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry is unique, because it is an integral part of every aspect of technology- product and process development and deployment. In Nuclear Industry, the quality assurance criteria are very stringent. And truly, Analytical Chemistry has continued to play a pivotal role in the entire nuclear fuel cycle, since the beginning of the Indian Atomic Energy Programme. The conference covers invited talk, nuclear materials, reactor systems, thorium technology, alternate energy sources, biology, agriculture and environment, water technology, isotope, radiation and laser technology, development of analytical instruments, and reference materials and inter-comparison exercises. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately. (author)

  1. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics 2015 (ScieTech 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaol, F. L.

    2015-06-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics 2015 (ScieTech 2015), was held at The Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali on 31 January - 1 February 2015. The ScieTech 2015 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists from around the world. ScieTech 2015 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within mathematics, chemistry and physics. As we already know that science and technology have brought tremendous benefits for human civilization. People are becoming healthier, wealthier, better educated, more peaceful, increasingly connected, and living longer. Of course, science and technology provide many answers to global challenges, but we will face more complex problems in the next decade due to increasing world population, limitation of energy, and climate change. Therefore, researchers should be more active in conducting research that enables collaboration between one and the others. Interdisciplinary cooperation is absolutely necessary in order to create a smart system for solving the global problems. We need a global and general long-term view of the future with long-range goals for solving complex problems in next decade. Therefore the conference was held to be a forum for researchers from different disciplines to start collaborating and conducting research that provides a solution to the global issues. The theme of ScieTech 2015 was ''The interdisciplinary Application between Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics to enhance the Quality of Life''. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting conference program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 197 papers and after rigorous review, 59 papers were accepted. The participants came from 19

  2. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Research progress is reported in programs on fuel-salt chemistry, properties of compounds in the Li--Te system, Te spectroscopy UF 4 --H equilibria, porous electrode studies of molten salts, fuel salt-coolant salt reactions, thermodynamic properties of transition-metal fluorides, and properties of sodium fluoroborate. Developmental work on analytical methods is summarized including in-line analysis of molten MSBR fuel, analysis of coolant-salts for tritium, analysis of molten LiF--BeF 2 --ThF 4 for Fe and analysis of LiF--BeF--ThF 4 for Te

  3. The use of computers for chemistry and corrosion monitoring in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eber, K.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion of steam generators in the nuclear power industry has caused increasingly expensive maintenance work during refueling outages. To assist in the control and monitoring of this problem, Northeast Utilities has developed computer programs for tracking steam generator water chemistry and steam generator eddy current inspection data. These programs have allowed detailed analytical studies to be performed which would have been extremely difficult without the use of computers. The paper discusses the capabilities and uses of a chemistry data management system. An example analysis of steam generator chemistry during plant startup is presented. The corrosion monitoring capabilities of several eddy current data analysis programs are also discussed. It is demonstrated how these programs allow a detailed analysis of the effects of a chemical cleaning operation to remove sludge from the steam generators. Applications of these analytical methods to other industries is also discussed

  4. Road maps on research and development plans for water chemistry of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Katsumura, Yosuke; Fuse, Motomasa; Takamori, Kenro; Tsuchiuchi, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Noriyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Water chemistry of nuclear power plants has played an important role in reduction of personnel doses, structural materials and fuel integrity assurance, and reduction of radioactive wastes production. Further contributions are requested for advanced utilization of the LWR, advanced fuels and aging management of plants. Since water chemistry has an effect on all structure and materials immersed and at the same time affected by them, the optimum control not sticking to specific issues and covering the whole plant is required for these requests. Taking account of roles and activities of the industry, governmental institutes and academia, road maps on research and development plans for water chemistry were compiled into identified eleven items with targets and counter measures taken, such as common basic technologies, dose reduction, SCC mitigation, fuel cans corrosion/hydrogen absorption mitigation, condition based maintenance and flow accelerated corrosion mitigation. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Training Course of Experimental Chemistry in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Solid State and Solution Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju hyeong; Park, Kwangheon; Kim, Tae hoon; Park, Hyoung gyu; Kim, Jisu [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hyuk jin [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chan ki; Kang, Do kyu; Jeong, Hyeon jun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this experimental study program in Tohoku University, basic experiments were done by the participants. First one is the hydrogen reduction experiment of the mixture of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}. Second one is to observe microscopic structure of solid solution of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} using SEM/EDX and XRD system, simulated fuel debris. Third one is milking process of {sup 239}Np from {sup 243}Am by solvent extraction using Tri-n-Octylamine (TOA). Last one is solvent extraction in PUREX by the simulated mixed aqueous solution of U, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 239}Np which is represented minor actinide elements included in the spent nuclear fuel. Uranium is separated from aqueous phase to organic phase during solvent extraction procedure using TBP and dodecane. Also, neptunium can be extracted to organic phase as nitric acid concentration change. The extraction behavior of neptunium is different by oxidation state in aqueous phase. The behavior of neptunium is represented as a combined form of these oxidation states in experiment. Therefore, because the oxidation states of neptunium can be controlled by controlling the concentration of nitric acid, the extractability of neptunium can be controlled.

  6. Application of nuclear chemistry in the study of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, P.K.

    2000-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of the strange Xenon components-HL and the s-type xenon can be explained in a straightforward manner as due to the alteration of the isotopic composition of xenon caused by a combined effect of (a) mass-fractionation, (b) spallation and (c) stellar-temperature neutron-capture reactions. As much as 42.49% of total 136 Xe (Σ 136 Xe) found in the Allende diamond inclusions is 244 Pu fission xenon ( 136f Xe) and the trapped xenon is severely mass-fractionated in such a manner that the lighter xenon isotopes are systematically depleted relative to the heavier isotopes. The relative abundances of 130 Xe and 132 Xe in the trapped xenon component are both markedly enhanced indicating that it was irradiated with a total flux of 1.2 x 10 23 n x cm -2 of stellar-temperature (10 keV) neutrons. The xenon found in the s-type xenon, on the other hand, resemble that of the atmospheric xenon irradiated with a total flux of about 6.0 x 10 23 n x cm -2 of 10 keV neutrons. These results indicate that we are seeing here the effects of nuclear processes occurring inside of a star, such as the exploding supernova. (author)

  7. Water chemistry control of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Yuichi; Makino, Ichiro; Yamauchi, Sumio; Fukuda, Fumihito.

    1992-01-01

    In PWR power plants, the primary system taking heat out of nuclear reactors and the secondary system generating steam and driving turbines are completely separated by steam generators, accordingly, by mutually independent water treatment, both systems are to be maintained in the optimal conditions. Namely, primary system is the closed water circulation circuit of simple liquid phase though under high temperature, high pressure condition, therefore, water shows the stable physical and chemical properties, and the minute water treatment for restraining the corrosion of structural materials and reducing radioactivity can be done. Secondary system is similar to the condensate and feedwater system of thermal power plants, and is the circuit for liquid-vapor two-phase transformation, but due to the local concentration of impurities by evaporation, the strict requirement is set for secondary water quality. However, secondary system can be treated in the state without radioactivity, and this is a great merit. The outline, basic concept and execution of primary water quality control, and the outline, concept, control criteria, facilities and execution of secondary water quality control are reported. (K.I.)

  8. Educational laboratory experiments on chemistry in a nuclear engineering school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, E.

    1982-01-01

    An educational laboratory experiment on radiochemistry was investigated by students in the general course of the Nuclear Engineering School of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Most of them are not chemical engineers, but electrical and mechanical engineers. Therefore, the educational experiment was designed for them by introducing a ''word experiment'' in the initial stage and by reducing the chemical procedure as far as possible. It began with calculations on a simple solvent extraction process-the ''word experiment''--followed by the chemical separation of 144 Pr from 144 Ce with tri-n-butyl phosphate in a nitric acid system and then measurement of the radioactive decay and growth of the separated 144 Pr and 144 Ce, respectively. The chemical procedure was explained by the phenomenon but not by the mechanism of chelation. Most students thought the experiment was an exercise in solvent extraction or radiochemical separation rather than a radioactive equilibrium experiment. However, a pure chemist considered it as a sort of physical experiment, where the chemical procedure was used only for preparation of measuring samples. Another experiment, where 137 Cs was measured after isolation with ammonium phosphomolybdate, was also investigated. The experiment eliminated the need for students who were not chemists to know how to use radioactive tracers. These students appreciated the realization that they could understand the radioactivity in the environmental samples in a chemical frame of reference even though they were not chemists

  9. Evolution of the groundwater chemistry around a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haworth, A.; Sharland, S.M.; Tasker, P.W.; Tweed, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    Some of the necessary techniques to construct a research model of the evolution of the groundwater under the influence of the backfill material in a nuclear waste repository are developed. These involve various extensions to the coupled ionic migration and chemical equilibria code, CHEQMATE. These extensions have been used in the first stages of a model of the chemical environment within the host rock. In this preliminary model we have considered a concrete backfill material embedded in a clay geology. However, the model is sufficiently flexible that other backfill materials and host rocks may be considered if a good thermodynamical description is available. The preliminary results from the model suggest that over timescales of about a thousand years the natural buffering action of the clay against changes in pH has a significant effect on the scale of perturbation by the ingress of highly alkaline porewater. It seems likely therefore that this type of modelling will have considerable relevance to the safety assessment models. (author)

  10. Thermo-chemistry of nuclear waste glasses: a new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linard, Y.; Neuville, D.R.; Richet, P.

    1997-01-01

    Understanding of the stability and weathering of glasses used for storing fission products is hampered by a general lack of basic thermochemical information. Models have been setup to predict Gibbs free energies of dissolution of glasses, but ascertaining their accuracy is made difficult by the very lack of reliable experimental data with which model results should be compared. As enthalpies of formation can in principle be determined from usual solution calorimetry experiments, the lack of Gibbs-free energy data for glasses mainly stems from the fact that, as disordered substances, glasses do not obey the third principle and have indeed large configurational entropies. These entropies can be determined from thermochemical measurements only when there exist a congruently melting crystalline compound with the same composition. Using available data, we have calculated the Gibbs-free energies of formation of a series of silicate glasses for which such a calorimetric determination is possible. With these results, we assess the predictions of Paul's model (1977) for calculating Gibbs-free energies of dissolution. As the complex compositions of the borosilicate glasses used for nuclear waste storage prevent determining configurational entropies by calorimetric methods, we point out how these can be determined instead from viscosity measurements. We finally discuss the implications of this approach for modeling of water-glass interactions. (authors)

  11. Water chemistry diagnosis system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hiroo; Koya, Hiroshi; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1990-01-01

    The water quality control for the BWRs in Japan has advanced rapidly recently, and as to the dose reduction due to the decrease of radioactivity, Japan takes the position leading the world. In the background of the advanced water quality control like this and the increase of nuclear power plants in operation, the automation of arranging a large quantity of water quality control information and the heightening of its reliability have been demanded. Hitachi group developed the water quality synthetic control system which comprises the water quality data management system to process a large quantity of water quality data with a computer and the water quality diagnosis system to evaluate the state of operation of the plants by the minute change of water quality and to carry out the operational guide in the aspect of water quality control. To this water quality diagnosis system, high speed fuzzy inference is applied in order to do rapid diagnosis with fuzzy data. The trend of development of water quality control system, the construction of the water quality synthetic control system, the configuration of the water quality diagnosis system and the development of algorithm and the improvement of the reliability of maintenance are reported. (K.I.)

  12. Numerical verification of equilibrium chemistry software within nuclear fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piro, M.H.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Simunovic, S.; Besmann, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical tool is in an advanced state of development to compute the equilibrium compositions of phases and their proportions in multi-component systems of importance to the nuclear industry. The resulting software is being conceived for direct integration into large multi-physics fuel performance codes, particularly for providing transport source terms, material properties, and boundary conditions in heat and mass transport modules. Consequently, any numerical errors produced in equilibrium chemistry computations will be propagated in subsequent heat and mass transport calculations, thus falsely predicting nuclear fuel behaviour. The necessity for a reliable method to numerically verify chemical equilibrium computations is emphasized by the requirement to handle the very large number of elements necessary to capture the entire fission product inventory. A simple, reliable and comprehensive numerical verification method called the Gibbs Criteria is presented which can be invoked by any equilibrium chemistry solver for quality assurance purposes. (author)

  13. Analytical chemistry in semiconductor manufacturing: Techniques, role of nuclear methods and need for quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This report is the result of a consultants meeting held in Gaithersburg, USA, 2-3 October 1987. The meeting was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards and Technology, and it was attended by 18 participants from Denmark, Finland, India, Japan, Norway, People's Republic of China and the USA. The purpose of the meeting was to assess the present status of analytical chemistry in semiconductor manufacturing, the role of nuclear analytical methods and the need for internationally organized quality control of the chemical analysis. The report contains the three presentations in full and a summary report of the discussions. Thus, it gives an overview of the need of analytical chemistry in manufacturing of silicon based devices, the use of nuclear analytical methods, and discusses the need for quality control. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Westinghouse Electric Company experiences in chemistry on-line monitoring in Eastern European nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balavage, J.

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company has provided a number of Chemistry On-Line Monitoring (OLM) Systems to Nuclear Power Plants in Eastern Europe. Eleven systems were provided to the Temelin Nuclear Power Plant in the south of the Czech Republic. Four systems were provided to the Russian NPP at Novovoronezh. In addition, a system design was developed for primary side chemistry monitoring for units 5 and 6 of another eastern European VVER. The status of the Temelin OLM systems is discussed including updates to the Temelin designs, and the other Eastern European installations and designs are also described briefly. Some of the problems encountered and lessons learned from these projects are also discussed. (R.P.)

  15. Chemistry in nuclear power plants from the point of view of OSART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.

    1990-01-01

    The standard programme of OSART (Operational Safety Review Team), a programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency, is divided into eight test areas. Chemistry as one of those areas is considered under the following aspects: Organization, personnel qualification, monitoring programmes, working rules, limit values, layout and equipment of laboratories, data acquisition and reporting, safety provisions and quality assurance in laboratories. At least one chemist belongs to the teams usually consisting of 10 to 15 experts and several observers. The author of this paper participated in various missions and in the periodical summary of OSART results. Here he speaks about the status and trends of chemistry in nuclear power plants with light water reactors. Following the principle of OSART, none of the nuclear power plants is named. (orig./BBR) [de

  16. Water chemistry: cause and control of corrosion degradation in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kain, Vivekanand

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion degradation of a material is directly determined by the water chemistry, material (composition, fabrication procedure and microstructure) and by the stress/strain in the material under operating conditions. Water chemistry plays an important role in both uniform corrosion and localized forms of corrosion of materials. Once we understand how water chemistry is contributing to corrosion of a material, it is logical to modify/change that water chemistry to control the corrosion degradation. In nuclear power plants, different water chemistries have been used in different components/systems. This paper will cover the origin of corrosion degradation in the Primary Heat Transport system of different reactor types, Steam Generator tubing, secondary circuit pipelines, service water pipelines and auxiliary systems and establish the role of water chemistry in causing corrosion degradation. The history of changes in water chemistry adopted in these systems to control corrosion degradation is also described. It is shown by examples that there is an obvious limitation in changing water chemistry to control corrosion degradation and in those cases, a change of material or change of the state of stresses/fabrication procedure becomes necessary. The role of water chemistry as a causative factor and also as a controlling parameter on particular types of corrosion degradation e.g. stress corrosion cracking, flow accelerated corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion is illustrated. It will be shown that increase in dissolved oxygen content (due to radiolysis in nuclear reactors) is sufficient to make even the de-mineralized water to cause stress corrosion cracking in Boiling Water Reactors. Hydrogen Water Chemistry (by hydrogen injection) to control dissolved oxygen is shown to control the stress corrosion cracking. However, it is not possible to control dissolved oxygen at all parts of the Boiling Water Reactors. Therefore, a further refinement in terms of noble metal

  17. M and c'99 : Mathematics and computation, reactor physics and environmental analysis in nuclear applications, Madrid, September 27-30, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J. M.; Ahnert, C.; Cabellos, O.

    1999-01-01

    The international conference on mathematics and computation, reactor physics and environmental analysis in nuclear applications in the biennial topical meeting of the mathematics and computation division of the American Nuclear Society. (Author)

  18. M and c'99 : Mathematics and computation, reactor physics and environmental analysis in nuclear applications, Madrid, September 27-30, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragones, J. M.; Ahnert, C.; Cabellos, O.

    1999-07-01

    The international conference on mathematics and computation, reactor physics and environmental analysis in nuclear applications in the biennial topical meeting of the mathematics and computation division of the American Nuclear Society. (Author)

  19. Dalhousie SLOWPOKE-2 reactor: A nuclear analytical chemistry facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatt, A.; Holzbecher, J.

    1990-01-01

    SLOWPOKE is an acronym for Safe Low POwer Kritical Experiment. The SOWPOKE-2 is a compact, inherently safe, swimming-pool-type reactor designed by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for neutron activation analysis (NAA) and isotope production. The Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor (DUSR) has been operating since 1976; a large beryllium reflector was added in 1986 to extend its lifetime by another 8 to 10 yr. The DUSR is generally operated at half-power with a maximum thermal flux of 1.1 x 10 12 n/cm 2 ·s in the inner pneumatic sites and that of 5.4 x 10 11 n/cm 2 ·s in the outer sites. Despite this comparatively low flux, SLOWPOKE-2 reactors have many beneficial features that are continuously being exploited at the DUSR facility for developing nuclear analytical methods for fundamental as well as applied studies. Although NAA is a well-established analytical technique, much of the activation analysis being performed in most facilities has been limited to methods using fairly long-lived nuclides. The approach at the DUSR facility has been to utilize the highly homogeneous, stable, and reproducible neutron flux to develop NAA methods based on short-lived nuclides. SLOWPOKE reactors have a fairly high epithermal neutron flux, which is being advantageously used for determining several trace elements in complex matrices. Radiochemical NAA (RNAA) methods using coprecipitation, distillation, and ion-exchange separations have been used for the determination of very low levels of several elements in biological materials

  20. Geometric control of nuclearity in copper(I)/dioxygen chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tsukasa; Morimoto, Yuma; Tano, Tetsuro; Mieda, Kaoru; Sugimoto, Hideki; Fujieda, Nobutaka; Ogura, Takashi; Itoh, Shinobu

    2014-08-18

    Copper(I) complexes supported by a series of N3-tridentate ligands bearing a rigid cyclic diamine framework such as 1,5-diazacyclooctane (L8, eight-membered ring), 1,4-diazacycloheptane (L7, seven-membered ring), or 1,4-diazacyclohexane (L6, six-membered ring) with a common 2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl side arm were synthesized and their reactivity toward O2 were compared. The copper(I) complex of L8 preferentially provided a mononuclear copper(II) end-on superoxide complex S as reported previously [Itoh, S., et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 2788-2789], whereas a copper(I) complex of L7 gave a bis(μ-oxido)dicopper(III) complex O at a low temperature (-85 °C) in acetone. On the other hand, no such active-oxygen complex was detected in the oxygenation reaction of the copper(I) complex of L6 under the same conditions. In addition, O2-reactivity of the copper(I) complex supported by an acyclic version of the tridentate ligand (LA, PyCH2CH2N(CH3)CH2CH2CH2N(CH3)2; Py = 2-pyridyl) was examined to obtain a mixture of a (μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxido)dicopper(II) complex (S)P and a bis(μ-oxido)dicopper(III) complex O. Careful inspection of the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes and the redox potentials of copper(I) complexes has revealed important geometric effects of the supporting ligands on controlling nuclearity of the generated copper active-oxygen complexes.

  1. Measurement and analysis of γ-spectra in the research of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenxin; Sun Tongyu

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of γ-ray spectra and method of data analysis are described for the research of nuclear chemistry. Gamma-ray spectra are collected as a function of time and are analysed by the computer codes GAMA33 or LEONE. Decay curves are constructed by selection of characteristic γ-ray using the computer code SORT. The analysis of half-life and identification of nuclides are performed with the interactive computer code TAU85 and Tektronix graphics terminal. Nuclear reaction cross-sections are calculated on weighted average of all the observed γ-rays for each nuclide after duplicate or erroneous identifications are screened

  2. Foreword of the Fifth Symposium on Nuclear Analytical Chemistry (NAC-V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.; Goswami, A.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2014-01-01

    The Fifth Symposium on Nuclear Analytical Chemistry (NAC-V) was organized at BARC, Mumbai during January 20-24, 2014 with more than 300 participants. It was sponsored by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences, Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), India and organized in cooperation with the IAEA and coorganized by the IANCAS. A total of 240 contributed abstracts along with 27 invited talks and 10 invited short talks were presented in 15 technical sessions. Selected 54 full papers of NAC-V have been accepted after review for publication in special issue of JRNC. (author)

  3. Participation of Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, in training of personnel for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterba, F.

    1983-01-01

    Graduates of application oriented fields of all mathematics and physics specializations of Solid state physics and Nuclear physics work successfully in nuclear power. In the mathematics fields great attention is devoted to optimization, control, process modeling, etc. The subject Solid state physics is subdivided into the following specializations: physics of metals, magnetic properties of the solid state and structural analysis. These specializations educate specialists with a good knowledge of the structure and properties of metal materials. Great attention is devoted to the causes and development of defects, materials creep and the radiation damage of crystal lattices. The nuclear physics specialization Applied nuclear physics deals with the use of nuclear methods in diverse fields and provides basic knowledge in nuclear power generation and the operation of nuclear reactors. The Faculty of Mathematics and Physics of the Charles University in Prague also runs postgraduate study courses in nuclear physics measurement methods, solid state physics, etc. (E.S.)

  4. Steam water cycle chemistry of liquid metal cooled innovative nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurmanov, Victor; Lemekhov, Vadim; Smykov, Vladimir

    2012-09-01

    selection of chemistry controls is vital for NPPs with liquid metal cooled reactors. This paper highlights principles and approaches to chemistry controls in steam/water cycles of future NPPs with innovative liquid metal cooled reactors. The recommendations on how to arrange chemistry controls in steam/water cycles of future NPPs with innovative liquid metal cooled reactors are based taking into account: - the experience with operation of fossil power industry; - secondary side water chemistry of lead-bismuth eutectics cooled nuclear reactors at submarines; - steam/water cycles of NPPs with sodium cooled fast breeders BN-350 and BN-600; - secondary water chemistry at conventional NPPs with WER, RBMK and some other reactors. (authors)

  5. Evaluation of a Voluntary Tutoring Program in Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics for First-Year Undergraduates at Universidad Andres Bello, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Verónica A.; Acuña, Fabiola C.; Quiero, Felipe J.; López, Margarita; Zahn, Carmen I.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the preliminary results of a tutoring program that provides personalized academic assistance to first-year undergraduates enrolled in introductory chemistry, physics and mathematics courses at Universidad Andres Bello (UNAB), in Concepción, Chile. Intervened courses have historically large enrolments, diverse student population…

  6. Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Sherman K

    2010-01-01

    Anyone can appreciate the beauty, depth, and vitality of mathematics with the help of this highly readable text, specially developed from a college course designed to appeal to students in a variety of fields. Readers with little mathematical background are exposed to a broad range of subjects chosen from number theory, topology, set theory, geometry, algebra, and analysis. Starting with a survey of questions on weight, the text discusses the primes, the fundamental theorem of arithmetic, rationals and irrationals, tiling, tiling and electricity, probability, infinite sets, and many other topi

  7. Mathematical modeling of processes of nuclear fuel extraction reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozen, A.M.; Zel'venskij, M.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model of extraction process in the mixer-settlers is given which describes both a simple step process and extraction complicated with chemical reactions. The extraction equilibrium is described on the basis of theoretical data on the extraction mechanism using the mass action law and contains one empirical constant. The equations for concentration extraction constants of uranium(6) and uranium(4), plutonium(3, 4, 6), neptunium(4, 6) and zirconium(4) depending on the solution ion strength are given, which are obtained by treatment of numerous experimental data. On the example of the reductive reextraction process it is shown that there is a good coincidence of the calculated results of the suggested model with the experimental ones by Mc-Kay. By the method of matematical modeling the uranium and plutonium separation processes without reducers are investigated. The purification improvement of uranium extract, for example, is followed by the deterioration of the data on the other end of cascade i.e. purification of plutonium reextract from uranium and vice versa. To obtain a high grade of separation is possible only in comparatively long cascades and, besides, the regime parameters should be precisely observed

  8. Geomechanical problems of an underground storage of spent nuclear fuel and their mathematic modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonín Hájek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the use of mathematical modelling for analysis of the thermo-mechanical (T-M processes, which are relevant for the assessment of underground repositories of the spent nuclear fuel. Wes shall discuss mathematical formulation, numerical methods and parallel alghorithms, which are capable to solve large-scale complicated and coupled 3D problems. Particularly, we show an application of the described methods and parallel computer simulations for analysis of model problems concerning the Swedish KBS3 concept of underground repository.

  9. Mathematical verification of a nuclear power plant protection system function with combined CPN and PVS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Seo Ryong; Son, Han Seong; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    In this work, an automatic software verification method for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) protection system is developed. This method utilizes Colored Petri Net (CPN) for modeling and Prototype Verification System (PVS) for mathematical verification. In order to help flow-through from modeling by CPN to mathematical proof by PVS, a translator has been developed in this work. The combined method has been applied to a protection system function of Wolsong NPP SDS2(Steam Generator Low Level Trip) and found to be promising for further research and applications. 7 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  10. Mathematical verification of a nuclear power plant protection system function with combined CPN and PVS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Seo Ryong; Son, Han Seong; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In this work, an automatic software verification method for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) protection system is developed. This method utilizes Colored Petri Net (CPN) for modeling and Prototype Verification System (PVS) for mathematical verification. In order to help flow-through from modeling by CPN to mathematical proof by PVS, a translator has been developed in this work. The combined method has been applied to a protection system function of Wolsong NPP SDS2(Steam Generator Low Level Trip) and found to be promising for further research and applications. 7 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  11. Discrete mathematical data analysis approach: a valuable assessment method for sustainable chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Kristina; Scherb, Hagen; Bruggemann, Rainer; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2013-06-01

    Sustainable/Green Chemistry is a chemical philosophy encouraging the design of products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. In this respect, metrical scientific disciplines like Chemometrics are important, because they indicate criteria for chemicals being hazardous or not. We demonstrated that sustainable principles in the disciplines Green Chemistry, Green Engineering, and Sustainability in Information Technology have main aspects in common. The use of non-hazardous chemicals or the more efficient use of chemical substances is one of these aspects. We take a closer look on the topic of the hazards of chemical substances. Our research focuses on data analyses concerning environmental chemicals named Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), which are found all over the world and pose a large risk to environment as well as to humans. The evaluation of the data is a major step in the elucidation of the danger of these chemicals. The data analysis method demonstrated here, is based on the theory of partially ordered sets and provides a generalized ranking. In our approach we investigate data sets of breast milk samples of women in Denmark, Finland, and Turkey which contained measurable levels of 20 POPs. The goal is twofold: On the one side the hazardous chemicals are to be identified and on the other side possible differences among the three nations should be detected, because in that case possible different uptake mechanisms may be supposed. The data analysis is performed by the free available software package PyHasse, written by the third author. We conclude that the data analysis method can well be applied for distinguishing between more or less dangerous existing chemicals. Furthermore, it should be used in sustainable chemistry in the same manner for detecting more and less sustainable chemicals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mathematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demazure, M.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Mathematics center (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Center is composed of different research teams: analysis, Riemann geometry, group theory, formal calculus and algorithm geometry, dynamical systems, topology and singularity. For each team, the members, the research topics, the national and international cooperations, are given. The papers concerning the investigations carried out in 1988, are listed [fr

  13. Nuclear chemistry and Radiochemistry in the USA; Kern- und Radiochemie in den USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Div.; Stoyer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry are very young sciences which developed at an extremely brisk pace within a very short period of time after the discovery of nuclear fission in 1938, and caused profound societal changes. In the United States, nuclear chemistry developed very differently from Germany, where nuclear research initially had been banned after the Second World War. The prime mover in the development in the United States was the Manhattan Project, the construction of the atomic bomb. The counteract the impending shortage of qualified personnel, important institutions have begun to establish training and support programs in the field. The National Laboratories in the United States introduced a National Security Internship Program, while the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tries to promote cooperation, and thus the training of personnel, by launching programs of its own. Yet, a greater shortage of qualified personnel is becoming apparent. The situation of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry in the United States can be summarized in the finding that research at the National Laboratories is very wide ranging. It receives sufficient funds from the DOE. However, the National Laboratories show a very high proportion of elderly personnel, a problem which will have to be corrected in the years to come. This may be helped by the Summer Schools financed by the DOE, though a summer school of six weeks cannot replace a sound training in nuclear chemistry of the kind still to be found in Germany. (orig.) [German] Kern- und Radiochemie sind sehr junge Wissenschaften, die sich nach der Entdeckung der Kernspaltung 1938 innerhalb kuerzester Zeit extrem rasant entwickelt und tiefe gesellschaftliche Veraenderungen bewirkt haben. In den USA hat sich die Kernchemie sehr unterschiedlich im Vergleich zu Deutschland entwickelt, wo die Kernforschung nach dem 2. Weltkrieg vorerst verboten war. Massgeblich in den USA war dabei das Manhatten-Projekt zum Bau von Nuklearwaffen

  14. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    Research and development activities dealing with the chemical problems related to design and ultimate operation of molten-salt reactor systems are described. An experimental test stand was constructed to expose metallurgical test specimens to Te 2 vapor at defined temperatures and deposition rates. To better define the chemistry of fluoroborate coolant, several aspects are being investigated. The behavior of hydroxy and oxy compounds in molten NaBF 4 is being investigated to define reactions and compounds that may be involved in corrosion and/or could be involved in methods for trapping tritium. Two corrosion products of Hastelloy N, Na 3 CrF 6 and Na 5 Cr 3 F 14 , were identified from fluoroborate systems. The evaluation of fluoroborate and alternate coolants continued. Research on the behavior of hydrogen and its isotopes is summarized. The solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium in Li 2 BeF 4 are very low. The sorption of tritium on graphite was found to be significant (a few milligrams of tritium per kilogram of graphite), possibly providing a means of sequestering a portion of the tritium produced. Development of analytical methods continued with emphasis on voltammetric and spectrophotometric techniques for the in-line analysis of corrosion products such as Fe 2+ and Cr 3+ and the determination of the U 3+ /U 4+ ratio in MSBR fuel salt. Similar studies were conducted with the NaBF 4 --NaF coolant salt. Information developed during the previous operation of the CSTF has been assessed and used to formulate plans for evaluation of in-line analytical methods in future CSTF operations. Electroanalytical and spectrophotometric research suggests that an electroactive protonic species is present in molten NaBF 4 --NaF, and that this species rapidly equilibrates with a volatile proton-containing species. Data obtained from the CSTF indicated that tritium was concentrated in the volatile species. (JGB)

  15. On-line water chemistry monitoring for corrosion prevention in ageing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.; Jaernstroem, R.; Kvarnstroem, R.; Chanfreau, E.

    1991-01-01

    General corrosion and consequently radiation buildup in nuclear power plants are controlled by the selection of material and the chemical environment. In power plants useful information concerning the kinetics of chemical reactions can be obtained by using high temperature, high pressure measurements for pH, conductivity and electrochemical potentials (ECP) of construction materials or redox-potential. The rates of general or uniform corrosion of materials in contact with the primary coolant are quite low and do not compromise the integrity of the primary circuit. Chemistry control should be applied in the first hand to minimize the dissolution and the transport and subsequent deposition of activated corrosion products to out-of-core regions. A computerized monitoring system for high temperature high pressure pH and electrochemical potential (ECP) has been in continuous use at the Loviisa power plant since 1988. Special emphasis has been put on learning the effect of pH and ECP control during cooldown process in order to further reduce background radiation buildup. During the shutdown for refueling outage in summer 1989 the high temperature water chemistry parameters were monitored. In addition to the high temperature water chemistry parameters concentrations of dissolved corrosion products as well as the activities of the corrosion products were measured. In this paper the results obtained through simultaneous monitoring of water chemistry parameters and concentrations of dissolved corrosion products as well as the activity measurements are presented and discussed. (author)

  16. Primary water chemistry control at units of Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunk, J.; Patek, G.; Pinter, T.; Tilky, P.; Doma, A.; Osz, J.

    2010-01-01

    The primary water chemistry of the four identical units of Paks Nuclear Power Plant has been developed based on Western-type PWR units, taking into consideration some Soviet-Russian modifications. The political changes in 90s have also influenced the water chemistry specifications and directions. At PWR units the transition operational modes have been developed while in case of VVER units - in lack of central uniform regulation - this question has become the competence and responsibility of each individual plant. This problem has resulted in separate water chemistry developments with a considerable time delay. The needs for life-time extensions all over the World have made the development of start-up and shut-down chemistry procedures extremely important, since they considerably influence the long term and safe operation of plants. The uniformly structured limit value system, the principles applied for the system development, and the logic schemes for actions to be taken are discussed in the paper, both for normal operation and transition modes. (author)

  17. Safety of nuclear reactors - Part A - unsteady state temperature history mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shayeb, M.; Yusoff, M.Z.; Boosroh, M.H.; Ideris, F.; Hasmady Abu Hassan, S.; Bondok, A.

    2004-01-01

    A nuclear reactor structure under abnormal operations of near meltdown will be exposed to a tremendous amount of heat flux in addition to the stress field applied under normal operation. Temperature encountered in such case is assumed to be beyond 1000 Celsius degrees. A 2-dimensional mathematical model based on finite difference methods, has been developed for the fire resistance calculation of a concrete-filled square steel column with respect to its temperature history. Effects due to nuclear radiation and mechanical vibrations will be explored in a later future model. The temperature rise in each element can be derived from its heat balance by applying the parabolic unsteady state, partial differential equation and numerical solution into the steel region. Calculation of the temperature of the elementary regions needs to satisfy the symmetry conditions and the relevant material properties. The developed mathematical model is capable to predict the temperature history in the column and on the surface with respect to time. (authors)

  18. Overview of the ANS [American Nuclear Society] mathematics and computation software standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetana, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    The Mathematics and Computations Division of the American Nuclear Society sponsors the ANS-10 Standards Subcommittee. This subcommittee, which is part of the ANS Standards Committee, currently maintains four ANSI/ANS software standards. These standards are: Recommended Programming Practices to Facilitate the Portability of Scientific Computer Programs, ANS-10.2; Guidelines for the Documentation of Computer Software, ANS-10.3; Guidelines for the Verification and Validation of Scientific and Engineering Computer Programs for the Nuclear Industry, ANS-10.4; and Guidelines for Accommodating User Needs in Computer Program Development, ANS-10.5. 5 refs

  19. Proceeding of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research of Nuclear Science and Technology: Book II. Nuclear Chemistry, Process Technology, and Radioactive Waste Processing and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The proceeding contains papers presented on Scientific Meeting and Presentation on on Basic Research of Nuclear Science and Technology, held in Yogyakarta, 25-27 April 1995. This proceeding is second part of two books published for the meeting contains papers on nuclear chemistry, process technology, and radioactive waste management and environment. There are 62 papers indexed individually. (ID)

  20. The American Chemical Society's Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology's summer schools in nuclear and radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    This successful educational program in nuclear and radiochemistry for advanced undergraduate students is described. Funding from the U.S. Department of Energy supports 24 fellowships for participants in the intensive six-week programs at San Jose State University (CA) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY). Students are provided transportation to and from the school site, room and board, books, lab supplies, and six units of college credit. The instructional program consists of lectures and laboratory exercises that cover the fundamentals of nuclear theory, radiochemistry, nuclear instrumentation, radiological safety, and applications in research, medicine, and industry. Guest lectures and field trips broaden the students' exposure to nuclear science. Assistance is provided in the following year to those students who wish to join a research project at a university or national laboratory, and thereafter, in their applications to graduate or professional school. (author)

  1. Radiochemistry and associated nuclear chemistry in the beginning of the twenty-first century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeij, J.J.M. de

    2002-01-01

    In many countries radiochemistry and associated nuclear chemistry are facing decreasing attention in scientific and technological education and training. In addition, research facilities involving radioactivity are dealing with growing difficulties, e.g. in respect to finances, staff, public support, and legislation. Quite often it is suggested that radiochemistry has matured and does not need any further development. Moreover, it is stated that radiochemical methods are out-run by new, non-nuclear methods, and thus have actually lost their raison d'etre. Altogether this leads to a situation where radioactivity and radiochemistry are partly vanishing both as a science and as a tool. This situation calls for a closer examination for areas where radiochemistry may continue to play a useful, if not a decisive role, and some guidelines were presented how to proceed in the near future. For that purpose a definition of radiochemistry is given to demarcate it from other areas. Nuclear chemistry as an adjacent field is strongly connected with radiochemistry, and in the frame of the presentation a relevant part of it is considered here as integrated in radiochemistry. The various areas of radiochemistry may be classified into three categories, which partly overlap. The first category is the field of the fundamental aspects of radiochemistry itself. This category covers among others nuclear reaction cross-sections, production routes with associated yields and radionuclidic impurities, decay schemes of radionuclides, radiochemical separations, recoil and hot-atom chemistry, isotope effects and fractionation, and interaction of radiation with matter and detection. The second category covers fields where radioactivity is inextricably bound to the subject involved. This holds e.g. for the entire nuclear fuel cycle, study of the very heavy elements (Z > 100), primordial radioactivity on earth, cosmogenic radioactivity in atmosphere and cosmos, and radionuclides for dating. The

  2. The present status and prospects for the development of radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narbutt, J.; Chmielewski, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    The report deals with a short history, achievements and trends of development of radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry in the world. It also presents the main achievements and short programmes of fundamental and applied research, as well as works on technology, as delivered by more than thirty research institutes and universities in Poland. The related teaching activities of Polish academic centers has been briefly discussed. The documents enclosed [list of publications (1997-2000; list of research groups; list of apparatus] bring a more detailed representation of the Polish research centers' activity in this field. (author)

  3. The Nuclear Science Facility at San Jose State University and the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Science Facility at SJSU was first opened for classes in 1975. It is designed primarily for undergraduate teaching of nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, tracer techniques, and radiation safety. Utilizing nearly $1.5 million in counting equipment alone, but excluding a reactor or accelerator, it allows simultaneous use of multiple counting assemblages for up to 20 individual students, even for advanced experiments with Ge/MCA units. Current academic programs include a B.S. Degree in Radiochemistry, an M.S. in Radiological Health Physics, and community outreach to grade schools (nearly 2,000 student-experiments for grades 7-12 were performed in AY88/89). To encourage nuclear chemistry as a potential area of study in graduate school, the US Department of Energy funded a special national Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. This was first held at SJSU in 1984; summer 1990 will see the seventh such program taught

  4. Application of Radiation Chemistry to Some Selected Technological Issues Related to the Development of Nuclear Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowski, Krzysztof; Skotnicki, Konrad; Szreder, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    The most important contributions of radiation chemistry to some selected technological issues related to water-cooled reactors, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes, and fuel evolution during final radioactive waste disposal are highlighted. Chemical reactions occurring at the operating temperatures and pressures of reactors and involving primary transients and stable products from water radiolysis are presented and discussed in terms of the kinetic parameters and radiation chemical yields. The knowledge of these parameters is essential since they serve as input data to the models of water radiolysis in the primary loop of light water reactors and super critical water reactors. Selected features of water radiolysis in heterogeneous systems, such as aqueous nanoparticle suspensions and slurries, ceramic oxides surfaces, nanoporous, and cement-based materials, are discussed. They are of particular concern in the primary cooling loops in nuclear reactors and long-term storage of nuclear waste in geological repositories. This also includes radiation-induced processes related to corrosion of cladding materials and copper-coated iron canisters, dissolution of spent nuclear fuel, and changes of bentonite clays properties. Radiation-induced processes affecting stability of solvents and solvent extraction ligands as well oxidation states of actinide metal ions during recycling of the spent nuclear fuel are also briefly summarized.

  5. Challenges of adolescent and maturing nuclear plants: a chemistry perspective on maintenance and outages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J.G. [Bruce Power, Chemistry Design, Plant Design Engineering, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: john.roberts@brucepower.com

    2003-07-01

    In his address to the Canadian Nuclear Society, Bruce Power's Section Manager for Chemistry Design will relate how Designers and Specifiers for Plant and Components have historically limited their approach to that of new plants. As nuclear plants become operational, John G. Roberts will explain how the requirements to protect the assets change as a result of changed capabilities, environments and requirements. John will offer examples to show how challenges were met during construction and commissioning. While plant changes are often necessary following commissioning to prevent serious operational problems, John will also discuss ways in which planners, suppliers and maintenance staff can broaden their views and embrace new work methods to ensure those changes don't unwittingly create new challenges. (author)

  6. Challenges of adolescent and maturing nuclear plants: a chemistry perspective on maintenance and outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    In his address to the Canadian Nuclear Society, Bruce Power's Section Manager for Chemistry Design will relate how Designers and Specifiers for Plant and Components have historically limited their approach to that of new plants. As nuclear plants become operational, John G. Roberts will explain how the requirements to protect the assets change as a result of changed capabilities, environments and requirements. John will offer examples to show how challenges were met during construction and commissioning. While plant changes are often necessary following commissioning to prevent serious operational problems, John will also discuss ways in which planners, suppliers and maintenance staff can broaden their views and embrace new work methods to ensure those changes don't unwittingly create new challenges. (author)

  7. Steam generator materials and secondary side water chemistry in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudelli, M.D.

    1979-04-01

    The main purpose of this work is to summarize the European and North American experiences regarding the materials used for the construction of the steam generators and their relative corrosion resistance considering the water chemestry control method. Reasons underlying decision for the adoption of Incoloy 800 as the material for the secondary steam generator system for Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant (Atucha Reactor) and Embalse de Rio III Nuclear Power Plant (Cordoba Reactor) are pointed out. Backup information taken into consideration for the decision of utilizing the All Volatil Treatment for the water chemistry control of the Cordoba Reactor is detailed. Also all the reasonswhich justify to continue with the congruent fosfatic method for the Atucha Reactor are analyzed. Some investigation objectives which would eventually permit the revision of the decisions taken on these subjects are proposed. (E.A.C.) [es

  8. Water chemistry control in thermal and nuclear power plants. 9. Nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The chemical management of fuels in nuclear power plants aims at maintenance of the soundness of nuclear fuels and at reduction of the radiation exposure of the working employees. With regard to the former, particular attention should be paid to the fabrication process of fuel assembly, mainly for chemical management for fuel cladding tubes together with fuel pellet-clad chemical interactions, and to the outer tubes in the power plants. With regard to the latter, the fabrication process should be carefully controlled to prevent radioactive impurity increase in primary cooling water systems by maintaining cleaning level and decreasing surface contamination. Reactions of zircalloy with water or hydrogen forming ZrH 2 , sintered density of UO 2 pellet controlling water content, pellet-clad interactions, stress corrosion cracking, crud induced fuel failure, behaviors of such fission products as I, Xe, Kr, and Cs in plants are also important to water and chemical management of nuclear fuels. (S. Ohno)

  9. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Researchin Nuclear Science and Technology part II: Nuclear Chemistry, Process Technology, Radioactive Waste Management and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukarsono, R.; Karmanto, Eko-Edy; Suradjijo, Ganang

    2000-01-01

    Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Scienceand Technology is an annual activity held by Centre for Research and Development of Advanced Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency, for monitoring research activities achieved by the Agency. The papers presented in the meeting were collected into proceedings. These are the second part of the proceedings that contain 71 articles in the fields of nuclear chemistry, process technology, radioactive waste management, and environment (PPIN).

  10. Proceeding of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear of the Scientific and Technology Part II : Nuclear Chemistry; Process Technology and Radioactive Waste Management; Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjatmoko; Karmanto, Eko Edy; Endang-Supartini

    1996-04-01

    Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Science and Technology is a routine activity was held by Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre, National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) for monitoring the research activity which achieved in BATAN. The Proceeding contains a proposal about basic which has Nuclear Chemistry, Process Technology, Radioactive Waste Management and Environment. This proceeding is the second part from two part which published in series. There are 61 articles which have separated index

  11. Nuclear fission - the great discovery of the nuclear chemistry 50 years ago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, B.

    1988-01-01

    A scientific discovery only seldom in that extent has influenced the scientific-technical progress and the historical development of mankind as the discovery of nuclear fission. The investigation of the reactions at irradiation of the uranium with neutrons was historically the order of the day. In 1938, the radiochemical proof of the nuclear fission succeeded by coprecipitation, fractional crystallization and application of the tracer method. To be master of these methods as well as their profound physico-chemical insight enabled O. Hahn and F. Strassmann to give reliable evidence of fission by identifying the fission product barium. (author)

  12. Mathematical modelling of heat production in deep geological repository of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovanda, O.

    2017-01-01

    Waste produced by nuclear industry requires special handling. Currently, there is a research taking place, focused at possibilities of nuclear waste storage in deep geological repositories, hosted in stable geological environment. The high-level nuclear waste produces significant amount of heat for a long time, which can affect either environment outside of or within the repository in a negative way. Therefore to reduce risks, it is desirable to know the principles of such heat production, which can be achieved using mathematical modeling. This thesis comes up with a general model of heat production-time dependency, dependable on initial composition of the waste. To be able to model real situations, output of this thesis needs to be utilized in an IT solution. (authors)

  13. Exploring hypothetical learning progressions for the chemistry of nitrogen and nuclear processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Deborah McKern

    Chemistry is a bridge that connects a number of scientific disciplines. High school students should be able to determine whether scientific information is accurate, how chemistry applies to daily life, and the mechanism by which systems operate (NRC, 2012). This research focuses on describing hypothetical learning progressions for student understanding of the chemical reactions of nitrogen and nuclear processes and examines whether there is consistency in scientific reasoning between these two distinct conceptual areas. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the written products of students including homework, formative and summative tests, laboratory notebooks, reflective journals, written presentations, and discussion board contributions via Edmodo (an online program). The ten participants were 15 and 16 year old students enrolled in a general high school chemistry course. Instruction took place over a ten week period. The learning progression levels ranged from 0 to 4 and were described as missing, novice, intermediate, proficient, and expert. The results were compared to the standards set by the NRC with a lower anchor (expectations for grade 8) and upper anchor (expectations for grade 12). The results indicate that, on average, students were able to reach an intermediate level of understanding for these concepts.

  14. Chemistry of actinides and fission products in the nuclear-fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    This colloquium was held under the auspices of the French and Russian Academies of Sciences, from 21 to 23 May 2003, at the 'Ecole nationale superieure de chimie de Paris' (ENSCP), under the cooperative framework agreed between the two Academies. Fifteen specialists from each country were brought together to present their results concerning research in their respective fields (industrial considerations, fundamental chemistry, the environment, new conditioning systems, hydro- and pyro-chemical separation techniques), situating the results in the general context of the two countries'common strategy for closing the nuclear fuel cycle and for the management of radioactive waste. The colloquium brought together 26 oral presentations, and three round table discussions (theoretical chemistry and modelling, the frontiers of research on the nuclear cycle, elemental characterisation). The speakers chosen represented a large section of the organisations involved in the research on these topics, from each country. This thematic issue of the Comptes Rendus Chimie presents some new insights into these topics and some original results. The colloquium was supported financially par the DRI of the French Academy des sciences, CNRS, IN2P3, CEA, Cogema, EDF, and ENSCP. (authors)

  15. Mathematical models in nuclear safety and radiation protection of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This collection of papers contains the full texts of 33 reports presented at the Seminar, all of which are indexed and abstracted separately for the INIS database. The topics of the reports cover the mathematical models and computer codes for risk analysis, reactor reliability simulating, safety-related benchmarks, thermohydraulic studies, reactor kinetics, hypothetical accidents and their radiological consequences, etc. The investigations refer mainly to WWER-440 and WWER-1000 type reactors of the Kozloduy NPP

  16. Fission product chemistry in severe nuclear reactor accidents, specialists' meeting at JRC-Ispra, 15-17 January 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-05-01

    A specialists' meeting was held at JRC-Ispra from 15 to 17 January 1990 to review the current understanding of fission-product chemistry during severe accidents in light water reactors. Discussions focussed on the important chemical phenomena that could occur across the wide range of conditions of a damaged nuclear plant. Recommendations for future chemistry work were made covering the following areas: (a) fuel degradation and fission-product release, (b) transport and attenuation processes in the reactor coolant system, (c) containment chemistry (iodine behaviour and core-concrete interactions). (author)

  17. Nuclear power plant conference 2010 (NPC 2010): International conference on water chemistry of nuclear reactor systems and 8th International radiolysis, electrochemistry and materials performance workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Chemistry Conference was held in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada on October 3-7, 2010. It was hosted by the Canadian Nuclear Society and was held in Canada for the first time. This international event hosted over 300 attendees, two thirds from outside of Canada, mostly from Europe and and Far East. The conference is formally known as the International Conference on Water Chemistry of Nuclear Reactor Systems and is the 15th of a series that began in 1977 in Bournemouth, UK. The conference focussed on the latest developments in the science and technology of water chemistry control in nuclear reactor systems. Utility scientists, engineers and operations people met their counterparts from research institutes, service organizations and universities to address the challenges of chemistry control and degradation management of their complex and costly plants for the many decades that they are expected to operate. Following the four day conference, the 8th International Radiolysis, Electrochemistry and Materials Performance Workshop was held as associated, but otherwise free-standing event on Friday, October 8, 2010. It was also well attended and the primary focus was the effect of radiation on corrosion. When asked about the importance of chemistry in operating nuclear power plants, the primary organizers summarized it in the following statement: 'Once a nuclear plant is in operation, chemistry improvement is the only way to increase the longevity of the plant and its equipment'. The organisers of the 2010 Workshop and the NPC 2010 conference decided that these two events would be held consecutively, as previous, but for the first time the organization and registration would be shared, which proved to be a winning combination by the attendance.

  18. Mathematical model use for evaluation of radioactivity spreading in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubik, I.; Gladki, Eh.; Yanchik, O.

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of knowledges of radioactive products behaviour and their spreading in nuclear power plant under normal and accident conditions a KOMPLEX program is developed in the FORTRAN 4 language, permitting to calculate the activity in separate parts of the nuclear power plant with WWR type reactor. The COMPLEX program includes the following subprograms: AZ - PRIM - for estimating active products in fuel, coolant, on the surfaces of fuel element cans and the primary circuit. The subprogram permits to estimate the coolant activity at the expense of fission fragments for 4 different leakage mechanisms: due to diffusion, considerable fuel element damage, contamination of fuel element can surface and fuel washout by coolant; KOR - the program for estimating active corrosion products; ACT - the program for estimating the activity of activation products; CONT - the program for estimating the activity in the nuclear power plant premises (protection envelop) and ventilating pipe. The desciption of the above subprograms is given. For testing of the mathematical model applicability and the possibilities of the corresponding programs the checking calculations for operating parameters of nuclear power plant with WWR type reactor were carried out. The calculation results obtained have shown the applicability of the model suggested and the corresponding programes for nuclear power plant under normal operation and accident conditions [ru

  19. Technetium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-01-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  20. Complex fluids, divided solids and their interfaces: Open scientific questions addressed at the Institute of Separation Chemistry of Marcoule for a sustainable nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, M.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Zemb, Th.

    2007-01-01

    Key issues in radiochemistry, physical chemistry of separation and chemistry of materials needed for a sustainable nuclear energy production are described. These driving questions are at the origin of the creation of the Institute of Separation Chemistry at Marcoule. Each of the domains has been described extensively in recent reports for science and technology of the French academy of Science. (authors)

  1. CANDU fuel deposits and chemistry optimizations. Recent regulatory experience in Canadian Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameswaran, Ram

    2014-01-01

    -exchange columns and filters could not be utilized. pH control was also less than optimal due to air ingress during outages. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) imposed a 3% derating on the power to maintain the safety margins. The utility implemented changes to the chemistry specifications and is operating the unit at a slightly higher pH range. The utility has also since implemented design changes to permit purification and filtration of PHT system during outages. CNSC has been closely monitoring the situation and recommended additional monitoring and reporting requirements to the utility. This paper will describe the chemistry optimization, improvements to the filtration system and other efforts undertaken by the utility to reduce crud deposit on the fuel. (author)

  2. The molten salt reactors (MSR) pyro chemistry and fuel cycle for innovative nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossard, Ph.; Garzenne, C.; Mouney, H.

    2002-01-01

    In the frame of the studies on next generation nuclear systems, and especially for the molten salt reactors and for the integrated fuel cycle (as IFR), the fuel cycle constraints must be taken into account in the preliminary studies of the system to improve the cycle and reactor optimisation. Among the purposes for next generation nuclear systems, sustainability and waste (radio-toxicity and mass) management are important goals. These goals imply reprocessing and recycling strategies. The objectives of this workshop are to present and to share the different strategies and scenarios, the needs based on these scenarios, the experimental facilities available today or in the future and their capabilities, the needs for demonstration. It aims at: identifying the needs for fuel cycle based on solid fuel or liquid fuel, and especially, the on-line reprocessing or clean up for the molten salt reactors; assessing the state-of-the-art on the pyro-chemistry applied to solid fuel and to present the research activities; assessing the state-of-the-art on liquid fuels (or others), and to present the research activities; expressing the R and D programs for pyro-chemistry, molten salt, and also to propose innovative processes; and proposing some joint activities in the frame of GEDEON and PRACTIS programs. This document brings together the transparencies of 18 contributions dealing with: scenario studies with AMSTER concept (Scenarios, MSR, breeders (Th) and burners); fuel cycle for innovative systems; current reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in molten salts (review of pyro-chemistry processes (non nuclear and nuclear)); high temperature NMR spectroscopies in molten salts; reductive extraction of An from molten fluorides (salt - liquid metal extraction); electrochemistry characterisation; characterisation with physical methods - extraction coefficient and kinetics; electrolytic extraction; dissolution-precipitation of plutonium in the eutectic LiCl-KCl (dissolution and

  3. Development of Iridium Solid-state Reference Electrode for the Water Chemistry Status Measurement in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, Heekwon; Lim, Dongseok; Cho, Jaeseon

    2013-01-01

    The result of ECP measurement of piping material in nuclear power plant at low temperature using the developed iridium (SSRE) reference electrode is approximately -0.370V. Based on the various results of this study, the developed iridium (SSRE) reference electrode can be applied to the water chemistry environments of nuclear power plant. Various metallic materials used in a nuclear power plant have been exposed to a variety of water chemistry environments and the corrosion of metallic materials occurs due to the reactions between metal structures and water chemistry environments. Therefore, the management of the water chemistry factors is needed to prevent corrosion. The chemical factors affecting the corrosion are pH and Electrochemical Corrosion Potential (ECP). The world-wide studies suggest that ECP and pH are effective indicators for preventing the material damage from water chemistry condition. ECP and pH should be measured as the reference electrodes, and should show stable potential characteristics with fast responses. In this study, the iridium reference electrodes using a solid-state metal oxide electrode has been developed to measure effective indicators such as ECP and pH. The iridium (SSRE) reference electrode for the ECP measurement in water chemistry environment of nuclear power plants has been developed. A calibration for water chemistry measurement was performed by potential measurement of iridium (SSRE) reference electrode with Ag/AgCl (SSRE) reference electrode. The result exhibited a stable potential for 117 hours and a super-Nernst ian response with 63.12mV/p H. In this study, the iridium (SSRE) reference electrode shows super-Nernst ian characteristic and it may be caused by the property of electrolytically coated iridium oxide. Considering the long-term stability of the developed electrode, it is possible to apply as a reference electrode through calibration procedure

  4. Institute for Nuclear Chemistry of the University of Mainz. Annual report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.

    1987-01-01

    The report summarizes the points of main efforts of the Institute for Nuclear Chemistry during 1986: A. Rapid separations (thermochromatography of platinum elements; ICP source for the HELIOS mass separator; oxidation states of Lr; ionic radii of Lr 3+ and Md 3+ ; heats of hydration). B. Exotic nuclei and nuclear structure (lifetime of the 167 keV level of 97 Sr; description of the K=3/2 + side band in 99 Y with the IBF/PTQ model; pairing-free K π =1 + -rotational bands in deformed odd/odd A ≅ 100 nuclei; proton particle states in 103,105 Rh; β-decay of the 110,112 Rh isomers; β-decay half-life of 130 48 Cd and its importance for astrophysical r-process scenarios; alpha burning of 14 O; β-decay half-lives of nuclei far from stability for astrophysical application; beta delayed neutron energy spectra for application in reactor physics). C. Nuclear fission (charge distribution in the reaction 232 Th(n R ,f); isomeric ratios and decay properties of 96m,g Y, 97m,g Y and 134m,g I). D. Heavy ion reactions (quasi fission in the reaction 40 Ar + 208 Pb near the Coulomb barrier; unusual excitation-energy distribution in quasi-fission reactions; competition of direct reactions with fusion; nucleon transfer in the reaction 40 Ar + 235 U; nuclear reactions and nuclear contact in U+U collisions below the barrier; deflection function and fragmentation in the system 197 Au → 197 Au; search for exotic heavy nuclei using Rutherford backscattering). E. Ecology of radionuclides (preparation of plutonium samples for laser spectroscopy; laser resonance-ionization mass spectrometry on uranium and plutonium; capture of externally produced ions in a high frequency quadrupole trap; Chernobyl fallout in the Mainz area). (orig./RB) [de

  5. State-of-the-Art Report on the Progress of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.D.; DelCul, G.D.; Spencer, B.B.; Jubin, R.T.; Maher, C.; Kim, I.-T.; Lee, H.; Federov, Yu. S.; Saprykin, V.F.; Beznosyuk, V.I.; Kolyadin, A.B.; Baron, P.; Miguirditchian, M.; Sorel, C.; Morita, Y.; Taylor, R.; Khaperskaya, A.; Hill, C.; Malmbeck, R.; Law, J.; Angelis, G. de; Boucher, L.; Xeres, X.; Collins, E.; Mendes, E.; Lee, H.-S.; Inoue, T.; Glatz, J.P.; Kormilitsyn, M.; Uhlir, J.; Ignatiev, V.; Serp, J.; Delpech, S.

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of advanced nuclear systems requires that new technologies associated with the back end of the fuel cycle are developed. The separation of minor actinides from other fuel components is one of the advanced concepts being studied to help close the nuclear fuel cycle and to improve the long-term effects on the performance of geological repositories. Separating spent fuel elements and subsequently converting them through transmutation into short-lived nuclides should considerably reduce the long-term risks associated with nuclear power generation. R and D programs worldwide are attempting to address such challenges, and many processes for advanced reprocessing and partitioning minor actinides are being developed. This report provides a comprehensive overview of progress on separation chemistry processes, and in particular on the technologies associated with the separation and recovery of minor actinides for recycling so as to help move towards the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. The report examines both aqueous and pyro processes, as well as the status of current and proposed technologies described according to the hierarchy of separations targeting different fuel components. The process criteria that will affect technology down-selection are also reviewed, as are non-proliferation requirements. The maturity of different reprocessing techniques are assessed using a scale based on the technology readiness level, and perspectives for future R and D are reviewed

  6. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear of the Science and Technology part II : Nuclear Chemistry and Process Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamsul Abraha; Yateman Arryanto; Sri Jauhari S; Agus Taftazani; Kris Tri Basuki; Djoko Sardjono, Ign.; Sukarsono, R.; Samin; Syarip; Suryadi, MS; Sardjono, Y.; Tri Mardji Atmono; Dwiretnani Sudjoko; Tjipto Sujitno, BA.

    2007-08-01

    The Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Science and Technology is a routine activity held by Centre for Accelerator Technology and Material Process, National Nuclear Energy Agency, for monitoring the research activity which achieved in National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Meeting was held in Yogyakarta on July 10, 2007. The proceedings contains papers presented on the meeting about Nuclear Chemistry and Process Technology and there are 47 papers which have separated index. The proceedings is the second part of the three parts which published in series. (PPIN)

  7. Report of the joint seminar on heavy-ion nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry in the energy region of tandem accelerators (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    A meeting of the second joint seminar on Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Chemistry in the Energy Region of Tandem Accelerators was held after an interval of two years at the Tokai Research Establishment of the JAERI, for three days from January 9 to 11, 1986. In the seminar, about 70 nuclear physicists and nuclear chemists of JAERI and other Institutes participated, and 38 papers were presented. These include general reviews and topical subjects which have been developed intensively in recent years, as well as the new results obtained by using the JAERI tandem accelerator. This report is a collection of the papers presented to the seminar. (author)

  8. Data processing technologies and diagnostics for water chemistry and corrosion control in nuclear power plants (DAWAC). Report of a coordinated research project 2001-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This publication provides information on the current status and development trends in monitoring, diagnostics and control of water chemistry and corrosion of core and primary circuit materials in water cooled power reactors. It summarizes the results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project and focuses on the methods for development, qualification and implementation of water chemistry expert systems at nuclear power plants. These systems are needed to have full benefit from using on-line sensors in real time mode when sensor signals, and other chemistry and operational data, are collected and continuously analysed with data acquisition and evaluation software. Technical knowledge was acquired in water chemistry control techniques (grab sampling, on-line monitoring, data collecting and processing, etc), plant chemistry and corrosion diagnostics, plant monitoring (corrosion, chemistry, activity) and plant chemistry improvement (analytical models and practices). This publication covers contributions from leading experts in water chemistry/corrosion, representing organizations from 16 countries with the largest nuclear capacities

  9. Development status of nuclear power in China and fundamental research progress on PWR primary water chemistry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xinqiang; Liu, Xiahe; Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei; Xu, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    China's non-fossil fuels are expected to reach 20% in primary energy ratio by 2030. It is urgent for China to speed up the development of nuclear power to increase energy supply, reduce gas emissions and optimize resource allocation. Chinese government slowed down the approval of new nuclear power plant (NPP) projects after Fukushima accident in 2011. At the end of 2012, the State Council approved the nuclear safety program and adjusted long-term nuclear power development plan (2011-2020), the new NPP's projects have been restarted. In June 2015, there are 23 operating units in mainland in China with total installed capacity of about 21.386 GWe; another 26 units are under construction with total installed capacity of 28.5 GWe. The main type of reactors in operation and under construction in China is pressurized water reactor (PWR), including the first AP1000 NPPs in the world (units 1 in Sanmen) and China self-developed Hualong one NPPs (units 5 and 6 in Fuqing). Currently, China's nuclear power development is facing historic opportunities and also a series of challenges. One of the most important is the safety and economy of nuclear power. The optimization of primary water chemistry is one of the most effective ways to minimize radiation field, mitigate material degradation and maintain fuel performance in PWR NPPs, which is also a preferred path to achieve both safety and economy for operating NPPs. In recent years, an increased attention has been paid to fundamental research and engineering application of PWR primary water chemistry in China. The present talk mainly consists of four parts: (1) development status of China's nuclear power industry; (2) safety of nuclear power and operating water chemistry; (3) fundamental research progress on Zn-injected water chemistry in China; (4) summary and future. (author)

  10. Standard guide for establishing a quality assurance program for analytical chemistry laboratories within the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the establishment of a quality assurance (QA) program for analytical chemistry laboratories within the nuclear industry. Reference to key elements of ANSI/ISO/ASQC Q9001, Quality Systems, provides guidance to the functional aspects of analytical laboratory operation. When implemented as recommended, the practices presented in this guide will provide a comprehensive QA program for the laboratory. The practices are grouped by functions, which constitute the basic elements of a laboratory QA program. 1.2 The essential, basic elements of a laboratory QA program appear in the following order: Section Organization 5 Quality Assurance Program 6 Training and Qualification 7 Procedures 8 Laboratory Records 9 Control of Records 10 Control of Procurement 11 Control of Measuring Equipment and Materials 12 Control of Measurements 13 Deficiencies and Corrective Actions 14

  11. A contribution from fundamental and applied technetium chemistry to the nuclear waste disposal safety case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totskiy, Yury; Yalcintas, Ezgi; Huber, Florian; Gaona, Xavier; Schaefer, Thorsten; Altmaier, Marcus; Geckeis, Horst [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal; Kalmykov, Stepan [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear waste disposal in deep geological formations such as crystalline (granite), sedimentary (claystone) or rock salt, is the favored option of the international nuclear waste disposal community. For the long-term safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories, a reliable prediction of radionuclide migration behavior is required. A potentially relevant mobilization and migration mechanism is caused by water intrusion into the repository, leading to radionuclide release via transport pathways. In this case, detailed knowledge of key parameters controlling the retention and mobilization of radionuclides in solution, i.e. redox processes, solubility limits and sorption properties, is essential. Dedicated research is required in order to derive process understanding and develop accurate site-independent chemical and thermodynamic models, applicable for all considered host rock formations and scenarios. Technetium-99 is a β-emitting fission product highly relevant for the safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories due to its significant content in radioactive waste (fission yield >6%), long half-life (t{sub 1/2} ∼ 2.1.10{sup 5} a) and redox sensitivity. The mobility of Tc in the environment strongly depends on its oxidation state. Tc(VII) exists as highly soluble and mobile TcO{sub 4-} pertechnetate anion under sub-oxic and oxidizing conditions, whereas Tc(IV) forms sparingly soluble hydrous oxide (TcO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O) solid phases under reducing conditions. In the first part of this study focusing on fundamental Tc chemistry, the redox behavior of Tc(VII)/Tc(IV) was investigated in dilute to concentrated solutions. The results are systematized according to Pourbaix diagrams calculated with the NEA.TDB data selection for Tc to assess the effect of homogeneous and heterogeneous reducing systems and ionic strength on Tc redox behaviour. Investigations focusing on the solubility and speciation of TcO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O(s) were performed in dilute to

  12. Effect of water chemistry improvement on flow accelerated corrosion in light-water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Wataru; Ohira, Taku; Nagata, Nobuaki; Abe, Ayumi; Takiguchi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of Carbon Steel (CS) piping has been one of main issues in Light-Water Nuclear Reactor (LWRs). Wall thinning of CS piping due to FAC increases potential risk of pipe rupture and cost for inspection and replacement of damaged pipes. In particular, corrosion products generated by FAC of CS piping brought steam generator (SG) tube corrosion and degradation of thermal performance, when it intruded and accumulated in secondary side of PWR. To preserve SG integrity by suppressing the corrosion of CS, High-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH9.8±0.2) has been adopted to Tsuruga-2 (1160 MWe PWR, commercial operation in 1987) in July 2005 instead of conventional Low-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH 9.3). By the High-AVT adoption, the accumulation rate of iron in SG was reduced to one-quarter of that under conventional Low-AVT. As a result, a tendency to degradation of the SG thermal efficiency was improved. On the other hand, it was clarified that High-AVT is ineffective against Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) at the region where the flow turbulence is much larger. By contrast, wall thinning of CS feed water pipes due to FAC has been successfully controlled by oxygen treatment (OT) for long time in BWRs. Because Magnetite film formed on CS surface under AVT chemistry has higher solubility and porosity in comparison with Hematite film, which is formed under OT. In this paper, behavior of the FAC under various pH and dissolved oxygen concentration are discussed based on the actual wall thinning rate of BWR and PWR plant and experimental results by FAC test-loop. And, it is clarified that the FAC is suppressed even under extremely low DO concentration such as 2ppb under AVT condition in PWR. Based on this result, we propose the oxygenated water chemistry (OWC) for PWR secondary system which can mitigate the FAC of CS piping without any adverse effect for the SG integrity. Furthermore, the applicability and effectiveness of this concept developed for FAC

  13. Chemistry Programme for Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-01-15

    This publication provides guidance on establishing a high standard chemistry programme in accordance with plant safety policy and regulatory requirements. It will be useful to managers of operating organizations and other staff responsible for supporting or monitoring plant activities and for oversight of the plant chemistry programme, as well as to regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Functions, responsibilities and interfaces; 3. Chemistry programme; 4. Chemistry control; 5. Chemistry aspects of radiation exposure optimization; 6. Chemistry surveillance; 7. Management of chemistry data; 8. Training and qualification; 9. Quality control of chemicals and other substances.

  14. Chemistry Programme for Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants. Specific Safety Guide (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This publication provides guidance on establishing a high standard chemistry programme in accordance with plant safety policy and regulatory requirements. It will be useful to managers of operating organizations and other staff responsible for supporting or monitoring plant activities and for oversight of the plant chemistry programme, as well as to regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Functions, responsibilities and interfaces; 3. Chemistry programme; 4. Chemistry control; 5. Chemistry aspects of radiation exposure optimization; 6. Chemistry surveillance; 7. Management of chemistry data; 8. Training and qualification; 9. Quality control of chemicals and other substances

  15. Chemistry Programme for Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides guidance on establishing a high standard chemistry programme in accordance with plant safety policy and regulatory requirements. It will be useful to managers of operating organizations and other staff responsible for supporting or monitoring plant activities and for oversight of the plant chemistry programme, as well as to regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Functions, responsibilities and interfaces; 3. Chemistry programme; 4. Chemistry control; 5. Chemistry aspects of radiation exposure optimization; 6. Chemistry surveillance; 7. Management of chemistry data; 8. Training and qualification; 9. Quality control of chemicals and other substances

  16. Conversion of Nuclear Waste into Nuclear Waste Glass: Experimental Investigation and Mathematical Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The melter feed, slurry, or calcine charged on the top of a pool of molten glass forms a floating layer of reacting material called the cold cap. Between the cold-cap top, which is covered with boiling slurry, and its bottom, where bubbles separate it from molten glass, the temperature changes by up to 1000 K. The processes that occur over this temperature interval within the cold cap include liberation of gases, conduction and consumption of heat, dissolution of quartz particles, formation and dissolution of intermediate crystalline phases, and generation of foam and gas cavities. These processes have been investigated using thermal analyses, optical and electronic microscopies, x-ray diffraction, as well as other techniques. Properties of the reacting feed, such as heat conductivity and density, were measured as functions of temperature. Investigating the structure of quenched cold caps produced in a laboratory-scale melter complemented the crucible studies. The cold cap consists of two main layers. The top layer contains solid particles dissolving in the glass-forming melt and open pores through which gases are escaping. The bottom layer contains bubbly melt or foam where bubbles coalesce into larger cavities that move sideways and release the gas to the atmosphere. The feed-to-glass conversion became sufficiently understood for representing the cold-cap processes via mathematical models. These models, which comprise heat transfer, mass transfer, and reaction kinetics models, have been developed with the final goal to relate feed parameters to the rate of glass melting

  17. Controlling chemistry parameters in nuclear reactors and power plants, plant chemistry specification requirements and compliance - an overview of TAPS 1 and 2 experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindranath; Muralidharan, K.; Save, C.B.; Patil, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station -TAPS 1 and 2 is a twin unit Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Nuclear Power Plant commissioned in the year 1969. Both units are running with capacity factor of more than 90 % in their 20 th cycle of operation as on today. The 220 MWe units were derated to 160 MWe during 1984 consequent to isolation of Secondary Steam Generators (SSG) in the 10 th cycle of operation due to SSG tube leaks. This paper presents an overview of Plant Chemistry Control measures and experiences during the last 38 years of operation. The overall plant chemistry performance of TAPS 1 and 2 observed is very good; which is evident from the material condition of various systems reflected in QC and I reports, NDT and ISI reports. This is also supported by the fact that both Units are showing excellent performance continuously during recent years. (author)

  18. Theoretical chemistry periodicities in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Periodicities in Chemistry and Biology, Volume 4 covers the aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the stably rotating patterns of reaction and diffusion; the chemistry of inorganic systems exhibiting nonmonotonic behavior; and population cycles. The text also describes the mathematical modeling of excitable media in neurobiology and chemistry; oscillating enzyme reactions; and oscillatory properties and excitability of the heart cell membrane. Selected topics from the theory of physico-chemical instabilities are also encompassed. Chemists, mechanical engin

  19. Mathematical optimization of incore nuclear fuel management decisions: Status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turinsky, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear fuel management involves making decisions about the number of fresh assemblies to purchase and their Attributes (e.g. enrichment and burnable poison loading), burnt fuel to reinsert, location of the assemblies in the core (i.e. loading pattern (LP)), and insertion of control rods as a function of cycle exposure (i.e. control rod pattern (CRP)). The out-of-core and incore nuclear fuel management problems denote an artificial separation of decisions to simplify the decisionmaking. The out-of-core problem involves multicycle analysis so that levelized fuel cycle cost can be evaluated; whereas, the incore problem normally involves single cycle analysis. Decision variables for the incore problem normally include all of the above noted decisions with the exception of the number of fresh assemblies, which is restricted by discharge burnup limits and therefore involves multicycle considerations. This paper reports on the progress that is being made in addressing the incore nuclear fuel management problem utilizing formal mathematical optimization methods. Advances in utilizing the Simulating Annealing, Genetic Algorithm and Tabu Search methods, with applications to pressurized and boiling water reactor incore optimization problem, will be reviewed. Recent work on the addition of multiobjective optimization capability to aide the decision maker, and utilization of heuristic rules and incorporation of parallel algorithms to increase computational efficiency, will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Assistance in chemistry and chemical processes related to primary, secondary and ancillary systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio A.; Becquart, Elena T.; Iglesias, Alberto M.; La Gamma, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina

    2003-01-01

    Argentina is currently running two nuclear power plants: Atucha I (CNA I) and Embalse (CNE) operated by Nucleoelectrica Argentina (NASA) whereas the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), among other activities, is responsible for research and development in the nuclear field, operates research reactors and carries out projects related to them. In particular, the Reactor Chemistry Section personnel (currently part of the Chemistry Dept.) has been working on the field of reactor water chemistry for more than 25 years, on research and support to the NPPs chemistry department. Though the most relevant tasks have been connected to primary and secondary circuits chemistry, ancillary systems show along the time unexpected problems or feasible improvements originated in the undergoing operating time as well as in phenomena not foreseen by the constructors. In the present paper are presented the tasks performed in relation to the following systems of Embalse NPP: 1) Heavy water upgrade column preliminary water treatment; 2) Liquid waste system preliminary water treatment; and 3) Primary heat transport system coolant crud composition. (author)

  1. Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Twenty-first annual progress report, February 1, 1985-January 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The nuclear chemistry group in the School of Chemistry continues investigating the radioactive decay of nuclei far from stability under this DOE contract. These nuclei are produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility [HHIRF] and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge [UNISOR]. Radioactive decay represents a unique method for the population of low-energy, low-spin structures in nuclei, and new phenomena which do not occur near stability can be explored. Our research encompasses three aspects of nuclear structure: (1) nuclear spectroscopy with detailed γγt, e - γt, Xγt, etc., multiparameter coincidence spectrometry; (2) on-line laser hyperfine structure [hfs] and isotope shift measurements for the determination of nuclear quadrupole moments, nuclear spins, and changes in mean nuclear charge radii as a means of revealing systematic shape changes in nuclei; and (3) theoretical calculations of predictions of nuclear models for comparison with experimental level structures in nuclei studied at UNISOR. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Partial volume effect correction in nuclear medicine: assessment with a mathematical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Murilo Collete da; Pozzo, Lorena

    2009-01-01

    Objective: assessment of Van Cittert partial volume effect correction method in nuclear medicine images, with a mathematical phantom. Material and method: we simulated an image of four circular sources of different diameters and intensity of 255 per pixel. The iterative algorithm was applied with 20 iterations and α = 1. We obtained the maximum and average counts on the entire image and in regions of interest placed on each of the sources. We also extracted count profiles plotted along the diameter of each of the sources. Results: the local convergence depends on the size of the source studied: the smaller the source, the greater the number of iterations required. It also depends on the information extracted: the use of average counts provides more homogeneous results than the maximum count. There is a significant improvement in image contrast. Conclusion: this study showed the possibility of qualitative and quantitative improvement in applying the bidimensional iterative Van Cittert method to images of simple geometry. (author)

  3. Mathematical verification of a nuclear power plant protection system function with combined CPN and PVS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Seo Ryong; Son, Han Seong; Seong, Poong Hyun

    1999-01-01

    In this work, an automatic software verification method for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) protection system is developed. This method utilizes Colored Petri Net (CPN) for system modeling and Prototype Verification System (PVS) for mathematical verification. In order to help flow-through from modeling by CPN to mathematical proof by PVS, an information extractor from CPN models has been developed in this work. In order to convert the extracted information to the PVS specification language, a translator also has been developed. ML that is a higher-order functional language programs the information extractor and translator. This combined method has been applied to a protection system function of Wolsung NPP SDS2 (Steam Generator Low Level Trip). As a result of this application, we could prove completeness and consistency of the requirement logically. Through this work, in short, an axiom or lemma based-analysis method for CPN models is newly suggested in order to complement CPN analysis methods and a guideline for the use of formal methods is proposed in order to apply them to NPP software verification and validation. (author). 9 refs., 15 figs

  4. Mathematical aspects of assessing extreme events for the safety of nuclear plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempski, Slawomir; Borysiewicz, Mieczyslaw

    2015-04-01

    In the paper the review of mathematical methodologies applied for assessing low frequencies of rare natural events like earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes or tornadoes, floods (in particular flash floods and surge storms), lightning, solar flares, etc., will be given in the perspective of the safety assessment of nuclear plants. The statistical methods are usually based on the extreme value theory, which deals with the analysis of extreme deviation from the median (or the mean). In this respect application of various mathematical tools can be useful, like: the extreme value theorem of Fisher-Tippett-Gnedenko leading to possible choices of general extreme value distributions, or the Pickands-Balkema-de Haan theorem for tail fitting, or the methods related to large deviation theory. In the paper the most important stochastic distributions relevant for performing rare events statistical analysis will be presented. This concerns, for example, the analysis of the data with the annual extreme values (maxima - "Annual Maxima Series" or minima), or the peak values, exceeding given thresholds at some periods of interest ("Peak Over Threshold"), or the estimation of the size of exceedance. Despite of the fact that there is a lack of sufficient statistical data directly containing rare events, in some cases it is still possible to extract useful information from existing larger data sets. As an example one can consider some data sets available from the web sites for floods, earthquakes or generally natural hazards. Some aspects of such data sets will be also presented taking into account their usefulness for the practical assessment of risk for nuclear power plants coming from extreme weather conditions.

  5. The application of artificial intelligence chemistry diagnostic system to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Meizhen

    1996-01-01

    By processing water chemistry data to diagnose sensor and equipment malfunctions in realtime, artificial intelligence chemistry diagnostic system helps to reduce the plant downtime due to steam generator tubing failures and other accidents. A typical processing system of water chemistry data is presented

  6. Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Twenty-second annual progress report, February 1, 1986-January 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear chemistry group in the School of Chemistry continues investigations of radioactive decay of nuclei far from stability under this DOE contract. These nuclei are produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge (UNISOR). Radioactive decay represents a unique method for the population of low-energy, low-spin structures in nuclei, and new phenomena which do not occur near stability can be explored. Our research interest encompasses three aspects of nuclear structure: (1) nuclear spectroscopy with detailed γγt, e - γt, Xγt, αγt multiparameter coincidence spectrometry; (2) measurements of single γ-ray angular distributions and magnetic moments of mass separated low-temperature oriented nuclei, using the helium dilution refrigerator ''ORIENT'' being installed on-line to the isotope separator; and (3) on-line laser hyperfine structure (hfs) and isotope shift measurements for determination of nuclear quadrupole moments, nuclear spins, and changes in mean nuclear charge radii as a means of revealing systematic shape changes in nuclei. 35 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  7. Computer-based system for inspection of water chemistry regimes in WWER-type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burcl, R.; Novak, M.; Malenka, P.

    1993-01-01

    The unsatisfactory situation in water chemistry testing at nuclear power plants with WWER type reactors is described. The testing primarily relies on laboratory analyses of manually taken samples. About 40 samples from one unit are tested per shift, which comprises approximately 250 determinations of various parameters. The time between two determinations is no shorter than 4 to 6 hours, thus rapid parameter changes between two determinations fail to be monitored. A novel system of automated chemistry monitoring is outlined, feasible for WWER type reactors. The system comprises 10 sets of sensors for monitoring all the relevant chemistry parameters of both the primary and secondary coolant circuits. Each sensor set has its own autonomous computer which secures its function even in case of loss of the chemical information network. The entire system is controlled by a master computer which also collects the results and provides contact with the power plant's information system. (Z.S.). 1 fig

  8. Power thresholds for fast oscillatory instabilities in nuclear reactors: a simple mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez-Antola, Roberto; Uruguay)

    2007-01-01

    The cores of nuclear reactors, including its structural parts and cooling fluids, are complex mechanical systems able to vibrate in a set of normal modes and frequencies, if suitable perturbed. The cyclic variations in the strain state of the core materials may modify the reactivity, and thus thermal power, producing variations in strain due to thermal-elastic effects. If the variation of the temperature field is fast enough and if the Doppler Effect and other stabilizing prompt effects in the fuel are weak enough, a fast oscillatory instability could be produced, coupled with mechanical vibrations of small enough amplitude that they will not be excluded by the procedures of conventional mechanical design. After a careful discussion of the time scales of neutron kinetics, thermal-elastic and vibration phenomena, a simple lumped parameter mathematical model is constructed in order to study, in a first approximation, the stability of the reactor. An integro-differential equation for power kinetics is derived. Under certain conditions, fast oscillatory instabilities are found when power is greater than a threshold value, and the delay in the global power feedback loop is big enough. Approximate analytical formulae are given for the power threshold, critical delay and power oscillation frequency. It is shown that if prompt stabilizing fuel effects are strong enough, dangerous fast power oscillations due to mechanical thermal-nuclear coupling phenomena can not appear at any power level. (author)

  9. Nuclear chemistry research. Progress report, November 1, 1974--October 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugarman, N.; Turkevich, A.

    1975-01-01

    The major effort in the high-energy nuclear chemistry program was the study of cross sections and kinematic properties of products formed from the interaction of 1- to 300-GeV protons with heavy- (Bi and U) and medium-mass (Cu, Ag) nuclei. The products studied ranged in mass from approximately 20 to that of the target nucleus. Except in the case of near-target product nuclei (ΔA approximately 10 to 20), no substantial change in cross section or recoil properties was observed at 300 GeV from those measured at 11.5 GeV. New experiments are in progress to relate the production mechanisms of selected products to fundamental particle interactions and the production of exotic particles. Extensive preparations were made for another experiment to be performed soon at higher intensity on the search for polyneutron aggregates at the LAMPF Accelerator. Work is continuing on the use of stable isotope tracers (methane-20 and 21) for the study of long-range transport and diffusion phenomena in the atmosphere. A collaborative effort on the study of extraterrestrial objects (meteorites and lunar samples) is continuing. The work has involved correlations among trace and minor elements, the evolution of the lunar regolith, differentiation of lunar magmas, and a study of lunar agglutinates

  10. Radiation processing of polymers and semiconductors at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Z.; Przybytniak, G.; Kaluska, I.

    2006-01-01

    R(and)D studies in the field of radiation technology in Poland are mostly concentrated at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT). The results of the INCT works on polymer and semiconductor modification have been implemented in various branches of national economy, particularly in industry and medicine. Radiation technology for polymer modification was implemented in the middle of the 1970-ties. Among others, the processes of irradiation and heat shrinkable products expansion have been developed. The transfer of this technology to Polish industry was performed in the middle of the 1980-ties. The present study aims at the formulation of new PE composites better suited to new generation of heat shrinkable products, for example, a new generation of hot-melt adhesives has been developed to meet specific requirements of customers. Modified polypropylene was used for the production of medical devices sterilized by radiation, especially disposable syringes, to overcome the low radiation resistance of the basic material. Modified polypropylene (PP-M) has been formulated at the INCT to provide material suitable for medical application and radiation sterilization process. Modification of semiconductor devices by EB was applied on an industrial scale since 1978 when the INCT and the LAMINA semiconductor factory successfully adopted that technology to improve specific semiconductor devices. This activity is continued on commercial basis where the INCT facilities served to contract irradiation of certain semiconductor devices according to the manufacturing program of the Polish factory and customers from abroad. (author)

  11. Proceedings of the 2013 International Conference on Mathematics and Computational Methods Applied to Nuclear Science and Engineering - M and C 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Mathematics and Computation Division of the American Nuclear (ANS) and the Idaho Section of the ANS hosted the 2013 International Conference on Mathematics and Computational Methods Applied to Nuclear Science and Engineering (M and C 2013). This proceedings contains over 250 full papers with topics ranging from reactor physics; radiation transport; materials science; nuclear fuels; core performance and optimization; reactor systems and safety; fluid dynamics; medical applications; analytical and numerical methods; algorithms for advanced architectures; and validation verification, and uncertainty quantification

  12. Proceedings of the 2013 International Conference on Mathematics and Computational Methods Applied to Nuclear Science and Engineering - M and C 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    The Mathematics and Computation Division of the American Nuclear (ANS) and the Idaho Section of the ANS hosted the 2013 International Conference on Mathematics and Computational Methods Applied to Nuclear Science and Engineering (M and C 2013). This proceedings contains over 250 full papers with topics ranging from reactor physics; radiation transport; materials science; nuclear fuels; core performance and optimization; reactor systems and safety; fluid dynamics; medical applications; analytical and numerical methods; algorithms for advanced architectures; and validation verification, and uncertainty quantification.

  13. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  14. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1981-12-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  15. Geomechanical problems of an underground storage of spent nuclear fuel and their mathematic modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blaheta, Radim; Byczanski, Petr; Šňupárek, Richard; Hájek, Antonín

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2007), s. 140-146 ISSN 1335-1788 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : mathematical modelling * thermo-mechanical processes * underground deposition Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  16. Probing beer aging chemistry by nuclear magnetic resonance and multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, J.A.; Barros, A.S.; Carvalho, B.; Brandao, T.; Gil, Ana M.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabonomics for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in beer exposed to forced aging (at 45 deg. C for up to 18 days) is described. Both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR spectra of beer recorded as a function of aging and an aging trend was observed. Inspection of PLS-DA loadings and peak integration revealed the importance of well known markers (e.g. 5-HMF) as well as of other compounds: amino acids, higher alcohols, organic acids, dextrins and some still unassigned spin systems. 2D correlation analysis enabled relevant compound variations to be confirmed and inter-compound correlations to be assessed, thus offering improved insight into the chemical aspects of beer aging. Highlights: · Use of NMR metabonomics for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in beer exposed to forced aging. · Compositional variations evaluated by principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminant analysis. · Results reveal importance of known markers and other compounds: amino and organic acids, higher alcohols, dextrins. · 2D correlation analysis reveals inter-compound relationships, offering insight into beer aging chemistry. - Abstract: This paper describes the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in tandem with multivariate analysis (MVA), for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in a lager beer exposed to forced aging (at 45 deg. C for up to 18 days). To evaluate the resulting compositional variations, both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR spectra of beer recorded as a function of aging and a clear aging trend was observed. Inspection of PLS-DA loadings and peak integration enabled the changing compounds to be identified, revealing the importance of well known markers such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5

  17. Probing beer aging chemistry by nuclear magnetic resonance and multivariate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, J.A. [CICECO-Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Barros, A.S. [QOPNA-Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Carvalho, B.; Brandao, T. [UNICER, Bebidas de Portugal, Leca do Balio, 4466-955, S. Mamede de Infesta (Portugal); Gil, Ana M., E-mail: agil@ua.pt [CICECO-Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-09-30

    Graphical abstract: The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabonomics for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in beer exposed to forced aging (at 45 deg. C for up to 18 days) is described. Both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR spectra of beer recorded as a function of aging and an aging trend was observed. Inspection of PLS-DA loadings and peak integration revealed the importance of well known markers (e.g. 5-HMF) as well as of other compounds: amino acids, higher alcohols, organic acids, dextrins and some still unassigned spin systems. 2D correlation analysis enabled relevant compound variations to be confirmed and inter-compound correlations to be assessed, thus offering improved insight into the chemical aspects of beer aging. Highlights: {center_dot} Use of NMR metabonomics for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in beer exposed to forced aging. {center_dot} Compositional variations evaluated by principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminant analysis. {center_dot} Results reveal importance of known markers and other compounds: amino and organic acids, higher alcohols, dextrins. {center_dot} 2D correlation analysis reveals inter-compound relationships, offering insight into beer aging chemistry. - Abstract: This paper describes the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in tandem with multivariate analysis (MVA), for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in a lager beer exposed to forced aging (at 45 deg. C for up to 18 days). To evaluate the resulting compositional variations, both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR spectra of beer recorded as a function of aging and a clear aging trend was observed. Inspection of PLS-DA loadings and peak integration enabled the changing compounds to be identified, revealing the importance of well known

  18. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellwag, B.; Aaltonen, P.; Hickling, J.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ''on-line'' and ''in-situ'' characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. For confirmation, a complete set of sensors

  19. SUMO, System performance assessment for a high-level nuclear waste repository: Mathematical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Miley, T.B.; Engel, D.W.; Chamberlain, P.J. II.

    1992-09-01

    Following completion of the preliminary risk assessment of the potential Yucca Mountain Site by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1988, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL to develop an integrated system model and computer code that provides performance and risk assessment analysis capabilities for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The system model that has been developed addresses the cumulative radionuclide release criteria established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and estimates population risks in terms of dose to humans. The system model embodied in the SUMO (System Unsaturated Model) code will also allow benchmarking of other models being developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. The system model has three natural divisions: (1) source term, (2) far-field transport, and (3) dose to humans. This document gives a detailed description of the mathematics of each of these three divisions. Each of the governing equations employed is based on modeling assumptions that are widely accepted within the scientific community

  20. Progress report on research and development work 1991 of the Department of Hot Chemistry, Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    In the year under review, the Institute of Hot Chemistry (IHCH) was in the midst of a thematic reorientation process. The priority of future chemical-technical work will be in the field of the development of supercriticality processes. The objective of such work consists in seeking new ways for getting rid of resistant chemical pollutants (halogenated organic compounds). The following projects are presented in detail: 1) Waste control in the environment (communal waste management; water and soil; emission-reducing processes; highly polluted soils); 2) Solid state and materials research (chemistry of materials research); basic physical research (neutrino and particle physics); 3) Nuclear waste management (concluding work on reprocessing technology), and 4) Other research projects (Institute-related research). The Annex lists the publications made by the IHCH staff. (BBR) [de

  1. Work on the hot atom chemistry at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veljkovic, S.

    1969-01-01

    A survey of work on hot atom chemistry from the establishment of the Institute up to now, where the role of Prof. P. Savic, should be specially emphasized, is given. The investigations in this domain during the first period, were directed to solve various problems in production of radioactive isotopes. Today these investigations are closely associated with the work in radiochemistry, physical chemistry of liquid and solid systems and fast reaction kinetics improving the development of these branches (author) [sr

  2. Analytical chemistry instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laing, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    In nine sections, 48 chapters cover 1) analytical chemistry and the environment 2) environmental radiochemistry 3) automated instrumentation 4) advances in analytical mass spectrometry 5) fourier transform spectroscopy 6) analytical chemistry of plutonium 7) nuclear analytical chemistry 8) chemometrics and 9) nuclear fuel technology

  3. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellwag, B [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany); Aaltonen, P [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hickling, J [CML GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ``on-line`` and ``in-situ`` characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. (Abstract Truncated)

  4. Physical Chemistry '98: Fourth International Conference on Fundamental and Applied Aspects of Physical Chemistry - Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribnikar, S.; Anic, S.

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings has following chapters: Plenary lectures; Chemical Thermodynamics; Spectroscopy, Molecular Structures, Physical Chemistry of Plasma; Kinetics, Catalysis, Nonlinear Dynamics; Electrochemistry; Biophysical Chemistry, Photochemistry, Radiation Chemistry; Radiochemistry, Nuclear Chemistry; Solid State Physical Chemistry, Material Science; Macromolecular Physical Chemistry; Environmental Protection; Phase Boundaries; Complex Compounds; General Physical Chemistry. A separated abstract was prepared for each of the 20 papers selected from the three chapters: Biophysical Chemistry, Photochemistry, Radiation Chemistry; Radiochemistry, Nuclear Chemistry. and Environmental Protection. Refs and figs

  5. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Mark; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Peterson, Per; Calderoni, Pattrick; Scheele, Randall; Casekka, Andrew; McNamara, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    -evaluate thermophysical properties of flibe and flinak. Pacific Northwest National Laboratories has focused on evaluating the fluorinating gas nitrogen trifluoride as a potential salt purification agent. Work there was performed on removing hydroxides and oxides from flinak salt under controlled conditions. Lastly, the University of California Berkeley has spent considerable time designing and simulating reactor components with fluoride salts at high temperatures. Despite the hurdles presented by the innate chemical hazards, considerable progress has been made. The stage has been set to perform new research on salt chemical control which could advance the fluoride salt cooled reactor concept towards commercialization. What were previously thought of as chemical undesirable, but nuclear certified, alloys have been shown to be theoretically compatible with fluoride salts at high temperatures. This preliminary report has been prepared to communicate the construction of the basic infrastructure required for flibe, as well as suggest original research to performed at the University of Wisconsin. Simultaneously, the contents of this report can serve as a detailed, but introductory guide to allow anyone to learn the fundamentals of chemistry, engineering, and safety required to work with flibe salt.

  6. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Peterson, Per [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Calderoni, Pattrick [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Scheele, Randall [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Casekka, Andrew [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); McNamara, Bruce [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-01-22

    -evaluate thermophysical properties of flibe and flinak. Pacific Northwest National Laboratories has focused on evaluating the fluorinating gas nitrogen trifluoride as a potential salt purification agent. Work there was performed on removing hydroxides and oxides from flinak salt under controlled conditions. Lastly, the University of California Berkeley has spent considerable time designing and simulating reactor components with fluoride salts at high temperatures. Despite the hurdles presented by the innate chemical hazards, considerable progress has been made. The stage has been set to perform new research on salt chemical control which could advance the fluoride salt cooled reactor concept towards commercialization. What were previously thought of as chemical undesirable, but nuclear certified, alloys have been shown to be theoretically compatible with fluoride salts at high temperatures. This preliminary report has been prepared to communicate the construction of the basic infrastructure required for flibe, as well as suggest original research to performed at the University of Wisconsin. Simultaneously, the contents of this report can serve as a detailed, but introductory guide to allow anyone to learn the fundamentals of chemistry, engineering, and safety required to work with flibe salt.

  7. Proceedings of the symposium on the joint research program between JAERI and Universities. Current status and future perspectives of the chemistry research in the nuclear fuel cycle back end field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    The first Symposium on the Joint Research Project between JAERI and Universities was held in Tokyo, January 27, 1999, to present the main achievements of the project in these 5 years and to discuss future perspectives of the chemistry research relating to the nuclear fuel cycle. The areas covered by the Joint Research Project are (1) Nuclear Chemistry for TRU Recycling, (2) Solid State Chemistry on Nuclear Fuels and Wastes, (3) Solution Chemistry on Fuel Reprocessing and Waste Management, and (4) Fundamental Chemistry on Radioactive Waste Disposal. The 8 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. Applied radiation chemistry - the present status in the Institute for Nuclear Research Academia Sinica (INRAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian-yun, L.

    1981-01-01

    The department of radiation chemistry in INRAS is one of the research centers of radiation chemistry in China. Since its establishment in 1958, basic theoretical and applied radiation chemistry have been extensively studied and promoted. In the field of applied radiation chemistry of polymers, radiation modification of polymeric systems is an important and active branch. Materials such as permselective membranes based on different polymer films have been prepared by means of radiation crosslinking and grafting. Superfine powdered wax, which may be used for the preparation of special lubricating grease of high quality, has been obtained via radiation degradation of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene). As for applied organic radiation chemistry, the main technological conditions of preparation of alkane sulfonic acid by radiation sulphoxidation of n-paraffin were optimized and the radiation sensitization effects of halogenated alkane and acetic anhydride on the indicated system were studied. The radiation stability of linear conjugated molecules and the related effects of intra- and intermolecular radiation protection were particularly investigated. These studies are described. (author)

  9. Research activity of institute of physical chemistry of Russian Academy of sciences in the field of nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikaev, A.K. [Institute of Physical Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    The report is a brief review of the most important directions in research activity of the Institute of Physical Chemistry of RAS (Moscow) in the field of nuclear fuel cycle. The main attention is paid to researches and developments on liquid radioactive waste management including the removal of wastes to deep geological formations and the immobilization of the wastes. In particular, the data from the study on the properties of new, basaltic-like matrices for the immobilization are presented. The results of research on gas evolution from the systems modeling liquid high-level radioactive wastes are considered. The separation of some radionuclides from irradiated nuclear and the production of radiation sources by various methods are discussed. (author)

  10. Nuclear microprobe and Raman investigation of the chemistry of the shell of the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, A.; Gauldie, R.W.; Pithie, J.; Sharma, S.K.; Jamieson, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear microscopy was used to study the layered structure in the shell of the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. In cross section, the layers appear as opaque white zones and clearer translucent zones. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the zones consist of alternating layers of the aragonite and calcite morphs of calcium carbonate, the mineral constituent of the shell. The chemistry of the shell varies from individual to individual but generally the predominant metal ion is Ca, with varying amounts of Si, Cl, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, Sb, Ni, Fe, As and Sr. Two dimensional maps of these major, minor and trace elements were measured in many shells with nuclear microscopy to identify the patterns of Zn and Sr deposition reflecting the calcite and aragonite layers. The significant difference in the patterns identified by ion beam analyses are possibly a result of isostructural exclusion of these metal ions between the different aragonite and calcite polymorphic forms of calcium carbonate. (author)

  11. 5. International seminar on primary and secondary side water chemistry of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The major subjects of the meetings are: water chemistry of primary and secondary coolant circuits of PWR type reactors (mainly WWER types), corrosion of steam generators, decontamination processes, treatment of radioactive waste waters and related subjects. All the 29 papers were individually indexed and abstracted for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  12. 5. International seminar on primary and secondary side water chemistry of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The major subjects of the meetings are: water chemistry of primary and secondary coolant circuits of PWR type reactors (mainly WWER types), corrosion of steam generators, decontamination processes, treatment of radioactive waste waters and related subjects. All the 29 papers were individually indexed and abstracted for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  13. The birth of nuclear chemistry created opportunities and danger, a pioneer recalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, J.

    1982-01-01

    An autobiographical account is given of the author's work in the Canadian wartime atomic energy project, and of his post-war work at the University of Saskatchewan on chemical studies with radioisotope tracers and on radiation chemistry. (U.K.)

  14. Nuclear-chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Eighteenth annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported on nuclear spectroscopy studies including lifetimes of the g/sub 7/2/ shell-model intruder states in 107 109 Ag, lifetime of the new /sup 187m/Au isomer, the decay of 187 Au - 187 Pt, decay of /sup 201m,g/Po, 203 At, and 125 Ba, and L-shell orbital EC probability and decay energy in 207 Bi decay. Also progress on nuclear model calculations of nuclear structure is reported

  15. Progress report for Nuclear Chemistry Project. Period covered: October 1, 1974--September 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Research on investigations of chemical bonding influences on the moderation and capture of negative mu mesons when stopped in matter, nuclear energy levels, internal fields in solids, and the validity of certain semiclassical approximations made in the treatment of nuclear rotational motion

  16. Advances in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, John R

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features

  17. Computational benchmark problems: a review of recent work within the American Nuclear Society Mathematics and Computation Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, H.L. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the recent accomplishments of the Computational Benchmark Problems Committee of the American Nuclear Society Mathematics and Computation Division is presented. Solutions of computational benchmark problems in the following eight areas are presented and discussed: (a) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor neutronics, (b) pressurized water reactor (PWR) thermal hydraulics, (c) PWR neutronics, (d) neutron transport in a cylindrical ''black'' rod, (e) neutron transport in a boiling water reactor (BWR) rod bundle, (f) BWR transient neutronics with thermal feedback, (g) neutron depletion in a heavy water reactor, and (h) heavy water reactor transient neutronics. It is concluded that these problems and solutions are of considerable value to the nuclear industry because they have been and will continue to be useful in the development, evaluation, and verification of computer codes and numerical-solution methods

  18. Economic analysis of the hydrogen production by means of the thermo-chemistry process iodine-sulfur with nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solorzano S, C.; Francois L, J. L.

    2011-11-01

    In this work an economic study was realized about a centralized plant of hydrogen production that works by means of a thermo-chemistry cycle of sulfur-iodine and uses heat coming from a nuclear power plant of IV generation, with base in the software -Hydrogen Economic Evaluation Programme- obtained through the IAEA. The sustainable technology that is glimpsed next for the generation of hydrogen is to great scale and based on processes of high temperature coupled to nuclear power plants, being the most important the cycle S-I and the electrolysis to high temperature, for what objective references are presented that can serve as base for the taking of decisions for its introduction in Mexico. After detailing the economic models that uses the software for the calculation of the even cost of hydrogen production and the characteristics, so much of the nuclear plant constituted by fourth generation reactors, as of the plant of hydrogen production, is proposed a -base- case, obtaining a preliminary even cost of hydrogen production with this process; subsequently different cases are studied starting from which are carried out sensibility analysis in several parameters that could rebound in this cost, taking into account that these reactors are still in design and planning stages. (Author)

  19. The Unsuspected Roles of Chemistry in Nuclear Power Plants: Special Chemical Technologies for Enhanced Safety and Increased Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sempere Belda, Luis

    2008-01-01

    The plant's chemists main responsibility is the establishment and monitoring of an adequate water chemistry to minimize corrosion and in PWRs, to control the neutron flux. But this is by no means the only way in which chemical applications contribute to the performance and safety of a NPP during its entire life: The use of special coatings and treatment protects the plant's components from aggressive environmental conditions. The chemical scale removal in steam generators improves the power output of aging plants, helping even to achieve permissions for NPP life extension. The use of special adhesives can replace welding in complicated or high-dose areas, even underwater. And chemical decontamination is used to remove activity from the components of the primary circuit prior to maintenance or replacement works in order to decrease the radiation exposure of the plant's personnel, employing revolutionary methods of waste minimization to limit the amount of generated radioactive waste to a minimum. The AREVA Group, in its pursue of excellence in all stages of the nuclear cycle, has devoted years of research and development to be able to provide the most advanced technological solutions in this field. The awareness of the existing possibilities will help present and future nuclear professionals, chemists and non-chemists alike, to benefit from the years of experience and continuous development in chemical technologies at the service of the nuclear industry. (authors)

  20. The Unsuspected Roles of Chemistry in Nuclear Power Plants: Special Chemical Technologies for Enhanced Safety and Increased Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sempere Belda, Luis [AREVA NP GmbH, An AREVA and SIEMENS Company, P.O. Box 1109, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The plant's chemists main responsibility is the establishment and monitoring of an adequate water chemistry to minimize corrosion and in PWRs, to control the neutron flux. But this is by no means the only way in which chemical applications contribute to the performance and safety of a NPP during its entire life: The use of special coatings and treatment protects the plant's components from aggressive environmental conditions. The chemical scale removal in steam generators improves the power output of aging plants, helping even to achieve permissions for NPP life extension. The use of special adhesives can replace welding in complicated or high-dose areas, even underwater. And chemical decontamination is used to remove activity from the components of the primary circuit prior to maintenance or replacement works in order to decrease the radiation exposure of the plant's personnel, employing revolutionary methods of waste minimization to limit the amount of generated radioactive waste to a minimum. The AREVA Group, in its pursue of excellence in all stages of the nuclear cycle, has devoted years of research and development to be able to provide the most advanced technological solutions in this field. The awareness of the existing possibilities will help present and future nuclear professionals, chemists and non-chemists alike, to benefit from the years of experience and continuous development in chemical technologies at the service of the nuclear industry. (authors)

  1. Analysis of Pipe Wall-thinning Caused by Water Chemistry Change in Secondary System of Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hun; Hwang, Kyeongmo [KEPCO E and C, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Seung-Jae [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Pipe wall-thinning by flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) is a significant and costly damage of secondary system piping in nuclear power plants (NPPs). All NPPs have their management programs to ensure pipe integrity from wall-thinning. This study analyzed the pipe wall-thinning caused by changing the amine, which is used for adjusting the water chemistry in the secondary system of NPPs. The pH change was analyzed according to the addition of amine. Then, the wear rate calculated in two different amines was compared at the steam cycle in NPPs. As a result, increasing the pH at operating temperature (Hot pH) can reduce the rate of FAC damage significantly. Wall-thinning is affected by amine characteristics depending on temperature and quality of water.

  2. Influence of processing variables and alloy chemistry on the corrosion behavior of ZIRLO nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comstock, R.J.; Sabol, G.P.; Schoenberger, G.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the thermal heat treatments used during the fabrication of ZIRLO (Zr-1Nb-1Sn-0.1Fe) fuel clad tubing and in ZIRLO alloy chemistry were explored to develop a further understanding of the relationship between processing, microstructure, and cladding corrosion performance. Heat treatment variables included intermediate tube annealing temperatures as well as a beta-phase heat treatment during the latter stages of the tube reduction schedule. Chemistry variables included deviations in niobium and tin content from the nominal composition. The effects of both heat treatment and chemistry on corrosion behavior were assessed by autoclave tests in both pure and lithiated water and high-temperature steam. Analytical electron microscopy demonstrated that the best out-reactor corrosion performance is obtained for microstructures containing a fine distribution of beta-niobium and Zr-Nb-Fe particles. Deviations from this microstructure, such as the presence of beta-zirconium phase, tend to degrade corrosion resistance. ZIRLO fuel cladding was irradiated in four commercial reactors. In all cases, the microstructure in the cladding included beta-niobium and Zr-Nb-Fe particles. ZIRLO fuel cladding processed with a late-stage beta heat treatment to further refine the second-phase particle size exhibited in-reactor corrosion behavior that was similar to reference ZIRLO cladding. Variations of the in-reactor corrosion behavior of ZIRLO were correlated to tin content, with higher oxide thickness observed in the ZIRLO cladding containing higher tin. The results of these studies indicate that optimum corrosion performance of ZIRLO is achieved by maintaining a uniform distribution of fine second-phase particles and controlled levels of tin

  3. Nuclear chemistry research of high-energy nuclear reactions at Carnegie-Mellon University, 1961--1977. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caretto, A.A. Jr.

    1977-11-01

    The activities and the results of research in the study of high energy nuclear reactions carried out at Carnegie Institute of Technology from 1957 to 1967 and at Carnegie-Mellon University from 1967 to 1977 are summarized. A complete list of all publications, doctoral dissertations, and reports resulting from the research of this project is also included. A major part of the report is a review of the research activities and results. The objective of the research of this project was the study of reactions initiated by projectiles of energy above about 100 MeV. The main effort was the investigation of simple nuclear reactions with the objective to deduce reaction mechanisms. These reactions were also used as probes to determine the nuclear structure of the target. In addition, a number of studies of spallation reactions were undertaken which included the determination of excitation functions and recoil properties. Recent research activities which have involved the study of pion induced reactions as well as reactions initiated by heavy ions is also discussed

  4. Hairs, criminals, moonrocks, metals, diseases, polluters[ Where next for nuclear analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jervis, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear methods of analysis have advanced dramatically in recent years, and in many ways, techniques that once were viewed as a scientific curiosity and the toys of a few scientists working in large nuclear research establishments, are now semi-routine and can be applied even by young students. Large amount of good analytical data are outputted from instruments having sophisticated embedded software. It is interesting to speculate on the directions that nuclear analytical techniques may take next: whether more multielement; more automation for vastly larger sample suites; extension to minor and major components of samples as well as trace components; coupling of nuclear methods to hyphenated methods. However, in some respects the resources needed to continue to develop and apply radioanalytical methods are on the wane: reactors and accelerators are being closed and fewer radiochemical specialists are being trained. The open question is whether instrumental analysis techniques will offer more and better results with less effort, or be less equipment intensive? In this paper some personal reflections on nuclear activation methods and their trends are presented and discussed. Some mileposts in the development of the field and some unique and interesting applicaions (as implied by the paper title) are cited and discussed. (author) 13 refs

  5. Nuclear chemistry research. Annual progress report, 1 January 1974--31 December 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolke, R.L.

    1974-01-01

    The charge-state program was directed toward heavier ions than had been studied previously. The low-level counting program was continued in two projects: a search for natural alpha radioactivity in osmium and a search for strontium activity in marine mollusc shells. In parallel with the latter work, a comprehensive literature review was made of the applications of radiochemistry to oceanographic research. A new, non-experimental project was begun: a general, consistent mathematical analysis of low-level counting statistics. Improvements in facilities and equipment are reported. (U.S.)

  6. Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Nineteenth annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Our effort is centered on radioactive decay studies of far-from-stable nuclides produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge (UNISOR). Progress is reported on the following studies: lifetime of the g/sub 7/2/ level in 109 Ag; halflife of the h/sub 9/2/ level in 187 Au; decay of 8.4 min 187 Au → 187 Pt; orbital EC probabilities and decay energy of 207 Bi; decay of 9 min /sup 201m/Po and 16 min /sup 201g/Po; decay of 2.5 min 125 Ba; decay of 7.4 min 203 At; exploration of neutron-deficient Sm, Pm, and Nd nuclides; preparation of thoron active deposit conversion electron sources; inception of nuclear laser spectroscopy at UNISOR; and nuclear structure calculations with nuclear models. Publications are listed

  7. 15. Mendeleev's meeting on general and applied chemistry. Obninsk symposium. Radiological problems in nuclear energetics and industry conversion. Abstracts. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Ecological aspects of nuclear-fuel engineering cycle and radiochemical technologies, radioactive waste processing and water purification, accidents at NPP and their consequences, ecological problems of industry conversion were discussed at the 15th Mendeleev's meeting on general and applied chemistry

  8. Aspects of nuclear wastes disposal of use in teaching basic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the utilization of several aspects of chemical issues in nuclear wastes disposal proposals are discussed. Equilibrium speciation, complexation competition, the effect of pH and complexation on redox speciation, sorption on colloids, etc. are a few examples of the chemical behavior of fission products and actinide metals in natural aquatic systems. A brief review of the types of nuclear wastes in the US and the proposed methods of disposal are presented to reflect the diversity of chemical problems involved and the opportunities they offer to use open-quotes realclose quotes examples in teaching

  9. Potential for accidents in a nuclear power plant: probabilistic risk assessment, applied statistical decision theory, and implications of such considerations to mathematics education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dios, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This dissertation focuses upon the field of probabilistic risk assessment and its development. It investigates the development of probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear engineering. To provide background for its development, the related areas of population dynamics (demography), epidemiology and actuarial science are studied by presenting information upon how risk has been viewed in these areas over the years. A second major problem involves presenting an overview of the mathematical models related to risk analysis to mathematics educators and making recommendations for presenting this theory in classes of probability and statistics for mathematics and engineering majors at the undergraduate and graduate levels

  10. Heavy water radiolysis and chemistry control of the Fugen Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibuki, Y.; Kitabata, T.; Kato, T.

    1989-01-01

    A computer analysis for heavy water radiolysis clarified the mechanism of the heavy water radiolysis rate change with impurities in the heavy water and cover gas, helium. The mechanism is supported by over ten years' operational data of the heavy water radiolysis in the Fugen nuclear power station. (author)

  11. Chem I Supplement. Chemistry Related to Isolation of High-Level Nuclear Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Darleane C.; Choppin, Gregory R.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses some of the problems associated with the safe disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. Describes several waste disposal plans developed by various nations. Outlines the multiple-barrier concept of isolation in deep geological questions associated with the implementation of such a method. (TW)

  12. Book of Abstracts of IV. All-Polish Conference on Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The different aspects of radiochemistry have been presented and discussed. Especially application of radiochemical methods for preparation of biologically active compounds usable in nuclear medicine and biology as well as for isotope separation and purification have been presented in details. The application of radiochemical methods convenient for environmental monitoring and contamination control have been extensively represented as well

  13. Radiation chemistry in the nuclear power reactor environment: from laboratory study to practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the work carried out at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in underlying and applied radiation chemical research performed to optimise the processes occurring in the four aqueous systems in and around the core. The aqueous systems subject to radiolysis in CANDU reactors are Heat Transport System, Moderator, Liquid Zone Controls and End Shields.

  14. The use of nuclear muprobe techniques to study the chemistry of lacustrine sediments and particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grime, G. W.; Davison, W.

    1993-05-01

    The Oxford SPM has been used in two novel studies of lake chemistry: (a) The distribution of dissolved iron in sediment pore waters close to the sediment/water interface has been measured using the novel technique of diffusive equilibration in a thin film (DET). In this technique, which has a spatial resolution of O stoichiometry of single particles. The particles were filtered from a depth of 14 m in Esthwaite Water in the English Lake District and handled in anoxic conditions until evacuation in the SPM sample chamber. Two distinct compositions of iron oxide were determined in clusters of about 5 μm diameter. Analysis by PIXE revealed that FeS was uniformly distributed in the particulate material and that it also contained elevated levels of Cu and Zn. This study was the first to demonstrate directly that discrete clusters of iron oxides are present in black particulate material which is commonly considered to comprise iron sulphides.

  15. Research in nuclear chemistry. Progress report, March 1, 1976--February 28, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The study of the binding of actinide ions by the humic and fulvic acid fractions of humus soil has been initiated. Comparison of the thermodynamics of binding of actinides by these soil fractions with the analogous data for a variety of monomer ligands of the type expected to be present in humic acid may enable us to derive a useful model for actinide sorption by humus soils. Inasmuch as humus constitutes a large fraction of the soils of the world, development of a model for its binding of actinide ions could be most helpful in understanding the environmental chemistry of the actinide elements. Our investigation of the binding of the actinide ions by these soil fractions has been coupled with a study of the protonation thermodynamics of humic acid in order to provide a more full characterization of these materials

  16. General chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Yeong Sik; Lee, Dong Seop; Ryu, Haung Ryong; Jang, Cheol Hyeon; Choi, Bong Jong; Choi, Sang Won

    1993-07-01

    The book concentrates on the latest general chemistry, which is divided int twenty-three chapters. It deals with basic conception and stoichiometry, nature of gas, structure of atoms, quantum mechanics, symbol and structure of an electron of ion and molecule, chemical thermodynamics, nature of solid, change of state and liquid, properties of solution, chemical equilibrium, solution and acid-base, equilibrium of aqueous solution, electrochemistry, chemical reaction speed, molecule spectroscopy, hydrogen, oxygen and water, metallic atom; 1A, IIA, IIIA, carbon and atom IVA, nonmetal atom and an inert gas, transition metals, lanthanons, and actinoids, nuclear properties and radioactivity, biochemistry and environment chemistry.

  17. A mathematical model for cost of maritime transport. Application to competitiveness of nuclear vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorval, C.

    1966-05-01

    In studying the competitiveness of a nuclear merchant vessel, economic assessments in terms of figures were discarded in favor of a simplified model, which gives a clearer idea of the mechanism of the comparison between alternative vessels and the particular influence of each parameter. An expression is formulated for the unit cost per ton carried over a given distance as a function of the variables (speed and deadweight tonnage) and is used to determine the optima for conventional and nuclear vessels. To represent the freight market involved in the optimization studies, and thus in the competitiveness computation, two cases are taken into account: the tonnage to be carried annually is limited, and the tonnage to be carried annually is not limited. In both cases the optima are calculated and compared for a conventional and a nuclear vessel. Competitiveness curves are plotted as a function of the ratios of nuclear and conventional fuel costs and nuclear and conventional marginal power costs. These curves express the limiting values of the above two ratios for which the transport costs of the nuclear and conventional vessels are equal. The competitiveness curves vary considerably according to the hypothesis adopted for the freight market and the limit of tonnage carried annually. (author) [fr

  18. Nuclear Chemistry Project. Progress report, Janary 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The first on-line operation of the Princeton electron spectrometer was achieved and its capability for fast life time measurements demonstrated. The first operation of the heavy ion source was achieved and beams of 75 meV 12 C +4 ions and 37 MeV 6 Li +2 ions demonstrated. The capability of the isotope separator to provide pure mass separated samples of radioisotopes is being utilized for three different applications. The very weak electron capture branch of 19-s krypton 81m to bromine 81 was studied. This transition probability is of crucial importance for a possible solar neutrino detection method based on natural bromine. Lead 202 has been prepared and mass separated for optical hyperfine spectroscopic studies. The isotope shift shift which measures the second moment, 2 >, of the nuclear charge indicates the more neutron deficient lead isotopes are becoming increasingly soft toward nuclear deformation

  19. Data processing system for small and medium sized clinical chemistry and nuclear medical units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariss, P; Haubold, E; Porth, A J

    1987-06-01

    A computer system, in clinical use for over 5 years, with a group practice specializing in laboratory-nuclear medicine is described for its hardware and software configuration. In addition to the conventional tasks of a computer system (patient data acquisition, issuance of worklists, result input, plausibility control, quality assurance, findings documentation), an integrated word processing system was developed for nuclear medicine in-vitro and in-vivo diagnosis. In addition, the computer system masters major administrative tasks, such as private and panel accounts, account reminders payments to suppliers, etc. the hardware and data bank are designed in a manner which permits direct data access over a period of 18 to 21 months.

  20. Nuclear chemistry research. Final report, April 1, 1962-May 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkevich, A.

    1985-12-01

    Nuclear chemical technqiues and insights have been used to study problems in science ranging from purely nuclear ones to those involving cosmology, meteorology and space science. In the first category were the first studies of the spallation of copper with both negative and positive mesons, and studies of the spallation of complex nuclei with pions and protons of up to hundreds of GeV. This work was made the basis of the first detailed investigation of the multiplicity of nuclear processes that take place in a solid body (such as the moon or meteorites) when it is exposed over long periods of time to cosmic radiation. Contributions have been made to the development and testing of a new meteorological tracer ( 13 CD 4 ) suitable for experiments on a multithousand kilometer scale. Possible new tracers for this purpose have been proposed. On the cosmological scene, attention has been called to the three locales in our universe where thermonuclear reactions take place leading to the synthesis of helium out of lighter particles. It has been shown that the rates involved reflect the strengths of three of the four fundamental forces of nature

  1. The latest general chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Geun Bae; Choi, Se Yeong; Kim, Chin Yeong; Yoon, Gil Jung; Lee, Eun Seok; Seo, Moon Gyu

    1995-02-01

    This book deals with the latest general chemistry, which is comprised of twenty-three chapters, the contents of this book are introduction, theory of atoms and molecule, chemical formula and a chemical reaction formula, structure of atoms, nature of atoms and the periodic table, structure of molecule and spectrum, gas, solution, solid, chemical combination, chemical reaction speed, chemical equilibrium, thermal chemistry, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, acid-base, complex, aquatic chemistry, air chemistry, nuclear chemistry, metal and nonmetal, organic chemistry and biochemistry. It has exercise in the end of each chapter.

  2. Conducting water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuit of VVER-based nuclear power plant units constructed without using copper containing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyapkov, V. F.

    2014-07-01

    The secondary coolant circuit water chemistry with metering amines began to be put in use in Russia in 2005, and all nuclear power plant units equipped with VVER-1000 reactors have been shifted to operate with this water chemistry for the past seven years. Owing to the use of water chemistry with metering amines, the amount of products from corrosion of structural materials entering into the volume of steam generators has been reduced, and the flow-accelerated corrosion rate of pipelines and equipment has been slowed down. The article presents data on conducting water chemistry in nuclear power plant units with VVER-1000 reactors for the secondary coolant system equipment made without using copper-containing alloys. Statistical data are presented on conducting ammonia-morpholine and ammonia-ethanolamine water chemistries in new-generation operating power units with VVER-1000 reactors with an increased level of pH. The values of cooling water leaks in turbine condensers the tube system of which is made of stainless steel or titanium alloy are given.

  3. A mathematical model for the interpretation of nuclear bomb test derived {sup 14}C incorporation in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Samuel [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, INSA de Lyon, F-69621, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS, UMR5208, Institut Camille Jordan, 43 blvd du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne-Cedex (France); Frisen, Jonas [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Spalding, Kirsty L., E-mail: kirsty.spalding@ki.s [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-04-15

    Human tissues continually replace dying cells with newborn cells. However, the rate of renewal varies by orders of magnitudes between blood cells, which are renewed every day and neurons, for which renewal is non-existent or limited to specific regions of the brain. Between those extreme are many tissues that turnover on a time scale of years, although no direct measurements have been done. We present here a mathematical method to estimate cell turnover in slowly renewing biological systems. Age distribution of DNA can be estimated from the integration of radiocarbon derived from nuclear bomb-testing during the cold war (1955-1963). For slowly renewing tissues, this method provides a better estimate of the average age of the tissue than direct estimates from the bomb-curve. Moreover, death, birth and turnover rates can be estimated. We highlight this method with data from human fat cells.

  4. George de Hevesy (1885-1966). Discoverer of hafnium, founder of radioanalytical chemistry and X-ray fluorescence analysis and father of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niese, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    George de Hevesy known as discoverer of hafnium, founder of radioanalytical chemistry and X-ray fluorescence analysis and father of nuclear medicine has done important research work in inorganic, physical and radioanalytical and physiological chemistry as well as in geochemistry, radiation biology and medicine. When he must flee for political reasons from a country he must change his colleagues, his equipments, and the topic of his work. It is extremely surprising that he could receive important results under such circumstances even at an advanced age. (author)

  5. Water chemistry and corrosion in water-steam circuits of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardent, R.; Menet, O.

    1981-01-01

    The water and steam circuits of steam generators in pressurized-water nuclear power plants are described together with the mechanism of denting, and the corrosion of spacer plates that leads to cracks in tubes by constriction. The different chemical specifications applicable to the water of the secondary circuit of the generators in normal operation and on first commissioning are listed. The results obtained and the measurements of chemical values taken in operation on the water in the secondary circuits of steam generators at Fessenheim and Bugey are presented [fr

  6. The Swedish authorities' views on water chemistry in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Inspectorate puts great importance on the safety related chemical issues. These issues already comprise a large share of its research and development resources and an even larger share can be foreseen. It is of great importance for the safety of the nuclear power industry and for it's confidence in the public that the research on the safety issues is maintained and never become stagnant. For exchange of experiance, to get a so concordant view on the safety issues as possible and to make the best use of the resources the Inspectorate would with great satisfaction see a greater international cooperation, both on the industry side and at the authority side. (author)

  7. The needs of basic chemistry studies for nuclear waste management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.

    2004-01-01

    There are several strategies to manage the radioactive matter which has taken the status of 'ultimate radwaste'. They are based on combinations of the three primary strategies: 'Wait for Decay', 'Concentrate and Confine' and 'Disperse and Dilute' the radio-toxic radionuclides and chemo-toxic elements. They are, or will be used for safe storage (interim and long term) or safe disposal of nuclear wastes. The chemical needs to apply these strategies are on materials for isolation, matrices for confinement and on the numerous aspects of the migration of the elements, both in the lithosphere and in the biosphere. According to the ultimate fate of long lived radionuclides which will be finally released into the environment, migration studies of elements are, or should be, the driving force of research in nuclear wastes management. The chemical needs for improving our present basic knowledge related to this field will be reviewed, with emphasis on some new topics and on the effects of concentration of the elements when they migrate. The necessity to open some 'dark boxes' will be outlined. The paper does not intend to give programs of researches but only tracks for future research. (authors)

  8. The needs of basic chemistry studies for nuclear waste management issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaumont, R

    2004-07-01

    There are several strategies to manage the radioactive matter which has taken the status of 'ultimate radwaste'. They are based on combinations of the three primary strategies: 'Wait for Decay', 'Concentrate and Confine' and 'Disperse and Dilute' the radio-toxic radionuclides and chemo-toxic elements. They are, or will be used for safe storage (interim and long term) or safe disposal of nuclear wastes. The chemical needs to apply these strategies are on materials for isolation, matrices for confinement and on the numerous aspects of the migration of the elements, both in the lithosphere and in the biosphere. According to the ultimate fate of long lived radionuclides which will be finally released into the environment, migration studies of elements are, or should be, the driving force of research in nuclear wastes management. The chemical needs for improving our present basic knowledge related to this field will be reviewed, with emphasis on some new topics and on the effects of concentration of the elements when they migrate. The necessity to open some 'dark boxes' will be outlined. The paper does not intend to give programs of researches but only tracks for future research. (authors)

  9. Nuclear Deterrence. Applications of Elementary Probability to International Relations. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Unit 327.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harvey A.

    This module is designed to apply mathematical models to nuclear deterrent problems, and to aid users in developing enlightened skepticism about the use of linear models in stability analyses and long-term predictions. An attempt is made at avoiding overwhelming complexities through concentration on land-based missile forces. It is noted that after…

  10. Chemical effect in nuclear decay processes. Applications in in situ studies in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    In certain cases, secondary processes, such as X-ray or electron emission initiated by the primary event, do show effects which can be correlated with the chemical state of the emitting atom. The most well known is Moessbauer recoil-less γ-emission, but this talk will concentrate on other, more widespread processes that follow either γ-ray internal conversion (γIC) or electron capture (EC). The former leads to electron emission and the latter to X-ray and Auger electron emission. Such emissions have been extensively studied in non-radioactive situations. These studies have shown that changes in photo- or Auger-electron energy can be readily correlated with valency and that the energies, peak shapes and peak intensities of X-rays that are generated by valence-core transitions show chemically related perturbations. γIC has been applied to the determination of changes of 3p and 3d binding energies as a function of technetium valency. The results are comparable with those from conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) it is the Kα and Kβ X-rays from chromium ( 51 Cr) that have been most extensively studied. Studies in non-radioactive systems for chromium and related first row transition elements seem to indicate that the Kβ/Kα intensity ratio increases with valency. This may be rationalized as due to a greater response by 3p than 2p electrons to a reduction in the number of 3d electrons: 3p becomes more contracted and so the 3p → 1s transition probability is enhanced leading to the relative increase in Kβ intensity. Once 'chemical effects' in γIC and EC:XES have been established for a range of recoil elements they may be used to determine the chemical state of a recoil atom in a solid state matrix without recourse to dissolution. Such a non-invasive procedure will yield invalunable data on the primary hot atom chemistry processes. (author)

  11. Mathematical modelling of immobilization of radioactive evaporator concentrate from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.B.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional methods of processing evaporator concentrates from NPP are evaporation and cementation.These methods allow to transform a liquid radioactive waste into the rather inert form, suitable for a final disposal. To assess the safety for disposal of radioactive mortar-waste composition, the leaching of 137 Cs from immobilized radioactive evaporator concentrate into a surrounding fluid has been studied. Leaching tests were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. Determination of retardation factors, K F and coefficients of distribution, k d , using a simplified mathematical model for analyzing the migration of radionuclides, has been developed. In our experiment we have achieved the lowest leaching values after 60 days in samples. Results presented in this paper are examples of results obtained in a 20 year mortar and concrete testing project, which will influence the design of the engineered trenches system for a future central Serbian radioactive waste disposal center. (author)

  12. Application of mathematical models in assessing environmental impacts of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    Mathematical models are divided into atmospheric models which monitoring the migration of radioactive substances in the atmosphere, hydrological models which monitoring the discharge of radioactive substances into the hydrosphere and their concentrations in sediments, water flora and fauna, and hydrogeological models which monitoring the migration of radioactive substances in ground water. The application is described of the hydrogeological model in the evaluation of the radiation burden in the environment of the Dobronin radioactive waste disposal site. This model contains the determination of the maximal amounts of disposed radioactive substances, maximal design-basis accident, the amounts of leached radioactive substances, the calculation of the time of migration of substances in the soil, the determination of the dispersion in the aquifer and the determination of the radiation burden of the population. (H.S.)

  13. Thermal control of high energy nuclear waste, space option. [mathematical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Problems related to the temperature and packaging of nuclear waste material for disposal in space are explored. An approach is suggested for solving both problems with emphasis on high energy density waste material. A passive cooling concept is presented which utilized conduction rods that penetrate the inner core. Data are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the rods and the limit of their capability. A computerized thermal model is discussed and developed for the cooling concept.

  14. Modelling the molecular composition and nuclear-spin chemistry of collapsing prestellar sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hily-Blant, P.; Faure, A.; Rist, C.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Flower, D. R.

    2018-04-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of prestellar sources and the associated evolution of their chemical composition. We use the University of Grenoble Alpes Astrochemical Network (UGAN), which includes reactions involving the different nuclear-spin states of H2, H+3, and of the hydrides of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur, for reactions involving up to seven protons. In addition, species-to-species rate coefficients are provided for the ortho/para interconversion of the H_3^+ + H2 system and isotopic variants. The composition of the medium is followed from an initial steady state through the early phase of isothermal gravitational collapse. Both the freeze-out of the molecules on to grains and the coagulation of the grains were incorporated in the model. The predicted abundances and column densities of the spin isomers of ammonia and its deuterated forms are compared with those measured recently towards the prestellar cores H-MM1, L16293E, and Barnard B1. We find that gas-phase processes alone account satisfactorily for the observations, without recourse to grain-surface reactions. In particular, our model reproduces both the isotopologue abundance ratios and the ortho:para ratios of NH2D and NHD2 within observational uncertainties. More accurate observations are necessary to distinguish between full scrambling processes—as assumed in our gas-phase network—and direct nucleus- or atom-exchange reactions.

  15. The chemistry and activity build up in the primary systems of pressurized water nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darras, Raymond.

    1980-11-01

    After giving a background information on the present standards for the primary coolant in pressurized water nuclear reactors, the choice of particular chemical additives to the water is presented and their main properties are given; the various radioactivated products that are derived from these additives are also considered. The corrosion products transport through the whole primary circuit is then investigated. Two basically different types of processes, particularly about surface deposits, are characterized: that of suspended solids and that of soluble species, which are both carried by water. The physico-chemical data that rule the variations of solubilities for the more important elements are reviewed with details. From these data, the relation between corrosion products transport and radioactive contamination in primary circuits are examined, and this in the complex physico-chemical conditions of plant operation. Characteristic measurements, from operating power reactors, are also presented to illustrate the preceeding phenomena. Finally a chapter reviews the possible solutions against the radioactive contamination of the circuits and their surroundings: - a more adequate choice of materials, - a search for better surface treatment and application methods, - a better evaluation of the existing water conditioning, - an efficient filtration of the fluid, - the use of decontaminating processes [fr

  16. Nuclear chemistry progress report, Oregon State University. August 1, 1995--August 1, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the authors summarize the highlights of the work done between August 1, 1995, and August 1, 1996. The work reported herein is the result of a collaborative effort between the nuclear chemists at Oregon State University and many other individuals and research groups. Each project discussed was the result of a joint effort of the groups, interchanging roles in data acquisition and analysis. The work described is part of a project involving the study of low energy ( 197 Au utilizing the MSU A1200 separator; synthesis of several new neutron-deficient nuclides in reactions of 20 MeV/nucleon 197 Au with heavy targets (Ti, Zr and Au); their participation in exclusive studies of heavy residue formation in the reaction of 35 MeV/nucleon 86 Kr with 197 Au in which it was found that the residues had large associated particle multiplicities indicating their formation in highly dissipative collisions, and that particle emission leading to residue formation relative to fission was favored as the dissipated energy increased

  17. Role of the chemistry in the occupational dose control in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blesa, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The safety and radioprotection problem in nuclear power plants does not only concern the plants in operation, but it also includes the design, building and decommissioning stages. The factors that determine the radiation field development and the possibility of diminishing them when they reach critical values are presented. Here are considered pressure vessel-heavy water reactors and particularly the radionucleides coming from the products of structural material corrosion. These products are removed by decontaminating compounds and primary circuit systems in general. In accordance with ALARA criterium, the factors that make the decontamination process advisable are analyzed. Firstly, the number of collective doses is discused. In case of heavily contaminated components there is another limitation to the ALARA criterion: the limits of individual dose in a fixed period of time (year, trimester, etc). Among the various decontamination processes-physical or chemical - the stages to follow just in chemical procedures are stated. As Atucha I and II Power Plants are uniques it is necessary to be ready to solve problems. The research and development programs of National Atomic Energy Commission have produced very valuable results such as the 'in situ' activation model and the HERO (high efficient electrochemical removal of oxides) decontamination procedure. (M.E.L.) [es

  18. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex I. PSI-F1-Newsletter 1996 nuclear and particle physics. Muons in solid-state physics and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlach, D.; Kettle, P.R.; Buechli, C. [eds.] [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-02-01

    This newsletter contains reports from the F1-Department and its Divisions. The contributions are categorized as follows: - activities of the F1-Department of PSI, - nuclear and particle physics supported by the Department, -applications of muons in solid-state physics and chemistry. Groups were asked to present new, preliminary or final results obtained in 1996, as well as a publication list, related to F1-supported work which had appeared in scientific journals during 1996. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  19. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex I: PSI-F1-Newsletter 1995. Nuclear and particle physics. Muons in solid-state physics and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlach, D; Kettle, P R [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This newsletter contains reports from the F1-Department and its Divisions. The contributions are categorized as follows: - activities of the F1-Department of PSI, - nuclear and particle physics supported by the Department, - applications of muons in solid-state physics and chemistry. Groups were asked to present new, preliminary or final results obtained in 1995, as well as a publication list, related to F1-supported work which had appeared in scientific journals during 1995. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  20. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex I. PSI-F1-Newsletter 1996 nuclear and particle physics. Muons in solid-state physics and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlach, D.; Kettle, P.R.; Buechli, C.

    1997-02-01

    This newsletter contains reports from the F1-Department and its Divisions. The contributions are categorized as follows: - activities of the F1-Department of PSI, - nuclear and particle physics supported by the Department, -applications of muons in solid-state physics and chemistry. Groups were asked to present new, preliminary or final results obtained in 1996, as well as a publication list, related to F1-supported work which had appeared in scientific journals during 1996. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  1. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex I: PSI-F1-Newsletter 1995. Nuclear and particle physics. Muons in solid-state physics and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlach, D.; Kettle, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter contains reports from the F1-Department and its Divisions. The contributions are categorized as follows: - activities of the F1-Department of PSI, - nuclear and particle physics supported by the Department, - applications of muons in solid-state physics and chemistry. Groups were asked to present new, preliminary or final results obtained in 1995, as well as a publication list, related to F1-supported work which had appeared in scientific journals during 1995. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  2. Oregon State University nuclear chemistry progress report, August 1, 1988--August 1, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.D.

    1989-08-01

    The work described herein is part of a project involving the study of intermediate energy, and relativistic heavy ion reactions. The intermediate energy research focused on the characterization of the heavy residues, the large target fragments with A frag >2/3 A target . For the reaction of 85 MeV/nucleon 12 C with 197 Au, we had measured the heavy residue yields and angular distributions previously. We report herein the measurement of their energy spectra. The average residue energies are quite low, ranging from 15 keV/nucleon to 314 keV/nucleon. These low energies imply errors in some previous measurements of heavy residues in that many residues have energies below counter thresholds, etc. The essential physics of heavy residue production is shown to be correctly described by a VUU calculation. For the reaction of 35 and 43 MeV/nucleon Kr with Au, we found the linear momenta of the near-target heavy residues to be in agreement with models of peripheral collisions. For the heavy residues with large ΔA values, the residue linear momenta approach a limiting value which is far below that expected from the ''universal'' systematics of linear momentum transfer in reactions induced by smaller projectiles. Reasons for this limiting behavior are suggested. In the area of relativistic nuclear collisions, complete target fragment mass distributions were measured for the ultrarelativistic reactions of 13.6 GeV/nucleon 16 O and 28 Si with 197 Au. An unexpected finding in this study was the relatively large cross section for the two neutron removal process via electromagnetic dissociation. Similar measurements for the reaction of 1.1 GeV/nucleon 197 Au with 197 Au furnished the first complete fragment mass distribution for that reaction

  3. Electron beam facilities and technologies developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Walis, L.; Zimek, Z.

    1992-01-01

    The operation of the first electron accelerator has been started at Institute /former Institute for Nuclear Research/ in 1971. This LAE-13/9 accelerator is a two-section lineac with adjustable energy of electrons: 5 to 13 MeV and the beam power up to 9 kW. The main technologies developed on the basis of LAE-13/9 are: sterilization, manufacturing of thermoshrinkable materials and modification of semiconductors. The accelerator is operated 4000 hours per year and used for small scale production and services in these fields. The other problems investigated in laboratory scale are: food preservation and hygenization, hygenization of municipal sewage sludge, and bio-conversion of pig-farm wastes into animal fodder. The laboratory experiments are basis for pilot construction and other industrial applications. The mentioned technology of thermoshrinkable tube production was implemented in industrial scale at ZWUT Czluchow which factory is equipped in the accelerator ILU-6 /20 kW, 2 MeV/. On the basis of similar unit a technological installation was built at Institute. The plant is furnished with a conveyer and the rewinding machines for tubes and tapes manufacturing. This allows continuous production of these materials. The plant will start operation next year and linear accelerator /10 MeV, 15 kW/ for this purpose is already delivered. The pilot plant for food preservation and hygenization has been built. It is equipped in small pilot accelerator 10 MeV, 1 kW and will be furnished with 10 MeV, 10 kW lineac this year. Beside of this technological lines Institute is furnished in Van de Graff accelerator /2, MeV, 100 μA/ and another laboratory unit LAE-10 /10 MeV, 10-100 ns 2 us/ is under construction. (J.P.N.)

  4. From hot atom chemistry to epithermal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, K.

    2004-01-01

    The rise and fall of hot atom chemistry (HAC) over the years from 1934 to 2004 is reviewed. Several applications are discussed, in particular to astrophysics and the interaction of energetic ions and atoms in space. Epithermal chemistry (ETC) is proposed to substitute the old name, since it better fits the energy range as well as the non-thermal and non-equilibrium character of the reactions. ETC also avoids the strong connexion of HAC to nuclear chemistry and stands for the opening of the field to physical chemistry and astrophysics. (orig.)

  5. Predictability of iodine chemistry in the containment of a nuclear power plant under hypothetical severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L.E.; Vela-Garcia, M.; Fontanet, J. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    One of the areas of top interest in the arena of severe accidents to get an accurate prediction of Source Term is Iodine Chemistry. In this paper an assessment of the current capability of MELCOR and ASTEC to predict iodine chemistry within containment in case of a postulated severe accident has been carried out. The experiments FPT1 and FPT2 of the PHEBUS-FP project have been used for comparisons, since they were carried out under rather different containment conditions during the chemistry phase (subcooled vs. saturated sump or acid vs. alkaline pH), which makes them very suitable to assess the current modeling capability of in-containment iodine chemistry models. The results obtained indicate that, even though, both integral codes have specific areas related to iodine chemistry that should be further developed and that their approach to the matter is drastically different, at present ASTEC-IODE allows for a more comprehensive simulation of the containment iodine chemistry. More importantly, lack of maturity of these codes would potentially maximize the so-called user-effect, so that it would be highly recommendable to perform sensitivity studies around iodine chemistry aspects when calculating Source Term scenarios. Key aspects needed of further research are: gaseous iodine chemistry (absent in MELCOR), organic iodine chemistry and adsorption/desorption on/from containment surfaces. (authors)

  6. Regional probabilistic nuclear risk and vulnerability assessment by integration of mathematical modelling land GIS-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigina, O.; Baklanov, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Kola Peninsula, Russian Arctic exceeds all other regions in the world in the number of nuclear reactors. The study was aimed at estimating possible radiation risks to the population in the Nordic countries in case of a severe accident in the Kola Peninsula. A new approach based on probabilistic analysis of modelled possible pathways of radionuclide transport and precipitation was developed. For the general population, Finland is at most risk with respect to the Kola NPP, because of: high population density or proximity to the radiation-risk sites and relatively high probability of an airflow trajectory there, and precipitation. After considering the critical group, northern counties in Norway, Finland and Sweden appear to be most vulnerable. (au)

  7. AECL research programs in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, I.H.; Eastwood, T.A.; Smith, D.R.; Stewart, R.B.; Tomlinson, M.; Torgerson, D.F.

    1980-09-01

    Fundamental or underlying research in chemistry is being done in AECL laboratories to further the understanding of processes involved in current nuclear energy systems and maintain an awareness of progress at the frontiers of chemical research so that new advances can be turned to advantage in future AECL endeavours. The report introduces the current research topics and describes them briefly under the following headings: radiation chemistry, isotope separation, high temperature solution chemistry, fuel reprocessing chemistry, and analytical chemistry. (auth)

  8. Summary report for April, May, and June 1950. Chemistry Divison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, D. W. [ed.

    1950-07-27

    A summary of activities for the Chemistry Division is reported for April-June 1950. Areas reporting activity include: Nuclear and Radiation Chemistry, Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, and Process Chemistry.

  9. Abstracts of the 26. Brazilian Congress on Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It is presented the short communications of papers presented at the 26. Brazilian Congress on Chemistry, of nuclear interest. The papers are classified in four areas: isotope chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry and physico-chemical. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Reduction of 68Ge activity containing liquid waste from 68Ga PET chemistry in nuclear medicine and radiopharmacy by solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blois, Erik; Chan, Ho Sze; Roy, Kamalika; Krenning, Eric P; Breeman, Wouter A P

    PET with 68 Ga from the TiO 2 - or SnO 2 - based 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators is of increasing interest for PET imaging in nuclear medicine. In general, radionuclidic purity ( 68 Ge vs. 68 Ga activity) of the eluate of these generators varies between 0.01 and 0.001%. Liquid waste containing low amounts of 68 Ge activity is produced by eluting the 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators and residues from PET chemistry. Since clearance level of 68 Ge activity in waste may not exceed 10 Bq/g, as stated by European Directive 96/29/EURATOM, our purpose was to reduce 68 Ge activity in solution from >10 kBq/g to <10 Bq/g; which implies the solution can be discarded as regular waste. Most efficient method to reduce the 68 Ge activity is by sorption of TiO 2 or Fe 2 O 3 and subsequent centrifugation. The required 10 Bq per mL level of 68 Ge activity in waste was reached by Fe 2 O 3 logarithmically, whereas with TiO 2 asymptotically. The procedure with Fe 2 O 3 eliminates ≥90% of the 68 Ge activity per treatment. Eventually, to simplify the processing a recirculation system was used to investigate 68 Ge activity sorption on TiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 or Zeolite. Zeolite was introduced for its high sorption at low pH, therefore 68 Ge activity containing waste could directly be used without further interventions. 68 Ge activity containing liquid waste at different HCl concentrations (0.05-1.0 M HCl), was recirculated at 1 mL/min. With Zeolite in the recirculation system, 68 Ge activity showed highest sorption.

  11. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, F.; Rodgers, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book include: Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; Primary products in radiation chemistry; Theoretical aspects of radiation chemistry; Theories of the solvated electron; The radiation chemistry of gases; Radiation chemistry of colloidal aggregates; Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides; Radiation chemistry of polymers; Radiation chemistry of biopolymers; Radiation processing and sterilization; and Compound index

  12. Mathematical modelling of thermal-plume interaction at Waterford Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, S.Y.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Waldrop plume model was used to analyze the mixing and interaction of thermal effluents in the Mississippi River resulting from heated-water discharges from the Waterford Nuclear Power Station Unit 3 and from two nearby fossil-fueled power stations. The computer program of the model was modified and expanded to accommodate the multiple intake and discharge boundary conditions at the Waterford site. Numerical results of thermal-plume temperatures for individual and combined operation of the three power stations were obtained for typical low river flow (200,000 cfs) and maximum station operating conditions. The predicted temperature distributions indicated that the surface jet discharge from Waterford Unit 3 would interact with the thermal plumes produced by the two fossil-fueled stations. The results also showed that heat recirculation between the discharge of an upstream fossil-fueled plant and the intake of Waterford Unit 3 is to be expected. However, the resulting combined temperature distributions were found to be well within the thermal standards established by the state of Louisiana

  13. Chemistry of the elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, N.N.; Earnshaw, A.

    1984-01-01

    This textbook presents an account of the chemistry of the elements for both undergraduate and postgraduate students. It covers not only the 'inorganic' chemistry of the elements, but also analytical, theoretical, industrial, organometallic;, bio-inorganic and other areas of chemistry which apply. The following elements of special nuclear interest are included: Rb, Cs, Fr, Sr, Ba, Ra, Po, At, Rn, Sc, Y, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Mo, Tc, Ru, the Lanthanide Elements, the Actinide Elements. (U.K.)

  14. Non-thermally activated chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.

    1987-01-01

    The subject is covered under the following headings: state-of-the art of non-thermally activated chemical processes; basic phenomena in non-thermal chemistry including mechanochemistry, photochemistry, laser chemistry, electrochemistry, photo-electro chemistry, high-field chemistry, magneto chemistry, plasma chemistry, radiation chemistry, hot-atom chemistry, and positronium and muonium chemistry; elementary processes in non-thermal chemistry including nuclear chemistry, interactions of electromagnetic radiations, electrons and heavy particles with matter, ionic elementary processes, elementary processes with excited species, radicalic elementary processes, and energy-induced elementary processes on surfaces and interfaces; and comparative considerations. An appendix with historical data and a subject index is given. 44 figs., 41 tabs., and 544 refs

  15. Chemistry of americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    Essential features of the descriptive chemistry of americium are reviewed. Chapter titles are: discovery, atomic and nuclear properties, collateral reading, production and uses, chemistry in aqueous solution, metal, alloys, and compounds, and, recovery, separation, purification. Author and subject indexes are included. (JCB)

  16. Mathematical model for the preliminary analysis of dual-mode space nuclear fission solid core power and propulsion systems, NUROC3A. AMS report No. 1239a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grey, J.; Chow, S.

    1976-06-30

    The three-volume report describes a dual-mode nuclear space power and propulsion system concept that employs an advanced solid-core nuclear fission reactor coupled via heat pipes to one of several electric power conversion systems. Such a concept could be particularly useful for missions which require both relatively high acceleration (e.g., for planetocentric maneuvers) and high performance at low acceleration (e.g., on heliocentric trajectories or for trajectory shaping). The first volume develops the mathematical model of the system.

  17. DECOVALEX - Mathematical models of coupled T-H-M processes for nuclear waste repositories. Executive summary for Phases I,II and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O.; Tsang, C.F.; Kautsky, F.

    1996-06-01

    This executive summary presents the motivation, structure, objectives, methodologies and results of the first stage of the international DECOVALEX project - DECOVALEX I (1992-1995). The acronym stands for Development of Coupled Models and their Validation against Experiment in Nuclear Waste Isolation, and the project is an international effort to develop mathematical models, numerical methods and computer codes for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in fractured rocks and buffer materials for geological isolation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive wastes, and validate them against laboratory and field experiments. 24 refs

  18. Fundamentals of quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    House, J E

    2004-01-01

    An introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics needed in physical chemistry. Mathematical tools are presented and developed as needed and only basic calculus, chemistry, and physics is assumed. Applications include atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, alpha decay, tunneling, and superconductivity. New edition includes sections on perturbation theory, orbital symmetry of diatomic molecules, the Huckel MO method and Woodward/Hoffman rules as well as a new chapter on SCF and Hartree-Fock methods. * This revised text clearly presents basic q

  19. Tracer techniques in estimating nuclear materials holdup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1987-01-01

    Residual inventory of nuclear materials remaining in processing facilities (holdup) is recognized as an insidious problem for safety of plant operations and safeguarding of special nuclear materials (SNM). This paper reports on an experimental study where a well-known method of radioanalytical chemistry, namely tracer technique, was successfully used to improve nondestructive measurements of holdup of nuclear materials in a variety of plant equipment. Such controlled measurements can improve the sensitivity of measurements of residual inventories of nuclear materials in process equipment by several orders of magnitude and the good quality data obtained lend themselves to developing mathematical models of holdup of SNM during stable plant operations

  20. Aspects of the physics and chemistry of water radiolysis by fast neutrons and fast electrons in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, D.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Tsang, K.T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Laughton, P.J

    1998-09-01

    Detailed radiation physics calculations of energy deposition have been done for the coolant of CANDU reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The geometry of the CANDU fuel channel was modelled in detail. Fluxes and energy-deposition rates for neutrons, recoil ions, photons, and fast electrons have been calculated using MCNP4B, WIMS-AECL, and specifically derived energy-transfer factors. These factors generate the energy/flux spectra of recoil ions from fast-neutron energy/flux spectra. The energy spectrum was divided into 89 discrete ranges (energy bins).The production of oxidizing species and net coolant radiolysis can be suppressed by the addition of hydrogen to the coolant of nuclear reactors. It is argued that the net dissociation of coolant by gamma rays is suppressed by lower levels of excess hydrogen than when dissociation is by ion recoils. This has consequences for the modelling of coolant radiolysis by homogeneous kinetics. More added hydrogen is required to stop water radiolysis by recoil ions acting alone than if recoil ions and gamma rays acted concurrently in space and time. Homogeneous kinetic models and experimental data suggest that track overlap is very inefficient in providing radicals from gamma-ray tracks to recombine molecular products in ion-recoil tracks. An inhomogeneous chemical model is needed that incorporates ionizing-particle track structure and track overlap. Such a model does not yet exist, but a number of limiting cases using homogeneous kinetics are discussed. There are sufficient uncertainties and contradictions in the data relevant to the radiolysis of reactor coolant that the relatively high CHC's (critical hydrogen concentration) observed in NRU reactor experiments (compared to model predictions) may be explainable by errors in fundamental data and understanding of water radiolysis under reactor conditions. The radiation chemistry program at CRL has been focused to generate quantitative water-radiolysis data in a

  1. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...... made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction...

  2. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction......Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...

  3. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids)

  4. Future in actinoids coordination chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Takafumi

    2006-01-01

    Actinoids coordination chemistry is concerned with spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, specifically with solid-state chemistry of nuclear fuels, separation process with radioactive substances, and geological disposal of high-level radioactive substances. In the 21st century, accumulation of minor actinides, Np, Am, Cm, and others will be realized according with the present program of nuclear energy development. The present article briefly introduces general properties of actinide elements, followed by their coordination chemistry compared with rare earths coordination chemistry. Special facility needed to treat actinoids as well as their chemistry is briefly explained, together with the specific experimental apparatus such as X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectrometry (TRLFS) with synchrotron radiation facilities. The effect of coordination with actinoids in the environment chemistry is important in underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. For theoretical analysis of the results with actinoids chemistry, relativistic calculation is needed. (S. Ohno)

  5. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kand, Purushottam

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a specialized area of radiology that uses very small amounts of radioactive materials to examine organ function and structure. Nuclear medicine is older than CT, ultrasound and MRI. It was first used in patients over 60-70 years ago. Today it is an established medical specialty and offers procedures that are essential in many medical specialities like nephrology, pediatrics, cardiology, psychiatry, endocrinology and oncology. Nuclear medicine refers to medicine (a pharmaceutical) that is attached to a small quantity of radioactive material (a radioisotope). This combination is called a radiopharmaceutical. There are many radiopharmaceuticals like DTPA, DMSA, HIDA, MIBI and MDP available to study different parts of the body like kidneys, heart and bones etc. Nuclear medicine uses radiation coming from inside a patient's body where as conventional radiology exposes patients to radiation from outside the body. Thus nuclear imaging study is a physiological imaging, whereas diagnostic radiology is anatomical imaging. It combines many different disciplines like chemistry, physics mathematics, computer technology, and medicine. It helps in diagnosis and to treat abnormalities very early in the progression of a disease. The information provides a quick and accurate diagnosis of wide range of conditions and diseases in a person of any age. These tests are painless and most scans expose patients to only minimal and safe amounts of radiation. The amount of radiation received from a nuclear medicine procedure is comparable to, or often many times less than, that of a diagnostic X-ray. Nuclear medicine provides an effective means of examining whether some tissues/organs are functioning properly. Therapy using nuclear medicine in an effective, safe and relatively inexpensive way of controlling and in some cases eliminating, conditions such as overactive thyroid, thyroid cancer and arthritis. Nuclear medicine imaging is unique because it provides doctors with

  6. Organization of nuclear education at the Faculty of Chemistry of the Byelorussian state university: progress and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskaya, T.A.; Kimlenko, I.M.; Sviridov, D.V.; Tolstik, A.L.; Shadyro, O.I.

    2013-01-01

    The strategy of the nuclear education in the Republic of Belarus is discussed. Nuclear knowledge management course is introduced into the curricular according to the IAEA recommendations. Podcasting lectures, advanced handbooks, interdisciplinary courses, cooperative learning is the main components of the nuclear education processes. The aspects of the interaction between the university and employers are considered [ru

  7. Proceeding of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Science and Technology part II : Nuclear Chemistry, Process Technology, Radioactive Waste Management and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukarsono, R.; Ganang Suradjijo

    2002-01-01

    Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research in Nuclear Science and Technology is a routine activity held by Centre for Research and Development of Advanced Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency, for monitoring the research activity which achieved in National Nuclear Energy Agency. This proceedings contains a proposal about basic research in nuclear technology which has environment. This proceedings is the second part of the two parts which published in series. There are 57 articles which have separated index. (PPIN)

  8. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-05-27

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis. -- Highlights: •Click chemistry detects O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) signals in the nucleus. •OP-Puro accumulates at PML-NBs during abortive proteasome activities. •SUMO and ubiquitin are promiscuously associated with OP-Puro at PML-NBs. •The nucleus may function in immature protein homeostasis.

  9. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-01-01

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis. -- Highlights: •Click chemistry detects O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) signals in the nucleus. •OP-Puro accumulates at PML-NBs during abortive proteasome activities. •SUMO and ubiquitin are promiscuously associated with OP-Puro at PML-NBs. •The nucleus may function in immature protein homeostasis.

  10. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-05-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

  11. Knot theory in modern chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Kate E; Miller, Mark A; Steed, Jonathan W; Sutcliffe, Paul M

    2016-11-21

    Knot theory is a branch of pure mathematics, but it is increasingly being applied in a variety of sciences. Knots appear in chemistry, not only in synthetic molecular design, but also in an array of materials and media, including some not traditionally associated with knots. Mathematics and chemistry can now be used synergistically to identify, characterise and create knots, as well as to understand and predict their physical properties. This tutorial review provides a brief introduction to the mathematics of knots and related topological concepts in the context of the chemical sciences. We then survey the broad range of applications of the theory to contemporary research in the field.

  12. Supplemental Instruction in Physical Chemistry I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby, Ellen; Scott, Timothy P.; Migl, David; Kolodzeji, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Physical chemistry I at Texas A&M University is an upper division course requiring mathematical and analytical skills. As such, this course poses a major problem for many Chemistry, Engineering, Biochemistry and Genetics majors. Comparisons between participants and non-participants in Supplemental Instruction for physical chemistry were made…

  13. Bad chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    General chemistry courses haven't changed significantly in forty years. Because most basic chemistry students are premedical students, medical schools have enormous influence and could help us start all over again to create undergraduate chemistry education that works.

  14. Mathematical simulation of the amplification of 1790-nm laser radiation in a nuclear-excited He - Ar plasma containing nanoclusters of uranium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosarev, V. A.; Kuznetsova, E. E.

    2014-02-01

    The possibility of applying dusty active media in nuclearpumped lasers has been considered. The amplification of 1790-nm radiation in a nuclear-excited dusty He - Ar plasma is studied by mathematical simulation. The influence of nanoclusters on the component composition of the medium and the kinetics of the processes occurring in it is analysed using a specially developed kinetic model, including 72 components and more than 400 reactions. An analysis of the results indicates that amplification can in principle be implemented in an active laser He - Ar medium containing 10-nm nanoclusters of metallic uranium and uranium dioxide.

  15. Canadian Mathematical Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    For two weeks in August, 1975 more than 140 mathematicians and other scientists gathered at the Universite de Sherbrooke. The occasion was the 15th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress, entitled Mathematics and the Life Sciences. Participants in this inter­ disciplinary gathering included researchers and graduate students in mathematics, seven different areas of biological science, physics, chemistry and medical science. Geographically, those present came from the United States and the United Kingdom as well as from academic departments and government agencies scattered across Canada. In choosing this particular interdisciplinary topic the programme committee had two chief objectives. These were to promote Canadian research in mathematical problems of the life sciences, and to encourage co-operation and exchanges between mathematical scientists" biologists and medical re­ searchers. To accomplish these objective the committee assembled a stim­ ulating programme of lectures and talks. Six ...

  16. Work on the hot atom chemistry at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Yugoslavia; Hemija vruceg atoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veljkovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1969-07-01

    A survey of work on hot atom chemistry from the establishment of the Institute up to now, where the role of Prof. P. Savic, should be specially emphasized, is given. The investigations in this domain during the first period, were directed to solve various problems in production of radioactive isotopes. Today these investigations are closely associated with the work in radiochemistry, physical chemistry of liquid and solid systems and fast reaction kinetics improving the development of these branches (author) [Serbo-Croat] Daje se pregled rada na hemiji vruceg atoma od osnivanja Instituta do danas, pri cemu se narocito istice uloga koju je u tome imao prof. P. Savic. Dok su u prvom periodu istrazivanja u ovoj oblasti doprinosila resavanju raznih problema proizvodnje radioaktivnih izotopa, ona su danas tesno povezana sa radom u radiohemiji, fizickoj hemiji tecnih i cvrstih sistema, kinetici brzih reakcija, doprinoseci sa svoje strane razvoju tih oblasti (author)

  17. Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Twentieth annual progress report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Research under this continuing DOE contract centers on radioactive decay studies of nuclei far from stability produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge (UNISOR). These investigations encompass three aspects of nuclear structure research: nuclear spectroscopic measurements involving detailed γγt, γe - t, and Xγt three-parameter coincidence spectrometry; on-line laser hyperfine structure (hfs) and isotope shift spectroscopy for determining quadrupole moments, nuclear spins, and mean nuclear charge radii; and computer calculations of nuclear model predictions for comparison with the experimental level schemes. The focus of this research program is on odd-mass nuclei in which the odd nucleon probes the core, making possible observation of such phenomena as the onset of abrupt shape changes, the occurrence of shape coexistence, and shell-model intruder states. These phenomena are critical tests of concepts fundamental to an understanding of low-energy nuclear structure, such as nuclear deformations, shell models, collective models, and particle-core couplings

  18. The physical basis of chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2000-01-01

    If the text you're using for general chemistry seems to lack sufficient mathematics and physics in its presentation of classical mechanics, molecular structure, and statistics, this complementary science series title may be just what you're looking for. Written for the advanced lower-division undergraduate chemistry course, The Physical Basis of Chemistry, Second Edition, offers students an opportunity to understand and enrich the understanding of physical chemistry with some quantum mechanics, the Boltzmann distribution, and spectroscopy. Posed and answered are questions concerning eve

  19. Basic mathematics for biochemists

    CERN Document Server

    Cornish-Bowden, Athel

    1981-01-01

    Some teachers of biochemistry think it positively beneficial for students to struggle with difficult mathematics. I do not number myself among these people, although I have derived much personal pleasure from the study of mathematics and from applying it to problems that interest me in biochemistry. On the contrary, I think that students choose courses in biochemistry out of interest in biochemistry and that they should not be encumbered with more mathematics than is absolutely required for a proper understanding of biochemistry. This of course includes physical chemistry, because a biochemist ignorant of physical chemistry is no biochemist. I have been guided by these beliefs in writing this book. I have laid heavy emphasis on those topics, such as the use of logarithms, that play an important role in biochemistry and often cause problems in teaching; I have ignored others, such as trigonometry, that one can manage without. The proper treatment of statistics has been more difficult to decide. Although it cle...

  20. A mathematical model of the accumulation of radionuclides by oysters (C. virginica) aquacultured in the effluent of a nuclear power reactor to include major biological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, C.T.; Smith, C.W.; Price, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The uptake, accumulation and loss of radionuclides by the American oyster (C. virginica) aquacultured in the effluent of a nuclear power reactor has been measured monthly for 3 yr at four field stations in the Montsweag Estuary of the Sheepscot River and at a control station in the nearby Damariscotta River Estuary, southern central coastal Maine, U.S.A. A mathematical model for the time variation of the specific activity of the oysters has been developed to include the physical half-lives of the various radionuclides, the biological half-lives of the various radionuclides (biological depuration), the water temperature (oyster hibernation) and shell growth. The resulting first order linear differential equation incorporating these phenomena is driven by the liquid radionuclide effluent release of the Maine Yankee Nuclear Reactor. Comparison of the monthly measurements of the specific activity for 58 Co, 60 Co, 54 Mn, 134 Cs and 137 Cs in oysters with model calculations show close agreement over all ranges of variation observed. A special feature of this mathematical model is its ability to describe the non-chemostatic field situation. (author)

  1. Proceeding of the Scientific Meeting and Presentation on Basic Research of Nuclear Science and Technology: Book II. Nuclear Chemistry, Process Technology, and Radioactive Waste Processing and Environment; Pertemuan dan Presentasi Ilmiah Penelitian Dasar Ilmu Pengetahuan dan Teknologi Nuklir. Buku II. Kimia Nuklir, Teknologi Proses, dan Pengolahan Limbah Radioaktif dan Lingkungan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The proceeding contains papers presented on Scientific Meeting and Presentation on on Basic Research of Nuclear Science and Technology, held in Yogyakarta, 25-27 April 1995. This proceeding is second part of two books published for the meeting contains papers on nuclear chemistry, process technology, and radioactive waste management and environment. There are 62 papers indexed individually. (ID)

  2. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems

  3. Radiochemistry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. A joint venture with chemistry, nuclear engineering, molecular biology, biochemistry, and the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.; Duval, P.; Jurisson, S.S.; Robertson, J.D.; Wall, J.D.; Quinn, T.P.; Volkert, W.A.; Neumeyer, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Missouri University, a recipient of a U.S. Department of Energy Radiochemistry Education Award Program (REAP) grant in 1999, has significantly expanded its education and research mission in radiochemistry. While MU had a viable radiochemistry program through existing faculty expertise and the utilization of the Missouri University Research Reactor, the REAP award allowed MU to leverage its resources in significantly expanding capabilities in radiochemistry. Specifically, the grant enabled the: (1) hiring of a new faculty member in actinide radiochemistry (Dr. Paul Duval); (2) support of six graduate students in radiochemistry; (3) purchase of new radiochemistry laboratory equipment; (4) more extensive collaboration with DOE scientists through interactions with faculty and graduate students, and (5) revised radiochemical curriculum (joint courses across disciplines and new courses in actinide chemistry). The most significant impact of this award has been in encouraging interdisciplinary education and research. The proposal was initiated by a joint effort between Nuclear Engineering and Chemistry, but also included faculty in biochemistry, radiology, and molecular biology. Specific outcomes of the REAP grant thus far are: (1) increased educational and research capabilities in actinide chemistry (faculty hire and equipment acquisition); (2) increased integration of biochemistry and radiochemistry (e.g., radiochemical analysis of uranium speciation in biological systems); (3) stronger interdisciplinary integration of molecular biology and radiochemical sciences (alpha-emitters for treating cancer); (4) new and more extensive interactions with national laboratory facilities (e.g., student internships at LANL and LLBL, faculty and lab scientist exchange visits, analytical measurements and collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source), and (7) new research funding opportunities based on REAP partnership. (author)

  4. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  5. Study of deposited crud composition on fuel surfaces in the environment of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) of a Boiling Water Reactor at Chinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Tsuey-Lin; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Su, Te-Yen; Wen, Tung-Jen; Men, Lee-Chung

    2012-09-01

    This paper aimed at the characterization of metallic composition and surface analysis on the crud of fuel rods for unit-1 of BWR-4 at Nuclear Power Plant. The inductively coupled plasma- atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) and the gamma spectrometry were carried out to analyze the corrosion product distributions and to determine the elemental compositions along the fuel rod under conditions of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) switched from normal water chemistry (NWC) of reactor coolant in this study. Most of the crud consisted of the flakes and irregular shapes via SEM morphology. The loosely adherent oxide layer was mostly composed of hematite (α- Fe 2 O 3 ) with amorphous iron oxides by XRD results. The average deposited amounts of crud was the order of 0.5 mg/cm 2 , indicating that the fuel surface of this plant under HWC environment appeared to be one with the lower crud deposition in terms of low iron level of feedwater. It also showed no significant difference in comparison with NWC condition. (authors)

  6. Chemistry of nuclear recoil 18F atoms. VIII. Mechanisms and yields of caging reactions in liquid phase 1,1-difluoroethane and 1,1,1-trifluoroethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, R.G.; Root, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    New procedures are reported for the specification of caging yields in nuclear recoil chemistry experiments. All five hot 18 F substitution channels in CH 3 CF 3 and CH 3 CHF 2 exhibit caging at large density. The respective total caged yields at 195 degreeK are 4.0% +- 0.6% and 5.6% +- 0.6%, and the total yields of stabilized substitution products are 8.9% +- 0.4% and 8.6% +- 0.6%. The simplest plausible caging mechanism involves primary Franck--Rabinowitsch radical recombination of 18 F atoms with aliphatic radicals. Density-variation results cannot be used for the qualitative detection of caging reactions unless excitation-stabilization complications have been shown to be unimportant

  7. Quantitative mineralogy and preliminary pore-water chemistry of candidate buffer and backfill materials for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, R.M.

    1984-07-01

    The quantitative mineralogy of seven candidate buffer and backfill materials for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault is presented. Two of the materials were coarse grained: one a blended very pure silica sand, and the other a crushed plagioclase-rich granite or granodiorite. Five materials were fine-grained soils containing abundant clay minerals. Of these, three were fairly pure, Cretaceous, ash-derived bentonites that contained up to 3 percent of soluble sulphates; one was a freshwater glacial clay containing 59 percent interlayered smectite-illite; and one was a crushed Paleozoic shale containing abundant illite and chlorite. The adsorbed cation regimes and the pore-water chemistry of the clays are discussed

  8. Keynote Speakers [ScieTech 2016: 4. international conference on science and engineering in mathematics, chemistry and physics, Bali (Indonesia), 30-31 January 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Dr Binayak Samader Choudhury, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur Title: Discontinuous Functions in Metric Fixed Point Theory Discontinuous functions have featured in metric fixed point theory since the theory originated in the first quarter of the 20th century. Today these functions occupy a large portion of this expanding branch of mathematics. The present talk gives an account of the recent developments of this area of research along with some of its implications. The broad subject area of the talk is functional analysis. Short Bio: Professor Binayak S. Choudhury is Professor at the Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, West Bengal, India for the last 12 years. He has a brilliant academic career. He obtained his Master of Science and Doctorate degrees from the University of Calcutta, India. He has held several administrative posts and was entrusted with various responsibilities at a governmental level. He served his Institute as Head of the Department of Mathematics (2005-2008) and as the Dean of the Faculty of Science (2013-2015). His research interests are in pure and applied mathematics and theoretical physics ranging over subject areas like topology, functional analysis, real analysis, probability theory, nonlinear dynamics and chaos, equilibrium problems, relativity and cosmology, quantum information theory, foundations of physics, mathematical biology, fuzzy systems and optimization and game theory, in each of which he has guided Ph.D. students. He has published nearly 200 research papers in reputed journals in addition to a good number of works published in conference proceedings. Until now 13 research students have obtained their Ph.D. degrees under his supervision and several other students are working with him. He is the recipient of several awards. He has delivered lectures in different parts of the world on topics both from theoretical physics and mathematics. He

  9. High temperature water chemistry monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants can be prevented or at least damped by water chemistry control or by the change of water chemistry control or by the change of water chemistry. Successful water chemistry control needs regular and continuous monitoring of such water chemistry parameters like dissolved oxygen content, pH, conductivity and impurity contents. Conventionally the monitoring is carried out at low pressures and temperatures, which method, however, has some shortcomings. Recently electrodes have been developed which enables the direct monitoring at operating pressures and temperatures. (author). 2 refs, 5 figs

  10. DECOVALEX - Mathematical models of coupled T-H-M processes for nuclear waste repositories. Report of phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Stephansson, O.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of the field/laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling defined for the phase III of the project. Results from test cases 2-6 are given in separate chapters of the report (which have been indexed separately), and the last chapter discusses the lessons learned from the three phases of the DECOVALEX project

  11. Theoretical study of the thermochemical properties of gaseous iodine compounds: incidences in atmospheric chemistry and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, F.; Fortin, C.; Cornet, M.; Khanniche, S.; Skoviera, J.; Cantrel, L.; Cernusak, I.

    2015-07-01

    Thermochemical properties (ΔfH 0 298K , S 0 298K et C p = f(T)) have been determined for a series of gaseous iodine-containing compounds by using quantum chemistry tools. Different levels of theory have been employed in this work in order to predict geometrical parameters and the energetics including spin-orbit coupling. The use of the B3LYP functional for the geometry optimization followed by a calculation of the total electronic energies using the Dual Level method allows to her standard enthalpies of formation at 298 K in good agreement with the available literature data. (authors)

  12. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60 Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.)

  13. The Influence Of Modified Water Chemistries On Metal Oxide Films, Activity Build-Up And Stress Corrosion Cracking Of Structural Materials In Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1998-07-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of activated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60 Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  14. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  15. The Use and Evaluation of Scaffolding, Student Centered-Learning, Behaviorism, and Constructivism to Teach Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and IR Spectroscopy in a Two-Semester Organic Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Kimberly; Lewallen, Denver W.; Leatherman, Jennifer; Maxwell, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2002, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry have been introduced at the beginning of the first-semester organic chemistry lab course at this university. Starting in 2008, each individual student was given 20 unique homework problems that consisted of multiple-choice [superscript 1]H NMR and IR problems…

  16. Water chemistry in nuclear power stations with high-temperature reactors with particular reference to the AVR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, R.; Resch, G.

    1976-01-01

    The water-steam cycle of a nuclear power plant with a helium-cooled high-temperature reactor differs in design data significantly and extensively from the corresponding cycles of light-water-cooled nuclear reactors and resembles to a great extent the water-steamcycle of a modern conventional power plant. The radioactive constituents of the water-steam cycle can be satisfactorily removed apart from Tritium by means of a pre-coat filter with powder-resisn, as comprehensive experiments have demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  17. Proceedings of 4. Meeting on Chemistry in Northeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The works of IV Meeting on Chemistry in Northeast are presented, including topics about compounds determination by nuclear analytical techniques and the non-nuclear techniques and physical-chemistry studies of chemical compounds. (C.G.C.)

  18. The Education of Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Darda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of mathematics education is not only preparingmathematicians but making well-informed citizens. This is a broad generalterms for objective of the teaching of mathematics. And, this might beimplemented as “accurate thorough knowledge” or “original logicalthinking”. So, teaching mathematics is not the conversation andtransmission of mathematical knowledge, but on the aim of preparing wellinformedcitizens trained in independent, critical thinking.By the mathematics, sciences become simple, clearer, and easier to bedeveloped. The mathematics is often applied for solving any problem ofother field of sciences, either in the physics such as astronomy, chemistry,technique; or social sciences such as economy, demography, and assurance.Those all need an analysis reading ability.Mathematical skill, therefore, relates strongly with the analysisreading ability in the human intellectual structure. This study is about therelationship between them. And, result of the study shows us as below:Both Mathematical skill and analysis reading ability possess the “high type”of thinking operation. Both also involve the same content of the abstractintelligent, i.e. symbolic and semantic contents. Last but not least, both alsouse the same product of thinking, i.e. units, classes, relations, and systems.Both can be transformed and have an implication.

  19. Anisotropic Rotational Diffusion Studied by Nuclear Spin Relaxation and Molecular Dynamics Simulation: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuson, Michael M.

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories studying the anisotropic rotational diffusion of bromobenzene using nuclear spin relaxation and molecular dynamics simulations are described. For many undergraduates, visualizing molecular motion is challenging. Undergraduates rarely encounter laboratories that directly assess molecular motion, and so the concept remains an…

  20. Reduction of 68Ge activity containing liquid waste from 68Ga PET chemistry in nuclear medicine and radiopharmacy by solidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. de Blois (Erik); H.S. Chan (Ho Sze); K. Roy (Kamalika); E.P. Krenning (Eric); W.A.P. Breeman (Wouter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPET with68Ga from the TiO2- or SnO2- based68Ge/68Ga generators is of increasing interest for PET imaging in nuclear medicine. In general, radionuclidic purity (68Ge vs.68Ga activity) of the eluate of these generators varies between 0.01 and 0.001%. Liquid waste containing low amounts