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Sample records for maternal death review

  1. The difficulties of conducting maternal death reviews in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Broek Nynke

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal death reviews is a tool widely recommended to improve the quality of obstetric care and reduce maternal mortality. Our aim was to explore the challenges encountered in the process of facility-based maternal death review in Malawi, and to suggest sustainable and logically sound solutions to these challenges. Methods SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis of the process of maternal death review during a workshop in Malawi. Results Strengths: Availability of data from case notes, support from hospital management, and having maternal death review forms. Weaknesses: fear of blame, lack of knowledge and skills to properly conduct death reviews, inadequate resources and missing documentation. Opportunities: technical assistance from expatriates, support from the Ministry of Health, national protocols and high maternal mortality which serves as motivation factor. Threats: Cultural practices, potential lawsuit, demotivation due to the high maternal mortality and poor planning at the district level. Solutions: proper documentation, conducting maternal death review in a blame-free manner, good leadership, motivation of staff, using guidelines, proper stock inventory and community involvement. Conclusion Challenges encountered during facility-based maternal death review are provider-related, administrative, client related and community related. Countries with similar socioeconomic profiles to Malawi will have similar 'pull-and-push' factors on the process of facility-based maternal death reviews, and therefore we will expect these countries to have similar potential solutions.

  2. The difficulties of conducting maternal death reviews in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongnyuy, Eugene J; van den Broek, Nynke

    2008-09-11

    Maternal death reviews is a tool widely recommended to improve the quality of obstetric care and reduce maternal mortality. Our aim was to explore the challenges encountered in the process of facility-based maternal death review in Malawi, and to suggest sustainable and logically sound solutions to these challenges. SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis of the process of maternal death review during a workshop in Malawi. Strengths: Availability of data from case notes, support from hospital management, and having maternal death review forms. Weaknesses: fear of blame, lack of knowledge and skills to properly conduct death reviews, inadequate resources and missing documentation. Opportunities: technical assistance from expatriates, support from the Ministry of Health, national protocols and high maternal mortality which serves as motivation factor. Threats: Cultural practices, potential lawsuit, demotivation due to the high maternal mortality and poor planning at the district level. Solutions: proper documentation, conducting maternal death review in a blame-free manner, good leadership, motivation of staff, using guidelines, proper stock inventory and community involvement. Challenges encountered during facility-based maternal death review are provider-related, administrative, client related and community related. Countries with similar socioeconomic profiles to Malawi will have similar 'pull-and-push' factors on the process of facility-based maternal death reviews, and therefore we will expect these countries to have similar potential solutions.

  3. Maternal Death Reviews of a Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Upadhyaya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: All pregnant women are at risk of obstetrical complications which occurs during labour and delivary that lead to maternal death. Here to report a 10 year review of maternal mortality ratio in "Paropakar Maternity and Women's Hospital (PMWH" Thapathali Kathmandu, Nepal. Methods: Medical records of 66 maternal deaths were reviewed to study the likely cause of each death over the study period. Results: There were a total of 66 maternal deaths. While 192487 deliveries conducted over the 10 year period. The maternal mortality ratio (MMR was 356.64/100000 live birth. The highest MMR of 74.22/100,000 was observed in 2059 and lowest was 17.42/100,000 in 2068 B.S. Leading cause of MMR was remained hemorrhage accounting for 30.30% followed by eclampsia 24.24%. Sepsis, suspected cases of pulmonary embolism and amniotic fluid embolism each contributing 15.15%, 4.54% and 3.03% respectively. Where as anesthetic complication and abortion constiuates 6.06 % each equally for maternal death. The death noted in older women (30+year were 36.36%. Primipara accounted for more deaths (51.51%. Conclusions: The fall in maternal mortality rate has been observed except for year 2063 BS. Haemorrhage is the main contributing cause behind maternal mortality.

  4. Review of causes of maternal deaths in Botswana in 2010

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method. Fifty-six case notes from the 80 reported maternal deaths in 2010 were reviewed. ... Sixty-six percent of deaths occurred in Botswana's two referral hospitals. Cases in .... with meningitis, pre-eclampsia and heart failure. ... General anaesthetic. 2 .... Several equipment failures were reported, involving X-ray, blood.

  5. Quality of Care: A Review Of Maternal Deaths In A Regional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    emergency obstetric care services to prevent further maternal deaths. (Afr J Reprod Health 2015; 19[3]: 68-76). Keywords: Maternal death, Review, Quality of care, Sub-saharan Africa, Ghana .... technology, adequate human resource, health.

  6. Analytical review of the magnitude and causes maternal death at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tanzania is one of the countries with the highest maternal mortalities in the word and sub Saharan Africa. However, recently there have been reports of a downward trend of this tragedy in Tanzania. Objectives: This study was done to determine the magnitude and the causes of maternal deaths at Dodoma ...

  7. Quality of Care: A Review of Maternal Deaths in a Regional Hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusi-Poku, Yaw; Antwil, Edward; Osei-Kwakye, Kingsley; Tetteh, Chris; Detoh, Eric Kwame; Antwi, Phyllis

    2015-09-01

    The government of Ghana and key stakeholders have put into place several interventions aimed at reducing maternal deaths. At the institutional level, the conduct of maternal deaths audit has been instituted. This also contributes to reducing maternal deaths as shortcomings that may have contributed to such deaths could be identified to inform best practice and forestall such occurrences in the future. The objective of this study was to review the quality of maternal care in a regional hospital. A review of maternal deaths using Quality of Care Evaluation Form adapted from the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) Maternal Death Audit Evaluation Committee was used. About fifty-five percent, 18 (55%) of cases were deemed to have received adequate documentation, senior clinicians were involved in 26(85%) of cases. Poor documentation, non-involvement of senior clinicians in the management of cases, laboratory related issues particularly in relation to blood and blood products as well as promptness of care and adequacy of intensive care facilities and specialists in the hospital were contributory factors to maternal deaths . These are common themes contributing to maternal deaths in developing countries which need to be urgently tackled. Maternal death review with emphasis on quality of care, coupled with facility gap assessment, is a useful tool to address the adequacy of emergency obstetric care services to prevent further maternal deaths.

  8. [Maternal death: unequal risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, A C; Fassin, D

    1989-01-01

    Nearly 99% of maternal deaths in the world each year occur in developing countries. New efforts have recently been undertaken to combat maternal mortality through research and action. The medical causes of such deaths are coming to be better understood, but the social mechanisms remain poorly grasped. Maternal mortality rates in developing countries are difficult to interpret because they tend to exclude all deaths not occurring in health care facilities. The countries of Europe and North America have an average maternal mortality rate of 30/100,000 live births, representing about 6000 deaths each year. The developing countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America have rates of 270-640/100,000, representing some 492,000 deaths annually. For a true comparison of the risks of maternal mortality in different countries, the risk itself and the average number of children per woman must both be considered. A Nigerian woman has 375 times greater risk of maternal death than a Swedish woman, but since she has about 4 times more children, her lifetime risk of maternal death is over 1500 times greater than that of the Swedish woman. The principal medical causes of maternal death are known: hemorrhages due to placenta previa or retroplacental hematoma, mechanical dystocias responsible for uterine rupture, toxemia with eclampsia, septicemia, and malaria. The exact weight of abortion in maternal mortality is not known but is probably large. The possible measures for improving such rates are of 3 types: control of fertility to avoid early, late, or closely spaced pregnancies; effective medical surveillance of the pregnancy to reduce the risk of malaria, toxemia, and hemorrhage, and delivery in an obstetrical facility, especially for high-risk pregnancies. Differential access to high quality health care explains much of the difference between mortality rates in urban and rural, wealthy and impoverished areas of the same country. The social determinants of high maternal mortality

  9. The Economic Cost of Implementing Maternal and Neonatal Death Review in a District of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Animesh; Halim, Abdul; Rahman, Fazlur; Eriksson, Charli; Dalal, Koustuv

    2016-12-09

    Maternal and neonatal death review (MNDR) introduced in Bangladesh and initially piloted in a district during 2010. MNDR is able to capture each of the maternal, neonatal deaths and stillbirths from the community and government facilities (hospitals). This study aimed to estimate the cost required to implement MNDR in a district of Bangladesh during 2010-2012. MNDR was implemented in Thakurgaon district in 2010 and later gradually extended until 2015. MNDR implementation framework, guidelines, tools and manual were developed at the national level with national level stakeholders including government health and family planning staff at different cadre for piloting at Thakurgaon. Programme implementation costs were calculated by year of costing and costing as per component of MNDR in 2013. The purchasing power parity conversion rate was 1 $INT = 24.46 BDT, as of 31 st Dec 2012. Overall programme implementation costs required to run MNDR were 109,02,754 BDT (445,738 $INT $INT) in the first year (2010). In the following years cost reduced to 8,208,995 BDT (335,609 $INT, during 2011) and 6,622,166 BDT (270,735 $INT, during 2012). The average cost per activity required was 3070 BDT in 2010, 1887 BDT and 2207 BDT required in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Each death notification cost 4.09 $INT, verbal autopsy cost 8.18 $INT, and social autopsy cost 16.35 $INT. Facility death notification cost 2.04 $INT and facility death review meetings cost 20.44 $INT. One death saved by MNDR costs 53,654 BDT (2193 $INT). Programmatic implementation cost of conducting MPDR give an idea on how much cost will be required to run a death review system for a low income country settings using government health system.

  10. The economic cost of implementing maternal and neonatal death review in a district of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Biswas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maternal and neonatal death review (MNDR introduced in Bangladesh and initially piloted in a district during 2010. MNDR is able to capture each of the maternal, neonatal deaths and stillbirths from the community and government facilities (hospitals. This study aimed to estimate the cost required to implement MNDR in a district of Bangladesh during 2010-2012. Materials and methods: MNDR was implemented in Thakurgaon district in 2010 and later gradually extended until 2015. MNDR implementation framework, guidelines, tools and manual were developed at the national level with national level stakeholders including government health and family planning staff at different cadre for piloting at Thakurgaon. Programme implementation costs were calculated by year of costing and costing as per component of MNDR in 2013. The purchasing power parity conversion rate was 1 $INT = 24.46 BDT, as of 31st Dec 2012. Results: Overall programme implementation costs required to run MNDR were 109,02,754 BDT (445,738 $INT $INT in the first year (2010. In the following years cost reduced to 8,208,995 BDT (335,609 $INT, during 2011 and 6,622,166 BDT (270,735 $INT, during 2012. The average cost per activity required was 3070 BDT in 2010, 1887 BDT and 2207 BDT required in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Each death notification cost 4.09 $INT, verbal autopsy cost 8.18 $INT, and social autopsy cost 16.35 $INT. Facility death notification cost 2.04 $INT and facility death review meetings cost 20.44 $INT. One death saved by MNDR costs 53,654 BDT (2193 $INT.Conclusions: Programmatic implementation cost of conducting MPDR give an idea on how much cost will be required to run a death review system for a low income country settings using government health system.

  11. Maternal death and near miss measurement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    2008-05-26

    May 26, 2008 ... Maternal health services need to be accountable more than ever ... of maternal death and near miss audit, surveillance and review is ..... (d) A fundamental principle of these ..... quality assurance in obstetrics in Nigeria - a.

  12. Implementing maternal death surveillance and response: a review of lessons from country case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Helen; Ameh, Charles; Roos, Natalie; Mathai, Matthews; Broek, Nynke van den

    2017-07-17

    Maternal Death Surveillance and Response (MDSR) implementation is monitored globally, but not much is known about what works well, where and why in scaling up. We reviewed a series of country case studies in order to determine whether and to what extent these countries have implemented the four essential components of MDSR and identify lessons for improving implementation. A secondary analysis of ten case studies from countries at different stages of MDSR implementation, using a policy analysis framework to draw out lessons learnt and opportunities for improvement. We identify the consistent drivers of success in countries with well-established systems for MDSR, and common barriers in countries were Maternal Death Review (MDR) systems have been less successful. MDR is accepted and ongoing at subnational level in many countries, but it is not adequately institutionalised and the shift from facility based MDR to continuous MDSR that informs the wider health system still needs to be made. Our secondary analysis of country experiences highlights the need for a) social and team processes at facility level, for example the existence of a 'no shame, no blame' culture, and the ability to reflect on practice and manage change as a team for recommendations to be acted upon, b) health system inputs including adequate funding and reliable health information systems to enable identification and analysis of cases c) national level coordination of dissemination, and monitoring implementation of recommendations at all levels and d) mandatory notification of maternal deaths (and enforcement of this) and a professional requirement to participate in MDRs. Case studies from countries with established MDSR systems can provide valuable guidance on ways to set up the processes and overcome some of the barriers; but the challenge, as with many health system interventions, is to find a way to provide catalytic assistance and strengthen capacity for MDSR such that this becomes embedded in

  13. Saving Mothers' Lives: Reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer: 2006-2008. The Eighth Report of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cantwell, Roch

    2011-03-01

    In the triennium 2006-2008, 261 women in the UK died directly or indirectly related to pregnancy. The overall maternal mortality rate was 11.39 per 100,000 maternities. Direct deaths decreased from 6.24 per 100,000 maternities in 2003-2005 to 4.67 per 100,000 maternities in 2006–2008 (p = 0.02). This decline is predominantly due to the reduction in deaths from thromboembolism and, to a lesser extent, haemorrhage. For the first time there has been a reduction in the inequalities gap, with a significant decrease in maternal mortality rates among those living in the most deprived areas and those in the lowest socio-economic group. Despite a decline in the overall UK maternal mortality rate, there has been an increase in deaths related to genital tract sepsis, particularly from community acquired Group A streptococcal disease. The mortality rate related to sepsis increased from 0.85 deaths per 100,000 maternities in 2003-2005 to 1.13 deaths in 2006-2008, and sepsis is now the most common cause of Direct maternal death. Cardiac disease is the most common cause of Indirect death; the Indirect maternal mortality rate has not changed significantly since 2003-2005. This Confidential Enquiry identified substandard care in 70% of Direct deaths and 55% of Indirect deaths. Many of the identified avoidable factors remain the same as those identified in previous Enquiries. Recommendations for improving care have been developed and are highlighted in this report. Implementing the Top ten recommendations should be prioritised in order to ensure the overall UK maternal mortality rate continues to decline.

  14. AN AUDIT OF MATERNAL DEATHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana Gowda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A study of maternal death conducted to evaluate various factors responsible for maternal deaths. To identify complications in pregnancy, a childbirth which result in maternal death, and to identify opportunities for preventive intervention and understand the events leading to death; so that improving maternal health and reducing maternal mortality rate significantly. To analyze the causes and epidemiological amounts maternal mortality e.g. age parity, socioeconomic status and literacy. In order to reduce maternal mortality and to implement safe motherhood program and complications of pregnancy and to find out safe motherhood program. METHODS: The data collected was a retrograde by a proforma containing particulars of the diseased, detailed history and relatives were interviewed for additional information. The data collected was analysed. RESULTS: Maternal mortality rate in our own institution is 200/ 100,000 live births. Among 30 maternal deaths, 56% deaths (17 were among low socio - economic status, groups 60% deaths among unbooked 53.5% deaths more along illiterates evidenced by direct and indirect deaths about 25% of deaths were preventable. CONCLUSION: Maternal death is a great tragedy in the family life. It is crusade to know not just the medical cause of the death but the circumstances what makes these continued tragic death even more unacceptable is that deaths are largely preventable

  15. Facility-Based Maternal Death in Western Africa: A Systematic Review

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    Nathali Gunawardena

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFor exploring maternal death, supply and demand-side factors can be characterized by the three delays model developed by Thaddeus and Maine (1994. The model comprises delay in deciding to seek care (delay 1, delay in reaching the health facility (delay 2, and delay in receiving quality care once at the health facility (delay 3. Few studies have comprehensively dealt with the health systems delays that prevent the receipt of timely and appropriate obstetric care once a woman reaches a health facility (phase III delays. The objective of the present study was to identify facility-level barriers in West African health facilities.MethodsElectronic databases (Medline, cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature, Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International Global Health, EMBASE were searched to identify original research articles from 1996 to 2016. Search terms (and synonyms related to (1 maternal health care (e.g., obstetric care, perinatal care, maternal health services; (2 facility level (e.g., maternity unit, health facility, phase III, hospital; and (3 Western Africa (e.g., Nigeria, Burkina Faso were combined. This review followed the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses.ResultsOf the 2103 citations identified, 13 studies were eligible. Studies were conducted in Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Gambia, Guinea, Senegal, and Sierra Leone. 30 facility-level barriers were identified and grouped into 6 themes (human resources, supply and equipment, referral-related, infrastructure, cost-related, patient-related. The most obvious barriers included staff shortages, lack of maternal health services and procedures offered to patients, and lack of necessary medical equipment and supplies in the health-care facilities.ConclusionThis review emphasizes that phase I and phase II barriers are not the only factors preventing women from accessing proper emergency obstetric care. Health-care facilities in Western

  16. Achieving accountability through maternal death reviews in Nigeria: a process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kok, Bregje; Imamura, M; Kanguru, L; Owolabi, O; Okonofua, F; Hussein, J

    2017-10-01

    Maternal death reviews (MDRs) are part of the drive to increase accountability for maternal deaths and reduce their occurrence by identifying barriers to effective, quality care. However, conducting MDRs well is difficult; staff commitment and establishing a blame free environment are key challenges. By examining the communication strategies used in MDRs this study sought to understand how MDR members implement policy imperatives (e.g. 'no blame, no name') and manage the inevitable sensitivities of discussing a client's death in a multidisciplinary team. We observed and recorded four MDRs in Nigerian teaching hospitals and used conversation and discourse analysis to identify patterns in verbal and non-verbal interactions. MDRs were conducted in a structured way and had multidisciplinary representation. We grouped discursive strategies observed into three overlapping clusters: 'doing' no-name no-blame; fostering participation; and managing personal accountability. Within these clusters, explicit reminders, gentle enquiries and instilling a sense of togetherness were used in doing no-name, no-blame. Strategies such as questioning and invoking protocol were only partially successful in fostering participation. Regarding managing accountability, forms of communication which limit personal responsibility ('pass the buck') and resist passing the buck were observed. Detailed, lengthy eye witness accounts of dramatic events appeared to reduce staff's personal accountability. We conclude that interactional processes affect the meaningfulness of MDRs. In-depth, critical analysis depends on resisting 'passing the buck' by practitioners and chairs especially, who are also key to fostering participation and extracting value from multidisciplinary representation. Our innovative methods provide detailed insights into MDRs as an interactional process, which can inform design of training aimed at enhancing MDR members' skills. However, given the multitude of systemic challenges we

  17. Contribution of indirect obstetric deaths to maternal mortality at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Maternal death is unacceptably high in this center like in most centers in the developing world. Objective: To determine the maternal mortality ratio and the contribution of the direct and indirect obstetric complications to maternal deaths. Method: A retrospective review of all maternal deaths at Nnamdi Azikiwe ...

  18. Shifting paradigm of maternal and perinatal death review system in Bangladesh: A real time approach to address sustainable developmental goal 3 by 2030 [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Biswas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Bangladesh has made remarkable progress in reducing maternal and neonatal morality, even though the millennium developmental goal to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality was not achieved. Sustainable Developmental Goal (SDG 3 has already been set for a new target to reduce maternal and neonatal deaths by 2030. The country takes this timely initiative to introduce a maternal and perinatal death review system. This review will discuss the shifting paradigm of the maternal and perinatal death review system in Bangladesh and its challenges in reaching the SDG on time. This review uses existing literature on the maternal and perinatal death review system in Bangladesh, and other systems in similar settings, as well as reports, case studies, news, government letters and meeting minutes. Bangladesh introduced the maternal and perinatal death review system in 2010. Prior to this there was no such comprehensive death review system practiced in Bangladesh. The system was established within the government health system and has brought about positive effects and outcomes. Therefore, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of Bangladesh gradually scaled up the maternal and perinatal death review system nationwide in 2016 within the government health system. The present death review system highlighted real-time data use, using the district health information software(DHIS-2. Health mangers are able to take remedial action plans and implement strategies based on findings in DHIS-2. Therefore, effective utilization of data can play a pivotal role in the reduction of maternal and perinatal deaths in Bangladesh. Overall, the maternal and perinatal death review system provides a great opportunity to achieve the SDG 3 on time. However, the system needs continuous monitoring at different levels to ensure its quality and validity of information, as well as effective utilization of findings for planning and implementation under a measureable

  19. Experiences with maternal and perinatal death reviews in the UK--the MBRRACE-UK programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurinczuk, J J; Draper, E S; Field, D J; Bevan, C; Brocklehurst, P; Gray, R; Kenyon, S; Manktelow, B N; Neilson, J P; Redshaw, M; Scott, J; Shakespeare, J; Smith, L K; Knight, M

    2014-09-01

    Established in 1952, the programme of surveillance and Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the UK is the longest running such programme worldwide. Although more recently instituted, surveillance and confidential enquiries into perinatal deaths are also now well established nationally. Recent changes to funding and commissioning of the Enquiries have enabled both a reinvigoration of the processes and improvements to the methodology with an increased frequency of future reporting. Close engagement with stakeholders and a regulator requirement for doctors to participate have both supported the impetus for involvement of all professionals leading to greater potential for improved quality of care for women and babies. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Effect of maternal death reviews and training on maternal mortality among cesarean delivery: post-hoc analysis of a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zongo, Augustin; Dumont, Alexandre; Fournier, Pierre; Traore, Mamadou; Kouanda, Séni; Sondo, Blaise

    2015-02-01

    To explore the differential effect of a multifaceted intervention on hospital-based maternal mortality between patients with cesarean and vaginal delivery in low-resource settings. We reanalyzed the data from a major cluster-randomized controlled trial, QUARITE (Quality of care, Risk management and technology in obstetrics). These subgroup analyses were not pre-specified and were treated as exploratory. The intervention consisted of an initial interactive workshop and quarterly educational clinically oriented and evidence-based outreach visits focused on maternal death reviews (MDR) and best practices implementation. The trial originally recruited 191,167 patients who delivered in each of the 46 participating hospitals in Mali and Senegal, between 2007 and 2011. The primary endpoint was hospital-based maternal mortality. Subgroup-specific Odds Ratios (ORs) of maternal mortality were computed and tested for differential intervention effect using generalized linear mixed model between two subgroups (cesarean: 40,975; and vaginal delivery: 150,192). The test for homogeneity of intervention effects on hospital-based maternal mortality among the two delivery mode subgroups was statistically significant (p-value: 0.0201). Compared to the control, the adjusted OR of maternal mortality was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.58-0.82, p=0.0034) among women with cesarean delivery. The intervention had no significant effect among women with vaginal delivery (adjusted OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.69-1.11, p=0.6213). This differential effect was particularly marked for district hospitals. Maternal deaths reviews and on-site training on emergency obstetric care may be more effective in reducing maternal mortality among high-risk women who need a cesarean section than among low-risk women with vaginal delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Facility-Based Maternal Death in Western Africa: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Nathali Gunawardena; Ghose Bishwajit; Sanni Yaya

    2018-01-01

    BackgroundFor exploring maternal death, supply and demand-side factors can be characterized by the three delays model developed by Thaddeus and Maine (1994). The model comprises delay in deciding to seek care (delay 1), delay in reaching the health facility (delay 2), and delay in receiving quality care once at the health facility (delay 3). Few studies have comprehensively dealt with the health systems delays that prevent the receipt of timely and appropriate obstetric care once a woman reac...

  2. Hepatitis E and Maternal Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Alain Labrique, assistant professor in the Department of International Health and Department of Epidemiology at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, gives us his perspective on hepatitis E and maternal deaths.

  3. Severe acute maternal morbidity and maternal death audit - a rapid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Severe acute maternal morbidity and maternal death audit - a rapid diagnostic tool for evaluating maternal care. L Cochet, R.C. Pattinson, A.P. Macdonald. Abstract. Objective. To analyse severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM) and maternal mortality in the Pretoria region over a 2-year period (2000 - 2001). Setting.

  4. Hepatitis E and Maternal Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-06

    Dr. Alain Labrique, assistant professor in the Department of International Health and Department of Epidemiology at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, gives us his perspective on hepatitis E and maternal deaths.  Created: 11/6/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID); National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 11/7/2012.

  5. Why do pregnant women die? A review of maternal deaths from 1990 to 2010 at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Michael A; Banks, Catiffaney; Brooks, Amber; Sellers, Alethia; Swain, Ryan; Cooper, Lauren

    2014-11-01

    The number of reported pregnancy-related deaths in the United States steadily increased from 7.2 deaths per 100,000 live births in 1987 to a high of 17.8 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2009. Compared to Caucasian women, African American women were nearly 4 times as likely to die from childbirth. To better understand the reason for this trend, we conducted a case-control study at University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Hospital. Our primary study hypothesis was that women who died at UAB were more likely to be African American than women in a control group who delivered an infant at UAB and did not die. We expected to find a difference in race proportions and other patient characteristics that would further help to elucidate the cause of a racial disparity in maternal deaths. We reviewed all maternal deaths (cases) at UAB Hospital from January 1990 through December 2010 identified based on electronic uniform billing data and ICD-9 codes. Each maternal death was matched 2:1 with women who delivered at a time that most closely coincided with the time of the maternal death in 2-step selection process (electronic identification and manual confirmation). Maternal variables obtained were comorbidities, duration of hospital stay, cause of death, race, distance from home to hospital, income, prenatal care, body mass index, parity, insurance type, mode of delivery, and marital status. The strength of univariate associations of maternal variables and case/control status was calculated. The association of case/control status and race was also examined after controlling for residential distance from the hospital. There was insufficient evidence to suggest racial disparity in maternal death. The proportion of African American women was 57% (42 of 77) in the maternal death group and 61% (94 of 154) in the control group (P = 0.23). The univariate odds ratio for maternal death for African American to Caucasian race was 0.66 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-1.19); the

  6. Social autopsy for maternal and child deaths: a comprehensive literature review to examine the concept and the development of the method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koffi Alain K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Social autopsy" refers to an interview process aimed at identifying social, behavioral, and health systems contributors to maternal and child deaths. It is often combined with a verbal autopsy interview to establish the biological cause of death. Two complementary purposes of social autopsy include providing population-level data to health care programmers and policymakers to utilize in developing more effective strategies for delivering maternal and child health care technologies, and increasing awareness of maternal and child death as preventable problems in order to empower communities to participate and engage health programs to increase their responsiveness and accountability. Through a comprehensive review of the literature, this paper examines the concept and development of social autopsy, focusing on the contributions of the Pathway Analysis format for child deaths and the Maternal and Perinatal Death Inquiry and Response program in India to social autopsy's success in meeting key objectives. The Pathway Analysis social autopsy format, based on the Pathway to Survival model designed to support the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness approach, was developed from 1995 to 2001 and has been utilized in studies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Adoption of the Pathway model has enriched the data gathered on care seeking for child illnesses and supported the development of demand- and supply-side interventions. The instrument has recently been updated to improve the assessment of neonatal deaths and is soon to be utilized in large-scale population-representative verbal/social autopsy studies in several African countries. Maternal death audit, starting with confidential inquiries into maternal deaths in Britain more than 50 years ago, is a long-accepted strategy for reducing maternal mortality. More recently, maternal social autopsy studies that supported health programming have been conducted in several developing countries

  7. Maternal deaths in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangen, Siri; Bødker, Birgit; Ellingsen, Liv

    2017-01-01

    reporting from hospitals. Each case was then assessed to determine the cause of death, and level of care provided. Potential improvements to care were evaluated. RESULTS: We registered 168 maternal deaths, 90 direct and 78 indirect cases. The maternal mortality ratio was 7.2/100 000 live births ranging from......INTRODUCTION: Despite the seriousness of the event, maternal deaths are substantially underreported. There is often a missed opportunity to learn from such tragedies. The aim of the study was to identify maternal deaths in the five Nordic countries, to classify causes of death based...... on internationally acknowledged criteria, and to identify areas that would benefit from further teaching, training or research to possibly reduce the number of maternal deaths. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We present data for the years 2005-2013. National audit groups collected data by linkage of registers and direct...

  8. Improving obstetric care in low-resource settings: implementation of facility-based maternal death reviews in five pilot hospitals in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fournier Pierre

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity are major problems. Service availability and quality of care in health facilities are heterogeneous and most often inadequate. In resource-poor settings, the facility-based maternal death review or audit is one of the most promising strategies to improve health service performance. We aim to explore and describe health workers' perceptions of facility-based maternal death reviews and to identify barriers to and facilitators of the implementation of this approach in pilot health facilities of Senegal. Methods This study was conducted in five reference hospitals in Senegal with different characteristics. Data were collected from focus group discussions, participant observations of audit meetings, audit documents and interviews with the staff of the maternity unit. Data were analysed by means of both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Results Health professionals and service administrators were receptive and adhered relatively well to the process and the results of the audits, although some considered the situation destabilizing or even threatening. The main barriers to the implementation of maternal deaths reviews were: (1 bad quality of information in medical files; (2 non-participation of the head of department in the audit meetings; (3 lack of feedback to the staff who did not attend the audit meetings. The main facilitators were: (1 high level of professional qualifications or experience of the data collector; (2 involvement of the head of the maternity unit, acting as a moderator during the audit meetings; (3 participation of managers in the audit session to plan appropriate and realistic actions to prevent other maternal deaths. Conclusion The identification of the barriers to and the facilitators of the implementation of maternal death reviews is an essential step for the future adaptation of this method in countries with few resources. We

  9. Review of causes of maternal deaths in Botswana in 2010 | Ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case-note review revealed several opportunities for improved quality of care: better teamwork, communication and supportive supervision of health professionals; earlier recognition of the seriousness of complication(s) with more aggressive case-management; joint management between HIV and obstetric clinicians; ...

  10. Maternal deaths in Denmark 2002-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Birgit; Hvidman, Lone; Weber, Tom

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a method for identification, classification and assessment of maternal deaths in Denmark and to identify substandard care. DESIGN: Register study and case audit based on data from the Registers of the Danish Medical Health Board, death certificates and hospital records. SET...

  11. Analysis of maternal death autopsies from the nationwide registration system of maternal deaths in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Junichi; Wakasa, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Kanayama, Naohiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Katsuragi, Shinji; Nakata, Masahiko; Murakoshi, Takeshi; Osato, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Masamitsu; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Ishiwata, Isamu; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2018-02-01

    To clarify the necessity for and problems related to autopsy for determining the cause of maternal death in Japan. Women who died during pregnancy or within a year after delivery were analyzed by the Maternal Death Exploratory Committee between 2012 and 2015 in Japan. Maternal deaths were analyzed to verify the requirement of autopsy in cases in which autopsy was performed and the need for autopsy in cases in which it was not performed. Among the 49 cases performed autopsy, the final diagnosis was compatible with the clinical course in 24 cases, while the autopsy diagnosis was incompatible with the clinical course in 13 cases. In two cases, the final diagnosis was based on the clinical course, but an autopsy could exclude other possible causes. In three cases, no exact cause of maternal death was identified after autopsy. On the other hand, in cases without an autopsy, the final diagnosis was made using ante-mortem operating findings and surgical specimens in twenty-one cases. Though, thirty-one cases were estimated diagnosis based on post-mortem imaging or ante-mortem examinations, the exact original cause of death was not determined in 25 cases, and the cause of death could not be identified in eight cases without autopsy. Because in most cases the autopsy provides an exact cause of death, the necessity of autopsies should be more widely accepted in Japan.

  12. A CLINICAL STUDY OF MATERNAL DEATHS DUE TO PPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana Gowda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A study of maternal death conducted to evaluate various factors responsible for maternal deaths. To identify complications in pregnancy, a childbirth which result in maternal death, and to identify opportunities for preventive intervention and understand the events leading to death; so that improving maternal health and reducing maternal mortality rate significantly. To analyze the causes and epidemiological amounts maternal mortality e.g. age parity, socioeconomic status and literacy. In order to reduce maternal mortality and to implement safe motherhood program and complications of pregnancy and to find out safe motherhood program. METHODS: The data collected was a retrograde by a proforma containing particulars of the diseased, detailed history and relatives were interviewed for additional information. The data collected was analysed. RESULTS: Maternal mortality rate in our own institution is 200/ 100,000 live births. Among 30 maternal deaths, 56% deaths (17 were among low socio - economic status, groups 60% deaths among unbooked 53.5% deaths more along illiterates evidenced by direct and indirect deaths about 25% of deaths were preventable. CONCLUSION: Maternal mortality is a global problem, facing every country in the world. Target specific interventions are needed for specific population. Fifth millennium development goal (MDG is to reduce maternal mortality by 75% by the year 2015, worthwhile investment for every case provider, results that investing on mothers

  13. Addressing maternal deaths due to violence: the Illinois experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Abigail R; Geller, Stacie E

    2017-11-01

    Homicide, suicide, and substance abuse accounted for nearly one fourth of all pregnancy-associated deaths in Illinois from 2002 through 2013. Maternal mortality review in Illinois has been primarily focused on obstetric and medical causes and little is known about the circumstances surrounding deaths due to homicide, suicide, and substance abuse, if they are pregnancy related, and if the deaths are potentially preventable. To address this issue, we implemented a process to form a second statewide maternal mortality review committee for deaths due to violence in late 2014. We convened a stakeholder group to accomplish 3 tasks: (1) identify appropriate committee members; (2) identify potential types and sources of information that would be required for a meaningful review of violent maternal deaths; and (3) revise the Maternal Mortality Review Form. Because homicide, suicide, and substance abuse are closely linked to the social determinants of health, the review committee needed to have a broad membership with expertise in areas not required for obstetric maternal mortality review, including social service and community organizations. Identifying additional sources of information is critical; the state Violent Death Reporting System, case management data, and police and autopsy reports provide contextual information that cannot be found in medical records. The stakeholder group revised the Maternal Mortality Review Form to collect information relevant to violent maternal deaths, including screening history and psychosocial history. The form guides the maternal mortality review committee for deaths due to violence to identify potentially preventable factors relating to the woman, her family, systems of care, the community, the legal system, and the institutional environment. The committee has identified potential opportunities to decrease preventable death requiring cooperation with social service agencies and the criminal justice system in addition to the physical

  14. Early maternal death due to acute encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vidanapathirana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maternal death in an unmarried woman poses a medico-legal challenge. A 24-year-old unmarried schoolteacher, residing at a boarding place, had been admitted to hospital in a state of cardiac arrest. At the autopsy, mild to moderate congestion of subarachnoid vessels and oedema of the brain was noted. An un-interfered foetus of 15 weeks with an intact sac and placental tissues were seen. Genital tract injuries were not present. Histopathological examination showed diffuse perivascular cuffing by mononuclear cells suggestive of viral encephalitis, considering the circumstances of death and the social stigma of pregnancy in this unmarried teacher, the possibility of attempted suicide by ingestion of a poison was considered. Abrus precatorius (olinda seeds commonly found in the area is known to produce acute encephalitis as well as haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and pulmonary congestion was also considered as a possible cause for this unusual presentation

  15. Direct maternal deaths in Norway 1976-1995

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersgaard, Alice Beate; Langhoff-Roos, J.; Oian, P.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To report direct maternal mortality ratio (MMR) in Norway between 1976 and 1995 including a description of the underlying complications in pregnancy, the causes of death and assessment of standard of care. METHODS: The maternal deaths were identified through the Cause of Death Registry......, Statistics Norway, and Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We requested copies of the hospital case records and the maternal death autopsies. The direct maternal deaths were classified on the basis underlying causes and assessed for substandard care according to the guidelines at the time of death...... and preventability provided optimal conditions and up to date guidelines. RESULTS: In the period 1976-1995 we identified 61 direct maternal deaths in Norway. The direct MMR was 5.5/100,000 births. Sufficient information was available for analysis in 51 of these cases. Six deaths occurred in early pregnancy. Among...

  16. Reducing maternal deaths in a low resource setting in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-27

    Mar 27, 2013 ... Results: There were 9150 live births and 59 maternal deaths during the study period ... Maternal mortality ratio (MMR) in developed countries .... Table 3: The prevalence rate and case fatality rate distribution for Eclampsia and ...

  17. Analysis of preventability of stroke-related maternal death from the nationwide registration system of maternal deaths in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, Shinji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Junichi; Nakamura, Masamitsu; Kanayama, Naohiro; Nakata, Masahiko; Murakoshi, Takeshi; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Osato, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Kayo; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Ishiwata, Isamu; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2018-08-01

    The number of stroke-related maternal deaths is increasing in Japan. We investigated methods to reduce maternal death from stroke. We analyzed stroke-related maternal deaths in Japan reported to the Committee of the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare from 2010 to 2014 inclusive. A total of 35 cases were identified. The median maternal age was 35 years (range 22-45) and the incidence of stoke in women ≥40 was seven-fold higher than in death from stroke.

  18. A review of maternal mortality at Jimma Hospital, Southwestern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective review of hospital maternal deaths at Jimma Hospital, Southwestern Ethiopia, covering the period from September 1990 to May 1999 was conducted with the objectives of determining the overall maternal mortality rate, observing trend of maternal mortality during the period, and identifying major causes of ...

  19. Maternal and pregnancy-related death: causes and frequencies in an autopsy study population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Claas; Schmidbauer, Martina; Tsokos, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Maternal deaths during pregnancy, both from pregnancy-related or other causes, are rare in Western industrialized countries. In this study we report maternal and pregnancy-related deaths in a large autopsy population focusing on medical history, autopsy findings and histological examinations. Medico-legal autopsy files (n = 11,270) from the Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences, University Medical Centre Charité, University of Berlin, and the State Institute of Legal and Social Medicine, Berlin, from 2005 to 2010 were reviewed. All female cases between 15 and 49 years were checked for maternal and pregnancy-related death, and deaths of pregnant women from non-natural causes were also included. Fatalities that met the chosen criteria were classified as "direct gestational death," "indirect gestational death" or "non-gestational death." 13 female fatalities (0.12 %) met the chosen criteria (median age 28 years ± 6.87 SD). Eight (61.5 %) women died in-hospital, four (30.8 %) at home, and one woman died in public. Three cases (23.1 %) were "non-gestational deaths," and one case (7.7 %) remained unclear after autopsy and additional examinations. Of the remaining nine cases, six cases (46.5 %) were "direct gestational deaths," and two cases (15.4 %) were "indirect gestational deaths." One case (7.7 %) was not to be defined as "late maternal death," but the cause of death seemed to be directly related to previous gestation ["(very) late maternal death"]. Maternal deaths during pregnancy, both from pregnancy-related or other causes, remain an uncommon event in routine forensic autopsy practice. We report on the collection and analysis of maternal and pregnancy-related deaths in a large autopsy population, with particular attention to the phenomenology of pregnancy, pathophysiological changes in different organ systems and their detection, and the forensic autopsy assessment.

  20. Gaining Insight into the Prevention of Maternal Death Using Narrative Analysis: An Experience from Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Eftekhar-Vaghefi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reduction in maternal mortality requires an in-depth knowledge of the causes of death. This study was conducted to explore the circumstances and events leading to maternal mortality through a holistic approach. Using narrative text analysis, all documents related to maternal deaths occurred from 2007 to 2011 in Kerman province/Iran were reviewed thoroughly by an expert panel. A 93-item chart abstraction instrument was developed according to the expert panel and literature. The instrument consisted of demographic and pregnancy related variables, underlying and contributing causes of death, and type of delays regarding public health aspects, medical and system performance issues. A total of 64 maternal deaths were examined. One third of deaths occurred in women less than 18 or higher than 35 years. Nearly 95% of them lived in a low or mid socioeconomic status. In half of the cases, inappropriate or nonuse of contraceptives was seen. Delay in the provision of any adequate treatment after arrival at the health facility was seen in 59% of cases. The most common medical causes of death were preeclampsia/eclampsia (15.6%, postpartum hemorrhage (12.5% and deep phlebothrombosis (10.9%, respectively. Negligence was accounted for 95% of maternal deaths. To overcome the root causes of maternal death, more emphasis should be devoted to system failures and patient safety rather than the underlying causes of death and medical issues solely.

  1. Maternal Mortality Ratio and Causes of Death in IRI Between 2009 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Vahiddastjerdy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Maternal Mortality Ratio is an important health indicator. We presented the distribution and causes of maternal mortality in Islamic Republic of Iran.Materials and methods: After provision of an electronic Registry system for date entry, a descriptive-retrospective data collection had been performed for all maternal Deaths in March 2009- March 2012. All maternal deaths and their demographic characteristic were identified by using medical registries, death certificates, and relevant codes according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 during pregnancy, labor, and 42 days after parturition.Results: During 3 years, there were 5094317 deliveries and 941 maternal deaths (MMR of 18.5 per 1000000 live births. We had access to pertained data of 896 cases (95.2% for review in our study. Of 896 reported deaths, 549 were classified as direct, 302 as indirect and 45 as unknown. Hemorrhage was the most common cause of maternal mortality, followed by Preeclampsia, Eclampsia and sepsis. Among all indirect causes, cardio -vascular diseases were responsible for 10% of maternal deaths, followed by thromboembolism, HTN and renal diseases.Conclusion: Although maternal mortality ratio in IRI could be comparable with the developed countries but its pattern is following developing countries and with this study we had provided reliable data for other prospective studies.

  2. "Near-miss" obstetric events and maternal deaths in Sagamu, Nigeria: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olusoji J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To determine the frequency of near-miss (severe acute maternal morbidity and the nature of near-miss events, and comparatively analysed near-miss morbidities and maternal deaths among pregnant women managed over a 3-year period in a Nigerian tertiary centre. Methods Retrospective facility-based review of cases of near-miss and maternal death which occurred between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2004. Near-miss case definition was based on validated disease-specific criteria, comprising of five diagnostic categories: haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, dystocia, infection and anaemia. The near-miss morbidities were compared with maternal deaths with respect to demographic features and disease profiles. Mortality indices were determined for various disease processes to appreciate the standard of care provided for life-threatening obstetric conditions. The maternal death to near-miss ratios for the three years were compared to assess the trend in the quality of obstetric care. Results There were 1501 deliveries, 211 near-miss cases and 44 maternal deaths. The total near-miss events were 242 with a decreasing trend from 2002 to 2004. Demographic features of cases of near-miss and maternal death were comparable. Besides infectious morbidity, the categories of complications responsible for near-misses and maternal deaths followed the same order of decreasing frequency. Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and haemorrhage were responsible for 61.1% of near-miss cases and 50.0% of maternal deaths. More women died after developing severe morbidity due to uterine rupture and infection, with mortality indices of 37.5% and 28.6%, respectively. Early pregnancy complications and antepartum haemorrhage had the lowest mortality indices. Majority of the cases of near-miss (82.5% and maternal death (88.6% were unbooked for antenatal care and delivery in this hospital. Maternal mortality ratio for the period was 2931.4 per 100

  3. [Maternal deaths due to infectious cause, results from the French confidential enquiry into maternal deaths, 2010-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigouzzo, A; Tessier, V; Zieleskiewicz, L

    2017-12-01

    Over the period 2010-2012, maternal mortality from infectious causes accounted for 5% of maternal deaths by direct causes and 16% of maternal deaths by indirect causes. Among the 22 deaths caused by infection occurred during this period, 6 deaths were attributed to direct causes from genital tract origin, confirming thus the decrease in direct maternal deaths by infection during the last ten years. On the contrary, indirect maternal deaths by infection, from extragenital origin, doubled during the same period, with 16 deaths in the last triennium, dominated by winter respiratory infections, particularly influenza: the 2009-2010 influenza A (H1N1) virus pandemic was the leading cause of indirect maternal mortality by infection during the studied period. The main infectious agents involved in maternal deaths from direct causes were Streptococcus A, Escherichia Coli and Clostridium perfringens: these bacterias were responsible for toxic shock syndrome, severe sepsis, secondary in some cases to cellulitis or necrotizing fasciitis. Of the 6 deaths due to direct infection, 4 were considered avoidable because of inadequate management: delayed or missed diagnosis, delayed or inadequate initiation of a specific medical and/or surgical treatment. Of the 16 indirect maternal deaths due to infection causes, the most often involved infectious agents were influenza A (H1N1) virus and Streptococcus pneumonia with induced purpura fulminans: the absence of influenza vaccination during pregnancy, delayed diagnosis and emergency initiation of a specific treatment, were the main contributory factors to these deaths and their avoidability in 70% of the cases analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Maternal death audit in Rwanda 2009-2013: a nationwide facility-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayinzoga, Felix; Bijlmakers, Leon; van Dillen, Jeroen; Mivumbi, Victor; Ngabo, Fidèle; van der Velden, Koos

    2016-01-22

    Presenting the results of 5 years of implementing health facility-based maternal death audits in Rwanda, showing maternal death classification, identification of substandard (care) factors that have contributed to death, and conclusive recommendations for quality improvements in maternal and obstetric care. Nationwide facility-based retrospective cohort study. All cases of maternal death audited by district hospital-based audit teams between January 2009 and December 2013 were reviewed. Maternal deaths that were not subjected to a local audit are not part of the cohort. 987 audited cases of maternal death. Characteristics of deceased women, timing of onset of complications, place of death, parity, gravida, antenatal clinic attendance, reported cause of death, service factors and individual factors identified by committees as having contributed to death, and recommendations made by audit teams. 987 cases were audited, representing 93.1% of all maternal deaths reported through the national health management information system over the 5-year period. Almost 3 quarters of the deaths (71.6%) occurred at district hospitals. In 44.9% of these cases, death occurred in the post-partum period. Seventy per cent were due to direct causes, with post-partum haemorrhage as the leading cause (22.7%), followed by obstructed labour (12.3%). Indirect causes accounted for 25.7% of maternal deaths, with malaria as the leading cause (7.5%). Health system failures were identified as the main responsible factor for the majority of cases (61.0%); in 30.3% of the cases, the main factor was patient or community related. The facility-based maternal death audit approach has helped hospital teams to identify direct and indirect causes of death, and their contributing factors, and to make recommendations for actions that would reduce the risk of reoccurrence. Rwanda can complement maternal death audits with other strategies, in particular confidential enquiries and near-miss audits, so as to

  5. Magnitude and Causes of Maternal Deaths at Health Facilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    indirect causes related to pregnancy, childbirth or postpartum period; 80 ... aggravated by pregnancy include malaria, anemia,. HIV/AIDS and ... for obstetric complications in 2007, 41 were classified as maternal deaths. The leading causes of ...

  6. Maternal death and the Millennium Development Goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2007-01-01

    Maternal health is one of the main global health challenges and reduction of the maternal mortality ratio, from the present 0.6 mio. per year, by three-quarters by 2015 is the target for the fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG 5). However this goal is the one towards which the least progress h...

  7. Maternal deaths databases analysis: Ecuador 2003-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pino

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maternal mortality ratio in Ecuador is the only millennium goal on which national agencies are still making strong efforts to reach 2015 target. The purpose of the study was to process national maternal death databases to identify a specific association pattern of variable included in the death certificate. Design and methods: The study processed mortality databases published yearly by the National Census and Statistics Institute (INEC. Data analysed were exclusively maternal deaths. Data corresponds to the 2003-2013 period, accessible through INEC’s website. Comparisons are based on number of deaths and use an ecological approach for geographical coincidences. Results: The study identified variable association into the maternal mortality national databases showing that to die at home or in a different place than a hospital is closely related to women’s socioeconomic characteristics; there was an association with the absence of a public health facility. Also, to die in a different place than the usual residence could mean that women and families are searching for or were referred to a higher level of attention when they face complications. Conclusions: Ecuadorian maternal deaths showed Patterns of inequity in health status, health care provision and health risks. A predominant factor seems unclear to explain the variable association found processing national databases; perhaps every pattern of health systems development played a role in maternal mortality or factors different from those registered by the statistics system may remain hidden. Some random influences might not be even considered in an explanatory model yet.

  8. One in Five Maternal Deaths in Bangladesh Associated with Acute Jaundice: Results from a National Maternal Mortality Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rupal; Nahar, Quamrun; Gurley, Emily S

    2016-03-01

    We estimated the proportion of maternal deaths in Bangladesh associated with acute onset of jaundice. We used verbal autopsy data from a nationally representative maternal mortality survey to calculate the proportion of maternal deaths associated with jaundice and compared it to previously published estimates. Of all maternal deaths between 2008 and 2010, 23% were associated with jaundice, compared with 19% from 1998 to 2001. Approximately one of five maternal deaths was preceded by jaundice, unchanged in 10 years. Our findings highlight the need to better understand the etiology of these maternal deaths in Bangladesh. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  9. Maternal morbidity and risk of death at delivery hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Katherine H; Savitz, David; Werner, Erika F; Pettker, Christian M; Goffman, Dena; Chazotte, Cynthia; Lipkind, Heather S

    2013-09-01

    To examine the effect of underlying maternal morbidities on the odds of maternal death during delivery hospitalization. We used data that linked birth certificates to hospital discharge diagnoses from singleton live births at 22 weeks of gestation or later during 1995-2003 in New York City. Maternal morbidities examined included prepregnancy weight more than 114 kilograms (250 pounds), chronic hypertension, pregestational or gestational diabetes mellitus, chronic cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, chronic lung disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and preeclampsia or eclampsia. Associations with maternal mortality were estimated using multivariate logistic regression. During the specified time period, 1,084,862 live singleton births and 132 maternal deaths occurred. Patients with increasing maternal age, non-Hispanic black ethnicity, self-pay or Medicaid, primary cesarean delivery, and premature delivery had higher rates of maternal mortality during delivery hospitalization. From the entire study population, 4.1% had preeclampsia or eclampsia (n=44,004), 1.8% had chronic hypertension (n=19,647), 1.1% of patients were classified as obese (n=11,936), 0.7% had pregestational diabetes (n=7,474), 0.4% had HIV (n=4,665), and 0.01% had pulmonary hypertension (n=166). Preeclampsia or eclampsia (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 8.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.5-12.1), chronic hypertension (adjusted OR, 7.7; 95% CI 4.7-12.5), underlying maternal obesity (adjusted OR, 2.9; 95% CI 1.1-8.1), pregestational diabetes (adjusted OR, 3.3; 95% CI 1.3-8.1), HIV (adjusted OR, 7.7; 95% CI 3.4-17.8), and pulmonary hypertension (adjusted OR, 65.1; 95% CI 15.8-269.3) were associated with an increased risk of death during the delivery hospitalization. The presence of maternal disease significantly increases the odds of maternal mortality at the time of delivery hospitalization. II.

  10. Maternal morbidity and mortality associated with delivery after intrauterine death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ifnan, F.; Jameel, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the maternal morbidity and mortality associated with delivery after intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) and to find out the place of fetal destructive procedures and cesarean section. All women were included in the present study who presented before the onset of labour pains, after intrauterine fetal death at 26 weeks or onward with singleton pregnancy. Assessment of maternal demographic characteristics, gestational age at fetal demise, delivery-IUFD interval, mode of delivery; vaginal with or without fetal destructive procedures/cesarean section and maternal complications were the main outcome measures. There were 1834 live birth and 63 deliveries with intrauterine fetal death. Mode of delivery was vaginal in 87.4% and cesarean section in 12.6% of the cases. Twelve (21%) of the vaginal deliveries were complicated by lower urogenital tract injuries in certain cases, whereas 75% (6/8) of patients delivered by cesarean section developed major postoperative complications like postpartum haemorrhage, shock, endometritis, peritonitis and wound dehiscence. No maternal death was identified. Rate of delivery with intrauterine fetal death was 34.3/1000 live-birth deliveries. (author)

  11. [Maternal deaths related to social vulnerabilities. Results from the French confidential enquiry into maternal deaths, 2010-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, V; Leroux, S; Guseva-Canu, I

    2017-12-01

    The theme of deprivation is new for the ENCMM. In view of the perceived increase in the number of maternal deaths that may be related to a deprivation situation, we sought to understand the main dimensions that could contribute to maternal death in this context, in order to propose a definition. The selection of cases made a posteriori is mainly based on a qualitative judgment. Between 2010 and 2012, among the deaths evaluated by the CNEMM, one or more elements related to social vulnerability were identified in 8.6% of the cases (18 deaths). The direct criteria used were the concepts of "deprivation" or "social difficulties", difficulties of housing, language barriers and isolation. The absence of prenatal care was retained as an indirect marker. We excluded cases where psychiatric pathology and/or addiction were predominant. Of the 18 cases identified with deprivation factors, death was considered "unavoidable" in 2 cases (11%), "certainly avoidable" or "possibly avoidable" in 13 cases (72%). In 3 cases (17%), avoidability could not be determined. Avoidability was related to the content and adequacy of care in 11 cases out of 13 (85%) and the patient's interaction with the health care system in 10 of 18 cases (56%). The analysis of maternal deaths among women in precarious situations points out that the link between socio-economic deprivation and poor maternal health outcomes potentially includes a specific risk of maternal death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Maternal death and near miss measurement: a case for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... a case for implementation in developing countries in the sustainable development agenda, a review article. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Maternal health, well-being and survival must remain a central goal and ...

  13. Risk Factors for Maternal Deaths in Unplanned Obstetric Admissions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... (37.5%), and respiratory distress (12.5%). There were 12 deaths (48%). Organ dysfunction on admission, massive blood loss and late presentation were the risk factors for mortality. The high maternal mortality was mainly due to limited supply of blood products and inadequate prenatal care resulting in disease severity.

  14. Health facility-based maternal death audit in Tigray, Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    of the duration of pregnancy, from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management ... understand why women die during maternity (6). Among many risk factors, early marriage puts women at ... antenatal care attended; gestation at time of death; died delivered or undelivered; place of delivery; main.

  15. Maternal and obstetrical predictors of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Isabel; Dahdouh, Elias M; Kugler, Perlyne; Mimran, Gracia; Balayla, Jacques

    2017-10-01

    Public Health initiatives, such as the "Safe to Sleep" campaign, have traditionally targeted infants' risk factors for the prevention of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). However, controversy remains regarding maternal and obstetrical risk factors for SIDS. In our study, we sought out to determine both modifiable and non-modifiable obstetrical and maternal risk factors associated with SIDS. We conducted a population-based cohort study using the CDC's Linked Birth-Infant Death data from the United States for the year 2010. The impact of several obstetrical and maternal risk factors on the risk of overall infant mortality and SIDS was estimated using unconditional regression analysis, adjusting for relevant confounders. Our cohort consisted of 4,007,105 deliveries and 24,174 infant deaths during the first year of life, of which 1991 (8.2%) were due to SIDS. Prominent risk factors for SIDS included (OR [95% CI]): black race, 1.89 [1.68-2.13]; maternal smoking, 3.56 [3.18-3.99]; maternal chronic hypertension, 1.73 [1.21-2.48]; gestational hypertension, 1.51 [1.23-1.87]; premature birth <37 weeks, 2.16 [1.82-2.55]; IUGR, 2.46 [2.14-2.82]; and being a twin, 1.81 [1.43-2.29], p < 0.0001. Relative to a cohort of infants who died of other causes, risk factors with a predilection for SIDS were maternal smoking, 2.48 [2.16-2.83] and being a twin, 1.52 [1.21-1.91], p < 0.0001. Conclusions for practice: While certain socio-demographic and gestational characteristics are important risk factors, maternal smoking remains the strongest prenatal modifiable risk factor for SIDS. We recommend the continuation of Public Health initiatives that promote safe infant sleeping practices and smoking cessation during and after pregnancy.

  16. Maternal correlates of maternal child feeding practices: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhie, Skye; Skouteris, Helen; Daniels, Lynne; Jansen, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Establishing healthy eating habits early in life is one important strategy to combat childhood obesity. Given that early maternal child feeding practices have been linked to child food intake and weight, identifying the maternal correlates of maternal child feeding practices is important in order to understand the determinants of childhood obesity; this was the overall aim of the current review. Academic databases were searched for studies examining the relationship between maternal child feeding practices and parenting, personal characteristics and psychopathology of mothers with preschoolers. Papers were limited to those published in English, between January 2000 and June 2012. Only studies with mothers of normally developing children between the ages of 2 and 6 years were included. There were no restrictions regarding the inclusion of maternal nationality or socioeconomic status (SES). Seventeen eligible studies were sourced. Information on the aim, sample, measures and findings of these was summarised into tables. The findings of this review support a relationship between maternal controlling parenting, general and eating psychopathology, and SES and maternal child feeding practices. The main methodological issues of the studies reviewed included inconsistency in measures of maternal variables across studies and cross-sectional designs. We conclude that the maternal correlates associated with maternal child feeding practices are complex, and the pathways by which maternal correlates impact these feeding practices require further investigation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Suboptimal care and maternal mortality among foreign-born women in Sweden: maternal death audit with application of the 'migration three delays' model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esscher, Annika; Binder-Finnema, Pauline; Bødker, Birgit; Högberg, Ulf; Mulic-Lutvica, Ajlana; Essén, Birgitta

    2014-04-12

    Several European countries report differences in risk of maternal mortality between immigrants from low- and middle-income countries and host country women. The present study identified suboptimal factors related to care-seeking, accessibility, and quality of care for maternal deaths that occurred in Sweden from 1988-2010. A subset of maternal death records (n = 75) among foreign-born women from low- and middle-income countries and Swedish-born women were audited using structured implicit review. One case of foreign-born maternal death was matched with two native born Swedish cases of maternal death. An assessment protocol was developed that applied both the 'migration three delays' framework and a modified version of the Confidential Enquiry from the United Kingdom. The main outcomes were major and minor suboptimal factors associated with maternal death in this high-income, low-maternal mortality context. Major and minor suboptimal factors were associated with a majority of maternal deaths and significantly more often to foreign-born women (p = 0.01). The main delays to care-seeking were non-compliance among foreign-born women and communication barriers, such as incongruent language and suboptimal interpreter system or usage. Inadequate care occurred more often among the foreign-born (p = 0.04), whereas delays in consultation/referral and miscommunication between health care providers where equally common between the two groups. Suboptimal care factors, major and minor, were present in more than 2/3 of maternal deaths in this high-income setting. Those related to migration were associated to miscommunication, lack of professional interpreters, and limited knowledge about rare diseases and pregnancy complications. Increased insight into a migration perspective is advocated for maternity clinicians who provide care to foreign-born women.

  18. Maternal sociodemographic characteristics and risk factors of antepartum fetal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, M A; Sultana, N; Chowdhury, S; Azim, E

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the sociodemographic profile and to identify the risk factors of ante-partum fetal death which occurs after the age of viability of fetus. This prospective observational study was conducted in the Obstetrics department of Ad-din Women Medical College Hospital during the period of June, 2009 to July, 2010. A total of 14,015 pregnant patients were admitted in the study place after the age of viability, which was taken as 28 weeks of gestation for our facilities. Eighty-three (0.59%) of them were identified as intrauterine fetal death. Assessment of maternal sociodemographic characteristics and maternal-fetal risk factors were evaluated with a semi structured questionnaire pretested. Majority (81.92%, n=68) of the patients were below 30 years of age, 78.31% belonged to middle socioeconomic group. Almost 58% women had education below SSC level and 28.91% took regular antenatal checkup. About 61.45% patients were multigravida. Most (59.04%) ante-partum deaths were identified below 32 weeks of pregnancy. Out of 83 patients, maternal risk factors were identified in 41(49.59%) cases where fetal risk factors were found in 16(19.27%) cases; no risk factors could be determined in rests. Hypertension (48.78%), diabetes (21.95%), hyperpyrexia (17.3%), abruptio placentae (4.88%) and UTI (7.36%) were identified as maternal factors; and congenital anomaly (37.5%), Rh incompatibility (37.5%), multiple pregnancy (12.5%) and post-maturity (12.5%) were the fetal risk factors. Here, proximal biological risk factors are most important in ante-partum fetal deaths. More investigations and facilities are needed to explain the causes of antepartum deaths.

  19. National data system on near miss and maternal death: shifting from maternal risk to public health impact in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladapo Olufemi T

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of reliable and up-to-date statistics on maternal deaths and disabilities remains a major challenge to the implementation of Nigeria's Road Map to Accelerate the Millennium Development Goal related to Maternal Health (MDG-5. There are currently no functioning national data sources on maternal deaths and disabilities that could serve as reference points for programme managers, health advocates and policy makers. While awaiting the success of efforts targeted at overcoming the barriers facing establishment of population-based data systems, referral institutions in Nigeria can contribute their quota in the quest towards MDG-5 by providing good quality and reliable information on maternal deaths and disabilities on a continuous basis. This project represents the first opportunity to initiate a scientifically sound and reliable quantitative system of data gathering on maternal health profile in Nigeria. Objective The primary objective is to create a national data system on maternal near miss (MNM and maternal mortality in Nigerian public tertiary institutions. This system will conduct periodically, both regionally and at country level, a review of the magnitude of MNM and maternal deaths, nature of events responsible for MNM and maternal deaths, indices for the quality of care for direct obstetric complications and the health service events surrounding these complications, in an attempt to collectively define and monitor the standard of comprehensive emergency obstetric care in the country. Methods This will be a nationwide cohort study of all women who experience MNM and those who die from pregnancy, childbirth and puerperal complications using uniform criteria among women admitted in tertiary healthcare facilities in the six geopolitical zones in Nigeria. This will be accomplished by establishing a network of all public tertiary obstetric referral institutions that will prospectively collect specific information on

  20. Maternal use of oral contraceptives and risk of fetal death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, R.; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Jørgensen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    Intrauterine exposure to artificial sex hormones such as oral contraceptives may be associated with an increased risk of fetal death. Between 1996 and 2002, a total of 92 719 women were recruited to The Danish National Birth Cohort and interviewed about exposures during pregnancy. Outcome.......2%) women took oral contraceptives during pregnancy. Use of combined oestrogen and progesterone oral contraceptives (COC) or progesterone-only oral contraceptives (POC) during pregnancy was not associated with increased hazard ratios of fetal death compared with non-users, HR 1.01 [95% CI 0.71, 1.45] and HR...... 1.37 [95% CI 0.65, 2.89] respectively. Neither use of COC nor POC prior to pregnancy was associated with fetal death. Stratification by maternal age and smoking showed elevated risks of fetal death for women contraception during pregnancy, but the interactions were...

  1. Maternal education and age: inequalities in neonatal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Sandra Costa; Flores, Patricia Viana Guimarães; Camargo, Kenneth Rochel; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino; Coeli, Claudia Medina

    2017-11-17

    Evaluate the interaction between maternal age and education level in neonatal mortality, as well as investigate the temporal evolution of neonatal mortality in each stratum formed by the combination of these two risk factors. A nonconcurrent cohort study, resulting from a probabilistic relationship between the Mortality Information System and the Live Birth Information System. To investigate the risk of neonatal death we performed a logistic regression, with an odds ratio estimate for the combined variable of maternal education and age, as well as the evaluation of additive and multiplicative interaction. The neonatal mortality rate time series, according to maternal education and age, was estimated by the Joinpoint Regression program. The neonatal mortality rate in the period was 8.09‰ and it was higher in newborns of mothers with low education levels: 12.7‰ (adolescent mothers) and 12.4‰ (mother 35 years old or older). Low level of education, without the age effect, increased the chance of neonatal death by 25% (OR = 1.25, 95%CI 1.14-1.36). The isolated effect of age on neonatal death was higher for adolescent mothers (OR = 1.39, 95%CI 1.33-1.46) than for mothers aged ≥ 35 years (OR = 1.16, 95%CI 1.09-1.23). In the time-trend analysis, no age group of women with low education levels presented a reduction in the neonatal mortality rate for the period, as opposed to women with intermediate or high levels of education, where the reduction was significant, around 4% annually. Two more vulnerable groups - adolescents with low levels of education and older women with low levels of education - were identified in relation to the risk of neonatal death and inequality in reducing the mortality rate.

  2. Substandard emergency obstetric care - a confidential enquiry into maternal deaths at a regional hospital in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Bjarke Lund; Elsass, Peter; Nielsen, Brigitte Bruun

    2010-01-01

    for major substandard care. Hospital based maternal deaths between 2006 and 2008 (35 months) were included. Of 68 registered maternal deaths sufficient information for reviewing was retrieved for 62 cases (91%). As a supplement, in-depth interviews with staff about the underlying causes of substandard care...... in 46 (74%) of the 62 cases reviewed. During the same time period MDA identified substandard care in 18 cases. Staff perceived poor organization of work and lack of training as important causes for substandard care. Local MDA was considered useful although time-consuming and sometimes threatening......, and staff dedication to the process was questioned. CONCLUSION: Quality assurance of emergency obstetric care might be strengthened by supplementing internal MDA with external CE....

  3. How do we reduce maternal deaths due to puerperal sepsis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Puerperal sepsis remains one of the leading causes of maternal deaths in South Africa and a large number of these deaths are avoidable. The National Committee on Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths (NCCEMD) identified these avoidable factors which included missed diagnoses, lack of appreciation of the ...

  4. Cardiovascular causes of maternal sudden death. Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome is leading cause in UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krexi, Dimitra; Sheppard, Mary N

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to determine the causes of sudden cardiac death during pregnancy and in the postpartum period and patients' characteristics. There are few studies in the literature. Eighty cases of sudden unexpected death due to cardiac causes in relation to pregnancy and postpartum period in a database of 4678 patients were found and examined macroscopically and microscopically. The mean age was 30±7 years with a range from 16 to 43 years. About 30% were 35 years old or older; 50% of deaths occurred during pregnancy and 50% during the postpartum period. About 59.18% were obese or overweight where body mass index data were available. The leading causes of death were sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) (53.75%) and cardiomyopathies (13.80%). Other causes include dissection of aorta or its branches (8.75%), congenital heart disease (2.50%) and valvular disease (3.75%). This study highlights sudden cardiac death in pregnancy or in the postpartum period, which is mainly due to SADS with underlying channelopathies and cardiomyopathy. We wish to raise awareness of these frequently under-recognised entities in maternal deaths and the need of cardiological screening of the family as a result of the diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. a review of maternal mortality at the kenyatta national hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... Main outcome measures: Determination of maternal mortality rates of all patients admitted to the ... complications of pregnancy and childbirth, majority of who come from ... Yearly distribution of maternal deaths. Year. Deaths.

  6. Reporting Fatal Neglect in Child Death Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Debbie

    2018-01-01

    Child death reviews are conducted with the aim of preventing child deaths however, definitions, inclusion criteria for the review of child deaths and reporting practices vary across Child Death Review Teams (CDRTs). This article aims to identify a common context and understanding of fatal neglect reporting by reviewing definitional issues of fatal neglect and comparing reporting practice across a number of CDRTs. Providing a consistent context for identifying and reporting neglect-related deaths may improve the understanding of the impact of fatal neglect and the risk factors associated with it and therefore, improve the potential of CDRT review to inform prevention programs, policies, and procedures.

  7. Estimating the Burden of Maternal and Neonatal Deaths Associated With Jaundice in Bangladesh: Possible Role of Hepatitis E Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Amal K.; Streatfield, Peter K.; Sazzad, Hossain M.S.; Nurul Huda, Tarique M.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Luby, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the population-based incidence of maternal and neonatal mortality associated with hepatitis E virus (HEV) in Bangladesh. Methods. We analyzed verbal autopsy data from 4 population-based studies in Bangladesh to calculate the maternal and neonatal mortality ratios associated with jaundice during pregnancy. We then reviewed the published literature to estimate the proportion of maternal deaths associated with liver disease during pregnancy that were the result of HEV in hospitals. Results. We found that 19% to 25% of all maternal deaths and 7% to 13% of all neonatal deaths in Bangladesh were associated with jaundice in pregnant women. In the published literature, 58% of deaths in pregnant women with acute liver disease in hospitals were associated with HEV. Conclusions. Jaundice is frequently associated with maternal and neonatal deaths in Bangladesh, and the published literature suggests that HEV may cause many of these deaths. HEV is preventable, and studies to estimate the burden of HEV in endemic countries are urgently needed. PMID:23078501

  8. Analysis of preventability of hypertensive disorder in pregnancy-related maternal death using the nationwide registration system of maternal deaths in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, Shinji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Junichi; Nakamura, Masamitsu; Kanayama, Naohiro; Nakata, Masahiko; Murakoshi, Takeshi; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Osato, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Kayo; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Ishiwata, Isamu; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2018-04-26

    Hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP) is a major cause of maternal death. The goal of this study was to investigate factors associated with maternal death due to HDP. HDP-related maternal deaths in Japan reported to the Committee of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare from 2010 to 2015 were examined. Out of 47 cases of HDP, 30 were identified as the major cause of maternal death. The median maternal age was 34 years (range 24-45) and the mortality in women aged ≥40 years was seven times higher that than in women aged deaths in Japan. Mothers aged ≥40 years are most at risk for HDP-related maternal death. Major concerns for preventabilities were late hospitalization, maternal transportation, and termination of pregnancy for term or near-term HDP. Regular vital checks and prompt lowering of BP were lacked during labor in most cases. HELLP syndrome should be managed at a general hospital with sufficient medical resources.

  9. Maternal death inquiry and response in India - the impact of contextual factors on defining an optimal model to help meet critical maternal health policy objectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalter Henry D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal death reviews have been utilized in several countries as a means of identifying social and health care quality issues affecting maternal survival. From 2005 to 2009, a standardized community-based maternal death inquiry and response initiative was implemented in eight Indian states with the aim of addressing critical maternal health policy objectives. However, state-specific contextual factors strongly influenced the effort's success. This paper examines the impact and implications of the contextual factors. Methods We identified community, public health systems and governance related contextual factors thought to affect the implementation, utilization and up-scaling of the death inquiry process. Then, according to selected indicators, we documented the contextual factors' presence and their impact on the process' success in helping meet critical maternal health policy objectives in four districts of Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and West Bengal. Based on this assessment, we propose an optimal model for conducting community-based maternal death inquiries in India and similar settings. Results The death inquiry process led to increases in maternal death notification and investigation whether civil society or government took charge of these tasks, stimulated sharing of the findings in multiple settings and contributed to the development of numerous evidence-based local, district and statewide maternal health interventions. NGO inputs were essential where communities, public health systems and governance were weak and boosted effectiveness in stronger settings. Public health systems participation was enabled by responsive and accountable governance. Communities participated most successfully through India's established local governance Panchayat Raj Institutions. In one instance this led to the development of a multi-faceted intervention well-integrated at multiple levels. Conclusions The impact of several contextual

  10. Current status of pregnancy-related maternal mortality in Japan: a report from the Maternal Death Exploratory Committee in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Junichi; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Katsuragi, Shinji; Osato, Kazuhiro; Murakoshi, Takeshi; Nakata, Masahiko; Nakamura, Masamitsu; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Sadahiro, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naohiro; Ishiwata, Isamu; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2016-03-21

    To clarify the problems related to maternal deaths in Japan, including the diseases themselves, causes, treatments and the hospital or regional systems. Descriptive study. Maternal death registration system established by the Japan Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (JAOG). Women who died during pregnancy or within a year after delivery, from 2010 to 2014, throughout Japan (N=213). The preventability and problems in each maternal death. Maternal deaths were frequently caused by obstetric haemorrhage (23%), brain disease (16%), amniotic fluid embolism (12%), cardiovascular disease (8%) and pulmonary disease (8%). The Committee considered that it was impossible to prevent death in 51% of the cases, whereas they considered prevention in 26%, 15% and 7% of the cases to be slightly, moderately and highly possible, respectively. It was difficult to prevent maternal deaths due to amniotic fluid embolism and brain disease. In contrast, half of the deaths due to obstetric haemorrhage were considered preventable, because the peak duration between the initial symptoms and initial cardiopulmonary arrest was 1-3 h. A range of measures, including individual education and the construction of good relationships among regional hospitals, should be established in the near future, to improve primary care for patients with maternal haemorrhage and to save the lives of mothers in Japan. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Research Review: Death Online - Alive and Kicking!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotved, Stine

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the physical death, the related grief, and the ensuing memorials has become visible in the digital arena. As every other aspect of life is to be found online, so are death and the surrounding issues. The research into the area is not far behind, and using the approach of a timeline...... with different stakeholders, this research review offers a systematic way of keeping track. The rather simple timeline relates to the death of a person, there is before, just around, and after death, appropriately named in a dead language: Ante Mortem, Peri Mortem, and Post Mortem. This review deals exclusively...... with the digital context of the physical death of existing human beings, as opposed to, e.g., in-game death experience or memorials for fictional characters. These are no doubt interesting issues that deserve their own review, although we might need to put citation marks around "death"....

  12. Piecing together the maternal death puzzle through narratives: the three delays model revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viva Combs Thorsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Malawi maternal mortality continues to be a major public health challenge. Going beyond the numbers to form a more complete view of why women die is critical to improving access to and quality of emergency obstetric care. The objective of the current study was to identify the socio-cultural and facility-based factors that contributed to maternal deaths in the district of Lilongwe, Malawi. METHODS: Retrospectively, 32 maternal death cases that occurred between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2011 were reviewed independently by two gynecologists/obstetricians. Interviews were conducted with healthcare staff, family members, neighbors, and traditional birth attendants. Guided by the grounded theory approach, interview transcripts were analyzed manually and continuously. Emerging, recurring themes were identified and excerpts from the transcripts were categorized according to the Three Delays Model (3Ds. RESULTS: Sixteen deaths were due to direct obstetric complications, sepsis and hemorrhage being most common. Sixteen deaths were due to indirect causes with the main cause being anemia, followed by HIV and heart disease. Lack of recognizing signs, symptoms, and severity of the situation; using traditional Birth Attendant services; low female literacy level; delayed access to transport; hardship of long distance and physical terrain; delayed prompt quality emergency obstetric care; and delayed care while at the hospital due to patient refusal or concealment were observed. According to the 3Ds, the most common delay observed was in receiving treatment upon reaching the facility due to referral delays, missed diagnoses, lack of blood, lack of drugs, or inadequate care, and severe mismanagement.

  13. Implementing Statewide Severe Maternal Morbidity Review: The Illinois Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Abigail R; Roesch, Pamela T; Garland, Caitlin E; Geller, Stacie E

    2018-03-07

    Severe maternal morbidity (SMM) rates in the United States more than doubled between 1998 and 2010. Advanced maternal age and chronic comorbidities do not completely explain the increase in SMM or how to effectively address it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have called for facility-level multidisciplinary review of SMM for potential preventability and have issued implementation guidelines. Within Illinois, SMM was identified as any intensive or critical care unit admission and/or 4 or more units of packed red blood cells transfused at any time from conception through 42 days postpartum. All cases meeting this definition were counted during statewide surveillance. Cases were selected for review on the basis of their potential to yield insights into factors contributing to preventable SMM or best practices preventing further morbidity or death. If the SMM review committee deemed a case potentially preventable, it identified specific factors associated with missed opportunities and made actionable recommendations for quality improvement. Approximately 1100 cases of SMM were identified from July 1, 2016, to June 30, 2017, yielding a rate of 76 SMM cases per 10 000 pregnancies. Reviews were conducted on 142 SMM cases. Most SMM cases occurred during delivery hospitalization and more than half were delivered by cesarean section. Hemorrhage was the primary cause of SMM (>50% of the cases). Facility-level SMM review was feasible and acceptable in statewide implementation. States that are planning SMM reviews across obstetric facilities should permit ample time for translation of recommendations to practice. Although continued maternal mortality reviews are valuable, they are not sufficient to address the increasing rates of SMM and maternal death. In-depth multidisciplinary review offers the potential to identify factors associated with SMM and interventions to prevent women from moving along the

  14. Local problems; local solutions: an innovative approach to investigating and addressing causes of maternal deaths in Zambia's Copperbelt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadley Mary B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal mortality in developing countries is high and international targets for reduction are unlikely to be met. Zambia's maternal mortality ratio was 591 per 100,000 live births according to survey data (2007 while routinely collected data captured only about 10% of these deaths. In one district in Zambia medical staff reviewed deaths occurring in the labour ward but no related recommendations were documented nor was there evidence of actions taken to avert further deaths. The Investigate Maternal Deaths and Act (IMDA approach was designed to address these deficiencies and is comprised of four components; identification of maternal deaths; investigation of factors contributing to the deaths; recommendations for action drawn up by multiple stakeholders and monitoring of progress through existing systems. Methods A pilot was conducted in one district of Zambia. Maternal deaths occurring over a period of twelve months were identified and investigated. Data was collected through in-depth interviews with family, focus group discussions and hospital records. The information was summarized and presented at eleven data sharing meetings to key decision makers, during which recommendations for action were drawn up. An output indicator to monitor progress was included in the routine performance assessment tool. High impact interventions were identified using frequency analysis. Results A total of 56 maternal deaths were investigated. Poor communication, existing risk factors, a lack of resources and case management issues were the broad categories under which contributing factors were assigned. Sixty three recommendations were drawn up by key decision-makers of which two thirds were implemented by the end of the pilot period. Potential high impact actions were related to management of AIDS and pregnancy, human resources, referral mechanisms, birth planning at household level and availability of safe blood. Conclusion In resource

  15. Pregnancy Complications Associated With Maternal Hypothyroidism: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Danielle Rosani; Santos, Thais da Silva; de Carvalho, Hayalla Corrêa; Lopes, Laíza Cristina Bahls; Günther, Luciene Setsuko Akimoto; Aristides, Sandra Mara Alessi; Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira; Demarchi, Izabel Galhardo

    2018-04-01

    Hypothyroidism is one of the most prevalent diseases in pregnancy, but there is no consensus about its management in pregnant women. In this systematic review, we evaluated the association between pregnancy complications and treated or untreated maternal hypothyroidism. PubMed and reference lists were searched for the Medical Subject Headings terms "pregnancy complications" and "hypothyroidism." The eligibility criteria for inclusion in the study were an original study published between 2002 and 2013. Six reviewers independently selected the studies, and 3 extracted the data. Two reviewers assessed the risk of bias and quality of the studies. Eighteen studies were included in the systematic review. The most prevalent complications associated with maternal hypothyroidism were abortion, intrauterine fetal death, preterm delivery, and preeclampsia. The pregnancy outcome depended on the treatment that was received by the patient. Strong evidence indicates that maternal hypothyroidism is associated with maternal-fetal complications, but no consensus was found among the studies reviewed herein. The dose of levothyroxine that is required to maintain euthyroidism is still questioned, but studies have suggested that levothyroxine should be adjusted according to the gestational period and laboratory profile.

  16. Recommendations for saving mothers' lives in Japan: Report from the Maternal Death Exploratory Committee (2010-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Junichi; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Masamitsu; Katsuragi, Shinji; Osato, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Kayo; Murakoshi, Takeshi; Nakata, Masahiko; Ishiwata, Isamu

    2016-12-01

    To make recommendations for saving mothers' lives, issues related to maternal deaths including diseases, causes, treatments, and hospital and regional systems are analyzed by the Maternal Death Exploratory Committee in Japan. In this report, we present ten clinical important recommendations based on the analysis of maternal deaths between 2010 and 2014 in Japan. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Maternal filicide in a cohort of English Serious Case Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, Peter; Retzer, Ameeta

    2018-03-02

    A national mixed-methods study of English Serious Case Reviews (SCRs) was carried out to better understand the characteristics and circumstances of maternally perpetrated filicides, to compare these with paternally perpetrated cases, and to identify learning points for mental health professionals. Published reports for all SCRs of children in England dying as a result of abuse or neglect from 2011 to 2014 were subject to qualitative analysis using a system of layered reading and inductive thematic analysis, along with descriptive and comparative quantitative analysis. There were 86 deaths directly attributable to child maltreatment within the immediate family. The mother was the suspected perpetrator in 20. Twelve of the mother perpetrators were victims of domestic violence, while 15 of the father perpetrators were known to be perpetrators of domestic violence. Those deaths resulting from impulsive violence or severe, persistent cruelty are almost exclusively perpetrated by males, while those with an apparent intent to kill the child are slightly more likely to be perpetrated by mothers. Four key themes were identified through the qualitative analysis: domestic violence, maternal mental illness, separation and maternal isolation, and the invisibility of the child. These findings highlight the important role of domestic violence and its interaction with maternal mental health. Professionals working with mothers with mental health problems need to adopt a supportive but professionally curious stance, to be alert to signs of escalating stress or worsening mental ill-health, and to provide supportive and accessible structures for at-risk families.

  18. Impact of Maternal Death on Household Economy in Rural China: A Prospective Path Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fang; Ao, Deng; Feng, Yao; Wang, Lin; Chen, Jie; Huntington, Dale; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the inter-relationships among maternal death, household economic status after the event, and potential influencing factors. We conducted a prospective cohort study of households that had experienced maternal death (n = 195) and those that experienced childbirth without maternal death (n = 384) in rural China. All the households were interviewed after the event occurred and were followed up 12 months later. Structural equation modeling was used to test the relationship model, utilizing income and expenditure per capita in the following year after the event as the main outcome variables, maternal death as the predictor, and direct costs, the amount of money offset by positive and negative coping strategies, whether the husband remarried, and whether the newborn was alive as the mediators. In the following year after the event, the path analysis revealed a direct effect from maternal death to lower income per capita (standardized coefficient = -0.43, p = 0.041) and to lower expenditure per capita (standardized coefficient = -0.51, peconomy. The results provided evidence for better understanding the mechanism of how this event affects a household economy and provided a reference for social welfare policies to target the most vulnerable households that have suffered from maternal deaths.

  19. Maternal deaths from bleeding associated with caesarean delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    community to pay attention to this serious problem. Since 2010, there have ..... should not have been allowed to leave the recovery area with signs of hypovolaemic shock. ... midwives working in the maternity section). The ESMOE training.

  20. Community-Based Cause of Death Study Linked to Maternal and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    While Ethiopia has successfully reduced under-five childhood mortality, there have been slower gains in reducing neonatal (newborn) and maternal mortality rates. About 220,000 children and mothers die every year in Ethiopia. For most, the causes of death are unknown as fewer than 30% of Ethiopia's births and deaths ...

  1. A comprehensive assessment of maternal deaths in Argentina: translating multicentre collaborative research into action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Silvina; Karolinski, Ariel; Romero, Mariana; Mercer, Raúl

    2007-08-01

    To perform a comprehensive assessment of maternal mortality in Argentina, the ultimate purpose being to strengthen the surveillance system and reorient reproductive health policies to prevent maternal deaths. Our multicentre population-based study combining qualitative and quantitative methodologies included a descriptive analysis of under-registration and distribution of causes of death, a case-control study to identify risk factors in health-care delivery and verbal autopsies to analyse social determinants associated with maternal deaths. A total of 121 maternal deaths occurred during 2002. The most common causes were abortion complications (27.4%), haemorrhage (22.1%), infection/sepsis (9.5%), hypertensive disorders (8.4%) and other causes (32.6%). Under-registration was 9.5% for maternal deaths (n = 95) and 15.4% for late maternal deaths (n = 26). The probability of dying was 10 times greater in the absence of essential obstetric care, active emergency care and qualified staff, and doubled with every 10-year increase in age. Other contributing factors included delays in recognizing "alarm signals"; reluctance in seeking care owing to desire to hide an induced abortion; delays in receiving timely treatment due to misdiagnosis or lack of supplies; and delays in referral/transportation in rural areas. A combination of methodologies is required to improve research on and understanding of maternal mortality via the systematic collection of health surveillance data. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive intervention to address public health and human rights issues in maternal mortality, and our results contribute to the consensus-building necessary to improve the existing surveillance system and prevention strategies.

  2. Maternal Deaths in 1990 at Kamuzu Central Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    obstetric complication of pregnancy, labour or the puerperium. .... A) Deaths from puerperal sepsis, excluding abortion -. There were 24 ... an intrauterine death, complicated by prolonged rupture of .... and vaginal tears are inevitable unless a generous incision in the lower ... health institutions if they can see that the outcome.

  3. Revealing the burden of maternal mortality: a probabilistic model for determining pregnancy-related causes of death from verbal autopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desta Teklay

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substantial reductions in maternal mortality are called for in Millennium Development Goal 5 (MDG-5, thus assuming that maternal mortality is measurable. A key difficulty is attributing causes of death for the many women who die unaided in developing countries. Verbal autopsy (VA can elicit circumstances of death, but data need to be interpreted reliably and consistently to serve as global indicators. Recent developments in probabilistic modelling of VA interpretation are adapted and assessed here for the specific circumstances of pregnancy-related death. Methods A preliminary version of the InterVA-M probabilistic VA interpretation model was developed and refined with adult female VA data from several sources, and then assessed against 258 additional VA interviews from Burkina Faso. Likely causes of death produced by the model were compared with causes previously determined by local physicians. Distinction was made between free-text and closed-question data in the VA interviews, to assess the added value of free-text material on the model's output. Results Following rationalisation between the model and physician interpretations, cause-specific mortality fractions were broadly similar. Case-by-case agreement between the model and any of the reviewing physicians reached approximately 60%, rising to approximately 80% when cases with a discrepancy were reviewed by an additional physician. Cardiovascular disease and malaria showed the largest differences between the methods, and the attribution of infections related to pregnancy also varied. The model estimated 30% of deaths to be pregnancy-related, of which half were due to direct causes. Data derived from free-text made no appreciable difference. Conclusion InterVA-M represents a potentially valuable new tool for measuring maternal mortality in an efficient, consistent and standardised way. Further development, refinement and validation are planned. It could become a routine

  4. Alcohol consumption in relation to maternal deaths from induced-abortions in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asamoah Benedict O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The fight against maternal deaths has gained attention as the target date for Millennium Development Goal 5 approaches. Induced-abortion is one of the leading causes of maternal deaths in developing countries which hamper this effort. In Ghana, alcohol consumption and unwanted pregnancies are on the ascendancy. We examined the association between alcohol consumption and maternal mortality from induced-abortion. We further analyzed the factors that lie behind the alcohol consumption patterns in the study population. Method The data we used was extracted from the Ghana Maternal Health Survey 2007. This was a national survey conducted across the 10 administrative regions of Ghana. The survey identified 4203 female deaths through verbal autopsy, among which 605 were maternal deaths in the 12 to 49 year-old age group. Analysis was done using Statistical software IBM SPSS Statistics 20. A case control study design was used. Cross-tabulations and logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between the different variables. Results Alcohol consumption was significantly associated with abortion-related maternal deaths. Women who had ever consumed alcohol (OR adjusted 2.6, 95% CI 1.38–4.87, frequent consumers (OR adjusted 2.6, 95% CI 0.89–7.40 and occasional consumers (OR adjusted 2.7, 95% CI 1.29–5.46 were about three times as likely to die from abortion-related causes compared to those who abstained from alcohol. Maternal age, marital status and educational level were found to have a confounding effect on the observed association. Conclusion Policy actions directed toward reducing abortion-related deaths should consider alcohol consumption, especially among younger women. Policy makers in Ghana should consider increasing the legal age for alcohol consumption. We suggest that information on the health risks posed by alcohol and abortion be disseminated to communities in the informal sector where

  5. Continuing with "…a heavy heart" - consequences of maternal death in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Rohini; Ogwang, Sheila; Karuga, Robinson; Rajan, Radha; Kes, Aslihan; Odhiambo, Frank O; Laserson, Kayla; Schaffer, Kathleen

    2015-05-06

    This study analyzes the consequences of maternal death to households in Western Kenya, specifically, neonatal and infant survival, childcare and schooling, disruption of daily household activities, the emotional burden on household members, and coping mechanisms. The study is a combination of qualitative analysis with matched and unmatched quantitative analysis using surveillance and survey data. Between September 2011 and March 2013 all households in the study area with a maternal death were surveyed. Data were collected on the demographic characteristics of the deceased woman; household socio-economic status; a history of the pregnancy that led to the death; schooling experiences of surviving school-age children; and disruption to household functioning due to the maternal death. These data were supplemented by in-depth and focus group discussions. Quantitative data on neonatal and infant survival from a demographic surveillance system in the study area were also used. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted with the quantitative data, and qualitative data were analyzed through text analysis using NVivo. More than three-quarters of deceased women performed most household tasks when healthy. After the maternal death, the responsibility for these tasks fell primarily on the deceased's husbands, mothers, and mothers-in-law. Two-thirds of the individuals from households that suffered a maternal death had to shift into another household. Most children had to move away, mostly to their grandmother's home. About 37% of live births to women who died of maternal causes survived till age 1 year, compared to 65% of live births to a matched sample of women who died of non-maternal causes and 93% of live births to surviving women. Older, surviving children missed school or did not have enough time for schoolwork, because of increased housework or because the loss of household income due to the maternal death meant school fees could not be paid. Respondents expressed

  6. Reliability of maternal recall and reporting of child births and deaths in rural Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Malla R; Levine, Richard J; Wasif, Nader K; Clemens, John D

    2003-04-01

    Demographic indicators such as fertility rates and infant mortality rates are often measured in census surveys by interviewing mothers to obtain their pregnancy histories and child deaths. The validity of such surveys depends upon accurate recall of histories, truthful reporting of events and understanding of the questions posed. To measure the reliability of maternal reporting, two census surveys conducted in a rural Egyptian population were compared. Women between 15 and 55 years of age residing in 20 villages were asked their histories of live births, stillbirths and child deaths. An identical set of questions was posed 2 years later. Twice-monthly home visits were conducted in the intervening 2-year interval to identify accurately any new births, stillbirths and deaths occurring in the population. The maternal reports from the first census were combined with the prospectively identified births, stillbirths and deaths and compared with the maternal reports from the second census. For 1502 women, the discrepancies in the total number of births, stillbirths and child deaths reported between the two surveys were 0.6%, 4% and 0.6% respectively. However, when the consistency of responses was analysed, the proportion of women with discordant responses was 10%, 6% and 7% for the same measures. These results suggest that, despite the large number of births and deaths that women may experience in developing countries, maternal interviews provide reliable responses that can be used to estimate mortality and fertility rates in settings where vital records are incomplete or unreliable.

  7. Indirect cost of maternal deaths in the WHO African Region in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirigia, Joses Muthuri; Mwabu, Germano Mwige; Orem, Juliet Nabyonga; Muthuri, Rosenabi Deborah Karimi

    2014-08-31

    An estimated 147,741 maternal deaths occurred in 2010 in 45 of the 47 countries in the African Region of the World Health Organization (WHO). The objective of this study was to estimate the indirect cost of maternal deaths in the Region to provide data for use in advocacy for increased domestic and external investment in multisectoral policy interventions to curb maternal mortality. This study used the cost-of-illness method to estimate the indirect cost of maternal mortality, i.e. the loss in non-health gross domestic product (GDP) attributable to maternal deaths. Estimates on maternal mortality for 2010 from Trends in maternal mortality: 1990 to 2010 published by WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA and the World Bank were used in these calculations. Values for future non-health GDP lost were converted into their present values by applying a 3% discount rate. One-way sensitivity analysis at 5% and 10% discount rates assessed the impact on non-health GDP loss. Indirect cost analysis was undertaken for the countries, categorized under three income groups. Group 1 consisted of nine high and upper middle income countries, Group 2 of 12 lower middle income countries, and Group 3 of 26 low income countries. Estimates for Seychelles in Group 1 and South Sudan in Group 3 were not provided in the source used. The 147,741 maternal deaths that occurred in 45 countries in the African Region in 2010 resulted in a total non-health GDP loss of Int$ 4.5 billion (PPP). About 24.5% of the loss was in Group 1 countries, 44.9% in Group 2 countries and 30.6% in Group 3 countries. This translated into losses in non-health GDP of Int$ 139,219, Int$ 35,440 and Int$ 16,397 per maternal death, respectively, for the three groups. Using discount rates of 5% and 10% reduced the total non-health GDP loss by 19.1% and 47.7%, respectively. Maternal mortality is responsible for a noteworthy level of non-health GDP loss among the countries in the African Region. There is urgent need, therefore, to increase

  8. Annual Report of the Perinatology Committee, Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2015: Proposal of urgent measures to reduce maternal deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Satoru; Takeda, Jun; Murakami, Keisuke; Kubo, Takahiko; Hamada, Hiromi; Murakami, Maki; Makino, Shintaro; Itoh, Hiroaki; Ohba, Takashi; Naruse, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kanayama, Naohiro; Matsubara, Shigeki; Sameshima, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2017-01-01

    Perinatal care in Japan has progressed rapidly in recent decades, remarkably reducing maternal, perinatal and neonatal mortality rates. This is attributable not only to the sustained efforts and dedication of past obstetricians and midwives, but also to the collective results achieved by the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and healthcare administration, including research on advanced medical care, education, medical care improvements and establishing perinatal care centers. Although the maternal mortality rate was in steady decline until 2007 (3.1/100 000 births), it repeatedly fluctuated thereafter, plateauing at 3.4 per 100 000 births in 2013 and 2.7 per 100 000 births in 2014. Thus, the Perinatology Committee has analyzed the current situation of maternal deaths and has proposed countermeasures to reduce such death. The items deliberated upon by related subcommittees in 2015 are presented herein. The addition of indications for 'fibrinogen concentrate', 'eptacog alfa' and approval of the PGE2 vaginal tablet for cervical ripening were discussed in the subcommittee for unapproved drug review. Thus, a request for approval for health insurance coverage was submitted to the 'Evaluation committee on unapproved or off-label drugs with high medical needs' of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Maternal and late-maternal deaths from suicide during the 10 years from 2005 to 2014 in Tokyo's 23 wards were jointly examined with the Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office. The suicide rate in the 23 wards is very high, at 8.7 per 100 000 births. Thus, the subcommittee for the reduction of maternal death discussed countermeasures for the eradication of maternal death and maternal suicide and the revision of death certificates. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Fetal growth and later maternal death, cardiovascular disease and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob A; Paidas, Michael J; Triche, Elizabeth W

    2012-01-01

    Low birthweight of the offspring has been associated with increased risk of early death and ischemic heart disease in the mother. However, other measurements of fetal growth than the basic birthweight are more accurate. We investigated the relation between the standardized birthweight by gestatio......Low birthweight of the offspring has been associated with increased risk of early death and ischemic heart disease in the mother. However, other measurements of fetal growth than the basic birthweight are more accurate. We investigated the relation between the standardized birthweight...... by gestational age and gender and the ponderal index and the mother's subsequent mortality and cardiovascular morbidity....

  10. Maternal deaths in South Africa | Moodley | Obstetrics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data has also no been subjected to statistical analysis. The “big five” causes of death are non-pregnancy related infections (mainly AIDS), complications of hypertension in pregnancy, obstetric haemorrhage, pregnancy-related sepsis and pre-existing medical conditions. Women 35 years and older were at greater risk of ...

  11. Audit of Maternal Mortality Ratio and Causes of Maternal Deaths in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    were collected from the files of the hospitalized pregnant women in the hospital. There were 38 maternal ... Mortality Ratio (MMR) is the “number of women died while ..... ASJOG, March. 2005. 4. ... World Bank, Washington DC. March 2011.

  12. [Historical Review of Cesarean Section at King's Maternity Hospital and Midwifery School Zagreb 1908-1918].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habek, D; Kruhak, V

    2016-04-01

    This article presents a historical review of the performance of 23 cesarean sections at the King’s Maternity Hospital and Midwifery School in Zagreb during the 1908-1918 period. Following prenatal screening by midwives and doctors in the hospital, deliveries in high risk pregnant women were performed at maternity hospitals, not at home. The most common indication for cesarean section was narrowed pelvis in 65.2% of women, while postpartum febrile condition was the most common complication in the puerperium. Maternal mortality due to sepsis after the procedure was 8.69% and overall perinatal mortality was 36.3% (stillbirths and early neonatal deaths).

  13. Community-Based Cause of Death Study Linked to Maternal and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Community-Based Cause of Death Study Linked to Maternal and Child ... newborn, and child health "Know-Do Gap" in Ethiopia by piloting a low-cost, ... platform to decrease the cost, while increasing the quality and feasibility, of COD surveys.

  14. Geographic Distribution of Maternal Group B Streptococcus Colonization and Infant Death During Birth Hospitalization: Eastern Wisconsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica J. F. Kram

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Maternal group B Streptococcus (GBS can be transmitted from a colonized mother to newborn during vaginal delivery and may or may not contribute to infant death. This study aimed to explore the geographic distribution and risk factors of maternal GBS colonization and infant death during birth hospitalization. Methods: We retrospectively studied mothers with live birth(s in a large eastern Wisconsin hospital system from 2007 through 2013. Associations between maternal and neonatal variables, GBS colonization and infant death were examined using chi-squared, Mann-Whitney U and t-tests. Multivariable logistic regression models also were developed. Results: Study population (N = 99,305 had a mean age of 28.1 years and prepregnancy body mass index (BMI of 26.7 kg/m2; 64.0% were white, 59.2% married, 39.3% nulliparous and 25.7% cesarean delivery. Mean gestational age was 39.0 weeks. Rate of maternal GBS colonization (22.3% overall was greater in blacks (34.1% vs. 20.1% in whites, P < 0.0001, unmarried women (25.5% vs. 20.0% married, P < 0.0001, women with sexually transmitted or other genital infections (P < 0.0001 and residents of ZIP code group 532XX (P < 0.0001, and was associated with increasing BMI (P < 0.0001. All predictors of colonization were significant on multivariable analysis. Rate of infant death was 5.7 deaths/1,000 live births (n = 558 excluding lethal anomalies and stillbirths and was negatively associated with maternal GBS colonization (P < 0.0001. On multivariable analysis, 532XX ZIP code group, lower gestational age, preterm labor, hyaline membrane disease, normal spontaneous vaginal delivery, hydramnios, oligohydramnios and absence of maternal GBS were associated with infant death. Conclusions: Geographic characteristics were associated with infant death and maternal GBS colonization. Further research is needed to determine if increased surveillance or treatment of mothers colonized with GBS decreases the risk of infant

  15. Review: Maternal health and the placental microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Elise; Gomez-Arango, Luisa F; Barrett, Helen L; Nitert, Marloes Dekker

    2017-06-01

    Over the past decade, the role of the microbiome in regulating metabolism, immune function and behavior in humans has become apparent. It has become clear that the placenta is not a sterile organ, but rather has its own endogenous microbiome. The composition of the placental microbiome is distinct from that of the vagina and has been reported to resemble the oral microbiome. Compared to the gut microbiome, the placental microbiome exhibits limited microbial diversity. This review will focus on the current understanding of the placental microbiota in normal healthy pregnancy and also in disease states including preterm birth, chorioamnionitis and maternal conditions such as obesity, gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia. Factors known to alter the composition of the placental microbiota will be discussed in the final part of this review. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. [Maternal death from severe malaria due to Plasmodium vivax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arróspide, Nancy; Espinoza, Máximo Manuel; Miranda-Choque, Edwin; Mayta-Tristán, Percy; Legua, Pedro; Cabezas, César

    2016-06-01

    Here we describe the case of a 19-year-old woman, in her 29th week of gestation, who was from Llumpe (Ancash, Peru) and had a history of traveling to Chanchamayo (Junín, Peru) and Rinconada (Ancash, Peru). The patient presented at Chacas Hospital (Chacas, Ancash, Peru) with general malaise, dehydration, respiratory distress, jaundice, the sensation of thermal rise, and abdominal pain. Analysis of blood smears revealed 60% hemoparasites. She was transferred to Ramos Guardia Hospital (Huaraz, Peru) where she presented increasing respiratory distress, choluria, hematuria, and decreased urine output, moreover she was positive for Plasmodium. From there she was transferred to Cayetano Heredia Hospital (Lima, Peru), where she was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with multiple organ failure, stillbirth, and leading to death. She underwent mechanical ventilation, was administered clindamycin, and was prescribed quinine, which she did not received due a lack by availability. The evolution of the illness was torpid, and she ultimately developed multiple organ failure and died. Plasmodium vivax infection was confirmed. Accordingly, we emphasize the importance of improving our diagnostic capabilities and management techniques to enable clinicians to provide adequate and timely treatment.

  17. Parental death and bipolar disorder: a robust association was found in early maternal suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsuchiya, Kenji; Agerbo, Esben; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2005-01-01

    of a conditional logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 947 subjects with bipolar disorder and 47,350 controls, those having experienced the parental suicide were significantly associated with an increased risk for BPD (incidence rate ratios: 1.83 [95% confidence interval: 1.07 to 3.12] for paternal suicide......, 3.44 [1.97 to 6.00] for maternal suicide), whereas the non-suicidal death of parents showed no such association. Those having experienced maternal suicide at some point before reaching 10 years of age were seven times as likely to develop bipolar disorder. LIMITATIONS: The cohort members were...

  18. Maternal rhabdomyolysis and twin fetal death associated with gestational diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Joan T; Schwartz, Nadav

    2013-08-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare, transient complication of pregnancy typically characterized by polyuria and polydipsia that may lead to mild electrolyte abnormalities. More severe sequelae of gestational diabetes insipidus are uncommon. We present a case of a 25-year-old woman at 23 weeks of gestation in a dichorionic-diamniotic twin pregnancy who developed severe symptomatic gestational diabetes insipidus complicated by rhabdomyolysis and death of both fetuses. Maternal rhabdomyolysis caused by gestational diabetes insipidus is extremely rare. Early recognition and treatment of gestational diabetes insipidus is necessary to prevent maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality.

  19. Causes of death among females-investigating beyond maternal causes: a community-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Weldearegawi, Berhe; Aregay, Alemseged; Tesfay, Fisaha Haile; Abreha, Loko; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Bezabih, Afework Mulugeta

    2014-09-10

    In developing countries, investigating mortality levels and causes of death among all age female population despite the childhood and maternal related deaths is important to design appropriate and tailored interventions and to improve survival of female residents. Under Kilite-Awlealo Health and Demographic Surveillance System, we investigated mortality rates and causes of death in a cohort of female population from 1st of January 2010 to 31st of December 2012. At the baseline, 33,688 females were involved for the prospective follow-up study. Households under the study were updated every six months by fulltime surveillance data collectors to identify vital events, including deaths. Verbal Autopsy (VA) data were collected by separate trained data collectors for all identified deaths in the surveillance site. Trained physicians assigned underlining causes of death using the 10th edition of International Classification of Diseases (ICD). We assessed overall, age- and cause-specific mortality rates per 1000 person-years. Causes of death among all deceased females and by age groups were ranked based on cause specific mortality rates. Analysis was performed using Stata Version 11.1. During the follow-up period, 105,793.9 person-years of observation were generated, and 398 female deaths were recorded. This gave an overall mortality rate of 3.76 (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.41, 4.15) per 1,000 person-years. The top three broad causes of death were infectious and parasitic diseases (1.40 deaths per 1000 person-years), non-communicable diseases (0.98 deaths per 1000 person-years) and external causes (0.36 per 1000 person-years). Most deaths among reproductive age female were caused by Human Deficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV/AIDS) and tuberculosis (0.14 per 1000 person-years for each cause). Pregnancy and childbirth related causes were responsible for few deaths among women of reproductive age--3 out of 73 deaths (4.1%) or 5.34 deaths per 1,000 person

  20. The maternal health outcomes of paid maternity leave: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Zoe; Garrett, Cameryn C; Hewitt, Belinda; Keogh, Louise; Hocking, Jane S; Kavanagh, Anne M

    2015-04-01

    Paid maternity leave has become a standard benefit in many countries throughout the world. Although maternal health has been central to the rationale for paid maternity leave, no review has specifically examined the effect of paid maternity leave on maternal health. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of studies that examine the association between paid maternity leave and maternal health. We conducted a comprehensive search of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Sociological Abstracts) and Google Scholar. We searched websites of relevant organisations, reference lists of key papers and journals, and citation indices for additional studies including those not in refereed journals. There were no language restrictions. Studies were included if they compared paid maternity leave versus no paid maternity leave, or different lengths of paid leave. Data were extracted and an assessment of bias was performed independently by authors. Seven studies were identified, with participants from Australia, Sweden, Norway, USA, Canada, and Lebanon. All studies used quantitative methodologies, including cohort, cross-sectional, and repeated cross-sectional designs. Outcomes included mental health and wellbeing, general health, physical wellbeing, and intimate partner violence. The four studies that examined leave at an individual level showed evidence of maternal health benefits, whereas the three studies conducting policy-level comparisons reported either no association or evidence of a negative association. The synthesis of the results suggested that paid maternity leave provided maternal health benefits, although this varied depending on the length of leave. This has important implications for public health and social policy. However, all studies were subject to confounding bias and many to reverse causation. Given the small number of studies and the methodological limitations of the evidence, longitudinal studies are

  1. A review of cultural influence on maternal mortality in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Emily C

    2013-05-01

    identify research examining the effect of culture on maternal mortality rates. literature review of CINAHL, Cochrane, PsychInfo, OVID Medline and Web of Science databases. developing countries with typically higher rates of maternal mortality. women, birth attendants, family members, nurse midwives, health-care workers, and community members. reviews, qualitative and mixed-methods research have identified components of culture that have a direct impact on maternal mortality. Examples of culture are given in the text and categorised according to the way in which they impact maternal mortality. cultural customs, practices, beliefs and values profoundly influence women's behaviours during the perinatal period and in some cases increase the likelihood of maternal death in childbirth. The four ways in which culture may increase MMR are as follows: directly harmful acts, inaction, use of care and social status. understanding the specifics of how the culture surrounding childbirth contributes to maternal mortality can assist nurses, midwives and other health-care workers in providing culturally competent care and designing effective programs to help decrease MMR, especially in the developing world. Interventions designed without accounting for these cultural factors are likely to be less effective in reducing maternal mortality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Death During Simulation: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Benjamin J; DeMaria, Samuel; Katz, Daniel; Heller, Joshua A; Goldberg, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    One of the goals of simulation is to teach subjects critical skills and knowledge applicable to live encounters, without the risk of harming actual patients. Although simulation education has surged in medical training over the last two decades, several ethically challenging educational methods have arisen. Simulated death has arisen as one of these challenging issues and currently there is no consensus regarding how to best manage this controversial topic in the simulated environment. The goal of this review is to analyze how simulated mortality has been used and discover whether or not this tool is beneficial to learners. In May 2016, the authors performed a literature search on both Pubmed and the Cochrane database using multiple variations of keywords; they then searched bibliographies and related articles. There were 901 articles acquired in the initial search. The authors eliminated articles that were not relevant to the subject matter. After adding articles from bibliographies and related articles, the authors included the 43 articles cited in this article. As a result, the authors of this article believe that death, when used appropriately in simulation, can be an effective teaching tool and can be used in a responsible manner.

  3. Immunization safety review: vaccinations and sudden unexpected death in infancy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Immunization Safety Review Committee; Stratton, Kathleen R

    2003-01-01

    ...), and neonatal death (infant death, whether sudden or not, during the first 4 weeks of life). Based on this review, the committee concluded that the evidence favors rejection of a causal relationship between some vaccines and SIDS...

  4. Procedures in child deaths in The Netherlands: a comparison with child death review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzen, S.; Petter, J.; L'Hoir, M.P.; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.; Need, A.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Child Death Review (CDR) is a method in which every child death is systematically and multidisciplinary examined to (1) improve death statistics, (2) identify factors that give direction for prevention, (3) translate the results into possible interventions, and (4) support families. The aim of

  5. Procedures in child deaths in The Netherlands : a comparison with child death review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoeff-Gijzen, Sandra; Petter, Jessica; L'Hoir, Monique P.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; Need, Ariana

    2017-01-01

    Aim Child Death Review (CDR) is a method in which every child death is systematically and multidisciplinary examined to (1) improve death statistics, (2) identify factors that give direction for prevention, (3) translate the results into possible interventions, and (4) support families. The aim of

  6. Review of Policies and Programs for Reducing Maternal Mortality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to determine the status of maternal health in Cross River State, a state in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria with high rate of maternal mortality. The study consisted of analysis of clinical data, desk reviews of published and unpublished materials and interviews with policymakers and service providers ...

  7. Innova ng for Maternal and Child Health in Africa

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Innova ng for Maternal and Child Health in Africa ... spacing are cri cal to maternal and child health programming. It is ... APHRC is the only African ins tu on ... Maternal death review and outcomes: An assessment in Lagos State, Nigeria.

  8. A review on child and maternal health status of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. M. Mahmudur Rahman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Child and maternal nutritional and health status is a very much concerning issue of Bangladesh. To summarize the specific conditions of Bangladeshi child and maternal health and related issues. This is a descriptive review and overall analysis and description of the literature was done regarding child and maternal health of the general population living in Bangladesh. The evidence reflected that infant, child, and maternal mortality in Bangladesh have declined gradually at least over the past years. It is found that infant mortality 2 times, child mortality 6 times, and under five mortality rates 3 times declined comparatively than the last two decades but it is noted that maternal assassination circumstance has not declined. Knowledge on child and maternal health carries an important role in education. Health knowledge index significantly improve child and maternal health although differentially. It is obvious that poverty is one of the root causes that have led to a high child and maternal mortalities and morbidities faced by the people of Bangladesh. The requirement for socio economic relief for those living in rural Bangladesh remains one of the core issues. Recently, Bangladesh is successfully declining the total number of childhood and nutrition related mortalities despites various complexities, but maternal health status is not improving at the same pace. Nongovernment and government funded organizations and policymakers should come forward for running some effective programs to conquer the situation completely in Bangladesh.

  9. Maternal-related deaths and impoverishment among adolescent girls in India and Niger: findings from a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verguet, Stéphane; Nandi, Arindam; Filippi, Véronique; Bundy, Donald A P

    2016-09-26

    High levels of maternal mortality and large associated inequalities exist in low-income and middle-income countries. Adolescent pregnancies remain common, and pregnant adolescent women face elevated risks of maternal mortality and poverty. We examined the distribution across socioeconomic groups of maternal deaths and impoverishment among adolescent girls (15-19 years old) in Niger, which has the highest total fertility rate globally, and India, which has the largest number of maternal deaths. In Niger and India, among adolescent girls, we estimated the distribution per income quintile of: the number of maternal deaths; and the impoverishment, measured by calculating the number of cases of catastrophic health expenditure incurred, caused by complicated pregnancies. We also examined the potential impact on maternal deaths and poverty of increasing adolescent girls' level of education by 1 year. We used epidemiological and cost inputs sourced from surveys and the literature. The number of maternal deaths would be larger among the poorer adolescents than among the richer adolescents in Niger and India. Impoverishment would largely incur among the richer adolescents in Niger and among the poorer adolescents in India. Increasing educational attainment of adolescent girls might avert both a large number of maternal deaths and a significant number of cases of catastrophic health expenditure in the 2 countries. Adolescent pregnancies can lead to large equity gaps and substantial impoverishment in low-income and middle-income countries. Increasing female education can reduce such inequalities and provide financial risk protection and poverty alleviation to adolescent girls. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Cholera in Pregnancy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Fetal, Neonatal, and Maternal Mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen-Toan Tran

    Full Text Available Maternal infection with cholera may negatively affect pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this research is to systematically review the literature and determine the risk of fetal, neonatal and maternal death associated with cholera during pregnancy.Medline, Global Health Library, and Cochrane Library databases were searched using the key terms cholera and pregnancy for articles published in any language and at any time before August 2013 to quantitatively summarize estimates of fetal, maternal, and neonatal mortality. 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated for each selected study. Random-effect non-linear logistic regression was used to calculate pooled rates and 95% CIs by time period. Studies from the recent period (1991-2013 were compared with studies from 1969-1990. Relative risk (RR estimates and 95% CIs were obtained by comparing mortality of selected recent studies with published national normative data from the closest year.The meta-analysis included seven studies that together involved 737 pregnant women with cholera from six countries. The pooled fetal death rate for 4 studies during 1991-2013 was 7.9% (95% CIs 5.3-10.4, significantly lower than that of 3 studies from 1969-1990 (31.0%, 95% CIs 25.2-36.8. There was no difference in fetal death rate by trimester. The pooled neonatal death rate for 1991-2013 studies was 0.8% (95% CIs 0.0-1.6, and 6.4% (95% CIs 0.0-20.8 for 1969-1990. The pooled maternal death rate for 1991-2013 studies was 0.2% (95% CIs 0.0-0.7, and 5.0% (95% CIs 0.0-16.0 for 1969-1990. Compared with published national mortality estimates, the RR for fetal death of 5.8 (95% CIs 2.9-11.3 was calculated for Haiti (2013, 1.8 (95% CIs 0.3-10.4 for Senegal (2007, and 2.6 (95% CIs 0.5-14.9 for Peru (1991; there were no significant differences in the RR for neonatal or maternal death.Results are limited by the inconsistencies found across included studies but suggest that maternal cholera is associated with adverse

  11. Communication about HIV and death: Maternal reports of primary school-aged children's questions after maternal HIV disclosure in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Tamsen J; Mitchell, Joanie; Lubbe, Anina M; Stein, Alan; Tomlinson, Mark; Bland, Ruth M

    2017-01-01

    Children's understanding of HIV and death in epidemic regions is under-researched. We investigated children's death-related questions post maternal HIV-disclosure. Secondary aims examined characteristics associated with death-related questions and consequences for children's mental health. HIV-infected mothers (N = 281) were supported to disclose their HIV status to their children (6-10 years) in an uncontrolled pre-post intervention evaluation. Children's questions post-disclosure were collected by maternal report, 1-2 weeks post-disclosure. 61/281 children asked 88 death-related questions, which were analysed qualitatively. Logistic regression analyses examined characteristics associated with death-related questions. Using the parent-report Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL), linear regression analysis examined differences in total CBCL problems by group, controlling for baseline. Children's questions were grouped into three themes: 'threats'; 'implications' and 'clarifications'. Children were most concerned about the threat of death, mother's survival, and prior family deaths. In multivariate analysis variables significantly associated with asking death-related questions included an absence of regular remittance to the mother (AOR 0.25 [CI 0.10, 0.59] p = 0.002), mother reporting the child's initial reaction to disclosure being "frightened" (AOR 6.57 [CI 2.75, 15.70] p=financial support to the family may facilitate or inhibit discussions about death post-disclosure. Communication about death did not have immediate negative consequences on child behaviour according to maternal report. In sub-Saharan Africa, given exposure to death at young ages, meeting children's informational needs could increase their resilience. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective effect of pregnancy in rural South Africa: questioning the concept of "indirect cause" of maternal death.

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    Michel Garenne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measurement of the level and composition of maternal mortality depends on the definition used, with inconsistencies leading to inflated rates and invalid comparisons across settings. This study investigates the differences in risk of death for women in their reproductive years during and outside the maternal risk period (pregnancy, delivery, puerperium, focusing on specific causes of infectious, non-communicable and external causes of death after separating out direct obstetrical causes. METHODS: Data on all deaths of women aged 15-49 years that occurred in the Agincourt sub-district between 1992 and 2010 were obtained from the Agincourt health and socio-demographic surveillance system (HDSS located in rural South Africa. Causes of death were assessed using a validated verbal autopsy instrument. Analysis included 2170 deaths, of which 137 occurred during the maternal risk period. FINDINGS: Overall, women had significantly lower mortality during the maternal risk period than outside it (age-standardized RR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.63-0.89. This was true in most age groups with the exception of adolescents aged 15-19 years where the risk of death was higher. Mortality from most causes, other than obstetric causes, was lower during the maternal risk period except for malaria, cardiovascular diseases and violence where there were no differences. Lower mortality was significant for HIV/AIDS (RR = 0.29, P<0.0001, cancers (RR = 0.10, P<0.023, and accidents (RR = 0, P<0.0001. INTERPRETATION: In this rural setting typical of much of Southern Africa, pregnancy was largely protective against the risk of death, most likely because of a strong selection effect amongst those women who conceived successfully. The concept of indirect cause of maternal death needs to be re-examined.

  13. Procedures in child deaths in The Netherlands: a comparison with child death review

    OpenAIRE

    Knoeff-Gijzen, Sandra; Petter, Jessica; L'Hoir, Monique P.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; Need, Ariana

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Child Death Review (CDR) is a method in which every child death is systematically and multidisciplinary examined to (1) improve death statistics, (2) identify factors that give direction for prevention, (3) translate the results into possible interventions, and (4) support families. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent procedures of organizations involved in the (health) care for children in The Netherlands cover these four objectives of CDR. Subject and methods: Organiz...

  14. Timing of maternal death: Levels, trends, and ecological correlates using sibling data from 34 sub-Saharan African countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Merdad

    Full Text Available Millennium Development Goal 5 has not been universally achieved, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Understanding whether maternal deaths occur during pregnancy, childbirth, or puerperium is important to effectively plan maternal health programs and allocate resources. Our main research objectives are to (1 describe the proportions and rates of mortality for the antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum periods; (2 document how these trends vary by sub-region; and (3 investigate ecological correlations between these rates and maternal care interventions. We used data from the Demographic and Health Survey program, which comprises 84 surveys from 34 sub-Saharan African countries conducted between 1990 and 2014. We calculated age-standardized maternal mortality rates and time-specific maternal mortality rates and proportions, and we assessed correlations with maternal care coverage. We found high levels of maternal mortality in all three periods. Time-specific maternal mortality rates varied by country and region, with some showing an orderly decline in all three periods and others exhibiting alarming increases in antepartum and postpartum mortality. Ecological analysis showed that antenatal care coverage was significantly associated with low antepartum mortality, whereas the presence of a skilled attendant at childbirth was significantly associated with low postpartum mortality. In sub-Saharan Africa, maternal deaths occur at high rates in all three risk periods, and vary substantially by country and region. The provision of maternal care is a predictor of time-specific maternal mortality. These results confirm the need for country-specific interventions during the continuum of care to achieve the global commitment to eliminating preventable maternal mortality.

  15. Increase in maternal death-related venous thromboembolism during pregnancy in Japan (2010-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Katsuragi, Shinji; Osato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Junichi; Nakata, Masahiko; Murakoshi, Takeshi; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Kanayama, Naohiro; Ishiwata, Isamu; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to understand the current circumstances of maternal-death-related venous thromboembolism (MD-VTE) in Japan. We retrospectively investigated the characteristics of cases of MD-VTE, and compared past and present rates of occurrence. We examined the Japanese data for MD-VTE in 2010-2013, and compared it with that from 1991-1992. MD-VTE occurred in 17 women in 1991-1992, and in 13 women in 2010-2013. The maternal mortality ratio of MD-VTE was 0.7 per 100,000 in 1991-1992 and 0.4 per 100,000 in 2010-2013. Both the maternal mortality ratio and rate of MD-VTE in 2010-2013 deceased significantly compared with 1991-1992 (PJapan. But, MD-VTE during pregnancy in 2010-2013 increased relative to 1991-1992. Future guidelines for prevention of VTE may need to extend beyond the perioperative period to decrease the incidence of MD-VTE.

  16. Reducing Maternal Deaths in Ethiopia: Results of an Intervention Programme in Southwest Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    Full Text Available In a large population in Southwest Ethiopia (population 700,000, we carried out a complex set of interventions with the aim of reducing maternal mortality. This study evaluated the effects of several coordinated interventions to help improve effective coverage and reduce maternal deaths. Together with the Ministry of Health in Ethiopia, we designed a project to strengthen the health-care system. A particular emphasis was given to upgrade existing institutions so that they could carry out Basic (BEmOC and Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric Care (CEmOC. Health institutions were upgraded by training non-clinical physicians and midwives by providing the institutions with essential and basic equipment, and by regular monitoring and supervision by staff competent in emergency obstetric work.In this implementation study, the maternal mortality ratio (MMR was the primary outcome. The study was carried out from 2010 to 2013 in three districts, and we registered 38,312 births. The MMR declined by 64% during the intervention period from 477 to 219 deaths per 100,000 live births (OR 0.46; 95% CI 0.24-0.88. The decline in MMR was higher for the districts with CEmOC, while the mean number of antenatal visits for each woman was 2.6 (Inter Quartile Range 2-4. The percentage of pregnant women who attended four or more antenatal controls increased by 20%, with the number of women who delivered at home declining by 10.5% (P<0.001. Similarly, the number of deliveries at health posts, health centres and hospitals increased, and we observed a decline in the use of traditional birth attendants. Households living near to all-weather roads had lower maternal mortality rates (MMR 220 compared with households without roads (MMR 598; OR 2.72 (95% CI 1.61-4.61.Our results show that it is possible to achieve substantial reductions in maternal mortality rates over a short period of time if the effective coverage of well-known interventions is implemented.

  17. Social Determinants of Maternal Health in Afghanistan: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafizada, Said Ahmad Maisam; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn; Labonté, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Afghanistan has a high maternal mortality rate of 400 per 100,000 live births. Although direct causes of maternal morbidity and mortality in Afghanistan include hemorrhage, obstructed labor, infection, high blood pressure, and unsafe abortion, the high burden of diseases responsible for maternal mortality arises in large part due to social determinants of health. The focus of this literature review is to examine the impact of various social determinants of health on maternal health in Afghanistan, filling an important gap in the existing literature. This narrative review was conducted using Arksey and O'Malley's framework of (1) defining the question, (2) searching the literature, (3) assessing the studies, (4) synthesizing selected evidence in context, and (5) summarizing potential programmatic implication of the context. We searched Medline, CABI global health database, and Google Scholar for relevant publications. A total of 38 articles/reports were included in this review. We found that social determinants such as maternal education, sociocultural practices, and social infrastructure have a significant impact on maternal health. Health care may be the immediate determinant, but it is influenced by other determinants that must be addressed in order to alleviate the burden on health care, as well as to achieve long-term reduction in maternal mortality. Because of the importance of social factors for maternal health outcomes, committed involvement of multiple government sectors (i.e. education, labor and social affairs, information and culture, transport and rural development among others, alongside health care) is the long-term solution to the maternal health problems in Afghanistan. National and international organizations' long-term commitment to social investment such as education, local economy, cultural change, and social infrastructure is recommended for Afghanstan and globally.

  18. Pediatric Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Matthew J; Hornby, Laura; Witteman, William; Shemie, Sam D

    2016-03-01

    Although pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death is increasing in frequency, there are no national or international donation after circulatory determination of death guidelines specific to pediatrics. This scoping review was performed to map the pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death literature, identify pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death knowledge gaps, and inform the development of national or regional pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death guidelines. Terms related to pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death were searched in Embase and MEDLINE, as well as the non-MEDLINE sources in PubMed from 1980 to May 2014. Seven thousand five hundred ninety-seven references were discovered and 85 retained for analysis. All references addressing pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death were considered. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not address pediatric patients, animal or laboratory studies, surgical techniques, and local pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death protocols. Narrative reviews and opinion articles were the most frequently discovered reference (25/85) and the few discovered studies were observational or qualitative and almost exclusively retrospective. Retained references were divided into themes and analyzed using qualitative methodology. The main discovered themes were 1) studies estimating the number of potential pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death donors and their impact on donation; 2) ethical issues in pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death; 3) physiology of the dying process after withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy; 4) cardiac pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death; and 5) neonatal pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death. Donor estimates suggest that pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death will

  19. Effect of Transient Maternal Hypotension on Apoptotic Cell Death in Foetal Rat Brain

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    Hamit Özyürek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intrauterine perfusion insufficiency induced by transient maternal hypotension has been reported to be associated with foetal brain malformations. However, the effects of maternal hypotension on apoptotic processes in the foetal brain have not been investigated experimentally during the intrauterine period. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transient maternal hypotension on apoptotic cell death in the intrauterine foetal brain. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Three-month-old female Wistar albino rats were allocated into four groups (n=5 each. The impact of hypoxic/ischemic injury induced by transient maternal hypotension on the 15th day of pregnancy (late gestation in rats was investigated at 48 (H17 group or 96 hours (H19 group after the insult. Control groups underwent the same procedure except for induction of hypotension (C17 and H17 groups. Brain sections of one randomly selected foetus from each pregnant rat were histopathologically evaluated for hypoxic/ischemic injury in the metencephalon, diencephalon, and telencephalon by terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling and active cysteine-dependent aspartate-directed protease-3 (caspase-3 positivity for cell death. Results: The number of terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (+ cells in all the areas examined was comparable in both hypotension and control groups. The H17 group had active caspase-3 (+ cells in the metencephalon and telencephalon, sparing diencephalon, whereas the C19 and H19 groups had active caspase-3 (+ cells in all three regions. The number of active caspase-3 (+ cells in the telencephalon in the H19 group was higher compared with the metencephalon and diencephalon and compared with H17 group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Our results suggest that prenatal hypoxic/ischemic injury triggers apoptotic mechanisms. Therefore, blockade of apoptotic pathways, considering the time pattern of the insult, may

  20. [The household economy: a determinant of maternal death among indigenous women in Chiapas, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Torres, María del Carmen; Cruz Burguete, Jorge Luis; Robledo Hernández, Gabriela Patricia; Montoya Gómez, Guillermo

    2006-02-01

    To assess the determining role of financial situation and gender relations on maternal mortality among Indigenous women in Chiapas, Mexico. A quantitative/qualitative study was performed by means of a survey of 158 families, as well as in-depth interviews of persons linked to cases of maternal death, community leaders from throughout the region, and focal groups composed of traditional birth attendants. Decision-making surrounding women's health within the household is a critical problem because it is entirely in the hands of the husband and his relatives. In cases of high-risk pregnancy or birth, options for seeking care outside the community become limited, so that 48.7% of all obstetric cases are assisted by traditional birth attendants, 45.3% by relatives, and 6% by the mate. The problem is compounded by the high level of marginalization and very low human development index that characterize the region under study, by women's exclusion from the ownership of goods, including land, and by the fact that 97.7% of women only speak indigenous languages. Gender inequities within Indigenous families, together with a household economy that does not cover the basic necessities, are among the factors that keep women from receiving the necessary care during their reproductive processes. Because of the low socioeconomic status these women have, decisions surrounding care during pregnancy, birth, and the puerperium take a large toll on their health and their lives.

  1. Tracing shadows: How gendered power relations shape the impacts of maternal death on living children in sub Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamin, Alicia Ely; Bazile, Junior; Knight, Lucia; Molla, Mitike; Maistrellis, Emily; Leaning, Jennifer

    2015-06-01

    Driven by the need to better understand the full and intergenerational toll of maternal mortality (MM), a mixed-methods study was conducted in four countries in sub-Saharan Africa to investigate the impacts of maternal death on families and children. The present analysis identifies gender as a fundamental driver not only of maternal, but also child health, through manifestations of gender inequity in household decision making, labor and caregiving, and social norms dictating the status of women. Focus group discussions were conducted with community members, and in depth qualitative interviews with key-informants and stakeholders, in Tanzania, Ethiopia, Malawi, and South Africa between April 2012 and October 2013. Findings highlight that socially constructed gender roles, which define mothers as caregivers and fathers as wage earners, and which limit women's agency regarding childcare decisions, among other things, create considerable gaps when it comes to meeting child nutrition, education, and health care needs following a maternal death. Additionally, our findings show that maternal deaths have differential effects on boy and girl children, and exacerbate specific risks for girl children, including early marriage, early pregnancy, and school drop-out. To combat both MM, and to mitigate impacts on children, investment in health services interventions should be complemented by broader interventions regarding social protection, as well as aimed at shifting social norms and opportunity structures regarding gendered divisions of labor and power at household, community, and society levels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Systematic review of effect of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeks Jonathan J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to provide a systematic review of the effectiveness of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality. Methods We searched published papers using Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, CINAHL, BNI, CAB ABSTRACTS, IBSS, Web of Science, LILACS and African Index Medicus from inception or at least 1982 to June 2006; searched unpublished works using National Research Register website, metaRegister and the WHO International Trial Registry portal. We hand searched major references. Selection criteria were maternity or childbearing age women, comparative study designs with concurrent controls, community-level interventions and maternal death as an outcome. We carried out study selection, data abstraction and quality assessment independently in duplicate. Results We found five cluster randomised controlled trials (RCT and eight cohort studies of community-level interventions. We summarised results as odds ratios (OR and confidence intervals (CI, combined using the Peto method for meta-analysis. Two high quality cluster RCTs, aimed at improving perinatal care practices, showed a reduction in maternal mortality reaching statistical significance (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.98. Three equivalence RCTs of minimal goal-oriented versus usual antenatal care showed no difference in maternal mortality (1.09, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.25. The cohort studies were of low quality and did not contribute further evidence. Conclusion Community-level interventions of improved perinatal care practices can bring about a reduction in maternal mortality. This challenges the view that investment in such interventions is not worthwhile. Programmes to improve maternal mortality should be evaluated using randomised controlled techniques to generate further evidence.

  3. Social Determinants of Maternal Health in Afghanistan: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Ahmad Maisam Najafizada

    2017-03-01

    Methods: This narrative review was conducted using Arksey and O’Malley’s framework of (1 defining the question, (2 searching the literature, (3 assessing the studies, (4 synthesizing selected evidence in context, and (5 summarizing potential programmatic implication of the context. We searched Medline, CABI global health database, and Google Scholar for relevant publications. Results: A total of 38 articles/reports were included in this review. We found that social determinants such as maternal education, sociocultural practices, and social infrastructure have a significant impact on maternal health. Health care may be the immediate determinant, but it is influenced by other determinants that must be addressed in order to alleviate the burden on health care, as well as to achieve long-term reduction in maternal mortality. Conclusion: Because of the importance of social factors for maternal health outcomes, committed involvement of multiple government sectors (i.e. education, labor and social affairs, information and culture, transport and rural development among others, alongside health care is the long-term solution to the maternal health problems in Afghanistan. National and international organizations’ long-term commitment to social investment such as education, local economy, cultural change, and social infrastructure is recommended for Afghanstan and globally.

  4. Review of Maternal Mortality in Ethiopia: A Story of the Past 30 Years

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Ethiopia is one of the six countries which have contributed to more than 50% of all maternal deaths across the world. This country has adopted the millennium development goals (MDGs) including reducing the maternal mortality by three-quarter, and put improvement in maternal health as one of the health ...

  5. Review of maternal deaths at Umtata General Hospital - 1981 - 1985 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The three major causes were medical conditions, hypertension and obstetric haemorrhage. Conclusion. Doctor-related, patient-related and transportation problems were identified as the main avoidable factors. Improvement in primary heaJth care, medical staffing and the transport system are the main recommendations ...

  6. A Review of the Importance of Maternal-fetal Attachment According to the Islamic Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Ghodrati; Marzieh Akbarzadeh

    2018-01-01

    Background & aim: Maternal-fetal attachment has an important effect on mother's identity as well as maternal and fetal health. Moreover, this concept is considered as a crucial issue for the improvement of children emotional development. Regarding the Islamic recommendations on maternal-fetal attachment and its correlation with maternal affection, this study was conducted to review the importance of maternal-fetal attachment according to the Islamic recommendations. Methods: This review was c...

  7. Fetal-Maternal Hemorrhage: A Case and Literature Review

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    Nino Solomonia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nearly all pregnancies include an insignificant hemorrhage of fetal blood into the maternal circulation. In some cases, the hemorrhage is large enough to compromise the fetus, resulting in fetal demise, stillbirth, or delivery of a severely anemic infant. Unfortunately, the symptoms of a significant fetal-maternal hemorrhage can be subtle, nonspecific, and difficult to identify at the time of the event. We present the case of a severely anemic newborn who was delivered in our facility with an extensive literature review.

  8. Complications of childbirth and maternal deaths in Kinshasa hospitals: testimonies from women and their families

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    Gourbin Catherine

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal mortality in Kinshasa is high despite near universal availability of antenatal care and hospital delivery. Possible explanations are poor-quality care and by delays in the uptake of care. There is, however, little information on the circumstances surrounding maternal deaths. This study describes and compares the circumstances of survivors and non survivors of severe obstetric complications. Method Semi structured interviews with 208 women who survived their obstetric complication and with the families of 110 women who died were conducted at home by three experienced nurses under the supervision of EK. All the cases were identified from twelve referral hospitals in Kinshasa after admission for a serious acute obstetric complication. Transcriptions of interviews were analysed with N-Vivo 2.0 and some categories were exported to SPSS 14.0 for further quantitative analysis. Results Testimonies showed that despite attendance at antenatal care, some women were not aware of or minimized danger signs and did not seek appropriate care. Cost was a problem; 5 deceased and 4 surviving women tried to avoid an expensive caesarean section by delivering in a health centre, although they knew the risk. The majority of surviving mothers (for whom the length of stay was known had the caesarean section on the day of admission while only about a third of those who died did so. Ten women died before the required caesarean section or blood transfusion could take place because they did not bring the money in time. Negligence and lack of staff competence contributed to the poor quality of care. Interviews revealed that patients and their families were aware of the problem, but often powerless to do anything about it. Conclusion Our findings suggest that women with serious obstetric complications have a greater chance of survival in Kinshasa if they have cash, go directly to a functioning referral hospital and have some leverage when dealing

  9. Gastrointestinal causes of sudden unexpected death: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Ritesh G; Ahmed, Saba; Pasha, Syed Bilal; Hussain, Syed Ather; Fatima, Huda; Kharoshah, Magdy A; Madadin, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Gastrointestinal conditions are a less common cause of sudden unexpected death when compared to other conditions such as cardiovascular conditions, but they are equally important. Various congenital and acquired gastrointestinal conditions that have resulted in sudden unexpected death are discussed. The possible lethal mechanisms behind each condition, along with any associated risk factors or secondary diseases, have been described. Through this article, we aim to highlight the need for physicians to prevent death in such conditions by ensuring that subclinical cases are diagnosed correctly before it is too late and by providing timely and efficacious treatment to the patient concerned. In addition, this review would certainly benefit the forensic pathologist while dealing with cases of sudden unexpected death due to gastrointestinal causes. This article is a review of the major gastrointestinal causes of sudden unexpected death. In addition, related fatal cases encountered occasionally in forensic autopsy practice are also included. There are several unusual and rare causes of life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding that may lead to sudden unexpected death to cover all the entities in detail. Nevertheless, this article is a general guide to the topic of gastrointestinal causes of sudden unexpected death.

  10. Effects of patient death on nursing staff: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Janet; Kirshbaum, Marilyn

    There were 509090 deaths recorded in England and Wales for 2008 (Office for National Statistics, 2010); of these, over 56% (260000) occurred in NHS hospitals. The death of a patient is an event that most, if not all, nursing staff will encounter during their work. This experience can elicit physical, cognitive, behavioural, spiritual and emotional responses (Parkes, 1998). The aim of this literature review is to explore how the death of patients in a hospital setting impact on nursing staff. A review of the literature was undertaken using the online databases CINAHL, Medline and PsychInfo. The search was limited to articles in the English language and those from peer-reviewed journals. Themes arising from the literature review included: the theoretical context; the emotional impact; the culture of the healthcare setting; staff's previous life experiences; and support available for healthcare staff. The death of patients does have an impact on nurses. This can affect them both in their work environment and outside of work. Education around grief theory and support from others are helpful for staff in developing strategies for coping with patient deaths.

  11. Peer Review Audit of Trauma Deaths in a Developing Country

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    Afzal Ali Jat

    2004-01-01

    Results and Conclusions: A total of 279 patients were registered in the trauma registry during the study period, including 18 trauma deaths. Peer review judged that six were preventable, seven were potentially preventable, and four were non-preventable. One patient was excluded because the record was not available for review. The proportion of preventable and potentially preventable deaths was significantly higher in our study than from developed countries. Of the multiple contributing factors identified, the most important were inadequate prehospital care, inappropriate interhospital transfer, limited hospital resources, and an absence of integrated and organized trauma care. This study summarizes the challenges faced in trauma care in a developing country.

  12. [Surrogate maternity--literature review and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilka, L; Rumpík, D; Pilka, R; Koudelka, M; Prudil, L

    2009-04-01

    This review summarizes opinions on surrogacy including internatinal and governmental organizations attitudes, as well as some religious concerns. Literature review. Reprofit International, Brno, Reproductive medicine and gynecology centre, Zlin, Department of obstetrics and gynecology, Palacky University, Olomouc. The developments in the field of assissted reproduction during the last twenty years have attracted unexpected public interest in some of its ethical and moral aspects. It is very difficult to find a uniform attitude to ethical concerns of assisted conception in plural society. Surrogate mother is defined as a woman who bears and relinquishes a child for another person. The european congress on human reproduction in Barcelona 2008 adopted following résumé on surrogacy: Public opinion has shifted to a position where surrogacy is recognized as an appropriate response to infertility in some circumstances and it is to be expected that this approach will be further strenghtened with stress on positive aspects of familiar life.

  13. Women's education level, maternal health facilities, abortion legislation and maternal deaths: a natural experiment in Chile from 1957 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Elard; Thorp, John; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastián; Romero, Camila X; Aguilera, Hernán; Ahlers, Ivonne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the main factors related to maternal mortality reduction in large time series available in Chile in context of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Time series of maternal mortality ratio (MMR) from official data (National Institute of Statistics, 1957-2007) along with parallel time series of education years, income per capita, fertility rate (TFR), birth order, clean water, sanitary sewer, and delivery by skilled attendants were analysed using autoregressive models (ARIMA). Historical changes on the mortality trend including the effect of different educational and maternal health policies implemented in 1965, and legislation that prohibited abortion in 1989 were assessed utilizing segmented regression techniques. During the 50-year study period, the MMR decreased from 293.7 to 18.2/100,000 live births, a decrease of 93.8%. Women's education level modulated the effects of TFR, birth order, delivery by skilled attendants, clean water, and sanitary sewer access. In the fully adjusted model, for every additional year of maternal education there was a corresponding decrease in the MMR of 29.3/100,000 live births. A rapid phase of decline between 1965 and 1981 (-13.29/100,000 live births each year) and a slow phase between 1981 and 2007 (-1.59/100,000 live births each year) were identified. After abortion was prohibited, the MMR decreased from 41.3 to 12.7 per 100,000 live births (-69.2%). The slope of the MMR did not appear to be altered by the change in abortion law. Increasing education level appears to favourably impact the downward trend in the MMR, modulating other key factors such as access and utilization of maternal health facilities, changes in women's reproductive behaviour and improvements of the sanitary system. Consequently, different MDGs can act synergistically to improve maternal health. The reduction in the MMR is not related to the legal status of abortion.

  14. Infection and acute respiratory distress syndrome during pregnancy: a case series of preventable maternal deaths from southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva, Akhila; Bhat, Rajeshwari G; Ramachandran, Amar; Kumar, Pratap

    2013-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is common among women admitted to obstetric intensive care units, and it contributes significantly, both directly and indirectly, to maternal deaths. We present a case series of ARDS in pregnant women caused by non-obstetric causes. The women were treated at a tertiary hospital in southern India. The striking features were delayed referral from the primary care unit and the lack of a primary diagnosis or treatment. Undiagnosed rheumatic heart disease, anemia, and malaria and H1N1 epidemics contributed to these cases of ARDS and maternal death. It is necessary to increase the awareness of evidence-based uniform protocols to tackle common medical complaints during pregnancy. Copyright © 2012 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. National estimates for maternal mortality: an analysis based on the WHO systematic review of maternal mortality and morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülmezoglu A Metin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the worldwide commitment to improving maternal health, measuring, monitoring and comparing maternal mortality estimates remain a challenge. Due to lack of data, international agencies have to rely on mathematical models to assess its global burden. In order to assist in mapping the burden of reproductive ill-health, we conducted a systematic review of incidence/prevalence of maternal mortality and morbidity. Methods We followed the standard methodology for systematic reviews. This manuscript presents nationally representative estimates of maternal mortality derived from the systematic review. Using regression models, relationships between study-specific and country-specific variables with the maternal mortality estimates are explored in order to assist further modelling to predict maternal mortality. Results Maternal mortality estimates included 141 countries and represent 78.1% of the live births worldwide. As expected, large variability between countries, and within regions and subregions, is identified. Analysis of variability according to study characteristics did not yield useful results given the high correlation with each other, with development status and region. A regression model including selected country-specific variables was able to explain 90% of the variability of the maternal mortality estimates. Among all country-specific variables selected for the analysis, three had the strongest relationships with maternal mortality: proportion of deliveries assisted by a skilled birth attendant, infant mortality rate and health expenditure per capita. Conclusion With the exception of developed countries, variability of national maternal mortality estimates is large even within subregions. It seems more appropriate to study such variation through differentials in other national and subnational characteristics. Other than region, study of country-specific variables suggests infant mortality rate, skilled birth

  16. hiv-aids related maternal mortality in benin city, ni- geria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Ofori-Adjei

    2011-06-01

    Jun 1, 2011 ... SUMMARY. Objective: To determine the causes and characteristics of maternal deaths in HIV-infected women. Design: A retrospective study of maternal deaths in a cohort of HIV-infected women. Setting: A facility-based maternal death review using case records and mortality summaries. Methods: Thirty ...

  17. A taxonomy and results from a comprehensive review of 28 maternal health voucher programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Ben W; Conlon, Claudia M; Higgs, Elizabeth S; Townsend, John W; Nahed, Matta G; Cavanaugh, Karen; Grainger, Corinne G; Okal, Jerry; Gorter, Anna C

    2013-12-01

    It is increasingly clear that Millennium Development Goal 4 and 5 will not be achieved in many low- and middle-income countries with the weakest gains among the poor. Recognizing that there are large inequalities in reproductive health outcomes, the post-2015 agenda on universal health coverage will likely generate strategies that target resources where maternal and newborn deaths are the highest. In 2012, the United States Agency for International Development convened an Evidence Summit to review the knowledge and gaps on the utilization of financial incentives to enhance the quality and uptake of maternal healthcare. The goal was to provide donors and governments of the low- and middle-income countries with evidence-informed recommendations on practice, policy, and strategies regarding the use of financial incentives, including vouchers, to enhance the demand and supply of maternal health services. The findings in this paper are intended to guide governments interested in maternal health voucher programmes with recommendations for sustainable implementation and impact. The Evidence Summit undertook a systematic review of five financing strategies. This paper presents the methods and findings for vouchers, building on a taxonomy to catalogue knowledge about voucher programme design and functionality. More than 120 characteristics under five major categories were identified: programme principles (objectives and financing); governance and management; benefits package and beneficiary targeting; providers (contracting and service pricing); and implementation arrangements (marketing, claims processing, and monitoring and evaluation). Among the 28 identified maternal health voucher programmes, common characteristics included: a stated objective to increase the use of services among the means-tested poor; contracted-out programme management; contracting either exclusively private facilities or a mix of public and private providers; prioritizing community

  18. A Taxonomy and Results from a Comprehensive Review of 28 Maternal Health Voucher Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Claudia M.; Higgs, Elizabeth S.; Townsend, John W.; Nahed, Matta G.; Cavanaugh, Karen; Grainger, Corinne G.; Okal, Jerry; Gorter, Anna C.

    2013-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that Millennium Development Goal 4 and 5 will not be achieved in many low- and middle-income countries with the weakest gains among the poor. Recognizing that there are large inequalities in reproductive health outcomes, the post-2015 agenda on universal health coverage will likely generate strategies that target resources where maternal and newborn deaths are the highest. In 2012, the United States Agency for International Development convened an Evidence Summit to review the knowledge and gaps on the utilization of financial incentives to enhance the quality and uptake of maternal healthcare. The goal was to provide donors and governments of the low- and middle-income countries with evidence-informed recommendations on practice, policy, and strategies regarding the use of financial incentives, including vouchers, to enhance the demand and supply of maternal health services. The findings in this paper are intended to guide governments interested in maternal health voucher programmes with recommendations for sustainable implementation and impact. The Evidence Summit undertook a systematic review of five financing strategies. This paper presents the methods and findings for vouchers, building on a taxonomy to catalogue knowledge about voucher programme design and functionality. More than 120 characteristics under five major categories were identified: programme principles (objectives and financing); governance and management; benefits package and beneficiary targeting; providers (contracting and service pricing); and implementation arrangements (marketing, claims processing, and monitoring and evaluation). Among the 28 identified maternal health voucher programmes, common characteristics included: a stated objective to increase the use of services among the means-tested poor; contracted-out programme management; contracting either exclusively private facilities or a mix of public and private providers; prioritizing community

  19. Maternal deaths after elective cesarean section for breech presentation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, Joke M.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Santema, Job G.; Schuitemaker, Nico W. E.; Van Roosmalen, Jos

    2007-01-01

    Background and methods. The cesarean section rate for term singleton breech babies in the Netherlands rose from 57 to 81% after the Term Breech Trial in 2000. The Dutch Maternal Mortality Committee registered and evaluated maternal mortality due to elective cesarean section for breech. Results. Four

  20. Investigating Maternal Mortality in a Public Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Maternal mortality in sub.Saharan Africa has remained high and this is a reflection of the poor quality of maternal services. Aim: To determine the causes, trends, and level of maternal mortality rate in Abakaliki, Ebonyi. Materials and Methods: This was a review of the records of all maternal deaths related to ...

  1. Maternal consumption of coffee during pregnancy and stillbirth and infant death in first year of life: prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisborg, Kirsten; Kesmodel, Ulrik; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2003-01-01

    pregnancy had an increased risk of stillbirth compared with women who did not drink coffee (odds ratio=3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 5.9). After adjustment for smoking habits and alcohol intake during pregnancy, the relative risk of stillbirth decreased slightly. Adjustment for parity, maternal age......Objective To study the association between coffee consumption during pregnancy and the risk of stillbirth and infant death in the first year of life. Design Prospective follow up study. Setting Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, 1989-96. Participants 18 478 singleton pregnancies in women...... with valid information about coffee consumption during pregnancy. Main outcome measures Stillbirth (delivery of a dead fetus at >28 weeks’ gestation) and infant death (death of a liveborn infant during the first year of life). Results Pregnant women who drank eight or more cups of coffee per day during...

  2. Preterm Birth Associated With Group B Streptococcus Maternal Colonization Worldwide: Systematic Review and Meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi-Jassir, Fiorella; Seale, Anna C; Kohli-Lynch, Maya; Lawn, Joy E; Baker, Carol J; Bartlett, Linda; Cutland, Clare; Gravett, Michael G; Heath, Paul T; Ip, Margaret; Le Doare, Kirsty; Madhi, Shabir A; Saha, Samir K; Schrag, Stephanie; Sobanjo-Ter Meulen, Ajoke; Vekemans, Johan; Rubens, Craig E

    2017-11-06

    Preterm birth complications are the leading cause of deaths among children birth in order to inform estimates of the burden of GBS. We conducted systematic literature reviews (PubMed/Medline, Embase, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS], World Health Organization Library Information System [WHOLIS], and Scopus) and sought unpublished data from investigator groups on the association of preterm birth (birth with maternal GBS colonization to be 1.21 (95% confidence interval [CI], .99-1.48; P = .061) in cohort and cross-sectional studies, and the odds ratio to be 1.85 (95% CI, 1.24-2.77; P = .003) in case-control studies. Preterm birth was associated with GBS bacteriuria in cohort studies (RR, 1.98 [95% CI, 1.45-2.69]; P birth is associated with maternal GBS colonization, especially where there is evidence of ascending infection (bacteriuria). Several biases reduce the chance of detecting an effect. Equally, however, results, including evidence for the association, may be due to confounding, which is rarely addressed in studies. Assessment of any effect on preterm delivery should be included in future maternal GBS vaccine trials. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  3. Domestic/family violence death reviews: an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugeja, Lyndal; Dawson, Myrna; McIntyre, Sara-Jane; Walsh, Carolyn

    2015-04-01

    Domestic/Family Violence Death Reviews (D/FVDRs) have been established in a number of high-income countries since 1990 as a mechanism to inform prevention-focused interventions to reduce domestic/family violence. D/FVDRs differ in their structure, governance, case identification processes and inclusion criteria, review measures, and outputs. Outside of the United States, the extent of heterogeneity across and within countries has not been explored. This study comprised an international comparison of D/FVDRs and their core elements to inform the establishment of D/FVDRs in other developed countries, and potentially low- and middle-income countries where violence is a leading cause of death. Such a review is also a necessary foundation for any future evaluation D/FVDRs. The review identified 71 jurisdictions where a D/FVDRs had been established in the past two decades, 25 of which met the inclusion criteria. All D/FVDRs examined stated a reduction in deaths as a goal of the review process; however, none reported an actual reduction. The focus of the D/FVDRs examined was on intimate partner homicides; however, more recently established D/FVDRs include other familial relationships. Almost one third of the D/FVDRs examined reported changes to the domestic/family system that occurred as a result of recommendations made from the review process. While similar in many ways, D/FVDRs differ along a number of important dimensions that make it difficult to identify best practices for jurisdictions considering the establishment of such an initiative. To share knowledge, existing networks should be expanded nationally and internationally to include jurisdictions that may be considering this initiative. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. The major clinical determinants of maternal death among obstetric near-miss patients: a tertiary centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simsek, Y.; Yilmaz, E.; Celik, E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the characteristics of obstetric near-miss patients to clarify the major risk factors of maternal mortality. Methods: From among the patients referred to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Inonu University of Medical Sciences, Turkey, between August 1, 2010 and March 1, 2012, electronic records of obstetric near-miss cases were retrospectively analysed. The obstetric and demographic characteristics of cases that were successfully treated (Group 1) as well as cases with maternal death (Group 2) were analysed and compared. SPSS 11.5 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 2687 cases handled during the study period, 95 (3.53%) were of the near-miss nature. The most frequently encountered underlying aetiology was severe preeclampsia (n=55; 57.89%) and haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count syndrome (n=20; 21.1%). These were followed by cases of postpartum bleeding (n=18; 18.9%). Maternal mortality occurred in 10 (10.5%) patients, representing Group 2. The amount of haemorrhage and blood transfused were significantly higher in the group. Maternal mortality cases had also significantly longer duration of intensive care unit admission. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and immediate management of the complications noted by the study can be the most important measures to prevent the occurrence of mortality. (author)

  5. Stakeholders' opinions on the implementation of Child Death Review in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzen, S.; Hoir, M.P. L; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.; Need, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The death of a child is an enormous tragedy for both the family and others involved. A child’s death appeals to everyone’s responsibility to take measures to prevent similar deaths in the future. Child Death Review (CDR) is an interagency approach in which a child’s death is

  6. Stakeholders’ opinions on the implementation of Child Death Review in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoeff-Gijzen, Sandra; L'Hoir, Monique P.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; Need, Ariana

    2016-01-01

    Background The death of a child is an enormous tragedy for both the family and others involved. A child’s death appeals to everyone’s responsibility to take measures to prevent similar deaths in the future. Child Death Review (CDR) is an interagency approach in which a child’s death is

  7. Towards an Inclusive and Evidence-Based Definition of the Maternal Mortality Ratio: An Analysis of the Distribution of Time after Delivery of Maternal Deaths in Mexico, 2010-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamadrid-Figueroa, Hector; Montoya, Alejandra; Fritz, Jimena; Olvera, Marisela; Torres, Luis M; Lozano, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Progress towards the Millennium Development Goal No. 5 was measured by an indicator that excluded women who died due to pregnancy and childbirth after 42 days from the date of delivery. These women suffered from what are defined as late deaths and sequelae-related deaths (O96 and O97 respectively, according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision). Such deaths end up not being part of the numerator in the calculation of the Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR), the indicator that governments and international agencies use for reporting. The issue is not trivial since these deaths account for a sizeable fraction of all maternal deaths in the world and show an upward trend over time in many countries. The aim of this study was to analyze empirical data on maternal deaths that occurred between 2010 and 2013 in Mexico, linking databases of the Deliberate Search and Reclassification of Maternal Deaths (BIRMM) and the Birth Information Subsystem (SINAC) of the Ministry of Health. Data were analyzed by negative binomial regression, survival analysis and multiple cause analysis. While the reported MMR decreased by 5% per year between 2010 and 2013, the MMR due to late and sequelae-related deaths doubled from 3.5 to 7 per 100,000 live-births in 2013 (p definition.

  8. Prioritizing investments in innovations to protect women from the leading causes of maternal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Tara M; Harner-Jay, Claudia M; Levisay, Alice M; Coffey, Patricia S; Free, Michael J; LaBarre, Paul D

    2014-01-09

    PATH, an international nonprofit organization, assessed nearly 40 technologies for their potential to reduce maternal mortality from postpartum hemorrhage and preeclampsia and eclampsia in low-resource settings. The evaluation used a new Excel-based prioritization tool covering 22 criteria developed by PATH, the Maternal and Neonatal Directed Assessment of Technology (MANDATE) model, and consultations with experts. It identified five innovations with especially high potential: technologies to improve use of oxytocin, a uterine balloon tamponade, simplified dosing of magnesium sulfate, an improved proteinuria test, and better blood pressure measurement devices. Investments are needed to realize the potential of these technologies to reduce mortality.

  9. Maternal death related to IVF in the Netherlands 1984-2008.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, D.D.M.; Schutte, J.M.; Bernardus, R.E.; Mooij, T.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed all deaths in the Netherlands that might have been related to IVF or to an IVF pregnancy in order to investigate this most serious complication. METHODS: All deaths related to IVF, within 1 year after IVF, from 1984 to 2008 were collected by sending a letter to all

  10. Fetal chondrodysplasia punctata associated with maternal autoimmune diseases: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrukban H

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hadeel Alrukban,1 David Chitayat1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, the Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Chondrodysplasia punctata (CDP is a skeletal abnormality characterized by premature calcification that is usually noticeable in the prenatal period and infancy. Etiologically, the condition is heterogeneous, and the causes include fetal conditions such as chromosome abnormalities, peroxisomal disorders, lysosomal storage disorders, cholesterol synthesis defects and abnormal vitamin K metabolism, as well as maternal diseases such as severe malabsorption and exposure to teratogens. An association between CDP and maternal autoimmune disease was first observed and reported by Curry et al and Costa et al in 1993 and expanded by Chitayat et al in 2010. This review lists the clinical characteristics and radiologic findings of all cases reported to date in English and discuss the possible etiology of this interesting fetal finding. Keywords: stippled epiphyses, peroxisomal disorders, vitamin K, chromosome abnormalities, intrauterine growth restriction epiphysis, growth plate

  11. Placental growth factor concentration in maternal circulation decreases after fetal death: lessons from a case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beharier, Ofer; Shusterman, Eden; Szaingurten-Solodkin, Irit; Weintraub, Adi Y; Sheiner, Eyal; Swissa, Shani S; Gitler, Daniel; Hershkovitz, Reli

    2015-11-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) has been suggested as a possible biomarker for major placenta-related disorders such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. However, experimental findings suggest that PlGF concentrations may be influenced by other factors besides the placenta. In the present study, we examined how acute fetal injury affects PlGF concentrations in maternal circulation. We therefore monitored PlGF concentrations in maternal circulation before and after feticide. A prospective comparative study was performed. Blood samples were drawn prospectively between January and July 2012, before and after feticide at predetermined time points in relation to the procedure (0, 30, 60, and 120 min). The levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the maternal circulation were measured to detect acute tissue damage. PlGF concentrations were measured by standard human ELISA. Following feticide (60 and 120 min), PlGF concentrations decreased significantly compared to the concentrations before feticide. LDH concentrations did not change before and after feticide. Our finding, along with the detailed review of the literature described in our work, supports a new concept in which primary fetal distress can affect PlGF concentration in maternal circulation. A large-scale study is required to strengthen our finding.

  12. Parental death and bipolar disorder: a robust association was found in early maternal suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsuchiya, Kenji; Agerbo, Esben; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2005-01-01

    of a conditional logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 947 subjects with bipolar disorder and 47,350 controls, those having experienced the parental suicide were significantly associated with an increased risk for BPD (incidence rate ratios: 1.83 [95% confidence interval: 1.07 to 3.12] for paternal suicide......BACKGROUND: Previous studies have suggested that early parental death may be associated with the emergence of bipolar disorder in later life. However, it remains unknown whether this association applies specifically to parental death due to suicide or only to early parental death. The present study...... were born in 1960 or later and were first admitted to or had first contact with Danish psychiatric facilities between 1981 and 1998 with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, and fifty age-matched controls per case were extracted. The effects of the deaths of relatives were estimated by means...

  13. Effectiveness of interventions to provide culturally appropriate maternity care in increasing uptake of skilled maternity care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coast, Ernestina; Jones, Eleri; Lattof, Samantha R; Portela, Anayda

    2016-12-01

    Addressing cultural factors that affect uptake of skilled maternity care is recognized as an important step in improving maternal and newborn health. This article describes a systematic review to examine the evidence available on the effects of interventions to provide culturally appropriate maternity care on the use of skilled maternity care during pregnancy, for birth or in the postpartum period. Items published in English, French and/or Spanish between 1 January 1990 and 31 March 2014 were considered. Fifteen studies describing a range of interventions met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted on population and intervention characteristics; study design; definitions and data for relevant outcomes; and the contexts and conditions in which interventions occurred. Because most of the included studies focus on antenatal care outcomes, evidence of impact is particularly limited for care seeking for birth and after birth. Evidence in this review is clustered within a small number of countries, and evidence from low- and middle-income countries is notably lacking. Interventions largely had positive effects on uptake of skilled maternity care. Cultural factors are often not the sole factor affecting populations' use of maternity care services. Broader social, economic, geographical and political factors interacted with cultural factors to affect targeted populations' access to services in included studies. Programmes and policies should seek to establish an enabling environment and support respectful dialogue with communities to improve use of skilled maternity care. Whilst issues of culture are being recognized by programmes and researchers as being important, interventions that explicitly incorporate issues of culture are rarely evaluated. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  14. Maternal obesity and gestational weight gain are risk factors for infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Lisa M; Siminerio, Lara L; Himes, Katherine P; Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Lash, Timothy L; Parisi, Sara M; Abrams, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Assessment of the joint and independent relationships of gestational weight gain and prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) on risk of infant mortality was performed. This study used Pennsylvania linked birth-infant death records (2003-2011) from infants without anomalies born to mothers with prepregnancy BMI categorized as underweight (n = 58,973), normal weight (n = 610,118), overweight (n = 296,630), grade 1 obesity (n = 147,608), grade 2 obesity (n = 71,740), and grade 3 obesity (n = 47,277). Multivariable logistic regression models stratified by BMI category were used to estimate dose-response associations between z scores of gestational weight gain and infant death after confounder adjustment. Infant mortality risk was lowest among normal-weight women and increased with rising BMI category. For all BMI groups except for grade 3 obesity, there were U-shaped associations between gestational weight gain and risk of infant death. Weight loss and very low weight gain among women with grades 1 and 2 obesity were associated with high risks of infant mortality. However, even when gestational weight gain in women with obesity was optimized, the predicted risk of infant death remained higher than that of normal-weight women. Interventions aimed at substantially reducing preconception weight among women with obesity and avoiding very low or very high gestational weight gain may reduce risk of infant death. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  15. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Function in Brain Death: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair-Collins, Michael; Northrup, Jesse; Olcese, James

    2016-01-01

    The Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) states that an individual is dead when "all functions of the entire brain" have ceased irreversibly. However, it has been questioned whether some functions of the hypothalamus, particularly osmoregulation, can continue after the clinical diagnosis of brain death (BD). In order to learn whether parts of the hypothalamus can continue to function after the diagnosis of BD, we performed 2 separate systematic searches of the MEDLINE database, corresponding to the functions of the posterior and anterior pituitary. No meta-analysis is possible due to nonuniformity in the clinical literature. However, some modest generalizations can reasonably be drawn from a narrative review and from anatomic considerations that explain why these findings should be expected. We found evidence suggesting the preservation of hypothalamic function, including secretion of hypophysiotropic hormones, responsiveness to anterior pituitary stimulation, and osmoregulation, in a substantial proportion of patients declared dead by neurological criteria. We discuss several possible explanations for these findings. We conclude by suggesting that additional clinical research with strict inclusion criteria is necessary and further that a more nuanced and forthright public dialogue is needed, particularly since standard diagnostic practices and the UDDA may not be entirely in accord. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. A profile of women at the highest risk of maternal death in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Sohail

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, health interventions implemented in Pakistan have been designed to increase the supply of maternal health services, but have not focused on reaching the poorest women or on providing high-quality services. Demand-side barriers to the utilization of health services are substantial in Pakistan, as are supply-side constraints to the provision of quality health care. This study uses data from the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2006-07 to develop a profile of the poorest women in Pakistan in order to understand demand-side barriers to accessing maternal health care. The study shows stark differences in human capital, material and demographic resources between the poorest women and other women. It illustrates how these differences translate into low levels of service utilization among the poorest women. The purpose of the study is to stimulate a discussion of both the difficulty and the importance of reaching the poorest women with high-quality maternal health interventions. The findings from several pilot projects in Pakistan suggest that the poorest women can be reached at disproportionately higher rates than non-poor women through targeted, community-based, interventions. There is little demonstrable evidence, however, that high-quality care has been provided through these interventions. Evidence-based approaches, which have the potential to overcome financial and sociocultural barriers to service utilization, should be scaled up as soon as possible. However, measures should be taken to ensure that the quality of care provided through these interventions is adequate and able to lead to significant reductions in mortality. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  17. Maternity Leave Access and Health: A Systematic Narrative Review and Conceptual Framework Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Ellie; Baird, Sarah; Bingenheimer, Jeffrey Bart; Markus, Anne Rossier

    2016-06-01

    Background Maternity leave is integral to postpartum maternal and child health, providing necessary time to heal and bond following birth. However, the relationship between maternity leave and health outcomes has not been formally and comprehensively assessed to guide public health research and policy in this area. This review aims to address this gap by investigating both the correlates of maternity leave utilization in the US and the related health benefits for mother and child. Methods We searched the peer-reviewed scholarly literature using six databases for the years 1990 to early 2015 and identified 37 studies to be included in the review. We extracted key data for each of the included studies and assessed study quality using the "Weight of the Evidence" approach. Results The literature generally confirms a positive, though limited correlation between maternity leave coverage and utilization. Likewise, longer maternity leaves are associated with improved breastfeeding intentions and rates of initiation, duration and predominance as well as improved maternal mental health and early childhood outcomes. However, the literature points to important disparities in access to maternity leave that carry over into health outcomes, such as breastfeeding. Synthesis We present a conceptual framework synthesizing what is known to date related to maternity leave access and health outcomes.

  18. CLINICAL AND SOCIO - ECONOMIC PROFILE OF BLACK WOMEN PRONE MATERNAL DEATH: ASSISTANCE TO WOMEN IN A UNIT OF PUBLIC DF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Aparecida Trevisan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sample survey conducted in the Public Health Unit of the Federal District, with only blackwomen pregnant. Aims to verify the compliance of specific group and degree of receptivityand awareness on health pregnancy. The study area lies in women's health and training ofhealth professionals in nursing.The analyzed result goes against the interests of publicmanagement in health through compliance with international agreements established in theMillennium Development Goals to reduce maternal and infant death and the eradication ofracism-4th 5th and 9th MDG / UN. He attempts to verify the paucity of nursing actions inthe face of known pre-existing impairment of hypertension, abortions, sickle cell anemia, pre-eclampsia in women of black ethnic group, living in communities of less infrastructure andless education. Registers the range, in the Federal District, the public health policies aimed atfulfilling agreements for equality and reducing child mortality and achieving the targets for2015 of reducing the maternal and infant mortality, according tothe United Nations, which isthe 5th goal millennium.Keywords: Women's Health, the black population, the UnitedNations

  19. A Review of the Importance of Maternal-fetal Attachment According to the Islamic Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ghodrati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Maternal-fetal attachment has an important effect on mother's identity as well as maternal and fetal health. Moreover, this concept is considered as a crucial issue for the improvement of children emotional development. Regarding the Islamic recommendations on maternal-fetal attachment and its correlation with maternal affection, this study was conducted to review the importance of maternal-fetal attachment according to the Islamic recommendations. Methods: This review was conducted on the religious texts, which covered the subject of interest and were published within 2000-2017. Various databases including Medline, PubMed, Google, IranMedex, SID, and Magiran as well as the websites of Muslim authorities (i.e., the section responding to religious questions were searched. The searching was carried out using keywords as: “Islamic religious teachings”, “pregnant women and Fatwa of the Islamic jurists”, and “aspects of maternal fetal attachment in Islam”. Results: According to the results of the reviewed texts, the mutual readiness of mother and fetus leads to the improvement of their affection. The maternal factors affecting the maternal-neonatal attachment included personality traits, marriage, selection of partner, post-marriage issues, pregnancy, as well as physical and psychological characteristics. There were also some effective factors on the newborn’s innate readiness for the development of attachment, such as fetal appearance, family and social support, maternal nutrition during pregnancy, and neonatal mood. Conclusion: According to the Holy Quran versus and hadiths, maternal-fetal attachment and its promotion are affected by both maternal and fetal factors. Moreover, following the factors affecting attachment will lead to their role functioning. Therefore, it is intensively recommended to incorporate a glance of Islamic instruction into the pregnancy education to improve the maternal-fetal attachment.

  20. Interventions that improve maternity care for immigrant women in the UK: protocol for a narrative synthesis systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, Gina Marie Awoko; Evans, Catrin; Morgan, Myfanwy; Bharj, Kuldip Kaur; Eldridge, Jeanette; Hussain, Basharat

    2017-07-12

    A quarter of all births in the UK are to mothers born outside the UK. There is also evidence that immigrant women have higher maternal and infant death rates and of inequalities in the provision and uptake of maternity services/birth centres. The topic is of great significance to the National Health Service because of directives that address inequalities and the changing patterns of migration to the UK. Our main question for the systematic review is 'what interventions exist that are specifically focused on improving maternity care for immigrant women in the UK?' The primary objective of this synthesis is to generate new interpretations of research evidence. Second, the synthesis will provide substantive base to guide developments and implementation of maternity services/birth centres which are acceptable and effective for immigrant women in the UK. We are using a narrative synthesis (NS) approach to identify, assess scientific quality and rigour, and synthesise empirical data focused on access and interventions that enhance quality of maternity care/birth centres for the UK immigrant women. The inclusion criteria include: publication date 1990 to present, English language, empirical research and findings are focused on women who live in the UK, participants of the study are immigrant women, is related to maternity care/birth centres access or interventions or experiences of maternity.In order to ensure the robustness of the NS, the methodological quality of key evidence will be appraised using the Center for Evidence-Based Management tools and review confidence with CERQual (Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative Research). Two reviewers will independently screen studies and extract relevant evidence. We will synthesise evidence studying relationships between included studies using a range of tools. Dissemination plan includes: an e-workshop for policymakers, collaborative practitioner workshops, YouTube video and APP, scientific papers and

  1. Associations between HIV, highly active anti-retroviral therapy, and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among maternal deaths in South Africa 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebitloane, Hannah M; Moodley, Jagidesa; Sartorius, Benn

    2017-02-01

    To explore potential relationships between HIV and highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP). A retrospective secondary analysis of maternal-deaths data from the 2011-2013 Saving Mothers Report from South Africa. The incidence of HIV infection amongst individuals who died owing to HDP was determined and comparisons were made based on HIV status and the use of HAART. Among 4452 maternal deaths recorded in the Saving Mothers report, a lower risk of a maternal deaths being due to HDP was observed among women who had HIV infections compared with women who did not have HIV (relative risk [RR] 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.64). Further, reduced odds of death being due to HDP were recorded among women with AIDS not undergoing HAART compared with women with HIV who did not require treatment (RR 0.42, 95% CI 0.3-0.58). Notably, among all women with AIDS, a greater risk of death due to HDP was demonstrated among those who received HAART compared with those who did not (RR 1.15, 95% CI 1.02-1.29). HIV and AIDS were associated with a decreased risk of HDP being the primary cause of death; the use of HAART increased this risk. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  2. Abortion legislation, maternal healthcare, fertility, female literacy, sanitation, violence against women and maternal deaths: a natural experiment in 32 Mexican states

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Elard; Chireau, Monique; Pliego, Fernando; Stanford, Joseph; Haddad, Sebastian; Calhoun, Byron; Aracena, Paula; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebasti?n; Thorp, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether there is an association between abortion legislation and maternal mortality outcomes after controlling for other factors thought to influence maternal health. Design Population-based natural experiment. Setting and data sources Official maternal mortality data from 32 federal states of Mexico between 2002 and 2011. Main outcomes Maternal mortality ratio (MMR), MMR with any abortive outcome (MMRAO) and induced abortion mortality ratio (iAMR). Independent variables Abo...

  3. Measuring maternal satisfaction with maternity care: A systematic integrative review: What is the most appropriate, reliable and valid tool that can be used to measure maternal satisfaction with continuity of maternity care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perriman, Noelyn; Davis, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this systematic integrative review is to identify, summarise and communicate the findings of research relating to tools that measure maternal satisfaction with continuity of maternity care models. In so doing the most appropriate, reliable and valid tool that can be used to measure maternal satisfaction with continuity of maternity care will be determined. A systematic integrative review of published and unpublished literature was undertaken using selected databases. Research papers were included if they measured maternal satisfaction in a continuity model of maternity care, were published in English after 1999 and if they included (or made available) the instrument used to measure satisfaction. Six hundred and thirty two unique papers were identified and after applying the selection criteria, four papers were included in the review. Three of these originated in Australia and one in Canada. The primary focus of all papers was not on the development of a tool to measure maternal satisfaction but on the comparison of outcomes in different models of care. The instruments developed varied in terms of the degree to which they were tested for validity and reliability. Women's satisfaction with maternity services is an important measure of quality. Most satisfaction surveys in maternity appear to reflect fragmented models of care though continuity of care models are increasing in line with the evidence demonstrating their effectiveness. It is important that robust tools are developed for this context and that there is some consistency in the way this is measured and reported for the purposes of benchmarking and quality improvement. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Incident reviews in UK maternity units: a systematic appraisal of the quality of local guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anjali; Mohamed-Ahmed, Olaa; Peirsegaele, Philippe; McClymont, Charlotte; Knight, Marian

    2015-03-14

    Maternity care is recognised as a particularly high-risk speciality that is subject to investigation and inquiry, and improvements in risk management have been recommended. However, the quality of guidelines for local reviews of maternity incidents is unknown. The aim of the study is to appraise the quality of local guidance on conducting reviews of severe maternity incidents in the National Health Service. Guidelines for incident reviews were requested from all 211 consultant-led maternity units in the UK during 2012. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation Instrument (AGREE II) was used to evaluate the quality of guidelines. The methods used for reviewing an incident, the people involved in the review and the methods for disseminating the outcomes of the reviews were also examined. Guidelines covering 148 (70%) of all NHS maternity units in the UK were received for evaluation. Most guidelines (55%) received were of good or high quality. The median score on 'scope and purpose' (86%), concerned with the aims and target population of the guideline, was higher than for other domains. Median scores were: 'stakeholder involvement' (representation of users' views) 56%, 'rigour of development' (process used to develop guideline) 34%, 'clarity of presentation' 78%, 'applicability' (organisational and cost implications of applying guideline) 56% and 'editorial independence' 0%. Most guidelines (81%) recommended a range of health professionals review serious maternity incidents using root cause analysis. Findings were most often disseminated at meetings, in reports and in newsletters. Many guidelines (69%) stated lessons learnt from incidents would be audited. Overall, local guidance for the review of maternity incidents was mostly of good or high quality. Stakeholder participation in guideline development could be widened, and editorial independence more clearly stated. It was unclear in over a quarter of guidelines whether changes in practice in response

  5. Maternal obesity in Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onubi, Ojochenemi J; Marais, Debbi; Aucott, Lorna; Okonofua, Friday; Poobalan, Amudha S

    2016-09-01

    Maternal obesity is emerging as a public health problem, recently highlighted together with maternal under-nutrition as a 'double burden', especially in African countries undergoing social and economic transition. This systematic review was conducted to investigate the current evidence on maternal obesity in Africa. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, CINAHL and PsycINFO were searched (up to August 2014) and identified 29 studies. Prevalence, associations with socio-demographic factors, labour, child and maternal consequences of maternal obesity were assessed. Pooled risk ratios comparing obese and non-obese groups were calculated. Prevalence of maternal obesity across Africa ranged from 6.5 to 50.7%, with older and multiparous mothers more likely to be obese. Obese mothers had increased risks of adverse labour, child and maternal outcomes. However, non-obese mothers were more likely to have low-birthweight babies. The differences in measurement and timing of assessment of maternal obesity were found across studies. No studies were identified either on the knowledge or attitudes of pregnant women towards maternal obesity; or on interventions for obese pregnant women. These results show that Africa's levels of maternal obesity are already having significant adverse effects. Culturally adaptable/sensitive interventions should be developed while monitoring to avoid undesired side effects. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health.

  6. Inadequate programming, insufficient communication and non-compliance with the basic principles of maternal death audits in health districts in Burkina Faso: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congo, Boukaré; Sanon, Djénéba; Millogo, Tieba; Ouedraogo, Charlemagne Marie; Yaméogo, Wambi Maurice E; Meda, Ziemlé Clement; Kouanda, Seni

    2017-09-29

    Implementation of quality maternal death audits requires good programming, good communication and compliance with core principles. Studies on compliance with core principles in the conduct of maternal death audits (MDAs) exist but were conducted in urban areas, at the 2nd or 3rd level of the healthcare system, in experimental situations, or in a context of skills-building projects or technical platforms with an emphasis on the review of "near miss". This study aims to fill the gap of evidence on the implementation of MDAs in rural settings, at the first level of care and in the routine care situation in Burkina Faso. We conducted a multiple-case study, with seven cases (health districts) chosen by contrasted purposive sampling using four criteria: (i) the intra-hospital maternal mortality rates for 2013, (ii) rural versus urban location, (iii) proofs of regular conduct of maternal death audits (MDAs) as per routine health information system, and (iv) the use of district hospital versus regional hospital for reference when the first mentioned does not exist. A review of audit records and structured and semi-structured interviews with staff involved in MDAs were conducted. The survey was conducted from 27 April to 30 May of 2015. The results showed that maternal death audits (MDAs) were irregularly scheduled, mostly driven by critical events. Overall, preparing sessions, communication and the conduct of MDAs were most of the time inadequate. Confidentiality was globally respected during the clinical audit sessions. The principle of "no name, no shame, and no blame" was differently applied and anonymity was rarely preserved. Programming, communication, and compliance with the basic principles in the conduct of maternal death audits were inadequate as compared to the national standards. Identifying determinants of such shortcomings may help guide interventions to improve the quality of clinical audits. La mise en œuvre d'audits de décès maternels de qualité n

  7. Effect of maternal death on child survival in rural West Africa: 25 years of prospective surveillance data in The Gambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Scott

    Full Text Available The death of a mother is a tragedy in itself but it can also have devastating effects for the survival of her children. We aim to explore the impact of a mother's death on child survival in rural Gambia, West Africa.We used 25 years of prospective surveillance data from the Farafenni Health and Demographic surveillance system (FHDSS. Mortality rates per 1,000 child-years up to ten years of age were estimated and Kaplan-Meier survival curves plotted by maternal vital status. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine factors associated with child survival.Between 1st April 1989 and 31st December 2014, a total of 2, 221 (7.8% deaths occurred during 152,906 child-years of follow up. Overall mortality rate was 14.53 per 1,000 child-years (95% CI: 13.93-15.14. Amongst those whose mother died, the rate was 25.89 (95% CI: 17.99-37.25 compared to 14.44 (95% CI: 13.84-15.06 per 1,000 child-years for those whose mother did not die. Children were 4.66 (95% CI: 3.15-6.89 times more likely to die if their mother died compared to those with a surviving mother. Infants whose mothers died during delivery or shortly after were up to 7 times more likely to die within the first month of life compared to those whose mothers survived. Maternal vital status was significantly associated with the risk of dying within the first 2 years of life (p-value <0.05, while this was no longer observed for children over 2 years of age (P = 0.872. Other factors associated with an increased risk of dying were living in more rural areas, and birth spacing and year of birth.Mother's survival is strongly associated with child survival. Our findings highlight the importance of the continuum of care for both the mother and child not only throughout pregnancy, and childbirth but beyond 6 weeks post-partum.

  8. Towards a consensus definition of maternal sepsis: results of a systematic review and expert consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet, Mercedes; Nogueira Pileggi, Vicky; Rijken, Marcus J; Coomarasamy, Arri; Lissauer, David; Souza, João Paulo; Gülmezoglu, Ahmet Metin

    2017-05-30

    There is a need for a clear and actionable definition of maternal sepsis, in order to better assess the burden of this condition, trigger timely and effective treatment and allow comparisons across facilities and countries. The objective of this study was to review maternal sepsis definitions and identification criteria and to report on the results of an expert consultation to develop a new international definition of maternal sepsis. All original and review articles and WHO documents, as well as clinical guidelines providing definitions and/or identification criteria of maternal sepsis were included. A multidisciplinary international panel of experts was surveyed through an online consultation in March-April 2016 on their opinion on the existing sepsis definitions, including new definition of sepsis proposed for the adult population (2016 Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock) and importance of different criteria for identification of maternal sepsis. The definition was agreed using an iterative process in an expert face-to-face consensus development meeting convened by WHO and Jhpiego. Standardizing the definition of maternal sepsis and aligning it with the current understanding of sepsis in the adult population was considered a mandatory step to improve the assessment of the burden of maternal sepsis by the expert panel. The literature review and expert consultation resulted in a new WHO consensus definition "Maternal sepsis is a life-threatening condition defined as organ dysfunction resulting from infection during pregnancy, child-birth, post-abortion, or post-partum period". Plans are in progress to validate the new WHO definition of maternal sepsis in a large international population. The operationalization of the new maternal sepsis definition requires generation of a set of practical criteria to identify women with sepsis. These criteria should enable clinicians to focus on the timely initiation of actionable elements of

  9. Cardiovascular deaths in children: general overview from the National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Victoria L; Covington, Theresa M; Dugan, Noreen P; Haley, Danielle Main; Dykstra, Heather; Overpeck, Mary; Iyer, V Ramesh; Shults, Justine

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular conditions rank sixth in causes of death in 1- to 19-year-olds. Our study is the first analysis of the cardiovascular death data set from the National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths, which provides the only systematic collection of cardiovascular deaths in children. We developed an analytical data set from the National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths database for cardiovascular deaths in children 0 to 21 years old, reviewing 1,098 cases from 2005 to 2009 in 16 states who agreed to participate. Cardiovascular cases were aged 4.8 ± 6.6 years; 55.3%, ≤1 year; 24.6%, ≥10 years; male, 58%; white, 70.5%; black, 22.3%; Hispanic, 19.5%. Prior conditions were present in 48.5%: congenital heart disease, 23%; cardiomyopathies, 4.6%; arrhythmia, 1.7%; and congestive heart failure, 1.6%. Deaths occurred most frequently in urban settings, 49.2%; and in the hospital, 40.4%; home, 26.1%; or at school/work/sports, 4.8%. Emergency medical services were not evenly distributed with differences by age, race, ethnicity, and area. Autopsies (40.4%) occurred more often in those >10 years old (odds ratio [OR] 2.9), blacks (OR 1.6), or in those who died at school/work/sports (OR 3.9). The most common cardiovascular causes of death included congenital heart disease, 40.8%; arrhythmias, 27.1%; cardiomyopathy, 11.8%; myocarditis, 4.6%; congestive heart failure, 3.6%; and coronary artery anomalies, 2.2%. Our study identified differences in causes and frequencies of cardiovascular deaths by age, race, and ethnicity. Prevention of death may be impacted by knowledge of prior conditions, emergency plans, automated external defibrillator programs, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation education, and by a registry for all cardiovascular deaths in children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gaps in the evidence for prevention and treatment of maternal anaemia: a review of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jacqui A; Barroso, Filipa; Stanworth, Simon J; Spiby, Helen; Hopewell, Sally; Doree, Carolyn J; Renfrew, Mary J; Allard, Shubha

    2012-06-24

    Anaemia, in particular due to iron deficiency, is common in pregnancy with associated negative outcomes for mother and infant. However, there is evidence of significant variation in management. The objectives of this review of systematic reviews were to analyse and summarise the evidence base, identify gaps in the evidence and develop a research agenda for this important component of maternity care. Multiple databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library. All systematic reviews relating to interventions to prevent and treat anaemia in the antenatal and postnatal period were eligible. Two reviewers independently assessed data inclusion, extraction and quality of methodology. 27 reviews were included, all reporting on the prevention and treatment of anaemia in the antenatal (n = 24) and postnatal periods (n = 3). Using AMSTAR as the assessment tool for methodological quality, only 12 of the 27 were rated as high quality reviews. The greatest number of reviews covered antenatal nutritional supplementation for the prevention of anaemia (n = 19). Iron supplementation was the most extensively researched, but with ongoing uncertainty about optimal dose and regimen. Few identified reviews addressed anaemia management post-partum or correlations between laboratory and clinical outcomes, and no reviews reported on clinical symptoms of anaemia. The review highlights evidence gaps including the management of anaemia in the postnatal period, screening for anaemia, and optimal interventions for treatment. Research priorities include developing standardised approaches to reporting of laboratory outcomes, and information on clinical outcomes relevant to the experiences of pregnant women.

  11. Maternal smoking and alcohol consumption during pregnancy as risk factors for sudden infant death.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell-Naughton, M

    2012-04-01

    A population based case control study was conducted to examine alcohol consumption and maternal smoking during pregnancy and the risk of SIDS in an Irish population. Each SIDS case (n = 287) was compared with control infants (n = 832) matched for date and place of birth for infants born from 1994 to 2001. Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate differences between Cases and Controls establishing Odds Ratio\\'s (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI). Mothers who smoked were 3 times more likely to have a SIDS Case, and a dose response effect was apparent, with mothers smoking 1-10 cigarettes\\/day OR 2.93 (CI 1.50-5.71), and those smoking > 10 cigarettes\\/day OR 4.36 (CI 2.50-7.61). More Case mothers consumed alcohol during pregnancy than Control mothers and, within drinkers, the amount of alcohol consumed was also greater (p < 0.05). A dose response with frequency of drinking was apparent. The adjusted odds ratio for those consuming alcohol in all three trimesters was 3.59 (CI:1.40-9.20). Both of these risk factors are modifiable and need to be incorporated into antenatal education from a SIDS point of view.

  12. Review Maternally derived egg yolk steroid hormones and sex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    some kind of functional link between maternally derived ... one progresses from the phylogenetically primitive boids to the more advanced ... but also in birds and fishes (Arcos 1972; Conley et al 1997;. McCormic ..... Ecology 79 1873–1883.

  13. A scoping research literature review to assess the state of existing evidence on the "bad" death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna M; Hewitt, Jessica A

    2018-02-01

    A scoping research literature review on "bad death" was undertaken to assess the overall state of the science on this topic and to determine what evidence exists on how often bad deaths occur, what contributes to or causes a bad death, and what the outcomes and consequences of bad deaths are. A search for English-language research articles was conducted in late 2016, with 25 articles identified and all retained for examination, as is expected with scoping reviews. Only 3 of the 25 articles provided incidence information, specifying that 7.8 to 23% of deaths were bad and that bad deaths were more likely to occur in hospitals than in community-care settings. Many different factors were associated with bad deaths, with unrelieved pain being the most commonly identified. Half of the studies provided information on the possible consequences or outcomes of bad deaths, such as palliative care not being initiated, interpersonal and team conflict, and long-lasting negative community effects. This review identified a relatively small number of research articles that focused in whole or in part on bad deaths. Although the reasons why people consider a death to be bad may be highly individualized and yet also socioculturally based, unrelieved pain is a commonly held reason for bad deaths. Although bad and good deaths may have some opposing causative factors, this literature review revealed some salient bad death attributes, ones that could be avoided to prevent bad deaths from occurring. A routine assessment to allow planning so as to avoid bad deaths and enhance the probability of good deaths is suggested.

  14. 78 FR 36596 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Death Gratuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... addition, notwithstanding any other provisions of law, no person shall generally be subject to penalty for... for OMB Review; Comment Request; Death Gratuity ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL... request (ICR) revision titled, ``Death Gratuity,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review...

  15. Sudden death amongst people practicing competitive sports (Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Wrzesiński

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is and unexpected cardiac arrest that may occur both during exercise and also an hour after its completion. It most often occurs in young sportsmen under 35 years of age and is usually associated with improperly performed physical activity proceeded by lack of specialized medical examination and research. Natural and cardiac causes are two basic phenomena that lead to cardiac death. As confirmed by Framingham Heart Study, conducted in the eighties of the twentieth century on the population of Americans, natural causes accounted for 13% while cardiac causes accounted for 88% off all. The statistics of the largest centers of sport medicine are presented as follows: Germany – 1 death per 200,000 people practicing sports (total while United States of America – 1 death per 80,000 people per year. The problem of of sudden deaths is and important topic worthy of a broader and more specific analysis. It should be noted that physical exertion is not is not a direct cause of sudden deaths. Currently the most research concerns professional athletes who have extensive support and knowledge about the exercise they perform. The main problem concerning subject of sudden deaths are not diagnosed hearth defects. Additional topic of interest is rarity of medical tests performed by amateur athletes and athletes at the lower levels of competition. Such athletes do not  have as extensive knowledge as their experienced idols, which may bring tragic consequences.

  16. Maternity high-dependency care and the Australian midwife: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingwell, Emma L; Butt, Janice; Leslie, Gavin

    2017-04-01

    Maternity high-dependency care has emerged throughout the 21st century in Australian maternity hospitals as a distinct sub-speciality of maternity care. However, what the care involves, how and why it should be provided, and the role of midwives in the provision of such care remains highly variable. Rising levels of maternal morbidity from non-obstetric causes have led midwives to work with women who require highly complex care, beyond the standard customary midwifery role. Whilst the nursing profession has developed and refined its expertise as a specialty in the field of high-dependency care, the midwifery profession has been less likely to pursue this as a specific area of practice. This paper explores the literature surrounding maternity high-dependency care. From the articles reviewed, four key themes emerge which include; the need for maternity high-dependency care, maternal morbidity and maternity high-dependency care, the role of the midwife and maternity high-dependency care and midwifery education and preparation for practice. It highlights the challenges that health services are faced with in order to provide maternity high-dependency care to women. Some of these challenges include resourcing and budgeting limitations, availability of educators with the expertise to train staff, and the availability of suitably trained staff to care for the women when required. In order to provide maternity high-dependency care, midwives need to be suitably equipped with the knowledge and skills required to do so. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Maternity protection vs. maternity rights for working women in Chile: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Lidia; Herrera, Tania

    2012-12-01

    Maternity leave in Chile has been a social right since 1919, when the International Labour Organization set the first global standards. From its inception, Chile's labour legislation focused on protecting motherhood and the family. The length of maternity leave has been extended several times since then but its main aim remains the protection of infant health. In 1931, Chile's first Labour Code required anyone employing 20 or more women to provide day care services and facilitate childcare and paid breastfeeding time for all mothers of children under one. Labour laws began to play an important role in accommodating the care of infants within working conditions, though not always effectively. In spite of job protection during pregnancy and breastfeeding, women can be dismissed on grounds other than pregnancy. It was only under Salvador Allende and again in the past two decades that Chile has enfranchised women as holders of health rights. However, many unresolved tensions remain. Chile promotes motherhood, but often considers that working women who demand employment protection abuse the system. Motherhood is a magic wand that represents the selflessness of women, but society throws a blanket of mistrust over women who wish to exercise their maternity rights and to determine the number and spacing of their children. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Causes of death determined in medicolegal investigations in residents of nursing homes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Briohny; Ibrahim, Joseph E; Bugeja, Lyndal; Ranson, David

    2014-08-01

    To systematically review published research characterizing the nature and circumstances surrounding the death of older people in nursing homes specifically using information generated for medicolegal death investigations. Systematic review in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement using the key words death, nursing homes, and medicolegal death investigation. Cross-sectional data from original, peer-reviewed articles published in English between 2000 and 2013 describing deaths of nursing home residents. Information was extracted for analysis about study and population characteristics, number and type of deaths, study design, findings, and limitations. Thirteen studies were identified. The studies examined external causes of deaths from suicide, choking, restraint or bed-related injuries, falls, and pressure injuries. Deaths were more frequent in women with existing comorbidities. Suicide was predominant in men. Identified risk factors and opportunities to reduce harm were identified at individual, organizational, and structural levels. Overall, the quality of the studies limited the aggregation and comparability of findings. This systematic review informs researchers, clinicians and policy-makers about how to reduce external causes of death in nursing homes. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Gaps in the evidence for prevention and treatment of maternal anaemia: a review of systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Jacqui A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaemia, in particular due to iron deficiency, is common in pregnancy with associated negative outcomes for mother and infant. However, there is evidence of significant variation in management. The objectives of this review of systematic reviews were to analyse and summarise the evidence base, identify gaps in the evidence and develop a research agenda for this important component of maternity care. Methods Multiple databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library. All systematic reviews relating to interventions to prevent and treat anaemia in the antenatal and postnatal period were eligible. Two reviewers independently assessed data inclusion, extraction and quality of methodology. Results 27 reviews were included, all reporting on the prevention and treatment of anaemia in the antenatal (n = 24 and postnatal periods (n = 3. Using AMSTAR as the assessment tool for methodological quality, only 12 of the 27 were rated as high quality reviews. The greatest number of reviews covered antenatal nutritional supplementation for the prevention of anaemia (n = 19. Iron supplementation was the most extensively researched, but with ongoing uncertainty about optimal dose and regimen. Few identified reviews addressed anaemia management post-partum or correlations between laboratory and clinical outcomes, and no reviews reported on clinical symptoms of anaemia. Conclusions The review highlights evidence gaps including the management of anaemia in the postnatal period, screening for anaemia, and optimal interventions for treatment. Research priorities include developing standardised approaches to reporting of laboratory outcomes, and information on clinical outcomes relevant to the experiences of pregnant women.

  20. Maternal Depression and Child Psychopathology: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Sherryl H.; Rouse, Matthew H.; Connell, Arin M.; Broth, Michelle Robbins; Hall, Christine M.; Heyward, Devin

    2011-01-01

    Although the association between maternal depression and adverse child outcomes is well established, the strength of the association, the breadth or specificity of the outcomes, and the role of moderators are not known. This information is essential to inform not only models of risk but also the design of preventive interventions by helping to…

  1. Review: Fetal-maternal communication via extracellular vesicles - Implications for complications of pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Stefanie; Elfeky, Omar; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Dutta, Suchismita; Lai, Andrew; Jayabalan, Nanthini; Nuzhat, Zarin; Palma, Carlos; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    The maternal physiology experiences numerous changes during pregnancy which are essential in controlling and maintaining maternal metabolic adaptations and fetal development. The human placenta is an organ that serves as the primary interface between the maternal and fetal circulation, thereby supplying the fetus with nutrients, blood and oxygen through the umbilical cord. During gestation, the placenta continuously releases several molecules into maternal circulation, including hormones, proteins, RNA and DNA. Interestingly, the presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) of placental origin has been identified in maternal circulation across gestation. EVs can be categorised according to their size and/or origin into microvesicles (∼150-1000 nm) and exosomes (∼40-120 nm). Microvesicles are released by budding from the plasmatic membrane, whereas exosome release is by fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasmatic membrane. Exosomes released from placental cells have been found to be regulated by oxygen tension and glucose concentration. Furthermore, maternal exosomes have the ability to stimulate cytokine release from endothelial cells. In this review, we will discuss the role of EVs during fetal-maternal communication during gestation with a special emphasis on exosomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The South African child death review pilot: A multiagency approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health and demographic surveillance sites and facility-based data from the Child Healthcare Problem Identification Programme (Child .... We defined fatal child abuse and neglect as a death due to physical abuse or neglect or ..... Factors associated with lower RTI during infancy. Variable. OR. 95% CI p-value. Age. Neonate.

  3. Prevalence, Impact, and Treatment of Death Rattle : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. Lokker (Martine); L. van Zuylen (Lia); C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin); A. van der Heide (Agnes)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractContext: Death rattle, or respiratory tract secretion in the dying patient, is a common and potentially distressing symptom in dying patients. Health care professionals often struggle with this symptom because of the uncertainty about management. Objectives: To give an overview of the

  4. Does maternal psychopathology increase the risk of pre-schooler obesity? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Pree M; Skouteris, Helen; Hayden, Melissa

    2015-04-01

    The preschool years may be a critical period for child obesity onset; however, literature examining obesity risk factors to date has largely focused on school-aged children. Several links have been made between maternal depression and childhood obesity risks; however, other types of maternal psychopathology have been widely neglected. The aim of the present review was to systematically identify articles that examined relationships between maternal psychopathology variables, including depressive and anxiety symptoms, self-esteem and body dissatisfaction, and risks for pre-schooler obesity, including weight outcomes, physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels, and nutrition/diet variables. Twenty articles meeting review criteria were identified. Results showed positive associations between maternal depressive symptoms and increased risks for pre-schooler obesity in the majority of studies. Results were inconsistent depending on the time at which depression was measured (i.e., antenatal, postnatal, in isolation or longitudinally). Anxiety and body dissatisfaction were only measured in single studies; however, both were linked to pre-schooler obesity risks; self-esteem was not measured by any studies. We concluded that maternal depressive symptoms are important to consider when assessing risks for obesity in preschool-aged children; however, more research is needed examining the impact of other facets of maternal psychopathology on obesity risk in pre-schoolers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Utilization of maternal health services among adolescent women in Bangladesh: A scoping review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabuddin, A S M; Delvaux, Thérèse; Abouchadi, Saloua; Sarker, Malabika; De Brouwere, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    To understand the health-seeking behaviour of adolescent women in Bangladesh with respect to the use of maternal health services. Literature review of seven electronic databases: PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO, Embase, CINAHL, POPLINE and Global Health. Studies published in English between 1990 and 2013 which describe Bangladeshi adolescent women's healthcare-seeking behaviour during pregnancy, delivery and post-partum were included. Twelve studies were included in this review. 11 used quantitative methods and one used a mixed-methods approach. All studies included married adolescent women only. Women with lower educational levels are less likely to seek skilled maternal health services than those with higher levels of education. Use of maternal health services is also less common among rural married adolescent women than women in urban areas. Being part of the richest bands of wealth, having had previous experiences of childbirth and higher women's autonomy positively influence the use of skilled maternal health services among married adolescent women in Bangladesh. Antenatal care is a key predictor of the use of skilled birth attendants for delivery and post-natal care. Maternal health-related programmes should be designed targeting rural and uneducated married adolescent women in Bangladesh. More qualitative investigations are required to broaden our understanding on maternal health-seeking behaviour of both married and unmarried adolescent women. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Contesting the Cause and Severity of the Black Death: A Review Essay

    OpenAIRE

    Noymer, A.

    2007-01-01

    The essay is a book review of Ole J. Benedictow's "The Black Death, 1346-1353: The Complete History". It discusses the history, demography, and epidemiology of the Black Death, an epidemic that struck fourteenth-century Europe with a severity that has not be equaled by any other epidemic in recorded history, before or since.

  7. Effect of maternal body mass index on hormones in breast milk: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, Nicholas J; Hyde, Matthew J; Gale, Chris; Parkinson, James R C; Jeffries, Suzan; Holmes, Elaine; Modi, Neena

    2014-01-01

    Maternal Body Mass Index (BMI) is positively associated with infant obesity risk. Breast milk contains a number of hormones that may influence infant metabolism during the neonatal period; these may have additional downstream effects on infant appetite regulatory pathways, thereby influencing propensity towards obesity in later life. To conduct a systematic review of studies examining the association between maternal BMI and the concentration of appetite-regulating hormones in breast milk. Pubmed was searched for studies reporting the association between maternal BMI and leptin, adiponectin, insulin, ghrelin, resistin, obestatin, Peptide YY and Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 in breast milk. Twenty six studies were identified and included in the systematic review. There was a high degree of variability between studies with regard to collection, preparation and analysis of breast milk samples. Eleven of fifteen studies reporting breast milk leptin found a positive association between maternal BMI and milk leptin concentration. Two of nine studies investigating adiponectin found an association between maternal BMI and breast milk adiponectin concentration; however significance was lost in one study following adjustment for time post-partum. No association was seen between maternal BMI and milk adiponectin in the other seven studies identified. Evidence for an association between other appetite regulating hormones and maternal BMI was either inconclusive, or lacking. A positive association between maternal BMI and breast milk leptin concentration is consistently found in most studies, despite variable methodology. Evidence for such an association with breast milk adiponectin concentration, however, is lacking with additional research needed for other hormones including insulin, ghrelin, resistin, obestatin, peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1. As most current studies have been conducted with small sample sizes, future studies should ensure adequate sample sizes and

  8. Effect of maternal body mass index on hormones in breast milk: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Andreas

    Full Text Available Maternal Body Mass Index (BMI is positively associated with infant obesity risk. Breast milk contains a number of hormones that may influence infant metabolism during the neonatal period; these may have additional downstream effects on infant appetite regulatory pathways, thereby influencing propensity towards obesity in later life.To conduct a systematic review of studies examining the association between maternal BMI and the concentration of appetite-regulating hormones in breast milk.Pubmed was searched for studies reporting the association between maternal BMI and leptin, adiponectin, insulin, ghrelin, resistin, obestatin, Peptide YY and Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 in breast milk.Twenty six studies were identified and included in the systematic review. There was a high degree of variability between studies with regard to collection, preparation and analysis of breast milk samples. Eleven of fifteen studies reporting breast milk leptin found a positive association between maternal BMI and milk leptin concentration. Two of nine studies investigating adiponectin found an association between maternal BMI and breast milk adiponectin concentration; however significance was lost in one study following adjustment for time post-partum. No association was seen between maternal BMI and milk adiponectin in the other seven studies identified. Evidence for an association between other appetite regulating hormones and maternal BMI was either inconclusive, or lacking.A positive association between maternal BMI and breast milk leptin concentration is consistently found in most studies, despite variable methodology. Evidence for such an association with breast milk adiponectin concentration, however, is lacking with additional research needed for other hormones including insulin, ghrelin, resistin, obestatin, peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1. As most current studies have been conducted with small sample sizes, future studies should ensure adequate sample

  9. 'Natural' and 'Unnatural' medical deaths and coronial law: A UK and international review of the medical literature on natural and unnatural death and how it applies to medical death certification and reporting deaths to coroners: Natural/Unnatural death: A Scientific Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    In the United Kingdom, when people die, either a doctor writes an acceptable natural cause of death medical certificate, or a coroner (fiscal in Scotland) investigates the case, usually with an autopsy. An inquest may or may not follow. The concept of 'natural or unnatural cause' death is not internationally standardized. This article reviews scientific evidence as to what is a natural death or unnatural death and how that relates to the international classification of deaths. Whilst there is some consensus on the definition, its application in considering whether to report to the coroner is more difficult. Depictions of deaths in terminal care, medical emergencies and post-operative care highlight these difficulties. It secondly reviews to what extent natural and unnatural are criteria for notification of deaths in England and Wales and internationally. It concludes with consideration of how medical concepts of unnatural death relate in England and Wales to coroners' legal concepts of what is unnatural. Deaths that appear natural to clinicians and pathologists may be legally unnatural and vice versa. It is argued that the natural/unnatural dichotomy is not a good criterion for reporting deaths under medical care to coroners, but the notification of a medical cause of death, using the International Classification of Disease Codes and the medical professional view as to whether it is scientifically natural, is of great value to the coroner in deciding whether it is legally unnatural.

  10. A qualitative review of immigrant women's experiences of maternal adaptation in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ju-Eun; Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Tiffany; Roh, Eun Ha

    2016-08-01

    to synthesise the evidence of immigrant women's experiences of maternal adaptation in Korea. eligible studies were identified by searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Korean electronic databases. Qualitative research studies, published in English and Korean addressing maternal adaptation experiences of immigrant women by marriage in Korea, were considered in the review. The suitability of the quality of articles was evaluated using the Joanna Briggs Institute's Critical Appraisal Checklist. Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria for data analysis. Authors, purpose of the study, study design, theoretical framework, population (nationality and sample size), data collection (setting and method), and main study findings were extracted and summarised in a data extraction form for further narrative analysis and synthesis. A qualitative systematic review was performed by means of thematic synthesis. the literature search identified 7,628 articles, of which 15 studies, published between 2009 and 2014, were evaluated in the systematic review. Two overarching categories including five themes were identified in the qualitative studies related to maternal adaptation experiences; 'Experiences of motherhood transition' and 'Experiences of child-rearing'. these findings demonstrate the importance of understanding and improving maternal adaptation of immigrant women living in Korea. This can be achieved by enhancing social support, providing culturally sensitive maternal healthcare services, and expanding opportunities for immigrant women in education, job training, and economic independence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. New politics, an opportunity for maternal health advancement in eastern myanmar: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyer, Adam B; Ali, Mohammed; Loyer, Diana

    2014-09-01

    Myanmar (formerly Burma) is a southeast Asian country, with a long history of military dictatorship, human rights violations, and poor health indicators. The health situation is particularly dire among pregnant women in the ethnic minorities of the eastern provinces (Kachin, Shan, Mon, Karen and Karenni regions). This integrative review investigates the current status of maternal mortality in eastern Myanmar in the context of armed conflict between various separatist groups and the military regime. The review examines the underlying factors contributing to high maternal mortality in eastern Myanmar and assesses gaps in the existing research, suggesting areas for further research and policy response. Uncovered were a number of underlying factors uniquely contributing to maternal mortality in eastern Myanmar. These could be grouped into the following analytical themes: ongoing conflict, health system deficits, and political and socioeconomic influences. Abortion was interestingly not identified as an important contributor to maternal mortality. Recent political liberalization may provide space to act upon identified roles and opportunities for the Myanmar Government, the international community, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in a manner that positively impacts on maternal healthcare in the eastern regions of Myanmar. This review makes a number of recommendations to this effect.

  12. The influence of physical activity during pregnancy on maternal, fetal or infant heart rate variability: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Pavel; Watson, Estelle D; Sattler, Matteo C; Ruf, Wolfgang; Titze, Sylvia; van Poppel, Mireille

    2016-10-26

    Physical activity (PA) during pregnancy has been shown to be associated with several positive effects for mother, fetus, and offspring. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a noninvasive and surrogate marker to determine fetal overall health and the development of fetal autonomic nervous system. In addition, it has been shown to be significantly influenced by maternal behavior. However, the influence of maternal PA on HRV has not yet been systematically reviewed. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the influence of regular maternal PA on maternal, fetal or infant HRV. A systematic literature search following a priori formulated criteria of studies that examined the influence of regular maternal PA (assessed for a minimum period of 6 weeks) on maternal, fetal or infant HRV was performed in the databases Pubmed and SPORTDiscus. Quality of each study was assessed using the standardized Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies (QATQS). Nine articles were included into the present systematic review: two intervention studies, one prospective longitudinal study, and six post-hoc analysis of subsets of the longitudinal study. Of these articles four referred to maternal HRV, five to fetal HRV, and one to infant HRV. The overall global rating for the standardized quality assessment of the articles was moderate to weak. The articles regarding the influence of maternal PA on maternal HRV indicated contrary results. Five of five articles regarding the influence of maternal PA on fetal HRV showed increases of fetal HRV on most parameters depending on maternal PA. The article referring to infant HRV (measured one month postnatal) showed an increased HRV. Based on the current evidence available, our overall conclusion is that the hypothesis that maternal PA influences maternal HRV cannot be supported, but there is a trend that maternal PA might increase fetal and infant HRV (clinical conclusion). Therefore, we recommend that further, high quality studies

  13. Length of maternity leave and health of mother and child--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehelin, Katharina; Bertea, Paola Coda; Stutz, Elisabeth Zemp

    2007-01-01

    Assessment of the literature on the length of maternity leaves and health of mothers and children; evaluation of the Swiss situation in view of the maternity leave policy implemented in 2005. Review of thirteen original studies identified by PubMed using topic-related terms. A positive association was shown between the length of maternity leave and mother's mental health and duration of breastfeeding. Extended maternity leaves were also associated with lower perinatal, neonatal and post-neonatal mortality rates as well as lower child mortality; however, results are obtained in ecological studies. There is less evidence regarding other health outcomes. The new policy in Switzerland extends maternity leave for a considerable number of women to 14 weeks. With this prolongation, fewer depressive symptoms and longer breastfeeding duration can be expected, while benefits regarding other health outcomes would warrant longer leaves. Longer maternity leaves are likely to produce health benefits. The new policy in Switzerland will probably improve the situation of those women, who previously were granted only minimal leave and/or mothers with additional social risk factors.

  14. Effective non-drug interventions for improving outcomes and quality of maternal health care in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekesah, Frederick M; Mbada, Chidozie E; Muula, Adamson S; Kabiru, Caroline W; Muthuri, Stella K; Izugbara, Chimaraoke O

    2016-08-15

    Many interventions have been implemented to improve maternal health outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Currently, however, systematic information on the effectiveness of these interventions remains scarce. We conducted a systematic review of published evidence on non-drug interventions that reported effectiveness in improving outcomes and quality of care in maternal health in SSA. African Journals Online, Bioline, MEDLINE, Ovid, Science Direct, and Scopus databases were searched for studies published in English between 2000 and 2015 and reporting on the effectiveness of interventions to improve quality and outcomes of maternal health care in SSA. Articles focusing on interventions that involved drug treatments, medications, or therapies were excluded. We present a narrative synthesis of the reported impact of these interventions on maternal morbidity and mortality outcomes as well as on other dimensions of the quality of maternal health care (as defined by the Institute of Medicine 2001 to comprise safety, effectiveness, efficiency, timeliness, patient centeredness, and equitability). Seventy-three studies were included in this review. Non-drug interventions that directly or indirectly improved quality of maternal health and morbidity and mortality outcomes in SSA assumed a variety of forms including mobile and electronic health, financial incentives on the demand and supply side, facility-based clinical audits and maternal death reviews, health systems strengthening interventions, community mobilization and/or peer-based programs, home-based visits, counseling and health educational and promotional programs conducted by health care providers, transportation and/or communication and referrals for emergency obstetric care, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and task shifting interventions. There was a preponderance of single facility and community-based studies whose effectiveness was difficult to assess. Many non-drug interventions have been

  15. Abortion legislation, maternal healthcare, fertility, female literacy, sanitation, violence against women and maternal deaths: a natural experiment in 32 Mexican states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Elard; Chireau, Monique; Pliego, Fernando; Stanford, Joseph; Haddad, Sebastian; Calhoun, Byron; Aracena, Paula; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastián; Thorp, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether there is an association between abortion legislation and maternal mortality outcomes after controlling for other factors thought to influence maternal health. Design Population-based natural experiment. Setting and data sources Official maternal mortality data from 32 federal states of Mexico between 2002 and 2011. Main outcomes Maternal mortality ratio (MMR), MMR with any abortive outcome (MMRAO) and induced abortion mortality ratio (iAMR). Independent variables Abortion legislation grouped as less (n=18) or more permissive (n=14); constitutional amendment protecting the unborn (n=17); skilled attendance at birth; all-abortion hospitalisation ratio; low birth weight rate; contraceptive use; total fertility rates (TFR); clean water; sanitation; female literacy rate and intimate-partner violence. Main results Over the 10-year period, states with less permissive abortion legislation exhibited lower MMR (38.3 vs 49.6; pabortion hospitalisation ratio (β=−0.566 to −0.962), clean water (β=−0.048 to −0.730), sanitation (β=−0.052 to −0.758) and intimate-partner violence (β=0.085 to 0.755). TFR showed an inverse association with MMR (β=−14.329) and MMRAO (β=−1.750) and a direct association with iAMR (β=1.383). Altogether, these factors accounted for (R2) 51–88% of the variance among states in overall mortality rates. No statistically independent effect was observed for abortion legislation, constitutional amendment or other covariates. Conclusions Although less permissive states exhibited consistently lower maternal mortality rates, this finding was not explained by abortion legislation itself. Rather, these differences were explained by other independent factors, which appeared to have a more favourable distribution in these states. PMID:25712817

  16. Practitioner review: maternal mood in pregnancy and child development--implications for child psychology and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Thomas G; Monk, Catherine; Fitelson, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    The empirical base suggesting a link between prenatal maternal anxiety, stress or depression and cognitive, behavioral, and biological outcomes in the infant and child has increased dramatically in the past 10 years. In this review, we consider the relevance of prenatal maternal mood for child mental health practitioners; the empirical base for a likely causal impact of the link between prenatal anxiety, depression, or stress and child outcomes; the degree to which the available evidence is sufficient for informing or altering clinical practice; and the possible role of prenatal interventions for promoting child health and development. A selective review of PubMed, Cochrane Library and other sources was undertaken. Clinically significant links between maternal prenatal distress and child behavioral and cognitive outcomes have been reported; predictions to stress physiology, immunology, and neurodevelopment have been reported but the effect sizes and clinical significance is less clear. Several candidate mechanisms have been proposed, with some supporting evidence. Many behavioral treatments for prenatal maternal distress exist, but their application to promoting child health is largely unknown. Research on maternal prenatal distress is a good example of translational research and offers a strong paradigm for promoting interdisciplinary clinical research on child health and development. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2013 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  17. Impact of Maternal Folate Deficiencies on Early Neurological Development: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T Emmerson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Folates are B-vitamins that cannot be generated de novo and are therefore obtained from the diet. In the brain, these vitamins are involved in nucleotide synthesis, DNA repair, lipid metabolism, methylation and neurotransmitter synthesis. It is well established that adequate levels of maternal folates are required for closure of the neural tube within the first month of pregnancy, however, it is not clear whether maternal folates are needed throughout pregnancy for brain development and whether they influence offspring neurological function after birth. The aim of this review is to outline current literature from epidemiological and animal model studies that shows maternal supplementation of folates throughout pregnancy does indeed affect offspring neurological function after birth. Evidence Acquisition A Medline search was performed using the following mesh terms, maternal-fetal exchange, folic acid, offspring neurologic manifestations, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, embryology, and behavior. Results The studies described in the present review have reported that maternal deficiencies in folates during pregnancy result in changes in behavior as well as in blood and brain tissue in offspring, including altered methylation, including reduced levels of the global methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM, and increased levels of oxidative stress. Conclusions The data summarized here outlines the importance of adequate levels of folates throughout pregnancy to facilitate appropriate neurological development of offspring after birth.

  18. Cochrane systematic reviews are useful to map research gaps for decreasing maternal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Evelina; Reveiz, Ludovic; Chambliss, Amy; Sangalang, Stephanie; Bonfill, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    To use an "evidence-mapping" approach to assess the usefulness of Cochrane reviews in identifying research gaps in the maternal health. The article describes the general mapping, prioritizing, reconciling, and updating approach: (1) identifying gaps in the maternal health research using published systematic reviews and formulating research questions, (2) prioritizing questions using Delphi method, (3) reconciling identified research priorities with the existing literature (i.e., searching of ongoing trials in trials registries), (4) updating the process. A comprehensive search of Cochrane systematic reviews published or updated from January 2006 to March 2011 was performed. We evaluated the "Implications for Research" section to identify gaps in the research. Our search strategy identified 695 references; 178 systematic reviews identifying at least one research gap were used. We formulated 319 research questions, which were classified into 11 different categories based on the direct and indirect causes of maternal mortality: postpartum hemorrhage, abortion, hypertensive disorders, infection/sepsis, caesarean section, diabetes, pregnancy prevention, preterm labor, other direct causes, indirect causes, and health policies and systems. Most research questions concerned the effectiveness of clinical interventions, including drugs (42.6%), nonpharmacologic interventions (16.3%), and health system (14.7%). It is possible to identify gaps in the maternal health research by using this approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Childhood Health Consequences of Maternal Obesity during Pregnancy: A Narrative Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Gaillard (Romy); S.M.S. Santos (Susana); L. Duijts (Liesbeth); J.F. Felix (Janine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Obesity is a major public health problem among women of reproductive age. In a narrative review, we examined the influence of maternal obesity during pregnancy on fetal outcomes and childhood adiposity, cardio-metabolic, respiratory and cognitive-related health outcomes. We

  20. Effect of Health Insurance on the Use and Provision of Maternal Health Services and Maternal and Neonatal Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lauren A.; Hatt, Laurel E.

    2013-01-01

    Financial barriers can affect timely access to maternal health services. Health insurance can influence the use and quality of these services and potentially improve maternal and neonatal health outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of the evidence on health insurance and its effects on the use and provision of maternal health services and on maternal and neonatal health outcomes in middle- and low-income countries. Studies were identified through a literature search in key databases and consultation with experts in healthcare financing and maternal health. Twenty-nine articles met the review criteria of focusing on health insurance and its effect on the use or quality of maternal health services, or maternal and neonatal health outcomes. Sixteen studies assessed demand-side effects of insurance, eight focused on supply-side effects, and the remainder addressed both. Geographically, the studies provided evidence from sub-Saharan Africa (n=11), Asia (n=9), Latin America (n=8), and Turkey. The studies included examples from national or social insurance schemes (n=7), government-run public health insurance schemes (n=4), community-based health insurance schemes (n=11), and private insurance (n=3). Half of the studies used econometric analyses while the remaining provided descriptive statistics or qualitative results. There is relatively consistent evidence that health insurance is positively correlated with the use of maternal health services. Only four studies used methods that can establish this causal relationship. Six studies presented suggestive evidence of overprovision of caesarean sections in response to providers’ payment incentives through health insurance. Few studies focused on the relationship between health insurance and the quality of maternal health services or maternal and neonatal health outcomes. The available evidence on the quality and health outcomes is inconclusive, given the differences in measurement, contradictory findings, and

  1. Barriers and facilitators of access to maternal services for women with disabilities: scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mheta, Doreen; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P

    2017-05-16

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) emphasises the increasing equitable coverage of quality health care and provision of integrated services as means of reducing maternal mortality. Despite so much effort being placed on improved access to maternity health care, studies show that women with disabilities are being systemically excluded from the mainstream maternal health services. The proposed scoping review aims to map literature on the barriers and facilitators of access to maternal services for women with disabilities. The search strategy for this scoping review study will involve electronic databases including Pubmed, MEDLINE via EBSCOhost, CINAHL Plus with full text via EBSCOhost, Africa-Wide Info via EBSCOhost, JSTOR and Proquest Health and Medical Complete. Articles will also be searched through the "Cited by" search as well as citations included in the reference lists of included articles. A two-stage mapping strategy would be conducted. Stage 1 would be to screen studies through examining their titles. Furthermore, we will screen abstracts of the identified studies descriptively and by focus and method as stipulated by the inclusion and exclusion criteria. In stage 2, we will extract data from the included studies. A parallel screening and data extraction will be undertaken by two reviewers. We will access the quality of the included studies using the mixed methods appraisal tool (MMAT). We will use NVIVO version 10 to extract the relevant outcomes and thematic analysis of the studies. We anticipate to find relevant studies reporting evidence on the barriers and facilitators of access to maternal health services in Sub-Saharan Africa. The evidence obtained from the included studies when summarised will help guide future research. The study findings will be disseminated electronically and in print. In addition, it will be presented at conferences related to sexual reproductive health, maternal health care and reproductive health.

  2. Predictors of maternal vaccination in the United States: An integrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kristen L

    2016-07-25

    The purpose of this literature review was to identify, analyze, and synthesize existing research related to patient, provider, and health system predictors of maternal vaccination in the United States, strategies used to increase maternal vaccination rates, and major theoretical frameworks used to guide maternal vaccination research. A search for evidence was conducted in CINAHL, PubMed, PsychINFO, Cochrane Systematic Reviews, and Google Scholar. Twenty-two articles were identified as best evidence for inclusion in this review: five randomized control trials, one cluster randomized trial, one mixed methods study, 12 observational studies, and three qualitative studies. Patient-focused predictors of maternal vaccination included provider recommendation; knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs; cues to action; and race and ethnicity. Provider-focused predictors included knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs; and multi-component intervention packages. Health system predictors included standing order protocols and practice site logistics. The major theoretical frameworks that emerged were the Health Belief Model, Theory of Reasoned Action/Theory of Planned Behavior, and Message Framing/Prospect Theory. Provider recommendation was the single most important predictor of vaccine acceptance among pregnant women. An abundance of theoretically-supported, patient-focused research was found in the literature. A minimal number of U.S.-based, provider-focused research was found and none of these used a theoretical framework. Minimal research examining health system barriers to maternal vaccination was found. Additional research into the logistical barriers to maternal vaccination programs within obstetrical practice locations in other geographical locations within the U.S. is warranted. Future provider- and health system-focused research needs to be grounded in theory. The field of implementation science may offer the theoretical guidance necessary to better understand problems in

  3. Factors promoting resident deaths at aged care facilities in Japan: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kentaro; Ogata, Yasuko; Kashiwagi, Masayo

    2018-03-01

    Due to an increasingly ageing population, the Japanese government has promoted elderly deaths in aged care facilities. However, existing facilities were not designed to provide resident end-of-life care and the proportion of aged care facility deaths is currently less than 10%. Consequently, the present review evaluated the factors that promote aged care facility resident deaths in Japan from individual- and facility-level perspectives to exploring factors associated with increased resident deaths. To achieve this, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science and Ichushi databases were searched on 23 January 2016. Influential factors were reviewed for two healthcare services (insourcing and outsourcing facilities) as well as external healthcare agencies operating outside facilities. Of the original 2324 studies retrieved, 42 were included in analysis. Of these studies, five focused on insourcing, two on outsourcing, seven on external agencies and observed facility/agency-level factors. The other 28 studies identified individual-level factors related to death in aged care facilities. The present review found that at both facility and individual levels, in-facility resident deaths were associated with healthcare service provision, confirmation of resident/family end-of-life care preference and staff education. Additionally, while outsourcing facilities did not require employment of physicians/nursing staff to accommodate resident death, these facilities required visits by physicians and nursing staff from external healthcare agencies as well as residents' healthcare input. This review also found few studies examining outsourcing facilities. The number of healthcare outsourcing facilities is rapidly increasing as a result of the Japanese government's new tax incentives. Consequently, there may be an increase in elderly deaths in outsourcing healthcare facilities. Accordingly, it is necessary to identify the factors associated with residents' deaths at outsourcing facilities.

  4. Effectiveness and Appropriateness of mHealth Interventions for Maternal and Child Health: Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huan; Chai, Yanling; Dong, Le; Niu, Wenyi; Zhang, Puhong

    2018-01-01

    Background The application of mobile health (mHealth) technology in reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health (RMNCH) is increasing worldwide. However, best practice and the most effective mHealth interventions have not been reviewed systematically. Objective A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of mHealth interventions for RMNCH around the world were conducted to investigate their characteristics as well as the features and effectiveness of mHealth interventions. Methods ...

  5. Abortion legislation, maternal healthcare, fertility, female literacy, sanitation, violence against women and maternal deaths: a natural experiment in 32 Mexican states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Elard; Chireau, Monique; Pliego, Fernando; Stanford, Joseph; Haddad, Sebastian; Calhoun, Byron; Aracena, Paula; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastián; Thorp, John

    2015-02-23

    To test whether there is an association between abortion legislation and maternal mortality outcomes after controlling for other factors thought to influence maternal health. Population-based natural experiment. Official maternal mortality data from 32 federal states of Mexico between 2002 and 2011. Maternal mortality ratio (MMR), MMR with any abortive outcome (MMRAO) and induced abortion mortality ratio (iAMR). Abortion legislation grouped as less (n=18) or more permissive (n=14); constitutional amendment protecting the unborn (n=17); skilled attendance at birth; all-abortion hospitalisation ratio; low birth weight rate; contraceptive use; total fertility rates (TFR); clean water; sanitation; female literacy rate and intimate-partner violence. Over the 10-year period, states with less permissive abortion legislation exhibited lower MMR (38.3 vs 49.6; ppermissive states. Multivariate regression models estimating effect sizes (β-coefficients) for mortality outcomes showed independent associations (p values between 0.001 and 0.055) with female literacy (β=-0.061 to -1.100), skilled attendance at birth (β=-0.032 to -0.427), low birth weight (β=0.149 to 2.166), all-abortion hospitalisation ratio (β=-0.566 to -0.962), clean water (β=-0.048 to -0.730), sanitation (β=-0.052 to -0.758) and intimate-partner violence (β=0.085 to 0.755). TFR showed an inverse association with MMR (β=-14.329) and MMRAO (β=-1.750) and a direct association with iAMR (β=1.383). Altogether, these factors accounted for (R(2)) 51-88% of the variance among states in overall mortality rates. No statistically independent effect was observed for abortion legislation, constitutional amendment or other covariates. Although less permissive states exhibited consistently lower maternal mortality rates, this finding was not explained by abortion legislation itself. Rather, these differences were explained by other independent factors, which appeared to have a more favourable distribution in these

  6. [Prenatal care and hospital maternal mortality in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga-Soriano, María Rode; Zonana-Nacach, Abraham; Anzaldo-Campos, María Cecilia; Olazarán-Gutiérrez, Asbeidi

    2014-01-01

    To describe the prenatal care (PC) received in women with maternal hospital deaths from 2005 to 2011 in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. Were reviewed the medical chars and registrations of the maternal deaths by the local Committees of Maternal Mortality. There were 44 maternal hospital deaths. Thirty (68%) women assisted to PC appointments during pregnancy, the average number of PC visits was 3.8 and 18 (41%) had an adequate PC (≥ 5 visits). Six (14%) women didn't know they were pregnant; 19 (43%), 21 (48%) y 4 (9%) maternal deaths were due to direct, indirect obstetric cause or non-obstetric causes. Eighteen (18%), 2 (4 %) and 34 (77%) of the maternal deaths occurred during pregnancy, delivery or puerperium. It is necessary pregnancy women have an early, periodic and systematic PC to identify opportunely risk factors associated with pregnancy complications.

  7. Changing conclusions on secondhand smoke in a sudden infant death syndrome review funded by the tobacco industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Elisa K; England, Lucinda; Glantz, Stanton A

    2005-03-01

    Prenatal and postnatal exposure to tobacco smoke adversely affects maternal and child health. Secondhand smoke (SHS) has been linked causally with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in major health reports. In 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) first noted an association between SHS and SIDS, and both prenatal exposure and postnatal SHS exposure were listed as independent risk factors for SIDS in a 1997 California EPA report (republished in 1999 by the National Cancer Institute) and a 2004 US Surgeon General report. The tobacco industry has used scientific consultants to attack the evidence that SHS causes disease, most often lung cancer. Little is known about the industry's strategies to contest the evidence on maternal and child health. In 2001, a review was published on SIDS that acknowledged funding from the Philip Morris (PM) tobacco company. Tobacco industry documents related to this review were examined to identify the company's influence on the content and conclusions of this review. Tobacco industry documents include 40 million pages of internal memos and reports made available to the public as a result of litigation settlements against the tobacco industry in the United States. Between November 2003 and January 2004, we searched tobacco industry document Internet sites from the University of California Legacy Tobacco Documents Library and the Tobacco Documents Online website. Key terms included "SIDS" and names of key persons. Two authors conducted independent searches with similar key terms, reviewed the documents, and agreed on relevancy through consensus. Thirty documents were identified as relevant. Two drafts (an early version and a final version) of an industry-funded review article on SIDS were identified, and 2 authors independently compared these drafts with the final publication. Formal comments by PM executives made in response to the first draft were also reviewed. We used Science Citation Index in July 2004 to determine

  8. How nurses cope with patient death: A systematic review and qualitative meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruishuang; Lee, Susan Fiona; Bloomer, Melissa Jane

    2018-01-01

    To review literature on nurses' coping strategies with patient death. Dealing with the loss of a patient was viewed as one of the most demanding and challenging encounters in clinical practice. Those nurses who are not competent in coping with patient death may be inadequate in supporting dying patients and their family members, and minimise the quality of end-of-life care. To get a broader understanding of how nurses cope with patient death and to develop meaningful and effective interventions, a systematic review which would help underpin the multidimensional approaches is needed. A systematic review. Exhaustive searching in ten databases: CINAHL Plus, EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED, PsycINFO, ProQuest Health & Medical Complete, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global, Google Scholar, EThOS and CareSearch. Meta-aggregation was used to synthesise the findings of the included studies. This systematic review aggregated ten categories from the sixteen qualitative studies included, and then two synthesised findings were derived: intrinsic resources and extrinsic resources. The intrinsic resources consisted of setting boundaries, reflection, crying, death beliefs, life and work experience, and daily routines and activity. The extrinsic resources were comprised of talking and being heard, spiritual practices, education and programmes, and debriefing. This systematic review synthesised the findings about what resources nurses use when coping with patient death and made recommendations on future directions. Areas which could be developed to improve deficiencies that nurses had when faced with the losses of their patients were identified. Nurses need more support resources, which better assist them in coping with patient death. The results of this systematic review could provide evidence for nurses' coping strategies when dealing with patient death, and the recommendations could be employed by nurses to cope with the losses of patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Maternal vitamin D supplementation to meet the needs of the breastfed infant: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Doria K; Senti, Jeanine L; Anderson, Cindy M

    2013-05-01

    Maternal vitamin D insufficiency during lactation, related to lack of sun exposure and minimal intake of vitamin D from the diet, contributes to low breast milk vitamin D content and, therefore, infant vitamin D deficiency. The objective of this review was to examine the literature regarding evidence for achieving maternal vitamin D status that promotes sufficient vitamin D transfer from mother to infant exclusively from breast milk. PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched using the terms lactation or breastfeeding or milk, human and vitamin D. The resulting articles were further limited to those written in English, published within the last 10 years, and involving clinical or randomized controlled trials of humans. The search yielded 13 studies, 3 of which provide evidence for maternal intake of vitamin D and the correlation with exclusively breastfed infants' serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level. A strong positive correlation exists between maternal vitamin D intake during exclusive breastfeeding and infant serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. There is support to conclude that when maternal vitamin D intake is sufficient, vitamin D transfer via breast milk is adequate to meet infant needs. In the reviewed studies, doses up to 10 times the current recommended daily intake of vitamin D were needed to produce sufficient transfer from mother to breastfed infant. Further research is needed to refine the dose and gestational timing of maternal vitamin D supplementation. Due to the high rates of vitamin D deficiency during lactation and the correlations between vitamin D deficiency and multiple diseases, providers should consider monitoring lactating mothers' vitamin D status.

  10. Health literacy of primiparae in the first six months of maternity: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Olecká

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to find out how the health literacy of primiparae in the first six months of motherhood is examined. The following research questions were raised: What methods are used to examine maternal health literacy? What aspects of maternal health literacy are investigated? Do the results prove any link between maternal health literacy and child health? Design: Review. Methods: The search for primary research studies was based on a combination of the following keywords: health literacy, mother*, maternity*, information, and knowledge in the Scopus and Web of Science databases. Exclusion criteria: not a primary study, does not concern research on primiparae of children under six months, unrelated to health literacy research or obtaining of information and acquiring of knowledge, not available in full-text, or clear research methodology description not available. The data were processed using thematic analysis based on the sorting method. Results: 31 studies were found, 17 of which were analysed. The majority of studies used quantitative methods of research with standardized tools. The key categories of health literacy related to obtaining, understanding and use of health information. No direct correlation was clearly demonstrated between level of maternal health literacy and child health. Conclusion: The trend in terms of the focus and goals of professional studies, regardless of cultural or national context, is a shift away from examining the way information is acquired to how it is understood by mothers.

  11. Maternal Anemia during pregnancy and infant low birth weight: A systematic review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Shoboo; Delpishe, Ali; Azami, Milad; Hafezi Ahmadi, Mohammed Reza; Sayehmiri, Kurosh

    2017-03-01

    Infant low birth weight is one of the major problems in different societies. Different reports have provided different results regarding the relationship between maternal anemia and infant low birth weight in different months of pregnancy. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between maternal anemia during pregnancy and infant low birth weight. This systematic review was conducted using related keywords in national (Sid, Iran.doc, Iran medex and Magiran) and international (PubMed, Science Direct, Cochrane, Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, Springer, Embase, Google scholar) databases. Relative risks and confidence intervals were extracted from each study. The results were combined using random-effects model for meta-analysis. The I 2 index was also used to measure heterogeneity between the studies. Overall, 17 studies with a total sample size of 245407 entered the final meta-analysis and demonstrated that the relative risk for maternal anemia in the first, second and third trimester of pregnancy were 1.26 (95% CI: 1.03-1.55), 0.97 (95% CI: 0.57-1.65), and 1.21 (95% CI: 0.84-1.76), respectively. The relationship between maternal anemia and infant low birth weight in the first trimester of pregnancy was significant. Maternal anemia, especially during the first trimester of pregnancy, can be considered as a risk factor for pregnancy outcomes. Therefore, one needs to take the necessary steps to cure this disease in order to reduce the incidence of infant low birth weight.

  12. DOHaD at the intersection of maternal immune activation and maternal metabolic stress: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J A; Norris, S A; Aronoff, D M

    2017-06-01

    The prenatal environment is now recognized as a key driver of non-communicable disease risk later in life. Within the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) paradigm, studies are increasingly identifying links between maternal morbidity during pregnancy and disease later in life for offspring. Nutrient restriction, metabolic disorders during gestation, such as diabetes or obesity, and maternal immune activation provoked by infection have been linked to adverse health outcomes for offspring later in life. These factors frequently co-occur, but the potential for compounding effects of multiple morbidities on DOHaD-related outcomes has not received adequate attention. This is of particular importance in low- or middle-income countries (LMICs), which have ongoing high rates of infectious diseases and are now experiencing transitions from undernutrition to excess adiposity. The purpose of this scoping review is to summarize studies examining the effect and interaction of co-occurring metabolic or nutritional stressors and infectious diseases during gestation on DOHaD-related health outcomes. We identified nine studies in humans - four performed in the United States and five in LMICs. The most common outcome, also in seven of nine studies, was premature birth or low birth weight. We identified nine animal studies, six in mice, two in rats and one in sheep. The interaction between metabolic/nutritional exposures and infectious exposures had varying effects including synergism, inhibition and independent actions. No human studies were specifically designed to assess the interaction of metabolic/nutritional exposures and infectious diseases. Future studies of neonatal outcomes should measure these exposures and explicitly examine their concerted effect.

  13. Maternal Obesity and Occurrence of Fetal Macrosomia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Laura; Ferraro, Zachary M.; Walker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine a precise estimate for the contribution of maternal obesity to macrosomia. Data Sources. The search strategy included database searches in 2011 of PubMed, Medline (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations and Ovid Medline, 1950–2011), and EMBASE Classic + EMBASE. Appropriate search terms were used for each database. Reference lists of retrieved articles and review articles were cross-referenced. Methods of Study Selection. All studies that examined the relationship between maternal obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) (pregravid or at 1st prenatal visit) and fetal macrosomia (birth weight ≥4000 g, ≥4500 g, or ≥90th percentile) were considered for inclusion. Tabulation, Integration, and Results. Data regarding the outcomes of interest and study quality were independently extracted by two reviewers. Results from the meta-analysis showed that maternal obesity is associated with fetal overgrowth, defined as birth weight ≥ 4000 g (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.92, 2.45), birth weight ≥4500 g (OR 2.77,95% CI 2.22, 3.45), and birth weight ≥90% ile for gestational age (OR 2.42, 95% CI 2.16, 2.72). Conclusion. Maternal obesity appears to play a significant role in the development of fetal overgrowth. There is a critical need for effective personal and public health initiatives designed to decrease prepregnancy weight and optimize gestational weight gain. PMID:25544943

  14. Maternal Obesity and Occurrence of Fetal Macrosomia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gaudet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine a precise estimate for the contribution of maternal obesity to macrosomia. Data Sources. The search strategy included database searches in 2011 of PubMed, Medline (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations and Ovid Medline, 1950–2011, and EMBASE Classic + EMBASE. Appropriate search terms were used for each database. Reference lists of retrieved articles and review articles were cross-referenced. Methods of Study Selection. All studies that examined the relationship between maternal obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2 (pregravid or at 1st prenatal visit and fetal macrosomia (birth weight ≥4000 g, ≥4500 g, or ≥90th percentile were considered for inclusion. Tabulation, Integration, and Results. Data regarding the outcomes of interest and study quality were independently extracted by two reviewers. Results from the meta-analysis showed that maternal obesity is associated with fetal overgrowth, defined as birth weight ≥ 4000 g (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.92, 2.45, birth weight ≥4500 g (OR 2.77,95% CI 2.22, 3.45, and birth weight ≥90% ile for gestational age (OR 2.42, 95% CI 2.16, 2.72. Conclusion. Maternal obesity appears to play a significant role in the development of fetal overgrowth. There is a critical need for effective personal and public health initiatives designed to decrease prepregnancy weight and optimize gestational weight gain.

  15. Associations Between Maternal-Foetal Attachment and Infant Developmental Outcomes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branjerdporn, Grace; Meredith, Pamela; Strong, Jenny; Garcia, Jenniffer

    2017-03-01

    Objectives Infant developmental outcomes may be influenced by a range of prenatal maternal characteristics. While there is some evidence to suggest that maternal-foetal attachment may be associated with infant developmental outcomes, there is a need to systematically review this evidence to guide future research and clinical practice. Methods Five electronic databases were systematically scanned. Key journals and reference lists were hand-searched. Papers were included if: (1) pregnant women were assessed for maternal-foetal attachment; (2) the infants were later assessed, under 2 years old, for any developmental outcome (e.g., social-emotional, cognition, motor, language, adaptive behaviour); and (3) they were published in English. Two independent reviewers used the STROBE checklist to appraise the quality of each paper. Results Of the 968 papers identified, eight were included in the review, and four of these were of low quality (infant temperament (n = 5), adaptive behaviour (e.g., colic, sleep) (n = 2), and milestone attainment (n = 1). There is some evidence to suggest that lower maternal-foetal attachment is related to suboptimal developmental outcomes. However, these results should be interpreted with caution due to the limited and low quality studies available. Conclusions Although maternal-foetal attachment may be associated with infant developmental outcomes, future research is required which: (1) considers a range of developmental outcomes, (2) has increased scientific rigour, (3) assesses mother-infant dyads at different prenatal and postnatal time points, and (4) examines different target populations.

  16. Prenatal maternal stress and atopic diseases in the child: a systematic review of observational human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, N W; Hansen, M V; Larsen, A D; Hougaard, K S; Kolstad, H A; Schlünssen, V

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that maternal stress during pregnancy promotes atopic disorders in the offspring. This is the first systematic review to address prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) and the subsequent risk of atopy-related outcomes in the child. The review was performed in accordance to the PRISMA criteria. We searched and selected studies in PubMed, Scopus, Embase and PsychINFO until November 2014. Sixteen (with 25 analyses) of 426 identified articles met the review criteria. Five main PNMS exposures (negative life events, anxiety/depression, bereavement, distress and job strain) and five main atopic outcomes (asthma, wheeze, atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and IgE) were assessed across the studies. Overall, 21 of the 25 analyses suggested a positive association between PNMS and atopic outcomes. Of the 11 exposure-response analyses reported, six found statistically significant trends. This systematic review suggests a relationship between maternal stress during pregnancy and atopic disorders in the child. However, the existing studies are of diverse quality. The wide definitions of often self-reported stress exposures imply a substantial risk for information bias and false-positive results. Research comparing objective and subjective measures of PNMS exposure as well as objective measures for atopic outcome is needed. © 2015 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Using Observational Data to Estimate the Effect of Hand Washing and Clean Delivery Kit Use by Birth Attendants on Maternal Deaths after Home Deliveries in Rural Bangladesh, India and Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Seward

    Full Text Available Globally, puerperal sepsis accounts for an estimated 8-12% of maternal deaths, but evidence is lacking on the extent to which clean delivery practices could improve maternal survival. We used data from the control arms of four cluster-randomised controlled trials conducted in rural India, Bangladesh and Nepal, to examine associations between clean delivery kit use and hand washing by the birth attendant with maternal mortality among home deliveries.We tested associations between clean delivery practices and maternal deaths, using a pooled dataset for 40,602 home births across sites in the three countries. Cross-sectional data were analysed by fitting logistic regression models with and without multiple imputation, and confounders were selected a priori using causal directed acyclic graphs. The robustness of estimates was investigated through sensitivity analyses.Hand washing was associated with a 49% reduction in the odds of maternal mortality after adjusting for confounding factors (adjusted odds ratio (AOR 0.51, 95% CI 0.28-0.93. The sensitivity analysis testing the missing at random assumption for the multiple imputation, as well as the sensitivity analysis accounting for possible misclassification bias in the use of clean delivery practices, indicated that the association between hand washing and maternal death had been over estimated. Clean delivery kit use was not associated with a maternal death (AOR 1.26, 95% CI 0.62-2.56.Our evidence suggests that hand washing in delivery is critical for maternal survival among home deliveries in rural South Asia, although the exact magnitude of this effect is uncertain due to inherent biases associated with observational data from low resource settings. Our findings indicating kit use does not improve maternal survival, suggests that the soap is not being used in all instances that kit use is being reported.

  18. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart--controversies regarding his illnesses and death: a bibliographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, William J

    2010-06-01

    More has been written about Mozart's illnesses and death than for any other composer. An exploration of PAMA's Bibliography of Performing Arts Medicine provides the data for this review. The bibliography contained 136 entries that pertained to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Of these, 81 were available to the author, either in printed or electronic copy. In order to provide a clearer historical perspective on this topic, this review assembles information pertaining to illnesses and other medical problems that occurred during Mozart's life as well as those purportedly contributing to his death.

  19. Maternal mortality at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Southeast Nigeria: a 10-year review (2003-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiechina, Nj; Okolie, Ve; Okechukwu, Zc; Oguejiofor, Cf; Udegbunam, Oi; Nwajiaku, Lsa; Ogbuokiri, C; Egeonu, R

    2013-01-01

    Maternal mortality is high the world over, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria. Nigeria has consistently demonstrated one of the most abysmally poor reproductive health indices in the world, maternal mortality inclusive. This is a sad reminder that, unless things are better organized, Southeast Nigeria, which Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH) represents, may not join other parts of the world in attaining Millennium Development Goal 5 to improve maternal health in 2015. This study was conducted to assess NAUTH'S progress in achieving a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) and to identify the major causes of maternal mortality. This was a 10-year retrospective study, conducted between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2012 at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Southeast Nigeria. During the study period, there were 8,022 live births and 103 maternal deaths, giving an MMR of 1,284/100,000 live births. The MMR was 1,709 in 2003, reducing to 1,115 in 2012. This is to say that there was a 24.86% reduction over 10 years, hence, in 15 years, the reduction should be 37%. This extrapolated reduction over 15 years is about 38% less than the target of 75% reduction. The major direct causes of maternal mortality in this study were: pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (27%), hemorrhage (22%), and sepsis (12%). The indirect causes were: anemia, anesthesia, and HIV encephalopathy. Most of the maternal deaths occurred in unbooked patients (98%) and within the first 48 hours of admission (76%). MMRs in NAUTH are still very high and the rate of reduction is very slow. At this rate, it will take this health facility 30 years, instead of 15 years, to achieve a 75% reduction in maternal mortality.

  20. Maternal mortality at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Southeast Nigeria: a 10-year review (2003–2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiechina, NJ; Okolie, VE; Okechukwu, ZC; Oguejiofor, CF; Udegbunam, OI; Nwajiaku, LSA; Ogbuokiri, C; Egeonu, R

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality is high the world over, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria. Nigeria has consistently demonstrated one of the most abysmally poor reproductive health indices in the world, maternal mortality inclusive. This is a sad reminder that, unless things are better organized, Southeast Nigeria, which Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH) represents, may not join other parts of the world in attaining Millennium Development Goal 5 to improve maternal health in 2015. Objectives This study was conducted to assess NAUTH’S progress in achieving a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) and to identify the major causes of maternal mortality. Materials and methods This was a 10-year retrospective study, conducted between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2012 at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Southeast Nigeria. Results During the study period, there were 8,022 live births and 103 maternal deaths, giving an MMR of 1,284/100,000 live births. The MMR was 1,709 in 2003, reducing to 1,115 in 2012. This is to say that there was a 24.86% reduction over 10 years, hence, in 15 years, the reduction should be 37%. This extrapolated reduction over 15 years is about 38% less than the target of 75% reduction. The major direct causes of maternal mortality in this study were: pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (27%), hemorrhage (22%), and sepsis (12%). The indirect causes were: anemia, anesthesia, and HIV encephalopathy. Most of the maternal deaths occurred in unbooked patients (98%) and within the first 48 hours of admission (76%). Conclusion MMRs in NAUTH are still very high and the rate of reduction is very slow. At this rate, it will take this health facility 30 years, instead of 15 years, to achieve a 75% reduction in maternal mortality. PMID:23901299

  1. Literature Review on Issues of Work Life Balance, Workplace Culture and Maternity/Childcare Issues

    OpenAIRE

    DREW, EILEEN PATRICIA; REDMOND, JENNIFER; VALIULIS, MARYANN

    2008-01-01

    PUBLISHED Dublin A copy of the report can be obtained from the author or access at the web address below This report is a literature review of work-life balance, workplace culture and maternity/childcare issues. It draws on national and international research, policy and legislation, and looks particularly at the role each of these factors play in the decision-making strategies of those facing a crisis pregnancy Crisis Pregnancy Agency

  2. Performance indicators for maternity care in a circumpolar context: a scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Rebecca; D'Hont, Thomsen; Linton, Janice; Murphy, Kellie E.; Veillard, Jeremy; Chatwood, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background In circumpolar regions, harsh climates and scattered populations have prompted the centralization of care and reduction of local maternity services. The resulting practice of routine evacuation for birth from smaller towns to larger urban centres points to a potential conflict between the necessity to ensure patient safety and the importance of delivering services that are responsive to the health needs and values of populations served. Objective To identify recommended performance/quality indicators for use in circumpolar maternity care systems. Methods We searched Scopus, Ebscohost databases (including Academic Search Complete and CINAHL), the Global Health Database, High North Research Documents, and online grey literature. Articles were included if they focused on maternal health indicators in the population of interest (Indigenous women, women receiving care in circumpolar or remote regions). Articles were excluded if they were not related to pregnancy, birth or the immediate post-partum or neonatal periods. Two reviewers independently reviewed articles for inclusion and extracted relevant data. Results Twenty-six documents were included. Twelve were government documents, seven were review articles or indicator compilations, four were indicator sets recommended by academics or non-governmental organizations and three were research papers. We extracted and categorized 81 unique health indicators. The majority of indicators reflected health systems processes and outcomes during the antenatal and intra-partum periods. Only two governmental indicator sets explicitly considered the needs of Indigenous peoples. Conclusions This review demonstrates that, although most circumpolar health systems engage in performance reporting for maternity care, efforts to capture local priorities and values are limited in most regions. Future work in this area should involve northern stakeholders in the process of indicator selection and development. PMID:27938636

  3. Performance indicators for maternity care in a circumpolar context: a scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Rich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In circumpolar regions, harsh climates and scattered populations have prompted the centralization of care and reduction of local maternity services. The resulting practice of routine evacuation for birth from smaller towns to larger urban centres points to a potential conflict between the necessity to ensure patient safety and the importance of delivering services that are responsive to the health needs and values of populations served. Objective: To identify recommended performance/quality indicators for use in circumpolar maternity care systems. Methods: We searched Scopus, Ebscohost databases (including Academic Search Complete and CINAHL, the Global Health Database, High North Research Documents, and online grey literature. Articles were included if they focused on maternal health indicators in the population of interest (Indigenous women, women receiving care in circumpolar or remote regions. Articles were excluded if they were not related to pregnancy, birth or the immediate post-partum or neonatal periods. Two reviewers independently reviewed articles for inclusion and extracted relevant data. Results: Twenty-six documents were included. Twelve were government documents, seven were review articles or indicator compilations, four were indicator sets recommended by academics or non-governmental organizations and three were research papers. We extracted and categorized 81 unique health indicators. The majority of indicators reflected health systems processes and outcomes during the antenatal and intra-partum periods. Only two governmental indicator sets explicitly considered the needs of Indigenous peoples. Conclusions: This review demonstrates that, although most circumpolar health systems engage in performance reporting for maternity care, efforts to capture local priorities and values are limited in most regions. Future work in this area should involve northern stakeholders in the process of indicator selection and development.

  4. Maternal obesity and breastfeeding intention, initiation, intensity and duration: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcksin, Rivka; Bel, Sarah; Galjaard, Sander; Devlieger, Roland

    2014-04-01

    This systematic review investigates the relationship between maternal obesity and breastfeeding intention, initiation, intensity, duration and milk supply. A comprehensive search was performed through three major databases, including Medline, Cochrane Library and Cumulative Index For Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and by screening reference lists of the relevant publications. Selection criteria were: report of original research, studies on low-risk obese mothers and the comparison with normal weight mothers which met at least two of the following primary outcomes: breastfeeding intention; initiation; intensity; duration and/or milk supply. Furthermore, the included reports had to contain a clear definition of pre-pregnant obesity, use compensation mechanisms for potential confounding factors, have a prospective cohort design and had to have been published between 1997 and 2011 and in English, French or Dutch. Effects of obesity on breastfeeding intention, initiation, intensity, duration and milk supply were analysed, tabulated and summarised in this review. Studies have found that obese women are less likely to intend to breastfeed and that maternal obesity seems to be associated with a decreased initiation of breastfeeding, a shortened duration of breastfeeding, a less adequate milk supply and delayed onset of lactogenesis II, compared with their normal weight counterparts. This systematic review indicates therefore that maternal obesity is an adverse determinant for breastfeeding success. © 2012 JohnWiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A systematic review of the relationship between severe maternal morbidity and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Marie; Sandall, Jane; Bick, Debra

    2012-11-10

    The incidence of severe maternal morbidity is increasing in high-income countries as a consequence, in part, of increased obstetric intervention and increasingly complex medical needs of women who become pregnant. Access to emergency obstetric care means that for the majority of women in these countries, an experience of severe maternal morbidity is unlikely to result in loss of life. However, little is known about the subsequent impact on postnatal psychological health resulting in an evidence gap to support provision of appropriate care for these women. There has recently been increasing recognition that childbirth can be a cause of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The combination of experiencing a life-threatening complication and its management may culminate in psychological trauma. This systematic review examined the association between women's experience of severe maternal morbidity during labour, at the time of giving birth or within the first week following birth, and PTSD and its symptoms. Relevant literature was identified through multiple databases, including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Web of Science, Cochrane library and the British Library, using predetermined search strategies. The search terms included "post-traumatic stress disorder", "PTSD", "stress disorders, post-traumatic", "maternal morbidity", "pregnancy complications" "puerperal disorders", "obstetric labo(u)r complication", "postpartum h(a)emorrhage", "eclampsia". Studies identified were categorised according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of included studies was assessed using the relevant CASP appraisal tools. Eleven primary studies met review criteria. Evidence of a relationship between severe maternal morbidity and PTSD/PTSD symptoms was inconsistent and findings varied between studies. Nevertheless, there is some evidence that severe pre-eclampsia is a risk factor for PTSD and its symptoms, an association possibly

  6. The increase in the rate of maternal deaths related to cardiovascular disease in Japan from 1991-1992 to 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Katsuragi, Shinji; Osato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Junichi; Nakata, Masahiko; Murakoshi, Takeshi; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Kanayama, Naohiro; Ishiwata, Isamu; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD), both genetic and acquired, increase the risk of maternal death (MD) unless proper genetic/clinical counseling is provided and a multidisciplinary approach is adopted during pregnancy. In recent decades, there has been a significant increase in the number of women with CVD of child-bearing age and in the incidence of pregnancy among relatively older women. However, the impact of this phenomenon on MD has not been carefully investigated. This retrospective study compares the incidence and etiology of maternal deaths related to cardiovascular disease (MD-CVD) in Japan in 2010-2012 to that seen in 1991-1992. Seven cases of MD-CVD were reported in 1991-1992, compared to 15 in 2010-2012. In 2010-2012, the causes included aortic dissection (n=5), peripartum cardiomyopathy (n=3), sudden adult/arrhythmic death syndrome (n=2), acute cardiomyopathy (n=2), pulmonary hypertension (n=2), and myocardial infarction (n=1), and four of these causes were not encountered in 1991-1992. The incidence of MD over the total number of pregnancies decreased from 9.4 per 100,000 cases in 1990-1992 to 4.6 per 100,000 cases in 2010-2012 (pJapan over the past 20 years. Thus, it is of critical importance to better understand the etiologies and early signs of MD-CVD and to devise an effective management program for pregnancies complicated by CVD. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Associations of maternal stress with children's weight-related behaviours: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, S G; Maher, J P; Belcher, B R; Leventhal, A M; Margolin, G; Shonkoff, E T; Dunton, G F

    2017-05-01

    Low adherence to guidelines for weight-related behaviours (e.g. dietary intake and physical activity) among US children underscores the need to better understand how parental factors may influence children's obesity risk. In addition to most often acting as primary caregiver to their children, women are also known to experience greater levels of stress than men. This study systematically reviewed associations between maternal stress and children's weight-related behaviours. Our search returned 14 eligible articles, representing 25 unique associations of maternal stress with a distinct child weight-related behaviour (i.e. healthy diet [n = 3], unhealthy diet [n = 6], physical activity [n = 7] and sedentary behaviour [n = 9]). Overall, findings for the relationship between maternal stress and children's weight-related behaviours were mixed, with no evidence for an association with children's healthy or unhealthy dietary intake, but fairly consistent evidence for the association of maternal stress with children's lower physical activity and higher sedentary behaviour. Recommendations for future research include prioritizing prospective designs, identifying moderators, and use of high-resolution, real-time data collection techniques to elucidate potential mechanisms. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  8. Associations of maternal stress with children’s weight-related behaviors: A systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Sydney G.; Maher, Jaclyn P.; Belcher, Britni R.; Leventhal, Adam M.; Margolin, Gayla; Shonkoff, Eleanor T.; Dunton, Genevieve F.

    2017-01-01

    Low adherence to guidelines for weight-related behaviors (e.g., dietary intake and physical activity) among U.S. children underscores the need to better understand how parental factors may influence children’s obesity risk. In addition to most often acting as primary caregiver to their children, women are also known to experience greater levels of stress than men. This study systematically reviewed associations between maternal stress and children’s weight-related behaviors. Our search returned 14 eligible articles, representing 25 unique associations of maternal stress with a distinct child weight-related behavior (i.e., healthy diet (n=3), unhealthy diet (n=6), physical activity (n=7), sedentary behavior (n=9)). Overall, findings for the relationship between maternal stress and children’s weight-related behaviors were mixed, with no evidence for an association with children’s healthy or unhealthy dietary intake, but fairly consistent evidence for the association of maternal stress with children’s lower physical activity and higher sedentary behavior. Recommendations for future research include prioritizing prospective designs, identifying moderators, and use of high resolution, real-time data collection techniques to elucidate potential mechanisms. PMID:28296057

  9. The effects of cash transfers and vouchers on the use and quality of maternity care services: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Benjamin M.; Harrison, Sean; Portela, Anayda; Bick, Debra

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundCash transfers and vouchers are forms of `demand-side financing' that have been widely used to promote maternal and newborn health in low- and middle-income countries during the last 15 years.MethodsThis systematic review consolidates evidence from seven published systematic reviews on the effects of different types of cash transfers and vouchers on the use and quality of maternity care services, and updates the systematic searches to June 2015 using the Joanna Briggs Institute appr...

  10. WHO systematic review of maternal morbidity and mortality: the prevalence of severe acute maternal morbidity (near miss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattinson Robert C

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To determine the prevalence of severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM worldwide (near miss. Method Systematic review of all available data. The methodology followed a pre-defined protocol, an extensive search strategy of 10 electronic databases as well as other sources. Articles were evaluated according to specified inclusion criteria. Data were extracted using data extraction instrument which collects additional information on the quality of reporting including definitions and identification of cases. Data were entered into a specially constructed database and tabulated using SAS statistical management and analysis software. Results A total of 30 studies are included in the systematic review. Designs are mainly cross-sectional and 24 were conducted in hospital settings, mostly teaching hospitals. Fourteen studies report on a defined SAMM condition while the remainder use a response to an event such as admission to intensive care unit as a proxy for SAMM. Criteria for identification of cases vary widely across studies. Prevalences vary between 0.80% – 8.23% in studies that use disease-specific criteria while the range is 0.38% – 1.09% in the group that use organ-system based criteria and included unselected group of women. Rates are within the range of 0.01% and 2.99% in studies using management-based criteria. It is not possible to pool data together to provide summary estimates or comparisons between different settings due to variations in case-identification criteria. Nevertheless, there seems to be an inverse trend in prevalence with development status of a country. Conclusion There is a clear need to set uniform criteria to classify patients as SAMM. This standardisation could be made for similar settings separately. An organ-system dysfunction/failure approach is the most epidemiologically sound as it is least open to bias, and thus could permit developing summary estimates.

  11. A theoretical and empirical review of the death-thought accessibility concept in terror management research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Joseph; Schimel, Jeff; Arndt, Jamie; Faucher, Erik H

    2010-09-01

    Terror management theory (TMT) highlights the motivational impact of thoughts of death in various aspects of everyday life. Since its inception in 1986, research on TMT has undergone a slight but significant shift from an almost exclusive focus on the manipulation of thoughts of death to a marked increase in studies that measure the accessibility of death-related cognition. Indeed, the number of death-thought accessibility (DTA) studies in the published literature has grown substantially in recent years. In light of this increasing reliance on the DTA concept, the present article is meant to provide a comprehensive theoretical and empirical review of the literature employing this concept. After discussing the roots of DTA, the authors outline the theoretical refinements to TMT that have accompanied significant research findings associated with the DTA concept. Four distinct categories (mortality salience, death association, anxiety-buffer threat, and dispositional) are derived to organize the reviewed DTA studies, and the theoretical implications of each category are discussed. Finally, a number of lingering empirical and theoretical issues in the DTA literature are discussed with the aim of stimulating and focusing future research on DTA specifically and TMT in general.

  12. Unexplained Absences and Risk of Death and Injury Among Nursing Home Residents: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Marta H; Weller, Carolina; Ibrahim, Joseph E

    2017-04-01

    Unexplained absence of nursing home (NH) residents is one of the most challenging issues related to the care of older people. The aim of this review was to examine the death and injury outcomes of unexplained absence of NH residents. We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, AgeLine, and Cochrane Library to identify qualitative and quantitative studies published in the English language. Data on death and injury were collated, and aggregate proportions were calculated where possible. Nine studies were identified; most (n = 6) were conducted in the United States. Persons with dementia formed the study population in all studies. There were 1440 individual unexplained absences reported across the 9 studies. We calculated a rate of 82 deaths and 61 injuries per 1000 incidents of unexplained absence. Extreme temperatures were the most common cause of death. Most individuals left by foot, and were found within a 1-mile radius of place last seen in green vegetation and waterways. This review provides valuable insight into death and injury outcomes. Further studies are recommended to improve understanding and prevent adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preventable trauma deaths: from panel review to population based-studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesconi Sergio

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Preventable trauma deaths are defined as deaths which could be avoided if optimal care has been delivered. Studies on preventable trauma deaths have been accomplished initially with panel reviews of pre-hospital and hospital charts. However, several investigators questioned the reliability and validity of this method because of low reproducibility of implicit judgments when they are made by different experts. Nevertheless, number of studies were published all around the world and ultimately gained some credibility, particularly in regions where comparisons were made before and after trauma system implementation with a resultant fall in mortality. During the last decade of century the method of comparing observed survival with probability of survival calculated from large trauma registries has obtained popularity. Preventable trauma deaths were identified as deaths occurred notwithstanding a high calculated probability of survival. In recent years, preventable trauma deaths studies have been replaced by population-based studies, which use databases representative of overall population, therefore with high epidemiologic value. These databases contain readily available information which carry out the advantage of objectivity and large numbers. Nowadays, population-based researches provide the strongest evidence regarding the effectiveness of trauma systems and trauma centers on patient outcomes.

  14. Use of Donor Human Milk and Maternal Breastfeeding Rates: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas; Nair, Harish; Simpson, Judith; Embleton, Nicholas

    2016-05-01

    The number of human milk banks is growing worldwide. The introduction of donor human milk (DHM) to neonatal units has been advocated as a strategy to promote maternal breastfeeding. However, concern has been raised that the introduction of DHM may actually lead to a decrease in maternal breastfeeding. To address this question, we conducted a systematic literature review of studies that assessed maternal breastfeeding rates before and after the introduction of DHM. We searched 7 electronic databases, carried out citation tracking, and contacted experts in the field. Where data for breastfeeding rates before and after the introduction of DHM were directly comparable, a relative risk was calculated. Our search identified 286 studies, of which 10 met the inclusion criteria. Definitions of patient populations and study outcomes varied, limiting meaningful comparison. Where possible, relative risks (RR) were calculated on aggregated data. The introduction of DHM had a significant positive impact on any breastfeeding on discharge (RR, 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.35;P= .005) but none on exclusive maternal breastfeeding on discharge (RR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.91-1.40;P= .27) or on exclusive administration of own mother's milk (OMM) days 1 to 28 of life (RR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.78-1.49; P= .65). A single-center study demonstrated a significant decrease in the percentage of feeds that were OMM after the introduction of DHM. In conclusion, the available data demonstrate some evidence of positive and negative effects on measures of maternal breastfeeding when DHM is introduced to a neonatal unit. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Maternal Anemia during pregnancy and infant low birth weight: A systematic review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoboo Rahmati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infant low birth weight is one of the major problems in different societies. Different reports have provided different results regarding the relationship between maternal anemia and infant low birth weight in different months of pregnancy. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between maternal anemia during pregnancy and infant low birth weight. Materials and Methods: This systematic review was conducted using related keywords in national (Sid, Iran.doc, Iran medex and Magiran and international (PubMed, Science Direct, Cochrane, Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, Springer, Embase, Google scholar databases. Relative risks and confidence intervals were extracted from each study. The results were combined using random-effects model for meta-analysis. The I2 index was also used to measure heterogeneity between the studies. Results: Overall, 17 studies with a total sample size of 245407 entered the final meta-analysis and demonstrated that the relative risk for maternal anemia in the first, second and third trimester of pregnancy were 1.26 (95% CI: 1.03-1.55, 0.97 (95% CI: 0.57-1.65, and 1.21 (95% CI: 0.84-1.76, respectively. The relationship between maternal anemia and infant low birth weight in the first trimester of pregnancy was significant. Conclusion: Maternal anemia, especially during the first trimester of pregnancy, can be considered as a risk factor for pregnancy outcomes. Therefore, one needs to take the necessary steps to cure this disease in order to reduce the incidence of infant low birth weight.

  16. Potential combined effects of maternal smoking and coffee intake on foetal death within the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, Maria; Nohr, Ellen A; Olsen, Jørn

    2018-01-01

    on the risk of foetal (early and late) death. The study included 90 086 pregnant women, with information about their smoking habit and coffee intake in early pregnancy, and several potential confounding factors. Interaction was studied by calculating both the hazard ratio (HR) in Cox's regression (linear......Background: Several studies have linked coffee intake and smoking to foetal death, but a possible interaction between both exposures remains unknown. Methods: We studied, within the Danish National Birth Cohort, the potential interaction between smoking and coffee drinking while pregnant...... and smoothed restricted cubic spline) and the interaction contrast ratio (ICR). Results: Women who neither smoked nor drank coffee were used as the reference group. Drinking more than 3 cups/d of coffee was associated with the highest risk of foetal death, spontaneous abortion and stillbirth for all smoking...

  17. Access and utilisation of maternity care for disabled women who experience domestic abuse: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although disabled women are significantly more likely to experience domestic abuse during pregnancy than non-disabled women, very little is known about how maternity care access and utilisation is affected by the co-existence of disability and domestic abuse. This systematic review of the literature explored how domestic abuse impacts upon disabled women’s access to maternity services. Methods Eleven articles were identified through a search of six electronic databases and data were analysed to identify: the factors that facilitate or compromise access to care; the consequences of inadequate care for pregnant women’s health and wellbeing; and the effectiveness of existing strategies for improvement. Results Findings indicate that a mental health diagnosis, poor relationships with health professionals and environmental barriers can compromise women’s utilisation of maternity services. Domestic abuse can both compromise, and catalyse, access to services and social support is a positive factor when accessing care. Delayed and inadequate care has adverse effects on women’s physical and psychological health, however further research is required to fully explore the nature and extent of these consequences. Only one study identified strategies currently being used to improve access to services for disabled women experiencing abuse. Conclusions Based upon the barriers and facilitators identified within the review, we suggest that future strategies for improvement should focus on: understanding women’s reasons for accessing care; fostering positive relationships; being women-centred; promoting environmental accessibility; and improving the strength of the evidence base. PMID:25029907

  18. Effect of Maternal and Pregnancy Risk Factors on Early Neonatal Death in Planned Home Births Delivering at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachilova, Sophia; Czuzoj-Shulman, Nicholas; Abenhaim, Haim Arie

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence of home birth in the United States is increasing, although its safety is undetermined. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of obstetrical risk factors on early neonatal death in planned home births delivering at home. The authors conducted a retrospective 3-year cohort study consisting of planned home births that delivered at home in the United States between 2011 and 2013. The study excluded infants with congenital and chromosomal anomalies and infants born at ≤34 weeks' gestation. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the adjusted effects of individual obstetrical variables on early neonatal deaths within 7 days of delivery. During the study period, there were 71 704 planned and delivered home births. The overall early neonatal death rate was 1.5 deaths per 1000 planned home births. The risks of early neonatal death were significantly higher in nulliparous births (OR 2.71; 95% CI 1.71-4.31), women with a previous CS (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.25-5.52), non-vertex presentations (OR 4.27; 95% CI 1.33-13.75), plural births (OR 9.79; 95% CI 4.25-22.57), preterm births (OR 4.68; 95% CI 2.30-9.51), and births at ≥41 weeks of gestation (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.09-2.84). Early neonatal deaths occur more commonly in certain obstetrical contexts. Patient selection may reduce adverse neonatal outcomes among planned home births. Copyright © 2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identifying preventable trauma death: does autopsy serve a role in the peer review process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantling, Dane; Teichman, Amanda; Kucejko, Robert; McCracken, Brendan; Eakins, James; Burns, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Missing life-threatening injuries is a persistent concern in any trauma program. Autopsy is a tool routinely utilized to determine an otherwise occult cause of death in many fields of medicine. It has been adopted as a required component of the trauma peer review (PR) process by both the American College of Surgeons and the Pennsylvania Trauma Foundation. We hypothesized that autopsy would not identify preventable deaths for augmentation of the PR process. A retrospective chart review using our institutional trauma registry of all trauma deaths between January 2012 and December 2015 was performed. Per the protocol of our level 1 center, all trauma deaths are referred to the medical examiner (ME) and reviewed as part of the trauma PR process. All autopsy results are evaluated with relation to injury severity score (ISS), trauma injury severity score (TRISS), nature of death, and injuries added by autopsy. ME reports are reviewed by the trauma medical director and referred back to the trauma PR committee if warranted. Trauma injury severity score methodology determines the probability of survival (Ps) given injuries identified. A patient with Ps of ≥0.5 is expected to survive their injuries. Cohorts were created based on when in the hospitalization death occurred: 48 h, or late death. A comparison was conducted between the ISS and Ps calculated during trauma workup and on autopsy using chi-square and Fischer's exact tests. A total of 173 patient deaths were referred to the ME with 123 responses received. Average length of stay was 2.61 d. Twenty-six patients had autopsy declined by the ME, 25 received an external examination only, and 72 received a full autopsy. Autopsy identified one case that was reconsidered in PR (P = 0.603) and added diagnoses, but not injuries, to one patient in the early death group (P = 1) and two in the late death group (P = 0.4921). No preventable cause of death was uncovered, and educational use was minimal. Autopsy did identify

  20. Maternal body mass index and risk of birth and maternal health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Abe, S K; Kanda, M; Narita, S; Rahman, M S; Bilano, V; Ota, E; Gilmour, S; Shibuya, K

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based cohort studies of maternal body mass index (BMI) and risk of adverse birth and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and the British Nursing Index were searched from inception to February 2014. Forty-two studies were included. Our study found that maternal underweight was significantly associated with higher risk of preterm birth (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.27), low birthweight (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.50-1.84) and small for gestational age (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.69-2.02). Compared with mothers with normal BMI, overweight or obese mothers were at increased odds of gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, caesarean delivery and post-partum haemorrhage. The population-attributable risk (PAR) indicated that if women were entirely unexposed to overweight or obesity during the pre-pregnancy or early pregnancy period, 14% to 35% fewer women would develop gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia or pregnancy-induced hypertension in Brazil, China, India, Iran or Thailand. The highest PAR of low birthweight attributable to maternal underweight was found in Iran (20%), followed by India (18%), Thailand (10%) and China (8%). Treatment and prevention of maternal underweight, overweight or obesity may help reduce the burden on maternal and child health in developing countries. © 2015 World Obesity.

  1. Maternal education and breastfeeding practices in China: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Yun; Du, Mengran; Binns, Colin W; Lee, Andy H

    2017-07-01

    to examine the association between maternal education and breastfeeding prevalence in China. a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted based on the literature of observational studies retrieved from electronic databases of CNKI, Medline, Embase, CINHAL, ProQuest and Science Direct. Maternal education was recoded into two binary categorical variables using different cut-off points. Both fixed and random effect models were used to estimate the pooled association between maternal education and breastfeeding prevalence in China. Visual inspection of Galbraith plot for heterogeneity detection, sensitivity analysis and publication bias test were performed. a total of 31 studies were included in the systematic review, and 15 and 26 studies were suitable for meta-analysis in terms of two different cutoff points of maternal education respectively. In the group using 6-year education cut-off (Group 1), the odds of breastfeeding was 10% (pooled OR=0.90, 95% CI: 0.83, 0.97) lower in mothers who had been educated for 'more than 6 years' compared to mothers with '6 years or less' education. In the group using 12-year education cut-off (Group 2), the odds of breastfeeding was 9% (pooled OR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.86, 0.96) lower in mothers who had 'more than 12 years' education compared to mothers who attained '12 years or less' education. There was substantial heterogeneity across the studies in both groups. Through meta-regression analysis, sample size of studies was detected contributing to the heterogeneity in Group 1; however none of study level factors were found to be a source of heterogeneity in Group 2. in the Chinese culture and employment environment, mothers who have attained a higher level of education are less likely to breastfeed their babies compared to mothers with lower education levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rural residents' perspectives on the rural 'good death': a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, Suzanne; MacLeod, Roderick D; Glasgow, Nicholas J; Wilson, Donna M; Phillips, Christine B; Wiles, Robert B

    2018-05-01

    The 'good death' is one objective of palliative care, with many 'good death' viewpoints and research findings reflecting the urban voice. Rural areas are distinct and need special consideration. This scoping review identified and charted current research knowledge on the 'good' rural death through the perspectives of rural residents, including rural patients with a life-limiting illness, to identify evidence and gaps in the literature for future studies. A comprehensive literature search of English language articles (no date filter applied) was conducted in 2016 (2 January to 14 February) using five library databases. Reference lists of included articles, recent issues of eight relevant journals and three grey literature databases were also hand-searched. Twenty articles (for 17 studies and one systematic review) were identified after a two-phase screening process by two reviewers, using pre-determined inclusion criteria. Data from each study were extracted and charted, analysed using a thematic analysis of the included articles' content, and with a quantitative analysis of the scoping review. These papers revealed data collected from rural patients with a life-limiting illness and family caregivers, rural healthcare providers, the wider rural community, rural community leaders and rural health administrators and policy makers. Rural locations were heterogeneous. Residents from developed and developing countries believe a 'good death' is one that is peaceful, free of pain and without suffering; however, this is subjective and priorities are based on personal, cultural, social and religious perspectives. Currently, there is insufficient data to generalise rural residents' perspectives and what it means for them to die well. Given the extreme importance of a 'good death', there is a need for further studies to elicit rural patient and family caregiver perspectives. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The determinants of home and nursing home death: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vania; Earle, Craig C; Esplen, Mary Jane; Fowler, Robert; Goldman, Russell; Grossman, Daphna; Levin, Leslie; Manuel, Douglas G; Sharkey, Shirlee; Tanuseputro, Peter; You, John J

    2016-01-20

    Most Canadians die in hospital, and yet, many express a preference to die at home. Place of death is the result of the interaction among sociodemographic, illness- and healthcare-related factors. Although home death is sometimes considered a potential indicator of end-of-life/palliative care quality, some determinants of place of death are more modifiable than others. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the determinants of home and nursing home death in adult patients diagnosed with an advanced, life-limiting illness. A systematic literature search was performed for studies in English published from January 1, 2004 to September 24, 2013 that evaluated the determinants of home or nursing home death compared to hospital death in adult patients with an advanced, life-limiting condition. The adjusted odds ratios, relative risks, and 95% confidence intervals of each determinant were extracted from the studies. Meta-analyses were performed if appropriate. The quality of individual studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale and the body of evidence was assessed according to the GRADE Working Group criteria. Of the 5,900 citations identified, 26 retrospective cohort studies were eligible. The risk of bias in the studies identified was considered low. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of home versus hospital death included multidisciplinary home palliative care, preference for home death, cancer as opposed to other diagnoses, early referral to palliative care, not living alone, having a caregiver, and the caregiver's coping skills. Knowledge about the determinants of place of death can be used to inform care planning between healthcare providers, patients and family members regarding the feasibility of dying in the preferred location and may help explain the incongruence between preferred and actual place of death. Modifiable factors such as early referral to palliative care, presence of a multidisciplinary home palliative care

  4. Social determinants and maternal exposure to intimate partner violence of obstetric patients with severe maternal morbidity in the intensive care unit: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Quintanilla, Beatriz Paulina; Taft, Angela; McDonald, Susan; Pollock, Wendy; Roque Henriquez, Joel Christian

    2016-11-28

    Maternal mortality is a potentially preventable public health issue. Maternal morbidity is increasingly of interest to aid the reduction of maternal mortality. Obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) are an important part of the global burden of maternal morbidity. Social determinants influence health outcomes of pregnant women. Additionally, intimate partner violence has a great negative impact on women's health and pregnancy outcome. However, little is known about the contextual and social aspects of obstetric patients treated in the ICU. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review of the social determinants and exposure to intimate partner violence of obstetric patients admitted to an ICU. A systematic search will be conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, ProQuest, LILACS and SciELO from 2000 to 2016. Studies published in English and Spanish will be identified in relation to data reporting on social determinants of health and/or exposure to intimate partner violence of obstetric women, treated in the ICU during pregnancy, childbirth or within 42 days of the end of pregnancy. Two reviewers will independently screen for study eligibility and data extraction. Risk of bias and assessment of the quality of the included studies will be performed by using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist. Data will be analysed and summarised using a narrative description of the available evidence across studies. This systematic review protocol will be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines. Since this systematic review will be based on published studies, ethical approval is not required. Findings will be presented at La Trobe University, in Conferences and Congresses, and published in a peer-reviewed journal. CRD42016037492. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Child death and maternal psychosis-like experiences in 44 low- and middle-income countries: The role of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Ai; Oh, Hans; Haro, Josep Maria; Hirayama, Fumi; DeVylder, Jordan

    2017-05-01

    Studies on the effect of child death on the mental wellbeing of women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are scarce despite the high child mortality rates. Thus, the aim of the current study was to assess the association between child death and psychosis-like experiences (PLEs), as well as the role of depression in this association. Data from 44 LMICs which participated in the World Health Survey (WHS) were analyzed. A total of 59,444 women who ever gave birth, aged 18-49years, without a self-reported lifetime psychosis diagnosis, were included in the analysis. The World Mental Health Survey version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used to establish the diagnosis of past 12-month DSM-IV depression, and assess four positive psychotic symptoms. Depression was defined as self-reported lifetime depression diagnosis and/or past 12-month depression. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. After adjustment for potential confounders, women who experienced child death had higher odds for all types of PLEs (when unadjusted for depression) (OR 1.20-1.71; pchild death (OR=1.54; 95%CI=1.20-1.97). Child death may be an important determinant of mental wellbeing among women in LMICs. Given the known adverse health outcomes associated with PLEs and depression, as well as the co-occurrence of these symptoms, mental health care may be particularly important for mothers who have experienced child loss in LMICs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between maternal nutritional status in pregnancy and offspring cognitive function during childhood and adolescence; a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veena, Sargoor R; Gale, Catharine R; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Kehoe, Sarah H; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Fall, Caroline Hd

    2016-08-12

    The mother is the only source of nutrition for fetal growth including brain development. Maternal nutritional status (anthropometry, macro- and micro-nutrients) before and/or during pregnancy is therefore a potential predictor of offspring cognitive function. The relationship of maternal nutrition to offspring cognitive function is unclear. This review aims to assess existing evidence linking maternal nutritional status with offspring cognitive function. Exposures considered were maternal BMI, height and weight, micronutrient status (vitamins D, B12, folate and iron) and macronutrient intakes (carbohydrate, protein and fat). The outcome was any measure of cognitive function in children aged nutritional status during pregnancy as defined by BMI, single micronutrient studies, or macronutrient intakes influences offspring cognitive function is inconclusive. There is a need for more trials especially in populations with high rates of maternal undernutrition. Registered in PROSPERO CRD42013005702 .

  7. Can cross sectional imaging contribute to the investigation of unexplained child deaths? A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Jamie J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This review examines the factors that can influence an investigation into the unexpected death of a child before considering if using imaging techniques could be of benefit. Method: A systematic search strategy was adopted to search databases using keywords, these results were then subjected to inclusion and exclusion criteria to filter and refine the evidence base further. Discussion: More research is published on the use of MRI in comparison with other modalities. There is evidence in the case of MRI in particular that its use could be of benefit in identifying and ruling out potential causes of death in children. Conclusion: More research is needed on the use of CT but the routine use of MRI in child death investigation could now be considered. Ethical considerations appear to be a barrier to research in this area and discussions as to how such considerations can be overcome is necessary

  8. Classification of maltreatment-related mortality by Child Death Review teams: How reliable are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Jared W; Schnitzer, Patricia G; Lanier, Paul; Shanahan, Meghan E; Daniels, Julie L; Marshall, Stephen W

    2017-05-01

    Accurate estimation of the incidence of maltreatment-related child mortality depends on reliable child fatality review. We examined the inter-rater reliability of maltreatment designation for two Alaskan Child Death Review (CDR) panels. Two different multidisciplinary CDR panels each reviewed a series of 101 infant and child deaths (ages 0-4 years) in Alaska. Both panels independently reviewed identical medical, autopsy, law enforcement, child welfare, and administrative records for each death utilizing the same maltreatment criteria. Percent agreement for maltreatment was 64.7% with a weighted Kappa of 0.61 (95% CI 0.51, 0.70). Across maltreatment subtypes, agreement was highest for abuse (69.3%) and lowest for negligence (60.4%). Discordance was higher if the mother was unmarried or a smoker, if residence was rural, or if there was a family history of child protective services report(s). Incidence estimates did not depend on which panel's data were used. There is substantial room for improvement in the reliability of CDR panel assessment of maltreatment related mortality. Standardized decision guidance for CDR panels may improve the reliability of their data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mapping of research on maternal health interventions in low- and middle-income countries: a review of 2292 publications between 2000 and 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chersich, M.; Blaauw, D.; Dumbaugh, M.; Penn-Kekana, L.; Thwala, S.; Bijlmakers, L.A.; Vargas, E.; Kern, E.; Kavanagh, J.; Dhana, A.; Becerra-Posada, F.; Mlotshwa, L.; Becerril-Montekio, V.; Mannava, P.; Luchters, S.; Pham, M.D.; Portela, A.G.; Rees, H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progress in achieving maternal health goals and the rates of reductions in deaths from individual conditions have varied over time and across countries. Assessing whether research priorities in maternal health align with the main causes of mortality, and those factors responsible for

  10. Measurement properties of comorbidity indices in maternal health research: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Kazuyoshi; D'Souza, Rohan; Inada, Eiichi; Lapinsky, Stephen E; Fowler, Robert A

    2017-11-13

    Maternal critical illness occurs in 1.2 to 4.7 of every 1000 live births in the United States and approximately 1 in 100 women who become critically ill will die. Patient characteristics and comorbid conditions are commonly summarized as an index or score for the purpose of predicting the likelihood of dying; however, most such indices have arisen from non-pregnant patient populations. We sought to systematically review comorbidity indices used in health administrative datasets of pregnant women, in order to critically appraise their measurement properties and recommend optimal tools for clinicians and maternal health researchers. We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify studies published from 1946 and 1947, respectively, to May 2017 that describe predictive validity of comorbidity indices using health administrative datasets in the field of maternal health research. We applied a methodological PubMed search filter to identify all studies of measurement properties for each index. Our initial search retrieved 8944 citations. The full text of 61 articles were identified and assessed for final eligibility. Finally, two eligible articles, describing three comorbidity indices appropriate for health administrative data remained: The Maternal comorbidity index, the Charlson comorbidity index and the Elixhauser Comorbidity Index. These studies of identified indices had a low risk of bias. The lack of an established consensus-building methodology in generating each index resulted in marginal sensibility for all indices. Only the Maternal Comorbidity Index was derived and validated specifically from a cohort of pregnant and postpartum women, using an administrative dataset, and had an associated c-statistic of 0.675 (95% Confidence Interval 0.647-0.666) in predicting mortality. Only the Maternal Comorbidity Index directly evaluated measurement properties relevant to pregnant women in health administrative datasets; however, it has only modest

  11. Associated factors to the maternal perception of child body weight: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perla Trejo-Ortíz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct a systematic review of literature about maternal perception of child weight and the factors that are associated with it. Materials and methods: SciELO, PubMed, LILACS and Redalyc were subject to a database search for articles published between 2009 and 2016. The final sample was comprised of twenty five articles. Results: From 21.8% to 98.2% of mothers underestimate the weight of their child. This has been associated with body mass index (BMI, sex, age, birth weight and the quantity of food that is ingested by the child; race, BMI, age, income and maternal education. Furthermore it has been found that the perception of child weight is associated with the presence of childhood obesity, actions and problems of parents to manage the weight of the child and dietary control. Conclusions: It is necessary to continue the study of the maternal perception of the child's weight and to find proposals for intervention aimed at reducing this problem.

  12. Perinatal maternal depression and cortisol function in pregnancy and the postpartum period: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Sunaina; Lewis, Andrew J; Galbally, Megan

    2016-05-31

    Perinatal depression has a significant impact on both mother and child. However, the influence of hormonal changes during pregnancy and the postpartum period remains unclear. This article provides a systematic review of studies examining the effects of maternal cortisol function on perinatal depression. A systematic search was conducted of six electronic databases for published research on the relationship between cortisol and perinatal depression. The databases included; MEDLINE complete, PsychINFO, SCOPUS, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences, Science Direct and EBSCO, for the years 1960 to May 2015. Risk of bias was assessed and data extraction verified by two investigators. In total, 47 studies met criteria and studies showed considerable variation in terms of methodology including sample size, cortisol assays, cortisol substrates, sampling processes and outcome measures. Those studies identified as higher quality found that the cortisol awakening response is positively associated with momentary mood states but is blunted in cases of major maternal depression. Furthermore, results indicate that hypercortisolemia is linked to transient depressive states while hypocortisolemia is related to chronic postpartum depression. Future research should aim to improve the accuracy of cortisol measurement over time, obtain multiple cortisol samples in a day and utilise diagnostic measures of depression. Future studies should also consider both antenatal and postnatal depression and the differential impact of atypical versus melancholic depression on cortisol levels, as this can help to further clarify the relationship between perinatal depression and maternal cortisol function across pregnancy and the postpartum period.

  13. Maternal Colonization With Group B Streptococcus and Serotype Distribution Worldwide: Systematic Review and Meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Neal J; Seale, Anna C; O'Driscoll, Megan; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Bianchi-Jassir, Fiorella; Gonzalez-Guarin, Juan; Lawn, Joy E; Baker, Carol J; Bartlett, Linda; Cutland, Clare; Gravett, Michael G; Heath, Paul T; Le Doare, Kirsty; Madhi, Shabir A; Rubens, Craig E; Schrag, Stephanie; Sobanjo-Ter Meulen, Ajoke; Vekemans, Johan; Saha, Samir K; Ip, Margaret

    2017-11-06

    Maternal rectovaginal colonization with group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the most common pathway for GBS disease in mother, fetus, and newborn. This article, the second in a series estimating the burden of GBS, aims to determine the prevalence and serotype distribution of GBS colonizing pregnant women worldwide. We conducted systematic literature reviews (PubMed/Medline, Embase, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS], World Health Organization Library Information System [WHOLIS], and Scopus), organized Chinese language searches, and sought unpublished data from investigator groups. We applied broad inclusion criteria to maximize data inputs, particularly from low- and middle-income contexts, and then applied new meta-analyses to adjust for studies with less-sensitive sampling and laboratory techniques. We undertook meta-analyses to derive pooled estimates of maternal GBS colonization prevalence at national and regional levels. The dataset regarding colonization included 390 articles, 85 countries, and a total of 299924 pregnant women. Our adjusted estimate for maternal GBS colonization worldwide was 18% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17%-19%), with regional variation (11%-35%), and lower prevalence in Southern Asia (12.5% [95% CI, 10%-15%]) and Eastern Asia (11% [95% CI, 10%-12%]). Bacterial serotypes I-V account for 98% of identified colonizing GBS isolates worldwide. Serotype III, associated with invasive disease, accounts for 25% (95% CI, 23%-28%), but is less frequent in some South American and Asian countries. Serotypes VI-IX are more common in Asia. GBS colonizes pregnant women worldwide, but prevalence and serotype distribution vary, even after adjusting for laboratory methods. Lower GBS maternal colonization prevalence, with less serotype III, may help to explain lower GBS disease incidence in regions such as Asia. High prevalence worldwide, and more serotype data, are relevant to prevention efforts. © The Author 2017. Published by

  14. [Maternal phenylketonuria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bókay, János; Kiss, Erika; Simon, Erika; Szőnyi, László

    2013-05-05

    Elevated maternal phenylalanine levels during pregnancy are teratogenic, and may result in embryo-foetopathy, which could lead to stillbirth, significant psychomotor handicaps and birth defects. This foetal damage is known as maternal phenylketonuria. Women of childbearing age with all forms of phenylketonuria, including mild variants such as hyperphenylalaninaemia, should receive detailed counselling regarding their risks for adverse foetal effects, optimally before contemplating pregnancy. The most assured way to prevent maternal phenylketonuria is to maintain the maternal phenylalanine levels within the optimal range already before conception and throughout the whole pregnancy. Authors review the comprehensive programme for prevention of maternal phenylketonuria at the Metabolic Center of Budapest, they survey the practical approach of the continuous maternal metabolic control and delineate the outcome of pregnancies of mothers with phenylketonuria from the introduction of newborn screening until most recently.

  15. A review of governance of maternity services at South Tipperary general hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flory, David

    2015-09-01

    This review of the governance of maternity services at South Tipperary General Hospital has focussed on the systems and processes for assurance of service quality, risk management and patient safety primarily inside the hospital but also in the Hospital Group structure within which it operates. The effectiveness of the governance arrangements is largely determined by the quality of the leadership and management – both clinical and general – which designs, implements, and oversees those systems and processes and is ultimately responsible and accountable.\\r\

  16. Perfil epidemiológico das mortes maternas ocorridas no Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil: 2004-2007 Epidemiological profile of maternal deaths in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: 2004-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioná Carreno

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi analisado o perfil epidemiológico das mortes maternas ocorridas no período de 2004-2007, no Rio Grande do Sul, através da Razão de Mortalidade Materna e da Razão de Mortalidade Materna Específica. Foram utilizados dados do Sistema de Informações de Saúde, sendo observados 323 óbitos maternos. Para a análise dos indicadores foi empregada a regressão de Poisson e testes estatísticos. Observou-se que no Estado houve um decréscimo na razão de mortalidade materna (0,98, contudo não foram encontradas diferenças nas medidas de estimativas (IC95% 0,87-1,10. A RMME foi maior em mulheres com mais de 40 anos, com baixo nível de escolaridade, de cor preta e sem companheiro. O período de maior estimativa de risco na morte materna foi durante a gravidez e o parto, e entre as principais causas diretas observadas foram constatadas hipertensão arterial e hemorragia. A mortalidade materna é um indicador importante que deve ser enfrentado e reduzido, pois a maior parte dos óbitos pode ser evitada.This study analyzed the epidemiological profile of maternal deaths that occurred from 2004 to 2007 in Rio Grande do Sul, by means of Maternal Mortality Rates and Specific Maternal Mortality Ratio. Data was obtained from the Health Information System database and 323 maternal deaths were identified. In order to analyze indicators, Poisson regression and statistical tests were carried out. A decrease in maternal mortality rates (0.98 was identified, although there was no difference in estimate measures (CI95% 0.87-1.10. Maternal deaths were more frequent in women who were over 40 years old, had low schooling, black skin and no partners. The period of highest risk of maternal death was during pregnancy and birth, and the main direct causes were arterial hypertension and bleeding. Maternal mortality is an important issue to be confronted and reduced, given most maternal deaths could have been avoided.

  17. Maternal mortality at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Southeast Nigeria: a 10-year review (2003–2012

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    Obiechina NJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available NJ Obiechina, VE Okolie, ZC Okechukwu, CF Oguejiofor, OI Udegbunam, LSA Nwajiaku, C Ogbuokiri, R Egeonu Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria Background: Maternal mortality is high the world over, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria. Nigeria has consistently demonstrated one of the most abysmally poor reproductive health indices in the world, maternal mortality inclusive. This is a sad reminder that, unless things are better organized, Southeast Nigeria, which Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH represents, may not join other parts of the world in attaining Millennium Development Goal 5 to improve maternal health in 2015. Objectives: This study was conducted to assess NAUTH'S progress in achieving a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR and to identify the major causes of maternal mortality. Materials and methods: This was a 10-year retrospective study, conducted between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2012 at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Southeast Nigeria. Results: During the study period, there were 8,022 live births and 103 maternal deaths, giving an MMR of 1,284/100,000 live births. The MMR was 1,709 in 2003, reducing to 1,115 in 2012. This is to say that there was a 24.86% reduction over 10 years, hence, in 15 years, the reduction should be 37%. This extrapolated reduction over 15 years is about 38% less than the target of 75% reduction. The major direct causes of maternal mortality in this study were: pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (27%, hemorrhage (22%, and sepsis (12%. The indirect causes were: anemia, anesthesia, and HIV encephalopathy. Most of the maternal deaths occurred in unbooked patients (98% and within the first 48 hours of admission (76%. Conclusion: MMRs in NAUTH are still very high and the rate of reduction is very slow. At this rate, it will take this health facility 30 years, instead of 15 years, to

  18. Systematic review of the incidence of sudden cardiac death in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Melissa H; Fonarow, Gregg C; Peterson, Eric D; Curtis, Anne B; Hernandez, Adrian F; Sanders, Gillian D; Thomas, Kevin L; Hayes, David L; Al-Khatib, Sana M

    2011-02-15

    The need for consistent and current data describing the true incidence of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and/or sudden cardiac death (SCD) was highlighted during the most recent Sudden Cardiac Arrest Thought Leadership Alliance's (SCATLA) Think Tank meeting of national experts with broad representation of key stakeholders, including thought leaders and representatives from the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and the Heart Rhythm Society. As such, to evaluate the true magnitude of this public health problem, we performed a systematic literature search in MEDLINE using the MeSH headings, "death, sudden" OR the terms "sudden cardiac death" OR "sudden cardiac arrest" OR "cardiac arrest" OR "cardiac death" OR "sudden death" OR "arrhythmic death." Study selection criteria included peer-reviewed publications of primary data used to estimate SCD incidence in the U.S. We used Web of Science's Cited Reference Search to evaluate the impact of each primary estimate on the medical literature by determining the number of times each "primary source" has been cited. The estimated U.S. annual incidence of SCD varied widely from 180,000 to >450,000 among 6 included studies. These different estimates were in part due to different data sources (with data age ranging from 1980 to 2007), definitions of SCD, case ascertainment criteria, methods of estimation/extrapolation, and sources of case ascertainment. The true incidence of SCA and/or SCD in the U.S. remains unclear, with a wide range in the available estimates that are badly dated. As reliable estimates of SCD incidence are important for improving risk stratification and prevention, future efforts are clearly needed to establish uniform definitions of SCA and SCD and then to prospectively and precisely capture cases of SCA and SCD in the overall U.S. population. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Associations between Breastfeeding and Maternal Responsiveness: A Systematic Review of the Literature12

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Recent recommendations and prevention programs have focused on the promotion of responsive feeding during infancy, but more research is needed to understand best practices for fostering responsive feeding during early life. The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the accumulating bodies of evidence aimed at understanding associations between mothers’ feeding experiences and responsive feeding in an attempt to clarify the nature of associations between feeding mode and responsive feeding. A literature search was conducted between January and October 2016; articles were collected from PsychINFO, Medline, and CINAHL, as well as from references in published research and reviews. Article inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) empirical research, 2) included a measure of infant feeding, 3) included a measure of maternal responsiveness, 4) study conducted in human participants, 5) available in English, and 6) study conducted in a developed and/or high-income country. Forty-three studies were identified. Cross-sectional observational studies consistently reported greater responsiveness among breastfeeding mothers than among formula-/bottle-feeding mothers. In addition, longitudinal studies showed that longer breastfeeding durations predicted lower use of nonresponsive feeding practices during later childhood, and some, but not all, found that breastfeeding mothers showed greater increases in responsiveness across infancy than did formula-/bottle-feeding mothers. However, a limited number of longitudinal studies also reported that greater responsiveness during early infancy predicted longer breastfeeding durations. A common limitation among these studies is the correlational nature of their designs and lack of prenatal measures of maternal responsiveness, which hinders our understanding of causal mechanisms. Although 2 randomized clinical trials aimed at promoting maternal responsiveness did not find effects of the intervention on breastfeeding outcomes

  20. Associations between Breastfeeding and Maternal Responsiveness: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Alison K

    2017-05-01

    Recent recommendations and prevention programs have focused on the promotion of responsive feeding during infancy, but more research is needed to understand best practices for fostering responsive feeding during early life. The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the accumulating bodies of evidence aimed at understanding associations between mothers' feeding experiences and responsive feeding in an attempt to clarify the nature of associations between feeding mode and responsive feeding. A literature search was conducted between January and October 2016; articles were collected from PsychINFO, Medline, and CINAHL, as well as from references in published research and reviews. Article inclusion criteria were as follows: 1 ) empirical research, 2 ) included a measure of infant feeding, 3 ) included a measure of maternal responsiveness, 4 ) study conducted in human participants, 5 ) available in English, and 6 ) study conducted in a developed and/or high-income country. Forty-three studies were identified. Cross-sectional observational studies consistently reported greater responsiveness among breastfeeding mothers than among formula-/bottle-feeding mothers. In addition, longitudinal studies showed that longer breastfeeding durations predicted lower use of nonresponsive feeding practices during later childhood, and some, but not all, found that breastfeeding mothers showed greater increases in responsiveness across infancy than did formula-/bottle-feeding mothers. However, a limited number of longitudinal studies also reported that greater responsiveness during early infancy predicted longer breastfeeding durations. A common limitation among these studies is the correlational nature of their designs and lack of prenatal measures of maternal responsiveness, which hinders our understanding of causal mechanisms. Although 2 randomized clinical trials aimed at promoting maternal responsiveness did not find effects of the intervention on breastfeeding

  1. Maternal and neonatal service usage and determinants in fragile and conflict-affected situations: a systematic review of Asia and the Middle-East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Saji S; Das, Ashis; Howard, Natasha

    2017-03-15

    Fragile and conflict-affected situations (FCS) in Asia and the Middle-East contribute significantly to global maternal and neonatal deaths. This systematic review explored maternal and neonatal health (MNH) services usage and determinants in FCS in Asia and the Middle-East to inform policy on health service provision in these challenging settings. This systematic review was conducted using a standardised protocol. Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, and selected development agency websites were searched for studies meeting inclusion criteria. Studies were assessed for methodological quality using an adapted evaluation tool. Qualitative and quantitative data were synthesized and pooled odds ratios generated for meta-analysis of service-usage determinants. Of 18 eligible peer-reviewed studies, eight were from Nepal, four from Afghanistan, and two each from Iraq, Yemen, and the Palestinian Territories. Fragile situations provide limited evidence on emergency obstetric care, postnatal care, and newborn services. Usage of MNH services was low in all FCS, irrespective of economic growth level. Demand-side determinants of service-usage were transportation, female education, autonomy, health awareness, and ability-to-pay. Supply-side determinants included service availability and quality, existence of community health-workers, costs, and informal payments in health facilities. Evidence is particularly sparse on MNH in acute crises, and remains limited in fragile situations generally. Findings emphasize that poor MNH status in FCS is a leading contributor to the burden of maternal and neonatal ill-health in Asia and the Middle-East. Essential services for skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric, newborn, and postnatal care require improvement in FCS. FCS require additional resources and policy attention to address the barriers to appropriate MNH care. Authors discuss the 'targeted policy approach for vulnerable groups' as a means of addressing MNH service usage

  2. Quality of care provided in two Scottish rural community maternity units: a retrospective case review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Sara; Humphrey, Tracy; Taylor, Ruth

    2017-06-21

    Women in Scotland with uncomplicated pregnancies are encouraged by professional bodies and national guidelines to access community based models of midwife-led care for their labour and birth. The evidence base for these guidelines relates to comparisons of predominantly urban birth settings in England. There appears to be little evidence available about the quality of the care during the antenatal, birth and post birth periods available for women within the Scottish Community Maternity Unit (CMU) model. The research aim was to explore the safety and effectiveness of the maternity services provided at two rural Community Maternity Units in Scotland, both 40 miles by main road access from a tertiary obstetric unit. Following appropriate NHS and University ethical approval, an anonymous retrospective review of consecutive maternity records for all women who accessed care at the CMUs over a 12 month period (June 2011 to May 2012) was undertaken in 2013 -14. Data was extracted using variables chosen to provide a description of the socio-demographics of the cohort and the process and outcomes of the care provided. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Regarding effectiveness, the correct care pathway was allocated to 97.5% of women, early access to antenatal care achieved by 95.7% of women, 94.8% of women at one CMU received continuity of carer and 78.6% of those clinically eligible accessed care in labour. 11.9% were appropriately transferred to obstetrician-led care antenatally and 16.9% were transferred in labour. All women received one-to one care in labour and 67.1% of babies born at the CMUs were breastfed at birth. Regarding safety, severe morbidity for women was rare, perineal trauma of 3rd degree tear occurred for 0.3% of women and 1.0% experienced an episiotomy. Severe post partum haemorrhage occurred for 0.3% of women. Babies admitted to the Neonatal unit were discharged within 48 hrs. These findings support the recommendations of professional

  3. Maternal obesity and offspring body composition by indirect methods: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Castillo-Laura

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study reviewed the evidence that assessed the association between maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI and/or gestational weight gain and offspring body composition in childhood. A systematic review was conducted. Cohort studies, case-control studies and randomized controlled trials measuring offspring body composition by indirect methods were included. Meta-analyses of the effect of pre-pregnancy BMI on offspring fat-free mass, body fat percent, and fat mass were conducted through random-effects models. 20 studies were included, most of which reported a positive association of pre-pregnancy BMI with offspring body fat. Standardized mean differences in body fat percent, fat mass and fat-free mass between infants of women with normal pre-pregnancy BMI and those of overweight/obese women were 0.31 percent points (95%CI: 0.19; 0.42, 0.38kg (95%CI: 0.26; 0.50, and 0.18kg (95%CI: -0.07; 0.42, respectively. Evidence so far suggests that pre-pregnancy maternal overweight is associated with higher offspring adiposity.

  4. Research review: maternal prenatal distress and poor nutrition - mutually influencing risk factors affecting infant neurocognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Catherine; Georgieff, Michael K; Osterholm, Erin A

    2013-02-01

    Accumulating data from animal and human studies indicate that the prenatal environment plays a significant role in shaping children's neurocognitive development. Clinical, epidemiologic, and basic science research suggests that two experiences relatively common in pregnancy - an unhealthy maternal diet and psychosocial distress - significantly affect children's future neurodevelopment. These prenatal experiences exert their influence in the context of one another and yet, almost uniformly, are studied independently. In this review, we suggest that studying neurocognitive development in children in relation to both prenatal exposures is ecologically most relevant, and methodologically most sound. To support this approach, we selectively review two research topics that demonstrate the need for dual exposure studies, including exemplar findings on (a) the associations between pregnant women's inadequate maternal intake of key nutrients - protein, fat, iron, zinc, and choline - as well as distress in relation to overlapping effects on children's neurocognitive development; and (b) cross-talk between the biology of stress and nutrition that can amplify each experience for the mother and fetus,. We also consider obstacles to this kind of study design, such as questions of statistical methods for 'disentangling' the exposure effects, and aim to provide some answers. Studies that specifically include both exposures in their design can begin to determine the relative and/or synergistic impact of these prenatal experiences on developmental trajectories - and thereby contribute most fully to the understanding of the early origins of health and disease. © 2012 The Author. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2012 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  5. An umbrella review of meta-analyses of interventions to improve maternal outcomes for teen mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SmithBattle, Lee; Loman, Deborah G; Chantamit-O-Pas, Chutima; Schneider, Joanne Kraenzle

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform an umbrella review of meta-analyses of intervention studies designed to improve outcomes of pregnant or parenting teenagers. An extensive search retrieved nine reports which provided 21 meta-analyses analyses. Data were extracted by two reviewers. Methodological quality was assessed using the AMSTAR Instrument. Most effect sizes were small but high quality studies showed significant outcomes for reduced low birth weight (RR = 0.60), repeat pregnancies/births (OR = 0.47-0.62), maternal education (OR = 1.21-1.83), and maternal employment (OR = 1.26). Several parenting outcomes (parent-child teaching interaction post-intervention [SMD = -0.91] and at follow-up [SMD = -1.07], and parent-child relationship post-intervention [SMD = -0.71] and at follow-up [SMD = -0.90]) were significant, but sample sizes were very small. Many reports did not include moderator analyses. Behavioral interventions offer limited resources and occur too late to mitigate the educational and social disparities that precede teen pregnancy. Future intervention research and policies that redress the social determinants of early childbearing are recommended. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Maternal and fetal effects of chocolate consumption during pregnancy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Rabia

    2018-03-13

    The purpose of this review is to explore the effects of chocolate consumption during pregnancy on fetus and mother herself. Randomized controlled trials/quasi-experimental/observational/controlled before and after studies involving chocolate/cocoa/cacao consumption (irrespective of type or dose, composition, exposure period, and method of administration) among pregnant women/animals; and measuring any outcome (beneficial or harmful) related to fetus or mother after chocolate exposure were included. Databases searched were PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus; between April and May 2017. Risk of bias within each human randomized controlled trial (RCT) and animals' experimental studies was evaluated by "The Cochrane Collaboration's tool" and SYRCLE's tool respectively. Fourteen human studies including a total of 6639 participants and nine animal studies were selected. Outcome variables investigated in human studies were maternal blood pressure, fetal heart rate, and striae gravidarum. Animal studies explored chocolate-induced teratogenicity and fetal metabolic derangements. Ten out of these 23 studies reported chocolate to be "beneficial"; five studies reported adverse effects, whereas eight studies declared chocolate as "neutral". Maternal chocolate intake has acute stimulatory effects on fetal reactivity and chronic blood pressure reducing effect in mothers. Chocolate is nonteratogenic and does not affect reproductive indices. Metabolic derangements in offsprings born to chocolate fed dams have been reported. Pregnant females must be careful about consumption of cocoa and chocolate. Future studies should be planned, keeping in view heterogeneities identified across the selected studies in this review.

  7. Lightning deaths: a retrospective review of New Mexico's cases, 1977-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Jennifer L; Lathrop, Sarah L; Briones, Alice J; Andrews, Sam W; Aurelius, Michelle B

    2015-01-01

    To better understand lightning deaths, a retrospective review of electronic records from New Mexico's Office of the Medical Investigator database was performed between 1977 and 2009 to update and assess current risk factors. Information on demographics, circumstances, autopsy, and death certificates were collected and analyzed. Fifty-four decedents were identified, ages 2-71 years old (mean 34 years old), 42 males and 12 females. Common racial/ethnic groups were non-Hispanic Whites and American Indians (together comprising 72% of all cases). Physical findings were often related to the heat carried by the electrical current including clothing alterations (29.6%) and burning of skin (53.7%). Most deaths occurred on weekend afternoons in summer months, associated with recreational activities or agricultural work, and rural locations (77.8%). Utilizing the demographic information, clustered events, and associated outdoor activities will assist in creating public awareness and provide a framework to support targeted warnings in an attempt to prevent future deaths. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  8. Learning from deaths: Parents' Active Role and ENgagement in The review of their Stillbirth/perinatal death (the PARENTS 1 study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhbakhi, Danya; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Burden, Christy; Jones, Ffion; Yoward, Freya; Redshaw, Maggie; Murphy, Samantha; Storey, Claire

    2017-10-02

    Following a perinatal death, a formal standardised multi-disciplinary review should take place, to learn from the death of a baby and facilitate improvements in future care. It has been recommended that bereaved parents should be offered the opportunity to give feedback on the care they have received and integrate this feedback into the perinatal mortality review process. However, the MBRRACE-UK Perinatal Confidential Enquiry (2015) found that only one in 20 cases parental concerns were included in the review. Although guidance suggests parental opinion should be sought, little evidence exists on how this may be incorporated into the perinatal mortality review process. The purpose of the PARENTS study was to investigate bereaved parents' views on involvement in the perinatal mortality review process. A semi-structured focus group of 11 bereaved parents was conducted in South West England. A purposive sampling technique was utilised to recruit a diverse sample of women and their partners who had experienced a perinatal death more than 6 months prior to the study. A six-stage thematic analysis was followed to explore parental perceptions and expectations of the perinatal mortality review process. Four over-arching themes emerged from the analysis: transparency; flexibility combined with specificity; inclusivity; and a positive approach. It was evident that the majority of parents were supportive of their involvement in the perinatal mortality review process and they wanted to know the outcome of the meeting. It emerged that an individualised approach should be taken to allow flexibility on when and how they could contribute to the process. The emotional aspects of care should be considered as well as the clinical care. Parents identified that the whole care pathway should be examined during the review including antenatal, postnatal, and neonatal and community based care. They agreed that there should be an opportunity for parents to give feedback on both good and

  9. Early Interventions Following the Death of a Parent: Protocol of a Mixed Methods Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mariana; Johnsen, Iren; Hauken, May Aa; Kristensen, Pål; Dyregrov, Atle

    2017-06-29

    Previous meta-analyses examined the effectiveness of interventions for bereaved children showing small to moderate effect sizes. However, no mixed methods systematic review was conducted on bereavement interventions following the loss of a parent focusing on the time since death in regard to the prevention of grief complications. The overall purpose of the review is to provide a rigorous synthesis of early intervention after parental death in childhood. Specifically, the aims are twofold: (1) to determine the rationales, contents, timeframes, and outcomes of early bereavement care interventions for children and/or their parents and (2) to assess the quality of current early intervention studies. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods intervention studies that start intervention with parentally bereaved children (and/or their parents) up to 6 months postloss will be included in the review. The search strategy was based on the Population, Interventions, Comparator, Outcomes, and Study Designs (PICOS) approach, and it was devised together with a university librarian. The literature searches will be carried out in the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), PsycINFO, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool will be used to appraise the quality of eligible studies. All data will be narratively synthetized following the Guidance on the Conduct of Narrative Synthesis in Systematic Reviews. The systematic review is ongoing and the data search has started. The review is expected to be completed by the end of 2017. Findings will be submitted to leading journals for publication. In accordance with the current diagnostic criteria for prolonged grief as well as the users' perspectives literature, this systematic review outlines a possible sensitive period for early intervention following the death of a parent. The hereby presented protocol ensures

  10. A review of national health policies and professional guidelines on maternal obesity and weight gain in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, N L; Brinsden, H; Lobstein, T

    2014-08-01

    Maternal obesity creates an additional demand for health-care services, as the routine obstetric care pathway requires alterations to ensure the most optimal care for obese women of childbearing age. This review examines the extent to which relevant national health documents reflect and respond to the health implications of maternal obesity and excessive gestational weight gain. A targeted search of peer-reviewed publications and grey literature was conducted for each country to identify national health documents, which were subsequently content analyzed according to an adapted framework. A total of 37 documents were identified, including one policy, 10 strategies and 26 guidelines, published within the last 10 years. Out of the 31 countries investigated, only 13 countries address maternal obesity while none address excessive gestational weight gain. We found inconsistencies and gaps in the recommendations to health-care service providers for the management of maternal obesity and weight gain in pregnancy. The findings show that only limited guidance on maternal obesity and gestational weight gain exists. The authors recommend that international, evidence-based guidelines on the management of maternal obesity and excessive gestational weight gain should be developed to reduce the associated health-care and economic costs. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical Obesity © 2014 World Obesity.

  11. Macro- and Micronutrients of Human Milk Composition: Are They Related to Maternal Diet? A Comprehensive Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keikha, Mojtaba; Bahreynian, Maryam; Saleki, Mohammad; Kelishadi, Roya

    2017-11-01

    This study aims at systematically reviewing the observational and interventional studies on the association of maternal macro- and micronutrient intake with breast milk content. We systematically searched the Medline via PubMed, Scopus, and ISI Web of Knowledge till October 2016 with the following search strategy: ("human milk" OR "breast milk" OR "breast milk composition" OR "human breast milk composition" OR "composition breast milk" OR "mother milk" OR "human breast milk") AND ("maternal diet" OR "maternal nutrition"). We also searched Google scholar for increasing the sensitivity of our search. The search was not limited to title and abstract due to the possibility that the desired outcome might have been considered a secondary aim. We excluded conference papers, editorials, letters, commentary, short survey, and notes. The search was refined to English language, and we did not consider any time limitation. To increase the sensitivity and to select more studies, the reference list of the published studies was checked as well. This review included 59 observational and 43 interventional studies on maternal diet related to breast milk composition. Different studies determined the associations and effects of some maternal dietary intake of micro and macronutrients and its reflection in human milk. Maternal dietary intake, particularly fatty acids, and some micronutrients, including fat soluble vitamins, vitamin B 1 , and vitamin C, was related to their content in breast milk composition.

  12. The impact of official development aid on maternal and reproductive health outcomes: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Michelle Taylor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Progress toward meeting Millennium Development Goal 5, which aims to improve maternal and reproductive health outcomes, is behind schedule. This is despite ever increasing volumes of official development aid targeting the goal, calling into question the distribution and efficacy of aid. The 2005 Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness represented a global commitment to reform aid practices in order to improve development outcomes, encouraging a shift toward collaborative aid arrangements which support the national plans of aid recipient countries (and discouraging unaligned donor projects. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic review to summarise the evidence of the impact on MDG 5 outcomes of official development aid delivered in line with Paris aid effectiveness principles and to compare this with the impact of aid in general on MDG 5 outcomes. Searches of electronic databases identified 30 studies reporting aid-funded interventions designed to improve maternal and reproductive health outcomes. Aid interventions appear to be associated with small improvements in the MDG indicators, although it is not clear whether changes are happening because of the manner in which aid is delivered. The data do not allow for a meaningful comparison between Paris style and general aid. The review identified discernible gaps in the evidence base on aid interventions targeting MDG 5, notably on indicators MDG 5.4 (adolescent birth rate and 5.6 (unmet need for family planning. DISCUSSION: This review presents the first systematic review of the impact of official development aid delivered according to the Paris principles and aid delivered outside this framework on MDG 5 outcomes. Its findings point to major gaps in the evidence base and should be used to inform new approaches and methodologies aimed at measuring the impact of official development aid.

  13. Maternal vitamin D status and childhood asthma, wheeze, and eczema: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Xiaodan

    2016-09-01

    Maternal vitamin D status has been reported to be associated with childhood allergic diseases. However, this association remains to be fully elucidated. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted using prospective cohort studies that examined the association between maternal vitamin D status and childhood allergic diseases including wheeze, eczema and asthma. We searched electronic databases of PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, the Wanfang (Chinese) database, the VIP (Chinese) database, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) up to August 2014. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from individual studies were synthesized using a fixed effects model. Four studies on the association between maternal vitamin D status and childhood asthma (3666 mother-child pairs), four studies on the association between maternal vitamin D status and childhood wheeze (2225 mother-child pairs) and three papers on the association between maternal vitamin D status and childhood eczema (2172 mother-child pairs) met our inclusion criteria. Maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy was associated with childhood eczema (pooled OR=0.904, 95% CI=0.831-0.983). However, the meta-analysis showed no statistical association between maternal vitamin D status and childhood asthma (pooled OR=0.981, 95% CI=0.944-1.019) or childhood wheeze (pooled OR=0.995, 95% CI=0.982-1.009). Our meta-analysis found that lower maternal vitamin D during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of childhood eczema but was not associated with childhood asthma or wheeze. The role of maternal vitamin D as an important protective factor for the development of childhood eczema remains to be elucidated. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. mHealth Interventions in Low-Income Countries to Address Maternal Health: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaci, Daniela; Chaudhri, Simran; Vasan, Ashwin

    The wide availability and relative simplicity of mobile phones make them a promising instrument for delivering a variety of health-related interventions. Mobile health (mHealth) interventions have been tested in a variety of health delivery areas, but research has been restricted to pilot and small studies with limited generalizability. The aim of this review was to explore the current evidence on the use of mHealth for maternal health interventions in low- and low middle-income countries. Peer-reviewed papers were identified from Medline/PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library via a combination of search terms. Quantitative or mixed-methods papers published in the English language between January 2000 and July 2015 were included. Three hundred and seventy papers were found in the literature search. We assessed the full text of 57 studies, and included 19 in the review. Study designs included were 5 randomized controlled trials, 9 before and after comparisons, 1 study with endline assessment only, 3 postintervention assessments, and 1 cohort study. Quality assessment elucidated 9 low-quality, 5 moderate, and 5 high studies. Five studies supported the use of mobile phones for data collection, 3 for appointment reminders, and 4 for both appointment reminders and health promotion. Six studies supported the use of mHealth for provider-to-provider communication and 1 for clinical management. Studies demonstrated promise for the use of mHealth in maternal health; however, much of the evidence came from low- and moderate-quality studies. Pilot and small programs require more rigorous testing before allocating resources to scaling up this technology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of text messaging for maternal and infant health: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Elisabeth; Gazmararian, Julie; Parker, Ruth M; Yang, Baiyu; Elon, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    Text messaging is an increasingly popular communication tool in health interventions, but has been little studied in maternal and infant health. This literature review evaluates studies of text messaging that may be applied to the promotion of maternal and infant health. Articles from peer-reviewed journals published before June 2012 were included if they were experimental or quasi-experimental studies of behaviors endorsed either by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the American Pediatrics Association, or the United States Preventive Services Task Force; included reproductive age women (12-50 years) or infants up to 2 years of age; and were available in English. Qualitative studies of text messaging specific to pregnant women were also included. Studies were compared and contrasted by key variables, including: design, time-period, study population, and results. Forty-eight articles were included, 30 of which were randomized controlled trials. Interventions vary greatly in effectiveness and soundness of methodology, but collectively indicate that there is a wide range of preventative behaviors that text message interventions can effectively promote, including smoking cessation, diabetes control, appointment reminders, medication adherence, weight loss, and vaccine uptake. Common methodological issues include not accounting for attention affect and not aligning text message content to measured outcomes. Those interventions that are based on an established theory of behavior change and use motivational as opposed to informational language are more likely to be successful. Building on the growing body of evidence for text message interventions reviewed here, as well as the growing popularity of text messaging as a medium, researchers should be able to use this technology to engage difficult to reach populations.

  16. An updated literature review on maternal-fetal and reproductive disorders of Toxoplasma gondii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, S; Rostami, A; Nourollahpour Shiadeh, M; Behniafar, H; Paktinat, S

    2018-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection is one of the most prevalent infectious disease with worldwide distribution. Congenital toxoplasmosis is annually responsible for 1.20 million disability-adjusted life years around the world, but often it is overlooked many countries. We performed an updated review to summarize the current researches on fetal, neonatal and maternal consequences of T. gondii infection and also adverse effects of toxoplasmosis on women reproductive organs. T. gondii infection could be cause of several abnormalities from hydrocephalus, microcephaly, deafness, abortion and still birth in fetal to psychomotor retardation, intellectual disability, hearing loss, slower postnatal motor development during the first year of life; and chorioretinitis, cryptogenic epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders in newborns. Moreover, this infection is related with neuropsychiatric disorders such as anxiety, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, depression, decreased weight, autoimmune thyroid diseases, self-directed violence, violent suicide attempts in mothers. This literature review emphasized that toxoplasmosis could be an important neglected factor endometritis, ovarian dysfunction, impaired folliculogenesis, ovarian and uterine atrophy, decrease in reproductive organs weight and reproductive performance in women. We reviewed role of the immunological profile such as pro-infiammatory cytokines and hormonal changes as main potential mechanisms related to this infection and development of maternal-fetal and reproductive disorders. T. gondii is associated with several brain related disorders in both mothers and newborns, and also it is cause of several abnormalities in reproductive organs. Early diagnosis and treatment of the infection could be effective to significantly improve the clinical outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Breastfeeding and maternal health outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ranadip; Sinha, Bireshwar; Sankar, Mari Jeeva; Taneja, Sunita; Bhandari, Nita; Rollins, Nigel; Bahl, Rajiv; Martines, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effect of breastfeeding on long-term (breast carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus) and short-term (lactational amenorrhoea, postpartum depression, postpartum weight change) maternal health outcomes. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Library and CABI databases. Outcome estimates of odds ratios or relative risks or standardised mean differences were pooled. In cases of heterogeneity, subgroup analysis and meta-regression were explored. Results Breastfeeding >12 months was associated with reduced risk of breast and ovarian carcinoma by 26% and 37%, respectively. No conclusive evidence of an association between breastfeeding and bone mineral density was found. Breastfeeding was associated with 32% lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Exclusive breastfeeding and predominant breastfeeding were associated with longer duration of amenorrhoea. Shorter duration of breastfeeding was associated with higher risk of postpartum depression. Evidence suggesting an association of breastfeeding with postpartum weight change was lacking. Conclusion This review supports the hypothesis that breastfeeding is protective against breast and ovarian carcinoma, and exclusive breastfeeding and predominant breastfeeding increase the duration of lactational amenorrhoea. There is evidence that breastfeeding reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes. However, an association between breastfeeding and bone mineral density or maternal depression or postpartum weight change was not evident. PMID:26172878

  18. Maternal Weight Gain in Pregnancy and Risk of Obesity among Offspring: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Y. Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To systematically review the evidence from prospective and retrospective cohort studies on the association between gestational weight gain (GWG and offspring’s body weight. Methods. Electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Academic Search Premiere were searched from inception through March 18, 2013. Included studies (n=23 were English articles that examined the independent associations of GWG with body mass index (BMI and/or overweight status in the offspring aged 2 to 18.9 years. Two authors independently extracted the data and assessed methodological quality of the included studies. Results. Evidence from cohort studies supports that total GWG and exceeding the Institute of Medicine maternal weight gain recommendation were associated with higher BMI z-score and elevated risk of overweight or obesity in offspring. The evidence of high rate of GWG during early- and mid-pregnancy is suggestive. Additionally, the evidence on inadequate GWG and net GWG in relation to body weight outcomes in offspring is insufficient to draw conclusions. Conclusions. These findings suggest that GWG is a potential risk factor for childhood obesity. However, findings should be interpreted with caution due to measurement issues of GWG and potential confounding effects of shared familial characteristics (i.e., genetics and maternal and child’s lifestyle factors.

  19. Maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and reproductive health in children: a review of epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linn Berger Håkonsen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Maternal cigarette smoking may affect the intrauterine hormonal environment during pregnancy and this early fetal exposure may have detrimental effects on the future trajectory of reproductive health. In this review, we discuss the epidemiological literature on the association between prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking and several aspects of reproductive health. The literature points towards an increased risk of the urogenital malformation cryptorchidism, but a potential protective effect on the risk of hypospadias in sons following prenatal cigarette smoking exposure. Studies on sexual maturation find a tendency towards accelerated pubertal development in exposed boys and girls. In adult life, prenatally exposed men have impaired semen quality compared with unexposed individuals, but an influence on fecundability, that is, the biological ability to reproduce, is less evident. We found no evidence to support an association between prenatal cigarette smoking exposure and testicular cancer. Among adult daughters, research is sparse and inconsistent, but exposure to cigarette smoking in utero may decrease fecundability. In conclusion, prenatal exposure to cigarette smoking may cause some long-term adverse effects on the reproductive health.

  20. Exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in horses: Review of the literature and comparative aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas de Solis, C

    2016-07-01

    Arrhythmias are common in equine athletes during and immediately after exercise. Many of these rhythm variations are not clinically relevant. In horses, a link between different exercising arrhythmias and poor performance or between exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is strongly suspected but not fully understood or proven. SCD during races or competitions is rare, but has catastrophic consequences for the safety of the human partner and public perceptions of welfare during equestrian sports. This review summarises current knowledge of equine exercise arrhythmias and their implications in SCD and compares existing principles and recommendations for equine subjects with those for human athletes. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  1. Deaths during apprehensions of agitated persons. A review of proposed pathophysiological theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamsen Fredrik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of sudden death during apprehension remains largely unclear. The most frequently discussed mechanisms are excited delirium, positional asphyxia, metabolic acidosis, acute and chronic drug abuse, and autonomic instability. As in most areas of forensic medicine, much of the knowledge comes from case reports, which are of little use in understanding causality. Experimental studies of some aspects have been performed, and they show somewhat divergent results and interpretations. The aim of this review is to summarize the different proposed theories, and to point out important issues for further research.

  2. Epidemiology of association between maternal periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes--systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Mark; Papapanou, Panos N

    2013-04-01

    There is still debate regarding potential relationships between maternal periodontitis during pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesize the available epidemiological evidence on this association. Combined electronic and hand search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, WEB OF SCIENCE and Cochrane Central Register databases. Original publications reporting data from cross-sectional, case-control or prospective cohort epidemiological studies on the association between periodontal status and preterm birth, low birthweight (LBW) or preeclampsia. The search was not limited to publications in English. All selected studies provided data based on professional assessments of periodontal status, and outcome variables, including preterm birth (pregnancy loss or miscarriage, or pre-eclampsia. Pregnant women with or without periodontal disease, and with or without adverse pregnancy outcomes, assessed either during pregnancy or postpartum. No intervention studies were included. Study appraisal and synthesis methods - Publications were assessed based on predefined screening criteria including type of periodontal assessment, consistency in the timing of the periodontal assessment with respect to gestational age, examiner masking and consideration of additional exposures and confounders. Maternal periodontitis is modestly but significantly associated with LBW and preterm birth, but the use of a categorical or a continuous exposure definition of periodontitis appears to impact the findings: Although significant associations emerge from case-control and cross-sectional studies using periodontitis "case definitions," these were substantially attenuated in studies assessing periodontitis as a continuous variable. Data from prospective studies followed a similar pattern, but associations were generally weaker. Maternal periodontitis was significantly associated with pre-eclampsia. There is a high degree of variability in study populations, recruitment

  3. Comparison of foeto-maternal outcome in pregnant women with hepatitis E - A review of 12 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naru, T.; Yousuf, F.; Malik, A.; Naz, S.; Ismail, H.

    2017-01-01

    To compare adverse maternal and foetal outcome in pregnant women with hepatitis E immunoglobulin M reactive versus non-reactive. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and comprised records of pregnant patients at any gestational age with clinical and biochemical evidence of hepatitis E from January 2002 and December 2014. . Maternal and perinatal outcome of the subjects were analysed. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. Results: Out of the 200 subjects, 168(84 %) were hepatitis E immunoglobulin M reactive and 32(16%) were non-reactive. The overall mean age was 26.7+-4.5 years. Also, 12(7%) patients in the immunoglobulin M reactive group were admitted to intensive care unit compared to no one from the non-reactive group. Similarly fulminant hepatic failure was seen in 12(7.1%) patients in the immunoglobulin M reactive group compared to no one in the other group. Post-partum haemorrhage was more frequent in the immunoglobulin M reactive group compared to the non-reactive group. There were 5(3%) maternal deaths in the reactive group compared to no death in the other group. Moreover, 34(20.2%) neonates of the immunoglobulin M reactive group needed neonatal intensive care unit admission compared to none in the non-reactive group. There were 4(2.4%) neonatal deaths in the reactive group. Conclusion: Participants in the immunoglobulin M reactive group had a higher percentage of adverse foeto-maternal outcomes compared to the non-reactive group. (author)

  4. Mortalidad materna en Guatemala: diferencias entre muerte hospitalaria y no hospitalaria Maternal mortality in Guatemala: differences between hospital and non-hospital deaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Marina Tzul

    2006-06-01

    Guatemala during 2000, comparing characteristics of intra- and extra-hospital maternal deaths. Multivariate statistical analysis was conducted using Stata 7.0 software RESULTS: Out of 649 registered MM cases, 270 (41.6% were classified as intra-hospital MM and 379 (58.4% as extra-hospital MM. A larger proportion of deaths occurred in women over 35 years of age (29.28%, those of indigenous ethnicity (65.49%, married or cohabiting (87.83%, who had unpaid employment (94.78%, and without formal education (66.56%. Compared with intra-hospital MM cases, the risk of extra-hospital MM was greater among indigenous women (OR 3.4; CI95% 2.8-5.3, those who had unpaid employment (OR 8.95; CI95% 1.7-46.4, a low level of formal education (OR 1.96; CI95% 1.0-3.8 and hemorrhaging as the immediate cause of death (OR 4.28; CI95% 2.3-7.9. CONCLUSIONS: Although some characteristics of intra- and extra-hospital MM cases are similar, a greater proportion of deaths were extra-hospital. This could be related to the high percentage of the population that lives in rural or marginalized areas, which in addition to certain cultural aspects (related to the fact that most of the population is indigenous may impede access to health services. The results of this study can be useful for determining intervention strategies to prevent maternal mortality in intra- and extra-hospital contexts in Guatemala.

  5. Regional differences in Dutch maternal mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, J.P.; Schutte, J.M.; Poeran, J.J.; van Roosmalen, J.; Bonsel, G.J.; Steegers, E.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study regional differences in maternal mortality in the Netherlands. Design Confidential inquiry into the causes of maternal mortality. Setting Nationwide. Population A total of 3 108 235 live births and 337 maternal deaths. Methods Data analysis of all maternal deaths in the period

  6. Associations of Maternal Vitamin D Deficiency with Pregnancy and Neonatal Complications in Developing Countries: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige van der Pligt

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant women in Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America are at risk of vitamin D deficiency (VDD and prevalence throughout these regions are among the highest, globally. Maternal VDD has been associated with increased risk of a number of adverse maternal and neonatal health outcomes, yet research from developing countries is limited. We assessed the associations of maternal VDD during pregnancy with adverse health outcomes by synthesizing the literature from observational studies conducted in developing countries. Six electronic databases were searched for English-language studies published between 2000 and 2017. Thirteen studies from seven countries were included in the review. Prevalence of VDD ranged from 51.3% to 100%. Six studies assessed both maternal and neonatal outcomes, four studies assessed only maternal outcomes and three studies assessed only neonatal outcomes. Ten studies showed at least one significant association between VDD and adverse maternal and/or neonatal health outcomes including pre-eclampsia (n = 3, gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 1, postpartum depression (n = 1, emergency cesarean section delivery (n = 1, low birth weight babies (n = 4, small for gestational age (n = 2, stunting (n = 1. However most of these studies (n = 6 also showed no association with multiple health outcomes. Vitamin D assessment methods, criteria applied to define VDD, season and trimester in which studies were conducted varied considerably across studies. In conclusion, this study highlights the need to improve maternal vitamin D status in developing countries in an effort to support best maternal and child health outcomes across these regions. Future research should focus on more unified approaches to vitamin D assessment and preventative approaches that may be embedded into already existing antenatal care settings.

  7. Maternal thyroid hormone insufficiency during pregnancy and risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in offspring: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William; Russell, Ginny; Baragwanath, Genevieve; Matthews, Justin; Vaidya, Bijay; Thompson-Coon, Jo

    2018-04-01

    In the last 2 decades, several studies have examined the association between maternal thyroid hormone insufficiency during pregnancy and neurodevelopmental disorders in children and shown conflicting results. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence for an association between maternal thyroid hormone insufficiency during pregnancy and neurodevelopmental disorders in children. We also sought to assess whether levothyroxine treatment for maternal thyroid hormone insufficiency improves child neurodevelopment outcomes. We performed systematic literature searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PSYCinfo, CINAHL, AMED, BNI, Cochrane, Scopus, Web of Science, GreyLit, Grey Source and Open Grey (latest search: March 2017). We also conducted targeted web searching and performed forwards and backwards citation chasing. Meta-analyses of eligible studies were carried out using the random-effects model. We identified 39 eligible articles (37 observational studies and 2 randomized controlled trials [RCT]). Meta-analysis showed that maternal subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroxinaemia are associated with indicators of intellectual disability in offspring (odds ratio [OR] 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20 to 3.83, P = .01, and OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.03 to 2.56, P = .04, respectively). Maternal subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroxinaemia were not associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and their effect on the risk of autism in offspring was unclear. Meta-analysis of RCTs showed no evidence that levothyroxine treatment for maternal hypothyroxinaemia or subclinical hypothyroidism reduces the incidence of low intelligence quotient in offspring. Although studies were generally of good quality, there was evidence of heterogeneity between the included observational studies (I 2 72%-79%). Maternal hypothyroxinaemia and subclinical hypothyroidism may be associated with intellectual disability in offspring. Currently, there is no evidence that levothyroxine

  8. Defining a Good Death (Successful Dying): Literature Review and a Call for Research and Public Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Emily A; Gallegos, Jarred V; Thomas, Lori P Montross; Depp, Colin A; Irwin, Scott A; Jeste, Dilip V

    2016-04-01

    There is little agreement about what constitutes good death or successful dying. The authors conducted a literature search for published, English-language, peer-reviewed reports of qualitative and quantitative studies that provided a definition of a good death. Stakeholders in these articles included patients, prebereaved and bereaved family members, and healthcare providers (HCPs). Definitions found were categorized into core themes and subthemes, and the frequency of each theme was determined by stakeholder (patients, family, HCPs) perspectives. Thirty-six studies met eligibility criteria, with 50% of patient perspective articles including individuals over age 60 years. We identified 11 core themes of good death: preferences for a specific dying process, pain-free status, religiosity/spirituality, emotional well-being, life completion, treatment preferences, dignity, family, quality of life, relationship with HCP, and other. The top three themes across all stakeholder groups were preferences for dying process (94% of reports), pain-free status (81%), and emotional well-being (64%). However, some discrepancies among the respondent groups were noted in the core themes: Family perspectives included life completion (80%), quality of life (70%), dignity (70%), and presence of family (70%) more frequently than did patient perspectives regarding those items (35%-55% each). In contrast, religiosity/spirituality was reported somewhat more often in patient perspectives (65%) than in family perspectives (50%). Taking into account the limitations of the literature, further research is needed on the impact of divergent perspectives on end-of-life care. Dialogues among the stakeholders for each individual must occur to ensure a good death from the most critical viewpoint-the patient's. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Maternal Diabetes and Cognitive Performance in the Offspring: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Camprubi Robles

    Full Text Available Diabetes during gestation is one of the most common pregnancy complications associated with adverse health effects for the mother and the child. Maternal diabetes has been proposed to negatively affect the cognitive abilities of the child, but experimental research assessing its impact is conflicting. The main aim of our study was to compare the cognitive function in children of diabetic and healthy pregnant women.A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted through a literature search using different electronic databases from the index date to January 31, 2015. We included studies that assessed the cognitive abilities in children (up to 14 years of diabetic and non-diabetic mothers using standardized and validated neuropsychological tests.Of 7,698 references reviewed, 12 studies involving 6,140 infants met our inclusion criteria and contributed to meta-analysis. A random effect model was used to compute the standardized mean differences and 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated. Infants (1-2 years of diabetic mothers had significantly lower scores of mental and psychomotor development compared to control infants. The effect size for mental development was -0.41 (95% CI -0.59, -0.24; p<0.0001 and for psychomotor development was -0.31 (95% CI -0.55, -0.07; p = 0.0125 with non-significant heterogeneity. Diabetes during pregnancy could be associated with decreased intelligence quotient scores in school-age children, although studies showed significant heterogeneity.The association between maternal diabetes and deleterious effects on mental/psychomotor development and overall intellectual function in the offspring must be taken with caution. Results are based on observational cohorts and a direct causal influence of intrauterine hyperglycemia remains uncertain. Therefore, more trials that include larger populations are warranted to elucidate whether gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM has a negative impact on offspring central nervous

  10. Maternal stress, well-being, and impaired sleep in mothers of children with developmental disabilities: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiwon

    2013-11-01

    Having children with developmental disabilities (DDs) requires a high level of caregiving responsibilities, and existing studies support that mothers of children with DDs experience high levels of maternal stress as well as poor sleep and well-being. Given the fact that the number of children with DDs has increased, an up-to-date literature review is necessary to identify factors associated with maternal stress, sleep, and well-being. In addition, understanding these factors and their relationships may provide better strategies in designing effective interventions that can reduce the burden in mothers of children with DDs. This review summarized 28 scientific research papers that examined maternal stress, sleep, and well-being in mothers of children with DDs in past 12 years. The study findings indicate that mothers of children with DDs experience higher levels of stress than mothers of typically developing children, and it remains high over time. In addition, these mothers often encounter depressive symptoms as well as poor sleep quality. The study results also reveal that there is a bidirectional relationship between maternal stress and depressive symptoms as well as between poor sleep quality and depressive symptoms. For example, higher stress mothers experienced more depressive symptoms. Mothers of children with DDs with poor sleep quality are significantly associated with more depressive symptoms. Child behavior problems were significantly associated with both maternal stress and depressive symptoms, but cautious interpretation is warranted due to the shared variance between child behavior problems, maternal stress, and depressive symptoms. Methodological guidelines for future research involve the use of reliable and valid instruments for the measurement of child behavior problems, maternal stress, and sleep. Recommendations for future research are included. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Systematic review of statistics on causes of deaths in hospitals: strengthening the evidence for policy-makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampatige, Rasika; Mikkelsen, Lene; Hernandez, Bernardo; Riley, Ian; Lopez, Alan D

    2014-11-01

    To systematically review the reliability of hospital data on cause of death and encourage periodic reviews of these data using a standard method. We searched Google Scholar, Pubmed and Biblioteca Virtual de la Salud for articles in English, Spanish and Portuguese that reported validation studies of data on cause of death. We analysed the results of 199 studies that had used medical record reviews to validate the cause of death reported on death certificates or by the vital registration system. The screened studies had been published between 1983 and 2013 and their results had been reported in English (n = 124), Portuguese (n = 25) or Spanish (n = 50). Only 29 of the studies met our inclusion criteria. Of these, 13 had examined cause of death patterns at the population level - with a view to correcting cause-specific mortality fractions - while the other 16 had been undertaken to identify discrepancies in the diagnosis for specific diseases before and after medical record review. Most of the selected studies reported substantial misdiagnosis of causes of death in hospitals. There was wide variation in study methodologies. Many studies did not describe the methods used in sufficient detail to be able to assess the reproducibility or comparability of their results. The assumption that causes of death are being accurately reported in hospitals is unfounded. To improve the reliability and usefulness of reported causes of death, national governments should do periodic medical record reviews to validate the quality of their hospital cause of death data, using a standard.

  12. Attitudes and behaviours of maternal health care providers in interactions with clients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannava, P; Durrant, K; Fisher, J; Chersich, M; Luchters, S

    2015-08-15

    High maternal mortality and morbidity persist, in large part due to inadequate access to timely and quality health care. Attitudes and behaviours of maternal health care providers (MHCPs) influence health care seeking and quality of care. Five electronic databases were searched for studies from January 1990 to December 2014. Included studies report on types or impacts of MHCP attitudes and behaviours towards their clients, or the factors influencing these attitudes and behaviours. Attitudes and behaviours mentioned in relation to HIV infection, and studies of health providers outside the formal health system, such as traditional birth attendants, were excluded. Of 967 titles and 412 abstracts screened, 125 full-text papers were reviewed and 81 included. Around two-thirds used qualitative methods and over half studied public-sector facilities. Most studies were in Africa (n = 55), followed by Asia and the Pacific (n = 17). Fifty-eight studies covered only negative attitudes or behaviours, with a minority describing positive provider behaviours, such as being caring, respectful, sympathetic and helpful. Negative attitudes and behaviours commonly entailed verbal abuse (n = 45), rudeness such as ignoring or ridiculing patients (n = 35), or neglect (n = 32). Studies also documented physical abuse towards women, absenteeism or unavailability of providers, corruption, lack of regard for privacy, poor communication, unwillingness to accommodate traditional practices, and authoritarian or frightening attitudes. These behaviours were influenced by provider workload, patients' attitudes and behaviours, provider beliefs and prejudices, and feelings of superiority among MHCPs. Overall, negative attitudes and behaviours undermined health care seeking and affected patient well-being. The review documented a broad range of negative MHCP attitudes and behaviours affecting patient well-being, satisfaction with care and care seeking. Reported negative patient

  13. Maternal Mortality in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeva, Sonia; Archer, Natalie P; Ruggiero, Karen; Hall, Manda; Stagg, Julie; Interis, Evelyn Coronado; Vega, Rachelle; Delgado, Evelyn; Hellerstedt, John; Hankins, Gary; Hollier, Lisa M

    2017-05-01

    A commentary on maternal mortality in Texas is provided in response to a 2016 article in Obstetrics & Gynecology by MacDorman et al. While the Texas Department of State Health Services and the Texas Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Task Force agree that maternal mortality increased sharply from 2010 to 2011, the percentage change or the magnitude of the increase in the maternal mortality rate in Texas differs depending on the statistical methods used to compute and display it. Methodologic challenges in identifying maternal death are also discussed, as well as risk factors and causes of maternal death in Texas. Finally, several state efforts currently underway to address maternal mortality in Texas are described. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Third delay of maternal mortality in a tertiary hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, N.; Khan, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the magnitude, causes and substandard care factors responsible for the third delay of maternal mortality seen in our unit III, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Civil Hospital, Karachi. This Cross-sectional, retrospective study was carried out on 152 mothers who died over a period of eight years from 1997 to 2004 at Civil Hospital Karachi. Death summaries of all maternal deaths were reviewed from death registers and were studied for substandard care factors which could have been responsible for the third delay of maternal mortality. The frequency of maternal mortality was 1.3 per 100 deliveries. The mean age was 29+-6.49 years and mean parity was 3.24+-3.25. The main causes of death were hypertensive disorders in 52/152 (34.21%), hemorrhage in 40/152 (26.31%), unsafe abortion in 16/152 (10.52%), puerperal sepsis in 14/152 (9.21%) and obstructed labor in 11/152 (7.2%) cases. Substandard care factors were present in 76.7% of patients, which included inappropriate management of pulmonary edema, delay in arranging blood for hemorrhaging patients and delay in surgical intervention. Substandard care factors were present in majority of cases of maternal deaths. Improvement of maternity care services in Civil Hospital Karachi is needed on an urgent basis. (author)

  15. Immigrant women's experiences of maternity-care services in Canada: a systematic review using a narrative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, Gina M A; Morgan, Myfanwy; Alexandre, Mirande; Chiu, Yvonne; Forgeron, Joan; Kocay, Deb; Barolia, Rubina

    2015-02-11

    Canada's diverse society and its statutory commitment to multiculturalism means that a synthesis of knowledge related to the healthcare experiences of immigrants is essential to realise the health potential for future Canadians. Although concerns about the maternity experiences of immigrants in Canada are relatively new, recent national guidelines explicitly call for the tailoring of services to user needs. We therefore assessed the experiences of immigrant women accessing maternity-care services in Canada. In particular, we investigated the experiences of immigrant women in Canada in accessing and navigating maternity and related healthcare services from conception to 6 months postpartum in Canada. Our focus was on (a) the accessibility and acceptability of maternity-care services for immigrant women and (b) the effects of the perceptions and experiences of these women on their birth and postnatal outcomes. We conducted a systematic review using a systematic search and narrative synthesis of peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed reports of empirical research, with the aim of providing stakeholders with perspectives on maternity-care services as experienced by immigrant women. We partnered with key stakeholders ('integrated knowledge users') to ensure the relevancy of topics and to tailor recommendations for effective translation into future policy, practice and programming. Two search phases and a three-stage selection process for published and grey literature were conducted prior to appraisal of literature quality and narrative synthesis of the findings. Our knowledge synthesis of maternity care among immigrants to Canada provided a coherent evidence base for (a) eliciting a better understanding of the factors that generate disparities in accessibility, acceptability and outcomes during maternity care; and (b) improving culturally based competency in maternity care. Our synthesis also identified pertinent issues in multiple sectors that should be addressed to

  16. Women's maternity care needs and related service models in rural areas: A comprehensive systematic review of qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ha; Le, Quynh; Ogden, Kathryn

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the needs of rural women in maternity care and service models available to them is significant for the development of effective policies and the sustainability of rural communities. Nevertheless, no systematic review of studies addressing these needs has been conducted. To synthesise the best available evidence on the experiences of women's needs in maternity care and existing service models in rural areas. Literature search of ten electronic databases, digital theses, and reference lists of relevant studies applying inclusion/exclusion criteria was conducted. Selected papers were assessed using standardised critical appraisal instruments from JBI-QARI. Data extracted from these studies were synthesised using thematic synthesis. 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. There were three main themes and several sub-themes identified. A comprehensive set of the maternity care expectations of rural women was reported in this review including safety (7), continuity of care (6) and quality of care (6), and informed choices needs (4). In addition, challenges in accessing maternity services also emerged from the literature such as access (6), risk of travelling (9) and associated cost of travel (9). Four models of maternity care examined in the literature were medically led care (5), GP-led care (4), midwifery-led care (7) and home birth (6). The systematic review demonstrates the importance of including well-conducted qualitative studies in informing the development of evidence-based policies to address women's maternity care needs and inform service models. Synthesising the findings from qualitative studies offers important insight for informing effective public health policy. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effects of cash transfers and vouchers on the use and quality of maternity care services: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Benjamin M; Harrison, Sean; Portela, Anayda; Bick, Debra

    2017-01-01

    Cash transfers and vouchers are forms of 'demand-side financing' that have been widely used to promote maternal and newborn health in low- and middle-income countries during the last 15 years. This systematic review consolidates evidence from seven published systematic reviews on the effects of different types of cash transfers and vouchers on the use and quality of maternity care services, and updates the systematic searches to June 2015 using the Joanna Briggs Institute approach for systematic reviewing. The review protocol for this update was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015020637). Data from 51 studies (15 more than previous reviews) and 22 cash transfer and voucher programmes suggest that approaches tied to service use (either via payment conditionalities or vouchers for selected services) can increase use of antenatal care, use of a skilled attendant at birth and in the case of vouchers, postnatal care too. The strongest evidence of positive effect was for conditional cash transfers and uptake of antenatal care, and for vouchers for maternity care services and birth with a skilled birth attendant. However, effects appear to be shaped by a complex set of social and healthcare system barriers and facilitators. Studies have typically focused on an initial programme period, usually two or three years after initiation, and many lack a counterfactual comparison with supply-side investment. There are few studies to indicate that programmes have led to improvements in quality of maternity care or maternal and newborn health outcomes. Future research should use multiple intervention arms to compare cost-effectiveness with similar investment in public services, and should look beyond short- to medium-term service utilisation by examining programme costs, longer-term effects on service utilisation and health outcomes, and the equity of those effects.

  18. The effects of cash transfers and vouchers on the use and quality of maternity care services: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Benjamin M.; Harrison, Sean; Portela, Anayda; Bick, Debra

    2017-01-01

    Background Cash transfers and vouchers are forms of ‘demand-side financing’ that have been widely used to promote maternal and newborn health in low- and middle-income countries during the last 15 years. Methods This systematic review consolidates evidence from seven published systematic reviews on the effects of different types of cash transfers and vouchers on the use and quality of maternity care services, and updates the systematic searches to June 2015 using the Joanna Briggs Institute approach for systematic reviewing. The review protocol for this update was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015020637). Results Data from 51 studies (15 more than previous reviews) and 22 cash transfer and voucher programmes suggest that approaches tied to service use (either via payment conditionalities or vouchers for selected services) can increase use of antenatal care, use of a skilled attendant at birth and in the case of vouchers, postnatal care too. The strongest evidence of positive effect was for conditional cash transfers and uptake of antenatal care, and for vouchers for maternity care services and birth with a skilled birth attendant. However, effects appear to be shaped by a complex set of social and healthcare system barriers and facilitators. Studies have typically focused on an initial programme period, usually two or three years after initiation, and many lack a counterfactual comparison with supply-side investment. There are few studies to indicate that programmes have led to improvements in quality of maternity care or maternal and newborn health outcomes. Conclusion Future research should use multiple intervention arms to compare cost-effectiveness with similar investment in public services, and should look beyond short- to medium-term service utilisation by examining programme costs, longer-term effects on service utilisation and health outcomes, and the equity of those effects. PMID:28328940

  19. The effects of cash transfers and vouchers on the use and quality of maternity care services: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Hunter

    Full Text Available Cash transfers and vouchers are forms of 'demand-side financing' that have been widely used to promote maternal and newborn health in low- and middle-income countries during the last 15 years.This systematic review consolidates evidence from seven published systematic reviews on the effects of different types of cash transfers and vouchers on the use and quality of maternity care services, and updates the systematic searches to June 2015 using the Joanna Briggs Institute approach for systematic reviewing. The review protocol for this update was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015020637.Data from 51 studies (15 more than previous reviews and 22 cash transfer and voucher programmes suggest that approaches tied to service use (either via payment conditionalities or vouchers for selected services can increase use of antenatal care, use of a skilled attendant at birth and in the case of vouchers, postnatal care too. The strongest evidence of positive effect was for conditional cash transfers and uptake of antenatal care, and for vouchers for maternity care services and birth with a skilled birth attendant. However, effects appear to be shaped by a complex set of social and healthcare system barriers and facilitators. Studies have typically focused on an initial programme period, usually two or three years after initiation, and many lack a counterfactual comparison with supply-side investment. There are few studies to indicate that programmes have led to improvements in quality of maternity care or maternal and newborn health outcomes.Future research should use multiple intervention arms to compare cost-effectiveness with similar investment in public services, and should look beyond short- to medium-term service utilisation by examining programme costs, longer-term effects on service utilisation and health outcomes, and the equity of those effects.

  20. Effects of user fee exemptions on the provision and use of maternal health services: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, Laurel E; Makinen, Marty; Madhavan, Supriya; Conlon, Claudia M

    2013-12-01

    User fee removal has been put forward as an approach to increasing priority health service utilization, reducing impoverishment, and ultimately reducing maternal and neonatal mortality. However, user fees are a source of facility revenue in many low-income countries, often used for purchasing drugs and supplies and paying incentives to health workers. This paper reviews evidence on the effects of user fee exemptions on maternal health service utilization, service provision, and outcomes, including both supply-side and demand-side effects. We reviewed 19 peer-reviewed research articles addressing user fee exemptions and maternal health services or outcomes published since 1990. Studies were identified through a USAID-commissioned call for evidence, key word search, and screening process. Teams of reviewers assigned criteria-based quality scores to each paper and prepared structured narrative reviews. The grade of the evidence was found to be relatively weak, mainly from short-term, non-controlled studies. The introduction of user fee exemptions appears to have resulted in increased rates of facility-based deliveries and caesarean sections in some contexts. Impacts on maternal and neonatal mortality have not been conclusively demonstrated; exemptions for delivery care may contribute to modest reductions in institutional maternal mortality but the evidence is very weak. User fee exemptions were found to have negative, neutral, or inconclusive effects on availability of inputs, provider motivation, and quality of services. The extent to which user fee revenue lost by facilities is replaced can directly affect service provision and may have unintended consequences for provider motivation. Few studies have looked at the equity effects of fee removal, despite clear evidence that fees disproportionately burden the poor. This review highlights potential and documented benefits (increased use of maternity services) as well as risks (decreased provider motivation and quality

  1. The maternal early warning criteria: a proposal from the national partnership for maternal safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhyre, Jill M; D'Oria, Robyn; Hameed, Afshan B; Lappen, Justin R; Holley, Sharon L; Hunter, Stephen K; Jones, Robin L; King, Jeffrey C; D'Alton, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Case reviews of maternal death have revealed a concerning pattern of delay in recognition of hemorrhage, hypertensive crisis, sepsis, venous thromboembolism, and heart failure. Early-warning systems have been proposed to facilitate timely recognition, diagnosis, and treatment for women developing critical illness. A multidisciplinary working group convened by the National Partnership for Maternal Safety used a consensus-based approach to define The Maternal Early Warning Criteria, a list of abnormal parameters that indicate the need for urgent bedside evaluation by a clinician with the capacity to escalate care as necessary in order to pursue diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. This commentary reviews the evidence supporting the use of early-warning systems, describes The Maternal Early Warning Criteria, and provides considerations for local implementation. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  2. The global effect of maternal education on complete childhood vaccination: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forshaw, Jennifer; Gerver, Sarah M; Gill, Moneet; Cooper, Emily; Manikam, Logan; Ward, Helen

    2017-12-28

    There is an established correlation between maternal education and reduction in childhood mortality. One proposed link is that an increase in maternal education will lead to an increase in health care access and vaccine uptake. Vaccinations are a central preventative child health tool, therefore demonstrating the importance of understanding factors that can improve coverage. This review aims to establish if there is a correlation between increasing maternal education and vaccine uptake and if this varies between continents, setting and time. An electronic database search was conducted using Medline Ovid, Embase and The Cochrane Library using a combination of keywords and appropriate MeSH terms for maternal education and child vaccination. Bibliographies were also hand searched. Data was extracted and entered onto a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and analysed using STATA 13.0 software. The primary outcome of effect size of maternal education on completion of childhood vaccinations was analysed at different levels. Secondary outcomes were explored using subgroup analyses of differences between continents, rural or urban settings, and dates. The online search yielded 3430 papers, 37 were included in this study. The analysis showed increasing child vaccination uptake with increasing maternal education. Overall, analysis showed that the odds of full childhood vaccination were 2.3 times greater in children whose mother received secondary or higher education when compared to children whose mother had no education. There was large variability in the effect size between the studies included. Improving maternal education is important for increasing childhood vaccination uptake and coverage. Further research is needed in higher income countries. PROSPERO Registration No: CRD42016042409 .

  3. STUDY ON MATERNAL MORTALITY AND NEAR MISS CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritanjali Behera

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Maternal mortality traditionally has been the indicator of maternal health. More recently the review of cases of near miss obstetric event is found to be useful to investigate maternal mortality. Cases of near miss are those, where a woman nearly died but survived a complication that occur during pregnancy or child birth. Aim and Objective 1. To analyse near miss cases and maternal deaths. 2. To determine maternal near miss indicator and to analyse the cause and contributing factors for both of them. MATERIALS AND METHODS This prospective observational study conducted in M.K.C.G. medical college, Berhampur from 1st October 2015 to 30th September 2017. All the cases of maternal deaths and near miss cases defined by WHO criteria are taken. Information regarding demographic profile and reproductive parameters are collected and results are analysed using percentage and proportion. RESULTS Out of 17977 deliveries 201 were near miss cases and 116 were maternal deaths. MMR was 681, near miss incidence 1.18, maternal death to near miss ratio was 1:1.73. Hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (37.4% was the leading cause followed by haemorrhage (17.4%. For near miss cases 101 cases fulfilled clinical criteria, 61 laboratory criteria and 131 cases management based criteria. CONCLUSION Hypertensive disorder of pregnancy and haemorrhage are the leading cause of maternal death and for near miss cases most common organ system involved was cardiovascular system. All the near miss cases should be interpreted as opportunities to improve the health care services.

  4. Distribution of causes of maternal mortality during delivery and post-partum: results of an African multicentre hospital-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonneau, Patrick F; Matsudai, Tomohiro; Alihonou, Eusèbe; De Souza, Jose; Faye, Ousseynou; Moreau, Jean-Charles; Djanhan, Yao; Welffens-Ekra, Christiane; Goyaux, Nathalie

    2004-06-15

    To assess the maternal mortality ratio in maternity units of reference hospitals in large west African cities, and to describe the distribution of complications and causes of maternal deaths. Prospective descriptive study in twelve reference maternities located in three African countries (Benin, Ivory Coast, Senegal). Data (clinical findings at hospital entry, medical history, complications, type of surgery, vital status of the women at discharge) were collected from obstetrical and surgical files and from admission hospital registers. All cases of maternal deaths were systematically reviewed by African and European staff. Of a total of 10,515 women, 1495 presented a major obstetric complication with dystocia or inappropriate management of the labour phase as the leading cause. Eighty-five maternal deaths were reported, giving a global hospital-based maternal mortality ratio of 800/100,000. Hypertensive disorders were involved in 25/85 cases (29%) and post-partum haemorrhage in 13/85 cases (15%). Relatively few cases (14) of major sepsis were reported, leading to three maternal deaths. The results of this multicentre study confirm the high rates of maternal mortality in maternity units of reference hospitals in large African cities, and in addition to dystocia the contribution of hypertensive disorders and post-partum haemorrhage to maternal deaths.

  5. Counting indirect crisis-related deaths in the context of a low-resilience health system: the case of maternal and neonatal health during the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochas, Laura; Channon, Andrew Amos; Nam, Sara

    2017-11-01

    Although the number of direct Ebola-related deaths from the 2013 to 2016 West African Ebola outbreak has been quantified, the number of indirect deaths, resulting from decreased utilization of routine health services, remains unknown. Such information is a key ingredient of health system resilience, essential for adequate allocation of resources to both 'crisis response activities' and 'core functions'. Taking stock of indirect deaths may also help the concept of health system resilience achieve political traction over the traditional approach of disease-specific surveillance. This study responds to these imperatives by quantifying the extent of the drop in utilization of essential reproductive, maternal and neonatal health services in Sierra Leone during the Ebola outbreak by using interrupted time-series regression to analyse Health Management Information System (HMIS) data. Using the Lives Saved Tool, we then model the implication of this decrease in utilization in terms of excess maternal and neonatal deaths, as well as stillbirths. We find that antenatal care coverage suffered from the largest decrease in coverage as a result of the Ebola epidemic, with an estimated 22 percentage point (p.p.) decrease in population coverage compared with the most conservative counterfactual scenario. Use of family planning, facility delivery and post-natal care services also decreased but to a lesser extent (-6, -8 and -13 p.p. respectively). This decrease in utilization of life-saving health services translates to 3600 additional maternal, neonatal and stillbirth deaths in the year 2014-15 under the most conservative scenario. In other words, we estimate that the indirect mortality effects of a crisis in the context of a health system lacking resilience may be as important as the direct mortality effects of the crisis itself. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved

  6. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Interventions on Maternal Perinatal Mental Health Outcomes: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenrong; MacBeth, Angus

    2017-01-01

    Presenting with common mental health difficulties, particularly depression and anxiety, there is also preliminary evidence that mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) including mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and integrated mindfulness yoga practices may also be effective in reducing common mental health difficulties during pregnancy. We systematically reviewed and synthesized the current literature on the effectiveness of MBIs in reducing severity of perinatal anxiety and depression. Databases including PubMed, Cochrane Library, IndMED and PsychoInfo were searched for relevant studies. Manual searches were conducted in relevant articles and Google Scholar. Seventeen cohorts representing 18 studies were included. Pre-post effect sizes were reported for both treatment and control groups. Seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs), two non-randomized controlled trials and nine treatment evaluations were included. Maternal participation in an MBI was associated with reductions in perinatal anxiety of moderate to large magnitude. Results for the effect of MBIs on depression were less consistent, with pre-post treatment reductions of moderate magnitude, but no significant differences in depression scores when MBI was compared with a control group. There was some evidence that MBIs were associated with increased mindfulness. Risk of bias in studies was variable. Our review offers preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of MBIs in reducing perinatal anxiety, with more equivocal findings with regard to perinatal depressive symptoms. Further methodologically rigorous evaluation using RCTs and longer follow-up periods are recommended.

  7. Maternal SSRI exposure increases the risk of autistic offspring: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalib, S; Emamhadi, M R; Yousefzadeh-Chabok, S; Shakouri, S K; Høilund-Carlsen, P F; Vafaee, M S; Michel, T M

    2017-09-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most common antidepressants used to preclude maternal pregnancy depression. There is a growing body of literature assessing the association of prenatal exposure to SSRIs with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present systematic review and meta-analysis reviewed the medical literature and pooled the results of the association of prenatal exposure to SSRIs with ASD. Published investigations in English by June 2016 with keywords of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRI, autism spectrum disorder, ASD, pregnancy, childhood, children, neurodevelopment were identified using databases PubMed and PMC, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and Google Scholar. Cochran's Q statistic-value (Q), degree of freedom (df), and I 2 indices (variation in odds ratio [OR] attributable to heterogeneity) were calculated to analyze the risk of heterogeneity of the within- and between-study variability. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were reported by a Mantel-Haenszel test. There was a non-significant heterogeneity for the included studies ([Q=3.61, df=6, P=0.730], I 2 =0%). The pooled results showed a significant association between prenatal SSRI exposure and ASD (OR=1.82, 95% CI=1.59-2.10, Z=8.49, P=0.00). The evidence from the present study suggests that prenatal exposure to SSRIs is associated with a higher risk of ASD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Association between maternal obesity and offspring Apgar score or cord pH: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tingting; Tang, Jun; Zhao, Fengyan; Qu, Yi; Mu, Dezhi

    2015-12-22

    Previous results are inconsistent regarding the association between maternal obesity and Apgar score or cord pH in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between maternal pre-pregnancy and pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and infant Apgar score or cord pH. We conducted a systematic review of studies published in English before 20 August 2015 using PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library. Eleven cohort studies with a total of 2,586,265 participants finally met our inclusion criteria. Pooled results revealed the following factors associated with Apgar score obese (OR 1.40; 95% CI, 1.27-1.54), and very obese (OR 1.71; 95% CI, 1.55-1.89). The pooled analysis also revealed that maternal overweight or obesity increased the risk for Apgar score maternal BMI and neonatal cord pH. Thus, this study suggests that maternal overweight and obesity affect baby's condition immediately after birth in general. More studies are needed to confirm these results and detect the influence of variables across studies.

  9. The National Partnership for Maternal Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DʼAlton, Mary E; Main, Elliott K; Menard, M Kathryn; Levy, Barbara S

    2014-05-01

    Recognition of the need to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity in the United States has led to the creation of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety. This collaborative, broad-based initiative will begin with three priority bundles for the most common preventable causes of maternal death and severe morbidity: obstetric hemorrhage, severe hypertension in pregnancy, and peripartum venous thromboembolism. In addition, three unit-improvement bundles for obstetric services were identified: a structured approach for the recognition of early warning signs and symptoms, structured internal case reviews to identify systems improvement opportunities, and support tools for patients, families, and staff that experience an adverse outcome. This article details the formation of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety and introduces the initial priorities.

  10. Sudden death after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)--case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Goran; Milosevic, Marko; Zelić, Marko; Stimac, Davor

    2014-12-01

    There are only a few cases found in literature regarding air embolism in endoscopic procedures, especially in connection to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We are presenting a case of a 56-year-old female patient who suffered from non-Hodgkin lymphoma located in her right groin. She was also diagnosed with choledocholithiasis and underwent ERCP to remove the gallstones. Immediately after the procedure she went into sudden cardiac arrest and subsequently died, despite all of our efforts. We reviewed literature in order to identify possible causes of death because fatal outcome following an uneventful and successful procedure was not expected. It is important to bear in mind all possible complications of ERCP. Our focus during the literature search was on air embolism.

  11. A review of ethylphenidate in deaths in east and west Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Claire; McKeown, Denise; Torrance, Hazel J

    2015-12-01

    Ethylphenidate is a psychostimulant and analogue of methylphenidate. Interestingly it is also produced as a metabolite from the co-ingestion of methylphenidate and alcohol (ethanol). In the UK, between April and June 2015, ethylphenidate and 6 other methylphenidate based novel psychoactive substances (NPS) were subjected to a temporary class drug order under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. Ethylphenidate is being abused by both novel and habitual drug users, more prominently in the East of Scotland. What is unknown in the literature is the contribution of ethylphenidate in deaths. A search was conducted for an 18 month period (July 2013 to December 2014) to identify cases where ethylphenidate was detected during post-mortem toxicological analysis. Nineteen cases were identified and these cases were examined with regards to case circumstances, pathology findings, toxicology results and adverse effects. The individuals ranged in age from 20 to 54 (median 37) and the majority were male (n=14) and from the East of Scotland (n=16), more specifically Edinburgh and surrounding area. Current or previous heroin abuse was a common theme in these cases (n=16) and injection was a common route of administration of "legal highs" or "burst". The concentration of ethylphenidate in the cases ranged from 0.008 mg/L to over 2 mg/L in post-mortem femoral blood (median 0.25 mg/L, average 0.39 mg/L). Other drugs commonly detected were benzodiazepines (n=15), followed by opiates (n=11, 4 of which were positive for 6-monoacetylmorphine) and then methadone (n=8). All 19 cases received a full post-mortem examination and there were 10 cases where drug toxicity was the sole or potentially contributory factor to the cause of death. Ethylphenidate was specifically mentioned in the cause of death for 5 cases, chronic intravenous (IV) drug use was named as part of the cause of death for 2 cases and in 6 cases there was evidence of complications and infections through IV drug use. As far as it is

  12. The Relationship between Maternal Nutrition during Pregnancy and Offspring Kidney Structure and Function in Humans: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qi Lee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The intrauterine environment is critical for fetal growth and organ development. Evidence from animal models indicates that the developing kidney is vulnerable to suboptimal maternal nutrition and changes in health status. However, evidence from human studies are yet to be synthesised. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to systematically review current research on the relationship between maternal nutrition during pregnancy and offspring kidney structure and function in humans. A search of five databases identified 9501 articles, of which three experimental and seven observational studies met the inclusion criteria. Nutrients reviewed to date included vitamin A (n = 3, folate and vitamin B12 (n = 2, iron (n = 1, vitamin D (n = 1, total energy (n = 2 and protein (n = 1. Seven studies were assessed as being of “positive” and three of “neutral” quality. A variety of populations were studied, with limited studies investigating maternal nutrition during pregnancy, while measurements of offspring kidney outcomes were diverse across studies. There was a lack of consistency in the timing of follow-up for offspring kidney structure and/or function assessments, thus limiting comparability between studies. Deficiencies in maternal folate, vitamin A, and total energy during pregnancy were associated with detrimental impacts on kidney structure and function, measured by kidney volume, proteinuria, eGFRcystC and mean creatinine clearance in the offspring. Additional experimental and longitudinal prospective studies are warranted to confirm this relationship, especially in Indigenous populations where the risk of renal disease is greater.

  13. The Relationship between Maternal Nutrition during Pregnancy and Offspring Kidney Structure and Function in Humans: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Qi; Collins, Clare E.; Gordon, Adrienne; Rae, Kym M.; Pringle, Kirsty G.

    2018-01-01

    The intrauterine environment is critical for fetal growth and organ development. Evidence from animal models indicates that the developing kidney is vulnerable to suboptimal maternal nutrition and changes in health status. However, evidence from human studies are yet to be synthesised. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to systematically review current research on the relationship between maternal nutrition during pregnancy and offspring kidney structure and function in humans. A search of five databases identified 9501 articles, of which three experimental and seven observational studies met the inclusion criteria. Nutrients reviewed to date included vitamin A (n = 3), folate and vitamin B12 (n = 2), iron (n = 1), vitamin D (n = 1), total energy (n = 2) and protein (n = 1). Seven studies were assessed as being of “positive” and three of “neutral” quality. A variety of populations were studied, with limited studies investigating maternal nutrition during pregnancy, while measurements of offspring kidney outcomes were diverse across studies. There was a lack of consistency in the timing of follow-up for offspring kidney structure and/or function assessments, thus limiting comparability between studies. Deficiencies in maternal folate, vitamin A, and total energy during pregnancy were associated with detrimental impacts on kidney structure and function, measured by kidney volume, proteinuria, eGFRcystC and mean creatinine clearance in the offspring. Additional experimental and longitudinal prospective studies are warranted to confirm this relationship, especially in Indigenous populations where the risk of renal disease is greater. PMID:29466283

  14. A systematic review of maternal confidence for physiologic birth: characteristics of prenatal care and confidence measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Melissa D; Saftner, Melissa A; Larson, Bridget; Weinfurter, Elizabeth V

    2014-01-01

    Because a focus on physiologic labor and birth has reemerged in recent years, care providers have the opportunity in the prenatal period to help women increase confidence in their ability to give birth without unnecessary interventions. However, most research has only examined support for women during labor. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the research literature for information about prenatal care approaches that increase women's confidence for physiologic labor and birth and tools to measure that confidence. Studies were reviewed that explored any element of a pregnant woman's interaction with her prenatal care provider that helped build confidence in her ability to labor and give birth. Timing of interaction with pregnant women included during pregnancy, labor and birth, and the postpartum period. In addition, we looked for studies that developed a measure of women's confidence related to labor and birth. Outcome measures included confidence or similar concepts, descriptions of components of prenatal care contributing to maternal confidence for birth, and reliability and validity of tools measuring confidence. The search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Scopus databases provided a total of 893 citations. After removing duplicates and articles that did not meet inclusion criteria, 6 articles were included in the review. Three relate to women's confidence for labor during the prenatal period, and 3 describe tools to measure women's confidence for birth. Research about enhancing women's confidence for labor and birth was limited to qualitative studies. Results suggest that women desire information during pregnancy and want to use that information to participate in care decisions in a relationship with a trusted provider. Further research is needed to develop interventions to help midwives and physicians enhance women's confidence in their ability to give birth and to develop a tool to measure confidence for use during prenatal care. © 2014 by

  15. Interventions to support effective communication between maternity care staff and women in labour: A mixed-methods systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yan-Shing; Coxon, Kirstie; Portela, Anayda Gerarda; Furuta, Marie; Bick, Debra

    2018-04-01

    the objectives of this review were (1) to assess whether interventions to support effective communication between maternity care staff and healthy women in labour with a term pregnancy could improve birth outcomes and experiences of care; and (2) to synthesize information related to the feasibility of implementation and resources required. a mixed-methods systematic review. studies which reported on interventions aimed at improving communication between maternity care staff and healthy women during normal labour and birth, with no apparent medical or obstetric complications, and their family members were included. 'Maternity care staff' included medical doctors (e.g. obstetricians, anaesthetists, physicians, family doctors, paediatricians), midwives, nurses and other skilled birth attendants providing labour, birth and immediate postnatal care. Studies from all birth settings (any country, any facility including home birth, any resource level) were included. two papers met the inclusion criteria. One was a step wedge randomised controlled trial conducted in Syria, and the other a sub-analysis of a randomised controlled trial from the United Kingdom. Both studies aimed to assess effects of communication training for maternity care staff on women's experiences of labour care. The study from Syria reported that a communication skills training intervention for resident doctors was not associated with higher satisfaction reported by women. In the UK study, patient-actors' (experienced midwives) perceptions of safety and communication significantly improved for postpartum haemorrhage scenarios after training with patient-actors in local hospitals, compared with training using manikins in simulation centres, but no differences were identified for other scenarios. Both studies had methodological limitations. the review identified a lack of evidence on impact of interventions to support effective communication between maternity care staff and healthy women during labour and

  16. Prenatal and Postpartum Maternal Psychological Distress and Infant Development: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Dawn; Tough, Suzanne; Whitfield, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Infant development plays a foundational role in optimal child development and health. Some studies have demonstrated an association between maternal psychological distress and infant outcomes, although the main emphasis has been on postpartum depression and infant-maternal attachment. Prevention and early intervention strategies would benefit from…

  17. Putting women at the center: a review of Indian policy to address person-centered care in maternal and newborn health, family planning and abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aradhana Srivastava

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Person-centered care is a critical component of quality care, essential to enable treatment adherence, and maximize health outcomes. Improving the quality of health services is a key strategy to achieve the new global target of zero preventable maternal deaths by 2030. Recognizing this, the Government of India has in the last decade initiated a number of strategies to address quality of care in health and family welfare services. Methods We conducted a policy review of quality improvement strategies in India from 2005 to 15, covering three critical areas– maternal and newborn health, family planning, and abortion (MNHFP + A. Based on Walt and Gilson’s policy triangle framework, we analyzed the extent to which policies incorporated person-centered care, while identifying unaddressed issues. Data was sourced from Government of India websites, scientific and grey literature databases. Results Twenty-two national policy documents, comprising two policy statements and 20 implementation guidelines of specific schemes were included in the review. Quality improvement strategies span infrastructure, commodities, human resources, competencies, and accountability that are driving quality assurance in MNHFP + A services. However, several implementation challenges have affected compliance with person-centered care, thereby affecting utilization and outcomes. Conclusion Focus on person-centered care in Indian MNHFP + A policy has increased in recent years. Nevertheless, some aspects must still be strengthened, such as positive interpersonal behavior, information sharing and promptness of care. Implementation can be improved through better provider training, patient feedback and monitoring mechanisms. Moreover, unless persisting structural challenges are addressed implementation of person-centered care in facilities will not be effective.

  18. A Review of Nitrates in Drinking Water: Maternal Exposure and Adverse Reproductive and Developmental Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassaram, Deana M.; Backer, Lorraine C.; Moll, Deborah M.

    2006-01-01

    In this review we present an update on maternal exposure to nitrates in drinking water in relation to possible adverse reproductive and developmental effects, and also discuss nitrates in drinking water in the United States. The current standard for nitrates in drinking water is based on retrospective studies and approximates a level that protects infants from methemoglobinemia, but no safety factor is built into the standard. The current standard applies only to public water systems. Drinking water source was related to nitrate exposure (i.e., private systems water was more likely than community system water to have nitrate levels above the maximum contaminant limit). Animal studies have found adverse reproductive effects resulting from higher doses of nitrate or nitrite. The epidemiologic evidence of a direct exposure–response relationship between drinking water nitrate level and adverse reproductive effect is still not clear. However, some reports have suggested an association between exposure to nitrates in drinking water and spontaneous abortions, intrauterine growth restriction, and various birth defects. Uncertainties in epidemiologic studies include the lack of individual exposure assessment that would rule out confounding of the exposure with some other cause. Nitrates may be just one of the contaminants in drinking water contributing to adverse outcomes. We conclude that the current literature does not provide sufficient evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to nitrates in drinking water and adverse reproductive effects. Future studies incorporating individual exposure assessment about users of private wells—the population most at risk—should be considered. PMID:16507452

  19. Effects of deworming on child and maternal health: a literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Winter Maxwell; Clermont, Adrienne; Walker, Neff

    2017-11-07

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections are widespread. Many studies have been published on the topic of deworming. The Lives Saved Tool (LiST) is a software package that uses a deterministic mathematical model to estimate the effect of scaling up interventions on maternal and child health outcomes. This review investigates the scope of available evidence for benefits of deworming treatments in order to inform a decision about possible inclusion of deworming as an intervention in LiST. We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. We included studies that reported pre/post data in children younger than 5 years or pregnant women for outcomes related to mortality and growth. We excluded studies that compared different anthelminthic treatments but did not include a placebo or non-treatment group, and those that did not report post-intervention outcomes. We categorized articles by treated population (children younger than 5 years and pregnant women), experimental versus observational, mass drug administration (MDA) versus treatment, and reported outcome. We identified 58 relevant trials; 27 investigated children younger than 5 years and 11 investigated pregnant women; one reported on both children younger than 5 years and pregnant women. We conducted meta-analyses of relevant outcomes in children younger than 5 years. Deworming did not show consistent benefits for indicators of mortality, anemia, or growth in children younger than five or women of reproductive age. We do not recommend including the effect of deworming in the LiST model.

  20. The worldwide incidence of preterm birth: a systematic review of maternal mortality and morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Stacy; Wojdyla, Daniel; Say, Lale; Betran, Ana Pilar; Merialdi, Mario; Requejo, Jennifer Harris; Rubens, Craig; Menon, Ramkumar; Van Look, Paul F A

    2010-01-01

    To analyse preterm birth rates worldwide to assess the incidence of this public health problem, map the regional distribution of preterm births and gain insight into existing assessment strategies. Data on preterm birth rates worldwide were extracted during a previous systematic review of published and unpublished data on maternal mortality and morbidity reported between 1997 and 2002. Those data were supplemented through a complementary search covering the period 2003-2007. Region-specific multiple regression models were used to estimate the preterm birth rates for countries with no data. We estimated that in 2005, 12.9 million births, or 9.6% of all births worldwide, were preterm. Approximately 11 million (85%) of these preterm births were concentrated in Africa and Asia, while about 0.5 million occurred in each of Europe and North America (excluding Mexico) and 0.9 million in Latin America and the Caribbean. The highest rates of preterm birth were in Africa and North America (11.9% and 10.6% of all births, respectively), and the lowest were in Europe (6.2%). Preterm birth is an important perinatal health problem across the globe. Developing countries, especially those in Africa and southern Asia, incur the highest burden in terms of absolute numbers, although a high rate is also observed in North America. A better understanding of the causes of preterm birth and improved estimates of the incidence of preterm birth at the country level are needed to improve access to effective obstetric and neonatal care.

  1. Student and educator experiences of maternal-child simulation-based learning: a systematic review of qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Karen; Marcellus, Lenora; Rivers, Julie; Gordon, Carol; Ryan, Maureen; Butcher, Diane

    2017-11-01

    Although maternal-child care is a pillar of primary health care, there is a global shortage of maternal-child health care providers. Nurse educators experience difficulties providing undergraduate students with maternal-child learning experiences for a number of reasons. Simulation has the potential to complement learning in clinical and classroom settings. Although systematic reviews of simulation are available, no systematic reviews of qualitative evidence related to maternal-child simulation-based learning (SBL) for undergraduate nursing students and/or educators have been located. The aim of this systematic review was to identify the appropriateness and meaningfulness of maternal-child simulation-based learning for undergraduate nursing students and nursing educators in educational settings to inform curriculum decision-making. The review questions are: INCLUSION CRITERIA TYPES OF PARTICIPANTS: Pre-registration or pre-licensure or undergraduate nursing or health professional students and educators. Experiences of simulation in an educational setting with a focus relevant to maternal child nursing. Qualitative research and educational evaluation using qualitative methods. North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. A three-step search strategy identified published studies in the English language from 2000 until April 2016. Identified studies that met the inclusion criteria were retrieved and critically appraised using the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-QARI) by at least two independent reviewers. Overall the methodological quality of the included studies was low. Qualitative findings were extracted by two independent reviewers using JBI-QARI data extraction tools. Findings were aggregated and categorized on the basis of similarity in meaning. Categories were subjected to a meta-synthesis to produce a single comprehensive set of synthesized findings. Twenty-two articles from 19 studies were included in the review

  2. The Relations Between Maternal Prenatal Anxiety or Stress and Child's Early Negative Reactivity or Self-Regulation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korja, Riikka; Nolvi, Saara; Grant, Kerry Ann; McMahon, Cathy

    2017-12-01

    In the present review, we examine the association between maternal prenatal stress or anxiety and children's early negative reactivity or self-regulation. The review includes 32 studies that focus on pregnancy-related anxiety, state or trait anxiety, perceived stress, and stressful life events in relation to child's crying, temperament, or behavior during the first 2 years of life. We searched four electronic databases and 32 studies were selected based on the inclusion criteria. Twenty-three studies found an association between maternal prenatal anxiety or stress and a child's negative reactivity or self-regulation, and typically the effect sizes varied from low to moderate. The association was found regardless of the form of prenatal stress or anxiety and the trimester in which the prenatal stress or anxiety was measured. In conclusion, several forms of prenatal anxiety and stress may increase the risk of emotional and self-regulatory difficulties during the first 2 years of life.

  3. Cause-specific mortality among children and young adults with epilepsy: Results from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Niu; Shaw, Esther C; Zack, Matthew; Kobau, Rosemarie; Dykstra, Heather; Covington, Theresa M

    2015-04-01

    We investigated causes of death in children and young adults with epilepsy by using data from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System (NCDR-CRS), a passive surveillance system composed of comprehensive information related to deaths reviewed by local child death review teams. Information on a total of 48,697 deaths in children and young adults 28days to 24years of age, including 551 deaths with epilepsy and 48,146 deaths without epilepsy, was collected from 2004 through 2012 in 32 states. In a proportionate mortality analysis by official manner of death, decedents with epilepsy had a significantly higher percentage of natural deaths but significantly lower percentages of deaths due to accidents, homicide, and undetermined causes compared with persons without epilepsy. With respect to underlying causes of death, decedents with epilepsy had significantly higher percentages of deaths due to drowning and most medical conditions including pneumonia and congenital anomalies but lower percentages of deaths due to asphyxia, weapon use, and unknown causes compared with decedents without epilepsy. The increased percentages of deaths due to pneumonia and drowning in children and young adults with epilepsy suggest preventive interventions including immunization and better instruction and monitoring before or during swimming. State-specific and national population-based mortality studies of children and young adults with epilepsy are recommended. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Cause-specific mortality among children and young adults with epilepsy: Results from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System ☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Niu; Shaw, Esther C.; Zack, Matthew; Kobau, Rosemarie; Dykstra, Heather; Covington, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated causes of death in children and young adults with epilepsy by using data from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System (NCDR-CRS), a passive surveillance system composed of comprehensive information related to deaths reviewed by local child death review teams. Information on a total of 48,697 deaths in children and young adults 28 days to 24 years of age, including 551 deaths with epilepsy and 48,146 deaths without epilepsy, was collected from 2004 through 2012 in 32 states. In a proportionate mortality analysis by official manner of death, decedents with epilepsy had a significantly higher percentage of natural deaths but significantly lower percentages of deaths due to accidents, homicide, and undetermined causes compared with persons without epilepsy. With respect to underlying causes of death, decedents with epilepsy had significantly higher percentages of deaths due to drowning and most medical conditions including pneumonia and congenital anomalies but lower percentages of deaths due to asphyxia, weapon use, and unknown causes compared with decedents without epilepsy. The increased percentages of deaths due to pneumonia and drowning in children and young adults with epilepsy suggest preventive interventions including immunization and better instruction and monitoring before or during swimming. State-specific and national population-based mortality studies of children and young adults with epilepsy are recommended. PMID:25794682

  5. Maternal and perinatal outcome of eclampsia in a tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were 17.4% maternal deaths mainly from pulmonary oedema, 6 (13.0%), acute renal failure, 4 (8.7%), and coagulopathy, 3 (6.5%). ... There is need to review existing protocol on Eclampsia management with emphasis on appropriate health education of pregnant mothers, good antenatal care, early diagnosis of ...

  6. Death and Death Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Gonca Karakus; Zehra Ozturk; Lut Tamam

    2012-01-01

    Although death and life concepts seem so different from each other, some believe that death and life as a whole that death is accepted as the goal of life and death completes life. In different cultures, societies and disciplines, there have been very different definitions of death which changes according to personality, age, religion and cultural status of the individual. Attitudes towards death vary dramatically according to individuals. As for the death anxiety, it is a feeling which start...

  7. Assessment of the wish to hasten death in patients with advanced disease: A systematic review of measurement instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido-Pérez, Mercedes; Monforte-Royo, Cristina; Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín; Porta-Sales, Josep; Balaguer, Albert

    2017-06-01

    Patients with advanced conditions may present a wish to hasten death. Assessing this wish is complex due to the nature of the phenomenon and the difficulty of conceptualising it. To identify and analyse existing instruments for assessing the wish to hasten death and to rate their reported psychometric properties. Systematic review based on PRISMA guidelines. The COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments checklist was used to evaluate the methodological quality of validation studies and the measurement properties of the instrument described. The CINAHL, PsycINFO, Pubmed and Web of Science databases were searched from inception to November 2015. A total of 50 articles involving assessment of the wish to hasten death were included. Eight concerned instrument validation and were evaluated using COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments criteria. They reported data for between two and seven measurement properties, with ratings between fair and excellent. Of the seven instruments identified, the Desire for Death Rating Scale or the Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death feature in 48 of the 50 articles. The Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death is the most widely used and is the instrument whose psychometric properties have been most often analysed. Versions of the Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death are available in five languages other than the original English. This systematic review has analysed existing instruments for assessing the wish to hasten death. It has also explored the methodological quality of studies that have examined the measurement properties of these instruments and offers ratings of the reported properties. These results will be useful to clinicians and researchers with an interest in a phenomenon of considerable relevance to advanced patients.

  8. A Two-Year Review on Epidemiology and Clinical Characteristics of Dengue Deaths in Malaysia, 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Yuan Liang; Hor, Chee Peng; Hussin, Narwani; Zakaria, Ariza; Goh, Pik Pin; Cheah, Wee Kooi

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue infection is the fastest spreading mosquito-borne viral disease, which affects people living in the tropical and subtropical countries. Malaysia had large dengue outbreaks in recent years. We aimed to study the demographics and clinical characteristics associated with dengue deaths in Malaysia. Methods We conducted a retrospective review on all dengue deaths that occurred nationwide between 1st January 2013 and 31st December 2014. Relevant data were extracted from mortality review reports and investigational forms. These cases were categorized into children (reviewed. Their mean age was 40.7±19.30 years, half were females and 72.5% were adults. The median durations of first medical contact, and hospitalization were 1 and 3 days, respectively. Diabetes and hypertension were common co-morbidities among adults and elderly. The most common warning signs reported were lethargy and vomiting, with lethargy (p = 0.038) being more common in children, while abdominal pain was observed more often in the adults (p = 0.040). But 22.4% did not have any warning signs. Only 34% were suspected of dengue illness at their initial presentation. More adults developed severe plasma leakage (p = 0.018). More than half (54%) suffered from multi-organ involvement, and 20.2% were free from any organ involvement. Dengue deaths occurred at the median of 3 days post-admission. Dengue shock syndrome (DSS) contributed to more than 70% of dengue deaths, followed by severe organ involvement (69%) and severe bleeding (29.7%). Conclusion In Malaysia, dengue deaths occurred primarily in adult patients. DSS was the leading cause of death, regardless of age groups. The atypical presentation and dynamic progression of severe dengue in this cohort prompts early recognition and aggressive intervention to prevent deaths. Trial Registration National Medical Research Registry (NMRR, NMRR-14-1374-23352) PMID:27203726

  9. A Two-Year Review on Epidemiology and Clinical Characteristics of Dengue Deaths in Malaysia, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Yuan Liang; Hor, Chee Peng; Hussin, Narwani; Zakaria, Ariza; Goh, Pik Pin; Cheah, Wee Kooi

    2016-05-01

    Dengue infection is the fastest spreading mosquito-borne viral disease, which affects people living in the tropical and subtropical countries. Malaysia had large dengue outbreaks in recent years. We aimed to study the demographics and clinical characteristics associated with dengue deaths in Malaysia. We conducted a retrospective review on all dengue deaths that occurred nationwide between 1st January 2013 and 31st December 2014. Relevant data were extracted from mortality review reports and investigational forms. These cases were categorized into children (reviewed. Their mean age was 40.7±19.30 years, half were females and 72.5% were adults. The median durations of first medical contact, and hospitalization were 1 and 3 days, respectively. Diabetes and hypertension were common co-morbidities among adults and elderly. The most common warning signs reported were lethargy and vomiting, with lethargy (p = 0.038) being more common in children, while abdominal pain was observed more often in the adults (p = 0.040). But 22.4% did not have any warning signs. Only 34% were suspected of dengue illness at their initial presentation. More adults developed severe plasma leakage (p = 0.018). More than half (54%) suffered from multi-organ involvement, and 20.2% were free from any organ involvement. Dengue deaths occurred at the median of 3 days post-admission. Dengue shock syndrome (DSS) contributed to more than 70% of dengue deaths, followed by severe organ involvement (69%) and severe bleeding (29.7%). In Malaysia, dengue deaths occurred primarily in adult patients. DSS was the leading cause of death, regardless of age groups. The atypical presentation and dynamic progression of severe dengue in this cohort prompts early recognition and aggressive intervention to prevent deaths. National Medical Research Registry (NMRR, NMRR-14-1374-23352).

  10. Maternal near-miss in a rural hospital in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gamal K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of maternal near-miss is a useful complement to the investigation of maternal mortality with the aim of meeting the United Nations' fifth Millennium Development Goal. The present study was conducted to investigate the frequency of near-miss events, to calculate the mortality index for each event and to compare the socio-demographic and obstetrical data (age, parity, gestational age, education and antenatal care of the near-miss cases with maternal deaths. Methods Near-miss cases and events (hemorrhage, infection, hypertensive disorders, anemia and dystocia, maternal deaths and their causes were retrospectively reviewed and the mortality index for each event was calculated in Kassala Hospital, eastern Sudan over a 2-year period, from January 2008 to December 2010. Disease-specific criteria were applied for these events. Results There were 9578 deliveries, 205 near-miss cases, 228 near-miss events and 40 maternal deaths. Maternal near-miss and maternal mortality ratio were 22.1/1000 live births and 432/100 000 live births, respectively. Hemorrhage accounted for the most common event (40.8%, followed by infection (21.5%, hypertensive disorders (18.0%, anemia (11.8% and dystocia (7.9%. The mortality index were 22.2%, 10.0%, 10.0%, 8.8% and 2.4% for infection, dystocia, anemia, hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders, respectively. Conclusion There is a high frequency of maternal morbidity and mortality at the level of this facility. Therefore maternal health policy needs to be concerned not only with averting the loss of life, but also with preventing or ameliorating maternal-near miss events (hemorrhage, infections, hypertension and anemia at all care levels including primary level.

  11. 75 FR 65395 - Notice Convening an Accountability Review Board To Examine the Circumstances of the Death of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7213] Notice Convening an Accountability Review Board To Examine the Circumstances of the Death of Three DoD Personnel Assigned to the U.S. Embassy's Office of Defense Representative Pakistan (ODRP) on February 3, 2010 Pursuant to Section 301 of the Omnibus...

  12. Pneumonitis and pneumonitis-related death in cancer patients treated with programmed cell death-1 inhibitors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Peng-Fei Cui,1–3,* Jun-Xun Ma,1,* Fei-Xue Wang,1,* Jing Zhang,1 Hai-Tao Tao,1 Yi Hu1 1First Department of Medical Oncology, 2Department of Graduate Administration, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 3Health Bureau of the 75709 Army, Central Theater of the Chinese PLA, Wuhan, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: We conducted a meta-analysis of published clinical trials to determine the relationship between the risks of pneumonitis and pneumonitis-related death and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 inhibitor treatment in patients with cancer.Materials and methods: We examined clinical trials from the Medline and Google Scholar databases. Data from original studies and review articles were also cross-referenced and evaluated. Randomized Phase II and Phase III trials of pembrolizumab and nivolumab treatment in patients with cancer were eligible for the analysis. Information about the participants, all-grade and high-grade pneumonitis, and pneumonitis-related death was extracted from each study and analyzed.Results: After the exclusion of ineligible studies, 12 clinical trials were included in the analysis. The odds ratio (OR for all-grade pneumonitis after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 4.59 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.51–8.37; P<0.00001, and the OR for high-grade pneumonitis after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 3.83 (95% CI: 1.54–9.48; P=0.004. The OR for pneumonitis-related death after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 2.47 (95% CI: 0.41–14.81; P=0.32. Moreover, the OR for all-grade pneumonitis after nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy was 3.54 (95% CI: 1.52–8.23; P=0.003, and that for high-grade pneumonitis after nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy was 2.35 (95% CI: 0.45–12.13; P=0.31. Treated cancer appeared to have no effect on the risk of pneumonitis.Conclusion: Our data showed that PD-1 inhibitors were associated with increased risks of all

  13. The effect of mobile application interventions on influencing healthy maternal behaviour and improving perinatal health outcomes: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Lisa M; Horey, Dell; Middleton, Philippa F; Boyle, Frances M; Flenady, Vicki

    2017-02-08

    Perinatal morbidity and mortality remain significant public health issues globally, with enduring impact on the health and well-being of women and their families. Pregnant women who adopt, practice and maintain healthy behaviours can potentially improve the health of themselves and their babies. Mobile applications are an increasingly popular mode of accessing, storing and sharing health information among pregnant women. The main objective of this review is to evaluate the effects of mobile application interventions during pregnancy on maternal behaviour and associated maternal and infant outcomes. This review will include randomised and non-randomised studies which tested use of mobile applications designed to improve either maternal knowledge or behaviours to address known risk factors associated with adverse perinatal health outcomes. This review will include studies which included pregnant women and/or women during birth. The search strategy will utilise a combination of keywords and MeSH terms. Literature databases such as PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL and WHO Global Health Library will be searched. Two reviewers will independently screen retrieved citations to determine if they meet inclusion criteria. Studies will be selected that provide information about interventions commenced in early pregnancy, late pregnancy or labour. Comparisons to be made include mobile applications versus interventions relying on paper-based or text-messaging-based communication; interpersonal communication such as face-to-face or telephone conversation; and no intervention or standard care. Quality assessment of included randomised studies will utilise established guidelines provided in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Quality assessment of non-randomised studies will be based on the Risk of Bias in Non-randomised Studies-of Interventions (ROBINS-I) assessment tool. Quality of the evidence will be evaluated using the Grades of

  14. A review on the relationship between marital adjustment and maternal attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birsen Mutlu

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: To determine the relationship between marital adjustment of mothers who have babies between 1-4 months old and their maternal attachment; as well as the relationship of maternal attachment and marital adjustment with sociodemographic characteristics. Method: The research is descriptive and correlational. Its sample consists of 113 mothers. Maternal Attachment Index (MAI and Marital Adjustment Scale (MAS are used as data collection tools. Results: We found that, for mothers who participated in this research, the average level of maternal attachment is 92.17 ± 8.49, and the average level of marital adjustment is 43.06 ± 7.90. We discovered that the maternal attachment level is higher for mothers who have completed high school and university, those who breastfeed their babies exclusively and whose spouses help care for the baby. We also discovered that the Marital Adjustment Score is higher among mothers who are employed, get married by companionship (not arranged, continue attending pregnancy classes and whose duration of marriage is between 1-5 years and 10-15 years. There is weak positive relationship (r=0.38; p=0.00 between marital adjustment and maternal attachment; and the regression analysis that is run to explain this relationship is statistically significant (F=26.131; p<0.05. Conclusion: In our study, the level of maternal attachment was high, while the level of marital adjustment was liminal. There are many factors affecting sociodemographic characteristics, pregnancy and baby care. The level of marital adjustment for mothers increases the maternal attachment.

  15. Pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death (pDCD): A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Matthew J; Sherry, Wendy; Hornby, Laura

    2018-04-14

    Pediatric donation after circulatory death (pDCD) is an established pathway for organ donation. It remains, however, a relatively rare event worldwide, and most clinicians outside of the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) are unfamiliar with it. The goal of this review is to introduce the processes and concepts of pDCD. While most children die in circumstances that would not allow pDCD, many children that die after withdrawal of life sustaining therapy (WLST) may be eligible for donation of some organs. The potential benefits of this practice to patients on the wait list are well known, but donation can also be an opportunity to honor a patient's or family's desire to altruistically improve the lives of others. Offering the possibility of donation requires careful attention to ethical principles to ensure that conflicts of interest are avoided and that the family is free to make an independent, fully informed decision. Doing so allows families and decision makers the autonomy to decide if donation is something they wish to incorporate into end-of-life care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The use of traditional medicine in maternity care among African women in Africa and the diaspora: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewamene, Zewdneh; Dune, Tinashe; Smith, Caroline A

    2017-08-02

    There is a paucity of literature describing traditional health practices and beliefs of African women. The purpose of this study was to undertake a systematic review of the use of traditional medicine (TM) to address maternal and reproductive health complaints and wellbeing by African women in Africa and the diaspora. A literature search of published articles, grey literature and unpublished studies was conducted using eight medical and social science databases (CINAHL, EMBASE, Infomit, Ovid Medline, ProQuest, PsychINFO, PubMed and SCOPUS) from the inception of each database until 31 December 2016. Critical appraisal was conducted using a quality assessment tool (QAT). A total of 20 studies conducted in 12 African countries representing 11,858 women were included. No literature was found on African women in the diaspora related to maternal use of TM or complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The prevalence of TM use among the African women was as high as 80%. The most common TM used was herbal medicine for reasons related to treatment of pregnancy related symptoms. Frequent TM users were pregnant women with no formal education, low income, and living far from public health facilities. Lack of access to the mainstream maternity care was the major determining factor for use of TM. TM is widely used by African women for maternal and reproductive health issues due to lack of access to the mainstream maternity care. Further research is required to examine the various types of traditional and cultural health practices (other than herbal medicine), the beliefs towards TM, and the health seeking behaviors of African women in Africa and the diaspora.

  17. Sexual orientation, fraternal birth order, and the maternal immune hypothesis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Anthony F; Skorska, Malvina

    2011-04-01

    In 1996, psychologists Ray Blanchard and Anthony Bogaert found evidence that gay men have a greater number of older brothers than do heterosexual men. This "fraternal birth order" (FBO) effect has been replicated numerous times, including in non-Western samples. More recently, strong evidence has been found that the FBO effect is of prenatal origin. Although there is no direct support for the exact prenatal mechanism, the most plausible explanation may be immunological in origin, i.e., a mother develops an immune reaction against a substance important in male fetal development during pregnancy, and that this immune effect becomes increasingly likely with each male gestation. This immune effect is hypothesized to cause an alteration in (some) later born males' prenatal brain development. The target of the immune response may be molecules (i.e., Y-linked proteins) on the surface of male fetal brain cells, including in sites of the anterior hypothalamus, which has been linked to sexual orientation in other research. Antibodies might bind to these molecules and thus alter their role in typical sexual differentiation, leading some later born males to be attracted to men as opposed to women. Here we review evidence in favor of this hypothesis, including recent research showing that mothers of boys develop an immune response to one Y-linked protein (i.e., H-Y antigen; SMCY) important in male fetal development, and that this immune effect becomes increasingly likely with each additional boy to which a mother gives birth. We also discuss other Y-linked proteins that may be relevant if this hypothesis is correct. Finally, we discuss issues in testing the maternal immune hypothesis of FBO. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The crucifixion of Jesus: review of hypothesized mechanisms of death and implications of shock and trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Joseph W

    2012-04-01

    The crucifixion of Jesus is arguably the most well-known and controversial execution in history. Christian faithful, dating back to the time of Jesus, have believed that Jesus was executed by crucifixion and later returned physically to life again. Others have questioned whether Jesus actually died by crucifixion, at all. From review of medical literature, physicians have failed to agree on a specific mechanism of Jesus' death. A search of Medline/Pubmed was completed with respect to crucifixion, related topics, and proposed mechanisms of Jesus' death. Several hypotheses for the mechanism of Jesus' death have been presented in medical literature, including 1) Pulmonary embolism 2) Cardiac rupture 3) Suspension trauma 4) Asphyxiation 5) Fatal stab wound, and 6) Shock. Each proposed mechanism of Jesus' death will be reviewed. The events of Jesus' execution are described, as they are pertinent to development of shock. Traumatic shock complicated by trauma-induced coagulopathy is proposed as a contributing factor, and possibly the primary mechanism, of Jesus' death by crucifixion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of women's nutrition before and during early pregnancy on maternal and infant outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Grant, Frederick; Goldenberg, Tamar; Zongrone, Amanda; Martorell, Reynaldo

    2012-07-01

    Current understanding of biologic processes indicates that women's nutritional status before and during early pregnancy may play an important role in determining early developmental processes and ensuring successful pregnancy outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of the evidence for the impact of maternal nutrition before and during early pregnancy (health outcomes and included 45 articles (nine intervention trials and 32 observational studies) that were identified through PubMed and EMBASE database searches and examining review articles. Intervention trials and observational studies show that periconceptional (importance of women's nutrition prior to and during the first trimester of pregnancy, but there is a need for well-designed prospective studies and controlled trials in developing country settings that examine relationships with low birthweight, SGA, PTD, stillbirth and maternal and neonatal mortality. The knowledge gaps that need to be addressed include the evaluation of periconceptional interventions such as food supplements, multivitamin-mineral supplements and/or specific micronutrients (iron, zinc, iodine, vitamin B-6 and B-12) as well as the relationship between measures of prepregnancy body size and composition and maternal, neonatal and child health outcomes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Effect of maternal diet on offspring coping styles in rodents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Anne A; Lagisz, Malgorzata; Senior, Alistair M; Hector, Katie L; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-11-01

    Maternal nutrition can have long-term effects on offspring morphology, physiology and behaviours. However, it is unclear whether mothers 'program' offspring behavioural coping strategy (proactive/reactive) according to the predicted nutritional quality of their future environment. We conducted a systematic review on this topic and meta-analytically synthesized relevant experimental data on mice and rats (46 studies). We included data from experiments where dams were subjected to caloric restriction, protein restriction or overfeeding around gestation and subsequently measured offspring activity, exploration, or anxiety. Overall, little evidence existed for effects of maternal nutrition on the three investigated behavioural traits. The high heterogeneity observed in the data set suggests that maternal programming may sometimes occur. However, because offspring had access to a balanced diet before testing, behaviours may have been reprogrammed. Our results may indicate that reprogrammed behaviours could ameliorate negative effects associated with sub-optimal nutrition in early life. Further, our systematic review revealed clear knowledge gaps and fruitful future research avenues. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  1. The impact of maternal hypothyroidism during pregnancy on neonatal outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiatong; Yu, Ping; Zhu, Huijuan; Pan, Hui; Li, Naishi; Yang, Hongbo; Jiang, Yu; Wang, Linjie; Wang, Bo; Wang, Yanhong; You, Lili; Chen, Shi

    2016-01-01

    The effects of maternal hypothyroidism on neonatal outcomes were not definitely confirmed. We conduct a systematic review of the literatures on the impact of maternal hypothyroidism on neonatal outcomes. We searched Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register databases complemented by manual searches in article references without language restrictions published from 1946 to April 2015. Nine trials are included. For preterm birth in pregnancies of hypothyroidism women, there is an increased tendency (RR 1.18; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.40; p = 0.06). The same result is seen relating to the low birth weight (RR 1.31; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.72; p = 0.05). Regarding small for gestational age there is no significant increase. Children who were born from mothers with hypothyroidism during pregnancy have increased birth weight (MD 32.35, 95% CI 7.46 to 57.24; p = 0.01). The impact of maternal hypothyroidism shows a trend of reduced risk of large for gestational age (RR 1.17; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.38; p = 0.06). Our review suggests that mothers with hypothyroidism during pregnancy are more likely to give birth to children with higher birth weight or LGA, and L-T4 supplementation should be recommended. The risk of preterm birth and low birth weight also tends to be higher in children with hypothyroidism mothers.

  2. [Sudden death in Versailles: A review of a cardiovascular treatrise by Dionis (1710)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, P

    2018-02-01

    In 1710, the surgeon Pierre Dionis publishes a Dissertation on sudden death. Echoing and expanding the work of his Roman colleague Jean Marie Lancisi, he describes and analyzes dozens of cases of sudden death observed by him. A large number of cases was followed by autopsies allowing clinicopathological confrontation. Are proposed causes of death (pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, hemorrhagic stroke, arterial rupture, etc.), pathophysiological mechanisms based on the ancient theory of humors, and preventive actions to avoid these unexpected deaths. In this article, we oppose these old data to those of current literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiology of Maternal and Fetal`s Burn in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aghaei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burn is one of the public health problems, especially in low-income and middle-income countries, and this problem is far more important for pregnant women and their fetus. There was no a systematic study to comprehensively review the epidemiology of Maternal and Fetal`s Burn inIran, this study was conducted for this purpose. Materials and Methods: In this systematic review and meta-analysis study, all related studies (Published in 2017 and earlier extracted by two independent groups from national and international databases (Magiran, SID, Web of Science, Medline, Scopus, etc.. Meta-analysis has been applied to obtain the overall outcomes of maternal and fetal mortality in pregnant women in Iran. Forest plot, τ2, and I2 tests are applied to evaluate heterogeneity, significance and its percentage, respectively. The analysis of meta-regression is applied because of the existence of heterogeneity. Publication bias is investigated by Funnel plot and Egger test. Results: The range of maternal and fetal mortality was 29.2% to 66.67% and 38.5% to 72.8%, respectively. Also, 48.4% and 54.2% were the overall outcome of maternal and fetal mortality based on meta-analysis, respectively. The highest maternal mortality is reported for pregnant women with Total Body Surface Area (TBSA over 50%, intentional burns, and acute respiratory failures. Finally, reduction of maternal mortality had a statistically significant relationship with passing time based on the univariate analysis. Conclusion:It can be inferred from our results that some hazards of burn in pregnant women are average age of 22-27 years, living in rural areas, low levels of socio-economic, low education level and being housewife. Also, according to meta-analysis results, about half of mothers and fetuses died in pregnant women as a result of burns in Iran.

  4. Effectiveness and Appropriateness of mHealth Interventions for Maternal and Child Health: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan; Chai, Yanling; Dong, Le; Niu, Wenyi; Zhang, Puhong

    2018-01-09

    The application of mobile health (mHealth) technology in reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health (RMNCH) is increasing worldwide. However, best practice and the most effective mHealth interventions have not been reviewed systematically. A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of mHealth interventions for RMNCH around the world were conducted to investigate their characteristics as well as the features and effectiveness of mHealth interventions. Studies of mHealth interventions for RMNCH between January 2011 and December 2016 were retrieved from 6 databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Global Health, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, and Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Medium). Comparable studies were included in a random-effects meta-analysis for both exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) and antenatal checks (ANC). Descriptive analyses were conducted for mHealth studies with a range of study designs. Analyses of 245 studies were included, including 51 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Results showed that there are increasing numbers of studies on mHealth interventions for RMNCH. Although 2 meta-analysis, one with 2 RCTs on EBF (odds ratio [OR] 2.03, 95% CI 1.34-3.08, I 2 =25%) and the other with 3 RCTs on ANC (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.13-1.79, I 2 =78%), showed that mHealth interventions are more effective than usual care, almost half (43%) of RCTs showed negative or unclear results on mHealth interventions. Functions described in mHealth interventions were diverse, and the health stages covered were broad. However, single function or single stage appeared to be dominant among mHealth interventions compared with multiple functions or stages. More rigorous evaluations are needed to draw consistent conclusions and to analyze mHealth products with multiple functions, especially those popular in the app markets. ©Huan Chen, Yanling Chai, Le Dong, Wenyi Niu, Puhong Zhang. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth

  5. Effects of community participation on improving uptake of skilled care for maternal and newborn health: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicely Marston

    Full Text Available Despite a broad consensus that communities should be actively involved in improving their own health, evidence for the effect of community participation on specific health outcomes is limited. We examine the effectiveness of community participation interventions in maternal and newborn health, asking: did participation improve outcomes? We also look at how the impact of community participation has been assessed, particularly through randomised controlled trials, and make recommendations for future research. We highlight the importance of qualitative investigation, suggesting key areas for qualitative data reporting alongside quantitative work.Systematic review of published and 'grey' literature from 1990. We searched 11 databases, and followed up secondary references. Main outcome measures were the use of skilled care before/during/after birth and maternal/newborn mortality/morbidity. We included qualitative and quantitative studies from any country, and used a community participation theoretical framework to analyse the data. We found 10 interventions. Community participation had largely positive impacts on maternal/newborn health as part of a package of interventions, although not necessarily on uptake of skilled care. Interventions improving mortality or use of skilled care raised awareness, encouraged dialogue and involved communities in designing solutions-but so did those showing no effect.There are few high-quality, quantitative studies. We also lack information about why participation interventions do/do not succeed - an area of obvious interest for programme designers. Qualitative investigation can help fill this information gap and should be at the heart of future quantitative research examining participation interventions - in maternal/newborn health, and more widely. This review illustrates the need for qualitative investigation alongside RCTs and other quantitative studies to understand complex interventions in context, describe

  6. Rise in maternal mortality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J. M.; Steegers, E. A. P.; Schuitemaker, N. W. E.; Santema, J. G.; de Boer, K.; Pel, M.; Vermeulen, G.; Visser, W.; van Roosmalen, J.

    2010-01-01

    To assess causes, trends and substandard care factors in maternal mortality in the Netherlands. Design Confidential enquiry into the causes of maternal mortality. Nationwide in the Netherlands. 2,557,208 live births. Data analysis of all maternal deaths in the period 1993-2005. Maternal mortality.

  7. The Life Review in Five Short Stories about Characters Facing Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, Grier

    1985-01-01

    Uses five modern short stories about people facing death to illustrate and connect various observations of and theories about the dying process developed by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross and Robert N. Butler. In response to the imminence of their deaths, the characters survey their past, attempting to reintegrate their life's experiences. (JAC)

  8. A 23-year review of sudden natural death autopsies in the Niger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Death occurring suddenly especially when the victim was active and recently fit, call for attention and thorough investigation to rule out secret homicide. Aim: To study the pattern of sudden natural death in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Methodology: The coroner's autopsy reports and hospital autopsy ...

  9. Death Anxiety in Persons with HIV/AIDS: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Audrey K.; Lee, Brittany L.; Henderson, Craig E.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most commonly cited psychological sequelae of HIV/AIDS is anxiety regarding death due to the illness (i.e., death anxiety; DA). However, extant research is inconclusive on several empirical issues, such as DA's relation to HIV/AIDS diagnostic status, the impact of illness-related symptoms on DA, and factors that may protect against DA.…

  10. Associations Between Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Nonresponsive Feeding Styles and Practices in Mothers of Young Children: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ana Cristina; Mesa, Tatiana; Greaney, Mary L; Wallington, Sherrie F; Wright, Julie A

    2017-05-26

    Childhood obesity is a significant global public health problem due to increasing rates worldwide. Growing evidence suggests that nonresponsive parental feeding styles and practices are important influences on children's eating behaviors and weight status, especially during early childhood. Therefore, understanding parental factors that may influence nonresponsive parental feeding styles and practices is significant for the development of interventions to prevent childhood obesity. The objectives of this systematic review were to (1) identify and review existing research examining the associations between maternal depressive symptoms and use of nonresponsive feeding styles and practices among mothers of young children (2-8 years of age), (2) highlight the limitations of reviewed studies, and (3) generate suggestions for future research. Using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis Protocols) guidelines, six electronic academic databases were searched for peer-reviewed, full-text papers published in English between January 2000 and June 2016. Only studies with mothers 18+ years old of normally developing children between 2 and 8 years of age were included. Of the 297 citations identified, 35 full-text papers were retrieved and 8 were reviewed. The reviewed studies provided mixed evidence for associations between maternal depressive symptoms and nonresponsive feeding styles and practices. Two out of three studies reported positive associations with nonresponsive feeding styles, in that mothers with elevated depressive symptoms were more likely than mothers without those symptoms to exhibit uninvolved and permissive or indulgent feeding styles. Furthermore, results of reviewed studies provide good evidence for association between maternal depressive symptoms and instrumental feeding (3 of 3 reviewed studies) and nonresponsive family mealtime practices (3/3), but mixed evidence for pressuring children to eat (3/6) and emotional

  11. Saving maternal lives in resource-poor settings: facing reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Ndola; Sreenivas, Amita; Vahidnia, Farnaz; Potts, Malcolm

    2009-02-01

    Evaluate safe-motherhood interventions suitable for resource-poor settings that can be implemented with current resources. Literature review to identify interventions that require minimal treatment/infrastructure and are not dependent on skilled providers. Simulations were run to assess the potential number of maternal lives that could be saved through intervention implementation according to potential program impact. Regional and country level estimates are provided as examples of settings that would most benefit from proposed interventions. Three interventions were identified: (i) improve access to contraception; (ii) increase efforts to reduce deaths from unsafe abortion; and (iii) increase access to misoprostol to control postpartum hemorrhage (including for home births). The combined effect of postpartum hemorrhage and unsafe abortion prevention would result in the greatest gains in maternal deaths averted. Bold new initiatives are needed to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of reducing maternal mortality by three-quarters. Ninety-nine percent of maternal deaths occur in developing countries and the majority of these women deliver alone, or with a traditional birth attendant. It is time for maternal health program planners to reprioritize interventions in the face of human and financial resource constraints. The three proposed interventions address the largest part of the maternal health burden.

  12. Components of Maternal Healthcare Delivery System Contributing to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Components of Maternal Healthcare Delivery System Contributing to Maternal Deaths ... transcripts were analyzed using a directed approach to content analysis. Excerpts were categorized according to three main components of the maternal ...

  13. The effect of universal maternal antenatal iron supplementation on neurodevelopment in offspring: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, C; Polson, R; van Woerden, H C; Wilson, P

    2018-05-04

    Although antenatal iron supplementation is beneficial to mothers, its impact on the neurodevelopment of offspring is controversial. A systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to assess whether routine maternal antenatal iron supplementation confers later neurodevelopmental benefit to offspring. Electronic databases were searched using MESH terms or key words and identified papers were reviewed by two independent reviewers. The study quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. The review was registered in the PROSPERO CRD data base. Seven publications were identified, based on four randomised trials published between 2006 and 2016. Three of the trials were in the Asian sub-continent. A range of tools were used to evaluate neurodevelopment. Meta-analysis of outcomes from the three RCTs meeting our inclusion criteria showed minimal effect of antenatal iron supplementation on the neurodevelopment of offspring, which was not statistically significant: weighted mean difference of 0.54 (95% CI: -0.67 to 1.75); test for overall effect Z = 0.87; p = 0.38; and heterogeneity 48%. Meta-analysis of outcomes of these RCTs at later stages of development produced similar results. The benefit of routine antenatal iron supplementation on neurodevelopment in offspring was not statistically significant in this relatively limited set of trials, and some benefit cannot be excluded in areas with a high prevalence of maternal anaemia. A large randomized controlled trial showing significant benefit would be required to modify our conclusions.

  14. Urinary Incontinence as a Predictor of Death: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor John

    Full Text Available The association between urinary incontinence (UI and increased mortality remains controversial. The objective of our study was to evaluate if this association exists.We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies comparing death rates among patients suffering from UI to those without incontinence. We searched in Medline, Embase and the Cochrane library using specific keywords. Studies exploring the post-stroke period were excluded. Hazard ratios (HR were pooled using models with random effects. We stratified UI by gender and by UI severity and pooled all models with adjustment for confounding variables.Thirty-eight studies were retrieved. When compared to non-urinary incontinent participants, UI was associated with an increase in mortality with pooled non adjusted HR of 2.22 (95%CI 1.77-2.78. The risk increased with UI severity: 1.24 (95%CI: 0.79-1.97 for light, 1.71 (95%CI: 1.26-2.31 for moderate, and 2.72 (95%CI: 1.90-3.87 for severe UI respectively. When pooling adjusted measures of association, the resulting HR was 1.27 (95%CI: 1.13-1.42 and increased progressively for light, moderate and severe UI: 1.07 (95%CI: 0.79-1.44, 1.25 (95%CI: 0.99-1.58, and 1.47 (95%CI: 1.03-2.10 respectively. There was no difference between genders.UI is a predictor of higher mortality in the general and particularly in the geriatric population. The association increases with the severity of UI and persists when pooling models adjusted for confounders. It is unclear if this association is causative or just reflects an impaired general health condition. As in most meta-analyses of observational studies, methodological issues should be considered when interpreting results.

  15. A Two-Year Review on Epidemiology and Clinical Characteristics of Dengue Deaths in Malaysia, 2013-2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liang Woon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue infection is the fastest spreading mosquito-borne viral disease, which affects people living in the tropical and subtropical countries. Malaysia had large dengue outbreaks in recent years. We aimed to study the demographics and clinical characteristics associated with dengue deaths in Malaysia.We conducted a retrospective review on all dengue deaths that occurred nationwide between 1st January 2013 and 31st December 2014. Relevant data were extracted from mortality review reports and investigational forms. These cases were categorized into children (<15 years, adults (15-59 years and elderly (≥60 years to compare their clinical characteristics.A total of 322 dengue deaths were reviewed. Their mean age was 40.7±19.30 years, half were females and 72.5% were adults. The median durations of first medical contact, and hospitalization were 1 and 3 days, respectively. Diabetes and hypertension were common co-morbidities among adults and elderly. The most common warning signs reported were lethargy and vomiting, with lethargy (p = 0.038 being more common in children, while abdominal pain was observed more often in the adults (p = 0.040. But 22.4% did not have any warning signs. Only 34% were suspected of dengue illness at their initial presentation. More adults developed severe plasma leakage (p = 0.018. More than half (54% suffered from multi-organ involvement, and 20.2% were free from any organ involvement. Dengue deaths occurred at the median of 3 days post-admission. Dengue shock syndrome (DSS contributed to more than 70% of dengue deaths, followed by severe organ involvement (69% and severe bleeding (29.7%.In Malaysia, dengue deaths occurred primarily in adult patients. DSS was the leading cause of death, regardless of age groups. The atypical presentation and dynamic progression of severe dengue in this cohort prompts early recognition and aggressive intervention to prevent deaths.National Medical Research Registry (NMRR, NMRR-14-1374-23352.

  16. Review: Adiponectin – The Missing Link between Maternal Adiposity, Placental Transport and Fetal Growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Irving L. M. H.; Powell, Theresa L.; Jansson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin has well-established insulin-sensitizing effects in non-pregnant individuals. Pregnant women who are obese or have gestational diabetes typically have low circulating levels of adiponectin, which is associated with increased fetal growth. Lean women, on the other hand, have high circulating levels of adiponectin. As a result, maternal serum adiponectin is inversely correlated to fetal growth across the full range of birth weights, suggesting that maternal adiponectin may limit fetal growth. In the mother, adiponectin is predicted to promote insulin sensitivity and stimulate glucose uptake in maternal skeletal muscle thereby reducing nutrient availability for placental transfer. Adiponectin prevents insulin-stimulated amino acid uptake in cultured primary human trophoblast cells by modulating insulin receptor substrate phosphorylation. Furthermore, chronic administration of adiponectin to pregnant mice inhibits placental insulin and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, down-regulates the activity and expression of key placental nutrient transporters and decreases fetal growth. Preliminary findings indicate that adiponectin binds to the adiponectin receptor-2 on the trophoblast cell and activates p38 MAPK and PPAR-α, which inhibits the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. In contrast to maternal adiponectin, recent reports suggest that fetal adiponectin may promote expansion of adipose tissue and stimulate fetal growth. Regulation of placental function by adiponectin constitutes a novel physiological mechanism by which the endocrine functions of maternal adipose tissue influence fetal growth. These findings may help us better understand the factors determining birth weight in normal pregnancies and in pregnancy complications associated with altered maternal adiponectin levels such as obesity and gestational diabetes. PMID:23245987

  17. Ebola virus disease and pregnancy - A review of the current knowledge of Ebola virus pathogenesis, maternal and neonatal outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebell, Lisa M.; Oduyebo, Titilope; Riley, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    The 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa devastated local health systems and caused thousands of deaths. Historical reports from Zaire ebolavirus outbreaks suggested pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of severe illness and death, with mortality rates from 74-100%. In total, 111 cases of pregnant patients with EVD are reported in the literature, with an aggregate maternal mortality of 86%. Pregnancy-specific data published from the recent outbreak include four small descriptive cohort studies and five case reports. Despite limitations including reporting bias and small sample size, these studies suggest mortality in pregnant women may be lower than previously reported, with five of 13(39%) infected women dying. Optimal treatments for pregnant women, and differences in EVD course between pregnant women and non-pregnant individuals are major scientific gaps that have not yet been systematically addressed. Ebola virus may be transmitted from mother to baby in utero, during delivery, or through contact with maternal body fluids after birth including breast milk. EVD is almost universally fatal to the developing fetus, and limited fetal autopsy data prevent inferences on risk of birth defects. Decisions about delivery mode and other obstetric interventions should be individualized. WHO recommends close monitoring of survivors who later become pregnant, but does not recommend enhanced precautions at subsequent delivery. Though sexual transmission of Ebola virus has been documented, birth outcomes among survivors have not been published and will be important to appropriately counsel women on pregnancy outcomes and inform delivery precautions for healthcare providers. PMID:28398679

  18. Perioperative deaths: a further comparative review of coroner's autopsies with particular reference to the occurrence of fatal iatrogenic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, G

    2000-07-01

    In previous triennial reviews of Coroner's perioperative autopsies conducted during the periods 1989 to 1991 and 1992 to 1994, it was observed that the necropsy incidence of such deaths rose from 2% to 2.6% (P 1) interventions, which were initially classified as elective procedures in 27 cases. There were 66 (24.4%) iatrogenic deaths, of which 2 (0.7%) were due to anaesthetic mishaps; 18/64 iatrogenic deaths, unrelated to anaesthesia, occurred after the first postoperative day. The proportions of such deaths amongst patients subjected to multiple interventions, or initial elective procedures, were more than twice as high as amongst those undergoing single procedures, and those initially classified as emergencies (35.6% versus 16.6% and 33.3% versus 13.2%, respectively; P negligence was recorded during the period in question. There appears to have been a steady increase in the number of perioperative deaths reported to the Coroner over the previous triennia (1989 to 1997) for which autopsies were conducted. While this observation may not denote an increase in perioperative morality rates per se, it may be indicative of an increasingly "aggressive" or defensive approach to the clinical management of seriously ill patients, particularly over the past decade. Although the rate of iatrogenic deaths appears to have stabilised, it is too early to say whether this apparent trend will persist in the future. It is perhaps not surprising that the risk of iatrogenic injury appears to increase with the number of interventions performed; however, it is not clear why initial, supposedly elective, interventions should be associated with an apparently greater risk of iatrogenic injury than those classified as emergency procedures. The substantial divergence between the autopsy finding of an iatrogenic death and the corresponding Coroner's verdict of misadventure may be comforting to clinicians, but certainly warrants further examination.

  19. PARENTS 2 study protocol: pilot of Parents' Active Role and ENgagement in the review of Their Stillbirth/perinatal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhbakhi, Danya; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Storey, Claire; Heazell, Alexander; Lynch, Mary; Timlin, Laura; Burden, Christy

    2018-01-10

    The perinatal mortality review meeting that takes place within the hospital following a stillbirth or neonatal death enables clinicians to learn vital lessons to improve care for women and their families for the future. Recent evidence suggests that parents are unaware that a formal review following the death of their baby takes place. Many would welcome the opportunity to feedback into the meeting itself. Parental involvement in the perinatal mortality review meeting has the potential to improve patient satisfaction, drive improvements in patient safety and promote an open culture within healthcare. Yet evidence on the feasibility of involving bereaved parents in the review process is lacking. This paper describes the protocol for the Parents' Active Role and Engangement iN the review of their Stillbirth/perinatal death study (PARENTS 2) , whereby healthcare professionals' and stakeholders' perceptions of parental involvement will be investigated, and parental involvement in the perinatal mortality review will be piloted and evaluated at two hospitals. We will investigate perceptions of parental involvement in the perinatal mortality review process by conducting four focus groups. A three-round modified Delphi technique will be employed to gain a consensus on principles of parental involvement in the perinatal mortality review process. We will use three sequential rounds, including a national consensus meeting workshop with experts in stillbirth, neonatal death and bereavement care, and a two-stage anonymous online questionnaire. We will pilot a new perinatal mortality review process with parental involvement over a 6-month study period. The impact of the new process will be evaluated by assessing parents' experiences of their care and parents' and staff perceptions of their involvement in the process by conducting further focus groups and using a Parent Generated Index questionnaire. This study has ethical approval from the UK Health Research Authority. We will

  20. Trends in maternal mortality at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Nigeria, 1999–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TU Agan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available TU Agan1, EI Archibong1, JE Ekabua1, EI Ekanem1, S E Abeshi1, TA Edentekhe2, EE Bassey21Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and 2Department of Anesthesia, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, NigeriaBackground: Maternal mortality remains a major public health challenge, not only at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, but in the developing world in general.Objective: The objective of this study was to assess trends in maternal mortality in a tertiary health facility, the maternal mortality ratio, the impact of sociodemographic factors in the deaths, and common medical and social causes of these deaths at the hospital.Methodology: This was a retrospective review of obstetric service delivery records of all maternal deaths over an 11-year period (01 January 1999 to 31 December 2009. All pregnancy-related deaths of patients managed at the hospital were included in the study.Results: A total of 15,264 live births and 231 maternal deaths were recorded during the period under review, giving a maternal mortality ratio of 1513.4 per 100,000 live births. In the last two years, there was a downward trend in maternal deaths of about 69.0% from the 1999 value. Most (63.3% of the deaths were in women aged 20–34 years, 33.33% had completed at least primary education, and about 55.41% were unemployed. Eight had tertiary education. Two-thirds of the women were married. Obstetric hemorrhage was the leading cause of death (32.23%, followed by hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Type III delay accounted for 48.48% of the deaths, followed by Type I delay (35.5%. About 69.26% of these women had no antenatal care. The majority (61.04% died within the first 48 hours of admission.Conclusion: Although there was a downward trend in maternal mortality over the study period, the extent of the reduction is deemed inadequate. The medical and social causes of maternal deaths identified in this study are preventable, especially

  1. The experiences of pregnant women at an advanced maternal age: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrighi, Juliane Dias; Wall, Marilene Loewen; Souza, Silvana Regina Rossi Kissula; Cancela, Franciane Zabloski Vieira

    2016-01-01

    To identify in the literature how the experiences of women age 35 or above are described in terms of pregnancy. Integrative review based on MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS, and SciELO databases, with no time period constraint. Eighteen studies that dealt with the experiences of pregnant women at an advanced maternal age were selected and analyzed. The studies evidenced four theme categories: the search for information, which pointed to a deficit of information supplied by health care professionals; perceiving the risks, which pointed to women's concerns about their own health and their children's; the ideal moment for motherhood, with different reasons for postponing it; and adjusting to a new routine, showing a concern regarding changes in daily life. From the results, it was possible to understand that other factors, in addition to those that include risks, are present in the experiences of older pregnant women and point to a need to involve such aspects in nursing care to create comprehensive strategies that are aligned with these women's needs. Identificar na literatura como são descritas as experiências das mulheres com idade igual ou superior a 35 anos na gestação. Revisão integrativa realizada nas bases de dados MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS e SciELO, sem restrição de período. Foram selecionados e analisados 18 estudos que tratavam das experiências das mulheres na gestação em idade avançada. Os estudos evidenciaram quatro categorias temáticas: A busca por informações, que mostrou aspectos como deficit de informações fornecidas pelos profissionais da saúde;Percebendo os riscos, que apontou uma preocupação da mulher com a própria saúde e a do filho;Momento ideal para a maternidade, com diferentes motivos para o adiamento; e Adaptação à nova rotina, com a preocupação em relação às mudanças no cotidiano. A partir dos resultados, foi possível compreender que outros fatores, além dos que incluem os riscos, permeiam as experi

  2. A Service evaluation of a hospital child death review process to elucidate understanding of contributory factors to child mortality and inform practice in the English National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Daniel S; Schindler, Margrid B; Marlow, Robin D; Fraser, James I

    2018-03-16

    To describe a novel approach to hospital mortality meetings to elucidate understanding of contributory factors to child death and inform practice in the National Health Service. All child deaths were separately reviewed at a meeting attended by professionals across the healthcare pathway, and an assessment was made of contributory factors to death across domains intrinsic to the child, family and environment, parenting capacity and service delivery. Data were analysed from a centrally held database of records. All child deaths in a tertiary children's hospital between 1 April 2010 and 1 April 2013. Descriptive data summarising contributory factors to child deaths. 95 deaths were reviewed. In 85% cases, factors intrinsic to the child provided complete explanation for death. In 11% cases, factors in the family and environment and, in 5% cases, factors in parenting capacity, contributed to patient vulnerability. In 33% cases, factors in service provision contributed to patient vulnerability and in two patients provided complete explanation for death. 26% deaths were classified as potentially preventable and in those cases factors in service provision were more commonly identified than factors across other domains (OR: 4.89; 95% CI 1.26 to 18.9). Hospital child death review meetings attended by professionals involved in patient management across the healthcare pathway inform understanding of events leading to a child's death. Using a bioecological approach to scrutinise contributory factors the multidisciplinary team concluded most deaths occurred as a consequence of underlying illness. Although factors relating to service provision were commonly identified, they rarely provided a complete explanation for death. Efforts to reduce child mortality should be driven by an understanding of modifiable risk factors. Systematic data collection arising from a standardised approach to hospital reviews should be the basis for national mortality review processes and database

  3. Causes of Death Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Yan-Biao; Zhao, Zhen-Gang; Xu, Yuan-Ning; Wei, Xin; Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Li, Yi-Jian; Cao, Jia-Yu; Tang, Hong; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Feng, Yuan; Chen, Mao

    2015-09-21

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an effective alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement in patients at high surgical risk. However, there is little published literature on the exact causes of death. The PubMed database was systematically searched for studies reporting causes of death within and after 30 days following TAVR. Twenty-eight studies out of 3934 results retrieved were identified. In the overall analysis, 46.4% and 51.6% of deaths were related to noncardiovascular causes within and after the first 30 days, respectively. Within 30 days of TAVR, infection/sepsis (18.5%), heart failure (14.7%), and multiorgan failure (13.2%) were the top 3 causes of death. Beyond 30 days, infection/sepsis (14.3%), heart failure (14.1%), and sudden death (10.8%) were the most common causes. All possible subgroup analyses were made. No significant differences were seen for proportions of cardiovascular deaths except the comparison between moderate (mean STS score 4 to 8) and high (mean STS score >8) -risk patients after 30 days post-TAVR (56.0% versus 33.5%, P=0.005). Cardiovascular and noncardiovascular causes of death are evenly balanced both in the perioperative period and at long-term follow-up after TAVR. Infection/sepsis and heart failure were the most frequent noncardiovascular and cardiovascular causes of death. This study highlights important areas of clinical focus that could further improve outcomes after TAVR. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Assessing the Effect of mHealth Interventions in Improving Maternal and Neonatal Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sondaal, Stephanie Felicie Victoria; Browne, Joyce Linda; Amoakoh-Coleman, Mary; Borgstein, Alexander; Miltenburg, Andrea Solnes; Verwijs, Mirjam; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Maternal and neonatal mortality remains high in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Availability and use of mobile phones is increasing rapidly with 90% of persons in developing countries having a mobile-cellular subscription. Mobile health (mHealth) interventions have been proposed as effective solutions to improve maternal and neonatal health. This systematic review assessed the effect of mHealth interventions that support pregnant women during the antenatal, birth a...

  5. Maternal mortality in the rural Gambia, a qualitative study on access to emergency obstetric care

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    Sundby Johanne

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal mortality is the vital indicator with the greatest disparity between developed and developing countries. The challenging nature of measuring maternal mortality has made it necessary to perform an action-oriented means of gathering information on where, how and why deaths are occurring; what kinds of action are needed and have been taken. A maternal death review is an in-depth investigation of the causes and circumstances surrounding maternal deaths. The objectives of the present study were to describe the socio-cultural and health service factors associated with maternal deaths in rural Gambia. Methods We reviewed the cases of 42 maternal deaths of women who actually tried to reach or have reached health care services. A verbal autopsy technique was applied for 32 of the cases. Key people who had witnessed any stage during the process leading to death were interviewed. Health care staff who participated in the provision of care to the deceased was also interviewed. All interviews were tape recorded and analyzed by using a grounded theory approach. The standard WHO definition of maternal deaths was used. Results The length of time in delay within each phase of the model was estimated from the moment the woman, her family or health care providers realized that there was a complication until the decision to seeking or implementing care was made. The following items evolved as important: underestimation of the severity of the complication, bad experience with the health care system, delay in reaching an appropriate medical facility, lack of transportation, prolonged transportation, seeking care at more than one medical facility and delay in receiving prompt and appropriate care after reaching the hospital. Conclusion Women do seek access to care for obstetric emergencies, but because of a variety of problems encountered, appropriate care is often delayed. Disorganized health care with lack of prompt response to

  6. Maternal homocysteine and small-for-gestational-age offspring: systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogeveen, M.; Blom, H.J.; den Heijer, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Growth retardation in utero leading to small-for-gestational- age (SGA) newborns is associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality and with lifelong consequences such as poor cognitive function and cardiovascular diseases. Maternal total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations

  7. Causes and consequences of maternal age-related aneuploidy in oocytes: a review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danylevska, Anna; Šebestová, Jaroslava

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2013), s. 65-72 ISSN 0375-8427 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/09/0743; GA ČR GAP502/12/2201 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : aneuploidy * oocyte * maternal age Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.756, year: 2013

  8. Book review: Diane Ravitch "The death and life of the great American school system". New York: Basic Books , 2010

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    Beals K.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current paper is a translation of Katharine Beals' review of the book "The death and life of the great American school system" by Diane Ravich. The article analyses the views on the causes of the inefficiency of the American school system expressed by Ravich, as well as the ways of its improvement suggested by her. A change of stance compared to her previous works is also noted. Translator: Vinogradova K.N.

  9. Risk of early-onset neonatal infection with maternal infection or colonization: a global systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Grace J Chan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal infections cause a significant proportion of deaths in the first week of life, yet little is known about risk factors and pathways of transmission for early-onset neonatal sepsis globally. We aimed to estimate the risk of neonatal infection (excluding sexually transmitted diseases [STDs] or congenital infections in the first seven days of life among newborns of mothers with bacterial infection or colonization during the intrapartum period.We searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and the World Health Organization Regional Databases for studies of maternal infection, vertical transmission, and neonatal infection published from January 1, 1960 to March 30, 2013. Studies were included that reported effect measures on the risk of neonatal infection among newborns exposed to maternal infection. Random effects meta-analyses were used to pool data and calculate the odds ratio estimates of risk of infection. Eighty-three studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies (8.4% were from high neonatal mortality settings. Considerable heterogeneity existed between studies given the various definitions of laboratory-confirmed and clinical signs of infection, as well as for colonization and risk factors. The odds ratio for neonatal lab-confirmed infection among newborns of mothers with lab-confirmed infection was 6.6 (95% CI 3.9-11.2. Newborns of mothers with colonization had a 9.4 (95% CI 3.1-28.5 times higher odds of lab-confirmed infection than newborns of non-colonized mothers. Newborns of mothers with risk factors for infection (defined as prelabour rupture of membranes [PROM], preterm <37 weeks PROM, and prolonged ROM had a 2.3 (95% CI 1.0-5.4 times higher odds of infection than newborns of mothers without risk factors.Neonatal infection in the first week of life is associated with maternal infection and colonization. High-quality studies, particularly from settings with high neonatal mortality, are needed to

  10. Maternal mortality and delay: Socio-demographic characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the contribution of delay to maternal deaths and also determined the socio¬demographic characteristics of patients with maternal deaths with associated delay. Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of all maternal deaths in Irrua specialist Teaching Hospital, Nigeria between January 1999 ...

  11. Causes of adult female deaths in Bangladesh: findings from two National Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Quamrun; El Arifeen, Shams; Jamil, Kanta; Streatfield, Peter Kim

    2015-09-18

    Assessment of causes of death and changes in pattern of causes of death over time are needed for programmatic purposes. Limited national level data exist on the adult female causes of death in Bangladesh. Using data from two nationally representation surveys, the 2001 and 2010 Bangladesh Maternal Mortality Surveys (BMMS), the paper examines the causes of adult female death, aged 15-49 years, and changes in the patterns of these deaths. In both surveys, all household deaths three years prior to the survey were identified. Adult female deaths were then followed by a verbal autopsy (VA) using the WHO structured questionnaire. Two physicians independently reviewed the VA forms to assign a cause of death using the ICD-10; in case of disagreement, a third physician made an independent review and assigned a cause of death. The overall mortality rates for women aged 15-49 in 2001 and 2010 were 182 per 100,000 and 120 per 100,000 respectively. There is a shift in the pattern of causes of death during the period covered by the two surveys. In the 2001 survey, the main causes of death were maternal (20 %), followed by diseases of the circulatory system (15 %), malignancy (14 %) and infectious diseases (13 %). However, in the 2010 survey, malignancies were the leading cause (21 %), followed by diseases of the circulatory system (16 %), maternal causes (14 %) and infectious diseases (8 %). While maternal deaths remained the number one cause of death among 20-34 years old in both surveys, unnatural deaths were the main cause for teenage deaths, and malignancies were the main cause of death for older women. Although there is an increasing trend in the proportion of women who died in hospitals, in both surveys most women died at home (74 % in 2001 and 62 % in 2010). The shift in the pattern of causes of adult female deaths is in agreement with the overall change in the disease pattern from communicable to non-communicable diseases in Bangladesh. Suicide and other violent deaths as

  12. Obstetric near-miss and maternal mortality in maternity university hospital, Damascus, Syria: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almerie, Yara; Almerie, Muhammad Q; Matar, Hosam E; Shahrour, Yasser; Al Chamat, Ahmad Abo; Abdulsalam, Asmaa

    2010-10-19

    Investigating severe maternal morbidity (near-miss) is a newly recognised tool that identifies women at highest risk of maternal death and helps allocate resources especially in low income countries. This study aims to i. document the frequency and nature of maternal near-miss at hospital level in Damascus, Capital of Syria, ii. evaluate the level of care at maternal life-saving emergency services by comparatively analysing near-misses and maternal mortalities. Retrospective facility-based review of cases of near-miss and maternal mortality that took place in the years 2006-2007 at Damascus Maternity University Hospital, Syria. Near-miss cases were defined based on disease-specific criteria (Filippi 2005) including: haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, dystocia, infection and anaemia. Main outcomes included maternal mortality ratio (MMR), maternal near miss ratio (MNMR), mortality indices and proportion of near-miss cases and mortality cases to hospital admissions. There were 28,025 deliveries, 15 maternal deaths and 901 near-miss cases. The study showed a MNMR of 32.9/1000 live births, a MMR of 54.8/100,000 live births and a relatively low mortality index of 1.7%. Hypertensive disorders (52%) and haemorrhage (34%) were the top causes of near-misses. Late pregnancy haemorrhage was the leading cause of maternal mortality (60%) while sepsis had the highest mortality index (7.4%). Most cases (93%) were referred in critical conditions from other facilities; namely traditional birth attendants homes (67%), primary (5%) and secondary (10%) healthcare unites and private practices (11%). 26% of near-miss cases were admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Near-miss analyses provide valuable information on obstetric care. The study highlights the need to improve antenatal care which would help early identification of high risk pregnancies. It also emphasises the importance of both: developing protocols to prevent/manage post-partum haemorrhage and training health

  13. Obstetric near-miss and maternal mortality in maternity university hospital, Damascus, Syria: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Chamat Ahmad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigating severe maternal morbidity (near-miss is a newly recognised tool that identifies women at highest risk of maternal death and helps allocate resources especially in low income countries. This study aims to i. document the frequency and nature of maternal near-miss at hospital level in Damascus, Capital of Syria, ii. evaluate the level of care at maternal life-saving emergency services by comparatively analysing near-misses and maternal mortalities. Methods Retrospective facility-based review of cases of near-miss and maternal mortality that took place in the years 2006-2007 at Damascus Maternity University Hospital, Syria. Near-miss cases were defined based on disease-specific criteria (Filippi 2005 including: haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, dystocia, infection and anaemia. Main outcomes included maternal mortality ratio (MMR, maternal near miss ratio (MNMR, mortality indices and proportion of near-miss cases and mortality cases to hospital admissions. Results There were 28 025 deliveries, 15 maternal deaths and 901 near-miss cases. The study showed a MNMR of 32.9/1000 live births, a MMR of 54.8/100 000 live births and a relatively low mortality index of 1.7%. Hypertensive disorders (52% and haemorrhage (34% were the top causes of near-misses. Late pregnancy haemorrhage was the leading cause of maternal mortality (60% while sepsis had the highest mortality index (7.4%. Most cases (93% were referred in critical conditions from other facilities; namely traditional birth attendants homes (67%, primary (5% and secondary (10% healthcare unites and private practices (11%. 26% of near-miss cases were admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Conclusion Near-miss analyses provide valuable information on obstetric care. The study highlights the need to improve antenatal care which would help early identification of high risk pregnancies. It also emphasises the importance of both: developing protocols to

  14. When, Where, and Why Are Babies Dying? Neonatal Death Surveillance and Review in Bangladesh.

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    Abdul Halim

    Full Text Available Better data on cause of, and factors contributing to, neonatal deaths are needed to improve interventions aimed at reducing neonatal mortality in low- and middle-income countries.Community surveillance to identify all neonatal deaths across four districts in Bangladesh. Verbal autopsy for every fifth case and InterVA-4 used to assign likely cause of death.6748 neonatal deaths identified, giving a neonatal mortality rate of 24.4 per 1000 live births. Of these, 51.3% occurred in the community and 48.7% at or on the way to a health facility. Almost half (46.1% occurred within 24 hours of birth with 83.6% of all deaths occurring in the first seven days of life. Birth asphyxia was the leading cause of death (43%, followed by infections (29.3%, and prematurity (22.2%. In 68.3% of cases, care had been provided at a health facility before death occurred. Care-seeking was significantly higher among mothers who were educated (RR 1.18, 95% CI: 1.04-1.35 or who delivered at a health facility (RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.37-1.60 and lower among mothers who had 2-4 previous births (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96, for baby girls (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80-0.93, and for low birth weight babies (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96.Most parents of neonates who died had accessed and received care from a qualified healthcare provider. To further reduce neonatal mortality, it is important that the quality of care provided, particularly skilled birth attendance, emergency obstetric care, and neonatal care during the first month of life is improved, such that it is timely, safe, and effective.

  15. Student and educator experiences of maternal-child simulation-based learning: a systematic review of qualitative evidence protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Karen; Marcellus, Lenora; Rivers, Julie; Gordon, Carol; Ryan, Maureen; Butcher, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of this systematic review is to identify the appropriateness and meaningfulness of maternal-child simulation-based learning for undergraduate or pre-registration nursing students in educational settings to inform curriculum decision-making.1. What are the experiences of nursing or health professional students participating in undergraduate or pre-licensure maternal-child simulation-based learning in educational settings?2. What are the experiences of educators participating in undergraduate or pre-licensure maternal-child simulation-based learning in educational settings?3. What teaching and learning practices in maternal-child simulation-based learning are considered appropriate and meaningful by students and educators? Maternal-child care is one of the pillars of primary health care. Health promotion and illness/ injury prevention begin in the preconception period and continue through pregnancy, birth, the postpartum period and the childrearing years. Thus, lifelong wellness is promoted across the continuum of perinatal and pediatric care which influences family health and early child development. Registered nurses (RNs) are expected to have the knowledge and skills needed to provide evidence-based nursing with childbearing and child-rearing families to promote health and address health inequities in many settings, including inner city, rural, northern, indigenous and global communities. The Canadian Maternity Experiences survey and the Report by the Advisor on Healthy Children and Youth provide information on current shortages of perinatal and child health care providers and stress the importance of the role of nurses as providers of rural and remote care. From a global health perspective, continued concern with both perinatal and child health morbidities and mortalities highlight the importance of maintaining and strengthening the presence of maternal and child health learning opportunities within undergraduate nursing curriculum.Despite this

  16. Sudden cardiac death in athletes and its preventive strategies: review article

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    Farzin Halabchi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death in sport, although rare, but is a tragic event, attracting the media and public attention. Sport and exercise may act as a trigger for sudden cardiac death. Risk of sudden death in young athletes with cardiovascular disease is 2.5 times more frequent than non-athlete individuals. More than 90% of cases of sudden death occur during or immediately after training or competition. Incidence of sudden cardiac death in any population, including athletes, is related to multiple factors such as gender, age, race, nationality, diagnostic screening methods and preventive measures for sudden cardiac death. Otherwise, incidence rate of sudden cardiac death is linked to the used definition and method of diagnosis. Different cardiovascular disorders may result in death of young athletes and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital coronary anomalies, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and aortic rupture are among the most common causes. Marfan syndrome, dilated cardiomyopathy, viral myocarditis, Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome, congenital long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome and commotio cordis are reported as other etiologies. In older athletes (more than 35 years, ischemic coronary heart disease is responsible for majority of the cases similar to the general population. Because the outcome of sudden cardiac arrest in sports is very poor except in few cases, proper national strategies are needed to diminish the burden of sudden death in young athletes. It seems that there are two main strategies to achieve this goal: A Primary prevention with use of purposeful pre-participation evaluation programs. This evaluation should focuss on the proper history and physical examination. Nevertheless, there is significant debate between American and European countries regarding the use of paraclinical investigations (especially ECG. American heart association does not recommend ECG as an essential part of evaluation. In contrast, European

  17. Upper Neogene stratigraphy and tectonics of Death Valley — a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, J. R.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Machette, M. N.; Klinger, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    New tephrochronologic, soil-stratigraphic and radiometric-dating studies over the last 10 years have generated a robust numerical stratigraphy for Upper Neogene sedimentary deposits throughout Death Valley. Critical to this improved stratigraphy are correlated or radiometrically-dated tephra beds and tuffs that range in age from > 3.58 Ma to Mormon Point. This new geochronology also establishes maximum and minimum ages for Quaternary alluvial fans and Lake Manly deposits. Facies associated with the tephra beds show that ˜3.3 Ma the Furnace Creek basin was a northwest-southeast-trending lake flanked by alluvial fans. This paleolake extended from the Furnace Creek to Ubehebe. Based on the new stratigraphy, the Death Valley fault system can be divided into four main fault zones: the dextral, Quaternary-age Northern Death Valley fault zone; the dextral, pre-Quaternary Furnace Creek fault zone; the oblique-normal Black Mountains fault zone; and the dextral Southern Death Valley fault zone. Post - 3.3 Ma geometric, structural, and kinematic changes in the Black Mountains and Towne Pass fault zones led to the break up of Furnace Creek basin and uplift of the Copper Canyon and Nova basins. Internal kinematics of northern Death Valley are interpreted as either rotation of blocks or normal slip along the northeast-southwest-trending Towne Pass and Tin Mountain fault zones within the Eastern California shear zone.

  18. Review of Canine Deaths While in Service in US Civilian Law Enforcement (2002-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojsih, Sarah E; Baker, Janice L; Les, Clifford M; Bir, Cynthia A

    2014-01-01

    Working dogs have been proven effective in multiple military and law enforcement applications. Similar to their human counterparts, understanding mortality while still in service can help improve treatment of injuries, and improve equipment and training, to potentially reduce deaths. This is a retrospective study to characterize mortality of working dogs used in civilian law enforcement. Reported causes of death were gathered from two working dog and law enforcement officer memorial websites. Of the 867 civilian law enforcement dogs reported to these memorial websites from 2002 to 2012 with reported causes of death while in service, the deaths of 318 were categorized as traumatic. The leading reported causes of traumatic death or euthanasia include trauma as a result of a vehicle strike, 25.8% (n=82); heatstroke, 24.8% (n=79); and penetrating ballistic trauma, 23.0% (n=73). Although the information gathered was from online sources, this study casts some light on the risks that civilian law enforcement dogs undergo as part of the tasks to which they are assigned. These data underscore the need for a comprehensive database for this specialized population of working dogs to provide the robust, reliable data needed to develop prevention and treatment strategies for this valuable resource. 2014.

  19. Methodological review: measured and reported congruence between preferred and actual place of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, C L; Somogyi-Zalud, E; Masaki, K H

    2009-09-01

    Congruence between preferred and actual place of death is an important palliative care outcome reported in the literature. We examined methods of measuring and reporting congruence to highlight variations impairing cross-study comparisons. Medline, PsychInfo, CINAHL, and Web of Science were systematically searched for clinical research studies examining patient preference and congruence as an outcome. Data were extracted into a matrix, including purpose, reported congruence, and method for eliciting preference. Studies were graded for quality. Using tables of preferred versus actual places of death, an overall congruence (total met preferences out of total preferences) and a kappa statistic of agreement were determined for each study. Twelve studies were identified. Percentage of congruence was reported using four different definitions. Ten studies provided a table or partial table of preferred versus actual deaths for each place. Three studies provided kappa statistics. No study achieved better than moderate agreement when analysed using kappa statistics. A study which elicited ideal preference reported the lowest agreement, while longitudinal studies reporting final preferred place of death yielded the highest agreement (moderate agreement). Two other studies of select populations also yielded moderate agreement. There is marked variation in methods of eliciting and reporting congruence, even among studies focused on congruence as an outcome. Cross-study comparison would be enhanced by the use of similar questions to elicit preference, tables of preferred versus actual places of death, and kappa statistics of agreement.

  20. Risk factors for maternal death in patients with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia Fatores de risco para morte materna em pacientes com pré-eclâmpsia grave/ eclâmpsia

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    Melania Maria Ramos de Amorim

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to determine the principal death causes in patients with severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and identify related risk factors. METHODS: a case-control study was performed comprising all cases of maternal death (n = 20 in patients with severe preeclampsia or eclampsia (n = 2.541. 80 controls (survivors were randomly selected. The odds ratio and an estimate of maternal death relative risk were determined, and a multiple logistic regression analysis performed to determine the adjusted odds ratio. RESULTS: the basic causes for death were: acute pulmonary edema, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, hemorrhagic shock, pulmonary embolism, acute renal failure, sepsis and three cases of undetermined causes of death. The principal risk factors were: age > 25 years old, multiparity, gestational age 110mmHg, convulsions, chronic systemic arterial hypertension, HELLP syndrome, pulmonary edema, normally inserted abruptio placenta, disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute renal failure. Variables persistently related to maternal death were: HELLP syndrome, eclampsia, acute pulmonary edema, eclampsia, chronic hypertension and lack of prenatal care. CONCLUSIONS: the principal risk factors for death in women with preeclampsia/eclampsia are the lack of prenatal care, associated to chronic hypertension, HELLP syndrome, eclampsia and acute pulmonary edema.OBJETIVOS: determinar as principais causas de óbito em pacientes com pré-eclâmpsia grave/eclâmpsia e identificar os fatores de risco associados. MÉTODOS: realizou-se um estudo de caso-controle, com todos os casos de morte materna (n = 20 em pacientes com pré-eclâmpsia grave ou eclâmpsia (n = 2.541. Selecionaram-se aleatoriamente 80 controles (sobreviventes. Determinou-se o odds ratio como estimativa do risco relativo de morte materna, realizando-se análise de regressão logística múltipla para determinação do odds ratio ajustado. RESULTADOS: as causas básicas de óbito foram: edema

  1. Maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity from acute fatty liver of pregnancy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Ruth R.; Schutte, Joke M.; Stekelenburg, Jelle; Zwart, Joost J.; van Roosmalen, Jos

    Objective: To assess maternal death and severe maternal morbidity from acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) in the Netherlands. Study design: A retrospective study of all cases of maternal mortality in the Netherlands between 1983 and 2006 and all cases of severe maternal morbidity in the

  2. Breastfeeding and maternal health outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Ranadip; Sinha, Bireshwar; Sankar, Mari Jeeva; Taneja, Sunita; Bhandari, Nita; Rollins, Nigel; Bahl, Rajiv; Martines, Jose Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the effect of breastfeeding on long-term (breast carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus) and short-term (lactational amenorrhoea, postpartum depression, postpartum weight change) maternal health outcomes. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Library and CABI databases. Outcome estimates of odds ratios or relative risks or standardised mean differences were pooled. In cases of heterogeneity, subgroup ana...

  3. Perfis de mortalidade neonatal precoce: um estudo para uma Maternidade Pública de Belo Horizonte (MG, 2001-2006 Profiles of early neonatal deaths: a study for a Public Maternity Hospital of Belo Horizonte (MG, 2001 - 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Maria de Assis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de estudo seccional, com base em dados secundários, com o objetivo de traçar o perfil dos óbitos neonatais precoces ocorridos em uma Maternidade Pública de referência no Estado de Minas Gerais (Maternidade Odete Valadares, Belo Horizonte, no período de 2001 a 2006. Foram utilizadas variáveis relacionadas ao recém-nascido (período de ocorrência do óbito, idade ao óbito, sexo, idade gestacional e peso ao nascer, à mãe (tipo de gravidez, tipo de parto, idade, parturição e número de nascidos mortos, bem como causas múltiplas de mortalidade categorizadas. Obtiveram-se três perfis de óbitos neonatais precoces por meio do método Grade of Membership, que possibilitou também encontrar a prevalência destes perfis. O Perfil 1 foi caracterizado por óbitos de difícil redução e teve prevalência de 41,4%; o Perfil 2, pelos óbitos passíveis de redução (prevalência de 28,3%; e o Perfil 3, pelos óbitos redutíveis (prevalência de 30,4%. Estes perfis possibilitaram a compreensão da mortalidade neonatal precoce na Maternidade Odete Valadares e a análise da sua relação com a história reprodutiva e obstétrica materna, bem como com as condições do recém-nascido. Chama a atenção a elevada prevalência de óbitos evitáveis, realidade que deve ser enfrentada pelos profissionais e pela rede pública de saúde.This is a cross-sectional study with the aim of describing the early neonatal deaths that took place at a Public Maternity Hospital, Maternidade Odete Valadares in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2001 to 2006. It used variables related to the newborn (period the death took place, age at death, gender, gestational age, and birth weight, to the mother (type of pregnancy, type of delivery, age, parity, and number of stillborn children, and to the multiple causes of death. Three profiles of early neonatal death were obtained through the Grade of Membership method (GoM, which also made it possible to find

  4. 77 FR 60741 - Convening of an Accountability Review Board To Examine the Circumstances Surrounding the Deaths...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... Hillary Rodham Clinton has determined that the recent deaths of Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens..., Libya involved loss of life at or related to a U.S. mission abroad. Therefore, Secretary Clinton has... cooperation. The Board will submit its conclusions and recommendations to Secretary Clinton within 60 days of...

  5. Risk of death from cardiovascular disease following breast cancer : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gernaat, S. A.M.; Ho, P. J.; Rijnberg, N.; Emaus, M. J.; Baak, L. M.; Hartman, M.; Grobbee, D. E.; Verkooijen, H. M.

    Purpose: Breast cancer incidence and survival is high, which results in high prevalence of breast cancer survivors. The risk of (death from) cardiovascular disease (CVD) is higher in patients exposed to cardiotoxic treatments, in particular if they have pre-existing CVD risk factors. This study

  6. Assumptions and moral understanding of the wish to hasten death: a philosophical review of qualitative studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Prat, A.; Leeuwen, E. van

    2018-01-01

    It is not uncommon for patients with advanced disease to express a wish to hasten death (WTHD). Qualitative studies of the WTHD have found that such a wish may have different meanings, none of which can be understood outside of the patient's personal and sociocultural background, or which

  7. A mixed methods systematic review of success factors of mhealth and telehealth for maternal health in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ag Ahmed, Mohamed Ali; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Hamelin-Brabant, Louise; Mbemba, Gisele Irène Claudine; Alami, Hassane

    2017-01-01

    Access to health care is still limited for many women in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), while it remains an important determinant of maternal mortality and morbidity. Information and communication technologies (ICTs), such as mhealth and telehealth, can help to facilitate this access by acting on the various obstacles encountered by women, be they socio-cultural, economic, geographical or organizational. However, various factors contribute to the success of mhealth and telehealth implementation and use, and must be considered for these technologies to go beyond the pilot project stage. The objective of this systematic literature review is to synthesize the empirical knowledge on the success factors of the implementation and use of telehealth and mhealth to facilitate access to maternal care in SSA. The methodology used is based on that of the Cochrane Collaboration, including a documentary search using standardized language in six databases, selection of studies corresponding to the inclusion criteria, data extraction, evaluation of study quality, and synthesis of the results. A total of 93 articles were identified, which allowed the inclusion of seven studies, six of which were on mhealth. Based on the framework proposed by Broens et al ., we synthesized success factors into five categories: (I) technology, such as technical support to maintain, troubleshoot and train users, good network coverage, existence of a source of energy and user friendliness; (II) user acceptance, which is facilitated by factors such as unrestricted use of the device, perceived usefulness to the worker, adequate literacy, or previous experience of use ; (III) short- and long-term funding; (IV) organizational factors, such as the existence of a well-organized health system and effective coordination of interventions; and (V) political or legislative aspects, in this case strong government support to deploy technology on a large scale. Telehealth and mhealth are promising solutions to reduce

  8. Influence of iron status on risk of maternal or neonatal infection and on neonatal mortality with an emphasis on developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabin, Loretta; Brabin, Bernard J.; Gies, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Infection is a major cause of neonatal death in developing countries. This review investigates whether host iron status affects the risk of maternal and/or neonatal infection, potentially contributing to neonatal death, and summarizes the iron acquisition mechanisms described for pathogens causing

  9. Cause of Death in “John Doe & Jane Doe”: A 5 year review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Harish; Singh, Amandeep

    2014-01-01

    Sometimes the opinion regarding the cause of death in “John Doe or Jane Doe” i.e. on unknown dead bodies is a test of ability of the forensic expert and on many occasions it yields little or no results. Here the identification of the body as such poses problems; rest aside the opinion regarding the cause/ manner of death. The present 5yr study was undertaken in the Department of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, Government Medical College & Hospital, Chandigarh to find the patterns of cause of death in unknown dead bodies, as very little literature is available with regard to John Doe or Jane Doe cases as a group, in India. Unidentified bodies comprised 4 % of the total 3165 cases brought for post-mortem examination to the department. Maximum cases belonged to the age group 41 - 50 years, 30 %. Majority of the opinions regarding the cause of death were given as “no definite opinion” (31%), followed by “cranio-cerebral damage” (30 %) and coronary insufficiency/ Cardiac disease/ aortic aneurysm rupture, (8.9%). Following measures should be undertaken to increase the chances of getting these unknown bodies identified and thereby increasing the chances of arriving at a definite cause of death: drafting of additional legislation for the management of unidentified dead bodies along with streamlining of work on the part of police, use of active investigation and modern investigative techniques, fixing the accountability of the police. Internet based sites of the police like ZIPNET (Zonal Integrated Police Networking) in Northern India, should also be used. PMID:25302219

  10. Prenatal exposure to cannabis and maternal and child health outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, J K L; Rosales, C B; Center, K E; Nuñez, A; Gibson, S J; Christ, C; Ehiri, J E

    2016-04-05

    To assess the effects of use of cannabis during pregnancy on maternal and fetal outcomes. 7 electronic databases were searched from inception to 1 April 2014. Studies that investigated the effects of use of cannabis during pregnancy on maternal and fetal outcomes were included. Case-control studies, cross-sectional and cohort studies were included. Data synthesis was undertaken via systematic review and meta-analysis of available evidence. All review stages were conducted independently by 2 reviewers. Maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes up to 6 weeks postpartum after exposure to cannabis. Meta-analyses were conducted on variables that had 3 or more studies that measured an outcome in a consistent manner. Outcomes for which meta-analyses were conducted included: anaemia, birth weight, low birth weight, neonatal length, placement in the neonatal intensive care unit, gestational age, head circumference and preterm birth. 24 studies were included in the review. Results of the meta-analysis demonstrated that women who used cannabis during pregnancy had an increase in the odds of anaemia (pooled OR (pOR)=1.36: 95% CI 1.10 to 1.69) compared with women who did not use cannabis during pregnancy. Infants exposed to cannabis in utero had a decrease in birth weight (low birth weight pOR=1.77: 95% CI 1.04 to 3.01; pooled mean difference (pMD) for birth weight=109.42 g: 38.72 to 180.12) compared with infants whose mothers did not use cannabis during pregnancy. Infants exposed to cannabis in utero were also more likely to need placement in the neonatal intensive care unit compared with infants whose mothers did not use cannabis during pregnancy (pOR=2.02: 1.27 to 3.21). Use of cannabis during pregnancy may increase adverse outcomes for women and their neonates. As use of cannabis gains social acceptance, pregnant women and their medical providers could benefit from health education on potential adverse effects of use of cannabis during pregnancy. Published by the BMJ

  11. The risk of sudden death in sport in patients with signs of connective tissue dysplasia (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekhanevych O.B.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Literature review indicates that, despite the disclosure of a number of causes and mechanisms of sudden death in people performing physical activities, this issue remains relevant today. The main cause of sudden death in sport is pathological conditions and heart diseases. Par¬ticular risk group during follow-up over persons involved in physical activity are those with the presence of small anomalies; this may be a ma¬nifestation of connective tissue dysplasia. With all the variety of affected organs and systems in patients with connective tissue dysplasia, cardio¬vascular disorders are the leading pathology determining the quality and pro¬gnosis of life.

  12. A review of factors associated with greater likelihood of suicide attempts and suicide deaths in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffer, Ayal; Isometsä, Erkki T; Azorin, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    of current/recent episode, predominant polarity, mood episode characteristics, psychosis, psychiatric comorbidity, personality characteristics, sexual dysfunction, first-degree family history of suicide or mood disorders, past suicide attempts, early life trauma, and psychosocial precipitants. CONCLUSION......OBJECTIVES: Many factors influence the likelihood of suicide attempts or deaths in persons with bipolar disorder. One key aim of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force on Suicide was to summarize the available literature on the presence and magnitude of effect of these factors....... METHODS: A systematic review of studies published from 1 January 1980 to 30 May 2014 identified using keywords 'bipolar disorder' and 'suicide attempts or suicide'. This specific paper examined all reports on factors putatively associated with suicide attempts or suicide deaths in bipolar disorder samples...

  13. Tobacco smoking and the risk of sudden cardiac death: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, Dagfinn; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio

    2018-06-01

    Smoking is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease including coronary heart disease and stroke, however, data regarding smoking and sudden cardiac death have not been summarized in a meta-analysis previously. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify this association. We searched the PubMed and Embase databases for studies of smoking and sudden cardiac death up to July 20th 2017. Prospective studies were included if they reported adjusted relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for smoking and sudden cardiac death. Summary RRs were estimated by use of a random effects model. Twelve prospective studies were included. The summary RR was 3.06 (95% CI 2.46-3.82, I 2  = 41%, p heterogeneity  = 0.12, n = 7) for current smokers and 1.38 (95% CI 1.20-1.60, I 2  = 0%, p heterogeneity  = 0.55, n = 7) for former smokers compared to never smokers. For four studies using non-current (never + former) smokers as the reference category the summary RR among current smokers was 2.08 (95% CI 1.70-2.53, I 2  = 18%, p heterogeneity  = 0.30). The results persisted in most of the subgroup analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias. These results confirm that smoking increases the risk of sudden cardiac death. Any further studies should investigate in more detail the effects of duration of smoking, number of cigarettes per day, pack-years, and time since quitting smoking and sudden cardiac death.

  14. An examination of pregnancy- related deaths among adolescents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    maternal deaths (direct maternal causes of death) and pregnancy- related deaths (all deaths including ... The study was set in SA, where adolescent pregnancies are high and generally .... reported sexual behaviours of youth, it was found that termination .... engagement and education, especially among adolescents, could.

  15. Ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death in Fabry disease: a systematic review of risk factors in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Shanat; Edward, Nicky C; Kotecha, Dipak; Liu, Boyang; Nordin, Sabrina; Kozor, Rebecca; Moon, James C; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn; Steeds, Richard P

    2017-10-17

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase A enzyme. Cardiovascular (CV) disease is a common cause of mortality in FD, in particular as a result of heart failure and arrhythmia, with a significant proportion of events categorized as sudden. There are no clear models for risk prediction in FD. This systematic review aims to identify the risk factors for ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and sudden cardiac deaths (SCD) in FD. A systematic search was performed following PRISMA guidelines of EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane from inception to August 2016, focusing on identification of risk factors for the development of VA or SCD. Thirteen studies were included in the review (n = 4185 patients) from 1189 articles, with follow-up of 1.2-10 years. Weighted average age was 37.6 years, and 50% were male. Death from any cause was reported in 8.3%. Of these, 75% was due to CV problems, with the majority being SCD events (62% of reported deaths). Ventricular tachycardia was reported in 7 studies, with an average prevalence of 15.3%. Risk factors associated with SCD events were age, male gender, left ventricular hypertrophy, late gadolinium enhancement on CV magnetic resonance imaging, and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. Although a multi-system disease, FD is a predominantly cardiac disease from a mortality perspective, with death mainly from SCD events. Limited evidence highlights the importance of clinical and imaging risk factors that could contribute to improved decision-making in the management of FD. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Morte materna mascarada: um caminho para sua identificação Muerte materna enmascarada: un camino para su identificación Identification of concealed or presumable maternal deaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Azevedo Gomes

    2006-12-01

    maternas no informadas.OBJECTIVE: to identify unreported concealed or presumable maternal deaths which occurred in the states of São Paulo, Paraná, Pará, Ceará, and Mato Grosso Brazil. METHODS: Data were collected from the CD-ROM Hospital Admission Authorization Database of the Hospital Information System of the Unified Health System (SIH-SUS regarding records of obstetric procedures and secondary diagnoses between the years of 1999 to 2000. RESULTS: There were 651 maternal deaths registered. From those, 55 were registered as concealed or presumable maternal deaths according to Chapter XV of the International Classification of Diseases (DID-10 - Pregnancy, Delivery and Postpartum. CONCLUSION: This study showed that this information system can be used as a complementary measure for the identification of unreported maternal deaths.

  17. Seeking order amidst chaos: a systematic review of classification systems for causes of stillbirth and neonatal death, 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisher, Susannah Hopkins; Teoh, Zheyi; Reinebrant, Hanna; Allanson, Emma; Blencowe, Hannah; Erwich, Jan Jaap; Frøen, J Frederik; Gardosi, Jason; Gordijn, Sanne; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Heazell, Alexander E P; Korteweg, Fleurisca; Lawn, Joy; McClure, Elizabeth M; Pattinson, Robert; Smith, Gordon C S; Tunçalp, Ӧzge; Wojcieszek, Aleena M; Flenady, Vicki

    2016-10-05

    Each year, about 5.3 million babies die in the perinatal period. Understanding of causes of death is critical for prevention, yet there is no globally acceptable classification system. Instead, many disparate systems have been developed and used. We aimed to identify all systems used or created between 2009 and 2014, with their key features, including extent of alignment with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and variation in features by region, to inform the World Health Organization's development of a new global approach to classifying perinatal deaths. A systematic literature review (CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Global Health, and PubMed) identified published and unpublished studies and national reports describing new classification systems or modifications of existing systems for causes of perinatal death, or that used or tested such systems, between 2009 and 2014. Studies reporting ICD use only were excluded. Data were independently double-extracted (except from non-English publications). Subgroup analyses explored variation by extent and region. Eighty-one systems were identified as new, modifications of existing systems, or having been used between 2009 and 2014, with an average of ten systems created/modified each year. Systems had widely varying characteristics: (i) comprehensiveness (40 systems classified both stillbirths and neonatal deaths); (ii) extent of use (systems were created in 28 countries and used in 40; 17 were created for national use; 27 were widely used); (iii) accessibility (three systems available in e-format); (iv) underlying cause of death (64 systems required a single cause of death); (v) reliability (10 systems tested for reliability, with overall Kappa scores ranging from .35-.93); and (vi) ICD alignment (17 systems used ICD codes). Regional databases were not searched, so system numbers may be underestimated. Some non-differential misclassification of systems was possible. The plethora of systems in use, and continuing

  18. Targeting strategies of mHealth interventions for maternal health in low and middle-income countries: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilozumba, Onaedo; Abejirinde, Ibukun-Oluwa Omolade; Dieleman, Marjolein; Bardají, Azucena; Broerse, Jacqueline E W; Van Belle, Sara

    2018-02-24

    Recently, there has been a steady increase in mobile health (mHealth) interventions aimed at improving maternal health of women in low-income and middle-income countries. While there is evidence indicating that these interventions contribute to improvements in maternal health outcomes, other studies indicate inconclusive results. This uncertainty has raised additional questions, one of which pertains to the role of targeting strategies in implementing mHealth interventions and the focus on pregnant women and health workers as target groups. This review aims to assess who is targeted in different mHealth interventions and the importance of targeting strategies in maternal mHealth interventions. We will search for peer-reviewed, English-language literature published between 1999 and July 2017 in PubMed, Web of Knowledge (Science Direct, EMBASE) and Cochrane Central Registers of Controlled Trials. The study scope is defined by the Population, Intervention, Comparison and Outcomes framework: P, community members with maternal or reproductive needs; I, electronic health or mHealth programmes geared at improving maternal or reproductive health; C, other non-electronic health or mHealth-based interventions; O, maternal health measures including family planning, antenatal care attendance, health facility delivery and postnatal care attendance. This study is a review of already published or publicly available data and needs no ethical approval. Review results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international conferences. CRD42017072280. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Comprehensive Review Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zahra Karimi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with multiple organ involvement and periods of relapse and remission that mainly affects young women of childbearing age. In this regard the reproductive health is an important issue. Although diagnosis, treatment and management of pregnancy in SLE women have been improved recently, but the main concern is effects of SLE on maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes. This study aimed to investigate the maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes in pregnant women with SLE. Materials and Methods: The databases of PubMed, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science as well as domestic database (Persian such as SID, Magiran, Irandoc, and Google Scholar were searched with using keywords such as" Systemic lupus erythematosus"; "Pregnancy"; "Neonatal lupus"; "maternal, fetus or neonatal outcome";  and equivalent Persian words. Included were all Persian and English articles, published between 2000 and May 2017. Finally, a total of 77 studies were included. Results: Adverse perinatal outcomes increase in pregnancies with lupus. Outcomes include respiratory, cardiovascular, blood and skin disorders in mothers; stillbirth, spontaneous, and recurrent abortion in fetuses and neonatal lupus, prematurity, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, and small for gestational age (SGA in neonates, respectively. Conclusion: Pregnant women with SLE are at high risk due to increased complications for both mother and fetus. It seems broad control of the women before fertilization, so that they be at full remission in the beginning of pregnancy and the disease activity be in complete control, it can help to improve outcomes of pregnancy and so better results can be expected.

  20. Review of autopsy reports of deaths relating to fire in South Australia 2000-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sully, Claire J; Walker, G Stewart; Langlois, Neil E I

    2018-06-01

    It has been noted there are gaps and inconsistencies in data pertaining to fire related deaths in Australia, which poses difficulties for analysis of national statistics. A search of post-mortem examination reports at Forensic Science SA from 2000 to 2015 revealed 275 cases regarded as fire related in which the body had been involved in a fire. The autopsy reports were evaluated to determine parameters including the location of the fire event, age and sex of victim, as well as the presence of soot in the airways and cherry-red coloration to the blood and/or organs, in addtion to toxicological levels of carboxyhemoglobin and alcohol. Fire events were clasified as structural, transportation or open air in type. Males were more commonly victims than females, especially in transportation fires, where males aged below 50 years were most at risk of death. Carboxyhemoglobin levels tended to be lower in victims of transportation fires. This study has confirmed that presence of soot in the respiratory tract and cherry-red coloration of a body retrieved from a fire are both linked to an increased level of blood carboxyhemoglobin. These findings significantly contribute to the documentation of fire deaths in Australia.

  1. Sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients: an in-depth review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Darren; Roberts, Paul R; New, David I; Kalra, Philip A

    2011-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death in hemodialysis patients, accounting for death in up to one-quarter of this population. Unlike in the general population, coronary artery disease and heart failure often are not the underlying pathologic processes for SCD; accordingly, current risk stratification tools are inadequate when assessing these patients. Factors assuming greater importance in hemodialysis patients may include left ventricular hypertrophy, electrolyte shift, and vascular calcification. Knowledge regarding SCD in hemodialysis patients is insufficient, in part reflecting the lack of an agreed-on definition of SCD in this population, although epidemiologic studies suggest the most common times for SCD to occur are toward the end of the long 72-hour weekend interval between dialysis sessions and in the 12 hours immediately after hemodialysis. Accordingly, it is hypothesized that the dialysis procedure itself may have important implications for SCD. Supporting this is recognition that hemodialysis is associated with both ventricular arrhythmias and dynamic electrocardiographic changes. Importantly, echocardiography and electrocardiography may show changes that are modifiable by alterations to dialysis prescription. The most effective preventative strategy in the general population, implanted cardioverter-defibrillator devices, are less effective in the presence of chronic kidney disease and have not been studied adequately in dialysis patients. Last, many dialysis patients experience SCD despite not fulfilling current criteria for implantation, making appropriate allocation of defibrillators uncertain. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy from the perspective of public health and maternal health care: review and case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor Markov Garnizov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present mini-review attempts to analyse the incidence, microbial agents and complications of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB in pregnancy. Although there are regional differences in the incidence and microflora involved in ASB in different countries and geographical areas, the prevalence of ASB in pregnant women is generally high and its complications aggravate pregnancy outcomes and exacerbate maternal and foetal morbidity. This makes ASB in pregnancy particularly important from a public health perspective, suggesting that all pregnant women should be subject to routine ASB testing. Another aspect that is highlighted here is the need for general consensus guidelines for treatment of ASB in pregnancy: recommended duration of treatment, types of antibiotics suitable for use in pregnancy, adverse side effects, both maternal and foetal. Finally, this paper describes a case of ASB in a pregnant woman, with Klebsiella pneumoniae identified as the causative agent. The pregnant woman had typical ASB-associated complications combined with an atypical symptom: urinary retention in early postpartum period, which, to the best of our knowledge, is described here for the first time.

  3. Neonatal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Loss & grief > Neonatal death Neonatal death E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... cope with your baby’s death. What is neonatal death? Neonatal death is when a baby dies in ...

  4. Progress on the maternal mortality ratio reduction in Wuhan, China in 2001-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoping Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most maternal deaths occur in developing countries and most maternal deaths are avoidable. China has made a great effort to reduce MMR by three quarters to meet the fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG5. METHODS: This retrospective study reviewed and analyzed maternal death data in Wuhan from 2001 to 2012. Joinpoint regression and multivariate Poisson regression was conducted using the log-linear model to measure the association of the number of maternal deaths with time, cause of death, where the death occurred, and cognitive factors including knowledge, attitude, resource, and management stratified. RESULTS: The MMR declined from 33.41 per 100,000 live births in 2001 to 10.63 per 100,000 live births in 2012, with a total decline of 68.18% and an average annual decline of 9.89%. From 2001-2012, the four major causes of maternal death were obstetric hemorrhage (35.16%, pregnancy complications (28.57%, amniotic fluid embolism (16.48% and gestational hypertension (8.79%. Multivariate Poisson regression showed on average the MMR decreased by.17% each year from 2001-2006 and stayed stagnant since 2007-2012. CONCLUSIONS: With the reduction in MMR in obstetric death (e.g. obstetric hemorrhage, there had been a remarkable reduction in MMR in Wuhan in 2001-2012, which may be due to (1 the improvement in the obstetric quality of perinatal care service on prevention and treatment of obstetric hemorrhage and emergency care skills, and (2 the improvement in the maternal health management and quality of prenatal care. Interventions to further reduce the MMR include several efforts such as the following: (1 designing community-based interventions, (2 providing subsidies to rural women and/hospitals for hospital delivery, (3 screening for pregnancy complications, and (4 establishing an emergency rescue system for critically ill pregnant women.

  5. A discussion paper: Do national maternity policy reviews take account of the education and training of the future midwifery workforce? An example from England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dr Jenny; Way, Dr Sue

    2018-03-30

    The development and provision of maternity services globally are continuing to receive much attention in order to improve care and safety for women and babies. In the UK national reviews of the maternity services have taken place, with local services taking forward specific pilot projects to support the implementation of policy recommendations. This paper argues that, in order to meet the requirements of change in maternity services, there also needs to be a prompt review of the education of student midwives in order to be confident that the workforce of the future is equipped to implement these changes successfully. Using changes to national policy in England, this paper raises the question of the need for flexible national education standards, to ensure a curriculum can meet the needs of the changing workforce without the need for constant revision of the curriculum. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of maternal haemoglobin as an indicator of maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Maternal measles antibodies (MMA) are actively transferred through the placenta from mother to foetus. A relationship could exist between MMA of mother-infant pairs and maternal nutritional indicator (haemoglobin). Objectives: This study reviewed the effects of maternal haemoglobin (Hb) on MMA of ...

  7. National level maternal health decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koduah, A.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal deaths and morbidity still pose an enormous challenge for health authorities in Ghana, a lower middle income country. Despite massive investments in maternal and neonatal health and special attention through Millennium Development Goals (MDG) 4

  8. Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of cryptorchidism: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    Full Text Available Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity are thought to increase the risk of cryptorchidism in newborn males, but the evidence is inconsistent.We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies on the association between maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of cryptorchidism. Articles were retrieved by searching PubMed and ScienceDirect, and the meta-analysis was conducted using Stata/SE 12.0 software. Sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate the influence of confounding variables.We selected 32 articles, including 12 case-control, five nested case-control, and 15 cohort studies. The meta-analysis showed that maternal smoking (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23 or diabetes (OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.00-1.46 during pregnancy were associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism. Overall, the association between maternal alcohol drinking (OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.87-1.07, pre-pregnancy body mass index (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.95-1.09 and risk of cryptorchidism were not statistically significant. Additional analysis showed reduced risk (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.82-0.96 of cryptorchidism with moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy. No dose-response relationship was observed for increments in body mass index in the risk of cryptorchidism. Sensitivity analysis revealed an unstable result for the association between maternal diabetes, alcohol drinking and cryptorchidism. Moderate heterogeneity was detected in studies of the effect of maternal alcohol drinking and diabetes. No publication bias was detected.Maternal gestational smoking, but not maternal pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity, was associated with increased cryptorchidism risk in the offspring. Moderate alcohol drinking may reduce the risk of cryptorchidism while gestational diabetes may be a risk factor, but further studies are needed to verify this.

  9. Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of cryptorchidism: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing-Huan; Zheng, Xin-Min; Liu, Tong-Zu; Zhang, Wei-Bin; Zheng, Hang; Chen, Mi-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity are thought to increase the risk of cryptorchidism in newborn males, but the evidence is inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies on the association between maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of cryptorchidism. Articles were retrieved by searching PubMed and ScienceDirect, and the meta-analysis was conducted using Stata/SE 12.0 software. Sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate the influence of confounding variables. We selected 32 articles, including 12 case-control, five nested case-control, and 15 cohort studies. The meta-analysis showed that maternal smoking (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23) or diabetes (OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.00-1.46) during pregnancy were associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism. Overall, the association between maternal alcohol drinking (OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.87-1.07), pre-pregnancy body mass index (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.95-1.09) and risk of cryptorchidism were not statistically significant. Additional analysis showed reduced risk (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.82-0.96) of cryptorchidism with moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy. No dose-response relationship was observed for increments in body mass index in the risk of cryptorchidism. Sensitivity analysis revealed an unstable result for the association between maternal diabetes, alcohol drinking and cryptorchidism. Moderate heterogeneity was detected in studies of the effect of maternal alcohol drinking and diabetes. No publication bias was detected. Maternal gestational smoking, but not maternal pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity, was associated with increased cryptorchidism risk in the offspring. Moderate alcohol drinking may reduce the risk of cryptorchidism while gestational diabetes may be a risk factor, but further studies are needed to verify this.

  10. Suboptimal care and maternal mortality among foreign-born women in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esscher, Annika; Binder-Finnema, Pauline; Bødker, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    that occurred in Sweden from 1988-2010. METHODS: A subset of maternal death records (n = 75) among foreign-born women from low- and middle-income countries and Swedish-born women were audited using structured implicit review. One case of foreign-born maternal death was matched with two native born Swedish cases...... language and suboptimal interpreter system or usage. Inadequate care occurred more often among the foreign-born (p = 0.04), whereas delays in consultation/referral and miscommunication between health care providers where equally common between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Suboptimal care factors, major...

  11. The Potential Impact of Animal Science Research on Global Maternal and Child Nutrition and Health: A Landscape Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odle, Jack; Jacobi, Sheila K; Boyd, R Dean; Bauman, Dale E; Anthony, Russell V; Bazer, Fuller W; Lock, Adam L; Serazin, Andrew C

    2017-03-01

    High among the challenges facing mankind as the world population rapidly expands toward 9 billion people by 2050 is the technological development and implementation of sustainable agriculture and food systems to supply abundant and wholesome nutrition. In many low-income societies, women and children are the most vulnerable to food insecurity, and it is unequivocal that quality nutrition during the first 1000 d of life postconception can be transformative in establishing a robust, lifelong developmental trajectory. With the desire to catalyze disruptive advancements in global maternal and child health, this landscape review was commissioned by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to examine the nutritional and managerial practices used within the food-animal agricultural system that may have relevance to the challenges faced by global human health. The landscape was categorized into a framework spanning 1 ) preconception, 2 ) gestation and pregnancy, 3 ) lactation and suckling, and 4 ) postweaning and toddler phases. Twelve key findings are outlined, wherein research within the discipline of animal sciences stands to inform the global health community and in some cases identifies gaps in knowledge in which further research is merited. Notable among the findings were 1 ) the quantitative importance of essential fatty acid and amino acid nutrition in reproductive health, 2 ) the suggested application of the ideal protein concept for improving the amino acid nutrition of mothers and children, 3 ) the prospect of using dietary phytase to improve the bioavailability of trace minerals in plant and vegetable-based diets, and 4 ) nutritional interventions to mitigate environmental enteropathy. The desired outcome of this review was to identify potential interventions that may be worthy of consideration. Better appreciation of the close linkage between human health, medicine, and agriculture will identify opportunities that will enable faster and more efficient innovations

  12. Determinants of male involvement in maternal and child health services in sub-Saharan Africa: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditekemena John

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Male participation is a crucial component in the optimization of Maternal and Child Health (MCH services. This is especially so where prevention strategies to decrease Mother-to-Child Transmission (MTCT of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV are sought. This study aims to identify determinants of male partners’ involvement in MCH activities, focusing specifically on HIV prevention of maternal to child transmission (PMTCT in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Literature review was conducted using the following data bases: Pubmed/MEDLINE; CINAHL; EMBASE; COCHRANE; Psych INFORMATION and the websites of the International AIDS Society (IAS, the International AIDS Conference and the International Conference on AIDS in Africa (ICASA 2011. Results We included 34 studies in this review, which reported on male participation in MCH and PMTCT services. The majority of studies defined male participation as male involvement solely during antenatal HIV testing. Other studies defined male involvement as any male participation in HIV couple counseling. We identified three main determinants for male participation in PMTCT services: 1 Socio-demographic factors such as level of education, income status; 2 health services related factors such as opening hours of services, behavior of health providers and the lack of space to accommodate male partners; and 3 Sociologic factors such as beliefs, attitudes and communication between men and women. Conclusion There are many challenges to increase male involvement/participation in PMTCT services. So far, few interventions addressing these challenges have been evaluated and reported. It is clear however that improvement of antenatal care services by making them more male friendly, and health education campaigns to change beliefs and attitudes of men are absolutely needed.

  13. The Potential Impact of Animal Science Research on Global Maternal and Child Nutrition and Health: A Landscape Review12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Sheila K; Boyd, R Dean; Bauman, Dale E; Anthony, Russell V; Bazer, Fuller W; Lock, Adam L; Serazin, Andrew C

    2017-01-01

    High among the challenges facing mankind as the world population rapidly expands toward 9 billion people by 2050 is the technological development and implementation of sustainable agriculture and food systems to supply abundant and wholesome nutrition. In many low-income societies, women and children are the most vulnerable to food insecurity, and it is unequivocal that quality nutrition during the first 1000 d of life postconception can be transformative in establishing a robust, lifelong developmental trajectory. With the desire to catalyze disruptive advancements in global maternal and child health, this landscape review was commissioned by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to examine the nutritional and managerial practices used within the food-animal agricultural system that may have relevance to the challenges faced by global human health. The landscape was categorized into a framework spanning 1) preconception, 2) gestation and pregnancy, 3) lactation and suckling, and 4) postweaning and toddler phases. Twelve key findings are outlined, wherein research within the discipline of animal sciences stands to inform the global health community and in some cases identifies gaps in knowledge in which further research is merited. Notable among the findings were 1) the quantitative importance of essential fatty acid and amino acid nutrition in reproductive health, 2) the suggested application of the ideal protein concept for improving the amino acid nutrition of mothers and children, 3) the prospect of using dietary phytase to improve the bioavailability of trace minerals in plant and vegetable-based diets, and 4) nutritional interventions to mitigate environmental enteropathy. The desired outcome of this review was to identify potential interventions that may be worthy of consideration. Better appreciation of the close linkage between human health, medicine, and agriculture will identify opportunities that will enable faster and more efficient innovations in global

  14. Assessing the Effect of mHealth Interventions in Improving Maternal and Neonatal Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondaal, Stephanie Felicie Victoria; Browne, Joyce Linda; Amoakoh-Coleman, Mary; Borgstein, Alexander; Miltenburg, Andrea Solnes; Verwijs, Mirjam; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal mortality remains high in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Availability and use of mobile phones is increasing rapidly with 90% of persons in developing countries having a mobile-cellular subscription. Mobile health (mHealth) interventions have been proposed as effective solutions to improve maternal and neonatal health. This systematic review assessed the effect of mHealth interventions that support pregnant women during the antenatal, birth and postnatal period in LMIC. The review was registered with Prospero (CRD42014010292). Six databases were searched from June 2014-April 2015, accompanied by grey literature search using pre-defined search terms linked to pregnant women in LMIC and mHealth. Quality of articles was assessed with an adapted Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Because of heterogeneity in outcomes, settings and study designs a narrative synthesis of quantitative results of intervention studies on maternal outcomes, neonatal outcomes, service utilization, and healthy pregnancy education was conducted. Qualitative and quantitative results were synthesized with a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis. In total, 3777 articles were found, of which 27 studies were included: twelve intervention studies and fifteen descriptive studies. mHealth interventions targeted at pregnant women increased maternal and neonatal service utilization shown through increased antenatal care attendance, facility-service utilization, skilled attendance at birth, and vaccination rates. Few articles assessed the effect on maternal or neonatal health outcomes, with inconsistent results. mHealth interventions may be effective solutions to improve maternal and neonatal service utilization. Further studies assessing mHealth's impact on maternal and neonatal outcomes are recommended. The emerging trend of strong experimental research designs with randomized controlled trials, combined with feasibility research, government involvement

  15. Assessing the Effect of mHealth Interventions in Improving Maternal and Neonatal Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Felicie Victoria Sondaal

    Full Text Available Maternal and neonatal mortality remains high in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC. Availability and use of mobile phones is increasing rapidly with 90% of persons in developing countries having a mobile-cellular subscription. Mobile health (mHealth interventions have been proposed as effective solutions to improve maternal and neonatal health. This systematic review assessed the effect of mHealth interventions that support pregnant women during the antenatal, birth and postnatal period in LMIC.The review was registered with Prospero (CRD42014010292. Six databases were searched from June 2014-April 2015, accompanied by grey literature search using pre-defined search terms linked to pregnant women in LMIC and mHealth. Quality of articles was assessed with an adapted Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Because of heterogeneity in outcomes, settings and study designs a narrative synthesis of quantitative results of intervention studies on maternal outcomes, neonatal outcomes, service utilization, and healthy pregnancy education was conducted. Qualitative and quantitative results were synthesized with a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis.In total, 3777 articles were found, of which 27 studies were included: twelve intervention studies and fifteen descriptive studies. mHealth interventions targeted at pregnant women increased maternal and neonatal service utilization shown through increased antenatal care attendance, facility-service utilization, skilled attendance at birth, and vaccination rates. Few articles assessed the effect on maternal or neonatal health outcomes, with inconsistent results.mHealth interventions may be effective solutions to improve maternal and neonatal service utilization. Further studies assessing mHealth's impact on maternal and neonatal outcomes are recommended. The emerging trend of strong experimental research designs with randomized controlled trials, combined with feasibility research

  16. The relationship between some neonatal and maternal factors during pregnancy with the prevalence of congenital malformations in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Salman; Safarpour, Hamid; Bazyar, Jafar; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Karimi, Arezoo; Anvary, Rahman

    2018-05-08

    Congenital malformations are one of the main causes of death and disability in children. These malformations arise during embryogenesis and fetal development during pregnancy due to exposure to some environmental factors and genetic mutations. Given the high prevalence of congenital malformations in Iran, the current study was conducted to investigate the relationship between some neonatal and maternal factors during pregnancy with the prevalence of congenital malformations in Iran. This was a systematic review and meta-analysis study. All studies conducted in Iran were extracted between 2000 and 2016 during a search in internal and external databases of Medlib, Medline, Pubmed, Web of Science, Google Scholar, Scopus, Magiran, SID, Cochrane, Irandoc, and all articles published. Then, the required data were entered into the Spss16 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL); and the model of fixed and random effects was analyzed in meta-analysis, Cochran, meta-regression using statistical tests. A total of 30 studies with a sample size of 928,311 patients were enrolled. Baby's gender (1-1.55: CI95%) OR: 1.25, preterm delivery (1.71-3.69: CI 95%) OR: 2.51, low birth weight (1.13-2.67: CI95%) OR: 1.74, age older than 35 for the pregnant mother (1.41-6.3: CI 95%) OR: 2.98, multiple births (1.14-3.46: CI 95%) OR: 1.99, mother suffering from chronic diseases (1.68-3.31: CI 95%) OR: 2.36 are significantly related with the risk of congenital malformations. Based on the results the baby's gender, premature birth, low birth weight, mother's age, consanguineous marriages, multiple births, family history of congenital malformations, and the risk of chronic diseases in the mother during pregnancy increase the birth of children with congenital malformations. As a result, control or modification of the above factors implementing a health and education intervention program can reduce the birth of children with congenital malformations.

  17. Systematic review of the literature on postpartum care: effectiveness of postpartum support to improve maternal parenting, mental health, quality of life, and physical health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Elizabeth; Levitt, Cheryl; Wong, Sharon; Kaczorowski, Janusz

    2006-09-01

    Postpartum support is recommended to prevent infant and maternal morbidity. This review examined the published evidence of the effectiveness of postpartum support programs to improve maternal knowledge, attitudes, and skills related to parenting, maternal mental health, maternal quality of life, and maternal physical health. MEDLINE, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials of interventions initiated from immediately after birth to 1 year in postnatal women. The initial literature search was done in 1999 and was enhanced in 2003 and 2005. Studies were categorized based on the the above outcomes. Data were extracted in a systematic manner, and the quality of each study was reviewed. In the 1999 search, 9 studies met the inclusion criteria. The 2003 and 2005 searches identified 13 additional trials for a total of 22 trials. Universal postpartum support to unselected women at low risk did not result in statistically significant improvements for any outcomes examined. Educational visits to a pediatrician showed statistically significant improvements in maternal-infant parenting skills in low-income primiparous women. In women at high risk for family dysfunction and child abuse, nurse home visits combined with case conferencing produced a statistically significant improvement in home environment quality using the HOME (Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment) program. Similarly, in women at high risk for either family dysfunction or postpartum depression, home visitation or peer support, respectively, produced a statistically significant reduction in Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale scores (difference - 2.23, 95% CI -3.72 to -0.74, p= 0.004; and 15.0% vs 52.4%, OR 6.23, 95% CI 1.40 to 27.84, p= 0.01, respectively). Educational programs reduced repeat unplanned pregnancies (12.0% vs 28.3%, p= 0.003) and increased effective contraceptive use (RR 1.35, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.68, p= 0.007). Maternal satisfaction was

  18. Community health workers' experiences of mobile device-enabled clinical decision support systems for maternal, newborn and child health in developing countries: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzabeng, Francis; Enuameh, Yeetey; Adjei, George; Manu, Grace; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this review is to synthesize evidence on the experiences of community health workers (CHWs) of mobile device-enabled clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) interventions designed to support maternal newborn and child health (MNCH) in low-and middle-income countries.Specific objectives.

  19. Non-invasive or minimally invasive autopsy compared to conventional autopsy of suspected natural deaths in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokker, Britt M; Wagensveld, Ivo M; Weustink, Annick C; Oosterhuis, J Wolter; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2016-04-01

    Autopsies are used for healthcare quality control and improving medical knowledge. Because autopsy rates are declining worldwide, various non-invasive or minimally invasive autopsy methods are now being developed. To investigate whether these might replace the invasive autopsies conventionally performed in naturally deceased adults, we systematically reviewed original prospective validation studies. We searched six databases. Two reviewers independently selected articles and extracted data. Methods and patient groups were too heterogeneous for meaningful meta-analysis of outcomes. Sixteen of 1538 articles met our inclusion criteria. Eight studies used a blinded comparison; ten included less than 30 appropriate cases. Thirteen studies used radiological imaging (seven dealt solely with non-invasive procedures), two thoracoscopy and laparoscopy, and one sampling without imaging. Combining CT and MR was the best non-invasive method (agreement for cause of death: 70 %, 95%CI: 62.6; 76.4), but minimally invasive methods surpassed non-invasive methods. The highest sensitivity for cause of death (90.9 %, 95%CI: 74.5; 97.6, suspected duplicates excluded) was achieved in recent studies combining CT, CT-angiography and biopsies. Minimally invasive autopsies including biopsies performed best. To establish a feasible alternative to conventional autopsy and to increase consent to post-mortem investigations, further research in larger study groups is needed. • Health care quality control benefits from clinical feedback provided by (alternative) autopsies. • So far, sixteen studies investigated alternative autopsy methods for naturally deceased adults. • Thirteen studies used radiological imaging modalities, eight tissue biopsies, and three CT-angiography. • Combined CT, CT-angiography and biopsies were most sensitive diagnosing cause of death.

  20. Epidemiology of Maternal Mortality in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    live births. Causes and determinants of maternal mortal- ity. Global causes of maternal mortality. Across the globe the causes of maternal deaths are strik- ..... at home”. Findings from Thyolo, Mangochi and Chik- wawa were similar". Perceived qua/ity of care. Like anywhere in the world, the perceived quality of care in ...

  1. Maternal mortality in Denmark, 1985-1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Betina Ristorp; Westergaard, Hanne Brix; Bødker, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    fortuitous causes. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were the major cause of direct maternal deaths. The rate of maternal deaths constituted 9.8/100,000 maternities (i.e. the number of women delivering registrable live births at any gestation or stillbirths at 24 weeks of gestation or later). CONCLUSION......: This is the first systematic report on deaths in Denmark based on data from national registries. The maternal mortality rate in Denmark is comparable to the rates in other developed countries. Fortunately, statistics are low, but each case represents potential learning. Obstetric care has changed and classification...

  2. Systematic review on human resources for health interventions to improve maternal health outcomes: evidence from low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Zohra S; Musavi, Nabiha B; Maliqi, Blerta; Mansoor, Nadia; de Francisco, Andres; Toure, Kadidiatou; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-03-12

    There is a broad consensus and evidence that shows qualified, accessible, and responsive human resources for health (HRH) can make a major impact on the health of the populations. At the same time, there is widespread recognition that HRH crises particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) impede the achievement of better health outcomes/targets. In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), equitable access to a skilled and motivated health worker within a performing health system is need to be ensured. This review contributes to the vast pool of literature towards the assessment of HRH for maternal health and is focused on interventions delivered by skilled birth attendants (SBAs). Studies were included if (a) any HRH interventions in management system, policy, finance, education, partnership, and leadership were implemented; (b) these were related to SBA; (c) reported outcomes related to maternal health; (d) the studies were conducted in LMICs; and (e) studies were in English. Studies were excluded if traditional birth attendants and/or community health workers were trained. The review identified 25 studies which revealed reasons for poor maternal health outcomes in LMICs despite the efforts and policies implemented throughout these years. This review suggested an urgent and immediate need for formative evidence-based research on effective HRH interventions for improved maternal health outcomes. Other initiatives such as education and empowerment of women, alleviating poverty, establishing gender equality, and provision of infrastructure, equipment, drugs, and supplies are all integral components that are required to achieve SDGs by reducing maternal mortality and improving maternal health.

  3. The Effect of Prenatal Home Visiting for Adolescent Mothers on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Taherh Hadian; Mojgan Mirghafourvand; Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh Charandabi; Solmaz Ghanbari; Jila Nahaeii; Shahla Meedya

    2018-01-01

    Background: Adolescence pregnancy is high risk both for mother and child. This systematic review aimed to determine the effect of home visiting on maternal and neonatal outcomes in adolescent mothers.Materials and Methods: This systematic review was performed by searching English databases including Cochran library, PubMed, Google scholar, Scopus, web of science, Embase, Ovid and Persian databases including SID, Magiran, and Barakat Knowledge Network System without time limitation. The search...

  4. Forensic tools for the diagnosis of electrocution death: Case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondello, Cristina; Micali, Antonio; Cardia, Luigi; Argo, Antonina; Zerbo, Stefania; Spagnolo, Elvira Ventura

    2018-06-01

    Diagnosis of death by electrocution may be difficult when electric marking is not visible or unclear. Accordingly, the body of a man who appeared to have died from accidental electrocution was carefully forensically analysed. Macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the current mark was carried out using a variable-pressure scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray microanalyser to highlight skin metallisation, indicating the presence of iron and zinc. The histological findings of electrocution myocardial damage were supported by the results of biochemical analysis which demonstrated the creatine kinase-MB and cardiac troponin I elevation. The effects of electric current flow were also highlighted by perforations of endothelial surface of a pulmonary artery using scanning electron microscope, and all the results were analysed by the main tools suggested in the literature.

  5. Potential brain death organ donors - challenges and prospects: A single center retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Al-Maslamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ donation after brain death (BD is a major source for obtaining transplantable organs for patients with end-stage organ disease (ESOD. This retrospective, descriptive study was carried out on all potential BD patients admitted in different intensive care units (ICUs of the Hamad medical Corporation (HMC, Doha, Qatar during a period from January 2011 to April 2012. Our aim was to evaluate various demographic criteria and challenges of organ donation among potential BD organ donors and plan a strategy to improve the rate of organ donation in Qatar. Various aspects of BD patients in the ICUs and their possible effects on organ donation were studied. The time intervals analyzed to determine the possible causes of delay of organ retrieval were: time of diagnosing fixed dilated pupils in the ICU, to performing the first BD test, then to the second BD test, to family approach, to organ retrieval and/or circulatory death (CD without organ retrieval. There were a total of 116 potential BD organ donors of whom 96 (82.75% were males and 20 (17.25% were females. Brain hemorrhage and head injury contributed to 37 (31.9% and 32 (27.6% BD cases, respectively. Time interval between diagnosing fixed dilated pupil and performing the first test of BD was delayed >24 h in 79% of the cases and between the first and second BD tests was >6 h in 70.8% of the cases. This delay is not compatible with the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC policy for BD diagnosis and resulted in a low number of organs retrieved. BD organ donation, a potential source for organs to save patients with ESOD has several pitfalls and every effort should be made to increase the awareness of the public as well as medical personnel to optimize donation efficacy.

  6. Does the use of specialist palliative care services modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Nicolson, Donald J; Macleod, Una; Allgar, Victoria; Dalgliesh, Christopher; Johnson, Miriam

    2016-05-01

    Cancer patients in lower socioeconomic groups are significantly less likely to die at home and experience more barriers to access to palliative care. It is unclear whether receiving palliative care may mediate the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. This review examines whether and how use of specialist palliative care may modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. A systematic review was conducted. Eligible papers were selected and the quality appraised by two independent reviewers. Data were synthesised using a narrative approach. MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Knowledge were searched (1997-2013). Bibliographies were scanned and experts contacted. Papers were included if they reported the effect of both socioeconomic status and use of specialist palliative care on place of death for adult cancer patients. Nine studies were included. All study subjects had received specialist palliative care. With regard to place of death, socioeconomic status was found to have (1) no effect in seven studies and (2) an effect in one study. Furthermore, one study found that the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death was only significant when patients received standard specialist palliative care. When patients received more intense care adapted to their needs, the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death was no longer seen. There is some evidence to suggest that use of specialist palliative care may modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Expenditure tracking and review of reproductive maternal, newborn and child health policy in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Muhammad Ashar; Nahyoun, Abdul Sattar; Rizvi, Arjumand; Bhatti, Zaid Ahmad; Bhutta, Zulfiqar Ahmad

    2017-07-01

    Since 2001 substantial resources have been allocated to the reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health sector (RMNCH) in Pakistan. Many new programmes have been started and coverage of some existing programmes has been extended to un-served and rural areas. Despite these efforts the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5 were not achieved (2000-15). Maternal Mortality Ratio was reduced to 170 per 100 000 live births (target 100) by 2013 at an annual reduction rate of 3.6% (1990-2013). Against the target of 46 per 1000 live births, the Under Five Mortality Rate was reduced to 81 per 1000 live births by 2015 at an annual reduction rate of 2.1% (1990-2015). We evaluated the comparative expenditures for the RMNCH sector and analysed impact of public expenditures on the use of the public facilities for the RMNCH services. Expenditure on RMNCH increased by 181% (2000-10), reaching PKR 628.79 billion (US$9.67 billion). The Share of the RMNCH expenditure in the total health expenditure increased from 16 to 21% (2005-10). The share of official development assistance for the RMNCH increased from 36 to 51% (2003-10). Equity was modestly achieved with a greater proportion of the poor using public facilities for the childhood diarrhoea (Concentration Index -0.06 in 2001-02 to - 0.11 in 2010-11) and reduction in the proportion of the rich using the public health facilities for institutional births (Concentration Index 0.30 in 2001-02 to 0.25 in 2010-11). Overall the RMNCH disease control programmes focused on vertical primary health approach and targeted the district health system in the un-served areas. Our findings confirm that diseconomies of scale, donor dependence and supply side perspective could only result in a modest progress towards achieving the MDGs. We call for urgent attention of the policy makers for the integration of the vertical and the routine primary health care and reliance on indigenous sustainable healthcare financing. We also recommend

  8. Maternal mortality audit in a tertiary health institution in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Nigeria has the second highest number of maternal deaths in the world.The study aimed at determining the causes of and non-obstetric contributors to maternal mortality at a tertiary referral hospital. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective audit of all consecutive maternal deaths in the hospital over a ...

  9. Kristeller maneuvers or fundal pressure and maternal/neonatal morbidity: obstetric and judicial literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvasi, Antonio; Zaami, Simona; Tinelli, Andrea; Trojano, Giuseppe; Montanari Vergallo, Gianluca; Marinelli, Enrico

    2018-02-21

    A significant amount of data concerning maternal-fetal damage arising from the exertion of Kristeller maneuvers (KMs) or fundal pressure (FP) go unreleased due to medicolegal implications. For this reason, the paper gathers information as to the real magnitude of litigation related to FP-induced damages and injuries. The authors have undertaken a research in order to include general search engines (PubMed-Medline, Cochrane, Embase, Google, GyneWeb) and legal databases (De Jure, Italian database of jurisprudence daily update; Westlaw, Thomson Reuters, American ruling database and Bailii, UK Court Ruling Database). Results confirm said phenomenon to be more wide ranging than it appears through official channels. Several courts of law, both in the United States of America (USA) and in European Union (EU) Member States as well, have ruled against the use of the maneuver itself, assuming a stance conducive to a presumption of guilt against those doctors and healthcare providers who resorted to KMs or FP during deliveries. Given how rife FP is in mainstream obstetric practice, it is as if there were a wide gap between obstetric real-life and what official jurisprudence and healthcare institutions-sanctioned official practices are. The authors think that it would be desirable to draft specifically targeted guidelines or recommendations on maneuvers during vaginal delivery, in which to point out exactly what kinds of maneuvering techniques are to be absolutely banned and what maneuvers are to be allowed, and under what conditions their application can be considered appropriate.

  10. A review of Intra-uterine foetal deaths at the Cape Coast Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-10

    Nov 10, 2010 ... Study design: This is a retrospective review of delivery suite records from Jan 1 2013 to Dec 31 2014. Methods: Study was undertaken at the Cape Coast .... popular tourist destination. The indigenous people are .... Skilled attendants at delivery, a key health sector indicator in Ghana, can reduce fresh still-.

  11. What interventions are effective on reducing inequalities in maternal and child health in low- and middle-income settings? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Beibei; Målqvist, Mats; Trygg, Nadja; Qian, Xu; Ng, Nawi; Thomsen, Sarah

    2014-06-21

    The deadline for achieving Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 is approaching, but inequalities between disadvantaged and other populations is a significant barrier for progress towards achieving these goals. This systematic review aims to collect evidence about the differential effects of interventions on different sociodemographic groups in order to identify interventions that were effective in reducing maternal or child health inequalities. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE and other relevant databases. The reference lists of included reviews were also screened to find more eligible studies. We included experimental or observational studies that assessed the effects of interventions on maternal and child health, but only studies that report quantitative inequality outcomes were finally included for analysis. 22 articles about the effectiveness of interventions on equity in maternal and child health were finally included. These studies covered five kinds of interventions: immunization campaigns, nutrition supplement programs, health care provision improvement interventions, demand side interventions, and mixed interventions. The outcome indicators covered all MDG 4 and three MDG 5 outcomes. None of the included studies looked at equity in maternal mortality, adolescent birth rate and unmet need for family planning. The included studies reported inequalities based on gender, income, education level or comprehensive socioeconomic status. Stronger or moderate evidence showed that all kinds of the included interventions may be more effective in improving maternal or child health for those from disadvantaged groups. Studies about the effectiveness of interventions on equity in maternal or child health are limited. The limited evidence showed that the interventions that were effective in reducing inequity included the improvement of health care delivery by outreach methods, using human resources in local areas or provided at the community level nearest to residents and

  12. Comparing Outcomes of Donation After Cardiac Death Versus Donation After Brain Death in Liver Transplant Recipients with Hepatitis C: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Wells

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation (LT using organs donated after cardiac death (DCD is increasing due, in large part, to a shortage of organs. The outcome of using DCD organs in recipients with hepatits C virus (HCV infection remains unclear due to the limited experience and number of publications addressing this issue.

  13. Demand-side financing measures to increase maternal health service utilisation and improve health outcomes: a systematic review of evidence from low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Susan F; Hunter, Benjamin M; Bisht, Ramila; Ensor, Tim; Bick, Debra

    2012-01-01

    In many countries financing for health services has traditionally been disbursed directly from governmental and non-governmental funding agencies to providers of services: the 'supply-side' of healthcare markets. Demand-side financing offers a supplementary model in which some funds are instead channelled through, or to, prospective users. In this review we considered evidence on five forms of demand-side financing that have been used to promote maternal health in developing countries: OBJECTIVES: The overall review objective was to assess the effects of demand-side financing interventions on maternal health service utilisation and on maternal health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. Broader effects on perinatal and infant health, the situation of underprivileged women and the health care system were also assessed. This review considered poor, rural or socially excluded women of all ages who were either pregnant or within 42 days of the conclusion of pregnancy, the limit for postnatal care as defined by the World Health Organization. The review also considered the providers of services.The intervention of interest was any programme that incorporated demand-side financing as a mechanism to increase the consumption of goods and services that could impact on maternal health outcomes. This included the direct consumption of maternal health care goods and services as well as related 'merit goods' such as improved nutrition. We included systems in which potential users of maternal health services are financially empowered to make restricted decisions on buying maternal health-related goods or services - sometimes known as consumer-led demand-side financing. We also included programmes that provided unconditional cash benefits to pregnant women (for example in the form of maternity allowances), or to families with children under five years of age where there was evidence concerning maternal health outcomes.We aimed to include quantitative studies (experimental

  14. Comprehensive review of the evidence regarding the effectiveness of community-based primary health care in improving maternal, neonatal and child health: 8. summary and recommendations of the Expert Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Robert E; Taylor, Carl E; Arole, Shobha; Bang, Abhay; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, A Mushtaque R; Kirkwood, Betty R; Kureshy, Nazo; Lanata, Claudio F; Phillips, James F; Taylor, Mary; Victora, Cesar G; Zhu, Zonghan; Perry, Henry B

    2017-06-01

    The contributions that community-based primary health care (CBPHC) and engaging with communities as valued partners can make to the improvement of maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) is not widely appreciated. This unfortunate reality is one of the reasons why so few priority countries failed to achieve the health-related Millennium Development Goals by 2015. This article provides a summary of a series of articles about the effectiveness of CBPHC in improving MNCH and offers recommendations from an Expert Panel for strengthening CBPHC that were formulated in 2008 and have been updated on the basis of more recent evidence. An Expert Panel convened to guide the review of the effectiveness of community-based primary health care (CBPHC). The Expert Panel met in 2008 in New York City with senior UNICEF staff. In 2016, following the completion of the review, the Panel considered the review's findings and made recommendations. The review consisted of an analysis of 661 unique reports, including 583 peer-reviewed journal articles, 12 books/monographs, 4 book chapters, and 72 reports from the gray literature. The analysis consisted of 700 assessments since 39 were analyzed twice (once for an assessment of improvements in neonatal and/or child health and once for an assessment in maternal health). The Expert Panel recommends that CBPHC should be a priority for strengthening health systems, accelerating progress in achieving universal health coverage, and ending preventable child and maternal deaths. The Panel also recommends that expenditures for CBPHC be monitored against expenditures for primary health care facilities and hospitals and reflect the importance of CBPHC for averting mortality. Governments, government health programs, and NGOs should develop health systems that respect and value communities as full partners and work collaboratively with them in building and strengthening CBPHC programs - through engagement with planning, implementation (including the

  15. A re-audit of the use of definitions of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in peer-reviewed literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W; Lee, Vivian

    2012-11-01

    The use of different definitions of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) may make comparison of data among studies difficult. Fifty randomly selected papers dealing with SIDS that were published between 2010 and 2011 in peer-reviewed journals were reviewed to determine whether one of three internationally accepted definitions of SIDS had been either written in the text or referenced. A significant improvement in the use of definitions has occurred since 2005, with the percentage of papers either quoting or referencing a standard definition increasing by 26%, from 42 to 68%. The 1989 NICHD definition remained the most commonly used definition (35.1%) followed by the 2004 San Diego definition (26.3%). Although the percentage of papers where either no definition was provided or where an idiosyncratic or mis-cited definition was used fell 26%, from 58 to 32%, nearly one in three papers published on SIDS in peer-reviewed journals that were included in this study still did not cite a standard definition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  16. Maternal Mortality In Imo State University Teaching Hospital, Orlu: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A maternal death is a calamity particularly for the immediate family members. Maternal mortality ratio is high in most developing countries. Although many studies have been carried out on maternal mortality in many parts of Nigeria there is a dearth of information on maternal mortality ratio in Imo State.

  17. Maternal and perinatal outcome of eclampsia in tertiary health institution in Southeast Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinma, Echendu Dolly

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the maternal and perinatal outcome in patients with eclampsia at Nnamdi-Azikiwe-University-Teaching-Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, Nigeria. A retrospective study of cases of eclampsia managed at NAUTH over a 10 year period - 1st January, 2000 to 31st December, 2009. Maternal outcome was measured in terms of complications and maternal death. Foetal outcome was assessed in terms of low birth weight, pre-term births, low apgar score, and perinatal deaths. There were 57 cases of eclampsia out of a total of 6,262 deliveries within the study period, giving a prevalence of 0.91%. Majority, 71.7%, had caesarean section. There were 17.4% maternal deaths mainly from pulmonary oedema, 6 (13.0%), acute renal failure, 4 (8.7%), and coagulopathy, 3 (6.5%). Perinatal deaths were 25.5% as a result of prematurity, 42 (82.4%), and low birth weight, 36 (70.6%). Twenty-one (41.2%) of the new born had Apgar score of less than seven at 5 min while 13.0% were severely asphyxiated. Eclampsia was associated with high maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in this study. There is need to review existing protocol on eclampsia management with emphasis on appropriate health education of pregnant mothers, good antenatal care, early diagnosis of pre-eclampsia with prompt treatment.

  18. Maternal nutrition and birth outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saad, Kathleen; Fraser, Drora

    2010-01-01

    In this review, the authors summarize current knowledge on maternal nutritional requirements during pregnancy, with a focus on the nutrients that have been most commonly investigated in association with birth outcomes. Data sourcing and extraction included searches of the primary resources establishing maternal nutrient requirements during pregnancy (e.g., Dietary Reference Intakes), and searches of Medline for "maternal nutrition"/[specific nutrient of interest] and "birth/pregnancy outcomes," focusing mainly on the less extensively reviewed evidence from observational studies of maternal dietary intake and birth outcomes. The authors used a conceptual framework which took both primary and secondary factors (e.g., baseline maternal nutritional status, socioeconomic status of the study populations, timing and methods of assessing maternal nutritional variables) into account when interpreting study findings. The authors conclude that maternal nutrition is a modifiable risk factor of public health importance that can be integrated into efforts to prevent adverse birth outcomes, particularly among economically developing/low-income populations.

  19. Regional perfusion by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation of abdominal organs from donors after circulatory death: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapey, Iestyn M; Muiesan, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    Organs from donors after circulatory death (DCDs) are particularly susceptible to the effects of warm ischemia injury. Regional perfusion (RP) by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being advocated as a useful remedy to the effects of ischemia/reperfusion injury, and it has been reported to enable the transplantation of organs from donors previously deemed unsuitable. The MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched, and articles published between 1997 and 2013 were obtained. A systematic review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Two hundred ten articles were identified, and 11 were eligible for inclusion. Four hundred eighty-two kidneys and 79 livers were transplanted from regional perfusion-supported donor after circulatory death (RP-DCD) sources. One-year graft survival was lower with uncontrolled RP-DCD liver transplantation, whereas 1-year patient survival was similar. Primary nonfunction and ischemic cholangiopathy were significantly more frequent with RP-DCDs versus donors after brain death (DBDs), but there was no difference in postoperative mortality between the 2 groups. The 1-year patient and graft survival rates for RP-DCD kidney transplantation were better than the rates with standard DCDs and were comparable to, if not better than, the rates with DBDs. At experienced centers, delayed graft function (DGF) for kidney transplantation from RP-DCDs was much less frequent in comparison with all other donor types. In conclusion, RP aids the recovery of DCD organs from ischemic injury and enables transplantation with acceptable survival. RP may help to increase the donor pool, but its benefits must still be balanced with the recognition of significantly higher rates of complications in liver transplantation. In kidney transplantation, significant reductions in DGF can be obtained with RP, and there are potentially important implications for long

  20. Comprehensive review of the evidence regarding the effectiveness of community–based primary health care in improving maternal, neonatal and child health: 8. summary and recommendations of the Expert Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Robert E; Taylor, Carl E; Arole, Shobha; Bang, Abhay; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, A Mushtaque R; Kirkwood, Betty R; Kureshy, Nazo; Lanata, Claudio F; Phillips, James F; Taylor, Mary; Victora, Cesar G; Zhu, Zonghan; Perry, Henry B

    2017-01-01

    Background The contributions that community–based primary health care (CBPHC) and engaging with communities as valued partners can make to the improvement of maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) is not widely appreciated. This unfortunate reality is one of the reasons why so few priority countries failed to achieve the health–related Millennium Development Goals by 2015. This article provides a summary of a series of articles about the effectiveness of CBPHC in improving MNCH and offers recommendations from an Expert Panel for strengthening CBPHC that were formulated in 2008 and have been updated on the basis of more recent evidence. Methods An Expert Panel convened to guide the review of the effectiveness of community–based primary health care (CBPHC). The Expert Panel met in 2008 in New York City with senior UNICEF staff. In 2016, following the completion of the review, the Panel considered the review’s findings and made recommendations. The review consisted of an analysis of 661 unique reports, including 583 peer–reviewed journal articles, 12 books/monographs, 4 book chapters, and 72 reports from the gray literature. The analysis consisted of 700 assessments since 39 were analyzed twice (once for an assessment of improvements in neonatal and/or child health and once for an assessment in maternal health). Results The Expert Panel recommends that CBPHC should be a priority for strengthening health systems, accelerating progress in achieving universal health coverage, and ending preventable child and maternal deaths. The Panel also recommends that expenditures for CBPHC be monitored against expenditures for primary health care facilities and hospitals and reflect the importance of CBPHC for averting mortality. Governments, government health programs, and NGOs should develop health systems that respect and value communities as full partners and work collaboratively with them in building and strengthening CBPHC programs – through engagement with

  1. The maternity of lesbian mothers from the nursing perspective: integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firley Poliana da Silva Lucio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to analyze the national and international scientific nursing literature about lesbian motherhood. The study is an integrative review of the Scopus, Cinahl, Lilacs and BDENF databases. The inclusion criteria for the sample selection were: articles published between 2010 and 2015, in English, Portuguese or Spanish. The exclusion criteria were: thesis, dissertations, monographs, editorials, case studies and review articles. The result constituted of five articles that described the experiences about homoparenthood in three countries. The analysis revealed the incipiency of the theme in the scientific nursing scope and showed the poor quality of assistance from health professionals, especially nurses, with a prejudicial and discriminatory approach. Thus, it is indispensable to guarantee the excellence in the quality of health services to lesbians in many caring scenarios, in a way to ensure more visibility, so their needs are comprehended and converted into effective actions that contemplate their demands.

  2. The influence of pregnancy and lactation on maternal bone health: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooneh Salari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is considered as an important public health problem especially in postmenopausal women. There are some hypotheses support the contributory effect of pregnancy and lactation on osteoporosis later in life. High calcium demand during pregnancy and lactation and low estrogenic state support those hypotheses. Numerous studies have investigated on the issue but there is no consensus about the contributory effect of pregnancy and lactation on osteoporosis. To explore the current state of fact, in the present study, all bibliographic databases were searched and all relevant studies on the topic of osteoporosis, lactation, and pregnancy were reviewed. The review shows that despite of controversial results, pregnancy may have protective effect on bone especially if followed by lactation.

  3. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Interventions on Maternal Perinatal Mental Health Outcomes: a Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Zhenrong; MacBeth, Angus

    2017-01-01

    Presenting with common mental health difficulties, particularly depression and anxiety, there is also preliminary evidence that mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) including mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and integrated mindfulness yoga practices may also be effective in reducing common mental health difficulties during pregnancy. We systematically reviewed and synthesized the current literature on the effectiveness of MBIs in reducing...

  4. Maternal mortality ratio – trends in t