WorldWideScience

Sample records for materials set experiments

  1. Setting science free from materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Rupert

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary science is based on the claim that all reality is material or physical. There is no reality but material reality. Consciousness is a by-product of the physical activity of the brain. Matter is unconscious. Evolution is purposeless. This view is now undergoing a credibility crunch. The biggest problem of all for materialism is the existence of consciousness. Panpsychism provides a way forward. So does the recognition that minds are not confined to brains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nursing students’ experiences of clinical education setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahnama M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Appropriate clinical environment has an important role in preparing students to use learned knowledge in practice through providing learning opportunities. Since the students’ experiences in the clinical setting affect on quality of their learning, the current study aimed to explain the experiences of nursing students concerning clinical education setting. Materials and Method: The current study was conducted based on conventional content analysis. Sampling was done purposively and the participants were 13 last year nursing students in Zabol Nursing and Midwifery School in 2013-2014. Data collection was done through in-depth semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was conducted through qualitative content analysis approach. Results: Based on the results, five major categories including threats, vision, dual forces, mindset and students’ action to clinical education and also10 subcategorie were identified. Conclusion: Since the formation of students’ experiences in these environments is one of the predictive factors in achieving their learning and in facilitating the professionalization process, thus the attention of managers in clinical settings is very important for decreasing the threats and concerns for students. In this way, the marred prospects of profession can be recovered through the meeting students’ expectations, attractiveness of the profession can be increased and the positive belief, actions and feelings can be created in students.

  3. Encyclopedia of Smart Materials, 2 Volume Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Mel

    2002-03-01

    Smart materials--materials and structures that can impart information about their environment to an observer or monitoring device--are revolutionizing fields as diverse as engineering, optics, and medical technology. Advances in smart materials are impacting disciplines across the scientific and technological landscape. Now, practictioners and researchers have an authoritative source to go to for answers about this emerging new area. Encyclopedia of Smart Materials provides A-to-Z coverage of the entire field of intelligent materials. Discussions of theory, fabrication, processing, applications, and uses of these unique materials are presented here in a collection of concise entries from the world's foremost experts in the field--including scientists, educators and engineers. This encyclopedia is as broad in scope as the technology itself, addressing daily, commercial applications as well as sophisticated units designed to operate in space, underwater, underground, and within the human body. Extensively cross-referenced and generously supplemented with bibliographies and indexes, this book's treatment also broaches the specialized properties and coatings that are required for the use of materials in extreme conditions. Illustrated with photographs, tables, line drawings, and equations, Encyclopedia of Smart Materials is the premier reference for material scientists, chemists, chemical engineers, process engineers, consultants, patent attorneys and students in these areas. An essential resource on the shelves of laboratories, government facilities, and academic libraries. Editor-in-Chief, Mel Schwartz has over forty years of experience with metals, ceramics, and composites, with special expertise in brazing. The holder of five patents, he has authored thirteen books and more than one hundred technical papers and articles. Reach the information you need rapidly and easily with the ONLINE edition of the Encyclopedia of Smart Materials. The online edition delivers all

  4. Materials science experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, S. H.; Giessen, B. C.; Glicksman, M. E.; Margrave, J. L.; Markovitz, H.; Nowick, A. S.; Verhoeven, J. D.; Witt, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    The criteria for the selection of the experimental areas and individual experiments were that the experiment or area must make a meaningful contribution to the field of material science and that the space environment was either an absolute requirement for the successful execution of the experiment or that the experiment can be more economically or more conveniently performed in space. A number of experimental areas and individual experiments were recommended for further consideration as space experiments. Areas not considered to be fruitful and others needing additional analysis in order to determine their suitability for conduct in space are also listed. Recommendations were made concerning the manner in which these materials science experiments are carried out and the related studies that should be pursued.

  5. Automated Experiments on Ad Privacy Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datta Amit

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To partly address people’s concerns over web tracking, Google has created the Ad Settings webpage to provide information about and some choice over the profiles Google creates on users. We present AdFisher, an automated tool that explores how user behaviors, Google’s ads, and Ad Settings interact. AdFisher can run browser-based experiments and analyze data using machine learning and significance tests. Our tool uses a rigorous experimental design and statistical analysis to ensure the statistical soundness of our results. We use AdFisher to find that the Ad Settings was opaque about some features of a user’s profile, that it does provide some choice on ads, and that these choices can lead to seemingly discriminatory ads. In particular, we found that visiting webpages associated with substance abuse changed the ads shown but not the settings page. We also found that setting the gender to female resulted in getting fewer instances of an ad related to high paying jobs than setting it to male. We cannot determine who caused these findings due to our limited visibility into the ad ecosystem, which includes Google, advertisers, websites, and users. Nevertheless, these results can form the starting point for deeper investigations by either the companies themselves or by regulatory bodies.

  6. Material Science Experiments on Mir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Roger L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the microgravity materials experiments carried out on the Shuttle/Mir program. There were six experiments, all of which investigated some aspect of diffusivity in liquid melts. The Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD) experiment investigated the diffusivity of molten Indium samples at 185 C using a radioactive tracer, In-114m. By monitoring two different gamma ray energies (190 keV and 24 keV) emitted by the samples it was possible to measure independently the diffusion rates in the bulk and at the surface of the samples. The Queens University Experiment in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD) was the furnace facility used to process 213 samples for the five other experiments. These experiments investigated the diffusion, ripening, crystal growth, and glass formation in metal, semiconductor, and glass samples. This facility had the capability to process samples in an isothermal or gradient configuration for varying periods of time at temperatures up to 900 C. Both the LMD and the QUELD furnaces were mounted on the Microgravity Isolation Mount (MIM) which provided isolation from g-jitter. All the microgravity experiments were supported by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS); a three head three axes acceleration monitoring system which measured and recorded the acceleration environment.

  7. Set-up of experiment R606

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    Experiment R606 (Aachen, CERN, Harvard, Munich, Northwestern, Riverside)installed in the specially constructed pit at intersection 6. It was designed to investigate production of new particles in the fragmentation and diffraction regions. Use was made of a toroidal field provided by 12 flat copper coils, seen here as the rays of a wheel; in the free spaces between coils are housed Cerenkov counters. These counters, together with calorimetric shower detectors, located behind the magnet, provide separation of electrons from hadrons. The momenta of particles going through the system are measured with two sets of three drift chambers, two in front of the magnet, one behind, whose size increases from 1.5 m for the one seen in the picture, to 5 m for the one on the back. On the right the thin- walled cylindrical vacuum chamber.

  8. Plastic Recycling Experiments in Materials Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, Tommy L.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to introduce a series of plastic recycling experiments to students in materials-related courses such as materials science, material technology and materials testing. With the plastic recycling experiments, students not only can learn the fundamentals of plastic processing and properties as in conventional materials courses, but also can be exposed to the issue of materials life cycle and the impact on society and environment.

  9. The National Airborne Field Experiment Data Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, J. P.; Balling, Jan E.; Bell, M.

    2007-01-01

    The National Airborne Field Experiment's (NAFE) were a series of intensive experiments recently conducted in different parts of Australia. These hydrologic-focused experiments have been designed to answer a range of questions which can only be resolved through carefully planned and executed field...

  10. Field Experience Study in a Traditional Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perenich, Theresa A.

    1978-01-01

    A field experience in fashion marketing for Kansas State University students is described. The functions and responsibilities of the coordinator, the student, and the departmental supervisor are outlined, along with the evaluation processes used. (Author/LBH)

  11. Material science experiments on the Atlas Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinigs, Rhonald K.; Atchison, Walter L.; Faehl, Rickey J.; Lindemuth, Irvin R.; Anderson, Wallace E.; Bartsch, Robert Richard; Flower-Maudlin, Elane C.; Hammerberg, James E.; Holtkamp, David B.; Jones, Michael E.; Kyrala, George A.; Oro, David M.; Parker, Jerald V.; Preston, Dean L.; Reinovsky, Robert E.; Scudder, David W.; Sheehey, Peter T.; Shlacter, Jack S.; Stokes, John L.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Tonks, Davis L.; Turchi, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Three material properties experiments that are to be performed on the Atlas pulsed power facility are described; friction at sliding metal interfaces, spallation and damage in convergent geomety, and plastic flow at high strain and high strain rate. Construction of this facility has been completed and experiments in high energy density hydrodynamics and material dynamics will begin in 2001.

  12. A Smart Material Interfaces Learning Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, A.; Pittarello, Fabio; Nijholt, Antinus

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a learning experience held with a class of primary school children who were introduced to a novel class of resources, named smart materials, and the interfaces built with them (Smart Material Interfaces). The pupils were guided along a multidisciplinary educational path in which

  13. Material Processing Facility - Skylab Experiment M512

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This chart details Skylab's Materials Processing Facility experiment (M512). This facility, located in the Multiple Docking Adapter, was developed for Skylab and accommodated 14 different experiments that were carried out during the three marned missions. The abilities to melt and mix without the contaminating effects of containers, to suppress thermal convection and buoyancy in fluids, and to take advantage of electrostatic and magnetic forces and otherwise masked by gravitation opened the way to new knowledge of material properties and processes. This beginning would ultimately lead to the production of valuable new materials for use on Earth.

  14. Materials performance experience at spallation neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, W.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    There is a growing, but not yet substantial, data base for materials performance at spallation neutron sources. Specially designed experiments using medium energy protons (650 MeV) have been conducted at the Proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) facility at the Swiss Nuclear Institute accelerator (SIN). Specially designed experiments using 760-800 MeV copper target have been completed at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). An extensive material testing program was initiated at LASREF in support of the German spallation neutron source (SNQ) project, before it terminated in 1985.

  15. Greenhouse Effect Detection Experiment (GEDEX). Selected data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lola M.; Warnock, Archibald, III

    1992-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains selected data sets compiled by the participants of the Greenhouse Effect Detection Experiment (GEDEX) workshop on atmospheric temperature. The data sets include surface, upper air, and/or satellite-derived measurements of temperature, solar irradiance, clouds, greenhouse gases, fluxes, albedo, aerosols, ozone, and water vapor, along with Southern Oscillation Indices and Quasi-Biennial Oscillation statistics.

  16. Material science experiments at the ATLAS facility

    CERN Document Server

    Keinigs, R K; Atchison, W L; Bartsch, R R; Faehl, R J; Flower-Maudlin, E C; Hammerberg, J E; Holtkamp, D B; Kyrala, G A; Oro, D M; Parker, J V; Preston, D L; Removsky, R E; Scudder, D W; Sheehey, P T; Shlachter, J S; Taylor, A J; Tonks, D L; Turchi, P J; Chandler, E A

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. Three experimental campaigns designed for fielding on the Atlas Pulsed Power Facility are discussed. The foci of these experiments are directed toward a better understanding of three material science issues; (1) strength at high strain and high strain rate, (2) friction at material interfaces moving at high relative velocities, and (3) material failure in convergent geometry. Atlas provides an environment for investigating these problems in parameter regimes and geometries that are inaccessible with standard techniques. For example, flow stress measurements of material strength using conventional Hopkinson bar experiments are limited to strain rates ~10/sup 4/ sec/sup -1/. Atlas will be capable of imploding metal shells to combined strains of 200% and strain rates >10/sup 6/ sec/sup -1/. Data obtained regimes is used to test different constitutive strength models used in several Los Alamos hydrocodes. Dynamic friction has been investigated for nearly 300 years, but a first...

  17. Neutron source characterization for materials experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented from HFIR-CTR32, EBRII-X287, and the Omega West Reactor. An important new source of damage in nickel arises from the 340 keV 56 Fe recoil from the 59 Ni(n,α) reaction used to produce high helium levels in materials irradiations in a thermal spectrum. The status of all other experiments is summarized

  18. The role of experience curves for setting MEPS for appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siderius, Hans-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) are an important policy instrument to raise the efficiency of products. In most schemes the concept of life cycle costs (LCC) is used to guide setting the MEPS levels. Although a large body of literature shows that product cost is decreasing with increasing cumulative production, the experience curve, this is currently not used for setting MEPS. This article shows how to integrate the concept of the experience curve into LCC calculations for setting MEPS in the European Union and applies this to household laundry driers, refrigerator-freezers and televisions. The results indicate that for driers and refrigerator-freezers at least twice the energy savings compared to the current approach can be achieved. These products also show that energy label classes can successfully be used for setting MEPS. For televisions an experience curve is provided, showing a learning rate of 29%. However, television prices do not show a relation with energy efficiency but are to a large extent determined by the time the product is placed on the market. This suggests to policy makers that for televisions and other products with a short (re)design and market cycle timing is more important than the MEPS levels itself. - Highlights: • We integrate experience curves into life cycle cost calculations for MEPS. • For driers and refrigerators this results in at least twice the energy savings. • For flat panel televisions an experience curve is provided

  19. ELT Materials: The Key to Fostering Effective Teaching and Learning Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Núñez Pardo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Our article aims at providing teachers with an overview for materials development, taking into account the experience gained by two teachers in the English Programme of the School of Education at Universidad Externado de Colombia in Bogotá. This experience has helped us achieve better teaching and learning conditions for our university students in their quest to learn a foreign language. This paper addresses the issue of the role of teachers as textbook developers, and how they can meet materials development demands by integrating a clear conceptualisation and set of principles as well as their essential components.

  20. Recreation settings, scenery, and visitor experiences: a research assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams

    2007-01-01

    A core task of recreation research is to understand the relation between settings, scenery, and visitor experiences. This paper uses environmental psychology to describe four conceptual models underlying these relations: inherent/aesthetic, opportunity/goal-directed, symbolic, and expressive. The paper then describes some challenges to applying results to recreation...

  1. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): initial experience in a clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaane, Per; Gullien, Randi; Eben, Ellen B.; Haakenaasen, Unni; Naess Jebsen, Ingvild; Krager, Mona; Bjoerndal, Hilde; Ekseth, Ulrika; Jahr, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a promising new technology. Some experimental clinical studies have shown positive results, but the future role and indications of this new technique, whether in a screening or clinical setting, need to be evaluated. Purpose: To compare digital mammography and DBT in a side-by-side feature analysis for cancer conspicuity, and to assess whether there is a potential additional value of DBT to standard state-of-the-art conventional imaging work-up with respect to detection of additional malignancies. Material and Methods: The study had ethics committee approval. A total of 129 women underwent 2D digital mammography including supplementary cone-down and magnification views and breast ultrasonography if indicated, as well as digital breast tomosynthesis. The indication for conventional imaging in the clinical setting included a palpable lump in 30 (23%), abnormal mammographic screening findings in 54 (42%), and surveillance in 45 (35%) of the women. The women were examined according to present guidelines, including spot-magnification views, ultrasonography, and needle biopsies, if indicated. The DBT examinations were interpreted several weeks after the conventional imaging without knowledge of the conventional imaging findings. In a later session, three radiologists performed a side-by-side feature analysis for cancer conspicuity in a sample of 50 cases. Results: State-of-the-art conventional imaging resulted in needle biopsy of 45 breasts, of which 20 lesions were benign and a total of 25 cancers were diagnosed. The remaining 84 women were dismissed with a normal/definitely benign finding and without indication for needle biopsy. The subsequent DBT interpretation found suspicious findings in four of these 84 women, and these four women had to be called back for repeated work-up with knowledge of the tomosynthesis findings. These delayed work-ups resulted in two cancers (increasing the cancer detection by 8%) and two

  2. Designing Meaningful Game Experiences for Rehabilitation and Sustainable Mobility Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gabrielli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the approach followed in two ongoing research projects aimed to designing meaningful game-based experiences to support home rehabilitation, eco-sustainable mobility goals and more in general better daily lifestyles. We first introduce the need for designing meaningful game-based experiences that are well-connected to the relevant non-game settings and can be customized by/for users, then, we show examples of how this approach can be realized in the rehabilitation and sustainable mobility contexts.

  3. Melting curve of materials: theory versus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfe, D; Vocadlo, L; Price, G D; Gillan, M J

    2004-01-01

    A number of melting curves of various materials have recently been measured experimentally and calculated theoretically, but the agreement between different groups is not always good. We discuss here some of the problems which may arise in both experiments and theory. We also report the melting curves of Fe and Al calculated recently using quantum mechanics techniques, based on density functional theory with generalized gradient approximations. For Al our results are in very good agreement with both low pressure diamond-anvil-cell experiments (Boehler and Ross 1997 Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 153 223, Haenstroem and Lazor 2000 J. Alloys Compounds 305 209) and high pressure shock wave experiments (Shaner et al 1984 High Pressure in Science and Technology ed Homan et al (Amsterdam: North-Holland) p 137). For Fe our results agree with the shock wave experiments of Brown and McQueen (1986 J. Geophys. Res. 91 7485) and Nguyen and Holmes (2000 AIP Shock Compression of Condensed Matter 505 81) and the recent diamond-anvil-cell experiments of Shen et al (1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 373). Our results are at variance with the recent calculations of Laio et al (2000 Science 287 1027) and, to a lesser extent, with the calculations of Belonoshko et al (2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 3638). The reasons for these disagreements are discussed

  4. Participatory health system priority setting: Evidence from a budget experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Font, Joan; Forns, Joan Rovira; Sato, Azusa

    2015-12-01

    Budget experiments can provide additional guidance to health system reform requiring the identification of a subset of programs and services that accrue the highest social value to 'communities'. Such experiments simulate a realistic budget resource allocation assessment among competitive programs, and position citizens as decision makers responsible for making 'collective sacrifices'. This paper explores the use of a participatory budget experiment (with 88 participants clustered in social groups) to model public health care reform, drawing from a set of realistic scenarios for potential health care users. We measure preferences by employing a contingent ranking alongside a budget allocation exercise (termed 'willingness to assign') before and after program cost information is revealed. Evidence suggests that the budget experiment method tested is cognitively feasible and incentive compatible. The main downside is the existence of ex-ante "cost estimation" bias. Additionally, we find that participants appeared to underestimate the net social gain of redistributive programs. Relative social value estimates can serve as a guide to aid priority setting at a health system level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Stratospheric experiments on curing of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudinov, Viacheslav; Kondyurin, Alexey; Svistkov, Alexander L.; Efremov, Denis; Demin, Anton; Terpugov, Viktor; Rusakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    Future space exploration requires a large light-weight structure for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories and other constructions. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the technology of polymerization of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment on Erath orbit. In orbit, the material is exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, plasma of free space due to cosmic rays, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The development of appropriate polymer matrix composites requires an understanding of the chemical processes of polymer matrix curing under the specific free space conditions to be encountered. The goal of the stratospheric flight experiment is an investigation of the effect of the stratospheric conditions on the uncured polymer matrix of the composite material. The unique combination of low residual pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short-wave UV component, cosmic rays and other aspects associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. We have done the stratospheric flight experiments with uncured composites (prepreg). A balloon with payload equipped with heater, temperature/pressure/irradiation sensors, microprocessor, carrying the samples of uncured prepreg has been launched to stratosphere of 25-30 km altitude. After the flight, the samples have been tested with FTIR, gel-fraction, tensile test and DMA. The effect of cosmic radiation has been observed. The composite was successfully cured during the stratospheric flight. The study was supported by RFBR grants 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011.

  6. Birth setting, labour experience, and postpartum psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Anna L; Yang, Lisa; Feeley, Nancy; Gold, Ian; Hayton, Barbara; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    2017-07-01

    although psychosocial risk factors have been identified for postpartum depression (PPD) and perinatal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the role of labour- and birth-related factors remains unclear. The present investigation explored the impact of birth setting, subjective childbirth experience, and their interplay, on PPD and postpartum PTSD. in this prospective longitudinal cohort study, three groups of women who had vaginal births at a tertiary care hospital, a birthing center, and those transferred from the birthing centre to the tertiary care hospital were compared. Participants were followed twice during pregnancy (12-14 and 32-34 weeks gestation) and twice after childbirth (1-3 and 7-9 weeks postpartum). symptoms of PPD and PTSD did not significantly differ between birth groups; however, measures of subjective childbirth experience and obstetric factors did. Moderation analyses indicated a significant interaction between pain and birth group, such that higher ratings of pain among women who were transferred was associated with greater symptoms of postpartum PTSD. women who are transferred appear to have a unique experience that may put them at greater risk for postpartum psychological distress. It may be beneficial for care providers to help prepare women for pain management and potential unexpected complications, particularly if it is their first childbirth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Reisman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM, circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  8. Patients' experiences of NPWT in an outpatient setting in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, B; Pedersen, B D

    2013-01-01

    qualitative interviews regarding their NPWT treatment. The French philosopher, Ricoeur's,theory of interpretation guided the data analysis, which included three levels: naive reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation and discussion. RESULTS: The patients experienced a high level of dependency......OBJECTIVE: To study patients' experiences of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) used for wounds of various aetiologies in the outpatient setting and the influences on daily life. METHOD: In this qualitative study, a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used. Ten patients underwent......, and they experienced embarrassment about odour,anxiety and uneasiness in relation to complications, a need for relatives' support and other social relation issues. It was important to include relatives as a resource and make use of the opportunity they presented to assist patients during information sessions about...

  9. Development of сertified reference materials set for opened porosity of solid substances and materials (imitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Sobina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with data of research for development of certified reference materials set for opened porosity of solid substances and materials (imitators (OPTB SO UNIIM Set Certified Reference Materials GSO 10583-2015. The certified values of opened porosity of metal cylinders were established by the method of hydrostatic weighing before and after boring of holes in. The certified reference materials are intended for calibration and verification of measuring instruments of opened porosity, based on the Boyle - Mariotte's law.

  10. Materials for pressure equipment under the new approach directives: a one-year home-experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdankiewicz, M.

    2005-01-01

    The New Approach Directives concerning pressure equipment set forth basic safety requirements for their designing, manufacturing and testing. The said requirements are being implemented in the field of materials in Poland after one-year experience. (author)

  11. Towards a Generic Set of Packaging Material Key Figures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Klooster, Roland; de Koeijer, Bjorn; de Lange, Jos

    Many companies consider the reduction of packaging material as a relevant development direction, either required by cost savings, supply chain efficiency, sustainability or substantiated by regulations (directive 94/62/EC). This aligns with an eco-efficient redundancy perspective on packaging.

  12. Concluding Remarks: Experiment from a materials perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, Z

    2011-01-01

    The author provides some remarks regarding the current status of experiments in strongly correlated electron systems. By construction, they are biased by the author's perspectives at the time of writing.

  13. Experience with dynamic material control subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severe, W.R.; Hagen, J.; Siebelist, R.; Wagner, R.P.; Olson, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    Operation of a Dynamic Material Control (DYMAC) prototype system has yielded some useful information for installing the final system. We discovered a bias between two methods for measuring filtrates. Evaluation of a unit process dynamic balance brought to light an operating procedure that weakens the accountability goals of the DYMAC system. We were able to correct both situations for the final system and learned that we must regularly monitor the system once it is operational for similar discrepancies

  14. Some aspects of the formulation of alginate dental impression materials--setting characteristics and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamuthu, Navina A; Braden, Michael; Patel, Mangala P

    2012-07-01

    To study the role of the various components of alginate dental impression materials. Experimental materials were formulated and their physical properties characterized and compared to commercially available counterparts (Neocolloid, Palgat Plus and Blueprint Cremix). Properties examined were: dimensional stability and weight change in water and artificial saliva; setting behavior; Shore A hardness and tear energy. The role of magnesium oxide was also investigated. Weight changes in water and artificial saliva can be attributed to an initial thermodynamic potential owing to the ionic content of the alginate, causing water to diffuse into the material. Water is then driven back out following a reversal of this potential. Hardness results for experimental materials were within the range obtained from the commercial materials. The hardness value for an experimental formulation that did not contain magnesium oxide was lower than values from the other experimental materials that did. Tear energies for all three experimental materials were greater than those of the commercial products. There were statistically significant differences between the two experimental materials that contained magnesium oxide and one that did not. With regard to setting time, statistically significant differences were seen between commercial materials and two of the experimental materials. The experimental material that did not contain magnesium oxide had a considerably longer setting time than all of the other materials tested. The key role of magnesium oxide in the setting reaction and the effect on hardness have been demonstrated and discussed. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transnational television audiences and modes of engagement: studying audience engagement as a set of experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keinonen, Heidi; Jensen, Pia Majbritt; Esser, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Audience engagement is attracting increasing attention in various academic disciplines. Recently, the industry- and technology-oriented conceptualizations of engagement have been challenged by a more audience-oriented understanding. This article aims at contributing to the development of a more...... nuanced audience-oriented approach. First, we make a theoretical argument by bringing various key theories together and, second, we present an empirical contribution by analysing audience engagement as a set of experiences. Our analysis builds on the empirical material produced by conducting two rounds...... and ritualistic engagement, ludic engagement. We also discovered that audiences at times get disengaged or opt to actively resist engagement....

  16. Setting priorities for space research: An experiment in methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    In 1989, the Space Studies Board created the Task Group on Priorities in Space Research to determine whether scientists should take a role in recommending priorities for long-term space research initiatives and, if so, to analyze the priority-setting problem in this context and develop a method by which such priorities could be established. After answering the first question in the affirmative in a previous report, the task group set out to accomplish the second task. The basic assumption in developing a priority-setting process is that a reasoned and structured approach for ordering competing initiatives will yield better results than other ways of proceeding. The task group proceeded from the principle that the central criterion for evaluating a research initiative must be its scientific merit -- the value of the initiative to the proposing discipline and to science generally. The group developed a two-stage methodology for priority setting and constructed a procedure and format to support the methodology. The first of two instruments developed was a standard format for structuring proposals for space research initiatives. The second instrument was a formal, semiquantitative appraisal procedure for evaluating competing proposals. This report makes available complete templates for the methodology, including the advocacy statement and evaluation forms, as well as an 11-step schema for a priority-setting process. From the beginning of its work, the task group was mindful that the issue of priority setting increasingly pervades all of federally supported science and that its work would have implications extending beyond space research. Thus, although the present report makes no recommendations for action by NASA or other government agencies, it provides the results of the task group's work for the use of others who may study priority-setting procedures or take up the challenge of implementing them in the future.

  17. Setting Standards and Primary School Teachers' Experiences of the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherman, Vanessa; Zimmerman, Lisa; Howie, Sarah J.; Bosker, Roel

    2014-01-01

    In South Africa, very few standard-setting exercises are carried out in education and, if they are, teachers are not involved in their execution. As a result, there is no clear understanding of what the standard is and how it was arrived at. This situation is compounded when teachers are held accountable when learners do not meet the prescribed…

  18. EV M-experiment in radiation material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeev, G.Z.; Kislitsin, S.B.; Pyatiletov, Yu.S.; Turkebaev, T.Eh.; Tyupkina, O.G.

    1999-01-01

    To simulate rapid processes in materials, rearrangement at the atomic level, or processes in which the access to the materials is limited or considered to be hazardous, the EV M-experiment is going to be applied more often in the atomic material science (calculating experiment, computer-aided simulation). This paper presents the most important outcomes obtained from the calculating experiment carried out by scientists of the Institute of Nuclear Physics of NNC RK, who are considered to be followers of the scientific school named after Kirsanov V.V. The review consists of the following sections: 1. Simulation of dynamic processes of radiation damage of materials. 2. Simulation of radiation defects in materials. 3. Simulation of radiation defects migration processes in crystals. 4. Simulation of irradiated materials failure and deformation processes

  19. Health Promotion in a Prison Setting: Experience in Villabona Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Pilar; Enjuanes, Jordi; Morata, Txus; Palasí, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse experiences of a health promotion intervention implemented by the Therapeutic and Educational Unit at Villabona prison in Spain, which aimed to create drug-free spaces as part of a model of social rehabilitation. Design: As part of a larger participatory evaluation study concerning the efficacy of…

  20. Nurse managers' experiences in continuous quality improvement in resource-poor healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakyo, Tracy Alexis; Xiao, Lily Dongxia

    2017-06-01

    Ensuring safe and quality care for patients in hospitals is an important part of a nurse manager's role. Continuous quality improvement has been identified as one approach that leads to the delivery of quality care services to patients and is widely used by nurse managers to improve patient care. Nurse managers' experiences in initiating continuous quality improvement activities in resource-poor healthcare settings remain largely unknown. Research evidence is highly demanded in these settings to address disease burden and evidence-based practice. This interpretive qualitative study was conducted to gain an understanding of nurse managers' Continuous Quality Improvement experiences in rural hospitals in Uganda. Nurse managers in rural healthcare settings used their role to prioritize quality improvement activities, monitor the Continuous Quality Improvement process, and utilize in-service education to support continuous quality improvement. The nurse managers in our sample encountered a number of barriers during the implementation of Continuous Quality Improvement, including: limited patient participation, lack of materials, and limited human resources. Efforts to address the challenges faced through good governance and leadership development require more attention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. BICEP2. II. Experiment and three-year data set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, P. A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Aikin, R. W.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Filippini, J. P.; Golwala, S. R.; Hildebrandt, S. R. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Amiri, M.; Davis, G.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Barkats, D. [Joint ALMA Observatory, ESO, Santiago (Chile); Benton, S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bischoff, C. A.; Buder, I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS 42, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bullock, E. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Day, P. K.; Dowell, C. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Duband, L. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA INAC-SBT, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Fliescher, S., E-mail: ogburn@stanford.edu [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Collaboration: Bicep2 Collaboration; and others

    2014-09-01

    We report on the design and performance of the BICEP2 instrument and on its three-year data set. BICEP2 was designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on angular scales of 1°-5°(ℓ = 40-200), near the expected peak of the B-mode polarization signature of primordial gravitational waves from cosmic inflation. Measuring B-modes requires dramatic improvements in sensitivity combined with exquisite control of systematics. The BICEP2 telescope observed from the South Pole with a 26 cm aperture and cold, on-axis, refractive optics. BICEP2 also adopted a new detector design in which beam-defining slot antenna arrays couple to transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers, all fabricated on a common substrate. The antenna-coupled TES detectors supported scalable fabrication and multiplexed readout that allowed BICEP2 to achieve a high detector count of 500 bolometers at 150 GHz, giving unprecedented sensitivity to B-modes at degree angular scales. After optimization of detector and readout parameters, BICEP2 achieved an instrument noise-equivalent temperature of 15.8 μK√s. The full data set reached Stokes Q and U map depths of 87.2 nK in square-degree pixels (5.'2 μK) over an effective area of 384 deg{sup 2} within a 1000 deg{sup 2} field. These are the deepest CMB polarization maps at degree angular scales to date. The power spectrum analysis presented in a companion paper has resulted in a significant detection of B-mode polarization at degree scales.

  2. Is Performance in Task-Cuing Experiments Mediated by Task Set Selection or Associative Compound Retrieval?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Charlotte L. D.; Monsell, Stephen; McLaren, Ian P. L.

    2014-01-01

    Task-cuing experiments are usually intended to explore control of task set. But when small stimulus sets are used, they plausibly afford learning of the response associated with a combination of cue and stimulus, without reference to tasks. In 3 experiments we presented the typical trials of a task-cuing experiment: a cue (colored shape) followed,…

  3. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  4. Functional relationship of room temperature and setting time of alginate impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Irnawati

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesia is a tropical country with temperature variation. A lot of dental clinics do not use air conditioner. The room temperature influences water temperature for mixing alginate impression materials. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the functional relationship of room temperature and initial setting time of alginate impression materials. Methods: The New Kromopan® alginate (normal and fast sets were used. The initial setting time were tested at 23 (control, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 degrees Celcius room temperatures (n = 5. The initial setting time was tested based on ANSI/ADA Specification no. 18 (ISO 1563. The alginate powder was mixed with distilled water (23/50 ratio, put in the metal ring mould, and the initial setting time was measured by test rod. Data were statistically analyzed by linear regression (α = 0.05. result: The initial setting times were 149.60 ± 0.55 (control and 96.40 ± 0.89 (31° C seconds for normal set, and 122.00 ± 1.00 (control and 69.60 ± 0.55 (31° C seconds for fast set. The coefficient of determination of room temperature to initial setting time of alginate were R2 = 0.74 (normal set and R2 = 0.88 (fast set. The regression equation for normal set was Y = 257.6 – 5.5 X (p < 0.01 and fast set was Y = 237.7 – 5.6 X (p < 0.01. Conclusions: The room temperature gave high contribution and became a strength predictor for initial setting time of alginates. The share contribution to the setting time was 0.74% for normal set and 0.88% for fast set alginates.

  5. Experiments simulation and design to set traffic lights operation rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Garcia, J.A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper it is used the experimental design to minimize the travel time of motor vehicles, in one of the most important avenues of Celaya City in Guanajuato, Mexico, by means of optimal synchronization of existing traffic lights. In the optimization process three factors are considered: the traffic lights’ cycle times, the synchrony defined as stepped, parallel and actual, and speed limit, each one with 3 evaluation levels. The response variables to consider are: motor vehicles’ travel time, fuel consumption and greenhouse effect gas (CO2) emissions. The different experiments are performed using the simulation model developed in the PTV-VISSIM software, which represents the vehicle traffic system. The obtained results for the different proposed scenarios allow to find proper levels at which the vehicle traffic system must be operated in order to improve mobility, to reduce contamination rates and decrease the fuel consumption for the different motor vehicles that use the avenue. (Author)

  6. Transport and diffusion of material quantities on propagating interfaces via level set methods

    CERN Document Server

    Adalsteinsson, D

    2003-01-01

    We develop theory and numerical algorithms to apply level set methods to problems involving the transport and diffusion of material quantities in a level set framework. Level set methods are computational techniques for tracking moving interfaces; they work by embedding the propagating interface as the zero level set of a higher dimensional function, and then approximate the solution of the resulting initial value partial differential equation using upwind finite difference schemes. The traditional level set method works in the trace space of the evolving interface, and hence disregards any parameterization in the interface description. Consequently, material quantities on the interface which themselves are transported under the interface motion are not easily handled in this framework. We develop model equations and algorithmic techniques to extend the level set method to include these problems. We demonstrate the accuracy of our approach through a series of test examples and convergence studies.

  7. Transport and diffusion of material quantities on propagating interfaces via level set methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adalsteinsson, David; Sethian, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We develop theory and numerical algorithms to apply level set methods to problems involving the transport and diffusion of material quantities in a level set framework. Level set methods are computational techniques for tracking moving interfaces; they work by embedding the propagating interface as the zero level set of a higher dimensional function, and then approximate the solution of the resulting initial value partial differential equation using upwind finite difference schemes. The traditional level set method works in the trace space of the evolving interface, and hence disregards any parameterization in the interface description. Consequently, material quantities on the interface which themselves are transported under the interface motion are not easily handled in this framework. We develop model equations and algorithmic techniques to extend the level set method to include these problems. We demonstrate the accuracy of our approach through a series of test examples and convergence studies

  8. [Blood transfusion in emergency settings: French military health service experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailliol, A; Ausset, S; Peytel, E

    2010-12-01

    Blood transfusion is required in a number of emergency settings and the French military health service (FMHS) has issued specific guidelines for the treatment of war casualties. These guidelines take into account European standards and laws, NATO standards, and also public sentiment regarding transfusion. These guidelines reflect a determination to control the process and to avoid the improvisation frequently associated with wartime transfusion. The evolution in warfare (terrorism and bombing more frequent than gunshot) and the wide use of body armor have deeply changed the clinical presentation of war injuries. These now involve the extremities in 80% of cases, with extensive tissue damage and heavy blood loss. The FMHS recommends that war casualties with hemorrhagic shock be brought quickly to a medical treatment facility (MTF) after first-line treatment applied through buddy aid or by medics. In the MTF, before an early Medevac, a damage control surgery will be performed, with resuscitation using freeze-dried plasma, red blood cells and fresh whole blood. The French military blood bank is responsible for blood product supply, training and medical advice regarding transfusion therapy during wartime, as well as hemovigilance. All transfusion therapy practices are periodically assessed but research on whole blood pathogen reduction is being conducted in order to reduce the residual infectious risk associated with this product. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. New nuclear data set ABBN-90 and its testing on macroscopic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosh'cheev, V.N.; Manturov, G.N.; Nikolaev, M.N.; Rineyskiy, A.A.; Sinitsa, V.V.; Tsyboolya, A.M.; Zabrodskaya, S.V.

    1993-01-01

    The new group constant set ABBN-90 is developed now. It based on the FOND-2 evaluated neutron data library processed with the code GRUCON. Some results of the testing ABBN-90 set in different macroscopic experiments are presented. (author)

  10. R20 Programme: Grout setting and strength development in ONKALO. Literature review, observations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karttunen, P.; Raivio, P.

    2008-12-01

    ONKALO is an underground rock characterisation facility planned to be a part of nuclear waste repository in future. ONKALO is located in Olkiluoto Finland. Posiva Oy owned by Teollisuuden Voima Oy and Fortum Power and Heat Oy is responsible for the repository, research, construction and use of the ONKALO and closing of the underground facility after use. During construction of ONKALO it has been observed that the setting and strength of grouting materials have not sporadically developed as expected (in ONKALO). The phenomenon has been observed for the first time in the year 2005. The observations examined in this report are made in the grouting field tests and in ordinary grouting during the year 2007. The phenomenon has been observed with low pH and standard grouts and bolt grouting mortars. The reasons for this phenomenon are studied based on literature review, observations and tests in the field and laboratory. The effect of reactions between groundwater and grout, the effect of the raw materials as well as curing conditions, temperature and pressure are studied. There are several potential factors that can cause observed phenomenon. Some factors are more probable than others. Laboratory experiments for the samples of poor strength development were done. These samples were taken from the grouting holes or packers in which the strength of the grout was not developed as expected. The results of these experiments were compared to the results gained from the samples cast from the same grout batches and cured in the tunnel conditions. The purpose was to find out the factor causing slow strength development of the grouted mixes. One single reason, which can slow the setting of the grouts in ONKALO is the low temperature in the rock, but the temperature cannot cause the phenomenon alone. Locally groundwater contains compounds that can create chemically aggressive environment for (the Portland) cement based grouts. The groundwater chemistry in ONKALO has not been proved

  11. Characteristics of sets of diffusion photographic materials for rapid X-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, E.A.; Neduv, A.M.; Korolev, A.I.; Mirzoyan, I.N.; Chelnokov, V.B.

    1989-01-01

    Peculiarities of application in X-ray radiography of roentgenographic films, roentgenographic paper, xeroroentgenographic plates and sets of diffusion photographic materials are considered. It is shown that the use of diffusion photographic materials for X-ray radiography permits to reduce the process labour consumption and to considerably reduce the time for the obtaining of a dry positive image and also to reduce the consumption of silver, but the image will preserve high information content. Selts of diffusion photographic materials are developed, which contain bromoiodosilver negative material with silver spraying of 2-3 g/m 3 and transparent positive material on Dacron basis. Prospects of application of sets of diffusion photographic materials in the practice of rapid X-ray radiography to solve the problems of industrial X-ray defectoscopy are panted out

  12. Flight Experiments for Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed (LWS-SET): Relationship to Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Barth, Janet L.; Brewer, Dana A.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on flight validation experiments for technologies to determine solar effects. The experiments are intended to demonstrate tolerance to a solar variant environment. The technologies tested are microelectronics, photonics, materials, and sensors.

  13. Susceptibility of materials processing experiments to low-level accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The types of material processing experiments being considered for shuttle can be grouped into four categories: (1) contained solidification experiment; (2) quasicontainerless experiments; (3) containerless experiments; and (4) fluids experiments. Low level steady acceleration, compensated and uncompensated transient accelerations, and rotation induced flow factors that must be considered in the acceleration environment of a space vehicle whose importance depends on the type of experiment being performed. Some control of these factors may be exercised by the location and orientation of the experiment relative to shuttle and by the orbit vehicle attitude chosen for mission. The effects of the various residual accelerations can have serious consequence to the control of the experiment and must be factored into the design and operation of the apparatus.

  14. New Materials = New Expressive Powers: Smart Material Interfaces and Arts, experience via smart materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, A.; Pittarello, Fabio; Nijholt, Antinus

    2014-01-01

    It is not easy for a growing artist to find his poetry. Smart materials could be an answer for those who are looking for new forms of art. Smart Material Interfaces (SMI) define a new interaction paradigm based on dynamic modications of the innovative materials' properties. SMI can be applied in

  15. Using Goal-Setting Strategies To Enrich the Practicum and Internship Experiences of Beginning Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Russell C.

    2000-01-01

    Goal setting can be an effective way to help beginning counselors focus on important developmental issues. This article argues that counselors and supervisors must consider issues related to goal-setting theory and understand the process by which goals are set so that optimal learning experiences are created. (Author/MKA)

  16. Material control study: a directed graph and fault tree procedure for adversary event set generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, H.E.; Lim, J.J.; Gilman, F.M.

    1978-01-01

    In work for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is developing an assessment procedure to evaluate the effectiveness of a potential nuclear facility licensee's material control (MC) system. The purpose of an MC system is to prevent the theft of special nuclear material such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The key in the assessment procedure is the generation and analysis of the adversary event sets by a directed graph and fault-tree methodology

  17. Experiments on thermal conductivity in buffer materials for geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, T.; Yano, T.; Wakamatsu, H.; Matsushima, E.

    1989-01-01

    Engineered barriers for geologic disposal for HLW are planned to consist of canister, overpack and buffer elements. One of important physical characteristics of buffer materials is determining temperature profiles within the near field in a repository. Buffer materials require high thermal conductivity to disperse radiogenic heat away to the host rock. As the buffer materials, compacted blocks of the mixture of sodium bentonite and sand have been the most promising candidate in some countries, e.g. Sweden, Switzerland and Japan. The authors have been carrying out a series of thermal dispersion experiments to evaluate thermal conductivity of bentonite/quartz sand blocks. In this study, the following two factors considered to affect thermal properties of the near field were examined: effective thermal conductivities of buffer materials, and heat transfer characteristics of the gap between overpack and buffer materials

  18. Level Set-Based Topology Optimization for the Design of an Electromagnetic Cloak With Ferrite Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otomori, Masaki; Yamada, Takayuki; Andkjær, Jacob Anders

    2013-01-01

    . A level set-based topology optimization method incorporating a fictitious interface energy is used to find optimized configurations of the ferrite material. The numerical results demonstrate that the optimization successfully found an appropriate ferrite configuration that functions as an electromagnetic......This paper presents a structural optimization method for the design of an electromagnetic cloak made of ferrite material. Ferrite materials exhibit a frequency-dependent degree of permeability, due to a magnetic resonance phenomenon that can be altered by changing the magnitude of an externally...

  19. Physical protection concepts of nuclear materials. The French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, G.; Artaud, R.

    1995-01-01

    As the nuclear energy was being developed, it appeared necessary to set up protections against its potential hazards, that should be more complete and elaborate than those implemented on the other industrial installations. This had to be done both in the safety field to prevent the environment and the populations from the consequences of severe casualties, and in the security field to avoid the risk of proliferation and limit to an acceptable level the results of voluntarily provoked accidents and sabotages. Taking advantage of the gathered experience, this document gives consideration to the concepts used in France in order to ensure the physical protection of the nuclear materials. The following topics are tackled: context inside which are envisaged the specific measures, coherence with the general dispositions taken to protect industrial installations, importance and limitations of the part played by the regulations, respective responsibilities of the plant operators and the public authorities, compromise between objectives in view and means to implement, adjustment between the physical protection system and the operating requirements. In addition, the ways in which these systems should be implemented are discussed, underlining the necessity to make progressive steps under a permanent will, in order, first, to update and bring under conformity the old installations, and second, to ensure the maintenance of the systems, taking account of the evolutions of needs and techniques. Those points are commented on examples taken among the different types of installations to be found in France, showing the differences in approach coming from the type and the age of the facilities, and giving the present trends for the new plants. (authors). 1 annexe

  20. Preservice Teachers' Experiences on Accessing Course Materials Using Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Zafer; Unal, Aslihan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates and reports the first time experiences of mobile device users accessing the course materials on both the web and mobile version of course management system (Web Moodle & Mobile Moodle) during an online course offered at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg College of Education.

  1. Y2K experiences in the nuclear material control area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, T.; Suzuki, T.

    1999-01-01

    Though the Y2K problem was treated by each organization, it became systematic in Japan when Advanced Information and Telecommunication Society Promotion Head-quarters was established recognizing the importance and urgency of the issue. The summary of the action and some experiences concerning Y2K issues in the nuclear materials control area are presented

  2. Spherical wave particle velocities in geologic materials from laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizek, J.C.; Florence, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    Particle velocity records that describe spherical waves in rock simulants, tuffs, salt, and granite have been obtained in laboratory experiments. The records aid the modeling of constitutive equations for continuum mechanics codes used in DNA containment research. The technique has also been applied to investigate containment-related problems involving material poperties, failure criteria, scaling, decoupling, and residual strain field relaxation. 22 figures

  3. Compositions and use of cementitious materials: experience from Onkalo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Johanna Hansen of Posiva in Finland summarised experiences of working with cementitious materials in the Finnish disposal programme. Posiva is responsible for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel from the Finnish nuclear power plants at Loviisa and Olkiluoto. Posiva plans to submit a construction license application in 2012 and, if approved, repository construction will begin in 2014-2015. The geologic disposal facility will be a KBS-3 type repository at a depth of 400 to 500 m in crystalline bedrock. Construction of the repository will require using a large quantity of cementitious materials. A 2007 estimate indicated that approximately 20 million kilograms of cementitious material will be introduced into the repository, although much of this material will be removed, with only approximately 6 million kilograms remaining in the repository after closure, mostly in the form of tunnel plugs. To minimise the potential negative effects of cementitious materials, low-pH cement and colloidal silica both were studied as alternative materials. Based on experience gained in constructing the ONKALO underground characterisation facility, Posiva decided that from the spring 2008 onwards, mainly low-pH cement will be used as grouting material because the grout cannot be removed for repository closure. The low-pH grout is composed of Portland cement, silica fume, and super-plasticizer. Various recipes were tested in the laboratory, and field mixing and grouting tests were conducted at ONKALO. The effects of organics on radionuclide retention and the leaching of organics from the cement also were evaluated. The studies indicated no impediments to the use of low-pH grout at ONKALO and showed that low-pH cementitious grout has better penetration ability and stiffness than regular grout. It was also concluded that the amount of cementitious materials in the repository can be reduced with careful design; for this, cooperation is needed between repository designers and long

  4. The influence of storage duration on the setting time of type 1 alginate impression material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmadina, A.; Triaminingsih, S.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    Alginate is one of the most commonly used dental impression materials; however, its setting time is subject to change depending on storage conditions and duration. This creates problems because consumer carelessness can affect alginate shelf life and quality. In the present study, the setting times of two groups of type I alginate with different expiry dates was tested. The first group consisted of 11 alginate specimens that had not yet passed the expiry date, and the second group consisted of alginates that had passed the expiry date. The alginate powder was mixed with distilled water, poured into a metal ring, and tested with a polished rod of poly-methyl methacrylate. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference (p<0.05) between the setting times of the alginate that had not passed the expiry date (157 ± 3 seconds) and alginate that had passed the expiry date (144 ± 2 seconds). These findings indicate that storage duration can affect alginate setting time.

  5. SeriousGeoGames - Geoscience Virtual Reality Experiences for Festival Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Festivals, fairs and showcases provide scientists an opportunity to engage with potentially thousands of members of the public in a short space of time. However, the festival setting provides the same members of the public many exhibits competing for their attention - for family groups, this means a successful exhibit must both attract the attention of the group, and also entertain them long enough for the scientist to communicate their message. Here, we will discuss the use of short Virtual Reality (VR) experiences by the SeriousGeoGames project in engaging the public with research in a festival-like setting. SeriousGeoGames uses bespoke, immersive VR experiences to both attract and engage the user. They merge scientific models and/or research field data with popular gaming engines, and present them in VR using the Oculus Rift headset. The experiences are designed to last around four minutes and follow a basic script, although a conversational tone is encouraged. SeriousGeoGames applications have been successfully exhibited at several festivals of different sizes and intended audiences, such as the national-level week-long Cheltenham Science Festival, and the local arts and cultural festival, Hull Freedom Festival. The Flash Flood! application was developed for the Natural Environment Research Council UK (NERC) Flooding from Intense Rainfall (FFIR) programme as a Knowledge Transfer (KT) tool. It was demonstrated at the 5-day NERC Into the blue Science Showcase as one of 38 stands highlighting the UK's cutting edge environmental science research. Over 5000 members of the public attended, and more than 1000 demonstrations of Flash Flood! were made, with 400 booklets handed out. The exhibit received positive feedback from users, and won third prize in a public vote for favourite stand - but this had little visible impact on online metrics of the SeriousGeoGames web presence. In terms of providing a 'positive experience' with science the application was successfully

  6. Ceramic bar impact experiments for improved material model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brar, N.S.; Proud, W.G.; Rajendran, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic bar-on-bar (uniaxial stress) experiments are performed to extend uniaxial strain deformation states imposed in flyer plate impact experiments. A number of investigators engaged in modeling the bar-on-bar experiments have varying degrees of success in capturing the observed fracture modes in bars and correctly simulating the measured in-situ axial stress or free surface velocity histories. The difficulties encountered are related to uncertainties in understanding the dominant failure mechanisms as a function of different stress states imposed in bar impacts. Free surface velocity of the far end of the target AD998 bar were measured using a VISAR in a series of bar-on-bar impact experiments at nominal impact speeds of 100 m/s, 220 m/s, and 300 m/s. Velocity history data at an impact of 100 m/s show the material response as elastic. At higher impact velocities of 200 m/s and 300 m/s the velocity history data suggest an inelastic material response. A high-speed (Imacon) camera was employed to examine the fracture and failure of impactor and target bars. High speed photographs provide comprehensive data on geometry of damage and failure patterns as a function of time to check the validity of a particular constitutive material model for AD998 alumina used in numerical simulations of fracture and failure of the bars on impact

  7. Applications of simulation experiments in LMFBR core materials technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    The development of charged particle bombardment experiments to simulate neutron irradiation induced swelling in austenitic alloys is briefly described. The applications of these techniques in LMFBR core materials technology are discussed. It is shown that use of the techniques to study the behavior of cold-worked Type-316 was instrumental in demonstrating at an early date the need for advanced materials. The simulation techniques then were used to identify alloying elements which can markedly decrease swelling and thus a focused reactor irradiation program is now in place to allow the future use of a lower swelling alloy for LMFBR core components

  8. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which children spent a majority of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings combined with relatively low amounts of teacher-directed activity, and a Structured-Balanced pattern in which children spent relatively equal proportions of their day engaged in child-directed free-choice activity settings and teacher-directed small- and whole-group activities. Daily routine profiles were associated with program type and curriculum use but not with measures of process quality. Children in Structured-Balanced classrooms had more opportunities to engage in language and literacy and math activities, whereas children in High Free-Choice classrooms had more opportunities for gross motor and fantasy play. Being in a Structured-Balanced classroom was associated with children's language scores but profiles were not associated with measures of children's math reasoning or socio-emotional behavior. Consideration of teachers' structuring of daily routines represents a valuable way to understand nuances in the provision of learning experiences for young children in the context of current views about developmentally appropriate practice and school readiness.

  9. Entombment Using Cementitious Materials: Design Considerations and International Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Roger Ray

    2002-08-01

    Cementitious materials have physical and chemical properties that are well suited for the requirements of radioactive waste management. Namely, the materials have low permeability and durability that is consistent with the time frame required for short-lived radionuclides to decay. Furthermore, cementitious materials can provide a long-term chemical environment that substantially reduces the mobility of some long-lived radionuclides of concern for decommissioning (e.g., C-14, Ni-63, Ni-59). Because of these properties, cementitious materials are common in low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities throughout the world and are an attractive option for entombment of nuclear facilities. This paper describes design considerations for cementitious barriers in the context of performance over time frames of a few hundreds of years (directed toward short-lived radionuclides) and time frames of thousands of years (directed towards longer-lived radionuclides). The emphasis is on providing an overview of concepts for entombment that take advantage of the properties of cementitious materials and experience from the design of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A few examples of the previous use of cementitious materials for entombment of decommissioned nuclear facilities and proposals for the use in future decommissioning of nuclear reactors in a few countries are also included to provide global perspective.

  10. Entombment Using Cementitious Materials: Design Considerations and International Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R.R.

    2002-05-15

    Cementitious materials have physical and chemical properties that are well suited for the requirements of radioactive waste management. Namely, the materials have low permeability and durability that is consistent with the time frame required for short-lived radionuclides to decay. Furthermore, cementitious materials can provide a long-term chemical environment that substantially reduces the mobility of some long-lived radionuclides of concern for decommissioning (e.g., C-14, Ni-63, Ni-59). Because of these properties, cementitious materials are common in low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities throughout the world and are an attractive option for entombment of nuclear facilities. This paper describes design considerations for cementitious barriers in the context of performance over time frames of a few hundreds of years (directed toward short-lived radionuclides) and time frames of thousands of years (directed towards longer-lived radionuclides). The emphasis is on providing a n overview of concepts for entombment that take advantage of the properties of cementitious materials and experience from the design of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A few examples of the previous use of cementitious materials for entombment of decommissioned nuclear facilities and proposals for the use in future decommissioning of nuclear reactors in a few countries are also included to provide global perspective.

  11. Entombment Using Cementitious Materials: Design Considerations and International Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    Cementitious materials have physical and chemical properties that are well suited for the requirements of radioactive waste management. Namely, the materials have low permeability and durability that is consistent with the time frame required for short-lived radionuclides to decay. Furthermore, cementitious materials can provide a long-term chemical environment that substantially reduces the mobility of some long-lived radionuclides of concern for decommissioning (e.g., C-14, Ni-63, Ni-59). Because of these properties, cementitious materials are common in low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities throughout the world and are an attractive option for entombment of nuclear facilities. This paper describes design considerations for cementitious barriers in the context of performance over time frames of a few hundreds of years (directed toward short-lived radionuclides) and time frames of thousands of years (directed towards longer-lived radionuclides). The emphasis is on providing a n overview of concepts for entombment that take advantage of the properties of cementitious materials and experience from the design of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A few examples of the previous use of cementitious materials for entombment of decommissioned nuclear facilities and proposals for the use in future decommissioning of nuclear reactors in a few countries are also included to provide global perspective

  12. Priority setting for risk assessment-The benefit of human experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonzo, Cristina; Laborde, Amalia

    2005-01-01

    The chemical risk assessment process plays an essential role in the potential human health risk evaluation. Setting priorities for this purpose is critical for better use of the available human and material resources. It has been generally accepted that all new chemicals require safety evaluation before manufacture and sale. This is a difficult task due to the large number of chemicals directly consumed by man, as well as those that are widely used. At present, more than 50% of chemicals do not have the minimum data requirements for risk assessment. Production and release volumes are well-established prioritization criteria, although volume itself does not directly reflect the likelihood of human exposure. This quantitative approach applied in setting priorities may be influenced by human experience. Human data provided by epidemiological investigations have been accepted as the most credible evidence for human toxicity although analytical studies are expensive and require long-term follow up. Unfortunately, some epidemiological studies continue to have difficulties with exposure documentation, controlling bias and confounding, and are not able to provide predictions of risk until humans are exposed. Clinical toxicology services and Poison Centres around the world accumulate a great amount of toxicological-related information that may contribute to the evidence-based medicine and research and so collaborate with all the risk assessment disciplines. The information obtained from these services and centers has the potential to prioritize existing chemical assessment processes or to influence scheduling of classes of chemicals. Prioritization process may be improved by evaluating Poisons Centres statistics about frequency of cases, severity of effects, detection of unusual circumstances of exposure, as well as vulnerable sub-populations. International efforts for the harmonization of these data offer a useful tool to take advantage of this global information. Case

  13. Suitability of various materials for porous filters in diffusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldaba, David; Vidal, Miquel; Rigol, Anna [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Analitica; Glaus, Martin; Van Loon, Luc [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland). Lab. for Waste Management; Leupin, Olivier [Nagra, Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2014-10-01

    The suitability of different porous materials (stainless steel, VYCOR {sup registered} glass, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and PEEK) for use as confining filters in diffusion experiments was evaluated by measuring the effective diffusion coefficients (D{sub e}) of neutral (HTO) and ionic solutes (Na{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+}, Cl{sup -}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) in the materials in through-diffusion experiments. For stainless steel filters, the D{sub e} values of the target solutes correlated satisfactorily with their bulk diffusion coefficient in water (D{sub w}); thus, the diffusion process in the stainless steel filters was primarily controlled by the diffusivity of the solvated ions. For the remaining materials, the D{sub e} and D{sub w} values were also correlated for the target solutes, and the geometric factors were in the sequence: VYCOR {sup registered} glass < Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} < PEEK. Stainless steel and VYCOR {sup registered} glass were the most appropriate materials because of their high D{sub e} values, but a specific interaction of caesium with VYCOR {sup registered} glass was hypothesised because the D{sub e} values obtained for this solute were slightly higher than expected.

  14. Material Control and Accountability Experience at the Fuel Conditioning Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D.; Fredrickson, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    placed on a balance, others methods (e.g., level measurements, volume calibration equations, calculated density via additive volumes) are utilized to measure the inventory mass. This paper will discuss the material control and accountability experience at the FCF after ten-plus years of processing spent nuclear fuel. A particular area of discussion is the calculated electrolyte density via additive volumes and its importance in determining the mass and composition in the FCF electro-refiners for material control and accountability of special nuclear material. (authors)

  15. Penerapan Pendekatan Reciprocal Teaching dalam Setting Pembelajaran Kooperatif Materi Sistem Persamaan Linear Tiga Variabel

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi, Wahyu Tiara

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to determine the effectiveness of mathematics learning with reciprocal teaching approach in the setting of cooperative learning. The subject matter is system of linear equations of three variables grade X IPS-1 MAN 2 Pontianak. Three aspects of learning effectiveness used are the teacher's ability to manage learning, the student activity learning, and the student learning outcomes. The research method used is descriptive method. The form of research used is pre-experiment w...

  16. Experience-based design for integrating the patient care experience into healthcare improvement: Identifying a set of reliable emotion words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Lauren R; Phillips, Jennifer; Brzozowicz, Keely; Chafetz, Lynne A; Plsek, Paul E; Blackmore, C Craig; Kaplan, Gary S

    2013-12-01

    Experience-based design is an emerging method used to capture the emotional content of patient and family member healthcare experiences, and can serve as the foundation for patient-centered healthcare improvement. However, a core tool-the experience-based design questionnaire-requires words with consistent emotional meaning. Our objective was to identify and evaluate an emotion word set reliably categorized across the demographic spectrum as expressing positive, negative, or neutral emotions for experience-based design improvement work. We surveyed 407 patients, family members, and healthcare workers in 2011. Participants designated each of 67 potential emotion words as positive, neutral, or negative based on their emotional perception of the word. Overall agreement was assessed using the kappa statistic. Words were selected for retention in the final emotion word set based on 80% simple agreement on classification of meaning across subgroups. The participants were 47.9% (195/407) patients, 19.4% (33/407) family members and 32.7% (133/407) healthcare staff. Overall agreement adjusted for chance was moderate (k=0.55). However, agreement for positive (k=0.69) and negative emotions (k=0.68) was substantially higher, while agreement in the neutral category was low (k=0.11). There were 20 positive, 1 neutral, and 14 negative words retained for the final experience-based design emotion word set. We identified a reliable set of emotion words for experience questionnaires to serve as the foundation for patient-centered, experience-based redesign of healthcare. Incorporation of patient and family member perspectives in healthcare requires reliable tools to capture the emotional content of care touch points. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Halden fuel and material experiments beyond operational and safety limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Boris; Wiesenack, Wolfgang; McGrath, M.; Tverberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main tasks of any research reactor is to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuel and materials prior to their introduction into the market. For commercial NPPs, it is important both to test nuclear fuels at a fuel burn-up exceeding current limits and to investigate reactor materials for higher irradiation dose. For fuel vendors such tests enable verification of fuel reliability or for the safety limits to be found under different operational conditions and accident situations. For the latter, in-pile experiments have to be performed beyond some normal limits. The program of fuel tests performed in the Halden reactor is aimed mainly at determining: The thermal FGR threshold, which may limit fuel operational power with burn-up increase, the “lift-off effect” when rod internal pressure exceeds coolant pressure, the effects of high burn-up on fuel behavior under power ramps, fuel relocation under LOCA simulation at higher burn-up, the effect of dry-out on high burn-up fuel rod integrity. This paper reviews some of the experiments performed in the Halden reactor for understanding some of the limits for standard fuel utilization with the aim of contributing to the development of innovative fuels and cladding materials that could be used beyond these limits. (author)

  18. Experiences of violence, burnout and job satisfaction in Korean nurses in the emergency medical centre setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hee Sook; Sok, Sohyune R

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the experience of violence in relation to burnout and job satisfaction in Korean nurses in the emergency medical centre setting. Participants were 236 nurses in the emergency medical centre setting of three metropolitan areas in Korea. Measures included a general characteristics form, characteristics related to experiences of violence, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. Data were collected from June 2013 to February 2014. In the prediction model, 33.4% of burnout was explained and 35.7% for job satisfaction. The greatest influence on burnout was handling violence, followed by verbal abuse. The greatest influence on job satisfaction was physical threat, followed by handling violence. The study shows that burnout and job satisfaction of Korean nurses in the emergency medical centre setting are related to experiences of violence such as verbal abuse, physical threat and physical violence, as well as handling violence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Pulsed power experiments in hydrodynamics and material properties

    CERN Document Server

    Reinovsky, R E

    1999-01-01

    A new application for high performance pulsed power program, the production of high energy density environments in materials for the study of material properties and hydrodynamics in complex geometries, has joined family of radiation source applications in the Stockpile Stewardship. The principle tool for producing high energy density environments is the high precision, magnetically imploded, near-solid density liner. The most attractive pulsed power system for driving such experiments is an ultra-high current, low impedance, microsecond time scale source that is economical both to build and operate. The 25-MJ Atlas capacitor bank system currently under construction at Los Alamos is the first system of its scale specifically designed to drive high precision solid liners. Delivering 30 MA, Atlas will provide liner velocities 12-15 km/sec and kinetic energies of 1-2 MJ /cm with extensive diagnostics and excellent reproducibility. Explosive flux compressor technology provides access to currents exceeding 100 MA ...

  20. Transcultural healthcare immersion: a unique interprofessional experience poised to influence collaborative practice in cultural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a model for interprofessional and transcultural learning established by the author and supported by the University of New England and Ghana Health Mission, Inc. The model for interprofessional immersion in cultural settings represents a guiding framework predicated on a conceptual "brick and mortar" process for building cultural proficiency among individuals and within teams. It encompasses social, clinical and behavioral components (brick) and personal desire, cultural humility and values (mortar). The ``bounty'' aspect of the model is achieved by way of successful student learning outcomes, positive interprofessional and community-based collaborations, and finally, and to be measured over time, favorable patient and population (programmatic) outcomes. In partnership with the Ghana Health Mission, Inc and local community health workers, students and faculty from a range of health professions took part in a cultural-clinical experience known as Transcultural Immersion in Healthcare. The goal of the experience was to advance cultural proficiency and knowledge through intensive cultural immersion. An urban setting in Ghana, located in West Africa served as the setting for this unique experience. The transcultural immersion in healthcare experience achieved its ``bounty'' as seen in the enhanced cultural proficiency of students and faculty, seamless interprofessional communication and collaboration, and provision of primary care and related services to patients and the Ghanaian community. Future research is in development to test the Model for Interprofessional Immersion in Cultural Settings (MIICS) in a variety of other settings and with a cross section of health disciplines.

  1. United States experience in the transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, A.M.; Rhoads, R.E.; Hall, R.J.; Williams, L.D.; Brobst, W.A.; Shappert, L.B.; Jefferson, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    The transport of radioactive material forms a vital link in the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States. Actual U.S. experience and practice with such systems for the packaging and transport of uranium ore concentrates, uranium hexafluoride, fresh fuel, irradiated fuel, non-high-level waste, and plutonium with low heat generation rates are described. Specific shipping systems in current use for these services are illustrated. A comparison will be made of shipping requirements for nuclear parks versus dispersed facilities. Shipping systems for other fuel cycle materials (e.g., high-level waste and cladding hulls) have not been developed because there has been no need to transport these materials commercially. However, conceptual designs for packaging and transport of such materials have been developed. Selected systems are reviewed and summarized. Transport safety in the U.S. is regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Key regulations defining packaging requirements, allowable radiation dose rates, and handling procedures are reviewed. Although the radioactive material shipping industry has an outstanding safety record, opposition to nuclear fuel cycle shipments has surfaced in several areas. The U.S. congressional ban on the shipment of plutonium by air, the actions of New York City to prohibit certain shipments within the city limits, and the requirement of U.S. railroads to ship spent fuel casks only in dedicated trains are reviewed. In an attempt to provide information on the safety margins inherent in the design of radioactive materials packages, ERDA has undertaken a series of accident studies and full scale crash tests that stress the packages beyond the levels expected in severe accidents. In addition, the level of total risk associated with radioactive materials shipments is being evaluated. Current ERDA crash test and transportation risk assessment studies are reviewed. Concern about the possibility of

  2. Servicing HEP experiments with a complete set of ready integreated and configured common software components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roiser, Stefan; Gaspar, Ana; Perrin, Yves; Kruzelecki, Karol

    2010-01-01

    The LCG Applications Area at CERN provides basic software components for the LHC experiments such as ROOT, POOL, COOL which are developed in house and also a set of 'external' software packages (70) which are needed in addition such as Python, Boost, Qt, CLHEP, etc. These packages target many different areas of HEP computing such as data persistency, math, simulation, grid computing, databases, graphics, etc. Other packages provide tools for documentation, debugging, scripting languages and compilers. All these packages are provided in a consistent manner on different compilers, architectures and operating systems. The Software Process and Infrastructure project (SPI) [1] is responsible for the continous testing, coordination, release and deployment of these software packages. The main driving force for the actions carried out by SPI are the needs of the LHC experiments, but also other HEP experiments could profit from the set of consistent libraries provided and receive a stable and well tested foundation to build their experiment software frameworks. This presentation will first provide a brief description of the tools and services provided for the coordination, testing, release, deployment and presentation of LCG/AA software packages and then focus on a second set of tools provided for outside LHC experiments to deploy a stable set of HEP related software packages both as binary distribution or from source.

  3. Servicing HEP experiments with a complete set of ready integreated and configured common software components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roiser, Stefan; Gaspar, Ana; Perrin, Yves [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, PH Department, SFT Group (Switzerland); Kruzelecki, Karol, E-mail: stefan.roiser@cern.c, E-mail: ana.gaspar@cern.c, E-mail: yves.perrin@cern.c, E-mail: karol.kruzelecki@cern.c [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, PH Department, LBC Group (Switzerland)

    2010-04-01

    The LCG Applications Area at CERN provides basic software components for the LHC experiments such as ROOT, POOL, COOL which are developed in house and also a set of 'external' software packages (70) which are needed in addition such as Python, Boost, Qt, CLHEP, etc. These packages target many different areas of HEP computing such as data persistency, math, simulation, grid computing, databases, graphics, etc. Other packages provide tools for documentation, debugging, scripting languages and compilers. All these packages are provided in a consistent manner on different compilers, architectures and operating systems. The Software Process and Infrastructure project (SPI) [1] is responsible for the continous testing, coordination, release and deployment of these software packages. The main driving force for the actions carried out by SPI are the needs of the LHC experiments, but also other HEP experiments could profit from the set of consistent libraries provided and receive a stable and well tested foundation to build their experiment software frameworks. This presentation will first provide a brief description of the tools and services provided for the coordination, testing, release, deployment and presentation of LCG/AA software packages and then focus on a second set of tools provided for outside LHC experiments to deploy a stable set of HEP related software packages both as binary distribution or from source.

  4. The Setting Time of Polyether Impression Materials after Contact with Conventional and Experimental Gingival Margin Displacement Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowska, Danuta; Raszewski, Zbigniew; Ziętek, Marek; Saczko, Jolanta; Kulbacka, Julita; Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz

    2018-02-01

    The compatibility of chemical gingival margin displacement agents with polyether impression materials has not been determined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the setting time of polyether impression elastomers after contact with conventional and experimental gingival displacement agents. The study compared the setting time of two polyether impression materials: medium body (Impregum Penta Soft) and light body (Impregum Garant L DuoSoft) after contact with 10 gingival displacement agents, including 5 conventional astringents (10%, 20%, and 25% aluminum chloride, 25% aluminum sulfate, and 15.5% ferric sulfate) and 5 experimental adrenergics (0.1% and 0.01% HCl-epinephrine, 0.05% HCl-tetrahydrozoline, 0.05% HCl-oxymetazoline, and 10% HCl-phenylephrine). As many as 120 specimens (60 light body and 60 medium body) were mixed with 20 μl of each of 10 gingival displacement agents, and the time to achieve maximum viscosity was measured with a viscometer. The setting times of these specimens were compared with the control group of 12 specimens, which were polymerized without contact with the displacement agents. The experiments were performed in two environments: 23°C and 37°C (± 0.1°C). Individual and average polymerization time compatibility indices (PTCI) were calculated. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). The evaluated chemical displacement agents from both groups changed the setting time of light- and medium-body PE. The negative individual PTCI values achieved astringent (20% aluminum chloride) with two PE in both temperature environments. The average PTCI values of the experimental displacement agents at laboratory and intraoral temperatures were significantly higher than the conventional agents. The present findings suggest that experimental retraction agents can be recommended clinically as gingival margin displacement agents with minimal effects on the setting time of medium- and light-body polyether impression materials; however, direct

  5. Accuracy of a reformulated fast-set vinyl polysiloxane impression material using dual-arch trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Alex H; Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Wataha, John C

    2009-05-01

    A common technique used for making crown impressions involves use of a vinyl polysiloxane impression material in combination with a dual-arch tray. A leading dental manufacturer has reformulated its vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression line, but the accuracy of the new material has not been verified. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of reformulated VPS impression materials using the single-step dual-arch impression technique. Dual-arch impressions were made on a typodont containing a master stainless steel standard crown preparation die, from which gypsum working dies were formed, recovered, and measured. The impression materials evaluated were Imprint 3 Penta Putty with Quick Step Regular Body (IP-0); Imprint 3 Penta Quick Step Heavy Body with Quick Step Light Body (IP-1); Aquasil Ultra Rigid Fast Set with LV Fast Set (AQ-1); and Aquasil Ultra Heavy Fast Set with XLV Fast Set (AQ-2) (n=10). All impressions were disinfected with CaviCide spray for 10 minutes prior to pouring with type IV gypsum. Buccolingual (BL), mesiodistal (MD), and occlusogingival (OG) dimensions were measured and compared to the master die using an optical measuring microscope. Linear dimensional change was also assessed for IP-0 and AQ-1 at 1 and 24 hours based on ANSI/ADA Specification No. 19. Single-factor ANOVA with Dunnett's T3 multiple comparisons was used to compare BL, MD, and OG changes, with hypothesis testing at alpha=.05. A repeated-measures ANOVA was used to compare linear dimensional changes. There were statistical differences among the 4 impression systems for 3 of 4 dimensions of the master die. IP-0 working dies were significantly larger in MD and OG-L dimensions but significantly smaller in the BL dimension. IP-1 working dies were significantly smaller in the BL dimension compared to the master die. With the exception of IP-0, differences detected were small and clinically insignificant. No significant differences were observed for linear dimensional change

  6. Social construction and materiality: the limits of indeterminacy in therapeutic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannamann, J W

    1998-01-01

    By drawing parallels between the courtroom testimony of a Christian Science practitioner and an intersession conversation between systemic family therapists, I critique the abstract idealism of language-centered social constructionism. I argue that social constructionist inquiry that highlights the indeterminacy of meaning without a corresponding emphasis on the responsive embodied practices of family members glosses over the material conditions shaping the politics of interaction. The implications of this problem are discussed as they relate to the setting of family therapy, where social construction theory is often used to guide practical interventions.

  7. Randomized controlled clinical trial on the three-dimensional accuracy of fast-set impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Heike; Quaas, Sebastian; Haim, Manuela; Preißler, Jörg; Walter, Michael H; Koch, Rainer; Luthardt, Ralph G

    2013-06-01

    The use of fast-setting impression materials with different viscosities for the one-stage impression technique demands precise working times when mixing. We examined the effect of varying working time on impression precision in a randomized clinical trial. Focusing on tooth 46, three impressions were made from each of 96 volunteers, using either a polyether (PE: Impregum Penta H/L DuoSoft Quick, 3 M ESPE) or an addition-curing silicone (AS: Aquasil Ultra LV, Dentsply/DeTrey), one with the manufacturer's recommended working time (used as a reference) and two with altered working times. All stages of the impression-taking were subject to randomization. The three-dimensional precision of the non-standard working time impressions was digitally analyzed compared to the reference impression. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate models. The mean difference in the position of the lower right first molar (vs. the reference impression) ranged from ±12 μm for PE to +19 and -14 μm for AS. Significantly higher mean values (+62 to -40 μm) were found for AS compared to PE (+21 to -26 μm) in the area of the distal adjacent tooth. Fast-set impression materials offer high precision when used for single tooth restorations as part of a one-stage impression technique, even when the working time (mixing plus application of the light- and heavy-body components) diverges significantly from the manufacturer's recommended protocol. Best accuracy was achieved with machine-mixed heavy-body/light-body polyether. Both materials examined met the clinical requirements regarding precision when the teeth were completely syringed with light material.

  8. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  9. Design of a materials testing experiment for the INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, M.A.; Opperman, E.K.

    1981-01-01

    The United States, Japan, USSR and the European community are jointly participating in the design of an International Tokamak Reactor called INTOR. In support of the US contribution to the INTOR design, the features of an experiment for bulk neutron irradiation damage studies were developed. It is anticipated that materials testing will be an important part of the programmatic mission of INTOR and consequently the requirements for materials testing in INTOR must be identified early in the reactor design to insure compatibility. The design features of the experiment, called a Channel Test, are given in this paper. The major components of the channel test are the water cooled heat sink (channel module) and the specimen capsule. The temperature within each of the 153 specimen capsules is predetermined by engineering the thermal barrier between the specimen capsule and heat sink. Individual capsules can be independently accessed and are designed to operate at a predetermined temperature within the range of 50 to 700 0 C. The total irradiation volume within a single channel test is 45 liters. Features of the channel test that result in experimental versatility and simplified remote access and handling are discussed

  10. Cometary Materials Originating from Interstellar Ices: Clues from Laboratory Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresneau, A.; Mrad, N. Abou; LS d’Hendecourt, L.; Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T.; Danger, G. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM UMR-CNRS 7345, F-13397 Marseille (France); Flandinet, L.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Vuitton, V.; Thissen, R., E-mail: gregoire.danger@univ-amu.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IPAG, Grenoble F-38000 (France)

    2017-03-10

    We use laboratory experiments to derive information on the chemistry occurring during the evolution of astrophysical ices from dense molecular clouds to interplanetary objects. Through a new strategy that consists of coupling very high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), we investigate the molecular content of the organic residues synthesized from different initial ice compositions. We also obtain information on the evolution of the soluble part of the residues after their over-irradiation. The results give insight into the role of water ice as a trapping and diluting agent during the chemical evolution. They also give information about the importance of the amount of ammonia in such ices, particularly regarding its competition with the carbon chemistry. All of these results allow us to build a first mapping of the evolution of soluble organic matter based on its chemical and physical history. Furthermore, our results suggest that interstellar ices should lead to organic materials enriched in heteroatoms that present similarities with cometary materials but strongly differ from meteoritic organic material, especially in their C/N ratios.

  11. Cometary Materials Originating from Interstellar Ices: Clues from Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresneau, A.; Abou Mrad, N.; d'Hendecourt, L. LS; Duvernay, F.; Flandinet, L.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Vuitton, V.; Thissen, R.; Chiavassa, T.; Danger, G.

    2017-03-01

    We use laboratory experiments to derive information on the chemistry occurring during the evolution of astrophysical ices from dense molecular clouds to interplanetary objects. Through a new strategy that consists of coupling very high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), we investigate the molecular content of the organic residues synthesized from different initial ice compositions. We also obtain information on the evolution of the soluble part of the residues after their over-irradiation. The results give insight into the role of water ice as a trapping and diluting agent during the chemical evolution. They also give information about the importance of the amount of ammonia in such ices, particularly regarding its competition with the carbon chemistry. All of these results allow us to build a first mapping of the evolution of soluble organic matter based on its chemical and physical history. Furthermore, our results suggest that interstellar ices should lead to organic materials enriched in heteroatoms that present similarities with cometary materials but strongly differ from meteoritic organic material, especially in their C/N ratios.

  12. Exploring Rural High School Learners' Experience of Mathematics Anxiety in Academic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlalele, Dipane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore rural high school learners' experience of mathematics anxiety in academic settings. Mathematics anxiety has been found to have an adverse effect on confidence, motivation and achievement. This quantitative study is exploratory and descriptive in nature. The participants were 403 learners doing mathematics in…

  13. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L. M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov; Egle, B. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Zenobia, S. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA–500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 10{sup 14} ions/(cm{sup 2} s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  14. Material screening with HPGe counting station for PandaX experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Chen, X.; Fu, C.; Ji, X.; Liu, X.; Xie, P.; Zhang, T.; Mao, Y.; Wang, S.; Wang, H.

    2016-01-01

    A gamma counting station based on high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector was set up for the material screening of the PandaX dark matter experiments in the China Jinping Underground Laboratory. Low background gamma rate of 2.6 counts/min within the energy range of 20 to 2700 keV is achieved due to the well-designed passive shield. The sentivities of the HPGe detetector reach mBq/kg level for isotopes like K, U, Th, and even better for Co and Cs, resulted from the low-background rate and the high relative detection efficiency of 175%. The structure and performance of the counting station are described in this article. Detailed counting results for the radioactivity in materials used by the PandaX dark-matter experiment are presented. The upgrading plan of the counting station is also discussed.

  15. Extended liner performance for hydrodynamics and material properties experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Reinovsky, R E

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. Over the last few years a new application for high performance pulsed power, the production of high energy density environments for the study of material properties under extreme conditions and hydrodynamics in complex geometries has joined the traditional family of radiation source applications. The newly commissioned Atlas pulsed power system at Los Alamos has replaced its predecessor, Pegasus, and joined the Shiva Star system at AFRL, Albuquerque and a variety of flux compression systems, principally at the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) as ultra high current drivers for the high precision, magnetically imploded, near-solid density liner that is used to create the needed environments. Three families of experiments: the production of ultra strong shocks (>10 Mbar), the production of strongly coupled plasmas by liner compression of an initially dense plasma of a few eV temperature, and the compression of a magnetized plasma for ...

  16. Goal setting with type 2 diabetes: a hermeneutic analysis of the experiences of diabetes educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Susan E; Boyd, Angela; Ballejos, Miriam; Kynast-Gales, Susan A; Malemute, Charlene L; Armstrong Shultz, Jill; Vandermause, Roxanne K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explicate and interpret common experiences of diabetes educators (DEs) with patient goal setting for patients with type 2 diabetes in diabetes education. Transcripts (n = 10) from semi-structured interviews were analyzed using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach to more deeply explore the accounts of DEs' goal setting with patients with type 2 diabetes. The overarching pattern that emerged was "Striking a Balance," which subsumed 4 subthemes: Applying Theoretical-Practical Principles When Setting Goals, Identifying Idealistic-Realistic Expectations, Creating Patient-Educator-Centered Plans, and Readying-Living With Goal Setting. The pattern, "Striking a Balance," revealed a common meaning of DEs as experiences requiring balance and nuance in goal setting with patients. The results of this study combined with the tenets of the self-determination theory can provide the DEs with real-life exemplars and a theoretical framework to encourage their patients to self-manage, increase intrinsic motivation, and improve adherence related to their lifestyle changes and glycemic control. DEs, as facilitators of change, can implement these changes with flexible and reciprocal activities with their patients. The DEs owned these activities and they are: "building the bond," "sharing the session," "readying for change," "sending them home," and "bringing them back."

  17. ICP MS selection of radiopure materials for the GERDA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Vacri, M. L.; Nisi, S.; Cattadori, C.; Janicsko, J.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Smolnikov, A.; Walter, M.

    2015-08-01

    The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment, located in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) aims to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of the 76Ge isotope. Both an ultra-low radioactivity background environment and active techniques to abate the residual background are required to reach the background index (of 10-3 counts/keV kg y) at the Qββ. In order to veto and suppress those events that partially deposit energy in Ge detectors, the readout of liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light (SL) has been implemented for the second GERDA experimental Phase. A double veto system has been designed and constructed using highly radiopure materials (scintillating fibers, wavelength shifters, polymeric foils, reflective foils). This work describes the study of lead, thorium and uranium ultra-trace content, performed at the LNGS Chemistry Laboratory by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HR ICP MS), for the selection of all materials involved in the construction of the veto system

  18. ICP MS selection of radiopure materials for the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Vacri, M. L., E-mail: divacrim@lngs.infn.it [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, via G.Acitelli 22, 67100 Assergi (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, University of L’Aquila, via Vetoio, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Nisi, S., E-mail: nisi@lngs.infn.it [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, via G.Acitelli 22, 67100 Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Cattadori, C., E-mail: cattadori@lngs.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Janicsko, J. [TUM Munich (Germany); Lubashevskiy, A. [MPIK, Heidelberg (Germany); JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Smolnikov, A. [MPIK, Heidelberg (Germany); Walter, M. [Physik-Institut, Universitat Zurich, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-08-17

    The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment, located in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) aims to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of the {sup 76}Ge isotope. Both an ultra-low radioactivity background environment and active techniques to abate the residual background are required to reach the background index (of 10{sup −3} counts/keV kg y) at the Q{sub ββ}. In order to veto and suppress those events that partially deposit energy in Ge detectors, the readout of liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light (SL) has been implemented for the second GERDA experimental Phase. A double veto system has been designed and constructed using highly radiopure materials (scintillating fibers, wavelength shifters, polymeric foils, reflective foils). This work describes the study of lead, thorium and uranium ultra-trace content, performed at the LNGS Chemistry Laboratory by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HR ICP MS), for the selection of all materials involved in the construction of the veto system.

  19. Experience gained with Euratom's nuclear materials accounting and reporting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, M.; Kschwendt, H.; Maxwell, A.G.; Littlejohn, M.

    1979-01-01

    The entry into force of the Verification Agreement in early 1977, linked to the wish to update the old Euratom System created in 1959, required that a new Euratom system (Community Regulation) be established. The main aspects of this new system, together with the practical experience gained in one and a half years operation, are presented. Certain basic accounting principles incorporated in the Euratom system, which are somewhat different from IAEA principles, are discussed in detail. This includes the notion of accounting date, some correction procedure aspects as well as the continuous updating of the book inventory to the physical reality in form of inventory changes. The effect of these differences when comparing IAEA and Euratom data is also mentioned. Furthermore, certain of the verifications carried out routinely on the operator's reports as well as on the reports submitted by Euratom to IAEA, are described and quantifications are given. Some mention is also made of areas where Euratom's role goes beyond that of the IAEA, i.e. the reporting implications of accounting for material by origin and control of particular use of the materials as well as verification of ore production and processing activities. Finally, improvements and simplifications concerning reports to the IAEA are proposed. (author)

  20. Shocked materials at the intersection of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzana, H. E.; Belak, J. F.; Bradley, K. S.; Bringa, E. M.; Budil, K. S.; Cazamias, J. U.; El-Dasher, B.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Hessler, J.; Kadau, K.; Kalantar, D. H.; McNaney, J. M.; Milathianaki, D.; Rosolankova, K.; Swift, D. C.; Taravillo, M.; Van Buuren, T. W.; Wark, J. S.; de la Rubia, T. Diaz

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the dynamic lattice response of solids under the extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a scientific quest that spans nearly a century. Critical to developing this understanding is the ability to probe and model the spatial and temporal evolution of the material microstructure and properties at the scale of the relevant physical phenomena-nanometers to micrometers and picoseconds to nanoseconds. While experimental investigations over this range of spatial and temporal scales were unimaginable just a decade ago, new technologies and facilities currently under development and on the horizon have brought these goals within reach for the first time. The equivalent advancements in simulation capabilities now mean that we can conduct simulations and experiments at overlapping temporal and spatial scales. In this article, we describe some of our studies which exploit existing and new generation ultrabright, ultrafast x-ray sources and large scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the real-time physical phenomena that control the dynamic response of shocked materials.

  1. Shocked materials at the intersection of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadau, Kai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic lattice response of solids under the extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a scientific quest that spans nearly a century. Critical to developing this understanding is the ability to probe and model the spatial and temporal evolution of the material microstructure and properties at the scale of the relevant physical phenomena -- nanometers to micrometers and picoseconds to nanoseconds. While experimental investigations over this range of spatial and temporal scales were unimaginable just a decade ago, new technologies and facilities currently under development and on the horizon have brought these goals within reach for the first time. The equivalent advancements in simulation capabilities now mean that we can conduct simulations and experiments at overlapping temporal and spatial scales. In this article, we describe some of our studies which exploit existing and new generation ultrabright, ultrafast x-ray sources and large scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the real-time physical phenomena that control the dynamic response of shocked materials.

  2. Vacuum System and Modeling for the Materials Plasma Exposure Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumsdaine, Arnold; Meitner, Steve; Graves, Van; Bradley, Craig; Stone, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the science of plasma-material interactions (PMI) is essential for the future development of fusion facilities. The design of divertors and first walls for the next generation of long-pulse fusion facilities, such as a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) or a DEMO, requires significant PMI research and development. In order to meet this need, a new linear plasma facility, the Materials Plasma Exposure Experiment (MPEX) is proposed, which will produce divertor relevant plasma conditions for these next generation facilities. The device will be capable of handling low activation irradiated samples and be able to remove and replace samples without breaking vacuum. A Target Exchange Chamber (TEC) which can be disconnected from the high field environment in order to perform in-situ diagnostics is planned for the facility as well. The vacuum system for MPEX must be carefully designed in order to meet the requirements of the different heating systems, and to provide conditions at the target similar to those expected in a divertor. An automated coupling-decoupling (“autocoupler”) system is designed to create a high vacuum seal, and will allow the TEC to be disconnected without breaking vacuum in either the TEC or the primary plasma materials interaction chamber. This autocoupler, which can be actuated remotely in the presence of the high magnetic fields, has been designed and prototyped, and shows robustness in a variety of conditions. The vacuum system has been modeled using a simplified finite element analysis, and indicates that the design goals for the pressures in key regions of the facility are achievable.

  3. Machine-learning-assisted materials discovery using failed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccuglia, Paul; Elbert, Katherine C.; Adler, Philip D. F.; Falk, Casey; Wenny, Malia B.; Mollo, Aurelio; Zeller, Matthias; Friedler, Sorelle A.; Schrier, Joshua; Norquist, Alexander J.

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid materials such as organically templated metal oxides, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and organohalide perovskites have been studied for decades, and hydrothermal and (non-aqueous) solvothermal syntheses have produced thousands of new materials that collectively contain nearly all the metals in the periodic table. Nevertheless, the formation of these compounds is not fully understood, and development of new compounds relies primarily on exploratory syntheses. Simulation- and data-driven approaches (promoted by efforts such as the Materials Genome Initiative) provide an alternative to experimental trial-and-error. Three major strategies are: simulation-based predictions of physical properties (for example, charge mobility, photovoltaic properties, gas adsorption capacity or lithium-ion intercalation) to identify promising target candidates for synthetic efforts; determination of the structure-property relationship from large bodies of experimental data, enabled by integration with high-throughput synthesis and measurement tools; and clustering on the basis of similar crystallographic structure (for example, zeolite structure classification or gas adsorption properties). Here we demonstrate an alternative approach that uses machine-learning algorithms trained on reaction data to predict reaction outcomes for the crystallization of templated vanadium selenites. We used information on ‘dark’ reactions—failed or unsuccessful hydrothermal syntheses—collected from archived laboratory notebooks from our laboratory, and added physicochemical property descriptions to the raw notebook information using cheminformatics techniques. We used the resulting data to train a machine-learning model to predict reaction success. When carrying out hydrothermal synthesis experiments using previously untested, commercially available organic building blocks, our machine-learning model outperformed traditional human strategies, and successfully predicted

  4. Microwave Palaeointensity Experiments On Terrestrial and Martian Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J.; Hill, M.; Gratton, M.

    The microwave palaeointensity technique was developed in Liverpool University (Walton et al 1996) and has successfully been applied to archaeological ceramics and recent lavas (Shaw et al 1996, 1999.; Hill et al 1999,2000). These published results show that microwave analysis provides accurate palaeointensity determinations com- bined with a very high success rate. Most recently the technique has been successfully applied to Martian material (Shaw et al, 2001) to look for the existence of an internal Martian dynamo early in Martian history. New experiments have been carried out us- ing microwaves to demagnetise synthetic muti-component TRM's and new palaeoin- tensity experiments providing a comparison between microwave analysis of laboratory TRM's and conventional thermal Thellier analysis of microwave generated mTRM's. These experiments demonstrate the equivalence of microwave and thermally gener- ated TRM's. D. Walton, S Snape, T.C. Rolph, J. Shaw and J.A. Share, Application of ferromagnetic resonance heating to palaeointensity determinations.1996, Phys Earth Planet Int,94, 183-186. J. Shaw, D. Walton, S Yang, T.C.Rolph, and J.A. Share. Microwave Archaeointensities from Peruvian Ceramics. 1996, Geophys. J. Int,124,241-244 J. Shaw, S. Yang, T. C. Rolph, and F. Y. Sun. A comparison of archaeointensity results from Chinese ceramics using Microwave and conventional ThellierSs and ShawSs methods.,1999, G J Int.136, 714-718 M. Hill, and J. Shaw, 1999, Palaeointensity results for Historic Lavas from Mt. Etna using microwave demagnetisation/remagnetisation in a modified Thellier type exper- iment. G. J. Int, 139, 583-590 M. J. Hill, and J. Shaw, 2000. Magnetic field intensity study of the 1960 Kilauea lava flow, Hawaii, using the microwave palaeointensity technique, Geophys. J. Int., 142, 487-504. J. Shaw, M. Hill, and S. J. Openshaw, 2001, Investigating the ancient Martian magnetic field using microwaves, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 190 (2001) 103-109

  5. Interprofessional education through shadowing experiences in multi-disciplinary clinical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Ainsley E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The World Health Organization has recently added Interprofessional Education (IPE to its global health agenda recognizing it as a necessary component of all health professionals' education. We suggest mandatory interprofessional shadowing experiences as a mechanism to be used by chiropractic institutions to address this agenda. IPE initiatives of other professions (pharmacy and medicine are described along with chiropractic. This relative comparison of professions local to our jurisdiction in Ontario, Canada is made so that the chiropractic profession may take note that they are behind other health care providers in implementing IPE. Interprofessional shadowing experiences would likely take place in a multi-disciplinary clinical setting. We offer an example of how two separate professions within a Family Health Team (FHT can work together in such a setting to enhance both student learning and patient care. For adult learners, using interprofessional shadowing experiences with learner-derived and active objectives across diverse health professional groups may help to improve the educational experience. Mandatory interprofessional shadowing experiences for chiropractors during their training can enhance future collaborative practice and provide success in reaching a goal common to each profession - improved patient care.

  6. Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone intended for efficient paving materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, A.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the growth of load on automotive roads, modern transportation engineering is in need of efficient paving materials. Runways and most advanced highways require Portland cement concretes. This makes important the studies directed to improvement of binders for such concretes. In the present work some peculiarities of the process of Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone with barium hydrosilicate sol were examined. It was found that the admixture of said sol leads to a shift in the induction period to later times without significant change in its duration. The admixture of a modifier with nanoscale barium hydrosilicates increases the degree of hydration of the cement clinker minerals and changes the phase composition of the hydration products; in particular, the content of portlandite and tricalcium silicate decreases, while the amount of ettringite increases. Changes in the hydration processes of Portland cement and early setting of cement stone that are caused by the nanoscale barium hydrosilicates, allow to forecast positive technological effects both at the stage of manufacturing and at the stage of operation. In particular, the formwork age can be reduced, turnover of molds can be increased, formation of secondary ettringite and corrosion of the first type can be eliminated.

  7. National Educators' Workshop. Update 92: Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Craig, Douglas F. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the workshop. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  8. Set of thermal neutron-scattering experiments for the Weapons Neutron Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, R.M.

    1975-12-01

    Six classes of experiments form the base of a program of thermal neutron scattering at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility. Three classes are to determine the average microscopic positions of atoms in materials and three are to determine the microscopic vibrations of these atoms. The first three classes concern (a) powder sample neutron diffraction, (b) small angle scattering, and (c) single crystal Laue diffraction. The second three concern (d) small kappa inelastic scattering, (e) scattering surface phonon measurements, and (f) line widths. An instrument to couple with the WNR pulsed source is briefly outlined for each experiment

  9. PENGEMBANGAN MODUL PEMBELAJARAN KIMIA BERVISI SETS BERORIENTASI CHEMO-ENTREPRENEURSHIP (CEP PADA MATERI LARUTAN ASAM BASA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Agus Prayitno

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kimia merupakan salah satu mata pelajaran yang berkaitan dengan kehidupan sehari- hari, dari segi lingkungan teknologi, maupun masyarakat. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menghasilkan modul pembelajaran kimia bervisi SETS berorientasi CEP pada materi larutan asam basa yang layak dan efektif digunakan dalam pembelajaran untuk meningkatkan motivasi belajar, minat wirausaha, dan hasil belajar siswa. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian pengembangan. Uji coba kelayakan produk pada penelitian ini dilaksanakan di MA Mu’allimin Mu’allimat dengan model penelitian one group pre-test and post-test design dan di MAN Rembang dengan model penelitian pre-test and post-test control group design. Data penelitian diperoleh dengan metode validasi, observasi, dokumentasi, tes, dan skala Likert. Hasil validasi ahli materi, ahli media, dan praktisi menunjukkan bahwa modul pembelajaran kimia bervisi SETS berorientasi CEP sangat layak digunakan dalam pembelajaran kimia dengan skor ratarata pada aspek kegrafikan 95,00, aspek penyajian 95,33, aspek kebahasaan 95,00, dan aspek kegrafikan 94,44. Hasil uji coba modul di MA Mu’allimin Mu’allimat menunjukkan peningkatan motivasi 20%, minat wirausaha 25%, dan hasil belajar siswa 79%. Uji coba modul di MAN Rembang peningkatan motivasi belajar siswa, minat wirausaha, dan hasil belajar siswa kelas eksperimen sebesar 27%, 17% dan 66%, sedangkan peningkatan kelas kontrol secara berturutturut 0,4%, 11%, dan 24%.Chemistryis one of the subjects related to everyday life, in terms of environmental technology, and society. The purpose of this research is to produce visionary chemistry learning modules SETS with CEP oriented on acid-base materials which properly and effectively use in learning to improve learning motivation, entrepreneurial interest, and student learning outcomes. This research is development reaserch. Testing the product viability on the research carried out in MA Mu'allimin Mu'allimat with research model are one

  10. COMPARING INTRA- AND INTERENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS OF OPTIMAL SETTING IN BREEDING EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domagoj Šimić

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of biometrical and quantitative-genetic parameters, not well known in Croatia, are being used for the most important agronomic traits to determine optimal genotype setting within a location as well as among locations. Objectives of the study are to estimate and to compare 1 parameters of intra-environment setting (effective mean square error EMSE, in lattice design, relative efficiency RE, of lattice design LD, compared to randomized complete block design RCBD, and repeatability Rep, of a plot value, and 2 operative heritability h2, as a parameter of inter-environment setting in an experiment with 72 maize hybrids. Trials were set up at four environments (two locations in two years evaluating grain yield and stalk rot. EMSE values corresponded across environments for both traits, while the estimations for RE of LD varied inconsistently over environments and traits. Rep estimates were more different over environments than traits. Rep values did not correspond with h2 estimates: Rep estimates for stalk rot were higher than those for grain yield, while h2 for grain yield was higher than for stalk rot in all instances. Our results suggest that due to importance of genotype × environment interaction, there is a need for multienvironment trials for both traits. If the experiment framework should be reduced due to economic or other reasons, decreasing number of locations in a year rather than decreasing number of years of investigation is recommended.

  11. The experience of intimate partner violence in the context of the rural setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, karen

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is a pervasive health and social problem in the United States; one in three women report being abused by an intimate partner at least once in their lifetime. IPV presents unique challenges to women living in rural areas that increase their vulnerability, limit their options for safety, and hamper efforts to leave an abusive relationship. Yet there is little research examining the lived experience of WV in a general population of women in the rural setting. Also, though there is a large body of research on TV screening and health care providers' attitudes and beliefs, little is known about rural providers specifically. A mixed methods study exploring the lived experience of IPV in women in the context of the rural setting was conducted. Along with qualitative interviews with women with experience of IPV, I conducted a survey to examine the TV-related knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of the health care providers who interact with the women. The results from this study form a picture of the lives of women who experience IPV in the rural setting as one of isolation, fear, and uncertainty tempered by determination to understand and overcome the violence. Six major themes were identified, 1) living with violence, 2) protect self, 3) isolation, 4) search for understanding, 5) system level abuse, and 6) creating a new life. In contrast to earlier studies, health care providers demonstrated good overall knowledge and judicious attitudes about IPV and beliefs congruent with available evidence related to IPV. When looked at together the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of the health care providers were aligned with the experiences voiced by the women participating in the interviews. The results of this study highlight the need for an interprofessional, public health approach that addresses the complex web of individual, social, cultural, economic, and political factors that create and feed the problem.

  12. Development of Data Acquisition Set-up for Steady-state Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit K.; Gupta, Arnab D.; Sunil, S.; Khan, Ziauddin

    2017-04-01

    For short duration experiments, generally digitized data is transferred for processing and storage after the experiment whereas in case of steady-state experiment the data is acquired, processed, displayed and stored continuously in pipelined manner. This requires acquiring data through special techniques for storage and on-the-go viewing data to display the current data trends for various physical parameters. A small data acquisition set-up is developed for continuously acquiring signals from various physical parameters at different sampling rate for long duration experiment. This includes the hardware set-up for signal digitization, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) based timing system for clock synchronization and event/trigger distribution, time slicing of data streams for storage of data chunks to enable viewing of data during acquisition and channel profile display through down sampling etc. In order to store a long data stream of indefinite/long time duration, the data stream is divided into data slices/chunks of user defined time duration. Data chunks avoid the problem of non-access of server data until the channel data file is closed at the end of the long duration experiment. A graphical user interface has been developed in Lab VIEW application development environment for configuring the data acquisition hardware and storing data chunks on local machine as well as at remote data server through Python for further data access. The data plotting and analysis utilities have been developed with Python software, which provides tools for further data processing. This paper describes the development and implementation of data acquisition for steady-state experiment.

  13. Does personalized goal setting and study planning improve academic performance and perception of learning experience in a developing setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazeem B. Yusuff, PhD

    2018-06-01

    .٢، والاختبارات النصفية ٢١.٩ (الانحراف المعياري = ٣.٧، والاختبارات النهائية ٤٢.٨ (الانحراف المعياري = ٥.٣، وكانت نسبة الإنجاز لأهداف المقرر أ (٧٧٪ و ب (٧٨٪ أعلى بكثير في مجموعة الدراسة. أظهرت التغذية الراجعة لنهاية المقرر اختلافات رئيسة في إدراك تجربة التعلم بين مجموعة الدراسة والمجموعة الضابطة. الاستنتاجات: يبدو أن تحديد الأهداف الشخصية والتخطيط للدراسة يؤدي إلى تحسن كبير في المشاركة المستمرة للتعلم، والتركيز على الأهداف الأكاديمية والأداء الأكاديمي. Abstract: Objective: The learning process for pharmacists must enable the skillful harnessing of metacognition, critical thinking, and effective application of specialized skills. This study assessed the impact of self-developed academic goals and study plans on pharmacy students' academic performance and perception of learning experience in a developing setting. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted at the College of Clinical Pharmacy, King Faisal University, KSA, in a compulsory 4th year course (Pharmacy management. The study group was exposed to goal setting and study planning while the control group had only routine teaching and learning activities planned for the course. Academic performance was determined with quizzes, midterm, and final exams, and the percentage achievement for the course objectives. An end-of-course evaluation, with a pre-tested questionnaire, was used to assess the perception of learning experience. Results: The study group constituted 41.4% (29, while 58.6% (41 were in the control group, with a mean ± SD age of 22.9 (SD = 3.2 and 21.6 (SD = 6.1 years, respectively. The mean ± SD scores for quizzes (8.4 (SD = 2

  14. Lessons learned from setting up the NOWESP research data base: Experiences in an interdisciplinary research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radach, Günther; Gekeler, Jens

    1996-09-01

    Research carried out within the framework of the MAST project NOWESP (North-West European Shelf Programme) was based on a multi-parameter data set of existing marine data, relevant for estimating trends, variability and fluxes on the Northwest European Shelf. The data sets were provided by the partners of the project. Additional data sets were obtained from several other institutions. During the project, the data were organized in the NOWESP Research Data Base (NRDB), for which a special data base scheme was defined that was capable of storing different types of marine data. Data products, like time series and interpolated fields, were provided to the partners for analysis (Radach et al. [1997]). After three years of project time, the feasibility of such an approach is discussed. Ways of optimizing data access and evaluation are proposed. A project-oriented Research Data Base is a useful tool because of its flexibility and proximity to the research being carried out. However, several requirements must be met to derive optimum benefits from this type of service unit. Since this task usually is carried out by a limited number of staff, an early start of project data management is recommended. To enable future projects to succeed in an analogous compilation of relevant data for their use, as performed in NOWESP, the task of organizing the data sets for any short-term project should be shared between a research data base group and a national or international data centre whose experience and software could be used. It must be ensured that only quality controlled data sets from the individual data-produ cing projects are delivered to the national data centres. It is recommended that data quality control should be performed by the originators and/or data centres before delivering any data sets to the research data base. Delivery of the (full) data sets should be checked and their quality should be approved by authorized data centres.

  15. EXTENSIVE LISTENING: LET STUDENTS EXPERIENCE LEARNING BY OPTIMIZING THE USE OF AUTHENTIC MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Hapsari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In a country like Indonesia, one of challenges in learning English as a foreign language is a lack of exposure of English in its authentic sense. The use of authentic materials seems to be an option to cope with this situation. One of the ways to optimize the use of the authentic materials to trigger students to experience learning and to enhance their active involvement in the learning process is by using it in extensive listening activities. Through extensive listening by using authentic materials, students are exposed to real native speech in meaningful language use. As the result, difficulties in listening gradually disappear.  In order to put the idea into practice, the first thing to do is to set objectives of each meeting based on core vocabulary and grammar that are suitable for the learners using comprehensible input principle as the basic consideration. Second, selecting authentic materials that suit the objectives and that give exposure to formulaic language and meaningful language use. Then, preparing activities in which the instruction is reasonable and lead to sufficient practice to develop fluency. Finally, synchronize teaching activities to increase students’ motivation to learn. As a follow up activities, students are informed and eventually involved in the whole process. Thus, students experience learning and actively involved in their learning process.

  16. 30 years of experience in safe transportation of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, K.

    2004-01-01

    In April 2003, Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd. (NFT) marked the 30 th anniversary of its founding. NFT was established in 1973 and in 1978, commenced SF transport to the reprocessing plant in Tokai-mura. And then, after making preparations to transport nuclear materials to the various facilities at the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Center in Rokkasho-mura, NFT successfully started transportation of LLW (low level waste) to Rokksho-mura's LLW disposal center in 1992, domestic land transportation of HLW returned from overseas to the HLW storage center in 1995, domestic land transportation of natural hexafluoride delivered from overseas to the uranium enrichment plant in 1996, and transportation of SF to the reprocessing plant in 2000. NFT has realized an annual SF transportation capacity of 300 MTU and is currently making great company wide efforts to meet the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant's future SF annual reprocessing capacity of 800MTU. At the end of FY2003, NFT had successfully transported 560 casks (about 1,730 MTU) of SF in more than 200 voyages in total, about 160,000 drums of LLW in around 100 voyages in total. This paper introduces the record of safe transport and its experience over the past 30 years and prospect for future transport business

  17. The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Canik, J.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Duckworth, R. C.; Goulding, R. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Lore, J. D.; Lumsdaine, A.; McGinnis, W. D.; Meitner, S. J.; Owen, L. W.; Shaw, G. C.; Luo, G.-N.

    2014-10-01

    Next generation plasma generators have to be able to access the plasma conditions expected on the divertor targets in ITER and future devices. The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will address this regime with electron temperatures of 1--10 eV and electron densities of 1021--1020 m-3. The resulting heat fluxes are about 10 MW/m2. MPEX is designed to deliver those plasma conditions with a novel Radio Frequency plasma source able to produce high density plasmas and heat electron and ions separately with Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). Preliminary modeling has been used for pre-design studies of MPEX. MPEX will be capable to expose neutron irradiated samples. In this concept targets will be irradiated in ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) or possibly at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and then subsequently (after a sufficient long cool-down period) exposed to fusion reactor relevant plasmas in MPEX. The current state of the pre-design of MPEX including the concept of handling irradiated samples will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  18. 30 years of experience in safe transportation of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, K. [Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    In April 2003, Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd. (NFT) marked the 30{sup th} anniversary of its founding. NFT was established in 1973 and in 1978, commenced SF transport to the reprocessing plant in Tokai-mura. And then, after making preparations to transport nuclear materials to the various facilities at the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Center in Rokkasho-mura, NFT successfully started transportation of LLW (low level waste) to Rokksho-mura's LLW disposal center in 1992, domestic land transportation of HLW returned from overseas to the HLW storage center in 1995, domestic land transportation of natural hexafluoride delivered from overseas to the uranium enrichment plant in 1996, and transportation of SF to the reprocessing plant in 2000. NFT has realized an annual SF transportation capacity of 300 MTU and is currently making great company wide efforts to meet the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant's future SF annual reprocessing capacity of 800MTU. At the end of FY2003, NFT had successfully transported 560 casks (about 1,730 MTU) of SF in more than 200 voyages in total, about 160,000 drums of LLW in around 100 voyages in total. This paper introduces the record of safe transport and its experience over the past 30 years and prospect for future transport business.

  19. Material Evidence for Ocean Impact from Shock-Metamorphic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Y.; Takayama, K.; Iancu, O. G.

    1993-07-01

    Continental impact reveals an excavated crater that has few fresh fine ejecta showing major high shock metamorphism due to weathering [1]. A giant ocean impact rarely remains as an excavated crater mainly due to crushing by dynamic plate-tectonic movements on the crust [2]. However, all impact materials, including fine-grained ejecta, can be obtained with artificial impact experiments [3]. The purpose of this study is to discuss material evidence for ocean impact based on shock-metamorphic experiments. Artificial impact experiments indicate that fine shocked quartz (SQ) aggregates can be formed on several target rocks (Table 1) [1]. It is found in Table 1 that (1) the largest-density deviation of SQ grain is found not at the wall-rock or the impact crater but at fine-grained ejecta, and (2) silica-poor rocks of basalt, gabbro, and anorthosite can also make fine SQ aggregates by impact. Table 1, which appears here in the hard copy, shows formations of fine shocked quartz aggregates from ocean-floor rocks of basalt, gabbroic anorthosite, and granite [3]. An asteroid (about 10 km across) hits the Earth ~65 m.y. ago [4] to result in global catastrophe by titanic explosion and climate change. But shocked quartz grains found in the K/T boundary layer were considered to come from crystalline continental rocks [5]. The present result as listed in Table 1 indicates that fine SQ aggregates can also be formed at sea-floor basaltic and gabbroic rocks [3]. The present result of formation of the SQ grains from sea- floor target rocks is nearly consistent with the finding of a sea-impact crater at the K/T boundary near the Caribbean [6]. Impact-induced volcanism at the K/T boundary can explained by the penetration from thin ocean crust to upper mantle reservoirs, if giant impact of a 10-km- diameter asteroid hit the ocean [2,7]. The present result can explain "phreatomagmatic (magmatic vapor) explosion," which is created by abrupt boiling between high-temperature magma and cold

  20. Moldable setting time evaluation between sodium alginate and bovine gelatine of glutinous rice mixture as dental putty materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarini, V.; Hasratiningsih, Z.; Karlina, E.; Febrida, R.; Asri, L. A. T. W.; Purwasasmita, BS

    2017-02-01

    Putty elastomeric material is a viscous, moldable material that can be used as a dental impression to record and duplicate the tooth structure. Commercially available putty materials are hardly found in the Indonesian market. The aim of this work is to develop an alternative putty dental material from glutinous rice with two different gelling agents; sodium alginate and bovine gelatine. A commercially putty material was used as a control. The length of time required for the putty materials to set (setting time) was evaluated with compression set test. The result showed that sodium alginate and bovine gelatine gelling agents resulted in moldable putty materials that comparable to the commercial product. Glutinous rice mixed with sodium alginate gelling agent demonstrated longer setting time (more than 1 hours) compared to bovine gelatine (6 minutes). These may occur due to heat treatment applied to the bovine gelatine, while sodium alginate mixture has a chemical reaction since CaCl2 crosslink agent had been added to the mixture. Glutinous rice with bovine gelatine mixture is a promising candidate to be used as a dental putty material.

  1. Health professionals' experience of teamwork education in acute hospital settings: a systematic review of qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Kylie; Jordan, Zoe; Stephenson, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Teamwork is seen as an important element of patient care in acute hospital settings. The complexity of the journey of care for patients highlights the need for health professionals to collaborate and communicate clearly with each other. Health organizations in western countries are committed to improving patient safety through education of staff and teamwork education programs have been integral to this focus. There are no current systematic reviews of the experience of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The objective of this systematic review was to search for the best available evidence on the experiences of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. This review considered studies reporting on experiences of registered health professionals who work in acute hospitals. This included medical, nursing and midwifery and allied health professionals. The focus of the meta-synthesis was the experiences and reflections of health professionals who were involved in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The geographical context for this review was acute hospitals in rural or metropolitan settings in Australia and overseas countries. The review focused on the experiences of health professionals who work in acute hospitals and participated in teamwork education programs. This review considered studies that focused on qualitative data including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research.In the absence of research studies, other text such as opinion papers, discussion papers and reports were considered. Studies published in English and from 1990 to 2013 were included in this review. The literature search for relevant papers occurred between 13 September and 26 October 2013. A three-step search strategy was utilized in this review. The databases searched were PubMed, CINAHL, Embase and Scopus. The

  2. Fuzzy sets on step of planning of experiment for organization and management of construction processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapidus Azariy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, problems of mathematical modeling and experiment planning of the organization and management of construction. The authors designated the basic restrictions and the difficulties in this field. Concluded that the planning of research experiment is possible in the information sphere with using of heuristic, graphical, mathematical models, as well as neural networks and genetic algorithms. The authors note the need for use of expert information in the case of the formalization of quality parameters. The article presented an overview of the translation methods of qualitative information into mathematical language. Comparison of methods the qualimetry of USSR scientists, the analytic hierarchy process and fuzzy set theory were performed. The benefits of the latter for interpretation of qualitative parameters were identified. The authors have given many examples of application fuzzy sets for formalization of organizational factors of construction processes. Finally, there conclusion was made about progressiveness and effectiveness of fuzzy set theory to describe the qualitative parameters of organization and management of construction.

  3. On the effective atomic number and electron density: A comprehensive set of formulas for all types of materials and energies above 1 keV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Thind, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive and consistent set of formulas is given for calculating the effective atomic number and electron density for all types of materials and for all photon energies greater than 1 keV. The are derived from first principles using photon interaction cross sections of the constituent atom....... The theory is illustrated by calculations and experiments for molecules of medical and biological interest, glasses for radiation shielding, alloys, minerals and liquids....

  4. Turkish Air Force's Experiences in Chemical Material Acquisition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taskiran, Huseyin

    2002-01-01

    .... In addition, it analyzes the chemical material acquisition from business perspective. Due to operating in different environments, the Turkish Air Force and the private sector have different objectives in the acquisition of chemical materials...

  5. Activity Settings and Daily Routines in Preschool Classrooms: Diverse Experiences in Early Learning Settings for Low-Income Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuligni, Allison Sidle; Howes, Carollee; Huang, Yiching; Hong, Sandra Soliday; Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines activity settings and daily classroom routines experienced by 3- and 4-year-old low-income children in public center-based preschool programs, private center-based programs, and family child care homes. Two daily routine profiles were identified using a time-sampling coding procedure: a High Free-Choice pattern in which…

  6. Children's moral experiences of crisis management in a child mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montreuil, Marjorie; Thibeault, Catherine; McHarg, Linda; Carnevale, Franco A

    2018-02-15

    The experiences of children related to conflict and crisis management in child mental health settings, especially those aged 12 and below, have been rarely studied. This study examined the moral experiences of children related to conflict and crisis management and the related use of restraint and seclusion in a child mental health setting. A 5-month focused ethnography using a participatory hermeneutic framework was conducted in a day hospital programme for children with severe disruptive disorders within a mental health institute. Children considered restraints and seclusion could help them feel safe in certain instances, for example if another child was being aggressive towards them or in exceptional cases to prevent self-injury. However, their own experiences of being restrained were predominantly negative, especially if not knowing the reason for their use, which they then found unfair. Some of the children emphasized the punitive nature of the use of restraints and seclusion, and most children disagreed with these practices when used as a punishment. Children's perspectives also highlighted the limits of the use of a uniform de-escalation approach by the staff to manage crises. Children considered discussing with the staff and developing a relationship with them as more helpful in case of a crisis then the use of a de-escalation approach or coercive strategies. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  7. Midwives' experiences of labour care in midwifery units. A qualitative interview study in a Norwegian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogheim, Gry; Hanssen, Tove A

    2015-12-01

    In some economically developed countries, women's choice of birth care and birth place is encouraged. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of midwives who started working in alongside/free-standing midwifery units (AMU/FMU) and their experiences with labour care in this setting. A qualitative explorative design using a phenomenographic approach was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten strategically sampled midwives working in midwifery units. The analysis revealed the following five categories of experiences noted by the midwives: mixed emotions and de-learning obstetric unit habits, revitalising midwifery philosophy, alertness and preparedness, presence and patience, and coping with time. Starting to work in an AMU/FMU can be a distressing period for a midwife. First, it may require de-learning the medical approach to birth, and, second, it may entail a revitalisation (and re-learning) of birth care that promotes physiological birth. Midwifery, particularly in FMUs, requires an especially careful assessment of the labouring process, the ability to be foresighted, and capability in emergencies. The autonomy of midwives may be constrained also in AMUs/FMUs. However, working in these settings is also viewed as experiencing "the art of midwifery" and enables revitalisation of the midwifery philosophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Qualitative Inquiry into Nursing Students’ Experience of Facilitating Reflection in Clinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Karimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Reflection is known as a skill that is central to nursing students’ professional development. Due to the importance and the role of reflection in clinical areas of nursing, it is important to know how to achieve it. However, nursing trainers face the challenge of how to help their students to improve reflection in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the nursing students’ experiences of facilitating reflection during clinical practice. This qualitative study was conducted by qualitative content analysis approach. Twenty nursing students during the second to eighth semester of their educational program were selected for participation using purposive sampling. Data were collected through in-depth semistructured interviews. The interview was transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. From the data analysis, four main themes were extracted. Motivation to reflect, complex experiences, efficient trainer, and effective relations were four main themes obtained from study that, in interaction with each other, had facilitating roles in students’ reflective process on experiences. The findings revealed that the nursing students’ reflection in clinical settings is effective in personal and professional level. Reflection of nursing students depends on motivational and educational factors and these factors increase the quality of care in patients. Furthermore, nursing educators need to create nurturing climate as well as supporting reflective behaviors of nursing students.

  9. Improved set of criticality accident detectors used in the intercomparison experiment in Valduc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jozefowicz, K.; Golnik, N.

    1996-01-01

    An improved set of critically accident detectors has been elaborated for the needs of the Inst. of Atomic Energy in Swierk. The sets, which consist of fission track detectors, wide-base silicon diodes and RPL glasses, were tested in the international intercomparison experiment in Valduc, France. Comparison of our results with the reference measurements showed a good agreement (within 25%) for both the neutron and gamma measurements. Additionally, the diode response to neutron kerma was investigated more extensively in the dose range between 2 and 10 Gy, where the dependence of the diode signal versus neutron kerma was not well known. A possibility of the multiple use of the diodes has been proved. (author)

  10. Experiences With and Perceptions of Workplace Bullying Among Athletic Trainers in the Secondary School Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitney, William A; Weuve, Celest; Mazerolle, Stephanie M

    2016-09-01

    Workplace bullying (WPB) has recently received much attention in society. Research on WPB in athletic training practice settings is limited. To determine the prevalence of WPB in the secondary school setting and explore the factors related to it. Mixed-methods study. Secondary school. A total of 567 athletic trainers (women = 322 [56.8%], men = 245 [43.2%]), aged 36.5 ± 11.1 years with 11.9 ± 9.5 years of experience took part in phase I. Ten participants (7 women and 3 men), aged 39.3 ± 10.1 years with 14.3 ± 8.3 years of experience, took part in phase II. For the online survey, we used the previously validated and reliable (Cronbach α = .84) Athletic Training Workplace Environment Survey, which included the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised. The prevalence of WPB was measured with descriptive statistics, and χ 2 analyses were used to compare differences between groups (ie, females and males, perpetrators' titles). The interview data were examined using an inductive content analysis. Of the participants, 44 (7.8%) were empirically identified as targets of bullying, though a higher percentage (12.4%, n = 70) self-identified as bullying targets. Men and women did not differ with respect to having experienced WPB, but more perpetrators were male (71.6%, n = 48) than female (28.4%, n = 19; χ 2 1 = 12.55, P = discrimination were antecedents of bullying. Stress, depression, and sleep disturbances were reported consequences. Participants coped with bullying by avoidance and role refocusing. Bullying was experienced by a small percentage of athletic trainers in the secondary school setting, a contrast to the findings in the collegiate practice setting.

  11. Ultrasound-guided Breast Biopsy in the Resource-limited Setting: An Initial Experience in Rural Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Stark

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the methodology and initial experience behind creation of an ultrasoundguided percutaneous breast core biopsy program in rural Uganda. Methods and Materials: Imaging the World Africa (ITWA is the registered non-governmental organization division of Imaging the World (ITW, a not-for-profit organization whose primary aim is the integration of affordable high-quality ultrasound into rural health centers. In 2013, ITWA began the pilot phase of an IRB-approved breast care protocol at a rural health center in Uganda. As part of the protocol’s diagnostic arm, an ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast core biopsy training curriculum was implemented in tandem with creation of regionally supplied biopsy kits. Results: A surgeon at a rural regional referral hospital was successfully trained and certified to perform ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast core biopsies. Affordable and safe biopsy kits were created using locally available medical supplies with the cost of each kit totaling $10.62 USD. Conclusion: Successful implementation of an ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast core biopsy program in the resource-limited setting is possible and can be made sustainable through incorporation of local health care personnel and regionally supplied biopsy materials. Our hope is that ITWA’s initial experience in rural Uganda can serve as a model for similar programs in the future.

  12. Experiences of Nigerian Internationally Educated Nurses Transitioning to United States Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iheduru-Anderson, Kechinyere C; Wahi, Monika M

    2018-04-01

    Successful transition to practice of internationally educated nurses (IENs) can critically affect quality of care. The aim of this study was to characterize the facilitators and barriers to transition of Nigerian IENs (NIENs) to the United States health care setting. Using a descriptive phenomenology approach, 6 NIENs were interviewed about their transitional experiences in the United States. Thematic methods were used for data analysis. The three major themes identified from the participants' stories were "fear/anger and disappointment" (FAD), "road/journey to success/overcoming challenges" (RJO), and "moving forward" (MF). The FAD theme predominated, including experiences of racism, bullying, and inequality. The RJO theme included resilience, and the MF theme encompassed personal growth. NIENs face personal and organizational barriers to adaptation, especially fear, anger and disappointment. Future research should seek to develop a model for optimal adaptation that focuses on improving both personal and organizational facilitators and decreasing barriers.

  13. Job Resources, Physician Work Engagement, and Patient Care Experience in an Academic Medical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Lases, Lenny S S; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2017-10-01

    Physician work engagement is associated with better work performance and fewer medical errors; however, whether work-engaged physicians perform better from the patient perspective is unknown. Although availability of job resources (autonomy, colleague support, participation in decision making, opportunities for learning) bolster work engagement, this relationship is understudied among physicians. This study investigated associations of physician work engagement with patient care experience and job resources in an academic setting. The authors collected patient care experience evaluations, using nine validated items from the Dutch Consumer Quality index in two academic hospitals (April 2014 to April 2015). Physicians reported job resources and work engagement using, respectively, the validated Questionnaire on Experience and Evaluation of Work and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The authors conducted multivariate adjusted mixed linear model and linear regression analyses. Of the 9,802 eligible patients and 238 eligible physicians, respectively, 4,573 (47%) and 185 (78%) participated. Physician work engagement was not associated with patient care experience (B = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.02 to 0.03; P = .669). However, learning opportunities (B = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.52; P = .019) and autonomy (B = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.51; P = .004) were positively associated with work engagement. Higher physician work engagement did not translate into better patient care experience. Patient experience may benefit from physicians who deliver stable quality under varying levels of work engagement. From the physicians' perspective, autonomy and learning opportunities could safeguard their work engagement.

  14. Setting research priorities across science, technology, and health sectors: the Tanzania experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Sylvia; Kingamkono, Rose; Tindamanyire, Neema; Mshinda, Hassan; Makandi, Harun; Tibazarwa, Flora; Kubata, Bruno; Montorzi, Gabriela

    2015-03-12

    Identifying research priorities is key to innovation and economic growth, since it informs decision makers on effectively targeting issues that have the greatest potential public benefit. As such, the process of setting research priorities is of pivotal importance for favouring the science, technology, and innovation (STI)-driven development of low- and middle-income countries. We report herein on a major cross-sectoral nationwide research priority setting effort recently carried out in Tanzania by the Tanzania Commission for Science and Technology (COSTECH) in partnership with the Council on Health Research for Development (COHRED) and the NEPAD Agency. The first of its type in the country, the process brought together stakeholders from 42 sub-sectors in science, technology, and health. The cross-sectoral research priority setting process consisted of a 'training-of-trainers' workshop, a demonstration workshop, and seven priority setting workshops delivered to representatives from public and private research and development institutions, universities, non-governmental organizations, and other agencies affiliated to COSTECH. The workshops resulted in ranked listings of research priorities for each sub-sector, totalling approximately 800 priorities. This large number was significantly reduced by an expert panel in order to build a manageable instrument aligned to national development plans that could be used to guide research investments. The Tanzania experience is an instructive example of the challenges and issues to be faced in when attempting to identify research priority areas and setting an STI research agenda in low- and middle-income countries. As countries increase their investment in research, it is essential to increase investment in research management and governance as well, a key and much needed capacity for countries to make proper use of research investments.

  15. Deliberate Practice of Creativity Training Set Series - A Creativity Training Material for Education (work in progress)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrge, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Five training sets including 450 unique thinking direction cards and 120 exercise cards. Designed for Educational Purposes.......Five training sets including 450 unique thinking direction cards and 120 exercise cards. Designed for Educational Purposes....

  16. Some relevant parameters for assessing fire hazards of combustible mine materials using laboratory scale experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litton, Charles D; Perera, Inoka E; Harteis, Samuel P; Teacoach, Kara A; DeRosa, Maria I; Thomas, Richard A; Smith, Alex C

    2018-04-15

    When combustible materials ignite and burn, the potential for fire growth and flame spread represents an obvious hazard, but during these processes of ignition and flaming, other life hazards present themselves and should be included to ensure an effective overall analysis of the relevant fire hazards. In particular, the gases and smoke produced both during the smoldering stages of fires leading to ignition and during the advanced flaming stages of a developing fire serve to contaminate the surrounding atmosphere, potentially producing elevated levels of toxicity and high levels of smoke obscuration that render the environment untenable. In underground mines, these hazards may be exacerbated by the existing forced ventilation that can carry the gases and smoke to locations far-removed from the fire location. Clearly, materials that require high temperatures (above 1400 K) and that exhibit low mass loss during thermal decomposition, or that require high heat fluxes or heat transfer rates to ignite represent less of a hazard than materials that decompose at low temperatures or ignite at low levels of heat flux. In order to define and quantify some possible parameters that can be used to assess these hazards, small-scale laboratory experiments were conducted in a number of configurations to measure: 1) the toxic gases and smoke produced both during non-flaming and flaming combustion; 2) mass loss rates as a function of temperature to determine ease of thermal decomposition; and 3) mass loss rates and times to ignition as a function of incident heat flux. This paper describes the experiments that were conducted, their results, and the development of a set of parameters that could possibly be used to assess the overall fire hazard of combustible materials using small scale laboratory experiments.

  17. Exploring rural high school learners' experience of mathematics anxiety in academic settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipane Hlalele

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to explore rural high school learners' experience of mathematics anxiety in academic settings. Mathematics anxiety has been found to have an adverse effect on confidence, motivation and achievement. This quantitative study is exploratory and descriptive in nature. The participants were 403 learners doing mathematics in 18 rural schools in the Free State province of South Africa. Participants completed a 20-item questionnaire and 373 (92.5% questionnaires were found to contain valid responses and were analysed by a professional statistician at the University of the Free State using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Version 17.0. The questionnaire was testedfor reliability using the Cronbach alpha coefficient and was found to have a reliability score of .841, indicating an acceptable reliability coefficient. Findings reveal that all learners sometimes, often, or always experience mathematics anxiety in academic settings. It is therefore important for teachers and authorities in education to observe its prevalence and to implement strategies toward the alleviation of the effects ofmathematics anxiety.

  18. Cardiovascular disease prevention in low resource settings: lessons from the Heartfile experience in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtar, Sania

    2003-01-01

    This paper outlines activities of the Heartfile Program in Pakistan (http://heartfile.org). The program focuses on cardiovascular disease prevention and health promotion, and includes several initiatives that encompass building policy, reorienting health services, and developing community interventions that utilize the print and electronic media and outreach at the grass-root level to incorporate social marketing approaches. Initiated by the nonprofit private sector, the program now links with major public sector primary healthcare programs, and is currently spearheading formulation of the National Action Plan on Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Control in Pakistan. In addition, the program is being refined, validated, and packaged as a replicable model for other developing countries and in low resource settings, utilizing appropriate principles of franchising with inbuilt components sensitive to cultural and social adaptations. A review of the planning process, implementation strategy, and fund-raising experience is presented. Strategies unique to low resource settings, such as the development of cost- and time-efficient strategic alliances and partnerships, have also been highlighted. In addition, specific caveats are identified as being helpful to private sector development of chronic disease prevention programs in resource-constrained settings, and a road map to a sustainable public-private sector partnership is provided.

  19. Injectable calcium sulfate/mineralized collagen-based bone repair materials with regulable self-setting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zonggang; Liu, Huanye; Liu, Xi; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2011-12-15

    An injectable and self-setting bone repair materials (nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/calcium sulfate hemihydrate, nHAC/CSH) was developed in this study. The nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen (nHAC) composite, which is the mineralized fibril by self-assembly of nano-hydrocyapatite and collagen, has the same features as natural bone in both main hierarchical microstructure and composition. It is a bioactive osteoconductor due to its high level of biocompatibility and appropriate degradation rate. However, this material lacks handling characteristics because of its particle or solid-preformed block shape. Herein, calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) was introduced into nHAC to prepare an injectable and self-setting in situ bone repair materials. The morphology of materials was observed using SEM. Most important and interesting of all, calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD), which is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, was introduced into nHAC as setting accelerator to regulate self-setting properties of injectable nHAC/CSH composite, and thus the self-setting time of nHAC/CSH composite can be regulated from more than 100 min to about 30 min and even less than 20 min by adding various amount of setting accelerator. The compressive properties of bone graft substitute after final setting are similar to those of cancellous bone. CSD as an excellent setting accelerator has no significant effect on the mechanical property and degradability of bone repair materials. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies demonstrated that the nHAC/CSH composite could provide more adequate stimulus for cell adhesion and proliferation, embodying favorable cell biocompatibility and a strong ability to accelerate bone formation. It can offer a satisfactory biological environment for growing new bone in the implants and for stimulating bone formation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. CANDU steam generator tubing material service experience and allied development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, A.E.; Lesurf, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    This paper covers the following aspects for the tube materials in CANDU-PHW steam generators: inservice performance with respect to tube leaks and coolant activity attributable to boiler tube corrosion, selection of tube materials for use with non-boiling and boiling primary coolants, supporting development on corrosion, vibration, fretting wear, tube inspection, leak detection and plugging of defective tubes. (author)

  1. Nanocomposite materials: From lab-scale experiments to prototypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dortmans, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Koster, T.P.M.; Nelissen, R.G.; Fischer, H.

    2002-01-01

    A porous PMMA material has been reinforced by clay particles, and properties of the resulting material were evaluated. The clay has been intercalated in a first step by melt-extrusion with a suitable block copolymer. A radical polymerisation reaction after swelling of the intercalated clay with

  2. Characterization of full set material constants of piezoelectric materials based on ultrasonic method and inverse impedance spectroscopy using only one sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiyang; Zheng, Limei; Jiang, Wenhua; Sahul, Raffi; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-09-14

    The most difficult task in the characterization of complete set material properties for piezoelectric materials is self-consistency. Because there are many independent elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants, several samples are needed to obtain the full set constants. Property variation from sample to sample often makes the obtained data set lack of self-consistency. Here, we present a method, based on pulse-echo ultrasound and inverse impedance spectroscopy, to precisely determine the full set physical properties of piezoelectric materials using only one small sample, which eliminated the sample to sample variation problem to guarantee self-consistency. The method has been applied to characterize the [001] C poled Mn modified 0.27Pb(In 1/2 Nb 1/2 )O 3 -0.46Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 -0.27PbTiO 3 single crystal and the validity of the measured data is confirmed by a previously established method. For the inverse calculations using impedance spectrum, the stability of reconstructed results is analyzed by fluctuation analysis of input data. In contrast to conventional regression methods, our method here takes the full advantage of both ultrasonic and inverse impedance spectroscopy methods to extract all constants from only one small sample. The method provides a powerful tool for assisting novel piezoelectric materials of small size and for generating needed input data sets for device designs using finite element simulations.

  3. Machinability Study on Milling Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials using Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, H.; Haron, C. H. C.; Ghani, J. A.; Suhaily, M.; Yuzairi, A. R.

    2018-04-01

    The surface roughness (Ra) and delamination factor (Fd) of a milled kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials are depending on the milling parameters (spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut). Therefore, a study was carried out to investigate the relationship between the milling parameters and their effects on a kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials. The composite panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) method. A full factorial design of experiments was use as an initial step to screen the significance of the parameters on the defects using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). If the curvature of the collected data shows significant, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is then applied for obtaining a quadratic modelling equation that has more reliable in expressing the optimization. Thus, the objective of this research is obtaining an optimum setting of milling parameters and modelling equations to minimize the surface roughness (Ra) and delamination factor (Fd) of milled kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials. The spindle speed and feed rate contributed the most in affecting the surface roughness and the delamination factor of the kenaf composite materials.

  4. Assessment of Barriers to Providing Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs in the Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Gibson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The primary objective of the study is to identify the barriers to providing Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs in the hospital setting. Methods: Potential barriers to IPPEs were identified via literature review and interviews with current IPPE preceptors from various institutions. Based on this information, an electronic survey was developed and distributed to IPPE preceptors in order to assess student, preceptor, logistical and college or school of pharmacy related barriers that potentially exist for providing IPPE in the hospital setting. Results: Sixty-eight of the 287 eligible survey respondents (24% completed the electronic survey. Seventy-six percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that available time was a barrier to precepting IPPE students even though a majority of respondents reported spending a third or more of their day with an IPPE student when on rotation. Seventy-three percent of respondents disagreed or strongly disagreed that all preceptors have consistent performance expectations for students, while just 46% agreed or strongly agreed that they had adequate training to precept IPPEs. Sixty-five percent of respondents agreed that IPPE students have the ability to be a participant in patient care and 70% of preceptors believe that IPPE students should be involved in patient care. Conclusions: Conducting IPPEs in the institutional setting comes with challenges. Based on the results of this study, experiential directors and colleges/schools of pharmacy could make a positive impact on the quality and consistency of IPPEs by setting student expectations and training preceptors on appropriate and consistent expectations for students.   Type: Original Research

  5. Analysis of benchmark critical experiments with ENDF/B-VI data sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J. Jr.; Kahler, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Several clean critical experiments were analyzed with ENDF/B-VI data to assess the adequacy of the data for U 235 , U 238 and oxygen. These experiments were (1) a set of homogeneous U 235 -H 2 O assemblies spanning a wide range of hydrogen/uranium ratio, and (2) TRX-1, a simple, H 2 O-moderated Bettis lattice of slightly-enriched uranium metal rods. The analyses used the Monte Carlo program RCP01, with explicit three-dimensional geometry and detailed representation of cross sections. For the homogeneous criticals, calculated k crit values for large, thermal assemblies show good agreement with experiment. This supports the evaluated thermal criticality parameters for U 235 . However, for assemblies with smaller H/U ratios, k crit values increase significantly with increasing leakage and flux-spectrum hardness. These trends suggest that leakage is underpredicted and that the resonance eta of the ENDF/B-VI U 235 is too large. For TRX-1, reasonably good agreement is found with measured lattice parameters (reaction-rate ratios). Of primary interest is rho28, the ratio of above-thermal to thermal U 238 capture. Calculated rho28 is 2.3 (± 1.7) % above measurement, suggesting that U 238 resonance capture remains slightly overpredicted with ENDF/B-VI. However, agreement is better than observed with earlier versions of ENDF/B

  6. Experience of air transport of nuclear fuel material in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, T.; Toguri, D.; Kawasaki, M.

    2004-01-01

    Certified Reference Materials (hereafter called as to CRMs), which are indispensable for Quality Assurance and Material Accountability in nuclear fuel plants, are being provided by overseas suppliers to Japanese nuclear entities as Type A package (non-fissile) through air transport. However, after the criticality accident at JCO in Japan, special law defining nuclear disaster countermeasures (hereafter called as to the LAW) has been newly enforced in June 2000. Thereafter, nuclear fuel materials must meet not only to the existing transport regulations but also to the LAW for its transport

  7. How We Used NASA Lunar Set in Planetary Material Science Analog Studies on Lunar Basalts and Breccias with Industrial Materials of Steels and Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczi, S.; Cech, V.; Jozsa, S.; Szakmany, G.; Fabriczy, A.; Foldi, T.; Varga, T.

    2005-01-01

    Analog studies play important role in space materials education. Various aspects of analogies are used in our courses. In this year two main rock types of NASA Lunar Set were used in analog studies in respect of processes and textures with selected industrial material samples. For breccias and basalts on the lunar side, ceramics and steels were found as analogs on the industrial side. Their processing steps were identified on the basis of their textures both in lunar and in industrial groups of materials.

  8. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education. Builders School, Ceramic Tile Setting 3-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, for individualized or group instruction on ceramic tile setting, was developed from military sources for use in vocational education. The course provides students with skills in mortar preparation, surface preparation, tile layout planning, tile setting, tile cutting, and the grouting of tile joints. Both theory and shop assignments…

  9. The clinical nurse leader in the perioperative setting: a preceptor experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Michael S; Casey, Gwendolyn L; Berry, Shirley J; Gannon, Jane

    2014-07-01

    The U.S. Veterans Administration (VA) has implemented the clinical nurse leader (CNL) role nationwide. Nursing leaders at the Malcolm Randall VA Medical Center in Gainesville, Florida, implemented the development of the CNL role in the perioperative setting during the summer of 2012. The perioperative department developed the position in partnership with the University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida. The team developed a description of the roles and experiences of the preceptors, the clinical nurse leader resident, and the University of Florida faculty member. The clinical nurse leader resident's successes and the positive outcomes, such as improved patient outcomes, experienced by the perioperative department demonstrated the importance of the CNL role. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. First year pre-service science teachers’ experiences of authentic instructional tasks in a PDS setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Birgitte; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    . The small groups gave the student teachers the opportunity to get on a level with the school students. They also refer to the iterative dimension and the importance of formative assessment. Based on the evaluative criteria it may be concluded that the two examples are successful models for authentic......Professional development schools (PDS) have been a source of inspiration for a new approach at the teacher education in Aarhus (DK). The importance of student teachers’ inquiries in authentic settings is in line with various research-based approaches to educating (science) teachers. The purpose...... for an authentic instructional task, are presented. Ten students were asked to describe their experiences of working with these tasks during repeated interviews. They refer to concrete examples of school students’ activities and/or learning when reflecting on their own learning and to dialogue with school students...

  11. Leisure-time youth centres as health-promoting settings: Experiences from multicultural neighbourhoods in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Ingela; Geidne, Susanna; Eriksson, Charli

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to advocate for the importance of meaningful leisure time for young people from a health-promotion perspective using experiences from two youth centres in multicultural neighbourhoods in Sweden. In this practice-based study, data were collected between 2012 and 2014 at two youth centres in multicultural, socially deprived suburbs in Sweden using surveys with 12- to 16-year-old adolescents ( n = 207), seven individual interviews with staff and three cooperation partners in the neighbourhoods, and six group interviews with adolescents (50% girls). Quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods were used for analysis. As part of the youth centres' strategies, they are open and inclusive, foster supportive relationships, emphasise youth empowerment, and integrate family, school and community in their work. The youth centres are health-promoting settings with regard to four of the action areas in the Ottawa Charter: build healthy public policy, create supportive environments, strengthen community actions and develop personal skills. There is a need for a variety and a combination of various structured and unstructured leisure-time activities because young people's background and life situation plays a role for their participation in leisure-time activities. We conclude that youth centres are well placed to be or to become health-promoting settings if the activities takes place in a structured environment.

  12. Shielding experiments in different materials with 252Cf neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathian, Deepa; Marathe, P.K.; Pal, Rupali; Jayalakshmi, V.; Chourasiya, G.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2008-01-01

    Adequate shielding for neutron sources can be determined using analytical method or by actually measuring the attenuation for the target configuration. This paper describes the measurement of Half Value Thickness (HVT), Tenth Value Thickness (TVT), Σ values for four different shielding materials, using a standard 252 Cf neutron source and comparing with the values calculated using an empirical relationship. BF 3 based REM-counter is used for measurement of neutron dose equivalent, against different thickness of the shielding material. The experimental HVT and S values are in good agreement with the calculated values. From this study, it is concluded that, among the four materials studied, high density polyethylene (HDPE) is best suitable for the shielding of a 252 Cf neutron source. (author)

  13. Analysis of material flow in metal forming processes by using computer simulation and experiment with model material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heon Young; Kim, Dong Won

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to analyze material flow in the metal forming processes by using computer simulation and experiment with model material, plasticine. A UBET program is developed to analyze the bulk flow behaviour of various metal forming problems. The elemental strain-hardening effect is considered in an incremental manner and the element system is automatically regenerated at every deforming step in the program. The material flow behaviour in closed-die forging process with rib-web type cavity are analyzed by UBET and elastic-plastic finite element method, and verified by experiments with plasticine. There were good agreements between simulation and experiment. The effect of corner rounding on material flow behavior is investigated in the analysis of backward extrusion with square die. Flat punch indentation process is simulated by UBET, and the results are compared with that of elastic-plastic finite element method. (Author)

  14. Setting up experimental incineration system for low-level radioactive samples and combustion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, Yasuhiro; Hanafusa, Tadashi; Nagamatsu, Tomohiro; Okada, Shigeru

    1997-01-01

    An incineration system was constructed which were composed of a combustion furnace (AP-150R), a cyclone dust collector, radioisotope trapping and measurement apparatus and a radioisotope storage room built in the first basement of the Radioisotope Center. Low level radioactive samples (LLRS) used for the combustion experiment were composed of combustible material or semi-combustible material containing 500 kBq of 99m TcO 4 or 23.25 kBq of 131 INa. The distribution of radioisotopes both in the inside and outside of combustion furnace were estimated. We measured radioactivity of a smoke duct gas in terminal exit of the exhaust port. In case of combustion of LLRS containing 99m TcO 4 or 131 INa, concentration of radioisotopes at the exhaust port showed less than legal concentration limit of these radioisotopes. In cases of combustion of LLRS containing 99m TcO 4 or 131 INa, decontamination factors of the incineration system were 120 and 1.1, respectively. (author)

  15. Supervisors' experiences of workplace supervision of nursing and paramedic students in rural settings: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trede, Franziska; McEwen, Celina; Kenny, Amanda; O'Meara, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We present our findings from a scoping review that sought to identify what is known about nursing and paramedic clinical supervisors' experiences of their supervision practices in rural settings. Our interest in these two groups is based on the central role that nurses and paramedics play in rural health care. Scoping reviews support identification of a broad range of literature, including all types of study designs. We adopted Arksey and O'Malley's five-stage approach: identifying the research question; identifying relevant studies; study selection; charting the data; and collating, summarising and reporting results. Databases searched included Academic Search Complete, Springer, Factiva, ProQuest, Ebsco, Informit, VOCEDplus and Scopus. Based on our research question and inclusion and exclusion criteria we selected relevant literature and summarised and reported it using Arksey and O'Malley's framework. The review yielded five articles from four countries: Sweden, Belgium, Malaysia and Australia. From this scoping review, we identified key themes related to supervisors' experiences, including clarification of expectations, support from managers and colleagues, the need for shared understanding between university, students and supervisors and required skills and competence in supervising students. © 2013.

  16. Aboriginal Australians' experience of social capital and its relevance to health and wellbeing in urban settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne-Yung, Kathryn; Ziersch, Anna; Baum, Fran; Gallaher, Gilbert

    2013-11-01

    Social capital has been linked to physical and mental health. While definitions of social capital vary, all include networks of social relationships and refer to the subsequent benefits and disadvantages accrued to members. Research on social capital for Aboriginal Australians has mainly focused on discrete rural and remote Aboriginal contexts with less known about the features and health and other benefits of social capital in urban settings. This paper presents findings from in-depth interviews with 153 Aboriginal people living in urban areas on their experiences of social capital. Of particular interest was how engagement in bonding and bridging networks influenced health and wellbeing. Employing Bourdieu's relational theory of capital where resources are unequally distributed and reproduced in society we found that patterns of social capital are strongly associated with economic, social and cultural position which in turn reflects the historical experiences of dispossession and disadvantage experienced by Aboriginal Australians. Social capital was also found to both reinforce and influence Aboriginal cultural identity, and had both positive and negative impacts on health and wellbeing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Patients' self-interested preferences: empirical evidence from a priority setting experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Begoña; Rodríguez-Míguez, Eva

    2011-04-01

    This paper explores whether patients act according to self-interest in priority setting experiments. The analysis is based on a ranking experiment, conducted in Galicia (Spain), to elicit preferences regarding the prioritization of patients on a waiting list for an elective surgical intervention (prostatectomy for benign prostatic hyperplasia). Participants were patients awaiting a similar intervention and members of the general populations. All of them were asked to rank hypothetical patients on a waiting list. A rank-ordered logit was then applied to their responses in order to obtain a prioritization scoring system. Using these estimations, we first test for differences in preferences between patients and general population. Second, we implement a procedure based on the similarity between respondents (true patients) and the hypothetical scenarios they evaluate (hypothetical patients) to analyze whether patients provide self-interested rankings. Our results show that patient preferences differ significantly from general population preferences. The findings also indicate that, when patients rank the hypothetical scenarios on the waiting list, they consider not only the explicit attributes but also the similarity of each scenario to their own. In particular, they assign a higher priority to scenarios that more closely match their own states. We also find that such a preference structure increases their likelihood of reporting "irrational" answers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Experiences of a support group for interns in the setting of war and political turmoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Jamil, Fatima; Hamadeh, Ghassan N; Osman, Hibah

    2007-10-01

    Intern support groups have been instituted in many residency programs to improve resident well-being. In this article, we discuss the themes that emerged in intern support group meetings in a family medicine program operating in a setting of war and political instability. We held support groups, led by a family physician and a psychologist, that met monthly. Participants were residents in the family medicine program at the American University of Beirut. These residents began their training days after the commencement of the 34-day war between Israel and Hizbollah in 2006. Themes and issues discussed by the residents were noted and are reported in this article. We found that despite the stressors of the political situation, our interns focused on the usual stress of internship, such as the difficulties of functioning as interns in other departments and dealing with the time demands of internship as their main sources of stress at the beginning of internship. The stresses associated with the war did not emerge in the group until later in the year. These included tension with patients and political confrontations with staff, as well as personal struggles with the lack of political stability and depressed mood. This paper serves to share our experience and highlight some areas of concern that residents experience when training in a country or region that is at war.

  19. Enacted Realities in Teachers' Experiences: Bringing Materialism into Pragmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström Sjödin, Elin; Wahlström, Ninni

    2017-01-01

    In this article we explore factors that constitute "the social" for the teacher Susan, which at the same time highlights ethical aspects of the exercise of her profession. We meet her in a situation where she is setting grades, and our interest focuses on the relations that become of concern for her in her professional task to give the…

  20. Cosmic Experiments: Remaking Materialism and Daoist Ethic "Outside of the Establishment".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Mei

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I discuss recent experiments in 'classical' (gudian) Chinese medicine. As the marketization and privatization of health care deepens and enters uncharted territories in China, a cohort of young practitioners and entrepreneurs have begun their quest for the 'primordial spirit' of traditional Chinese medicine by setting up their own businesses where they engage in clinical, pedagogical, and entrepreneurial practices outside of state-run institutions. I argue that these explorations in classical Chinese medicine, which focus on classical texts and Daoist analytics, do not aim to restore spirituality to the scientized and secularized theory of traditional Chinese medicine. Nor are they symptomatic of withdrawals from the modern world. Rather, these 'cosmic experiments' need to be understood in relation to dialectical and historical materialisms as modes of knowledge production and political alliance. In challenging the status of materialist theory and the process of theorization in traditional Chinese medicine and postsocialist life more broadly speaking, advocates of classical Chinese medicine imagine nondialectical materialisms as immanent ways of thinking, doing, and being in the world.

  1. Preparation of Magnetic Composite Materials: Experiments for Secondary School Students

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldíková, Eva; Pospíšková, K.; Maděrová, Zdeňka; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Šafařík, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 1 (2016), s. 64-68 ISSN 0009-2770 Keywords : dyes removal * nanoparticles * mechanochemistry * technology * adsorbent * fe3o4 * magnetic modification * magnetic composite materials * magnetic separation * microwave-assisted synthesis * mechanochemical synthesis Impact factor: 0.387, year: 2016

  2. Experiences of packaging research outputs into extension materials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Research dissemination is one component of research that still faces many hindrances, ... time-frames for dissemination activities going beyond project phase-out in order to maximise ..... Available or upcoming extension materials, with cost and availability ..... Renewable Natural Resources Research Strategy, Annual.

  3. Deconstructing the Constructed Experience: Reforming Science Materials to Develop Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, Timothy A.; Hughes, Claire E.

    2018-01-01

    For over 50 years, science educators have been calling for increased opportunities for students to engage with science in creative manners, but teachers are still reliant on packaged materials that promote single and 'correct' responses with cookbook approaches. This article suggests five strategies that teachers can use to enhance constructed…

  4. Application of simulation experiments to fusion materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolfi, F.V. Jr.; Li, C.Y.

    1978-01-01

    One of the major problems in the development of structural alloys for use in magnetic fusion reactors (MFRs) is the lack of suitable materials testing facilities. This is because operating fusion reactors, even of the experimental size, do not exist. A primary task in the early stages of MFR alloy development will be to adapt currently available irradiation facilities for use in materials development. Thus, it is generally recognized that, at least for the next ten years, studies of irradiation effects in an MFR environment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of structural materials must utilize ion and fission neutron simulations. Special problems will arise because, in addition to displacement damage, an MFR radiation environment will produce, in candidate structural materials, higher and more significant concentrations of gaseous nuclear transmutation products, e.g., helium and hydrogen, than found in a fast breeder reactor. These effects must be taken into account when simulation techniques are employed, since they impact heavily on irradiation microstructure development and, hence, mechanical properties

  5. Why Is 10 Past 10 the Default Setting for Clocks and Watches in Advertisements? A Psychological Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Karim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Have you ever noticed that in watch advertisements the time is usually set at 10:10? The reasons and psychological effects of this default time setting are elusive. In Experiment 1, we hypothesized that watches showing a time setting resembling a smiling face (10:10 would enhance emotional valence and intention to buy compared to a neutral time setting (11:30, whereas a time setting resembling a sad face (8:20 would have the opposite effect. Moreover, we investigated a possible interaction effect with the gender of the participants. In Experiment 2, we directly tested the hypotheses that watches set at 10:10 resemble a smiling face, whereas watches set at 8:20 resemble a sad face. The data of the first experiment reveal that watches set at 10:10 showed a significant positive effect on the emotion of the observer and the intention to buy. However, watches set at 8:20 did not show any effect on the emotion or the intention to buy. Moreover, watches set at 10:10 induced in women significantly stronger ratings of pleasure than in men. The data of the second experiment show that participants consistently perceive high resemblance between watches set at 10:10 and a smiling face as well as high resemblance between watches set at 8:20 and a sad face. This study provides for the first time empirical evidence for the notion that using watches with a time setting resembling a smiling face (like 10:10 can positively affect the emotional response of the observers and their evaluation of a seen watch, even though they are not aware of the fact that the shown time setting is inducing this effect. Practical implications of the observed findings and alternative explanations are discussed.

  6. Why Is 10 Past 10 the Default Setting for Clocks and Watches in Advertisements? A Psychological Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Ahmed A; Lützenkirchen, Britta; Khedr, Eman; Khalil, Radwa

    2017-01-01

    Have you ever noticed that in watch advertisements the time is usually set at 10:10? The reasons and psychological effects of this default time setting are elusive. In Experiment 1, we hypothesized that watches showing a time setting resembling a smiling face (10:10) would enhance emotional valence and intention to buy compared to a neutral time setting (11:30), whereas a time setting resembling a sad face (8:20) would have the opposite effect. Moreover, we investigated a possible interaction effect with the gender of the participants. In Experiment 2, we directly tested the hypotheses that watches set at 10:10 resemble a smiling face, whereas watches set at 8:20 resemble a sad face. The data of the first experiment reveal that watches set at 10:10 showed a significant positive effect on the emotion of the observer and the intention to buy. However, watches set at 8:20 did not show any effect on the emotion or the intention to buy. Moreover, watches set at 10:10 induced in women significantly stronger ratings of pleasure than in men. The data of the second experiment show that participants consistently perceive high resemblance between watches set at 10:10 and a smiling face as well as high resemblance between watches set at 8:20 and a sad face. This study provides for the first time empirical evidence for the notion that using watches with a time setting resembling a smiling face (like 10:10) can positively affect the emotional response of the observers and their evaluation of a seen watch, even though they are not aware of the fact that the shown time setting is inducing this effect. Practical implications of the observed findings and alternative explanations are discussed.

  7. Some Experience with Illicit Trafficking of Radioactive Materials in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngaile, J.E.; Banzi, F.P.; Kifanga, L.D.

    2008-01-01

    Illicit trafficking of radioactive materials (orphan sources or disuse sources) is of global concern. Reports on the IAEA Illicit Trafficking Data Base (ITDB) indicates increasing trend of incidents recorded in more than 40 countries on six continents[1]. It is suspected that nuclear trafficking is fueled by nuclear terrorism and is a threat for increasing illegal trade in nuclear and radioactive materials to manufacture Radiological Disposal Devices (RDD)- dirty bombs. As such, the international co-operative efforts are needed to uncover and combat nuclear trafficking in order to minimize its consequences such as external radiation exposure of persons from source to various radiation levels during illicit movement and after seizure; rupture of source leading to internal exposure of persons and environmental contamination. Although accidents with radioactive materials have not occurred in the United Republic of Tanzania (URT), incidents of illicit trafficking and unauthorized possession of radioactive materials has occurred thus prompting the Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission (TAEC) to strengthen its nuclear security of nuclear and radioactive material in the URT. Nuclear faclities and radioactive sources lacks adequate physical protection against theft, fire or different forms of unauthorized access. Tanzaniaia has recorded about thirteen (13) illicit trafficking incidents of radioactive between 1996-2006. Caesium-137, Uranium-238; and Uranium oxide standard and Radium-226 with activity ranging from low to significantly high were among the radiounuclides which were intercepted. Most of these incidents had their original outside Tanzania. The incidents were uncovered by informers in cooperation with the police. Despite the fact that the management of these incidents by the police were adequate, it was observed that there is an inadequate radiation protection arrangements during transport of seized sources; lack of precautions for safety when handling seized

  8. Stigma of addiction and mental illness in healthcare: The case of patients' experiences in dental settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A Brondani

    Full Text Available To explore the ways in which stigma is experienced in healthcare and dental settings by patients with a history of addiction and mental illness.Audio-recorded, semi-structured interviews with a purposefully selected convenience sample of residents from two community treatment centres in Vancouver, Canada were conducted. The interview guide contained questions about experiences while seeking health and dental care and was based on an existing framework of labeling, stereotyping, exclusion, discrimination, and power imbalance. Interviews were transcribed verbatim for coding and thematic analysis.Twenty-five participants between 23 and 67 years of age were interviewed; 17 were males. Most had a self-reported history of depression combined with use of alcohol and crack-cocaine; most of them only sought dental care for emergency purposes. Textual analysis of more than 300 pages of transcribed interviews revealed that participants perceived stigma when they were negatively stereotyped as 'unworthy', labeled as 'different', excluded from the decision-making process, discriminated against, 'treated unfairly', and felt powerless when interacting in the heath and dental care systems. Conversely, positive experiences were characterized by empathy, reassurance and good communication, which were empowering for patients.When associated with stigma, mental illness and addictions have negative implications for accessing health and dental care. From our participants' perspectives, it seems that the lack of understanding about their life conditions by the healthcare professionals was the origin of stigma. We suggest that an increased social awareness of these health issues be enhanced among current and future health and dental care professionals to help improve care experiences for this marginalized population.

  9. Setting waste isolation times into a geological context: some experience with natural analogues in public information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritschi, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The concept of geological repositories: Permanent protection of humans and the environment by long-term passive isolation of the radioactive materials from the environment. Permanent means until radioactivity has decayed to insignificant levels (Many tens of thousands of years up to one million years into the future). Human experience with timescales: - Personal: Some 10 years, maybe up to 2 to (3) generations; - 'Rapid' (normally experienced as slow) and relevant changes with regard to personal well-being during this time span; - 100 years of European history; - Human History up to 5,000 years: but relevant to experience? So there is a complete mismatch of personal experience with the question addressed in the safety case. Understandable explanation of a geological repository: - Why is a geological repository necessary? - Why are geological repositories safe? - How can one be sure, what happens in 100,000 years? Radioactive waste must be disposed of in a way to ensure permanent protection of humans and the environment (Swiss Nuclear Energy Law). A Containment is thus necessary. Today's containment (storage) needs maintenance, but how about stability of society? How about the future development on the surface where we live? Passive safety is based on multiple barrier system: passive containment without the need of maintenance in a geological environment. Requirements on the host rock and the geosphere: Sound science and expertise is available for all the components. The need for translation: What pictures do you use to explain the functioning of a geological repository over long time scales? Pictures, Symbols, 'Analogues' must be adapted to the specific situation in a country. So whatever may happen on the surface over the next one million years: Time stands still in the underground

  10. The Experience and Effectiveness of Nurse Practitioners in Orthopaedic Settings: A Comprehensive Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anita; Staruchowicz, Lynda

    This review asks "What is the experience and effectiveness of nurse practitioners in orthopaedic settings"?The objective of the quantitative component of this review is to synthesise the best available evidence on effectiveness of orthopaedic nurse practitioner specific care on patient outcomes and process indicators.The objective of the qualitative component of this review is to synthesise the best available evidence on the experience of becoming or being an orthopaedic nurse practitioner in relation to role development, role implementation and (ongoing) role evaluation.The objective of the text and opinion component of this review is to synthesise the best available evidence of the contemporary discourse on the effectiveness and experience of nurse practitioners in orthopaedic settings. Nurse practitioner roles have emerged in response to areas of unmet healthcare needs in a variety of settings. Nurse practitioners first evolved in the United States 40 years ago in response to a shortage of primary health care physicians. Nurse practitioners filled the void by providing access to primary health care services where otherwise there was none. Nurse practitioners comprise one branch of advanced nursing practice in the US along with Nurse Anaesthetists (NA), Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS) and Nurse Midwives (NM). Canada soon followed America's lead by establishing the nurse practitioner role in 1967. Canada has two areas of advanced nursing practice, namely nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist; they are moving towards introducing nurse anaesthetists currently. The nurse practitioner role was introduced into the United Kingdom 20 years ago.There is commonality amongst the definition and characteristics of Nurse Practitioner (NP)/Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) role and practice internationally in terms of education, practice standards and regulation; operationally there is variability however. Australia's progress with nurse practitioners is very much

  11. Performance of fast-setting impression materials in the reproduction of subgingival tooth surfaces without soft tissue retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Heike; Röhl, Andreas; Walter, Michael H; Luthardt, Ralph G; Quaas, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Fast-setting impression materials may be prone to inaccuracies due to accidental divergence from the recommended mixing protocol. This prospective randomized clinical trial aimed to assess three-dimensional (3D) deviations in the reproduction of subgingival tooth surfaces and to determine the effect of either following or purposely diverging from the recommended mixing procedure for a fast-setting addition-curing silicone (AS) and fast-setting polyether (PE). After three impressions each were taken from 96 participants, sawcut gypsum casts were fabricated with a standardized procedure and then optically digitized. Data were assessed with a computer-aided 3D analysis. For AS impressions, multivariate analysis of variance revealed a significant influence of the individual tooth and the degree to which the recommended mixing protocol was violated. For PE impressions, the ambient air temperature and individual tooth showed significant effects, while divergence from the recommended mixing protocol was not of significance. The fast-setting PE material was not affected by changes in the recommended mixing protocol. For the two fast-setting materials examined, no divergences from the recommended mixing protocol of less than 2 minutes led to failures in the reproduction of the subgingival tooth surfaces.

  12. Sample positioning in neutron diffraction experiments using a multi-material fiducial marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marais, D., E-mail: Deon.Marais@necsa.co.za [Research and Development Division, South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa) SOC Limited, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Venter, A.M., E-mail: Andrew.Venter@necsa.co.za [Research and Development Division, South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa) SOC Limited, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Faculty of Agriculture Science and Technology, North-West University, Mahikeng 2790 (South Africa); Markgraaff, J., E-mail: Johan.Markgraaff@nwu.ac.za [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); James, J., E-mail: Jon.James@open.ac.uk [Faculty of Mathematics, Computing and Technology, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK76AA England (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-01

    An alternative sample positioning method is reported for use in conjunction with sample positioning and experiment planning software systems deployed on some neutron diffraction strain scanners. In this approach, the spherical fiducial markers and location trackers used with optical metrology hardware are replaced with a specifically designed multi-material fiducial marker that requires one diffraction measurement. In a blind setting, the marker position can be determined within an accuracy of ±164 µm with respect to the instrument gauge volume. The scheme is based on a pre-determined relationship that links the diffracted peak intensity to the absolute positioning of the fiducial marker with respect to the instrument gauge volume. Two methods for establishing the linking relationship are presented, respectively based on fitting multi-dimensional quadratic functions and a cross-correlation artificial neural network.

  13. National Educators' Workshop: Update 2003. Standard Experiments in Engineering, Materials Science, and Technology. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Edwin J. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Edmonson, William (Compiler); Wilkerson, Amy (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The 18th Annual National Educators Workshop [NEW:Update 2003] was a part of NASA Langley s celebration of the Centennial of Controlled, Powered Flight by Orville and Wilbur Wright on December 17, 1903. The conference proceedings from NEW:Update 2003 reflect the Flight 100 theme by first providing a historic perspective on the remarkable accomplishments of the Wright Brothers. The historical perspective set the stag for insights into aeronautics and aerospace structures and materials now and into the future. The NEW:Update 2003 proceedings provide valuable resources to educators and students in the form of visuals, experiments and demonstrations for classes/labs at levels ranging from precollege through college education.

  14. National Educators' Workshop: Update 2003. Standard Experiments in Engineering, Materials Science, and Technology. Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Edwin J. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Edmonson, William (Compiler); Wilkerson, Amy (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The 18th Annual National Educators Workshop [NEW:Update 2003] was a part of NASA Langley s celebration of the Centennial of Controlled, Powered Flight by Orville and Wilbur Wright on December 17, 1903. The conference proceedings from NEW:Update 2003 reflect the Flight 100 theme by first providing a historic perspective on the remarkable accomplishments of the Wright Brothers. The historical perspective set the stag for insights into aeronautics and aerospace structures and materials now and into the future. The NEW:Update 2003 proceedings provide valuable resources to educators and students in the form of visuals, experiments and demonstrations for classes/labs at levels ranging from precollege through college education.

  15. Setting of loose-fill insulation materials in walls; Saetningsfri indblaesning af loesfyldsisolering i vaegge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, T.V.

    2001-07-01

    The report describes material behaviour, which significantly influences the settling of loose-fill insulation materials. The specific application presented here is loose-fill insulation material injected in walls as thermal insulation. The physical formulation of the issue to be discussed is that the mass is kept in position in the cavity by frictional forces, which counteracts the settling but complicates injection. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether there is a possibility that decreased friction will be able to release settling. Cellulose loose-fill material injected in a 0.1 m thick and 1 m wide gypsum wall with a minimum density of 48 kg/m3 was found not to settle if kept at a constant relative humidity, RH 50 %. A minimum density of 53 kg/m3 is necessary if the thickness of the wall is increased from 0.1 m to 0.3 m. If changing the constant environment from RH 50 % to RH 80 % a minimum density of 63 kg/m3 is necessary. Furthermore, results so far show that cellulose loose-fill material spread on the attic floor will have a density after settling of 48 kg /M3 for a constant RH 50 %, corresponding to 43 kg/m3 dry material. The results were found by using a model and tests. (au)

  16. UK experience of managing a radioactive materials transport event database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, N.J.; Barrett, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A description is given of the transport event database RAMTED and the related annual accident and incident reports. This database covers accidents and incidents involving the transport of radioactive material in the UK from 1958 to the present day. The paper discusses the history and content of the database, the origin of event data contained in it, the criteria for inclusion and future developments. (author)

  17. Experiment and research on materials irradiated by plasma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Wenyu; Yao Lianghua; Tang Sujun; Chang Shufen; Li Guodong

    1992-08-01

    The TiC and SiC coating on the graphite substrate and wall carbonization were studied by plasma radiation in HL-1 tokamak. Samples were analysed with AES (auger electron spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscopy), XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and XDS (X-ray diffraction spectroscopy). The results show that the TiC and SiC materials coated on limiter and wall and wall carbonization can reduce the metal and oxygen impurities and improve the plasma merit

  18. Irradiation creep experiments on fusion reactor candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation creep rates were determined for annealed and cold-worked AMCR- and 316-type steel alloys in the high flux reactor at Petten, for various irradiation temperatures, stresses and for neutron doses up to 4 dpa. Primary creep elongations were found in all annealed materials. A negative creep elongation was found in cold-worked materials for stresses equal to or below about 100 MPa. An increase of the negative creep elongation is found for decreasing irradiation temperatures and decreasing applied stresses. The stress exponent of the irradiation creep rate in annealed and cold-worked AMCR alloys is n = 1.85 and n = 1.1, respectively. The creep rates of cold-worked AMCR alloys are almost temperature independent over the range investigated (573-693 K). The results obtained in the HFR at Petten are compared with those obtained in ORR and EBR II. The smallest creep rates are found for cold-worked materials of AMCR- and US-PCA-type at Petten which are about a factor two smaller than the creep rates obtained of US-316 at Petten or for US-PCA at ORR or for 316L at EBR II. The scatter band factor for US-PCA, 316L, US-316 irradiated in ORR and EBR II is about 1.5 after a temperature and damage rate normalization

  19. Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational eXperiment - University of Washington instrumented C-131A aircraft Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TARFOX_UWC131A is the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational eXperiment (TARFOX) - University of Washington instrumented C-131A aircraft data set. The...

  20. Nuclear material discovery or loss: the French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetti, S.H.

    2006-01-01

    In a nuclear facility, when a difference between the physical inventory listing and accountancy records is discovered, the French law (Article 11 of the 'Decret 81-512') requires a declaration to the High Civil Servant for Defence of the Ministry in charge of Industry. Moreover, according to article L.1333-13 of the Defence Code, in case of a suspicion of loss, theft or diversion of nuclear material, the licensee has to declare this event to the police. In the meantime, an investigation is carried out in the facility, and in cooperation with other facilities if necessary. These measures are aimed at: - Finding the lost nuclear material (if any), - Understand the causes of the problem, - Solve the differences by acting on the PIL or/and accountancy records, - Act to prevent any other occurrence of this kind of event. These actions can take place in the general field of a police investigation. After all these facts and information have been gathered, the licensee writes down a complete file which is transferred to the High Civil Servant for Defence of the Ministry in charge of Industry, in order to be analysed by his technical support body (IRSN). Thus, the IRSN is able to give its conclusion to the authority about this event, especially regarding: - The causes of the event, - Relevance and completeness of investigations, - Pertinence of the corrections, - Relevance of corrective actions, - Probability of another occurrence. This system is useful to ensure a complete follow-up of the events occurring in the various nuclear facilities in France, to have an extensive overview of the problems on a national scale. If an item is found in a facility A, numerous questions must be answered: - Where does it come from? - Since when is it in facility A? - How did it happened that this item has been transferred from facility B to facility A without the transfer of information? - We will consider these issues through examples. This kind of event can be potentially very rich in

  1. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1991. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, J.E.; Jacobs, J.A.; Stiegler, J.O.

    1992-06-01

    Given here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 91, held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on November 12-14, 1991. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community

  2. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1988. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 88, held May 10 to 12, 1988 at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersberg, Maryland. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  3. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1989 Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 89, held October 17 to 19, 1989 at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, Virginia. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  4. National Educators' Workshop: Update 95. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A.; Karnitz, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 95. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  5. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1993. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 93 held at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on November 3-5, 1993. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  6. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1991. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Stiegler, James O. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 91, held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on November 12-14, 1991. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  7. Ethical violations in the clinical setting: the hidden curriculum learning experience of Pakistani nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafree, Sara Rizvi; Zakar, Rubeena; Fischer, Florian; Zakar, Muhammad Zakria

    2015-03-19

    The importance of the hidden curriculum is recognised as a practical training ground for the absorption of medical ethics by healthcare professionals. Pakistan's healthcare sector is hampered by the exclusion of ethics from medical and nursing education curricula and the absence of monitoring of ethical violations in the clinical setting. Nurses have significant knowledge of the hidden curriculum taught during clinical practice, due to long working hours in the clinic and front-line interaction with patients and other practitioners. The means of inquiry for this study was qualitative, with 20 interviews and four focus group discussions used to identify nurses' clinical experiences of ethical violations. Content analysis was used to discover sub-categories of ethical violations, as perceived by nurses, within four pre-defined categories of nursing codes of ethics: 1) professional guidelines and integrity, 2) patient informed consent, 3) patient rights, and 4) co-worker coordination for competency, learning and patient safety. Ten sub-categories of ethical violations were found: nursing students being used as adjunct staff, nurses having to face frequent violence in the hospital setting, patient reluctance to receive treatment from nurses, the near-absence of consent taken from patients for most non-surgical medical procedures, the absence of patient consent taking for receiving treatment from student nurses, the practice of patient discrimination on the basis of a patient's socio-demographic status, nurses withdrawing treatment out of fear for their safety, a non-learning culture and, finally, blame-shifting and non-reportage of errors. Immediate and urgent attention is required to reduce ethical violations in the healthcare sector in Pakistan through collaborative efforts by the government, the healthcare sector, and ethics regulatory bodies. Also, changes in socio-cultural values in hospital organisation, public awareness of how to conveniently report ethical

  8. Tracking difference in gene expression in a time-course experiment using gene set enrichment analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pui Shan Wong

    Full Text Available Fistulifera sp. strain JPCC DA0580 is a newly sequenced pennate diatom that is capable of simultaneously growing and accumulating lipids. This is a unique trait, not found in other related microalgae so far. It is able to accumulate between 40 to 60% of its cell weight in lipids, making it a strong candidate for the production of biofuel. To investigate this characteristic, we used RNA-Seq data gathered at four different times while Fistulifera sp. strain JPCC DA0580 was grown in oil accumulating and non-oil accumulating conditions. We then adapted gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA to investigate the relationship between the difference in gene expression of 7,822 genes and metabolic functions in our data. We utilized information in the KEGG pathway database to create the gene sets and changed GSEA to use re-sampling so that data from the different time points could be included in the analysis. Our GSEA method identified photosynthesis, lipid synthesis and amino acid synthesis related pathways as processes that play a significant role in oil production and growth in Fistulifera sp. strain JPCC DA0580. In addition to GSEA, we visualized the results by creating a network of compounds and reactions, and plotted the expression data on top of the network. This made existing graph algorithms available to us which we then used to calculate a path that metabolizes glucose into triacylglycerol (TAG in the smallest number of steps. By visualizing the data this way, we observed a separate up-regulation of genes at different times instead of a concerted response. We also identified two metabolic paths that used less reactions than the one shown in KEGG and showed that the reactions were up-regulated during the experiment. The combination of analysis and visualization methods successfully analyzed time-course data, identified important metabolic pathways and provided new hypotheses for further research.

  9. Electronic data capture in a rural African setting: evaluating experiences with different systems in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Carina; Hall, Jenny; Banda, Masford; Beard, James; Bird, Jon; Kazembe, Peter; Fottrell, Ed

    2014-01-01

    As hardware for electronic data capture (EDC), such as smartphones or tablets, becomes cheaper and more widely available, the potential for using such hardware as data capture tools in routine healthcare and research is increasing. We aim to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of four EDC systems being used simultaneously in rural Malawi: two for Android devices (CommCare and ODK Collect), one for PALM and Windows OS (Pendragon), and a custom-built application for Android (Mobile InterVA--MIVA). We report on the personal field and development experience of fieldworkers, project managers, and EDC system developers. Fieldworkers preferred using EDC to paper-based systems, although some struggled with the technology at first. Highlighted features include in-built skip patterns for all systems, and specifically the 'case' function that CommCare offers. MIVA as a standalone app required considerably more time and expertise than the other systems to create and could not be customised for our specific research needs; however, it facilitates standardised routine data collection. CommCare and ODK Collect both have user-friendly web-interfaces for form development and good technical support. CommCare requires Internet to build an application and download it to a device, whereas all steps can be done offline with ODK Collect, a desirable feature in low connectivity settings. Pendragon required more complex programming of logic, using a Microsoft Access application, and generally had less technical support. Start-up costs varied between systems, and all were considered more expensive than setting up a paper-based system; however running costs were generally low and therefore thought to be cost-effective over the course of our projects. EDC offers many opportunities for efficient data collection, but brings some issues requiring consideration when designing a study; the decision of which hardware and software to use should be informed by the aim of data collection

  10. A reaction time experiment on adult attachment: The development of a measure for neurophysiological settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresia Wichmann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, there has been an increase of experimental research on automatic unconscious processes concerning the evaluation of the self and others. Previous research investigated implicit aspects of romantic attachment using self-report measures as explicit instruments for assessing attachment style. There is a lack of experimental procedures feasible for neurobiological settings. We developed a reaction time experiment (RT using a narrative attachment measure with an implicit nature and were interested to capture automatic processes, when the individuals’ attachment system is activated. We aimed to combine attachment methodology with knowledge from implicit measures by using a decision reaction time paradigm. This should serve as a means to capture implicit aspects of attachment. This experiment evaluated participants’ response to prototypic attachment sentences in association with their own attachment classification, measured with the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP.First the AAP was administered as the standardized interview procedure to 30 healthy participants, which were classified into a secure or insecure group. In the following experimental session, both experimenter and participants were blind with respect to classifications. 128 prototypically secure or insecure sentences related to the 8 pictures of the AAP were presented to the participants. Their response and reaction times were recorded. Based on the response (accept, reject a continuous security scale was defined. Both the AAP classification and security scale were related to the reaction times. Differentiated study hypotheses were confirmed for insecure sentences, which were accepted faster by participants from the insecure attachment group (or with lower security scale, and rejected faster by participants form secure attachment group (or with higher security scale. The elaborating unconscious processes were more activated by insecure sentences with

  11. Transportation of radioactive materials routing analysis: The Nevada experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardila-Coulson, M.V.

    1991-01-01

    In 1987, the Nevada State Legislature passed a Bill requiring the Nevada Dept. of Transportation to develop and enforce a plan for highway routing of highway route controlled quantity shipments of radioactive materials and high-level radioactive waste. A large network with all the major highways in Nevada was created and used in a computer model developed by Sandia National Labs. Twenty-eight highway parameters that included geometrics, traffic characteristics, environment and special facilities were collected. Alternative routes were identified by minimizing primary parameters (population density and accident rates). An analysis using the US DOT Guidelines were performed to identify a preferred route from the alternative routes

  12. Expansive learning in the university setting: the case for simulated clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Jacquelyn

    2007-03-01

    This paper argues that simulated practice in the university setting is not just a second best to learning in the clinical area but one which offers the potential for deliberation and deep learning [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136]. The context of student learning in an undergraduate midwifery programme is analysed using human activity theory [Engeström, Y., 2001. Expansive learning at work: toward an activity theoretical reconceptualization. Journal of Education and Work, 14, 133-156]. The advantages of this approach to student learning as opposed to situated learning theory and the concept of legitimate peripheral participation [Lave, J., Wenger, E., 1991. Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge University Press, New York] are discussed. An activity system changes as a result of contradictions and tensions between what it purports to produce and the views of stakeholders (multi-voicedness) as well as its historical context (Historicity of activity). A focus group with students highlights their expressed need for more simulated practice experience. The views of midwifery lecturers are sought as an alternative voice on this tension in the current programme. Qualitative differences in types of simulated experience are explored and concerns about resources are raised in the analysis. Discussion considers the value of well planned simulations in encouraging the expression of tacit understanding through a group deliberative learning process [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136].

  13. National Educators' Workshop: Update 2002 - Standard Experiments in Engineering, Materials Science, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Edwin J. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Chung, W. Richard (Compiler)

    2003-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 2002 held in San Jose, California, October 13-16,2002. This publication provides experiments and demonstrations that can serve as a valuable guide to faculty who are interested in useful activities for their students. The material was the result of years of research aimed at better methods of teaching technical subjects. The experiments developed by faculty, scientists, and engineers throughout the United States and abroad add to the collection from past workshops. They include a blend of experiments on new materials and traditional materials.

  14. Changes in setting time of alginate impression material with different water temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decky J. Indrani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies showed that setting process of alginates can be influenced by temperature. Purpose: To determine the changes in setting time due to differences in water temperature and to determine the correlation between water temperature and the setting time. Methods: Seven groups of dough alginate were prepared by mixing alginate powder and water, each using a temperature between 13° C–28° C with a interval of 2.5° C. A sample mold (Θ = 30 mm, t = 16 mm was placed on a flat plate and filled with doug alginate. Immediately the flat end of a polished acrylic rod was placed in contact with the surface of dough alginate. Setting time of alginat was measured from the starting of the mix to the time when the alginate does not adhere to the end of the rod. Setting time alginate data were analyzed using one way ANOVA, LSD and Pearson. Results: Setting time of alginate with water temperature between 13° C–28° C were 87 to 119.4 seconds and were significantly different (p < 0.01. The setting time between group were also significantly different (p<0.01. There was an inverse correlation between water temperature and the setting time (r = -0.968. Conclusion: Water temperature between 13° C–28°C with a difference of 2.5° C produced significant differences in alginate setting time; the lower the water temperature being used the longer the setting time was produced.Latar belakang: Penelitian-penelitian sebelumnya menunjukkan bahwa proses pengerasan alginat dapat dipengaruhi oleh suhu. Tujuan: Mengetahui perubahan waktu pengerasan alginat akibat perbedaan suhu air serta mengetahui hubungan antara suhu air dan waktu pengerasan. Metode: Tujuh kelompok adonan alginat yang dipersiapkan dengan mencampur bubuk alginat dan air, masingmasing menggunakan suhu antara 13°C–28° C dengan interval 2,5° C. Pengukuran waktu pengerasan alginat dilakukan sesuai dengan spesifikasi ADA no.18. Sebuah cetakan sampel terbuat dari pralon berbentuk

  15. Physical Settings and Materials Recommended for Play Therapy with Japanese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuanhong; Ramirez, Sylvia Z.; Kranz, Peter L.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a number of important issues to consider in play therapy with Japanese children. They include the waiting room and playroom decor, toys, and other materials, as well as terminology that are commonly used in Japan. The layout of the small and large playrooms, use of the "Wa-Shitsu" (a traditional Japanese room…

  16. Managing a work-life balance: the experiences of midwives working in a group practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereday, Jennifer; Oster, Candice

    2010-06-01

    To explore how a group of midwives achieved a work-life balance working within a caseload model of care with flexible work hours and on-call work. in-depth interviews were conducted and the data were analysed using a data-driven thematic analysis technique. Children, Youth and Women's Health Service (CYWHS) (previously Women's and Children's Hospital), Adelaide, where a midwifery service known as Midwifery Group Practice (MGP) offers a caseload model of care to women within a midwife-managed unit. 17 midwives who were currently working, or had previously worked, in MGP. analysis of the midwives' individual experiences provided insight into how midwives managed the flexible hours and on-call work to achieve a sustainable work-life balance within a caseload model of care. it is important for midwives working in MGP to actively manage the flexibility of their role with time on call. Organisational, team and individual structure influenced how flexibility of hours was managed; however, a period of adjustment was required to achieve this balance. the study findings offer a description of effective, sustainable strategies to manage flexible hours and on-call work that may assist other midwives working in a similar role or considering this type of work setting. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A new instrumental set-up for polarized neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Wolfgang; Ohl, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Neutron scattering with polarization analysis is a powerful tool to determine magnetic structures and excitations. A common setup is to mount the sample at the center of a Helmholtz-type coil which can provide a magnetic field of any direction at the sample position and also a guide field along the neutron flight paths around the sample. Recent experiments showed quite a high demand for measurements at low momentum transfers. For the corresponding low scattering angles air scattering gives rise to a very large background. For this reason we have extended the standard setup to a combination of a large vacuum tank surrounded by electrical coils. The vacuum tank eliminates the air scattering and we can use the polarization analysis down to the lowest accessible momentum transfers. The coils themselves also show some new features: In contrary to the classic (symmetric) coil distribution we use an asymmetric setup which gives the advantage of a larger scattering window. Due to a more sophisticated current distribution this modified coil arrangement needs not to be rotated for different scattering conditions. The whole set-up will soon be available at IN12, a cold neutrons three-axis spectrometer operated by FZ Juelich in collaboration with CEA Grenoble as a CRG-B instrument at the Institut Laue Langevin in Grenoble

  18. A statistical method for predicting sound absorbing property of porous metal materials by using quartet structure generation set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Dong; Wu, Jiu Hui; Jing, Li

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A random internal morphology and structure generation-growth method, termed as the quartet structure generation set (QSGS), has been utilized based on the stochastic cluster growth theory for numerical generating the various microstructures of porous metal materials. • Effects of different parameters such as thickness and porosity on sound absorption performance of the generated structures are studied by the present method, and the obtained results are validated by an empirical model as well. • This method could be utilized to guide the design and fabrication of the sound-absorption porous metal materials. - Abstract: In this paper, a statistical method for predicting sound absorption properties of porous metal materials is presented. To reflect the stochastic distribution characteristics of the porous metal materials, a random internal morphology and structure generation-growth method, termed as the quartet structure generation set (QSGS), has been utilized based on the stochastic cluster growth theory for numerical generating the various microstructures of porous metal materials. Then by using the transfer-function approach along with the QSGS tool, we investigate the sound absorbing performance of porous metal materials with complex stochastic geometries. The statistical method has been validated by the good agreement among the numerical results for metal rubber from this method and a previous empirical model and the corresponding experimental data. Furthermore, the effects of different parameters such as thickness and porosity on sound absorption performance of the generated structures are studied by the present method, and the obtained results are validated by an empirical model as well. Therefore, the present method is a reliable and robust method for predicting the sound absorption performance of porous metal materials, and could be utilized to guide the design and fabrication of the sound-absorption porous metal materials

  19. An analysis of fast critical experiments using JEF-1-based 50-group constant set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Do; Gil, Choong Sup; Kim, Young Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-01

    JEF-1-based 50-group cross section set for fast reactor calculations was generated using NJOY system. The set was then examined by analyzing measured integral quantities such as criticality and central reaction rate ratios for 27 fast critical assemblies. The calculated results using the new set were also compared with those of ENDF/B-IV or -V based fast set. In general, the JEF-1-based set shows an improvement in predicting measured integral quantities in comparison with the previous set. With a few exceptions, JEF-1 results are compareble to those of ENDF/B-V.

  20. Teacher Experiences of Delivering an Obesity Prevention Programme (The WAVES Study Intervention) in a Primary School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Tania L; Clarke, Joanne L; Lancashire, Emma R; Pallan, Miranda J; Passmore, Sandra; Adab, Peymane

    2015-01-01

    Objective: There has been a wealth of childhood obesity prevention studies in school-based settings. However, few have investigated the experiences of school staff charged with delivery of such programmes. This study aimed to elicit teachers' experiences of delivering a childhood obesity prevention programme for children aged 6-7 years. Design:…

  1. Combining theory and experiment in electrocatalysis: Insights into materials design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seh, Zhi Wei; Kibsgaard, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Electrocatalysis plays a central role in clean energy conversion, enabling a number of sustainable processes for future technologies. This review discusses design strategies for state-of-the-art heterogeneous electrocatalysts and associated materials for several different electrochemical transformations involving water, hydrogen, and oxygen, using theory as a means to rationalize catalyst performance. By examining the common principles that govern catalysis for different electrochemical reactions, we describe a systematic framework that clarifies trends in catalyzing these reactions, serving as a guide to new catalyst development while highlighting key gaps that need to be addressed. Here, we conclude by extending this framework to emerging clean energy reactions such as hydrogen peroxide production, carbon dioxide reduction, and nitrogen reduction, where the development of improved catalysts could allow for the sustainable production of a broad range of fuels and chemicals.

  2. ITER transient consequences for material damage: modelling versus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B; Janeschitz, G; Landman, I; Pestchanyi, S; Loarte, A; Federici, G; Merola, M; Linke, J; Zhitlukhin, A; Podkovyrov, V; Klimov, N; Safronov, V

    2007-01-01

    Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten macrobrush armours are foreseen as PFC for the ITER divertor. In ITER the main mechanisms of metallic armour damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion. In the case of CFC armour, due to rather different heat conductivities of CFC fibres a noticeable erosion of the PAN bundles may occur at rather small heat loads. Experiments carried out in the plasma gun facilities QSPA-T for the ITER like edge localized mode (ELM) heat load also demonstrated significant erosion of the frontal and lateral brush edges. Numerical simulations of the CFC and tungsten (W) macrobrush target damage accounting for the heat loads at the face and lateral brush edges were carried out for QSPA-T conditions using the three-dimensional (3D) code PHEMOBRID. The modelling results of CFC damage are in a good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the experiments. Estimation of the droplet splashing caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability was performed

  3. Geologic setting of diverse volcanic materials in northern Elysium Planitia, Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Geologic mapping of high-resolution (30-50 m/pixel) Viking Orbiter images of northern Elysium Planitia has identified seven sites where current problems in martian volcanology, chronology, and stratigraphy can be resolved. These sites, which are discussed in the context of a potential Mars rover/sample return mission, would permit the following investigations: (1) the dating of Lower Amazonian lava flows from Elysium Mons (thereby providing absolute calibration for global crater size/frequency relative chronologies), (2) the petrologic investigation of long run-out lava flows, (3) the geologic interpretation of materials that may either be lava flows or lahar deposits, (4) the analysis of materials believed to be ash deposits produced by explosive eruptions of Hecates Tholus, and (5) the investigation of the stratigraphy of fractured terrain along the boundary between northern Elysium Planitia and southern Utopia Planitia. 63 refs

  4. How firms set prices for medical materials: a multi-country study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Hiroo; Mollahaliloglu, Salih

    2009-09-01

    This study presents a comparison of medical material prices, discusses why differences exist, and examines methods for comparing prices. Market prices for drug-eluting stents (DES), non-drug-eluting stents (non-DES), and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) catheters were collected from five countries: the United States, Japan, Korea, Turkey, and Thailand. To compare prices, three adjustment methods were used: currency exchange rates, purchasing power parity (PPP), and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. The ratios of medical material prices compared with those in the United States were higher in Japan (from 1.4 for DES to 5.0 for PTCA catheters) and Korea (from 1.2 for DES to 4.0 for PTCA catheters), and lower in Turkey (from 0.8 for non-DES to 1.4 for DES) and Thailand (from 0.5 for non-DES to 1.3 for PTCA catheters). The PPP-adjusted ratios changed slightly for Japan, Korea, and Turkey. When the prices were adjusted by GDP per capita, the ratios were much higher. Comparing prices using currency exchange rates or PPP is applicable only between countries with stable economic relations; adjustment by GDP per capita reflects the actual burden. Further study is needed to fully elucidate the factors influencing the global medical material market.

  5. Assessment of the Swedish EQ-5D experience-based value sets in a total hip replacement population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Szilárd; Burström, Kristina; Zethraeus, Niklas; Eneqvist, Ted; Garellick, Göran; Rolfson, Ola

    2015-12-01

    All patients undergoing elective total hip replacement (THR) in Sweden are asked to complete a survey, including the EQ-5D. Thus far, EQ-5D values have been presented using the UK TTO value set based on hypothetical values. Shift to the use of the recently introduced Swedish experience-based value set, derived from a representative Swedish population, is an appealing alternative. To investigate how accurate the Swedish experience-based VAS value set predicts observed EQ VAS values and to compare correlations between Swedish and UK value sets including two provisional value sets derived from the THR population. Pre- and one-year postoperative data from 56,062 THR patients from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register were used. Agreement between the observed and the predicted EQ VAS values was assessed with correlation. Based on pre- and postoperative data, we constructed two provisional VAS value sets. Correlations between observed and calculated values using the Swedish VAS value set were moderate (r = 0.46) in preoperative data and high (r = 0.72) in postoperative data. Correlations between UK and register-based value sets were constantly lower compared to Swedish value sets. Register-based values and Swedish values were highly correlated. The Swedish value sets are more accurate in terms of representation of the Swedish THR patients than the currently used UK TTO value set. We find it feasible to use the experience-based Swedish value sets for further presentation of EQ-5D values in the Swedish THR population.

  6. Information overload or search-amplified risk? Set size and order effects on decisions from experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Thomas T; Noguchi, Takao; Gibbert, Michael

    2013-10-01

    How do changes in choice-set size influence information search and subsequent decisions? Moreover, does information overload influence information processing with larger choice sets? We investigated these questions by letting people freely explore sets of gambles before choosing one of them, with the choice sets either increasing or decreasing in number for each participant (from two to 32 gambles). Set size influenced information search, with participants taking more samples overall, but sampling a smaller proportion of gambles and taking fewer samples per gamble, when set sizes were larger. The order of choice sets also influenced search, with participants sampling from more gambles and taking more samples overall if they started with smaller as opposed to larger choice sets. Inconsistent with information overload, information processing appeared consistent across set sizes and choice order conditions, reliably favoring gambles with higher sample means. Despite the lack of evidence for information overload, changes in information search did lead to systematic changes in choice: People who started with smaller choice sets were more likely to choose gambles with the highest expected values, but only for small set sizes. For large set sizes, the increase in total samples increased the likelihood of encountering rare events at the same time that the reduction in samples per gamble amplified the effect of these rare events when they occurred-what we call search-amplified risk. This led to riskier choices for individuals whose choices most closely followed the sample mean.

  7. Electronic data capture in a rural African setting: evaluating experiences with different systems in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina King

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: As hardware for electronic data capture (EDC, such as smartphones or tablets, becomes cheaper and more widely available, the potential for using such hardware as data capture tools in routine healthcare and research is increasing. Objective: We aim to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of four EDC systems being used simultaneously in rural Malawi: two for Android devices (CommCare and ODK Collect, one for PALM and Windows OS (Pendragon, and a custom-built application for Android (Mobile InterVA – MIVA. Design: We report on the personal field and development experience of fieldworkers, project managers, and EDC system developers. Results: Fieldworkers preferred using EDC to paper-based systems, although some struggled with the technology at first. Highlighted features include in-built skip patterns for all systems, and specifically the ‘case’ function that CommCare offers. MIVA as a standalone app required considerably more time and expertise than the other systems to create and could not be customised for our specific research needs; however, it facilitates standardised routine data collection. CommCare and ODK Collect both have user-friendly web-interfaces for form development and good technical support. CommCare requires Internet to build an application and download it to a device, whereas all steps can be done offline with ODK Collect, a desirable feature in low connectivity settings. Pendragon required more complex programming of logic, using a Microsoft Access application, and generally had less technical support. Start-up costs varied between systems, and all were considered more expensive than setting up a paper-based system; however running costs were generally low and therefore thought to be cost-effective over the course of our projects. Conclusions: EDC offers many opportunities for efficient data collection, but brings some issues requiring consideration when designing a study; the decision of which hardware

  8. Micro-Scale Experiments and Models for Composite Materials with Materials Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zike, Sanita

    Numerical models are frequently implemented to study micro-mechanical processes in polymer/fibre composites. To ensure that these models are accurate, the length scale dependent properties of the fibre and polymer matrix have to be taken into account. Most often this is not the case, and material...... properties acquired at macro-scale are used for micro-mechanical models. This is because material properties at the macro-scale are much more available and the test procedures to obtain them are well defined. The aim of this research was to find methods to extract the micro-mechanical properties of the epoxy...... resin used in polymer/fibre composites for wind turbine blades combining experimental, numerical, and analytical approaches. Experimentally, in order to mimic the stress state created by a void in a bulk material, test samples with finite root radii were made and subjected to a double cantilever beam...

  9. Electron irradiation experiments in support of fusion materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Matsui, H.; Kohno, Y.

    1991-11-01

    Microstructural evolution in response to 1 MeV irradiation has been investigated for three simple ferritic alloys, pure beryllium, pure vanadium, and two simple vanadium alloys over a range of temperatures and doses. Microstructural evolution in Fe-3, -9, and -18Cr ferritic alloys is found to consist of crenulated, faulted a loops and circular, unfaulted a/2 loops at low temperatures, but with only unfaulted loops at high temperatures. The complex dislocation evolution is attributed to sigma phase precipifaults arising from chromium segregation to point defect sinks. Beryllium is found to be resistant to electron damage; the only effect observed was enhanced dislocation mobility. Pure vanadium, V-5Fe, and V-1Ni microstructural response was complicated by precipitation on heating to 400 degrees C and above, but dislocation evolution was investigated in the range of room temperature to 300 degrees C and at 600 degrees C. The three materials behaved similarly, except that pure vanadium showed more rapid dislocation evolution. This difference does not explain the enhanced swelling observed in vanadium alloys

  10. Transport experience with the NAC-1 radioactive materials shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, J.D.; Hoffman, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    During the first one and one-half years of operation of Nuclear Assurance Corporation's (NAC) four (4) second-generation NAC-1 truck casks, shipments of spent fuel assemblies, fuel rods, and other highly irradiated reactor components have involved over 300,000 cask miles of travel by land, and cask handling at some ten different nuclear facilities. This on-site experience has included the use of various types of auxiliary lifting devices, operational problems with which have identified the need to establish related Quality Assurance procedures in the area of post-fabrication testing. During the course of pre-shipment checkout and testing of the casks minor defects in the upper impact limiter and lower cask shielding wall have been detected and repaired according to procedure. One enroute occurrence with the cask in which an emergency response was implemented has emphasized the need for rigid adherence to procedural checkout before shipment. Periodic inspection and testing are performed as part of the cask license requirement whereby cask components are inspected and/or replaced. During such test periods leaking ball valves and a leaking neutron shield tank have been detected and repaired. (author)

  11. Second Language Experience Facilitates Statistical Learning of Novel Linguistic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christine E; Wang, Tianlin; Saffran, Jenny R

    2017-04-01

    Recent research has begun to explore individual differences in statistical learning, and how those differences may be related to other cognitive abilities, particularly their effects on language learning. In this research, we explored a different type of relationship between language learning and statistical learning: the possibility that learning a new language may also influence statistical learning by changing the regularities to which learners are sensitive. We tested two groups of participants, Mandarin Learners and Naïve Controls, at two time points, 6 months apart. At each time point, participants performed two different statistical learning tasks: an artificial tonal language statistical learning task and a visual statistical learning task. Only the Mandarin-learning group showed significant improvement on the linguistic task, whereas both groups improved equally on the visual task. These results support the view that there are multiple influences on statistical learning. Domain-relevant experiences may affect the regularities that learners can discover when presented with novel stimuli. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  12. Comprehensive diagnostic set for intense lithium ion hohlraum experiments on PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, R.J.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    A review of the comprehensive diagnostic package developed at Sandia National Laboratories for intense lithium ion hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II will be presented. This package contains an extensive suite of x-ray spectral and imaging diagnostics that enable measurements of target radiation smoothing, hydro-motion, and temperature. The x-ray diagnostics include time-integrated and time-resolved pinhole cameras, energy-resolved 1-D streaked imaging diagnostics that enable measurements of target radiation smoothing, hydro-motion, and temperature. The x-ray diagnostics include time-integrated and time-resolved pinhole cameras, energy-resolved 1-D streaked imaging diagnostics, time-integrated and time-resolved grazing incidence spectrographs, a transmission grating spectrography, an elliptical crystal spectrograph, a bolometer array, an eleven element x-ray diode (XRD) array, and an eleven element PIN diode detector array. A hohlraum temperature measurement technique under development is a shock breakout diagnostic that measures the radiation pressure at the hohlraum wall. The incident Li beam symmetry and an estimate of incident Li beam power density are measured from ion beam-induced characteristic x-ray line and neutron emissions. An attempt to measure the Li beam intensity directly on target used Rutherford scattered ions into an ion movie camera and a magnetic spectrograph. The philosophy used in designing all the diagnostics in the set has emphasized redundant and independent measurements of fundamental physical quantities relevant to the performance of the target. Details of each diagnostic, its integration, data reduction procedures, and recent PBFA-II data will be discussed

  13. Errorless learning for training individuals with schizophrenia at a community mental health setting providing work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Robert S; Liberman, Robert P; Becker, Deborah R; Drake, Robert E; Sugar, Catherine A; Green, Michael F

    2009-07-01

    The effects of errorless learning (EL) on work performance, tenure, and personal well-being were compared with conventional job training in a community mental health fellowship club offering 12-week time-limited work experience. Participants were 40 clinically stable schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder outpatients randomly assigned to EL vs conventional instruction (CI) at a thrift-type clothing store. EL participants received training on how to perform their assigned job tasks based on principles of EL, such as error reduction and automation of task performance. CI participants received training common to other community-based entry-level jobs that included verbal instruction, a visual demonstration, independent practice, and corrective feedback. Participants were scheduled to work 2 hours per week for 12 weeks. For both groups, job training occurred during the first 2 weeks at the worksite. Work performance (assessed using the Work Behavior Inventory, WBI) and personal well-being (self-esteem, job satisfaction, and work stress) were assessed at weeks 2, 4, and 12. Job tenure was defined as the number of weeks on the job or total number of hours worked prior to quitting or study end. The EL group performed better than the CI group on the Work Quality Scale from the WBI, and the group differences were relatively consistent over time. Results from the survival analyses of job tenure revealed a non-significant trend favoring EL. There were no group differences on self-esteem, job satisfaction, or work stress. The findings provide modest support for the extensions of EL to community settings for enhancing work performance.

  14. Flash autoclave settings may influence eradication but not presence of well-established biofilms on orthopaedic implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dustin L; Taylor, Nicholas B; Epperson, Richard T; Rothberg, David L

    2017-10-04

    Flash autoclaving is one of the most frequently utilized methods of sterilizing devices, implants or other materials. For a number of decades, it has been common practice for surgeons to remove implantable devices, flash autoclave and then reimplant them in a patient. Data have not yet indicated the potential for biofilms to survive or remain on the surface of orthopaedic-relevant materials following flash autoclave. In this study, monomicrobial and polymicrobial biofilms were grown on the surface of clinically relevant titanium materials and exposed to flash autoclave settings that included varying times and temperatures. Data indicated that when the sterilization and control temperatures of an autoclave were the same, biofilms were able to survive flash autoclaving that was performed for a short duration. Higher temperature and increased duration rendered biofilms non-viable, but none of the autoclave settings had the ability to remove or disperse the presence of biofilms from the titanium surfaces. These findings may be beneficial for facilities, clinics, or hospitals to consider if biofilms are suspected to be present on materials or devices, in particular implants that have had associated infection and are considered for re-implantation. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Set of Activities Addressed for Elementary School Students: Cells and the Genetic Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Miranda

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The time lag between the progresses in the area of molecular biology reached in the last years and the schools science curricula  can be reduced through  initiatives of the university  regarding  the dissemina- tion of sciences. Inside of this context, one of the major objectives of the CBME has been the scientific education  and  dissemination on Molecular  Biosciences.  Among the  strategies organized  to promote the dissemination of this area, the Scientific Dissemination Coordination of CBME developed a set of playful activities  for students from public and private  elementary schools (7th  and 8th grades.  As a first step science teachers were interviewed  in order to indicate  which topics related  to molecular bio- sciences they  usually  include in their curricula  planning.  The approach  considered  in the elaboration of the set of activities  was the construction of knowledge of the concepts related  to topics as cell types, their  structures and  organelles,  and  the  importance of the  nucleus and  DNA. The set was offered to170 students. Students from private  schools were evaluated by their  performance  through  the classes, which were registered  by the  notes  of the  instructors.  Students from public  schools were evaluated through  questionnaires containing  basic  concepts  on the  theme  applied  before (pre-test and  after (post-test the set of activities  in order to measure,  respectively,  the previous and acquired knowledge. The  programming accomplished  at  the  public  school was partially modified  due  to  the  absence  of a laboratory, microscopes  and  a room  of computers, without, however,  to  alter  the  objectives  and content of the  activities.   The  comparative analysis  of the  pre- and  post-tests revealed  that, in this latter, there  was an increase of the average percentage  of correct  answers and an

  16. PENERAPAN PEMBELAJARAN SAINS DENGAN PENDEKATAN SETS PADA MATERI CAHAYA UNTUK MENINGKATKAN HASIL BELAJAR SISWA KELAS V SD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ragil

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini dilatarbelakangi oleh nilai rata-rata dan presentase ketuntasan klasikal siswa yang masih rendah pada matapelajaran sains di SD. Untuk mengatasi permasalahan tersebut, diterapkan pembelajaran sains dengan pendekatan SETS(Science, Environment, Technology, Society. SETS adalah visi atau pendekatan pembelajaran yang memiliki fokus utamamemberikan pengalaman penyelidikan pada siswa untuk mendapatkan pengetahuan yang berkaitan dengan sains, lingkungan,teknologi, dan masyarakat serta kesalingketerkaitannya. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan pembelajaran sainsdengan pendekatan SETS yang diterapkan, dan mengetahui peningkatan hasil belajar. Data penelitian berupa hasil belajar kognitifdiperoleh dari test, hasil belajar afektif dan psikomotorik diperoleh dari lembar observasi, untuk mengetahui peningkatan hasilbelajar siswa secara keseluruhan digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah uji gain. Hasil analisis data menunjukkan adanyapeningkatan hasil belajar kognitif, afektif dan psikomotorik. Dari hasil analisis tersebut dapat disimpulkan bahwa penerapanpembelajaran sains dengan pendekatan SETS dapat meningkatkan hasil belajar siswa. This research was carried out with the background of low average mark and classical mastery percentage of science subject ofelementary school student. With the purpose of the research of describing science lesson with SETS approach to increase learningachievement, the researcher applies SETS approach in the lesson of light material. The data of cognitive learning achievement isfound by using test, while the affective and psychomotor ones are taken from observation sheets. In order to examine the overalllearning achievement, this study uses gain test. The data analysis shows that there is an improvement of cognitive, affective andpsychomotor learning achievements of student after having the lesson. It is concluded that the application of science lesson withSETS approach can increase the students

  17. Soil Materials and Health: An new experience for teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Cationic clays are very extended compounds on the earth surface so they constitute the main component of soils and sedimentary rocks. Due to their presence and special properties that they have, mankind has used them with therapeutic aims from Prehistory, not being rare to find references to this subject in works of classic authors. During the Renaissance and with the appearance of the first Pharmacopeia, its use was regulated to a certain extent. The scientific development reached during the XXth century has allowed to understand and to study the reasons of the useful and peculiar properties of clays, directly related to their colloidal size and crystalline structure. These properties are translated in a high specific surface area, optimal rheological properties and/or excellent sorptive capacity; everything makes cationic clays very useful for a wide range of applications. In the field of health, cationic clays are used in Pharmaceutical Technology and Dermopharmacy as ideal excipients and substances of suitable biological activity due to their chemical inertness and low or null toxicity for the patient (Carretero, 2002; Lopez Galindo et al., 2005; Choy et al., 2007; del Hoyo, 2007). Cationic clays can be used in a wide range of applications in health. However, it must be also considered that the risk exposure to cationic clays may cause several diseases, as it has been seen above. Cationic clays have been used as excipients and active principles in the pharmaceutical industry. The last tendencies are their use in geomedicine, as much to come up as to treat diseases. One stands out his presence in spas and aesthetic medicine. Development of new pharmaceutical formulations is observed, based on cationic clays, for cancer therapy. It has to emphasize the importance in the synthesis of biosensors with cationic clays. Cationic clays can be considered a group of promising materials in the development of new health applications. The study of the use of the cationic

  18. The structure and material composition of ossified aortic valves identified using a set of scientific methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Antonín; Šmíd, Michal; Havelcová, Martina; Coufalová, Lucie; Kučková, Štěpánka; Velčovská, Martina; Hynek, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis has become a common and dangerous disease in recent decades. This disease leads to the mineralization of aortic valves, their gradual thickening and loss of functionality. We studied the detailed assessment of the proportion and composition of inorganic and organic components in the ossified aortic valve, using a set of analytical methods applied in science: polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The sample valves showed the occurrence of phosphorus and calcium in the form of phosphate and calcium carbonate, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and hydroxy-fluorapatite, with varying content of inorganic components from 65 to 90 wt%, and with phased development of degenerative disability. The outer layers of the plaque contained an organic component with peptide bonds, fatty acids, proteins and cholesterol. The results show a correlation between the formation of fluorapatite in aortic valves and in other parts of the human bodies, associated with the formation of bones.

  19. Radiation impact on the characteristics of optical glasses test results on a selected set of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit, Michel; Gussarov, Andrei; Berghmans, Francis; Doyle, Dominic; Ulbrich, Gerd

    2017-11-01

    It is well known within the Space optics community that radiation may significantly affect transmittance of glasses. To overcome this drawback, glass manufacturers have developed Cerium doped counterparts of classical glasses. This doped glasses display much less transmittance sensitivity to radiation. Still, the impact of radiation on refractive index is less known and may affect indifferently classical or Cerium doped glasses. ESTEC has initialised an R&D program with the aim of establishing a comprehensive data base gathering radiation sensitivity data, called Dose coefficients, for all the glass optical parameters (transmittance / refractive index / compaction……). The first part of this study, to define the methodology for such a data base, is run by ASTRIUM SAS in co-operation with SCK CEN. This covers theoretical studies associated to testing of a selected set of classical and "radiation hardened" glasses. It is proposed here to present first the theoretical backgrounds of this study and then to give results which have been obtained so far.

  20. JSD1000: multi-group cross section sets for shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamano, Naoki

    1984-03-01

    A multi-group cross section library for shielding safety analysis has been produced by using ENDF/B-IV. The library consists of ultra-fine group cross sections, fine-group cross sections, secondary gamma-ray production cross sections and effective macroscopic cross sections for typical shielding materials. Temperature dependent data at 300, 560 and 900 K have been also provided. Angular distributions of the group to group transfer cross section are defined by a new method of ''Direct Angular Representation'' (DAR) instead of the method of finite Legendre expansion. The library designated JSD1000 are stored in a direct access data base named DATA-POOL and data manipulations are available by using the DATA-POOL access package. The 3824 neutron group data of the ultra-fine group cross sections and the 100 neutron, 20 photon group cross sections are applicable to shielding safety analyses of nuclear facilities. This report provides detailed specifications and the access method for the JSD1000 library. (author)

  1. Consumer attitudes towards and satisfaction with emergency contraception counselling: experience from clinic and retail pharmacy settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, Denise; Battle, Marlene; Kueter, Teddi J; Payakachat, Nalin

    2015-10-01

    To collectively assess consumer attitudes towards and satisfaction with emergency contraception (EC) counselling by student pharmacists in two different locations: an academic healthcare clinic and a retail pharmacy. EC counselling was provided by trained student pharmacists utilizing a standardized education toolkit. Participants were asked to rate the counselling at the end of the knowledge survey. In addition to descriptive statistics, we compared the self-reported attitudes and satisfaction with the counselling between the two sites. The majority of participants from both settings rated 'strongly agree' on the attitude and satisfaction statements for the EC counselling. Participants from the clinic setting rated higher in two of the four statements than the participants from the retail setting. Participants had positive attitudes towards and were highly satisfied with the EC counselling in both settings. EC counselling should be encouraged in practice settings. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  2. The experience of a nationwide Community of Practice to set up Regional Prevention Plans in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Angela; Perra, Alberto; Lombardo, Flavia

    2017-07-27

    In 2010, the Italian Ministry of Health decided to start the planning process to elaborate the National Plan of Prevention 2010-2012 jointly with the 21 Regions. The National Institute of Health was responsible for supporting regional planners (RPs) by an original participatory approach of a web-based Community of Practice (CoP) to set up their own Regional Plans of Prevention. In this paper, we summarise the theoretical framework adopted, the main phases characterising the lifecycle of the nationwide CoP, the evaluation approach adopted and its findings. Following the CoP theoretical framework from Wenger, an initial group of RPs were trained on Project Cycle Management as a planning method and thereafter they started interacting on a web-based Moodle platform for 8 months. The CoP evaluation mainly took into account aspects of 'immediate value', such as members interactions within the website, and several quantitative and qualitative tools were used to monitor changes over time. Data were retrieved from Moodle statistics or directly from the RPs by the means of a Knowledge, Attitude and Practice survey, a reaction survey, SWOT analysis and focus groups. The level of individual RPs knowledge increased after the initial course from 55.7% to 75%, attitudes and competence perception about the planning process method also showed an overall favourable change. During the CoP life span, the number of members increased from the original 98 RPs to include up to 600 new members on the basis of spontaneous demand. From April 2010 to January 2011, the 'vital signs' of the CoP were monitored, including RP logins (13,450 total logins and 3744 unique logins), views (27,522) and posts (1606) distributed in 326 forum discussion threads. Data and information retrieved from quantitative and qualitative evaluation approaches proved to be useful for the management and follow-up of the CoP. The CoP experience was successful as 19 out of 20 Regions submitted their Regional Preventive

  3. Permeable barrier materials for strontium immobilization: Unsaturated flow apparatus determination of hydraulic conductivity -- Column sorption experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, T.E.; Conca, J.

    1996-09-01

    Selected materials were tested to emulate a permeable barrier and to examine the (1) capture efficiency of these materials relating to the immobilization of strontium-90 and hexavalent chromium (Cr 6+ ) in Hanford Site groundwater; and (2) hydraulic conductivity of the barrier material relative to the surrounding area. The emplacement method investigated was a permeable reactive barrier to treat contaminated groundwater as it passes through the barrier. The hydraulic conductivity function was measured for each material, and retardation column experiments were performed for each material. Measurements determining the hydraulic conductivity at unsaturated through saturated water content were executed using the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus

  4. The Experience of Adolescents and Young Adults Treated for Cancer in an Adult Setting: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Steve; Grinyer, Anne; Limmer, Mark

    2018-02-13

    The purpose of this review is to explore the literature on the experience of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) having cancer treatment in an adult setting, rather than on a specialist adolescent cancer unit. The integrative review method was used to explore the current literature. Primary research on the topic was located systematically and then synthesized into a thematic narrative. The experience of AYAs undergoing treatment in an adult setting was generally negative. This can be attributed to three themes: feeling isolated in the adult setting; the lack of empathy from staff working in the adult setting; and the inappropriateness of the adult environment for this age group. As many AYAs with cancer will continue to have treatment in adult settings, staff working in this environment should be aware of the negative experience of this cohort and the impact this can have on a vulnerable group of patients. Staff could consider simple ways of improving the AYA experience, such as connecting AYA patients with their peers to reduce isolation; adapting their approach to take account of the unique emotional needs of this age group; and considering ways of making the environment more welcoming and age-appropriate.

  5. Materials Science Experiments Under Microgravity - A Review of History, Facilities, and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Materials science experiments have been a key issue already since the early days of research under microgravity conditions. A microgravity environment facilitates processing of metallic and semiconductor melts without buoyancy driven convection and sedimentation. Hence, crystal growth of semiconductors, solidification of metallic alloys, and the measurement of thermo-physical parameters are the major applications in the field of materials science making use of these dedicated conditions in space. In the last three decades a large number of successful experiments have been performed, mainly in international collaborations. In parallel, the development of high-performance research facilities and the technological upgrade of diagnostic and stimuli elements have also contributed to providing optimum conditions to perform such experiments. A review of the history of materials science experiments in space focussing on the development of research facilities is given. Furthermore, current opportunities to perform such experiments onboard ISS are described and potential future options are outlined.

  6. CRISP. D3.1. Specification of experiments and test set up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamphuis, I.G.; Kester, J.C.P.; Kok, J.K.; Schaeffer, G.J.; Gajic, Z.; Karlsson, D.; Andrieu, C.; Fontela, M.; Raison, B.; Penkov, D.

    2005-08-01

    In the CRISP project three field experiments are implemented for using novel ICTs for better integration of Distributed Generation in the electricity grid. These experiments deal with: (a) supply demand matching; (b) fault detection and diagnostics; and (c) intelligent load shedding. For each of the experiments the problem statement, the project definition, the project description and the planning and organisation are described, respectively in section A, B and C of this document

  7. A review of low density porous materials used in laser plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Keiji; Musgrave, Christopher S. A.; Nazarov, Wigen

    2018-03-01

    This review describes and categorizes the synthesis and properties of low density porous materials, which are commonly referred to as foams and are utilized for laser plasma experiments. By focusing a high-power laser on a small target composed of these materials, high energy and density states can be produced. In the past decade or so, various new target fabrication techniques have been developed by many laboratories that use high energy lasers and consequently, many publications and reviews followed these developments. However, the emphasis so far has been on targets that did not utilize low density porous materials. This review therefore, attempts to redress this balance and endeavors to review low density materials used in laser plasma experiments in recent years. The emphasis of this review will be on aspects of low density materials that are of relevance to high energy laser plasma experiments. Aspects of low density materials such as densities, elemental compositions, macroscopic structures, nanostructures, and characterization of these materials will be covered. Also, there will be a brief mention of how these aspects affect the results in laser plasma experiments and the constrictions that these requirements put on the fabrication of low density materials relevant to this field. This review is written from the chemists' point of view to aid physicists and the new comers to this field.

  8. Setting a New Research Agenda: Professional Migration Experiences and Their Impact on Family Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Ted

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the growing pattern of migration experiences for professional people and the impact these have on the well-being of the family as a whole and individual family members who reside outside their home countries for prescribed periods of time. It is easy to argue that the experiences of such families are far…

  9. The M-Learning Experience of Language Learners in Informal Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendurur, Emine; Efendioglu, Esra; Çaliskan, Neslihan Yondemir; Boldbaatar, Nomin; Kandin, Emine; Namazli, Sevinç

    2017-01-01

    This study is designed to understand the informal language learners' experiences of m-learning applications. The aim is two-folded: (i) to extract the reasons why m-learning applications are preferred and (ii) to explore the user experience of Duolingo m-learning application. We interviewed 18 voluntary Duolingo users. The findings suggest that…

  10. Factors affecting experiences of intensive care patients in Turkey: patient outcomes in critical care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Yurdanur; Korhan, Esra Akin; Eser, Ismet; Khorshid, Leyla

    2013-07-01

    To determine the factors affecting a patient's intensive care experience. The descriptive study was conducted at an intensive care unit in the Aegean Region of Turkey, and comprised 158 patients who spent at least 48 hours at the unit between June and November 2009. A questionnaire form and the Intensive Care Experience Scale were used as data collection tools. SPSS 11.5 was used for statistical analysis of the data. Of the total, 86 (54.4%) patients related to the surgical unit, while 72 (45.5%) spent time at the intensive care unit. Most of the subjects (n=113; 71.5%) reported that they constantly experienced pain during hospitalisation. Patients receiving mechanical ventilation support and patients reporting no pain had significantly higher scores on the intensive care experience scale. Patients who reported pain remembered their experiences less than those having no pain. Interventions are needed to make the experiences of patients in intensive care more positive.

  11. Irradiation experiments and materials testing capabilities in High Flux Reactor in Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzginova, N.; Blagoeva, D.; Hegeman, H.; Van der Laan, J.

    2011-01-01

    The text of publication follows: The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten is a powerful multi-purpose research and materials testing reactor operating for about 280 Full Power Days per year. In combination with hot cells facilities, HFR provides irradiation and post-irradiation examination services requested by nuclear energy research and development programs, as well as by industry and research organizations. Using a variety of the custom developed irradiation devices and a large experience in executing irradiation experiments, the HFR is suitable for fuel, materials and components testing for different reactor types. Irradiation experiments carried out at the HFR are mainly focused on the understanding of the irradiation effects on materials; and providing databases for irradiation behavior of materials to feed into safety cases. The irradiation experiments and materials testing at the HFR include the following issues. First, materials irradiation to support the nuclear plant life extensions, for instance, characterization of the reactor pressure vessel stainless steel claddings to insure structural integrity of the vessel, as well as irradiation of the weld material coupons to neutron fluence levels that are representative for Light Water Reactors (LWR) internals applications. Secondly, development and qualification of the structural materials for next generation nuclear fission reactors as well as thermo-nuclear fusion machines. The main areas of interest are in both conventional stainless steel and advanced reduced activation steels and special alloys such as Ni-base alloys. For instance safety-relevant aspects of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) such as the integrity of fuel and structural materials with increasing neutron fluence at typical HTR operating conditions has been recently assessed. Thirdly, support of the fuel safety through several fuel irradiation experiments including testing of pre-irradiated LWR fuel rods containing UO 2 or MOX fuel. Fourthly

  12. Prospective Validation of the Decalogue, a Set of Doctor-Patient Communication Recommendations to Improve Patient Illness Experience and Mood States within a Hospital Cardiologic Ambulatory Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piercarlo Ballo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to improve doctor-patient communication may have a beneficial impact on patient’s illness experience and mood, with potential favorable clinical effects. We prospectively tested the psychometric and clinical validity of the Decalogue, a tool utilizing 10 communication recommendations for patients and physicians. The Decalogue was administered to 100 consecutive patients referred for a cardiologic consultation, whereas 49 patients served as controls. The POMS-2 questionnaire was used to measure the total mood disturbance at the end of the consultation. Structural equation modeling showed high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha 0.93, good test-retest reproducibility, and high validity of the psychometric construct (all > 0.80, suggesting a positive effect on patients’ illness experience. The total mood disturbance was lower in the patients exposed to the Decalogue as compared to the controls (1.4±12.1 versus 14.8±27.6, p=0.0010. In an additional questionnaire, patients in the Decalogue group showed a trend towards a better understanding of their state of health (p=0.07. In a cardiologic ambulatory setting, the Decalogue shows good validity and reliability as a tool to improve patients’ illness experience and could have a favorable impact on mood states. These effects might potentially improve patient engagement in care and adherence to therapy, as well as clinical outcome.

  13. Progress in mass spectrometry for the analysis of set-off phenomena in plastic food packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Margarita; Alfaro, Pilar; Nerín, Cristina; Jones, Emrys; Riches, Eleanor

    2016-07-01

    In most cases, food packaging materials contain inks whose components can migrate to food by diffusion through the material as well as by set-off phenomena. In this work, different mass spectrometry approaches had been used in order to identify and confirm the presence of ink components in ethanol (95%) and Tenax(®) as food simulants. Three different sets of materials, manufactured with different printing technologies and with different structures, were analyzed. Sample analysis by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), using a quadrupole-time of flight (Q-TOF) as a mass analyser proved to be an excellent tool for identification purposes while ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) shown to be very useful for the confirmation of the candidates proposed. The results showed the presence of different non-volatile ink components in migration such as colorants (Solvent Red 49), plasticizers (dimethyl sebacate, tributyl o-acetyl citrate) or surfactants (SchercodineM, triethylene glycol caprilate). An oxidation product of an ink additive (triphenyl phosphine oxide) was also detected. In addition, a surface analysis technique, desorption electrospray mass spectrometry (DESI-MS), was used for analyzing the distribution of some ink components (tributyl o-acetyl citrate Schercodine L, phthalates) in the material. The detection of some of these compounds in the back-printed side confirmed the transference of this compound from the non-food to the food contact side. The results also showed that concentration of ink migrants decreased when an aluminum or polypropylene layer covered the ink. When aluminum was used, concentration of most of ink migrants decreased, and for 5 out of the 9 even disappeared. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Being the Bridge: The Lived Experience of Educating with Online Courseware in the High School Blended Learning Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambo, Anna Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores the lived experiences of educators who teach in flex model blended learning settings using online, vendor-provided courseware. The tradition of hermeneutic phenomenology grounds this inquiry (Heidegger, 1927/2008). Phenomenological research activities designed by van Manen (1990, 2002) provide the methodological…

  15. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting:Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2008-01-01

    care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods: Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results: Three main categories of experience were identified: 1) The health professionals' management, where...

  16. Impact of Vicarious Learning Experiences and Goal Setting on Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Technology Integration: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Ertmer, Peggy A.

    This pilot study was designed to explore how vicarious learning experiences and goal setting influence preservice teachers' self-efficacy for integrating technology into the classroom. Twenty undergraduate students who were enrolled in an introductory educational technology course at a large midwestern university participated and were assigned…

  17. Experiences from occupational exposure limits set on aerosols containing allergenic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar; Larsen, Søren; Hansen, Jitka S

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposure limits (OELs) together with determined airborne exposures are used in risk assessment based managements of occupational exposures to prevent occupational diseases. In most countries, OELs have only been set for few protein-containing aerosols causing IgE-mediated allergies. ...... is available for setting OELs for proteins and protein-containing aerosols where the critical effect is IgE sensitization and IgE-mediated airway diseases.......Occupational exposure limits (OELs) together with determined airborne exposures are used in risk assessment based managements of occupational exposures to prevent occupational diseases. In most countries, OELs have only been set for few protein-containing aerosols causing IgE-mediated allergies...... for setting OELs. Our aim is to analyse prerequisites for setting OELs for the allergenic protein-containing aerosols. Opposite to the key effect of toxicological reactions, two thresholds, one for the sensitization phase and one for elicitation of IgE-mediated symptoms in sensitized individuals, are used...

  18. BellTest and CHSH experiments with more than two settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basoalto, R M; Percival, I C [Department of Physics, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-04

    Strong nonlocality allows signals faster than light. Weak nonlocality is a statistical property of classical events for which there is no realistic local theory. This requires the violation of at least one general Bell inequality. The theory of ideal quantum measurements predicts weak nonlocality but not strong nonlocality. Bell experiment here refers to any experiment designed to demonstrate weak nonlocality. BellTest is a computer program generally available on the Web to help planning and analysis of such Bell experiments. In Mode 1 it obtains general Bell inequalities. In Mode 2 it tests for their violation. We describe its use, with some new results for illustration.

  19. Experiment study on sediment erosion of Pelton turbine flow passage component material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Lu, L.; Zhu, L.

    2012-11-01

    A rotating and jet experiment system with high flow velocity is designed to study the anti-erosion performance of materials. The resultant velocity of the experiment system is high to 120 m/s. The anti-erosion performance of materials used in needle and nozzle and bucket of Pelton turbine, which is widely used in power station with high head and little discharge, was studied in detail by this experiment system. The experimental studies were carried with different resultant velocities and sediment concentrations. Multiple linear regression analysis method was applied to get the exponents of velocity and sediment concentration. The exponents for different materials are different. The exponents of velocity ranged from 3 to 3.5 for three kinds of material. And the exponents of sediment concentration ranged from 0.97 to 1.03 in this experiment. The SEM analysis on the erosion surface of different materials was also carried. On the erosion condition with high resultant impact velocity, the selective cutting loss of material is the mainly erosion mechanism for metal material.

  20. Experiment study on sediment erosion of Pelton turbine flow passage component material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J; Lu, L; Zhu, L

    2012-01-01

    A rotating and jet experiment system with high flow velocity is designed to study the anti-erosion performance of materials. The resultant velocity of the experiment system is high to 120 m/s. The anti-erosion performance of materials used in needle and nozzle and bucket of Pelton turbine, which is widely used in power station with high head and little discharge, was studied in detail by this experiment system. The experimental studies were carried with different resultant velocities and sediment concentrations. Multiple linear regression analysis method was applied to get the exponents of velocity and sediment concentration. The exponents for different materials are different. The exponents of velocity ranged from 3 to 3.5 for three kinds of material. And the exponents of sediment concentration ranged from 0.97 to 1.03 in this experiment. The SEM analysis on the erosion surface of different materials was also carried. On the erosion condition with high resultant impact velocity, the selective cutting loss of material is the mainly erosion mechanism for metal material.

  1. The Multi-Faceted Experience of Empathy in Intellectual Disability Settings: An IPA Study

    OpenAIRE

    Renton, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This research thesis explored the concept of empathy. The specific purpose was to further understand the idea of empathy in relation to the experience of male support workers who provide residential care to adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) and challenging behaviour. The thesis aimed to provide some insights into how support workers develop and extract meaning from their experiences of relationships with clients and the impact of this on their own self-care, namely, self-compassion. ...

  2. Improving students’ creative thinking skill through local material-based experiment (LMBE) on protein qualitative test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriyanti, F. M. T.; Halimatul, H. S.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to enhance chemistry students’ creative thinking skills using material from local resources on protein qualitative test experiment (LMBE). In this study, a quasi experiment method using one group pretest-postest non-equivalen control group design was carried out on the effectiveness of local material-based experiment approach. The data was collected using the test consists of five assay test and student work sheet (LKM). The effectiveness of the local material-based experiment was tested by means of percentage of normalized gain and score percentage of students’ worksheet. Comparison of creative thinking skills pretest and postest scores showed that the implementation of local material- based experiment (LMBE) enhanced students’s creative thinking skills in experiment class with the value of normalized gain (=0,77) at high category, while in control class reached to =0,44 at medium category. In addition, the LKM shown the enhancements of all aspect of creative thinking skills, including fluency, flexibility, and elaboration skills with the score of in experiment class are 0.79; 0.75; and 0.87 at high category, respectively. In contrast, the only the elaboration skill of control group was improved at high category (=0.76), while fluency and flexibility indicators enhanced at medium category (=0.48 and 0.56, respectively).

  3. Experience With Routine Vaginal pH Testing in a Family Practice Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana J. Pavletic

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite recommendations by Centers for Disease Control and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, pH testing is infrequently performed during the evaluation of vaginitis. Consequently, little information exists on its use in a primary care setting.

  4. Female Students' Experiences of Computer Technology in Single- versus Mixed-Gender School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lee-Ann; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This study explores how female students compare learning computer technology in a single- versus a mixed- gender school setting. Twelve females participated, all of whom were enrolled in a grade 12 course in Communications' Technology. Data collection included a questionnaire, a semi-structured interview and focus groups. Participants described…

  5. The Interplay of Space, Place and Identity: Transforming Our Learning Experiences in an Outdoor Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Alice L. E. V.; Wright, W. Alan; Strean, William B.; Watson, Gavan P. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we use a day-long professional development workshop for higher education faculty conducted in an outdoor setting as the starting point for an examination of the value of such activities. We explore the potential benefits, in terms of learning and holistic well-being, of educational activities designed to provide participants with…

  6. The Experiences of Registered Nurses Transitioning from Patient Care Settings to Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwin, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who make the move from a patient-care service setting to an academic teaching environment often go through a transition phase in their first semesters of teaching that is difficult and traumatic. RNs that go on to higher academic degrees often do so in order to teach in schools of nursing. However, graduate work in nursing…

  7. Use of Web 2.0 Technologies to Enhance Learning Experiences in Alternative School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Engin; Roehrig, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    As the learning paradigms are shifting to include various forms of digital technologies such as synchronous, asynchronous, and interactive methods, social networking technologies have been introduced to the educational settings in order to increase the quality of learning environments. The literature suggests that effective application of these…

  8. Special Education Teachers' Experiences Supporting and Supervising Paraeducators: Implications for Special and General Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Sarah N.; Chapin, Shelley E.; Nolan, James F.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in paraeducator supports, in large part because students with low incidence disabilities are being included more frequently in general education settings. As a result, special education teachers have been given additional supervisory responsibilities related to directing the work of paraeducators in…

  9. Rank the Voltage across Light Bulbs … Then Set up the Live Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Greg C.

    2018-01-01

    The Tasks Inspired by Physics Education Research (TIPERS) workbooks pose questions in styles quite different from the end-of-chapter problems that those of us of a certain age were assigned back in the days before Netscape. My own spin on TIPERS is not just to do them on paper, but to have students set up the situations in the laboratory to…

  10. Fabrication of 1m x 1m readout strips panel and quality verification of new set of SFS dielectric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Pandey, A.; Sogarwal, Hariom; Marimuthu, N.; Singh, V.; Subrahmanyam, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    India based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is going to use ∼ 30,000 Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) as an active detector. Resistive Plate chambers are parallel plate fast gaseous detector made up of high resistivity (10"1"2 ohm) of glass or bakelite. Glass plates work as electrodes of positive and negative potential. When a charged particle passes through chamber it ionizes the gas and charge move towards opposite electrodes. The pick-up panels pick these signals. Signals are sent to front end electronics. The characteristic impedance of the strips of the panels should be matched with front end electronics which helps in minimizing the reflected signal. Since INO is an underground laboratory, all material used in it must be fireproof. Since ∼ 60,000 pick-up panels are going to be used in INO hence it should be cheaper also. We recently received a new set of Silicon Fiber Sheets - a dielectric material, of 25 pieces of 1m x 0.5m having thickness 05 mm. We fabricated a set of readout strips panel of dimension 1m x 1m. We will present this work in detail

  11. Developing Archive Information Packages for Data Sets: Early Experiments with Digital Library Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, R. E.; Yang, M.; Gooyabadi, M.; Lee, C.

    2008-12-01

    The key to interoperability between systems is often metadata, yet metadata standards in the digital library and data center communities have evolved separately. In the data center world NASA's Directory Interchange Format (DIF), the Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (CSDGM), and most recently the international Geographic Information: Metadata (ISO 19115:2003) are used for descriptive metadata at the data set level to allow catalog interoperability; but use of anything other than repository- based metadata standards for the individual files that comprise a data set is rare, making true interoperability, at the data rather than data set level, across archives difficult. While the Open Archival Information Systems (OAIS) Reference Model with its call for creating Archive Information Packages (AIP) containing not just descriptive metadata but also preservation metadata is slowly being adopted in the community, the PREservation Metadata Implementation Strategies (PREMIS) standard, the only extant OAIS- compliant preservation metadata standard, has scarcely even been recognized as being applicable to the community. The digital library community in the meantime has converged upon the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) for interoperability between systems as evidenced by support for the standard by digital library systems such as Fedora and Greenstone. METS is designed to allow inclusion of other XML-based standards as descriptive and administrative metadata components. A recent Stanford study suggests that a combination of METS with included FGDC and PREMIS metadata could work well for individual granules of a data set. However, some of the lessons learned by the data center community over the last 30+ years of dealing with digital data are 1) that data sets as a whole need to be preserved and described and 2) that discovery and access mechanisms need to be hierarchical. Only once a user has reviewed a data set description and determined

  12. Characteristics of the Nordic Seas overflows in a set of Norwegian Earth System Model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuncheng; Ilicak, Mehmet; Bentsen, Mats; Fer, Ilker

    2016-08-01

    Global ocean models with an isopycnic vertical coordinate are advantageous in representing overflows, as they do not suffer from topography-induced spurious numerical mixing commonly seen in geopotential coordinate models. In this paper, we present a quantitative diagnosis of the Nordic Seas overflows in four configurations of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) family that features an isopycnic ocean model. For intercomparison, two coupled ocean-sea ice and two fully coupled (atmosphere-land-ocean-sea ice) experiments are considered. Each pair consists of a (non-eddying) 1° and a (eddy-permitting) 1/4° horizontal resolution ocean model. In all experiments, overflow waters remain dense and descend to the deep basins, entraining ambient water en route. Results from the 1/4° pair show similar behavior in the overflows, whereas the 1° pair show distinct differences, including temperature/salinity properties, volume transport (Q), and large scale features such as the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The volume transport of the overflows and degree of entrainment are underestimated in the 1° experiments, whereas in the 1/4° experiments, there is a two-fold downstream increase in Q, which matches observations well. In contrast to the 1/4° experiments, the coarse 1° experiments do not capture the inclined isopycnals of the overflows or the western boundary current off the Flemish Cap. In all experiments, the pathway of the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water is misrepresented: a major fraction of the overflow proceeds southward into the West European Basin, instead of turning westward into the Irminger Sea. This discrepancy is attributed to excessive production of Labrador Sea Water in the model. The mean state and variability of the Nordic Seas overflows have significant consequences on the response of the AMOC, hence their correct representations are of vital importance in global ocean and climate modelling.

  13. Experiences with workplace bullying among athletic trainers in the collegiate setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weuve, Celest; Pitney, William A; Martin, Malissa; Mazerolle, Stephanie M

    2014-01-01

    Workplace bullying (WPB) is a series of persistent negative interactions that affect a clinician's ability to perform his or her role. Although WPB has been studied in other health professions, to date, no information exists pertaining to WPB in athletic training. To determine the prevalence of WPB in the collegiate setting and examine factors that influence its occurrence. Cross-sectional study. Collegiate setting. There were 723 (329 female, 394 male) athletic trainers (ATs) aged 37.5 ± 10.4 years. We collected data via the validated and reliable online Athletic Training Environment Survey. Descriptive statistics were obtained to determine a bullying score for each AT and examine the prevalence of WPB. Chi-square analyses were performed to examine the differences between (1) sex, (2) academic degree level, (3) employment title, and (4) National Athletic Trainers' Association district. A total of 106 participants (14.7%) had a score of 2 or higher, indicating they were bullied in the athletic training setting. Of those bullied, 47 (44.3%) were women and 59 (55.7%) were men. There was no difference between women and men with respect to having experienced bullying (χ(2)1 = 0.068, P = .794). Moreover, no difference existed in the prevalence of bullying among ATs holding various degrees (χ(2)3 = 6.73, P = .081) or among ATs holding various titles within an organization (χ(2)5 = 3.55, P = .616). More (χ(2)1 = 23.77, P = Bullying was experienced by both male and female ATs in the collegiate setting, and a higher number of bullies were male. More research is necessary to explore WPB in other work settings.

  14. A framework of analysis for field experiments with alternative materials in road construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, D; Jullien, A

    2009-01-01

    In France, a wide variety of alternative materials is produced or exists in the form of stockpiles built up over time. Such materials are distributed over various regions of the territory depending on local industrial development and urbanisation trends. The use of alternative materials at a national scale implies sharing local knowledge and experience. Building a national database on alternative materials for road construction is useful in gathering and sharing information. An analysis of feedback from onsite experiences (back analysis) is essential to improve knowledge on alternative material use in road construction. Back analysis of field studies has to be conducted in accordance with a single common framework. This could enable drawing comparisons between alternative materials and between road applications. A framework for the identification and classification of data used in back analyses is proposed. Since the road structure is an open system, this framework has been based on a stress-response approach at both the material and structural levels and includes a description of external factors applying during the road service life. The proposal has been shaped from a review of the essential characteristics of road materials and structures, as well as from the state of knowledge specific to alternative material characterisation.

  15. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  16. Generation of covariance data among values from a single set of experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Modern nuclear data evaluation methods demand detailed uncertainty information for all input results to be considered. It can be shown from basic statistical principles that provision of a covariance matrix for a set of data provides the necessary information for its proper consideration in the context of other included experimental data and/or a priori representations of the physical parameters in question. This paper examines how an experimenter should go about preparing the covariance matrix for any single experimental data set he intends to report. The process involves detailed examination of the experimental procedures, identification of all error sources (both random and systematic); and consideration of any internal discrepancies. Some specific examples are given to illustrate the methods and principles involved

  17. Experience in the operation of the diesel engines of emergency generating sets at Fessenheim and Bugey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorey, J.

    1982-01-01

    The reliability parameters of the diesel engines in the emergency generating sets at Fessenheim and Bugey have been evaluated using informations assembled through the System for Collecting Reliability Data. The results thus obtained have been compared with those resulting from a previous theoretical study. Secondly, an examination of the incident report shows up certain difficulties in the evaluation of reliability that are specific to stand-by equipment [fr

  18. Set up of a method for the adjustment of resonance parameters on integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, P.

    1996-01-01

    Resonance parameters for actinides play a significant role in the neutronic characteristics of all reactor types. All the major integral parameters strongly depend on the nuclear data of the isotopes in the resonance-energy regions.The author sets up a method for the adjustment of resonance parameters taking into account the self-shielding effects and restricting the cross section deconvolution problem to a limited energy region. (N.T.)

  19. Evolving Non-Dominated Parameter Sets for Computational Models from Multiple Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Peter C. R.; Gobet, Fernand

    2013-03-01

    Creating robust, reproducible and optimal computational models is a key challenge for theorists in many sciences. Psychology and cognitive science face particular challenges as large amounts of data are collected and many models are not amenable to analytical techniques for calculating parameter sets. Particular problems are to locate the full range of acceptable model parameters for a given dataset, and to confirm the consistency of model parameters across different datasets. Resolving these problems will provide a better understanding of the behaviour of computational models, and so support the development of general and robust models. In this article, we address these problems using evolutionary algorithms to develop parameters for computational models against multiple sets of experimental data; in particular, we propose the `speciated non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm' for evolving models in several theories. We discuss the problem of developing a model of categorisation using twenty-nine sets of data and models drawn from four different theories. We find that the evolutionary algorithms generate high quality models, adapted to provide a good fit to all available data.

  20. Priority setting in health care: trends and models from Scandinavian experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2013-08-01

    The Scandinavian welfare states have public health care systems which have universal coverage and traditionally low influence of private insurance and private provision. Due to raises in costs, elaborate public control of health care, and a significant technological development in health care, priority setting came on the public agenda comparatively early in the Scandinavian countries. The development of health care priority setting has been partly homogeneous and appears to follow certain phases. This can be of broader interest as it may shed light on alternative models and strategies in health care priority setting. Some general trends have been identified: from principles to procedures, from closed to open processes, and from experts to participation. Five general approaches have been recognized: The moral principles and values based approach, the moral principles and economic assessment approach, the procedural approach, the expert based practice defining approach, and the participatory practice defining approach. There are pros and cons with all of these approaches. For the time being the fifth approach appears attractive, but its lack of true participation and the lack of clear success criteria may pose significant challenges in the future.

  1. Seeking to understand lived experiences of personal recovery in personality disorder in community and forensic settings - a qualitative methods investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Andrew; Sanders, Caroline; Shaw, Jenny

    2017-08-01

    Understandings of personal recovery have emerged as an alternative framework to traditional ideas of clinical progression, or symptom remission, in clinical practice. Most research in this field has focussed on the experience of individuals suffering with psychotic disorders and little research has been conducted to explore the experience of individuals with a personality disorder diagnosis, despite the high prevalence of such difficulties. The nature of the personality disorder diagnosis, together with high prevalence rates in forensic settings, renders the understanding of recovery in these contexts particularly problematic. The current study seeks to map out pertinent themes relating to the recovery process in personality disorder as described by individuals accessing care in either community or forensic settings. Individual qualitative interviews were utilised to explore the lived experience of those receiving a personality disorder diagnosis and accessing mental health care in either community or forensic settings. A thematic analysis was conducted to identify shared concepts and understanding between participants. Fourty-one individual participant interviews were conducted across forensic and community settings. Recovery was presented by participants as a developing negotiated understanding of the self, together with looked for change and hope in the future. Four specific themes emerged in relation to this process: 1. Understanding early lived experience as informing sense of self 2. Developing emotional control 3. Diagnosis as linking understanding and hope for change 4. The role of mental health services. Through considering personal recovery in personality disorder as a negotiated understanding between the individual, their social networks and professionals this study illustrates the complexity of working through such a process. Clarity of understanding in this area is essential to avoid developing resistance in the recovery process. Understanding of

  2. Women's Leadership Development in Sport Settings: Factors Influencing the Transformational Learning Experience of Female Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megheirkouni, Majd; Roomi, Muhammad Azam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores the positive and negative factors influencing transformational learning experiences of female leaders in women's leadership development programmes in sports and examines the differences in learning/change factors cited by those who successfully addressed them and those who failed. Design/methodology/approach: The study…

  3. Initial experience with transperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy in an Irish hospital setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, J C

    2009-08-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy has gained widespread acceptance as a treatment for both benign and malignant conditions and is becoming increasingly popular in Irish hospitals. We report a single surgeon, single centre experience with 20 consecutive laparoscopic nephrectomies comparing them to 20 open cases performed prior to the establishment of a laparoscopic service.

  4. Lived experience of working with female patients in a high-secure mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beryl, Rachel; Davies, Jason; Völlm, Birgit

    2018-02-01

    Women's secure hospitals are often considered to be stressful and demanding places to work, with these environments characterized as challenging and violent. However, the staff experience of working in this environment is not well represented in the literature. The present study is the first to examine the 'lived experience' of seven nurses working in the National High Secure Healthcare Service for Women. Interview transcripts were analysed with the use of interpretative phenomenological analysis, and the findings presented within four superordinate themes 'horror', 'balancing acts', 'emotional hard labour', and 'the ward as a community'. These themes all depict the challenges that participants experience in their work, the ways in which they cope with these challenges, and how they make sense of these experiences. A meta-theme of 'making sense by understanding why' is also presented, which represents the importance for participants to attempt to make sense of the tensions and challenges by formulating a fuller meaning. The findings suggest the importance of workforce development in terms of allowing sufficient protected time for reflection and formulation (e.g. within the format of group supervision or reflective practice), and for staff-support mechanisms (e.g. clinical supervision, counselling, debriefs) to be inbuilt into the ethos of a service, so as to provide proactive support for staff 'on the frontline'. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Spanish experiences with marginal and special materials on the construction of road embankments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano Linares, H.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of existing materials along the alignment of a road is an essential problem within the Sustainable Development policies, which is being promoting worldwide since a long time. In the Word road Association (PIARC-AIPCR) this subject has being investigated by different Technical Committees during last decades. Additionally, the review of the article 330 Embankment of PG-3 (FOM 1382/2002) has opened the door to new non-conventional materials, as wastes and artificial materials, to be used on embankments. This could come to adequate solutions, technically, and environmentally, contributing with national legislation on valorisation policies. In this sense, the use of marginal materials and wastes con represent and important save on natural resources and dumping sites. In Spain, some experiences with marginal materials and wastes have being carried out. The work presented has consisted in compiling and analysing the experiences executed with marginal materials and wastes on Spanish road embankments. Although there are many other cases, 24 cases published with adequate information have being analysed, summarising aspects as: materials problems arrangement solutions or treatments employed. Analysing these experiences and making them public can be a way to transmit confidence, help to improve knowledge, and progress on the preparation of recommendations. This work has being carried out on the frame of the Project Geotechnical Engineering, Materials and Structures and Impact of Infrastructure in Civil engineering (TTIGEM), within the frame Program Border Cooperation Spain-External Borders (POCTEFEX); particularly in the Activity 2 related to Technology Transfer of Construction Materials, including marginal materials and wastes. (Author)

  6. Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  7. Healing process following application of set or fresh mineral trioxide aggregate as a root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mehdi; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Habibi, Ataollah; Mohtasham, Nooshin

    2011-01-01

    An unsuccessful attempt to reach the apical area or to place the retrograde material is a major difficulty in periradicular surgery. The aim of this study was to compare the histological evaluation of the healing process following an orthograde versus a retrograde application of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as a root-end filling material during apical surgery on cats' teeth in order to find out whether orthograde placement of MTA before surgery can be used instead of retrograde placement during surgery. In this experimental study, 24 canine teeth in 12 mature and healthy cats were filled with either MTA or gutta-percha in an orthograde manner. Two weeks later, the teeth with MTA were surgically exposed and resected to the set-MTA within the canals. The teeth previously filled by gutta-percha were also surgically exposed, and retrograde cavities were prepared at the root ends and filled with fresh-MTA. After 8 weeks, the animals were euthanized by vital perfusion. Six-micron histological slices were prepared from samples, stained by Hematoxylin & Eosin, and histologically studied by means of a light microscope. The collected data was analyzed by the Chi-square and the T-test. One of the samples in the fresh-MTA group was omitted during processing because of inappropriate sectioning. In the set-MTA group, 5 out of 12 showed chronic abscess, while in the fresh-MTA group, 2 out of 11 were discovered to have chronic abscess; however, no significant difference was observed (P>.05). Hard tissue healing (cementum, bone, cementum + bone formation) in the set-MTA and fresh-MTA groups were 7 out of 12 and 9 out of 11, respectively. While healing seemed more likely to occur in the fresh-MTA group, the difference was statistically insignificant (P>.05). The magnitude of bone, cementum, or bone and cementum formation showed slight differences between the two groups; however, the figures failed to show any marked differences (P>.05). Orthograde placement of MTA could be used

  8. Material radioassay and selection for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, LIBPhys, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Sivers, M. von [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics; Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Scotto Lavina, L. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-12-15

    The XENON1T dark matter experiment aims to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through low-energy interactions with xenon atoms. To detect such a rare event necessitates the use of radiopure materials to minimize the number of background events within the expected WIMP signal region. In this paper we report the results of an extensive material radioassay campaign for the XENON1T experiment. Using gamma-ray spectroscopy and mass spectrometry techniques, systematic measurements of trace radioactive impurities in over one hundred samples within a wide range of materials were performed. The measured activities allowed for stringent selection and placement of materials during the detector construction phase and provided the input for XENON1T detection sensitivity estimates through Monte Carlo simulations. (orig.)

  9. South Asian immigrant women's experiences of being respected within cancer treatment settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Neufeld, Anne; Olson, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this focused ethnographic inquiry was to examine South Asian immigrant women's experiences and perceptions of respect within health professional-client relationships in the context of a Canadian outpatient treatment clinic. Characteristics of respect described by 11 women interviewed were the meaning of respect, health professional's way of being, their way of attending to the person, and their way of talking. Language, cultural values and beliefs, along with underlying societal, individual and institutional factors that coexist with health professionals' ability to create respect were some of the dimensions that influenced how immigrant women experienced respect. Health professionals' capacity to acknowledge South Asian immigrant women as individuals helped to formulate/construct respect for their individual identities. The need to be respected for 'my social identity' as an immigrant woman with cancer was woven throughout women's stories, illustrated by their personal experiences and perspectives.

  10. Double perovskites overtaking the single perovskites: A set of new solar harvesting materials with much higher stability and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangsabanik, Jiban; Sugathan, Vipinraj; Yadav, Anuradha; Yella, Aswani; Alam, Aftab

    2018-05-01

    Solar energy plays an important role in substituting the ever declining source of fossil fuel energy. Finding novel materials for solar cell applications is an integral part of photovoltaic research. Hybrid lead halide perovskites are one of, if not the most, well sought material in the photovoltaic research community. Its unique intrinsic properties, flexible synthesis techniques, and device fabrication architecture made the community highly buoyant over the past few years. Yet, there are two fundamental issues that still remain a concern, i.e., the stability in external environment and the toxicity due to Pb. This led to a search for alternative materials. More recently, double perovskite [A2B B'X6 (X =Cl, Br, I)] materials have emerged as a promising choice. Few experimental synthesis and high throughput computational studies have been carried out to check for promising candidates of this class. The main outcome from these studies, however, can essentially be summarized into two categories: (i) either they have an indirect band gap or (ii) a direct but large optical band gap, which is not suitable for solar devices. Here we propose a large set of stable double perovskite materials, Cs2B B 'X6 (X =Cl, Br, I), which show indirect to direct band gap transition via small Pb+2 doping at both B and B'sites. This is done by careful band (orbital) engineering using first-principles calculations. This kind of doping has helped to change the topology of the band structure, triggering an indirect to direct transition that is optically allowed. It also reduces the band gap significantly, bringing it well into the visible region. We also simulated the optical absorption spectra of these systems and found a comparable/higher absorption coefficient and solar efficiency with respect to the state of the art photovoltaic absorber material CH3NH3PbI3 . A number of materials Cs2(B0.75Pb0.25) (B0.75'Pb0.25) X6 (for various combinations of B ,B ', and X ) are found to be promising

  11. Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Data Sets for Global Environment and Climate Change Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, T. Dale; Carlson, Ann B.; Denn, Fredrick M.

    1997-01-01

    For a number of years there has been considerable interest in the earth's radiation budget (ERB) or energy balance, and entails making the best measurements possible of absorbed solar radiation, reflected shortwave radiation (RSW), thermal outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), and net radiation. ERB data are fundamental to the development of realistic climate models and studying natural and anthropogenic perturbations of the climate. Much of the interest and investigations in the earth's energy balance predated the age of earth-orbiting satellites (Hunt et al., 1986). Beginning in the mid 1960's earth-orbiting satellites began to play an important role in making measurements of the earth's radiation flux although much effort had gone into measuring ERB parameters prior to 1960 (House et al., 1986). Beginning in 1974 and extending until the present time, three different satellite experiments (not all operating at the same time) have been making radiation budget measurements almost continually in time. Two of the experiments were totally dedicated to making radiation budget measurements of the earth, and the other experiment flown on NOAA sun-synchronous AVHRR weather satellites produced radiation budget parameters as a by-product. The heat budget data from the AVHRR satellites began collecting data in June 1974 and have operated almost continuously for 23 years producing valuable data for long term climate monitoring.

  12. The effectiveness of three sets of school-based instructional materials and community training on the acquisition and generalization of community laundry skills by students with severe handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, S A; Bates, P E

    1987-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of three sets of school-based instructional materials and community training on acquisition and generalization of a community laundry skill by nine students with severe handicaps. School-based instruction involved artificial materials (pictures), simulated materials (cardboard replica of a community washing machine), and natural materials (modified home model washing machine). Generalization assessments were conducted at two different community laundromats, on two machines represented fully by the school-based instructional materials and two machines not represented fully by these materials. After three phases of school-based instruction, the students were provided ten community training trials in one laundromat setting and a final assessment was conducted in both the trained and untrained community settings. A multiple probe design across students was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the three types of school instruction and community training. After systematic training, most of the students increased their laundry performance with all three sets of school-based materials; however, generalization of these acquired skills was limited in the two community settings. Direct training in one of the community settings resulted in more efficient acquisition of the laundry skills and enhanced generalization to the untrained laundromat setting for most of the students. Results of this study are discussed in regard to the issue of school versus community-based instruction and recommendations are made for future research in this area.

  13. Applying radiological emergency planning experience to hazardous materials emergency planning within the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltman, A.; Newsom, D.; Lerner, K.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear industry has extensive radiological emergency planning (REP) experience that is directly applicable to hazardous materials emergency planning. Recently, the Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio, successfully demonstrated such application. The REP experience includes conceptual bases and standards for developing plans that have been tested in hundreds of full-scale exercises. The exercise program itself is also well developed. Systematic consideration of the differences between chemical and radiological hazards shows that relatively minor changes to the REP bases and standards are necessary. Conduct of full-scale, REP-type exercises serves to test the plans, provide training, and engender confidence and credibility

  14. Physical protection of nuclear materials: Experience in regulation, implementation and operations. Proceedings of a conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The conference was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 10 to 14 November 1997. It was attended by 162 registered participants from 42 countries and eight international organizations. The 58 papers presented dealt with the experience of regulators, designers and facility operators, including response forces, in meeting the demands and requirements in this changing area of physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for each of the papers. Topics covered include contemporary and emerging issues, experience in regulation, implementation at facilities, program assessment and cooperation, hardware and software, illicit trafficking in nuclear materials, and transportation

  15. Analysis of the elastic behaviour of nonclassical nonlinear mesoscopic materials in quasi-static experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffino, E.; Scalerandi, M.

    2000-01-01

    As discovered by recent quasi-static and dynamic resonance experiments, the classical nonlinear theory fails in describing the hysteretic behaviour of nonlinear mesoscopic materials like rocks, concrete, etc. The paper applies the local interaction simulation approach (LISA) for studying such kind of nonclassical nonlinearity. To this purpose, in the LISA treatment of ultrasonic wave propagation has been included a phenomenological model, based on the PM space approach, of the local mesoscopic features of rocks and other materials with localized damages. A quantitative comparison of simulation and experimental results in quasi-static experiments is also presented

  16. Experience in nuclear materials accountancy, including the use of computers, in the UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.R.; Adamson, A.S.; Good, P.T.; Terrey, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    The UKAEA have operated systems of nuclear materials accountancy in research and development establishments handling large quantities of material for over 20 years. In the course of that time changing requirements for nuclear materials control and increasing quantities of materials have required that accountancy systems be modified and altered to improve either the fundamental system or manpower utilization. The same accountancy principles are applied throughout the Authority but procedures at the different establishments vary according to the nature of their specific requirements; there is much in the cumulative experience of the UKAEA which could prove of value to other organizations concerned with nuclear materials accountancy or safeguards. This paper reviews the present accountancy system in the UKAEA and summarizes its advantages. Details are given of specific experience and solutions which have been found to overcome difficulties or to strengthen previous weak points. Areas discussed include the use of measurements, the establishment of measurement points (which is relevant to the designation of MBAs), the importance of regular physical stock-taking, and the benefits stemming from the existence of a separate accountancy section independent of operational management at large establishments. Some experience of a dual system of accountancy and criticality control is reported, and the present status of computerization of nuclear material accounts is summarized. Important aspects of the relationship between management systems of accountancy and safeguards' requirements are discussed briefly. (author)

  17. Setting up of Nuclide GRAF-3S spark source mass spectrometer for the analysis of high purity materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahalingam, T.R.; Murugaiyan, P.; Soni, K.S.; Venkateswarlu, Ch.

    1975-01-01

    A spark source mass spectrometer model GRAF-35 manufactured by the Nuclide Corporation, U.S.A., was set up for analysis of nuclear-grade and high purity materials. The main difficulty with its successful operation was to achieve and maintain the required level of vacuum i.e. less than 2X10 -8 torr in the magnetic analyser region. With 100 1/s ion pump, the required vacuum could be achieved, but the spectrometer required periodical baking which minimises the life of the instrument. The pumping system was replaced by Ultek Boostivac pump - a combination of ion pump (150 1/s) and a titanium sublimation pump (1000 1/sec speed for condensable vapours) which eliminated baking as the necessary level of vacuum could be easily achieved whenever required. Results of the analysis of zone-refined indium and uranium for trace impurities are given. (M.G.B.)

  18. Investigating the experience of outdoor and adventurous project work in an educational setting using a self-determination framework

    OpenAIRE

    Sproule, J.; Martindale, R.; Wang, J.; Allison, P.; Nash, C.; Gray, S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to carry out a preliminary investigation to explore the use ofoutdoor and adventurous project work (PW) within an educational setting. Specifically, differencesbetween the PW and normal academic school experiences were examined using a selfdeterminationtheory framework integrated with a goal orientation and psychological skills perspective.Additionally, an exploratory investigation was carried out to examine the extent to which key motivation constructs predicted...

  19. Setting up the photoluminescence laboratory at ISOLDE & Perturbed Angular Correlation spectroscopy for BIO physics experiments using radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Savva, Giannis

    2016-01-01

    The proposed project I was assigned was to set up the photoluminescence (PL) laboratory at ISOLDE, under the supervision of Karl Johnston. My first week at CERN coincided with the run of a BIO physics experiment using radioactive Hg(II) ions in which I also participated under the supervision of Stavroula Pallada. This gave me the opportunity to work in two projects during my stay at CERN and in the present report I describe briefly my contribution to them.

  20. Experiences with fast breeder reactor education in laboratory and short course settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltar, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    The breeder reactor industry throughout the world has grown impressively over the last two decades. Despite the uncertainties in some national programs, breeder reactor technology is well established on a global scale. Given the magnitude of this technological undertaking, there has been surprisingly little emphasis on general breeder reactor education - either at the university or laboratory level. Many universities assume the topic too specialized for including appropriate courses in their curriculum - thus leaving students entering the breeder reactor industry to learn almost exclusively from on-the-job experience. The evaluation of four course presentations utilizing visual aids is presented

  1. Learning Physics Down a Slide: A Set of Experiments to Measure Reality Through Smartphone Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Martínez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the use of smartphones among teenagers in their daily life has grown significantly. Despite the efforts to use tablets in learning processes, these teenagers are often prompted to switch off their personal devices before entering a classroom. Moreover, most mobile learning applications do not take advantage of the device sensors (e.g., touchscreen, accelerometer, or gyroscope. In order to overcome this situation, we have developed Serious Physics, a free mobile app that allows using smartphones as measuring tools to conduct experiments on Physics.

  2. Reciprocal Education Experiences In Two GK-12 Programs: Teachers Learning And Students Teaching In Diverse Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, M.; Williams, C.; Rodriguez, T.; Greely, T.; Pyrtle, A. J.; Rivera-Rentas, A. L.; Vilches, M.

    2004-12-01

    The National Science Foundation's Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) Program has enabled science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduate schools across the country to become more active in local area K-12 schools. An overview of a graduate student's experiences, insights gained and lessons learned as a Fellow in the 2003-2004 Universidad Metropolitana's (UMET) environmental science and the 2004-2005 University of South Florida's (USF) ocean science GK-12 Programs is presented. The major goals of the 2003-2004 UMET GK-12 Program were 1) to enrich environmental science teaching and learning via a thematic approach in eight local public schools and 2) to provide UMET graduate students with exposure to teaching methodologies and practical teaching experience. Utilizing examples from local environments in and nearby Carolina, Puerto Rico to teach key science principles at Escuela de la Comunidad Juana Rodriguez Mundo provided numerous opportunities to relate science topics to students' daily life experiences. By 2004, the UMET GK-12 Program had successfully engaged the entire student body (primarily comprised of bilingual minority kindergarten to sixth graders), teachers and school administrators in environment-focused teaching and learning activities. Examples of such activities include tree planting projects to minimize local erosion, conducting a science fair for the first time in many years, and numerous opportunities to experience what "real scientists do" while conducting environmental science investigations. During the 2004-2005 academic year, skills, insights and lessons learned as a UMET GK-12 Fellow are being further enhanced through participation in the USF GK-12 OCEANS Program. The overall objectives of the 2004-2005 USF GK-12 OCEANS assignment at Madeira Beach Elementary School in Saint Petersburg, Florida are to 1) engage students from various ethnic backgrounds and cultures in hands-on science activities, 2) enhance the

  3. A review of analogue modelling of geodynamic processes: Approaches, scaling, materials and quantification, with an application to subduction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, Wouter P.; Strak, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    We present a review of the analogue modelling method, which has been used for 200 years, and continues to be used, to investigate geological phenomena and geodynamic processes. We particularly focus on the following four components: (1) the different fundamental modelling approaches that exist in analogue modelling; (2) the scaling theory and scaling of topography; (3) the different materials and rheologies that are used to simulate the complex behaviour of rocks; and (4) a range of recording techniques that are used for qualitative and quantitative analyses and interpretations of analogue models. Furthermore, we apply these four components to laboratory-based subduction models and describe some of the issues at hand with modelling such systems. Over the last 200 years, a wide variety of analogue materials have been used with different rheologies, including viscous materials (e.g. syrups, silicones, water), brittle materials (e.g. granular materials such as sand, microspheres and sugar), plastic materials (e.g. plasticine), visco-plastic materials (e.g. paraffin, waxes, petrolatum) and visco-elasto-plastic materials (e.g. hydrocarbon compounds and gelatins). These materials have been used in many different set-ups to study processes from the microscale, such as porphyroclast rotation, to the mantle scale, such as subduction and mantle convection. Despite the wide variety of modelling materials and great diversity in model set-ups and processes investigated, all laboratory experiments can be classified into one of three different categories based on three fundamental modelling approaches that have been used in analogue modelling: (1) The external approach, (2) the combined (external + internal) approach, and (3) the internal approach. In the external approach and combined approach, energy is added to the experimental system through the external application of a velocity, temperature gradient or a material influx (or a combination thereof), and so the system is open

  4. Results from a Set of Three-Dimensional Numerical Experiments of a Hot Jupiter Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Nathan J.; Debras, Flirian; Baraffe, Isabelle; Thuburn, John; Amundsen, David S.; Acreman, David M.; Smith, Chris; Browning, Matthew K.; Manners, James; Wood Nigel

    2017-01-01

    We present highlights from a large set of simulations of a hot Jupiter atmosphere, nominally based on HD 209458b, aimed at exploring both the evolution of the deep atmosphere, and the acceleration of the zonal flow or jet. We find the occurrence of a super-rotating equatorial jet is robust to changes in various parameters, and over long timescales, even in the absence of strong inner or bottom boundary drag. This jet is diminished in one simulation only, where we strongly force the deep atmosphere equator-to-pole temperature gradient over long timescales. Finally, although the eddy momentum fluxes in our atmosphere show similarities with the proposed mechanism for accelerating jets on tidally-locked planets, the picture appears more complex. We present tentative evidence for a jet driven by a combination of eddy momentum transport and mean flow.

  5. Challenges with controlling varicella in prison settings: experience of California, 2010 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jessica; Lopez, Adriana S; Tootell, Elena; Baumrind, Nikki; Mohle-Boetani, Janet; Leistikow, Bruce; Harriman, Kathleen H; Preas, Christopher P; Cosentino, Giorgio; Bialek, Stephanie R; Marin, Mona

    2014-10-01

    This article describes the epidemiology of varicella in one state prison in California during 2010 and 2011, control measures implemented, and associated costs. Eleven varicella cases were reported, of which nine were associated with two outbreaks. One outbreak consisted of three cases and the second consisted of six cases with two generations of spread. Among exposed inmates serologically tested, 98% (643/656) were varicella-zoster virus seropositive. The outbreaks resulted in > 1,000 inmates exposed, 444 staff exposures, and > $160,000 in costs. The authors documented the challenges and costs associated with controlling and managing varicella in a prison setting. A screening policy for evidence of varicella immunity for incoming inmates and staff and vaccination of susceptible persons has the potential to mitigate the impact of future outbreaks and reduce resources necessary to manage cases and outbreaks. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Challenges with controlling varicella in prison settings: Experience of California, 2010–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jessica; Lopez, Adriana S.; Tootell, Elena; Baumrind, Nikki; Mohle-Boetani, Janet; Leistikow, Bruce; Harriman, Kathleen H.; Preas, Christopher P.; Cosentino, Giorgio; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Marin, Mona

    2015-01-01

    We describe the epidemiology of varicella in one state prison in California during 2010–2011, control measures implemented, and associated costs. Eleven varicella cases were reported, 9 associated with 2 outbreaks. One outbreak consisted of 3 cases and the second consisted of 6 cases with 2 generations of spread. Among exposed inmates serologically tested, 98% (643/656) were VZV sero-positive. The outbreaks resulted in >1,000 inmates exposed, 444 staff exposures, and >$160,000 in costs. We documented the challenges and costs associated with controlling and managing varicella in a prison setting. A screening policy for evidence of varicella immunity for incoming inmates and staff and vaccination of susceptible persons has the potential to mitigate the impact of future outbreaks and reduce resources necessary for managing cases and outbreaks. PMID:25201912

  7. High-speed infrared imaging for material characterization in experimental mechanics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Marcotte, Frédérick; Lagueux, Philippe; Farley, Vincent; Guyot, Éric; Morton, Vince

    2017-10-01

    Heat transfers are involved in many phenomena such as friction, tensile stress, shear stress and material rupture. Among the challenges encountered during the characterization of such thermal patterns is the need for both high spatial and temporal resolution. Infrared imaging provides information about surface temperature that can be attributed to the stress response of the material and breaking of chemical bounds. In order to illustrate this concept, tensile and shear tests were carried out on steel, aluminum and carbon fiber composite materials and monitored using high-speed (Telops FASTM2K) and high-definition (Telops HD-IR) infrared imaging. Results from split-Hopkinson experiments carried out on a polymer material at high strain-rate are also presented. The results illustrate how high-speed and high-definition infrared imaging in the midwave infrared (MWIR, 3 - 5 μm) spectral range can provide detailed information about the thermal properties of materials undergoing mechanical testing.

  8. Development of Control Teaching Material for Mechatronics Education Based on Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, Takao; Watanabe, Shinichi; Shikanai, Yoshihito; Ozaki, Koichi

    In this paper, we have developed a teaching material for technical high school students to understand the control technique. The material makes the students understanding the control technique through the sensibility obtained from the experience of riding the robot. We have considered the correspondence of the teaching material with the ARCS Model. Therefore, the material aims to improve the interest and the willingness to learn mechatronics and control technique by experiencing the difference of the response by the change in the control parameters. As the results of the questionnaire to the technical high school students in the class, we have verified educative effect of the teaching material which can be improved willingness of learning and interesting for mechatronics and control technique.

  9. Impact of ICTs on Open and Distance Learning in a Developing Country Setting: The Philippine experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda dela Pena Bandalaria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the information and communication technologies (ICTs in open and distance learning (ODL in a developing country, the Philippines, is critically evaluated in this paper. Specifically, this paper examines how ICTs have influenced or shaped the development of ODL in this country. Also examined are the different stages or generations of distance education (DE in the Philippines, which are characterized mainly by the dominant technology used for the delivery of instructional content and student support services. The different ICTs being used in ODL and their specific applications to the various facets of this mode of delivery are also described. Also included is an examination on how quality of education is ensured in a technology-driven system of teaching and learning, which includes, among others, the employment of the ‘quality circle approach’ in the development of courses and learning packages, and the provision of appropriate technologies to perform academic processes and achieve institutional goals. Experiences of the various universities in the Philippines are also cited in this paper. Lessons have been drawn from the ODL experience to guide educators from other developing countries.

  10. Patient experience and use of probiotics in community-based health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Lee, Blake; Curry, William J; Fetterman, John; Graybill, Marie A; Karpa, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    To investigate patient experience with probiotics and factors that influence probiotic use among adult patients. Patients were invited to complete a questionnaire that assessed their experiences and opinions regarding probiotics. Questionnaires were distributed to patients seeking primary health care services at a family and community medicine practice site and a community pharmacy. Patients were invited to complete the questionnaire while awaiting the physician or waiting for prescriptions to be filled. Overall, 162 surveys were completed and returned (66% response rate) from patients aged 18 to 89 years of age (mean 49.5 years). Most patients (n=107; 65%) were familiar with the term "probiotic", and 49 patients (29.9%) had personally used the supplements in the past. Of those who had used probiotics, the majority (57%) had used the supplements to maintain "good gastrointestinal health" and most (59%) felt that the supplements had been beneficial. However, most (59%) had not informed their health care provider about their use of the supplements. Use of probiotic supplements is common among consumers, but may not be reported to health care providers.

  11. Patient experience and use of probiotics in community-based health care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Lee B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Blake Chin-Lee,1 William J Curry,1 John Fetterman,2 Marie A Graybill,1 Kelly Karpa2 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, 2Department of Pharmacology, Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine Hershey, PA, USA Objective: To investigate patient experience with probiotics and factors that influence probiotic use among adult patients.Method: Patients were invited to complete a questionnaire that assessed their experiences and opinions regarding probiotics. Questionnaires were distributed to patients seeking primary health care services at a family and community medicine practice site and a community pharmacy. Patients were invited to complete the questionnaire while awaiting the physician or waiting for prescriptions to be filled. Results: Overall, 162 surveys were completed and returned (66% response rate from patients aged 18 to 89 years of age (mean 49.5 years. Most patients (n=107; 65% were familiar with the term “probiotic”, and 49 patients (29.9% had personally used the supplements in the past. Of those who had used probiotics, the majority (57% had used the supplements to maintain “good gastrointestinal health” and most (59% felt that the supplements had been beneficial. However, most (59% had not informed their health care provider about their use of the supplements.Conclusion: Use of probiotic supplements is common among consumers, but may not be reported to health care providers. Keywords: primary care, community pharmacy, probiotic

  12. Developing antitobacco mass media campaign messages in a low-resource setting: experience from the Kingdom of Tonga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, C; Phongsavan, P; Gloede, S; Filiai, S; Tongamana, V O

    2017-05-01

    Tobacco use has become the leading cause of preventable death in Tonga, a small island nation in the South Pacific. One pragmatic and economical strategy to address this worrying trend is to adapt effective antitobacco mass media materials developed in high-income countries for local audiences. Using Tonga as an example, this paper shares the practical steps involved in adapting antitobacco campaign materials for local audiences with minimal resources, a limited budget and without the need for an external production team. The Tongan experience underscores the importance of an adaptation process that draws from evidence-based best-practice models and engages local and regional stakeholders to ensure that campaign materials are tailored to the local context and are embedded within a mix of antitobacco strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Developing antitobacco mass media campaign messages in a low-resource setting: experience from the Kingdom of Tonga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, C; Phongsavan, P; Gloede, S; Filiai, S; Tongamana, V O

    2017-01-01

    Tobacco use has become the leading cause of preventable death in Tonga, a small island nation in the South Pacific. One pragmatic and economical strategy to address this worrying trend is to adapt effective antitobacco mass media materials developed in high-income countries for local audiences. Using Tonga as an example, this paper shares the practical steps involved in adapting antitobacco campaign materials for local audiences with minimal resources, a limited budget and without the need for an external production team. The Tongan experience underscores the importance of an adaptation process that draws from evidence-based best-practice models and engages local and regional stakeholders to ensure that campaign materials are tailored to the local context and are embedded within a mix of antitobacco strategies. PMID:26969171

  14. The improvement in management of material and production reserves of the enterprise in conditions of uncertainty using the fuzzy sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raskatova M.I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article a method of management of material and production reserves of industrial enterprises in conditions of uncertainty has been suggested. The method proposes that a part of a benchmark in economic and mathematical models of determining the volume and completion time for orders for raw products and materials be represented as fuzzy numbers. The application of fuzzy-set theory allows taking into account the uncertainty of the external environment without using the theory of probability. The use of the latter is often difficult. The criterion for choosing the optimal management strategy is the minimization of the objective function of the total cost connected with reserves management. It is suggested to obtain the benchmarks that are expressed by fuzzy numbers with a method of expert evaluation. Using the results obtained with the suggested approach the decision-maker will be able to form a concrete strategy for reserves management in a constantly changing market situation. The suggested technique is universal; its application is possible in various industries.

  15. Use of INAA in the preparation of a set soil Reference Materials with certified values of total element contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J.; Horakova, J.; Soukal, L.

    1997-01-01

    A set of certified Reference Materials was prepared consisting of four natural agricultural soils with normal (n) and elevated (e) levels of element contents: CRM 7001 Light Sandy Soil (n), CRM 7002 Light Sandy Soil (e), CRM 7003 Silty Clay Loam (n), and CRM 7004 Loam (e). In these materials, certified and/or information values of the total contents of the elements As, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn, and their fractions extractable by aqua regia, boiling and cold 2M nitric acid were derived from an interlaboratory comparison in which 28 laboratories participated. Highly precise and accurate procedures of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) were employed for homogeneity testing and also for certification of the total element contents. For comparation purposes, NIST SRM-2704 Buffalo River Sediment was analyzed by INAA, as well. The INAA results obtained compared very well with the certified and/or information values for four soil CRMs and also with NIST values for SRM-2704. From this agreement, a very high reliability of the new soil CRMs can be inferred. (author)

  16. Advance Care Planning: Understanding Clinical Routines and Experiences of Interprofessional Team Members in Diverse Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Kelly; Sudore, Rebecca L; Nowels, David; Feng, Cindy X; Levy, Cari R; Lum, Hillary D

    2017-12-01

    Interprofessional health care team members consider advance care planning (ACP) to be important, yet gaps remain in systematic clinical routines to support ACP. A clearer understanding of the interprofessional team members' perspectives on ACP clinical routines in diverse settings is needed. One hundred eighteen health care team members from community-based clinics, long-term care facilities, academic clinics, federally qualified health centers, and hospitals participated in a 35-question, cross-sectional online survey to assess clinical routines, workflow processes, and policies relating to ACP. Respondents were 53% physicians, 18% advanced practice nurses, 11% nurses, and 18% other interprofessional team members including administrators, chaplains, social workers, and others. Regarding clinical routines, respondents reported that several interprofessional team members play a role in facilitating ACP (ie, physician, social worker, nurse, others). Most (62%) settings did not have, or did not know of, policies related to ACP documentation. Only 14% of settings had a patient education program. Two-thirds of the respondents said that addressing ACP is a high priority and 85% felt that nonphysicians could have ACP conversations with appropriate training. The clinical resources needed to improve clinical routines included training for providers and staff, dedicated staff to facilitate ACP, and availability of patient/family educational materials. Although interprofessional health care team members consider ACP a priority and several team members may be involved, clinical settings lack systematic clinical routines to support ACP. Patient educational materials, interprofessional team training, and policies to support ACP clinical workflows that do not rely solely on physicians could improve ACP across diverse clinical settings.

  17. Organisational aspects of mammography screening in digital settings: First experiences of Luxembourg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannoun, F.; Schanck, J. M.; Scharpantgen, A.; Wagnon, M. C.; Ben Daoud, M.; Back, C.

    2008-01-01

    Luxembourg has been conducting a breast cancer screening programme since 1992, like a large number of other European countries, as early detection and treatment of breast cancer have been proven to reduce mortality. The majority of these screening programmes are based on analogue X-ray technology and have optimised their organisation of transporting, archiving and reading with respect to films. Last decade is marked by enormous developments in digital mammography. Different technologies such as flat panel-, computed radiography- and scanning systems became available. Digital mammography is expected to have a major impact on quality and organisation of breast cancer screening programmes. Screening programmes are now faced with a huge challenge of incorporating the digital technology, including implementation of electronic image exchange, conception of new electronic work-flow, establishing adapted quality assurance programmes and training of radiologists and technical personnel. Initial experiences of the Luxembourg approach in organising digital mammography screening and its quality assurance are reported. (authors)

  18. Illness experiences of diabetes in the context of malaria in settings experiencing double burden of disease in southeastern Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmy Metta

    Full Text Available Tanzania is doubly burdened with both non-communicable and infectious diseases, but information on how Tanzanians experience the co-existence of these conditions is limited. Using Kleinman's eight prompting questions the study synthesizes explanatory models from patients to describe common illness experiences of diabetes in a rural setting where malaria is the predominant health threat.We conducted 17 focus group discussions with adult members of the general community, diabetes patients, neighbours and relatives of diabetes patients to gain insight into shared experiences. To gain in-depth understanding of the individual illness experiences, we conducted 41 in-depth interviews with malaria or diabetes patients and family members of diabetes patients. The analysis followed grounded theory principles and the illness experiences were derived from the emerging themes.The illness experiences showed that malaria and diabetes are both perceived to be severe and fatal conditions, but over the years people have learned to live with malaria and the condition is relatively manageable compared with diabetes. In contrast, diabetes was perceived as a relatively new disease, with serious life-long consequences. Uncertainty, fear of those consequences, and the increased risk for severe malaria and other illnesses impacted diabetes patients and their families' illness experiences. Unpredictable ailments and loss of consciousness, memory, libido, and functional incapability were common problems reported by diabetes patients. These problems had an effect on their psychological and emotional health and limited their social life. Direct and indirect costs of illness pushed individuals and their families further into poverty and were more pronounced for diabetes patients.The illness experiences revealed both malaria and diabetes as distressing conditions, however, diabetes showed a higher level of stress because of its chronicity. Strategies for supporting social

  19. Formal reporting of second-opinion CT interpretation: experience and reimbursement in the emergency department setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Adam B; Saghir, Amina; Camacho, Marc

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a system for formally reporting second-opinion interpretations of CT imaging exams accompanying patients transferred emergently to a tertiary care center. Second-opinion interpretations of cross-sectional imaging exams rendered in the emergency department setting over 6 months spanning 22 September 2009 to 22 March 2010 were reviewed and tallied by two radiologists and a research assistant, with a focus on professional fee reimbursement rates. A more in depth review was performed of those exams for which a clinical referral request form was available, detailing such information as the clinical history, content and source of available initial interpretation, and congruity of the initial interpretation with clinical data. Discrepancies between outside and second-opinion interpretations were also assessed. This quality assurance exercise was reviewed by our institutional review board, which waived formal informed consent. Formal second-opinion interpretation was rendered for 370 exams on 198 patients (mean age, 53.5 years; 45.1% female), received from 50 referring facilities. Head CT was the most common imaging exam referred for second opinion. Forty-one of 370 exams (11%) were submitted for self-pay, and 43 (12%) were written off as free care. The remaining 286 exams (77%) were submitted for reimbursement of the professional fee only. Ultimately, of the 286 exams submitted, 260 (91%) were reimbursed for professional fees, 199 (70%) on the initial submission. Of 29 health plans contracted with our facility, 22 ultimately approved all claims made. Three plans denied all claims submitted. The largest payer was Medicare, which reimbursed 88 of 90 submitted claims. Clinical intake forms were available for 184 exams on 107 patients (mean age, 52.7 years, 43.0% female). Trauma was the most common indication, or history, provided (55% of 184 exams, 40% of 107 patients). An outside report of some form was available for 112 of the 184

  20. Experiences of nurses working in a rural primary health-care setting in Mopani district, Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MP Mohale

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Professional nurses working in rural, primary health-care settings are experiencing burnout due to serious shortages of personnel. This is exacerbated by the brain drain of nurses leaving the country. Rural settings are resource constrained in terms of personnel and equipment. This results in dissatisfaction among nurses due to the unbearable working conditions which result in stress and frustration. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive study was conducted to explore and describe the experiences of nurses working in a rural primary health-care setting in the greater Letaba sub district in Limpopo Province. Purposive sampling was used to identify the participants. Data was collected in the form of in-depth interviews. The study revealed that nurses working in primary health-care settings were experiencing emotional and physical strain as a result of the shortage of human resources. It was recommended that policies that meet the health-care needs of rural communities be developed, and that strategies to retain professional nurses in primary health-care settings be formulated.

  1. Do Fitness Apps Need Text Reminders? An Experiment Testing Goal-Setting Text Message Reminders to Promote Self-Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Willoughby, Jessica F

    2018-01-01

    Fitness tracking apps have the potential to change unhealthy lifestyles, but users' lack of compliance is an issue. The current intervention examined the effectiveness of using goal-setting theory-based text message reminders to promote tracking activities on fitness apps. We conducted a 2-week experiment with pre- and post-tests with young adults (n = 50). Participants were randomly assigned to two groups-a goal-setting text message reminder group and a generic text message reminder group. Participants were asked to use a fitness tracking app to log physical activity and diet for the duration of the study. Participants who received goal-setting reminders logged significantly more physical activities than those who only received generic reminders. Further, participants who received goal-setting reminders liked the messages and showed significantly increased self-efficacy, awareness of personal goals, motivation, and intention to use the app. The study shows that incorporating goal-setting theory-based text message reminders can be useful to boost user compliance with self-monitoring fitness apps by reinforcing users' personal goals and enhancing cognitive factors associated with health behavior change.

  2. Experiences with developing and implementing a virtual clinic for glaucoma care in an NHS setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Aachal; Baldwin, Alex; Brookes, John; Foster, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development of a virtual glaucoma clinic, whereby technicians collect information for remote review by a consultant specialist. This was a hospital-based service evaluation study. Patients suitable for the stable monitoring service (SMS) were low-risk patients with "suspect", "early"-to-"moderate" glaucoma who were deemed stable by their consultant care team. Three technicians and one health care assistant ran the service. Patients underwent tests in a streamlined manner in a dedicated clinical facility, with virtual review of data by a consultant specialist through an electronic patient record. Feasibility of developing a novel service within a UK National Health Service setting and improvement of patient journey time within the service were studied. Challenges to implementation of virtual clinic include staffing issues and use of information technology. Patient journey time within the SMS averaged 51 minutes, compared with 92 minutes in the glaucoma outpatient department. Patient satisfaction with the new service was high. Implementing innovation into existing services of the National Health Service is challenging. However, the virtual clinic showed an improved patient journey time compared with that experienced within the general glaucoma outpatient department. There exists a discrepancy between patient management decisions of reviewers, suggesting that some may be more risk averse than others when managing patients seen within this model. Future work will assess the ability to detect progression of disease in this model compared with the general outpatient model of care.

  3. Setting up a parathyroid multidisciplinary team meeting: one year's experience, outcomes and learning points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancox, S H; Sinnott, J D; Kirkland, P; Lipscomb, D; Owens, E; Howlett, D C

    2018-03-01

    A parathyroid multidisciplinary team meeting was set up at East Sussex Healthcare Trust, from November 2014 to November 2015, in order to improve and streamline services for patients with parathyroid pathology. Data were collected on all new referrals for hyperparathyroidism, and on the outcomes for each patient discussed at the meeting, including the number of operations and management outcomes. A survey was sent out to the members of the multidisciplinary team meeting to determine their perception of its effectiveness. Seventy-nine new referrals were discussed throughout the year; 43 per cent were recommended for surgery, 41 per cent had a trial of conservative or medical management before re-discussion, and 16 per cent required further imaging. Ninety-two per cent of patients underwent an ultrasound, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography or nuclear medicine (sestamibi) scan prior to the meeting. All ultrasound scans were performed by a consultant radiologist. The multidisciplinary team meeting has been successful, with perceived benefits for patients, improved imaging evaluation and efficiency of referral pathways, leading to more appropriate patient management.

  4. Mechanical experiments on the superplastic material ALNOVI-1, including leak information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snippe, Q.H.C.; Meinders, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Mechanical testing of superplastic materials, in particular ALNOVI-1. → Uniaxial tests to show the one-dimensional stress-strain behaviour and the high amount of strain rate sensitivity. → Void volume fractions have been observed. → Free bulge experiments to show the dependence on the backpressure during the forming stage. → Measuring leak tightness of superplastically formed sheets. → Experiments are used in order to develop a constitutive model in a later stage. - Abstract: In subatomic particle physics, unstable particles can be detected with a so-called vertex detector, placed inside a particle accelerator. A detecting unit close to the accelerator bunch of charged particles must be separated from the accelerator vacuum. A thin sheet with a complex 3D shape prevents the detector vacuum from polluting the accelerator vacuum. Therefore, this sheet has to be completely leak tight. However, this can conflict with restrictions concerning maximum sheet thickness of the product. To produce such a complex thin sheet, superplastic forming can be very attractive in cases where a small number of products is needed. In order to predict gas permeability of these formed sheets, many mechanical experiments are necessary, where the gas leak has to be measured. To obtain insight in the mechanical behaviour of the used material, ALNOVI-1, tensile experiments were performed to describe the uniaxial stress-strain behaviour. From these experiments, a high strain rate sensitivity was measured. The flow stress of this material under superplastic conditions was low and the material behaved in an isotropic manner upon large plastic strains. The results of these experiments were used to predict the forming pressure as a function of time in a free bulge experiment, such that a predefined target strain rate will not be exceeded in the material. An extra parameter within these bulging experiments is the application of a hydrostatic pressure during the

  5. Extension of academic pediatric radiology to the community setting: experience in two sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecklund, K.; Share, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Background. Children are better served by radiologists and technical personnel trained in the care of pediatric patients. However, a variety of obstacles may limit the access of children to dedicated pediatric imaging facilities. Objective. We designed and implemented two models for providing community-based imaging by academic pediatric radiologists. Materials and methods. The first site was an outpatient clinic staffed by physicians from the university-affiliated children's hospital. Imaging services included radiography, fluoroscopy, and ultrasound. The second site was a full-service community hospital radiology department staffed by a group practice, with pediatric imaging covered by the children's hospital radiologists. Facility, equipment, and protocol modifications were required to maintain quality standards. Success of these models was determined by volume statistics, referring physician/patient satisfaction surveys, and quality-assurance (QA) programs. Results. The outpatient satellite had a 48 % increase in total examinations from the first year to the second year and 87 % the third year. Pediatric examinations in the community hospital increased over 1000 % the first 7 months. Referring physicians reported increased diagnostic information and patient satisfaction compared to previous service. QA efforts revealed improved image quality when pediatric radiologists were present, but some continuing difficulties off-hours. Conclusion. We successfully implemented pediatric imaging programs in previously underserved communities. This resulted in increased pediatric radiologist supervision and interpretation of examinations performed on children and improved referring physician and patient satisfaction. (orig.)

  6. Extension of academic pediatric radiology to the community setting: experience in two sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecklund, K.; Share, J.C. [Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-01-01

    Background. Children are better served by radiologists and technical personnel trained in the care of pediatric patients. However, a variety of obstacles may limit the access of children to dedicated pediatric imaging facilities. Objective. We designed and implemented two models for providing community-based imaging by academic pediatric radiologists. Materials and methods. The first site was an outpatient clinic staffed by physicians from the university-affiliated children's hospital. Imaging services included radiography, fluoroscopy, and ultrasound. The second site was a full-service community hospital radiology department staffed by a group practice, with pediatric imaging covered by the children's hospital radiologists. Facility, equipment, and protocol modifications were required to maintain quality standards. Success of these models was determined by volume statistics, referring physician/patient satisfaction surveys, and quality-assurance (QA) programs. Results. The outpatient satellite had a 48 % increase in total examinations from the first year to the second year and 87 % the third year. Pediatric examinations in the community hospital increased over 1000 % the first 7 months. Referring physicians reported increased diagnostic information and patient satisfaction compared to previous service. QA efforts revealed improved image quality when pediatric radiologists were present, but some continuing difficulties off-hours. Conclusion. We successfully implemented pediatric imaging programs in previously underserved communities. This resulted in increased pediatric radiologist supervision and interpretation of examinations performed on children and improved referring physician and patient satisfaction. (orig.)

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of acinetobacter species-one year experience in a tertiary care setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, Z.A.; Abbasi, S.A.; Mirza, I.A.; Malik, N.; Sattar, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To find out antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Acinetobacter species isolated from 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2009 at Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Rawalpindi. Materials and Methods: A total of 276 isolates of Acinetobacter spp yielded from various clinical specimens during the study period were included Routine conventional methods were used to identify various species of Acinetobacter and modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was used for susceptibility testing. Out of total 276 isolates, 176 (63.8%) turned out to be Acinetobacter baumannii and 100 (36.2%) were Acinetobacter johnsonii. Overall sensitivity of Acinetobacter spp against piperacillin/sulbactam, tigecycline, sulbactam/cefoperazone, piperacillin/tazobactam, imipenem, doxycycline, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim /sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, gentamycin, ceftriaxone, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and ampicillin were 64%,63%, 48%, 47%, 41%,39%,35%, 34%, 32%, 31 %, 29%, 19%, 18% and 5% respectively. Out of 276 isolates, 181 (66 %) were multidrug resistant while 33 (18 %) isolates were pan-drug resistant. (author)

  8. Irradiation experiments on materials for core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Materials degradation due to the aging phenomena is one of the key issues for the life assessment and extension of the light water reactors (LWRs). This presentation introduces JAERI`s activities in the field of LWR material researches which utilize the research and testing reactors for irradiation experiments. The activities are including the material studies for the core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding. These materials are exposed to the neutron/gamma radiation and high temperature water environments so that it is worth reviewing their degradation phenomena as the continuum. Three topics are presented; For the core internal materials, the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels is the present major concern. At JAERI the effects of alloying elements on IASCC have been investigated through the post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in high-temperature water. The radiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels is still a significant issue for LWR safety, and at JAERI some factors affecting the embrittlement behavior such as a dose rate have been investigated. Waterside corrosion of Zircaloy fuel cladding is one of the limiting factors in fuel rod performance and an in-situ measurement of the corrosion rate in high-temperature water was performed in JMTR. To improve the reliability of experiments and to extent the applicability of experimental techniques, a mutual utilization of the technical achievements in those irradiation experiments is desired. (author)

  9. Dynamic Data Driven Experiment Control Coordinated with Anisotropic Elastic Material Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Michopoulos; Tomonari Furukawa; John C. Hermanson; Samuel G. Lambrakos

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to propose and demonstrate a multi level design optimization approach for the coordinated determination of a material constitutive model synchronously to the design of the experimental procedure needed to acquire the necessary data. The methodology achieves both online (real-time) and offline design of optimum experiments required for...

  10. Physicists purchase materials testing machine in support of pioneering particle physics experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    Sharpe, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    "The particle physics group at Liverpool University has purchased an LRXPlus singlecolumn materials testing machine from Lloyd Instruments, which will be used to help characterise the carbon-fibre support frames for detectors used for state-of-the-art particle physics experiments." (1 page)

  11. Recommended nuclear criticality safety experiments in support of the safe transportation of fissile material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollefson, D.A.; Elliott, E.P.; Dyer, H.R.; Thompson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Validation of computer codes and nuclear data (cross-section) libraries using benchmark quality critical (or certain subcritical) experiments is an essential part of a nuclear criticality safety evaluation. The validation results establish the credibility of the calculational tools for use in evaluating a particular application. Validation of the calculational tools is addressed in several American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) standards, with ANSI/ANS-8.1 being the most relevant. Documentation of the validation is a required part of all safety analyses involving significant quantities of fissile materials. In the case of transportation of fissile materials, the safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) must contain a thorough discussion of benchmark experiments, detailing how the experiments relate to the significant packaging and contents materials (fissile, moderating, neutron absorbing) within the package. The experiments recommended in this paper are needed to address certain areas related to transportation of unirradiated fissile materials in drum-type containers (packagings) for which current data are inadequate or are lacking

  12. Model for movement of molten limiter material during the ISX-B beryllium limiter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.; England, A.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Hogan, J.T.; Neilson, G.H.

    1986-01-01

    A model is proposed for the movement and erosion of limiter material during the Beryllium Limiter Experiment performed on the ISX-B Tokamak. This model is consistent with observed experimental results and plasma operational characteristics. Conclusions drawn from the model can provide an understanding of erosion mechanisms, thereby contributing to the development of future design criteria. (author)

  13. Shape Memory Polymers: A Joint Chemical and Materials Engineering Hands-On Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Mujan; Beck, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Hands-on experiences are excellent tools for increasing retention of first year engineering students. They also encourage interdisciplinary collaboration, a critical skill for modern engineers. In this paper, we describe and evaluate a joint Chemical and Materials Engineering hands-on lab that explores cross-linking and glass transition in…

  14. Design expertise: how knowledge, experience, and skills set expert architects apart from novices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Florio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the design process under the cognitive theory proposes an understanding of internal mental processes, based on the processing of information derived from the knowledge, experience, and skills of the architect. Although it is difficult to trace the sources of the architects’ thoughts, the drawings they produce facilitate the identification of the successive approaches used during the design process. Since cognition, or the act of thinking, itself cannot be observed, we can only analyze the results of the thought that guided cognitive actions. The steps of the research conducted by the authors of this article were as follows: 1 three experienced architects and three novices were filmed individually, for 60 minutes, while they carried out a project; 2 these professionals were interviewed for 30 minutes after the end of the project; 3 physical, perceptual, functional, and conceptual cognitive actions were identified by segmenting and codifying the actions performed during the filming; 4 these data were translated into graphs; 5 the differences between novices and experts were identified from the response time in each of the four levels of cognitive actions; and 6 the qualitative analysis of actions and effectiveness were assessed. Experienced architects quickly recovered from their memory-specific knowledge and, based on scant evidence, select, combine, and generate different ideas during the design process. They can do so because the knowledge encoded in typical situations enables them to make faster and better supported decisions. Expertise is the human faculty that allows performance of cognitive operations that involve daily thinking and doing with quality, speed, and vitality. An expert is someone who performs a task significantly better than most other people do. We concluded that expert architects perform projects with greater ease than beginners, not only because they have more knowledge and experience, but

  15. Modelling of thermal shock experiments of carbon based materials in JUDITH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Pestchanyi, S.; Koza, Y.; Linke, J.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of hot plasma with material in fusion devices can result in material erosion and irreversible damage. Carbon based materials are proposed for ITER divertor armour. To simulate carbon erosion under high heat fluxes, electron beam heating in the JUDITH facility has been used. In this paper, carbon erosion under energetic electron impact is modeled by the 3D thermomechanics code 'PEGASUS-3D'. The code is based on a crack generation induced by thermal stress. The particle emission observed in thermal shock experiments is a result of breaking bonds between grains caused by thermal stress. The comparison of calculations with experimental data from JUDITH shows good agreement for various incident power densities and pulse durations. A realistic mean failure stress has been found. Pre-heating of test specimens results in earlier onset of brittle destruction and enhanced particle loss in agreement with experiments

  16. Modelling of thermal shock experiments of carbon based materials in JUDITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikova, O.V. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-Association, IWV-2, 52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: o.ogorodnikova@fz-juelich.de; Pestchanyi, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, EURATOM-Associaton, IHM, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Koza, Y. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-Association, IWV-2, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-Association, IWV-2, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of hot plasma with material in fusion devices can result in material erosion and irreversible damage. Carbon based materials are proposed for ITER divertor armour. To simulate carbon erosion under high heat fluxes, electron beam heating in the JUDITH facility has been used. In this paper, carbon erosion under energetic electron impact is modeled by the 3D thermomechanics code 'PEGASUS-3D'. The code is based on a crack generation induced by thermal stress. The particle emission observed in thermal shock experiments is a result of breaking bonds between grains caused by thermal stress. The comparison of calculations with experimental data from JUDITH shows good agreement for various incident power densities and pulse durations. A realistic mean failure stress has been found. Pre-heating of test specimens results in earlier onset of brittle destruction and enhanced particle loss in agreement with experiments.

  17. Modelling of thermal shock experiments of carbon based materials in JUDITH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Pestchanyi, S.; Koza, Y.; Linke, J.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of hot plasma with material in fusion devices can result in material erosion and irreversible damage. Carbon based materials are proposed for ITER divertor armour. To simulate carbon erosion under high heat fluxes, electron beam heating in the JUDITH facility has been used. In this paper, carbon erosion under energetic electron impact is modeled by the 3D thermomechanics code 'PEGASUS-3D'. The code is based on a crack generation induced by thermal stress. The particle emission observed in thermal shock experiments is a result of breaking bonds between grains caused by thermal stress. The comparison of calculations with experimental data from JUDITH shows good agreement for various incident power densities and pulse durations. A realistic mean failure stress has been found. Pre-heating of test specimens results in earlier onset of brittle destruction and enhanced particle loss in agreement with experiments.

  18. Experiences with developing and implementing a virtual clinic for glaucoma care in an NHS setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotecha A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aachal Kotecha,1,2 Alex Baldwin,1 John Brookes,1 Paul J Foster1,2 1Glaucoma Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust, 2NIHR BRC, Moorfields Eye Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, UK Background: This article describes the development of a virtual glaucoma clinic, whereby technicians collect information for remote review by a consultant specialist.Design and Methods: This was a hospital-based service evaluation study. Patients suitable for the stable monitoring service (SMS were low-risk patients with “suspect”, “early”-to-“moderate” glaucoma who were deemed stable by their consultant care team. Three technicians and one health care assistant ran the service. Patients underwent tests in a streamlined manner in a dedicated clinical facility, with virtual review of data by a consultant specialist through an electronic patient record.Main outcome measure: Feasibility of developing a novel service within a UK National Health Service setting and improvement of patient journey time within the service were studied.Results: Challenges to implementation of virtual clinic include staffing issues and use of information technology. Patient journey time within the SMS averaged 51 minutes, compared with 92 minutes in the glaucoma outpatient department. Patient satisfaction with the new service was high.Conclusion: Implementing innovation into existing services of the National Health Service is challenging. However, the virtual clinic showed an improved patient journey time compared with that experienced within the general glaucoma outpatient department. There exists a discrepancy between patient management decisions of reviewers, suggesting that some may be more risk averse than others when managing patients seen within this model. Future work will assess the ability to detect progression of disease in this model compared with the general

  19. Microcosm experiments to control anaerobic redox conditions when studying the fate of organic micropollutants in aquifer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Manuela; Carrera, Jesús; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Ayora, Carlos; Cama, Jordi; Köck-Schulmeyer, Marianne; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià; Tobella Brunet, Joana; Hernández García, Marta

    2011-11-01

    The natural processes occurring in subsurface environments have proven to effectively remove a number of organic pollutants from water. The predominant redox conditions revealed to be one of the controlling factors. However, in the case of organic micropollutants the knowledge on this potential redox-dependent behavior is still limited. Motivated by managed aquifer recharge practices microcosm experiments involving aquifer material, settings potentially feasible in field applications, and organic micropollutants at environmental concentrations were carried out. Different anaerobic redox conditions were promoted and sustained in each set of microcosms by adding adequate quantities of electron donors and acceptors. Whereas denitrification and sulfate-reducing conditions are easily achieved and maintained, Fe- and Mn-reduction are strongly constrained by the slower dissolution of the solid phases commonly present in aquifers. The thorough description and numerical modeling of the evolution of the experiments, including major and trace solutes and dissolution/precipitation of solid phases, have been proven necessary to the understanding of the processes and closing the mass balance. As an example of micropollutant results, the ubiquitous beta-blocker atenolol is completely removed in the experiments, the removal occurring faster under more advanced redox conditions. This suggests that aquifers constitute a potentially efficient alternative water treatment for atenolol, especially if adequate redox conditions are promoted during recharge and long enough residence times are ensured. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Statistical homogeneity tests applied to large data sets from high energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusina, J.; Franc, J.; Kůs, V.

    2017-12-01

    Homogeneity tests are used in high energy physics for the verification of simulated Monte Carlo samples, it means if they have the same distribution as a measured data from particle detector. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, χ 2, and Anderson-Darling tests are the most used techniques to assess the samples’ homogeneity. Since MC generators produce plenty of entries from different models, each entry has to be re-weighted to obtain the same sample size as the measured data has. One way of the homogeneity testing is through the binning. If we do not want to lose any information, we can apply generalized tests based on weighted empirical distribution functions. In this paper, we propose such generalized weighted homogeneity tests and introduce some of their asymptotic properties. We present the results based on numerical analysis which focuses on estimations of the type-I error and power of the test. Finally, we present application of our homogeneity tests to data from the experiment DØ in Fermilab.

  1. Policy on manager involvement in work re-integration: managers' experiences in a Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, Karin; Meershoek, Agnes; de Rijk, Angelique; Nijhuis, Frans J N

    2014-01-01

    In Canada and other countries, sickness absence among workers is a significant concern. Local return-to-work policies developed by both management and workers' representatives are preferred to tackle the problem. This article examines how managers perceive this local bipartite agreed upon return-to-work policy, wherein a social constructivist view on the policy process is taken. In-depth interviews were held with 10 managers on their experiences with execution of this policy in a Canadian healthcare organization. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and qualitative analyses were completed to gain deep insight into the managers' perspectives. Results show that the managers viewed themselves as a linchpin between the workplace and the worker. They did not feel heard by the other stakeholders, wrestled with worker's limitations, struggled getting plans adjusted and became overextended to meet return-to-work objectives. The study shows that the managers felt unable to meet the responsibilities the policy demanded and got less involved in the return-to-work process than this policy intended. RTW policy needs to balance on the one hand, flexibility to safeguard active involvement of managers and, on the other hand, strictness regarding taking responsibility by stakeholders, particularly the health care and re-integration professionals.

  2. Dynamic and impact contact mechanics of geologic materials: Grain-scale experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, David M.; Hopkins, Mark A.; Ketcham, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    High fidelity treatments of the generation and propagation of seismic waves in naturally occurring granular materials is becoming more practical given recent advancements in our ability to model complex particle shapes and their mechanical interaction. Of particular interest are the grain-scale processes that are activated by impact events and the characteristics of force transmission through grain contacts. To address this issue, we have developed a physics based approach that involves laboratory experiments to quantify the dynamic contact and impact behavior of granular materials and incorporation of the observed behavior indiscrete element models. The dynamic experiments do not involve particle damage and emphasis is placed on measured values of contact stiffness and frictional loss. The normal stiffness observed in dynamic contact experiments at low frequencies (e.g., 10 Hz) are shown to be in good agreement with quasistatic experiments on quartz sand. The results of impact experiments – which involve moderate to extensive levels of particle damage – are presented for several types of naturally occurring granular materials (several quartz sands, magnesite and calcium carbonate ooids). Implementation of the experimental findings in discrete element models is discussed and the results of impact simulations involving up to 5 × 105 grains are presented.

  3. Dynamic and impact contact mechanics of geologic materials: Grain-scale experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, David M.; Hopkins, Mark A.; Ketcham, Stephen A. [Engineer Research and Development Center - Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Rd., Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2013-06-18

    High fidelity treatments of the generation and propagation of seismic waves in naturally occurring granular materials is becoming more practical given recent advancements in our ability to model complex particle shapes and their mechanical interaction. Of particular interest are the grain-scale processes that are activated by impact events and the characteristics of force transmission through grain contacts. To address this issue, we have developed a physics based approach that involves laboratory experiments to quantify the dynamic contact and impact behavior of granular materials and incorporation of the observed behavior indiscrete element models. The dynamic experiments do not involve particle damage and emphasis is placed on measured values of contact stiffness and frictional loss. The normal stiffness observed in dynamic contact experiments at low frequencies (e.g., 10 Hz) are shown to be in good agreement with quasistatic experiments on quartz sand. The results of impact experiments - which involve moderate to extensive levels of particle damage - are presented for several types of naturally occurring granular materials (several quartz sands, magnesite and calcium carbonate ooids). Implementation of the experimental findings in discrete element models is discussed and the results of impact simulations involving up to 5 Multiplication-Sign 105 grains are presented.

  4. HNCA-TOCSY-CANH experiments with alternate 13C-12C labeling: a set of 3D experiment with unique supra-sequential information for mainchain resonance assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Koh; Gal, Maayan; Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio; Wagner, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Described here is a set of three-dimensional (3D) NMR experiments that rely on CACA-TOCSY magnetization transfer via the weak 3 J(C α C α ) coupling. These pulse sequences, which resemble recently described 13 C detected CACA-TOCSY (Takeuchi et al. 2010) experiments, are recorded in 1 H 2 O, and use 1 H excitation and detection. These experiments require alternate 13 C- 12 C labeling together with perdeuteration, which allows utilizing the small 3 J(C α C α ) scalar coupling that is otherwise masked by the stronger 1 J CC couplings in uniformly 13 C labeled samples. These new experiments provide a unique assignment ladder-mark that yields bidirectional supra-sequential information and can readily straddle proline residues. Unlike the conventional HNCA experiment, which contains only sequential information to the 13 (C α ) of the preceding residue, the 3D hnCA-TOCSY-caNH experiment can yield sequential correlations to alpha carbons in positions i−1, i + 1 and i−2. Furthermore, the 3D hNca-TOCSY-caNH and Hnca-TOCSY-caNH experiments, which share the same magnetization pathway but use a different chemical shift encoding, directly couple the 15 N- 1 H spin pair of residue i to adjacent amide protons and nitrogens at positions i−2, i−1, i + 1 and i + 2, respectively. These new experimental features make protein backbone assignments more robust by reducing the degeneracy problem associated with the conventional 3D NMR experiments.

  5. Is mass drug administration against lymphatic filariasis required in urban settings? The experience in Kano, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pam, Dung D; de Souza, Dziedzom K; D'Souza, Susan; Opoku, Millicent; Sanda, Safiya; Nazaradden, Ibrahim; Anagbogu, Ifeoma N; Okoronkwo, Chukwu; Davies, Emmanuel; Elhassan, Elisabeth; Molyneux, David H; Bockarie, Moses J; Koudou, Benjamin G

    2017-10-01

    The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF), launched in 2000, has the target of eliminating the disease as a public health problem by the year 2020. The strategy adopted is mass drug administration (MDA) to all eligible individuals in endemic communities and the implementation of measures to reduce the morbidity of those suffering from chronic disease. Success has been recorded in many rural endemic communities in which elimination efforts have centered. However, implementation has been challenging in several urban African cities. The large cities of West Africa, exemplified in Nigeria in Kano are challenging for LF elimination program because reaching 65% therapeutic coverage during MDA is difficult. There is therefore a need to define a strategy which could complement MDA. Thus, in Kano State, Nigeria, while LF MDA had reached 33 of the 44 Local Government Areas (LGAs) there remained eleven 'urban' LGAs which had not been covered by MDA. Given the challenges of achieving at least 65% coverage during MDA implementation over several years in order to achieve elimination, it may be challenging to eliminate LF in such settings. In order to plan the LF control activities, this study was undertaken to confirm the LF infection prevalence in the human and mosquito populations in three urban LGAs. The prevalence of circulating filarial antigen (CFA) of Wuchereria bancrofti was assessed by an immuno-chromatography test (ICT) in 981 people in three urban LGAs of Kano state, Nigeria. Mosquitoes were collected over a period of 4 months from May to August 2015 using exit traps, gravid traps and pyrethrum knock-down spray sheet collections (PSC) in different households. A proportion of mosquitoes were analyzed for W. bancrofti, using dissection, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results showed that none of the 981 subjects (constituted of West Africa may not be of significant importance

  6. Screening for Adverse Childhood Experiences in a Family Medicine Setting: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowa, Patricia T; Olson, Ardis L; Johnson, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    The role of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in predicting later adverse adult health outcomes is being widely recognized by makers of public policy. ACE questionnaires have the potential to identify in clinical practice unaddressed key social issues that can influence current health risks, morbidity, and early mortality. This study seeks to explore the feasibility of implementing the ACE screening of adults during routine family medicine office visits. At 3 rural clinical practices, the 10-question ACE screen was used before visits with 111 consecutive patients of 7 clinicians. Clinician surveys about the use of the results and the effect on the visits were completed immediately after the visits. The presence of any ACE risk and "high-risk" ACE scores (≥4) were compared with clinician survey responses. A risk of ACEs was present in 62% of patients; 22% had scores ≥4. Clinicians were more likely to have discussed ACE issues for high-risk patients (score 0-3, 36.8%; score ≥4, 83.3%; P =. 00). Clinicians also perceived that they gained new information (score 0-3, 35.6%; score ≥4, 83.3%; P = .00). Clinical care changed for a small proportion of high-risk patients, with no change in immediate referrals or plan for follow-up. In 91% of visits where a risk of ACEs was present, visit length increased by ≤5 minutes. Incorporation of ACE screening during routine care is feasible and merits further study. ACE screening offers clinicians a more complete picture of important social determinants of health. Primary care-specific interventions that incorporate treatment of early life trauma are needed. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  7. A balancing act: a phenomenological exploration of medical students' experiences of using mobile devices in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid-Doubell, F; Mohamed, S; Elmusharaf, K; O'Neill, C S

    2016-05-03

    The aims of this study were to describe the experiences of senior students using mobile devices in a clinical setting while learning and interacting with clinical teachers, patients and each other, and to identify challenges that facilitated or impeded the use of such devices in the hospital. Interpretative phenomenology was chosen to guide our enquiry. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to examine the experiences of five senior medical students using mobile devices in the clinical setting. Senior medical students at an international medical school in the Middle East. Three main themes emerged from the data analysis: learning; professional identity and transitioning from student to doctor. The findings showed that using mobile devices in the clinical area as a learning tool was not a formalised process. Rather, it was opportunistic learning at the bedside and on occasion a source of distraction from clinical teaching. Students needed to negotiate relationships between themselves, the clinical teacher and patients in order to ensure that they maintained an acceptable professional image. Participants experienced and negotiated the change from student to doctor making them mindful of using their devices at the bedside. Mobile devices are part of daily life for a medical student and there is a need to adapt medical education in the clinical setting, to allow the students to use their devices in a sensitive manner. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Experience of air transport of nuclear fuel material as type A package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Masashi; Kageyama, Tomio; Suzuki, Toru

    2004-01-01

    Special law on nuclear disaster countermeasures (hereafter called as to nuclear disaster countermeasures low) that is domestic law for dealing with measures for nuclear disaster, was enforced in June, 2000. Therefore, nuclear enterprise was obliged to report accidents as required by nuclear disaster countermeasures law, besides meeting the technical requirement of existent transport regulation. For overseas procurement of plutonium reference materials that are needed for material accountability, A Type package must be transported by air. Therefore, concept of air transport of nuclear fuel materials according to the nuclear disaster countermeasures law was discussed, and the manual including measures against accident in air transport was prepared for the oversea procurement. In this presentation, the concept of air transport of A Type package containing nuclear fuel materials according to the nuclear disaster countermeasures law, and the experience of a transportation of plutonium solution from France are shown. (author)

  9. Evaluation of diffusion parameters of radon in porous material by flow-through diffusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chunnan Hsu; Shihchin Tsai; Shihming Liang

    1994-01-01

    The effectiveness of a material in reducing the fluence rate of Rn from soil was assessed in this study by using a flow-through diffusion experiment to evaluate the diffusion parameters -apparent diffusion coefficient and capacity factor - of radon (Rn) in a porous material. An improved method based on the nonlinear least-squares and Marquardt's method (NLSM method) was proposed to provide more reliable analyses of experimental data than the graphical method. The NLSM method was confirmed by the experimental results to be capable of estimating the diffusion parameters, even if the process was transient. This method was also demonstrated to correlate sufficiently with the results by the conventional method while the process had already reached steady-state. Natural mordenite was employed in this study as a testing material because it has more effective sorption for noble gas than any other earthen material. (author)

  10. Is mass drug administration against lymphatic filariasis required in urban settings? The experience in Kano, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dung D Pam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF, launched in 2000, has the target of eliminating the disease as a public health problem by the year 2020. The strategy adopted is mass drug administration (MDA to all eligible individuals in endemic communities and the implementation of measures to reduce the morbidity of those suffering from chronic disease. Success has been recorded in many rural endemic communities in which elimination efforts have centered. However, implementation has been challenging in several urban African cities. The large cities of West Africa, exemplified in Nigeria in Kano are challenging for LF elimination program because reaching 65% therapeutic coverage during MDA is difficult. There is therefore a need to define a strategy which could complement MDA. Thus, in Kano State, Nigeria, while LF MDA had reached 33 of the 44 Local Government Areas (LGAs there remained eleven 'urban' LGAs which had not been covered by MDA. Given the challenges of achieving at least 65% coverage during MDA implementation over several years in order to achieve elimination, it may be challenging to eliminate LF in such settings. In order to plan the LF control activities, this study was undertaken to confirm the LF infection prevalence in the human and mosquito populations in three urban LGAs.The prevalence of circulating filarial antigen (CFA of Wuchereria bancrofti was assessed by an immuno-chromatography test (ICT in 981 people in three urban LGAs of Kano state, Nigeria. Mosquitoes were collected over a period of 4 months from May to August 2015 using exit traps, gravid traps and pyrethrum knock-down spray sheet collections (PSC in different households. A proportion of mosquitoes were analyzed for W. bancrofti, using dissection, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR.The results showed that none of the 981 subjects (constituted of <21% of children 5-10 years old tested

  11. Direct containment heating experiments in Zion Nuclear Power Plant geometry using prototypic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-01-01

    Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments have been completed which utilize prototypic core materials. The experiments reported on here are a continuation of the Integral Effects Testing (IET) DCH program. The experiments incorporated a 1/40 scale model of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant containment structures. The model included representations of the primary system volume, RPV lower head, cavity and instrument tunnel, and the lower containment structures. The experiments were steam driven. Iron-alumina thermite with chromium was used as a core melt stimulant in the earlier IET experiments. These earlier IET experiments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided useful data on the effect of scale on DCH phenomena; however, a significant question concerns the potential experiment distortions introduced by the use of non-prototypic iron/alumina thermite. Therefore, further testing with prototypic materials has been carried out at ANL. Three tests have been completed, DCH-U1A, U1B and U2. DCH-U1A and U1B employed an inerted containment atmosphere and are counterpart to the IET-1RR test with iron/alumina thermite. DCH-U2 employed nominally the same atmosphere composition of its counterpart iron/alumina test, IET-6. All tests, with prototypic material, have produced lower peak containment pressure rises; 45, 111 and 185 kPa in U1A, U1B and U2, compared to 150 and 250 kPa IET-1RR and 6. Hydrogen production, due to metal-steam reactions, was 33% larger in U1B and U2 compared to IET-1RR and IET-6. The pressurization efficiency was consistently lower for the corium tests compared to the IET tests

  12. Tracer experiment data sets for the verification of local and meso-scale atmospheric dispersion models including topographic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, E.; Schuler, W.

    1992-01-01

    Software and data for nuclear energy applications are acquired, tested and distributed by several information centres; in particular, relevant computer codes are distributed internationally by the OECD/NEA Data Bank (France) and by ESTSC and EPIC/RSIC (United States). This activity is coordinated among the centres and is extended outside the OECD area through an arrangement with the IAEA. This article proposes more specifically a scheme for acquiring, storing and distributing atmospheric tracer experiment data (ATE) required for verification of atmospheric dispersion models especially the most advanced ones including topographic effects and specific to the local and meso-scale. These well documented data sets will form a valuable complement to the set of atmospheric dispersion computer codes distributed internationally. Modellers will be able to gain confidence in the predictive power of their models or to verify their modelling skills. (au)

  13. Experiences of stigma and discrimination in social and healthcare settings among trans people living with HIV in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbert, M; Wolton, A; Crenna-Jennings, W; Benton, L; Kirwan, P; Lut, I; Okala, S; Ross, M; Furegato, M; Nambiar, K; Douglas, N; Roche, J; Jeffries, J; Reeves, I; Nelson, M; Weerawardhana, C; Jamal, Z; Hudson, A; Delpech, V

    2018-07-01

    The People Living with HIV StigmaSurvey UK 2015 was a community led national survey investigating experiences of people living with HIV in the UK in the past 12 months. Participants aged 18 and over were recruited through over 120 cross-sector community organisations and 46 HIV clinics to complete an anonymous online survey. Trans is an umbrella term which refers to individuals whose current gender identity is different to the gender they were assigned at birth. Trans participants self-identified via gender identity and gender at birth questions. Descriptive analyses of reported experiences in social and health care settings were conducted and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify sociodemographic predictors of reporting being treated differently to non-HIV patients, and being delayed or refused healthcare treatment in the past 12 months. 31 out of 1576 participants (2%) identified as trans (19 trans women, 5 trans men, 2 gender queer/non-binary, 5 other). High levels of social stigma were reported for all participants, with trans participants significantly more likely to report worrying about verbal harassment (39% vs. 23%), and exclusion from family gatherings (23% vs. 9%) in the last 12 months, compared to cisgender participants. Furthermore, 10% of trans participants reported physical assault in the last 12 months, compared to 4% of cisgender participants. Identifying as trans was a predictor of reporting being treated differently to non-HIV patients (48% vs. 30%; aOR 2.61, CI 1.06, 6.42) and being delayed or refused healthcare (41% vs. 16%; aOR 4.58, CI 1.83, 11.44). Trans people living with HIV in the UK experience high levels of stigma and discrimination, including within healthcare settings, which is likely to impact upon health outcomes. Trans-specific education and awareness within healthcare settings could help to improve service provision for this demographic.

  14. Nurses' experiences providing palliative care to individuals living in rural communities: aspects of the physical residential setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, S; Brazil, K; Williams, A; Wilson, D; Willison, K; Marshall, D; Taniguchi, A; Phillips, C

    2014-01-01

    Efforts are needed to improve palliative care in rural communities, given the unique characteristics and inherent challenges with respect to working within the physical aspects of residential settings. Nurses who work in rural communities play a key role in the delivery of palliative care services. Hence, the purpose of this study was to explore nurses' experiences of providing palliative care in rural communities, with a particular focus on the impact of the physical residential setting. This study was grounded in a qualitative approach utilizing an exploratory descriptive design. Individual telephone interviews were conducted with 21 community nurses. Data were analyzed by thematic content analysis. Nurses described the characteristics of working in a rural community and how it influences their perception of their role, highlighting the strong sense of community that exists but how system changes over the past decade have changed the way they provide care. They also described the key role that they play, which was often termed a 'jack of all trades', but focused on providing emotional, physical, and spiritual care while trying to manage many challenges related to transitioning and working with other healthcare providers. Finally, nurses described how the challenges of working within the physical constraints of a rural residential setting impeded their care provision to clients who are dying in the community, specifically related to the long distances that they travel while dealing with bad weather. These study findings contribute to our understanding of the experiences of nurses working in rural communities in terms of the provision of palliative care and the influence of the physical residential setting that surrounds them. These findings are important since nurses play a major role in caring for community-dwelling clients who are dying, but they are confronted with many obstacles. As such, these results may help inform future decisions about how to best improve

  15. New Experiences in Dike Construction with Soil-Ash Composites and Fine-Grained Dredged Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duszyński Remigiusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The supporting structure inside a coastal dike is often made of dredged non-uniform sand with good compaction properties. Due to the shortage of natural construction material for both coastal and river dikes and the surplus of different processed materials, new experiments were made with sand-ash mixtures and fine-grained dredged materials to replace both dike core and dike cover materials resulting in economical, environmentally friendly and sustainable dikes. Ash from EC Gdańsk and dredged sand from the Vistula river were mixed to form an engineering material used for dike construction. The optimum sand-ash composites were applied at a field test site to build a large-scale research dike. Fine-grained dredged materials from Germany were chosen to be applied in a second full-scale research dike in Rostock. All materials were investigated according to the standards for soil mechanical analysis. This includes basic soil properties, mechanical characteristics, such as grain-size distribution, compaction parameters, compressibility, shear strength, and water permeability. In the field, the infiltration of water into the dike body as well as the erosion resistance of the cover material against overflowing water was determined. Results of both laboratory and field testing are discussed in this paper. In conclusion, the mixing of bottom ash with mineral soil, such as relatively uniform dredged sand, fairly improves the geotechnical parameters of the composite, compared to the constituents. Depending on the composite, the materials may be suitable to build a dike core or an erosion-resistant dike cover.

  16. New Experiences in Dike Construction with Soil-Ash Composites and Fine-Grained Dredged Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszyński, Remigiusz; Duszyńska, Angelika; Cantré, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    The supporting structure inside a coastal dike is often made of dredged non-uniform sand with good compaction properties. Due to the shortage of natural construction material for both coastal and river dikes and the surplus of different processed materials, new experiments were made with sand-ash mixtures and fine-grained dredged materials to replace both dike core and dike cover materials resulting in economical, environmentally friendly and sustainable dikes. Ash from EC Gdańsk and dredged sand from the Vistula river were mixed to form an engineering material used for dike construction. The optimum sand-ash composites were applied at a field test site to build a large-scale research dike. Fine-grained dredged materials from Germany were chosen to be applied in a second full-scale research dike in Rostock. All materials were investigated according to the standards for soil mechanical analysis. This includes basic soil properties, mechanical characteristics, such as grain-size distribution, compaction parameters, compressibility, shear strength, and water permeability. In the field, the infiltration of water into the dike body as well as the erosion resistance of the cover material against overflowing water was determined. Results of both laboratory and field testing are discussed in this paper. In conclusion, the mixing of bottom ash with mineral soil, such as relatively uniform dredged sand, fairly improves the geotechnical parameters of the composite, compared to the constituents. Depending on the composite, the materials may be suitable to build a dike core or an erosion-resistant dike cover.

  17. Experiments on container materials for Swiss high-level waste disposal projects. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.P.

    1984-12-01

    The present concept for final disposal of high-level waste in Switzerland consists of a repository at a depth of 1000 to 1500 m in the crystalline bedrock of northern Switzerland. The waste will be placed in a container which is required to function as a high integrity barrier for at least 1000 years. This report is the second of a set of two dealing with the evaluation of potential materials for such containers. Four materials were identified for further evaluation in the first of these reports; they were cast steel, nodular cast iron, copper and Ti-Code 12. It was concluded that some testing was needed, in particular with respect to corrosion, in order to confirm these materials as candidate container materials. The experimental programme included: 1) corrosion tests on copper under gamma radiation; 2) immersion corrosion tests on the four candidate materials including welded specimens; 3) corrosion testing of the four materials in saturated bentonite; 4) constant strain rate testing of Ti-Code 12 and copper at 80 degrees C; 5) the behaviour of copper, Ti-Code 12 and Zircaloy-2 when immersed in liquid lead; 6) corrosion potential and galvanic current measurements on several material pairs. The standard test medium was natural mineral water from the Bad Saeckingen source. This water has a total dissolved solids content of approx. 3200 mg/l, about 1600 mg/l as chloride. The oxygen level was defined as 0.1 μg/g. In certain cases this medium was modified in order to test under more severe conditions. The results of the corrosion tests confirm in general the evaluation in the first part of the report. All of the materials are suitable for high-level waste containers: cast steel, nodular cast iron and copper as single layer containers, and Ti-Code 12 as an outer corrosion resistant layer. Copper could also be used under an outer steel layer, where it could arrest local penetration

  18. Control of helium effects in irradiated materials based on theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.; Lee, E.H.; Maziasz, P.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1986-01-01

    Helium produced in materials by (n,α) transmutation reactions during neutron irradiations or subjected in ion bombardment experiments causes substantial changes in the response to displacement damage. In particular, swelling, phase transformations and embrittlement are strongly affected. Present understanding of the mechanisms underlying these effects is reviewed. Key theoretical relationships describing helium effects on swelling and helium diffusion are described. Experimental data in the areas of helium effects on swelling and precipitation is reviewed with emphasis on critical experiments that have been designed and evaluated in conjunction with theory. Confirmed principles for alloy design to control irradiation performance are described

  19. Control assembly materials for water reactors: Experience, performance and perspectives. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    materials science and materials engineering of control assembly materials, the 1993 meeting and the current one are helping to fill a gap in the information exchange opportunities in this important branch of nuclear research and development. The second TCM, entitled Control Assembly Materials for Water Reactors: Experience, Performance and Perspectives, was attended by thirty-one participants from fourteen countries, nineteen papers were presented and are reproduced in this proceedings together with a summary of the meeting.

  20. Control assembly materials for water reactors: Experience, performance and perspectives. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    materials science and materials engineering of control assembly materials, the 1993 meeting and the current one are helping to fill a gap in the information exchange opportunities in this important branch of nuclear research and development. The second TCM, entitled Control Assembly Materials for Water Reactors: Experience, Performance and Perspectives, was attended by thirty-one participants from fourteen countries, nineteen papers were presented and are reproduced in this proceedings together with a summary of the meeting

  1. Elastic and inelastic electrons in the double-slit experiment: A variant of Feynman's which-way set-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frabboni, Stefano; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Grillo, Vincenzo; Pozzi, Giulio

    2015-07-01

    Modern nanotechnology tools allowed us to prepare slits of 90 nm width and 450 nm spacing in a screen almost completely opaque to 200 keV electrons. Then by covering both slits with a layer of amorphous material and carrying out the experiment in a conventional transmission electron microscope equipped with an energy filter we can demonstrate that the diffraction pattern, taken by selecting the elastically scattered electrons, shows the presence of interference fringes, but with a bimodal envelope which can be accounted for by taking into account the non-constant thickness of the deposited layer. However, the intensity of the inelastically scattered electrons in the diffraction plane is very broad and at the limit of detectability. Therefore the experiment was repeated using an aluminum film and a microscope also equipped with a Schottky field emission gun. It was thus possible to observe also the image due to the inelastically scattered electron, which does not show interference phenomena both in the Fraunhofer or Fresnel regimes. If we assume that inelastic scattering through the thin layer covering the slits provides the dissipative process of interaction responsible for the localization mechanism, then these experiments can be considered a variant of the Feynman which-way thought experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Teachers' Perceptions of Their Mentoring Role in Three Different Clinical Settings: Student Teaching, Early Field Experiences, and Entry Year Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Dianne M.; Beam, Pamela C.; Henning, John E.; Cochran, Deborah C.; Knight, Rhonda Talford

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in mentoring across three different clinical settings: student teaching, early field experiences, and entry year teachers. Eighteen teachers with mentoring experience in all three clinical settings were selected and interviewed. The teachers' expectations for teacher development,…

  3. Automated nuclear material recovery and decontamination of large steel dynamic experiment containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, D.K.; Gallant, D.A.; Nelson, D.C.; Stovall, L.A.; Wedman, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    A key mission of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to reduce the global nuclear danger through stockpile stewardship efforts that ensure the safety and reliability of nuclear weapons. In support of this mission LANL performs dynamic experiments on special nuclear materials (SNM) within large steel containers. Once these experiments are complete, these containers must be processed to recover residual SNM and to decontaminate the containers to below low level waste (LLW) disposal limits which are much less restrictive for disposal purposes than transuranic (TRU) waste limits. The purpose of this paper is to describe automation efforts being developed by LANL for improving the efficiency, increasing worker safety, and reducing worker exposure during the material cleanout and recovery activities performed on these containers

  4. Experiences of mental health nursing staff working with voice hearers in an acute setting: An interpretive phenomenological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, E; Gupta, A; Collins, S C

    2018-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Community mental health staff and their service users have reported mixed views on the importance of talking about the content of voices. Community staff have reported feeling that they do not have the skills to explore voice content and worry about making things worse. Voice hearers experiencing extreme distress due to the content of their voices can access support through acute inpatient mental health services. No previous studies have focused on the experiences of staff who nurse voice hearers at a time of acute distress. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: MHNs and HSWs working with voice hearers in acute distress report feeling powerless and helpless, as they feel that they cannot lessen the distress experienced by the voice hearer. Despite these difficult feelings, staff report finding ways of coping, including using structured tools to help make sense of their service users' voice-hearing experiences and accessing reflective practice forums. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Due to the current context of increased acuity and limited resources in acute services, there may be a need to further protect time for staff to access reflective practice groups and supervision forums to help them manage the difficult feelings arising from their work with voice hearers. Introduction Mental health nursing (MHN) staff in acute settings work with voice hearers at times of crises when they experience high levels of distress. Previous research has focused on community mental health staff's experiences and their service users views on exploring the content of voices. No studies have explored this from an acute mental health service perspective. Aim This study therefore sought to explore the experiences of staff working with voice hearers in an acute mental health service. Method Due to the exploratory nature of the research, a qualitative design was chosen. Three MHNs and five healthcare support workers (HSWs) were

  5. The experience and views of mental health nurses regarding nursing care delivery in an integrated, inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Walter, Garry; Hunt, Glenn

    2005-06-01

    Positive and effective consumer outcomes hinge on having in place optimal models of nursing care delivery. The aim of this study was to ascertain the experience and views of mental health nurses, working in hospitals in an area mental health service, regarding nursing care delivery in those settings. Surveys (n = 250) were sent to all mental health nurses working in inpatient settings and 118 (47%) were returned. Results showed that the quality of nursing care achieved high ratings (by 87%), and that two-thirds of respondents were proud to be a mental health nurse and would choose to be a mental health nurse again. Similarly, the majority (71%) would recommend mental health nursing to others. Concern was, however, expressed about the continuity and consistency of nursing work and information technology resources. Nurses with community experiences rated the importance of the following items, or their confidence, higher than those without previous community placements: the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork; the importance of participating in case review; the importance of collaborating with community staff; confidence in performing mental state examinations; and confidence in collaborating with community staff, suggesting that this placement had positive effects on acute care nursing.

  6. Choice Experiment Analysis of Outdoor Decking Material Selection in E-Commerce Market in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Holopainen, Jani Markus; Toppinen, Anne Maarit Kristiina; Lähtinen, Katja Päivikki; Rekola, Mika Olavi

    2017-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, there has been hope that the uptake of certified forest products would ensure more sustainable forest management and also deliver business benefits along the value chain. Our study applies a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) to model an e-commerce purchase in the case of multiple products with various attribute and certification combinations in the Finnish retail outdoor decking material market. We received 2772 responses from 231 participants in an online survey. Applyi...

  7. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    builds on current understanding of fault modes in composites. This paper investigates faults in laminated ply composites. Such structures mainly...experiments where intermittent ground truth and in-situ characteristics are collected. Growth patterns are analyzed for damage types typical of laminated ...2: [0/902/45/-45/90], and Layup 3: [902/45/-45]2. Torayca T700G uni-directional carbon- prepreg material was used for 15.24 cm x 25.4 cm coupons with

  8. Simple material physics experiment for studying phase diagrams and solid state transformations in alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, S; Kamal, R [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1977-09-01

    Study of phase diagram and accompanying solid state transformations is essential to determine the best possible composition, manufacturing techniques and physical properties of an alloy. A simple technique having wide applications in metallurgical industry is to study the temperature--time curve of the alloy undergoing cooling with an uniform rate. An experiment which uses this technique is described. It is widely applicable in the fields of materials science, applied solid state physics, physical metallurgy and physical chemistry.

  9. Development of Teaching Materials for a Physical Chemistry Experiment Using the QR Code

    OpenAIRE

    吉村, 忠与志

    2008-01-01

    The development of teaching materials with the QR code was attempted in an educational environment using a mobile telephone. The QR code is not sufficiently utilized in education, and the current study is one of the first in the field. The QR code is encrypted. However, the QR code can be deciphered by mobile telephones, thus enabling the expression of text in a small space.Contents of "Physical Chemistry Experiment" which are available on the Internet are briefly summarized and simplified. T...

  10. Experiment of forced convection heat transfer using microencapsulated phase-change-material slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Shinji; Akino, Norio; Tanaka, Amane; Nagashima, Akira.

    1997-01-01

    The present study describes an experiment on forced convective heat transfer using a water slurry of Microencapsulated Phase-change-material. A normal paraffin hydrocarbon is microencapsulated by melamine resin, melting point of 28.1degC. The heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in a circular tube were evaluated. The heat transfer coefficient using the slurry in case with and without phase change were compared to in case of using pure water. (author)

  11. Glass melter materials technical options for the French vitrification process and operations experience authors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonniaud, R.; Roznad, L.; Demay, R.

    1986-09-01

    The French vitrification process for solidifying high-level radioactive waste which has been under industrial application since 1978, is mentioned briefly. This technique involves glass melting at 1,150 deg.C, using an induction heated metallic vessel. The molten glass pouring is controlled by a thermal gate, which is also heated by induction. Two types of vessel are in use. Both are remotely removable and disposable to permit replacement at regular intervals. The technical criteria (the materials used have to meet) are described. The behaviour of the materials has been investigated using the industrial experience gained in the AVM facility during 8 years of operation, as well as with operation of a prototype for the new vitrification facilities under construction at La Hague. A short description of the use of these materials is also presented

  12. Thermal comfort characteristics of some selected building materials in the regional setting of Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Fasogbon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In Ile-Ife, it is very common to see quite a lot of local people engaging in mud bricks moulding, concrete block making, mud house construction and the bricklaying profession in general. These have particular bearing on the economy and the political situation of the people involved as in the profession there is set of rules and regulations guiding the rate and procedure for carrying out any such moulding or construction work. Considering the importance of this, the present study investigated the thermal performance of some selected building materials in the ancient city of Ile-Ife in Nigeria. The work demonstrated how a building envelope responds to outdoor conditions through graphic illustrations. This was followed by constructing three physical building models, with model 1 constructed of mud bricks, model 2 constructed of concrete blocks and model 3 constructed of cast concrete. Each of the models was first roofed with galvanised Iron roofing sheets, later with aluminium roofing sheets and finally with asbestos roofing. Readings were taken by inserting TGP-4500 Data loggers into appropriate positions. The results showed that internal temperatures in the mud-brick and cast concrete buildings remained fairly stable despite external diurnal fluctuations. Humidity data collected also showed that fluctuations in external humidity levels do not affect humidity levels within the mud-brick and cast concrete structures significantly. On the other hand, the structure made of concrete blocks responded more to external fluctuations in temperature and humidity. Moreover, humidity levels in the cast concrete building were the least, followed by those in the mud-brick house; while the concrete block structure had the highest level of humidity. It was also discovered that aluminium roofing gave the highest internal temperature, followed by galvanised iron roofing and the least was seen with asbestos roofing. For external diurnal fluctuations, building model

  13. Views and experiences of mental health nurses working with undergraduate assistants in nursing in an acute mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Mannix, Judy; Jackson, Debra; Hunt, Glenn E

    2012-04-01

    Undergraduate nurses are employed as assistants in nursing (AIN) in inpatient mental health settings; however, there is a paucity of published research exploring registered nurses' (RN) views about the AIN role in these settings. This qualitative study documents the views and experiences of RN working with undergraduate AIN. Fifty structured face-to-face interviews were analysed, and the results are discussed in three sections. The first section outlines RN perceptions of qualities and skills required of AIN in mental health, and the responses primarily focus on communication skills, initiative, and willingness to learn. The second section targets factors in the workplace that might enhance the interest of AIN in a mental health nursing career; the responses emphasize their need to work with experienced staff. The last section outlines RN expectations of AIN, most of which are met and involve physical observations and technical tasks; less fulfilled activities primarily cluster around interactions with patients. Findings highlight the advantages and disadvantages of drawing on undergraduate nursing students as AIN in mental health settings. Communication skills, personal initiative, safety training to prevent violence, and education to increase knowledge and awareness about mental illness, diagnosis, and mental status-related skills were all important concerns articulated by RN. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Men's experiences of sexuality after cancer: a material discursive intra-psychic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Emilee; Ussher, Jane M; Perz, Janette; Wong, W K Tim; Hobbs, Kim; Mason, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Men can experience significant changes to their sexuality following the onset of cancer. However, research on men's sexuality post-cancer has focused almost exclusively on those with prostate and testicular cancer, despite evidence that the diagnosis and treatment for most cancers can impact on men's sexuality. This Australian qualitative study explores the experiences of changes to sexuality for 21 men across a range of cancer types and stages, sexual orientations and relationship contexts. Semi-structured interviews were analysed with theoretical thematic analysis guided by a material discursive intra-psychic approach, recognising the materiality of sexual changes, men's intrapsychic experience of such changes within a relational context and the influence of the discursive construction of masculine sexuality. Material changes included erectile difficulty, decreased desire, and difficulty with orgasm. The use of medical aids to minimise the impact of erectile difficulties was shaped by discursive constructions of 'normal' masculine sexuality. The majority of men reported accepting the changes to their sexuality post-cancer and normalised them as part of the natural ageing process. Men's relationship status and context played a key role managing the changes to their sexuality. We conclude by discussing the implications for clinical practice.

  15. Modeling and experiments of x-ray ablation of National Ignition Facility first wall materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.T.; Burnham, A.K.; Tobin, M.T.; Peterson, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses results of modeling and experiments on the x-ray response of selected materials relevant to NIF target chamber design. X-ray energy deposition occurs in such small characteristic depths (on the order of a micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion significantly affect the material response, even during the typical 10-ns pulses. The finite-difference ablation model integrates four separate processes: x-ray energy deposition, heat conduction, hydrodynamics, and surface vaporization. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser facility in Livermore on response of various materials to NIF-relevant x-ray fluences. Fused silica, Si nitride, B carbide, B, Si carbide, C, Al2O3, and Al were tested. Response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with SEM and atomic force microscopes. Judgements were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material; relative importances of these processes were also studied with the x-ray response model

  16. Small scale thermal violence experiments for combined insensitive high explosive and booster materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rae, Philip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Clare L [AWE, UK; Stennett, C [DCMT SHRIVENHAM, UK; Flower, H M [AWE, UK

    2010-01-01

    A small scale cook-off experiment has been designed to provide a violence metric for both booster and IHE materials, singly and in combination. The experiment has a simple, axisymmetric geometry provided by a 10 mm internal diameter cylindrical steel confinement up to 80 mm in length. Heating is applied from one end of the sample length creating pseudo 1-D heating profile and a thermal gradient across the sample(s). At the opposite end of the confinement to the heating block, a machined groove provides a point of rupture that generates a cylindrical fragment. The displacement of the external face of the fragment is detected by Heterodyne Velocimetry. Proof of concept experiments are reported focusing on HMX and TATB formulations, and are described in relation to confinement, ullage and heating profile. The development of a violence metric, based upon fragment velocity records is discussed.

  17. Effects of place identity, place dependence, and experience-use history on perceptions of recreation impacts in a natural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Dave D; Virden, Randy J; van Riper, Carena J

    2008-10-01

    It is generally accepted that recreation use in natural environments results in some degree of negative social and environmental impact. Environmental managers are tasked with mitigating the impact while providing beneficial recreation opportunities. Research on the factors that influence visitors' perceptions of environmental and social conditions is necessary to inform sound environmental management of protected natural areas. This study examines the effect of prior experience with the setting and two dimensions of place attachment (i.e., place identity and place dependence) on visitors' perceptions of three types of recreation impacts (i.e., depreciative behavior, environmental impacts, and recreation conflict). Principal components analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modeling were used to test the study hypotheses using data collected from 351 visitors through on-site questionnaires (response rate of 93 percent). The results show that prior experience exhibited a moderate and significant direct positive effect on place identity, place dependence, and visitors' perceptions of recreation impacts. Contrary to study hypotheses and prior research, neither place dependence nor place identity exhibited a significant effect on the dependent variables. The results show that prior experience causes visitors to be more sensitive to depreciative behaviors, environmental impacts, and recreation conflict. These findings raise concerns over potential visitor displacement and deterioration of site conditions. Implications for resource managers are discussed, which include education, modifying visitor use patterns, and site design strategies.

  18. Effects of Place Identity, Place Dependence, and Experience-Use History on Perceptions of Recreation Impacts in a Natural Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Dave D.; Virden, Randy J.; van Riper, Carena J.

    2008-10-01

    It is generally accepted that recreation use in natural environments results in some degree of negative social and environmental impact. Environmental managers are tasked with mitigating the impact while providing beneficial recreation opportunities. Research on the factors that influence visitors’ perceptions of environmental and social conditions is necessary to inform sound environmental management of protected natural areas. This study examines the effect of prior experience with the setting and two dimensions of place attachment (i.e., place identity and place dependence) on visitors’ perceptions of three types of recreation impacts (i.e., depreciative behavior, environmental impacts, and recreation conflict). Principal components analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modeling were used to test the study hypotheses using data collected from 351 visitors through on-site questionnaires (response rate of 93 percent). The results show that prior experience exhibited a moderate and significant direct positive effect on place identity, place dependence, and visitors’ perceptions of recreation impacts. Contrary to study hypotheses and prior research, neither place dependence nor place identity exhibited a significant effect on the dependent variables. The results show that prior experience causes visitors to be more sensitive to depreciative behaviors, environmental impacts, and recreation conflict. These findings raise concerns over potential visitor displacement and deterioration of site conditions. Implications for resource managers are discussed, which include education, modifying visitor use patterns, and site design strategies.

  19. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE): Overview, Accomplishments and Future Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Pippin, Gary; Jenkins, Philip P.; Walters, Robert J.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Palusinski, Iwona; Lorentzen, Justin R.

    2014-01-01

    Materials and devices used on the exterior of spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are subjected to environmental threats that can cause degradation in material properties, possibly threatening spacecraft mission success. These threats include: atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, charged particle radiation, temperature extremes and thermal cycling, micrometeoroid and debris impacts, and contamination. Space environmental threats vary greatly based on spacecraft materials, thicknesses and stress levels, and the mission environment and duration. For more than a decade the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) has enabled the study of the long duration environmental durability of spacecraft materials in the LEO environment. The overall objective of MISSE is to test the stability and durability of materials and devices in the space environment in order to gain valuable knowledge on the performance of materials in space, as well as to enable lifetime predictions of new materials that may be used in future space flight. MISSE is a series of materials flight experiments, which are attached to the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Individual experiments were loaded onto suitcase-like trays, called Passive Experiment Containers (PECs). The PECs were transported to the ISS in the Space Shuttle cargo bay and attached to, and removed from, the ISS during extravehicular activities (EVAs). The PECs were retrieved after one or more years of space exposure and returned to Earth enabling post-flight experiment evaluation. MISSE is a multi-organization project with participants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense (DoD), industry and academia. MISSE has provided a platform for environmental durability studies for thousands of samples and numerous devices, and it has produced many tangible impacts. Ten PECs (and one smaller tray) have been flown, representing MISSE 1 through MISSE

  20. Sensitivity of corneal biomechanical and optical behavior to material parameters using design of experiments method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengchen; Lerner, Amy L; Funkenbusch, Paul D; Richhariya, Ashutosh; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2018-02-01

    The optical performance of the human cornea under intraocular pressure (IOP) is the result of complex material properties and their interactions. The measurement of the numerous material parameters that define this material behavior may be key in the refinement of patient-specific models. The goal of this study was to investigate the relative contribution of these parameters to the biomechanical and optical responses of human cornea predicted by a widely accepted anisotropic hyperelastic finite element model, with regional variations in the alignment of fibers. Design of experiments methods were used to quantify the relative importance of material properties including matrix stiffness, fiber stiffness, fiber nonlinearity and fiber dispersion under physiological IOP. Our sensitivity results showed that corneal apical displacement was influenced nearly evenly by matrix stiffness, fiber stiffness and nonlinearity. However, the variations in corneal optical aberrations (refractive power and spherical aberration) were primarily dependent on the value of the matrix stiffness. The optical aberrations predicted by variations in this material parameter were sufficiently large to predict clinically important changes in retinal image quality. Therefore, well-characterized individual variations in matrix stiffness could be critical in cornea modeling in order to reliably predict optical behavior under different IOPs or after corneal surgery.

  1. Crack path predictions and experiments in plane structures considering anisotropic properties and material interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Judt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In many engineering applications special requirements are directed to a material's fracture behavior and the prediction of crack paths. Especially if the material exhibits anisotropic elastic properties or fracture toughnesses, e.g. in textured or composite materials, the simulation of crack paths is challenging. Here, the application of path independent interaction integrals (I-integrals, J-, L- and M-integrals is beneficial for an accurate crack tip loading analysis. Numerical tools for the calculation of loading quantities using these path-invariant integrals are implemented into the commercial finite element (FE-code ABAQUS. Global approaches of the integrals are convenient considering crack tips approaching other crack faces, internal boundaries or material interfaces. Curved crack faces require special treatment with respect to integration contours. Numerical crack paths are predicted based on FE calculations of the boundary value problem in connection with an intelligent adaptive re-meshing algorithm. Considering fracture toughness anisotropy and accounting for inelastic effects due to small plastic zones in the crack tip region, the numerically predicted crack paths of different types of specimens with material interfaces and internal boundaries are compared to subcritically grown paths obtained from experiments.

  2. Solar furnace experiments for thermophysical properties studies of rare-earth oxide MHD materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutures, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Some high temperature work performed with solar furnaces on rare earth oxides is reviewed. Emphasis is on the thermophysical properties (refractoriness, vaporization behavior) and the nature of solid solution on materials which could be used as electrodes for the MHD process. As new sources of energy are being developed due to the world energy crisis, MHD conversion could be useful. The development of MHD systems requires new efforts to develop and optimize materials properties. These materials must have good mechanical and electrical properties (if possible, pure electronic conduction with good emission). Because of the high temperature in MHD generators, the materials for electrodes must have good refractoriness and also must resist vaporization and corrosion at high temperature (T approx. 2000 0 C). Rare-earth oxides are the basic components for most of the MHD electrode materials and it is important to know their thermophysical properties (solidification point phase transitions, heat of fusion and of phase transition, vapor pressure). Because of the high temperature range and the nature of the atmosphere in which these experiments must be performed, special equipment adapted to solar furnaces was developed

  3. Materials on the International Space Station - Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R. J.; Garner, J. C.; Lam, S. N.; Vazquez, J. A.; Braun, W. R.; Ruth, R. E.; Lorentzen, J. R.; Bruninga, R.; Jenkins, P. P.; Flatico, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a space solar cell experiment currently being built by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in collaboration with NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), and the US Naval Academy (USNA). The experiment has been named the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiment (FTSCE), and the purpose is to rapidly put current and future generation space solar cells on orbit and provide validation data for these technologies. The FTSCE is being fielded in response to recent on-orbit and ground test anomalies associated with space solar arrays that have raised concern over the survivability of new solar technologies in the space environment and the validity of present ground test protocols. The FTSCE is being built as part of the Fifth Materials on the International Space Station (MISSE) Experiment (MISSE-5), which is a NASA program to characterize the performance of new prospective spacecraft materials when subjected to the synergistic effects of the space environment. Telemetry, command, control, and communication (TNC) for the FTSCE will be achieved through the Amateur Satellite Service using the PCSat2 system, which is an Amateur Radio system designed and built by the USNA. In addition to providing an off-the-shelf solution for FTSCE TNC, PCSat2 will provide a communications node for the Amateur Radio satellite system. The FTSCE and PCSat2 will be housed within the passive experiment container (PEC), which is an approximately 2ft x2ft x 4in metal container built by NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) as part of the MISSE-5 program. NASA LaRC has also supplied a thin film materials experiment that will fly on the exterior of the thermal blanket covering the PCSat2. The PEC is planned to be transported to the ISS on a Shuttle flight. The PEC will be mounted on the exterior of the ISS by an astronaut during an extravehicular activity (EVA). After nominally one year, the PEC will be retrieved and returned to Earth. At the time of writing this paper, the

  4. Experiments to quantify airborne release from packages with dispersible radioactive materials under accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, R.; Lange, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Koeln (Germany); Koch, W.; Nolte, O. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin (ITEM), Nikolai-Fuchs-Str.1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    For transport or handling accidents involving packages with radioactive materials and the assessment of potential radiological consequences, for the review of current requirements of the IAEA Transport Regulations, and for their possible further development reliable release data following mechanical impact are required. Within this context a research project was carried out which extends the basis for a well-founded examination of the contemporary system of requirements of 'Low Specific Activity' (LSA)-type materials and allows for its further development where appropriate. This project comprises a prior system-analytical examination and an experimental programme aiming at improving the general physical understanding of the release process as well as the quantity and the characteristics of airborne released material for non-fixed dispersible LSA-II material upon mechanical impact. Impaction experiments applying small, medium and real sized specimens of different dispersible materials revealed that the release behaviour of dispersible powders strongly depends upon material properties, e.g. particle size distribution and cohesion forces. The highest experimentally determined release fraction of respirable mass (AED < 10 {mu}m) amounted to about 2 % and was obtained for 2 kg of un-contained easily dispersible pulverized fly ash (PFA). For larger un-contained PFA specimen the release fraction decreases. However, packaging containing powdery material substantially reduces the airborne release fraction. The measured airborne release fractions for a 200 l drum with Type A certificate containing PFA were about a factor of 50 to 100 lower than for un-contained material. For a drop height of 9 m the airborne release fraction amounted to about 4 x 10{sup -5}. This value should be applicable for most of transport and handling accidents with mechanical impact. For a metal container of Type IP-2 or better which contains powder masses of 100 kg or more this release

  5. Benchmark Data Set for Wheat Growth Models: Field Experiments and AgMIP Multi-Model Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Martre, P.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J. W.; Hatfield, J. L.; Ruane, A. C.; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, P.J.; Rotter, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    The data set includes a current representative management treatment from detailed, quality-tested sentinel field experiments with wheat from four contrasting environments including Australia, The Netherlands, India and Argentina. Measurements include local daily climate data (solar radiation, maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation, surface wind, dew point temperature, relative humidity, and vapor pressure), soil characteristics, frequent growth, nitrogen in crop and soil, crop and soil water and yield components. Simulations include results from 27 wheat models and a sensitivity analysis with 26 models and 30 years (1981-2010) for each location, for elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature changes, a heat stress sensitivity analysis at anthesis, and a sensitivity analysis with soil and crop management variations and a Global Climate Model end-century scenario.

  6. Priority setting in the Austrian healthcare system: results from a discrete choice experiment and implications for mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzakis, Emmanouil; Paolucci, Francesco; Rubicko, Georg

    2014-06-01

    The impact of mental conditions is expected to be among the highest ranked causes of illness in high income countries by 2020. With changing health needs, policy makers have to make choices in an environment with increasingly constrained resources and competing demands. Discrete choice experiments have been identified as a useful approach to inform and support decision-making in health care systems and, in particular, its rationing. Policymakers, researchers and health practitioners from Austria participated in an experiment designed to elicit preferences for efficiency and equity in a generic priority setting framework. Using aggregate criteria an empirical measure of the efficiency/equity trade-off is calculated and a selection of health care interventions, including mental health, are ranked in composite league tables (CLTs). With the exception of severity of the condition, all equity parameters decrease attractiveness of an intervention, whereas the opposite holds for all three efficiency criteria. The efficiency/equity ratio (i.e. decision-makers' preference for efficiency over equity) is 3.5 and 5 for interventions targeted at younger and middle age populations, respectively, while for older populations this ratio is negative implying a rejection of all equity criteria. Irrespective of such differences interventions targeting mental health rank highly on all CLTs. Based on system-wide generic decision making criteria, mental health is shown to be a top priority for Austria. Preference-based approaches might offer complementary information to policymakers in priority setting decisions and a useful tool to support rationale rather than ad hoc decision-making.

  7. Corrosion evaluation of materials from the second deployment of the Gulf of Mexico Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeman, G.J.

    1979-10-01

    The corrosion behavior and nature of films formed on 5052 aluminum, CA706 copper-nickel alloy, AL-6X stainless alloy, and grade 2 titanium in seawater during the second deployment of the Gulf of Mexico Experiment (GOME II) were evaluated by optical and scanning-electron microscopy as well as gravimetric measurements. The thickness of the corrosion-product and biofouling film on the copper-nickel alloy increased linearly with time over the 99-day duration of the experiment, whereas the film thickness on aluminum was independent of exposure time. The uniform corrosion of aluminum and the copper-nickel alloy, based upon defilmed metal loss from preweighed ring specimens, was approx. 0.3 and 0.7 mils, respectively, for the 55-day exposure period. The thin films formed on stainless alloy and titanium were composed primarily of organic residues. The corrosion resistance of titanium and stainless alloy was excellent under the conditions in this experiment, although some evidence for pitting attack was found for the latter material. This study is directed toward the evaluation of candidate materials for OTEC heat exchangers.

  8. An integrated methods study of the experiences of youth with severe disabilities in leisure activity settings: the importance of belonging, fun, and control and choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Gibson, Barbara E; Mistry, Bhavnita; Pinto, Madhu; Goh, Freda; Teachman, Gail; Thompson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to examine the leisure activity setting experiences of two groups of youth with severe disabilities - those with complex continuing care (CCC) needs and those who have little functional speech and communicate using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Twelve youth took part in a mixed methods study, in which their experiences were ascertained using qualitative methods (observations, photo elicitation and interviews) and the measure of Self-Reported Experiences of Activity Settings (SEAS). Data integration occurred using a "following a thread" technique and case-by-case analysis. The analysis revealed several highly valued aspects of leisure activity setting experiences for youth, including engagement with others, enjoying the moment, and control and choice in selection and participation in activity settings. The findings provide preliminary insights into the nature of optimal activity settings for youth with severe disabilities, and the mediators of these experiences. Compared to other youth, the data illustrate both the commonalities of experiences and differences in the ways in which these experiences are attained. Implications for research concern the utility of mixed methods approaches in understanding the complex nature of participation experiences. Implications for clinical practice concern the importance of not assuming the nature of youths' experiences.

  9. Material science experience gained from the space nuclear rocket program: Insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1992-07-01

    Although Rover reactors are viewed as the ultimate in high-temperature operating systems, many of the materials used in these reactors (for example, support rods, control drums, and the reflector) have to be held at relatively low temperatures while the reactor operates, in order to maintain their structural integrity. Thus the insulators needed to separate these temperature domains are crucial to the reactor's ultimate operating times and temperatures. All of the reactors that were tested used pyrolytic graphite as the primary insulator. However, it had been long planned to replace the graphite with zirconium carbide and a lengthy and intensive effort to develop the zirconium carbide insulators had been made at the time Rover was terminated. This report details research and development and the experience we gained with both these insulator materials

  10. In-pile test of tritium release from tritium breeding materials (VOM-21H experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasawa, Toshimasa; Takeshita, Hidefumi; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi.

    1986-10-01

    Material development and blanket design of lithium-based ceramics such as lithium oxide, lithium aluminate, lithium silicate and lithium zirconate have been performed in Japan, United State of America and Europian Communities. Lithium oxide is a most attractive candidate for tritium breeding materials because of its high lithium density, high thermal conductivity and good tritium release performance. This work has been done to clarify the characteristics of tritium release and recovery from Li 2 O by means of in-situ tritium release measurement. The effects of temperature and sweep gas composition on the tritium release were investigated in this VOM-21H Experiment. Good measurement of tritium release was achieved but there were uncertainties in reproduciblity of data. The experimental results show that the role of surface adsorption/desorption makes a significant contribution to the tritium release and tritium inventory. Also, it is necessary to define the rate limiting process either diffusion or surface adsorption/desorption. (author)

  11. Radiological Characterisation from a Waste and Materials End-State Perspective: Practices and Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mommaert, Chantal; Andrieu, Caroline; Desnoyers, Yvon; Denis Pombet; Salsac, Marie-Delphine; Knaack, Michael; Altavilla, Massimo; Manes, Daniela; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Ul Syed, Naeem; Palomo, Nieves Martin; Larsson, Arne; Dunlop, Alister; Susan Brown; Emptage, Matthew; Black, Greg; Abu-Eid, Rateb; Szilagyi, Andrew; Weber, Inge; )

    2017-01-01

    Radiological characterisation is a key enabling activity for the planning and implementation of nuclear facility decommissioning. Effective characterisation allows the extent, location and nature of contamination to be determined and provides crucial information for facility dismantling, the management of material and waste arisings, the protection of workers, the public and the environment, and associated cost estimations. This report will be useful for characterisation practitioners who carry out tactical planning, preparation, optimisation and implementation of characterisation to support the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the management of associated materials and waste. It compiles recent experience from NEA member countries in radiological characterisation, including from international experts, international case studies, an international conference, and international standards and guidance. Using this comprehensive evidence base, the report identifies relevant good practice and provides practical advice covering all stages of the characterisation process

  12. Practical experience with nuclear material control and accountancy in a large reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebaillif, D.; Mitterrand, B.; Rincel, X.; Regnier, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the system implemented in UP3 and provides the results of the 9-year operation experience. It will be insisted on the necessity to perform measurements as accurately as possible in order to have an effective system. The Nuclear Material Control and Accountancy implemented at La Hague has proven to be an effective and efficient tool for the management of the facility. In particular it has been shown the necessity to determine as accurately as possible every transfer of nuclear material (NM) out or into the facility of area of the facility, whatever is considered, in order to establish the best possible balance of NM. A computerized system permits accurate and timely data collection, following up of throughputs and inventories, establishment of reports and records requested by national and international authorities [ru

  13. Preparation of 24 ternary thin film materials libraries on a single substrate in one experiment for irreversible high-throughput studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenconsejo, Pio John S; Siegel, Alexander; Savan, Alan; Thienhaus, Sigurd; Ludwig, Alfred

    2012-01-09

    For different areas of combinatorial materials science, it is desirable to have multiple materials libraries: especially for irreversible high-throughput studies, like, for example, corrosion resistance testing in different media or annealing of complete materials libraries at different temperatures. Therefore a new combinatorial sputter-deposition process was developed which yields 24 materials libraries in one experiment on a single substrate. It is discussed with the example of 24 Ti-Ni-Ag materials libraries. They are divided based on the composition coverage and orientation of composition gradient into two sets of 12 nearly identical materials libraries. Each materials library covers at least 30-40% of the complete ternary composition range. An acid etch test in buffered-HF solution was performed, illustrating the feasibility of our approach for destructive materials characterization. The results revealed that within the composition range of Ni < 30 at.%, the films were severely etched. The composition range which shows reversible martensitic transformations was confirmed to be outside this region. The high output of the present method makes it attractive for combinatorial studies requiring multiple materials libraries.

  14. Experiences of stigma in healthcare settings among adults living with HIV in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati-Najarkolaei, Fatemeh; Niknami, Shamsaddin; Aminshokravi, Farkhondeh; Bazargan, Mohsen; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Hadjizadeh, Ebrahim; Tavafian, Sedigheh S

    2010-07-22

    People living with HIV (PLHIV) sometimes experience discrimination. There is little understanding of the causes, forms and consequences of this stigma in Islamic countries. This qualitative study explored perceptions and experiences of PLHIV regarding both the quality of healthcare and the attitudes and behaviours of their healthcare providers in the Islamic Republic of Iran. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were held with a purposively selected group of 69 PLHIV recruited from two HIV care clinics in Tehran. Data were analyzed using the content analysis approach. Nearly all participants reported experiencing stigma and discrimination by their healthcare providers in a variety of contexts. Participants perceived that their healthcare providers' fear of being infected with HIV, coupled with religious and negative value-based assumptions about PLHIV, led to high levels of stigma. Participants mentioned at least four major forms of stigma: (1) refusal of care; (2) sub-optimal care; (3) excessive precautions and physical distancing; and (4) humiliation and blaming. The participants' healthcare-seeking behavioural reactions to perceived stigma and discrimination included avoiding or delaying seeking care, not disclosing HIV status when seeking healthcare, and using spiritual healing. In addition, emotional responses to perceived acts of stigma included feeling undeserving of care, diminished motivation to stay healthy, feeling angry and vengeful, and experiencing emotional stress. While previous studies demonstrate that most Iranian healthcare providers report fairly positive attitudes towards PLHIV, our participants' experiences tell a different story. Therefore, it is imperative to engage both healthcare providers and PLHIV in designing interventions targeting stigma in healthcare settings. Additionally, specialized training programmes in universal precautions for health providers will lead to stigma reduction. National policies to strengthen medical training and

  15. Automatic reduction of large X-ray fluorescence data-sets applied to XAS and mapping experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Montoya, Ligia Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In this thesis two automatic methods for the reduction of large fluorescence data sets are presented. The first method is proposed in the framework of BioXAS experiments. The challenge of this experiment is to deal with samples in ultra dilute concentrations where the signal-to-background ratio is low. The experiment is performed in fluorescence mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy with a 100 pixel high-purity Ge detector. The first step consists on reducing 100 fluorescence spectra into one. In this step, outliers are identified by means of the shot noise. Furthermore, a fitting routine which model includes Gaussian functions for the fluorescence lines and exponentially modified Gaussian (EMG) functions for the scattering lines (with long tails at lower energies) is proposed to extract the line of interest from the fluorescence spectrum. Additionally, the fitting model has an EMG function for each scattering line (elastic and inelastic) at incident energies where they start to be discerned. At these energies, the data reduction is done per detector column to include the angular dependence of scattering. In the second part of this thesis, an automatic method for texts separation on palimpsests is presented. Scanning X-ray fluorescence is performed on the parchment, where a spectrum per scanned point is collected. Within this method, each spectrum is treated as a vector forming a basis which is to be transformed so that the basis vectors are the spectra of each ink. Principal Component Analysis is employed as an initial guess of the seek basis. This basis is further transformed by means of an optimization routine that maximizes the contrast and minimizes the non-negative entries in the spectra. The method is tested on original and self made palimpsests.

  16. Materials to be used for radionuclide transport experiments (milestones SPL3A1M4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, B.

    1998-02-01

    Experiments to determine the effect of canister corrosion products on the transport of radionuclides will be undertaken using the FE(III) oxides goethite and hematite as proxies for the expected corrosion envelope that will form as a result of alteration of the corrosion allowance overpack prior to the breaching of the waste container. Samples of ESF invert concrete that have been crushed, or left intact but fractured, and that have been subjected to hydrothermal alteration will be used to determine the effect of cementitious materials on transport of radionuclides. A mixture of CaCO 3 , Si0 2 , and aggregate will be used as a proxy for completely carbonated concrete

  17. Experience in safeguarding nuclear material at the Rheinsberg nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.

    1976-01-01

    The three years' experience that has been gained in application of the Safeguards Agreement shows that the carrying out of inspections at the nuclear power plant has virtually no effect on operating conditions. In future it will be possible to reduce this effect even further and still maintain the operational reliability of the station. Verification of the transfer of nuclear material and detection of possible violations have proved relatively simple. The labour requirement of each unit at the station for the performance of inspections is not more that thirty man-days. Constructive collaboration between power station staff and inspectors is of great importance in improving the safeguards procedures. (author)

  18. Environmental assessment for consolidation of certain materials and machines for nuclear criticality experiments and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In support of its assigned missions and because of the importance of avoiding nuclear criticality accidents, DOE has adopted a policy to reduce identifiable nuclear criticality safety risks and to protect the public, workers, government property and essential operations from the effects of a criticality accident. In support of this policy, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA) 18, provides a program of general purpose critical experiments. This program, the only remaining one of its kind in the United States, seeks to maintain a sound basis of information for criticality control in those physical situations that DOE will encounter in handling and storing fissionable material in the future, and ensuring the presence of a community of individuals competent in practicing this control

  19. Set-up of a pre-test mock-up experiment in preparation for the HCPB Breeder Unit mock-up experimental campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, F., E-mail: francisco.hernandez@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) (Germany); Kolb, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-WPT) (Germany); Ilić, M.; Kunze, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) (Germany); Németh, J. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics (Hungary); Weth, A. von der [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► As preparation for the HCPB-TBM Breeder Unit out-of-pile testing campaign, a pre-test experiment (PREMUX) has been prepared and described. ► A new heater system based on a wire heater matrix has been developed for imitating the neutronic volumetric heating and it is compared with the conventional plate heaters. ► The test section is described and preliminary thermal results with the available models are presented and are to be benchmarked with PREMUX. ► The PREMUX integration in the air cooling loop L-STAR/LL in the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology is shown and future steps are discussed. -- Abstract: The complexity of the experimental set-up for testing a full-scaled Breeder Unit (BU) mock-up for the European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Test Blanket Module (HCPB-TBM) has motivated to build a pre-test mock-up experiment (PREMUX) consisting of a slice of the BU in the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} region. This pre-test aims at verifying the feasibility of the methods to be used for the subsequent testing of the full-scaled BU mock-up. Key parameters needed for the modeling of the breeder material is also to be determined by the Hot Wire Method (HWM). The modeling tools for the thermo-mechanics of the pebble beds and for the mock-up structure are to be calibrated and validated as well. This paper presents the setting-up of PREMUX in the L-STAR/LL facility at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. A key requirement of the experiments is to mimic the neutronic volumetric heating. A new heater concept is discussed and compared to several conventional heater configurations with respect to the estimated temperature distribution in the pebble beds. The design and integration of the thermocouple system in the heater matrix and pebble beds is also described, as well as other key aspects of the mock-up (dimensions, layout, cooling system, purge gas line, boundary conditions and integration in the test facility). The adequacy of these methods for the full-scaled BU

  20. Reexamination of cross-sections for fast neutrons by computational checking of single material integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriewer, J.; Hehn, G.; Mattes, M.

    1976-06-01

    Transmission experiments for fast neutrons and pure materials offer the possibility to check the accuracy of nuclear data compilations by recalculating the measured discharge spectra. In this paper the calculations were mainly based on two Benchmark experiments with pure iron carried out at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. One of the experiments employed a 252 Cf fission source and spherically symmetric arrangement; the other was based on transmission of an iron cylinder by 14-MeV neutrons from a D+T source. The checking calculations were based on the data compilation ENDF/B-IV (occasionally also ENDF/B-III) and on the transport codes ANISN (1D) and DOT-2 (2D) with lined up ESTOQ (for calculating the first-collision source). The calculations with the Cf source showed good agreement with the results of measurement, whereas the checking of the arrangement with 14 MeV neutrons yielded a marked underestimation of the neutron flux density in the range of 2 MeV up to 14 MeV. The discussion of the results including the choice of codes was done on the basis of a literature review on the Benchmark experiments for iron with fast neutrons carried out until now. (orig.) [de

  1. Coupled heat transfer model and experiment study of semitransparent barrier materials in aerothermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Lin; Qi, Hong

    Semi-transparent materials (such as IR optical windows) are widely used for heat protection or transfer, temperature and image measurement, and safety in energy , space, military, and information technology applications. They are used, for instance, ceramic coatings for thermal barriers of spacecrafts or gas turbine blades, and thermal image observation under extreme or some dangerous environments. In this paper, the coupled conduction and radiation heat transfer model is established to describe temperature distribution of semitransparent thermal barrier medium within the aerothermal environment. In order to investigate this numerical model, one semi-transparent sample with black coating was considered, and photothermal properties were measured. At last, Finite Volume Method (FVM) was used to solve the coupled model, and the temperature responses from the sample surfaces were obtained. In addition, experiment study was also taken into account. In the present experiment, aerodynamic heat flux was simulated by one electrical heater, and two experiment cases were designed in terms of the duration of aerodynamic heating. One case is that the heater irradiates one surface of the sample continually until the other surface temperature up to constant, and the other case is that the heater works only 130 s. The surface temperature responses of these two cases were recorded. Finally, FVM model of the coupling conduction-radiation heat transfer was validated based on the experiment study with relative error less than 5%.

  2. Clearance of materials, some experience from the UK - Clearing a recent building, a chance to get as much material out as indistinguishable from background. A rare opportunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, Peter; Fisher, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This poster will illustrate the methods used in the UK to clear materials from a relatively modern building with good history. Some materials were cleared as clean, i.e. there was no reasonable chance of contamination given where they were and how they had been used. Other materials were cleared as Out of Scope, i.e. they complied with the relevant UK legislation to be considered in law as non-radioactive. The first group was subjected to limited confirmation measurements whereas the latter were carefully monitored. The aim was to set up, for each object, a monitoring method which took account of the fingerprint, the material mass per unit area and its influence on background. The capacity of the monitoring method was described in terms of Maximum Missable Activity and the aim was to set up methods which gave MMAs which gave confident sentencing but limited the time taken. The project was very successful. (authors)

  3. Are distribution coefficients measured from batch experiments meaningful for quantifying retention in compacted material?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutelard, F.; Charles, Y.; Page, J. [CEA/DEN/DPC/SECR/L3MR batiment 450, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: To quantify the ability of a clayey material to act as a barrier for radionuclides migration, reliable data on retention properties must be available. The most common method for determining the distribution coefficient, quantifying the radionuclide adsorption, is the batch technique applied to powdered solid. Are these data meaningful for highly compacted minerals? This question is still under debate in literature [1,2]. The aim of the present study is to compare distribution coefficient (KD) value for Cs and Ni onto compacted and dispersed for both Bentonite MX80 and Callovo-Oxfordian clayey material in a simulated site water. Firstly, classical batch sorption experiments are carried on dispersed materials pre-conditioned with the simulated site water at pH 7.3. Radiotracer {sup 137}Cs and {sup 58}Ni are used to investigate the constant-pH isotherm sorption. The bottleneck for measuring distribution coefficient onto highly compacted material lies in a careful monitoring of chemical conditions because they are driven by diffusion processes. For this study, we have chosen to use in-diffusion experiments [3]. Sample size is optimized to reach for high retention level (300 mL/g) the steady state in a reasonable time (3 to 6 month). In order to describe the response surface of compacted distribution coefficient on bentonite MX80, a 2 variables Doehlert matrix has been chosen. In this experimental design, the two variables are density and dispersed distribution coefficient. Bentonite is pre-conditioning before compaction to a density ranging from 1.2 to 1.85 kg/l. The pellet is confined in a cylindrical stainless steel filter (150 {mu}L) closed to both ends. The cell is placed in a tightly closed bottle containing the working solution. After a re-equilibration period (at least 3 weeks), {sup 133}Cs and {sup 59}Ni stable isotope are introduced for monitoring the KD level (between 150 mL/g to 330 mL/g). Radiotracer {sup 137}Cs and {sup 58

  4. Are distribution coefficients measured from batch experiments meaningful for quantifying retention in compacted material?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutelard, F.; Charles, Y.; Page, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: To quantify the ability of a clayey material to act as a barrier for radionuclides migration, reliable data on retention properties must be available. The most common method for determining the distribution coefficient, quantifying the radionuclide adsorption, is the batch technique applied to powdered solid. Are these data meaningful for highly compacted minerals? This question is still under debate in literature [1,2]. The aim of the present study is to compare distribution coefficient (KD) value for Cs and Ni onto compacted and dispersed for both Bentonite MX80 and Callovo-Oxfordian clayey material in a simulated site water. Firstly, classical batch sorption experiments are carried on dispersed materials pre-conditioned with the simulated site water at pH 7.3. Radiotracer 137 Cs and 58 Ni are used to investigate the constant-pH isotherm sorption. The bottleneck for measuring distribution coefficient onto highly compacted material lies in a careful monitoring of chemical conditions because they are driven by diffusion processes. For this study, we have chosen to use in-diffusion experiments [3]. Sample size is optimized to reach for high retention level (300 mL/g) the steady state in a reasonable time (3 to 6 month). In order to describe the response surface of compacted distribution coefficient on bentonite MX80, a 2 variables Doehlert matrix has been chosen. In this experimental design, the two variables are density and dispersed distribution coefficient. Bentonite is pre-conditioning before compaction to a density ranging from 1.2 to 1.85 kg/l. The pellet is confined in a cylindrical stainless steel filter (150 μL) closed to both ends. The cell is placed in a tightly closed bottle containing the working solution. After a re-equilibration period (at least 3 weeks), 133 Cs and 59 Ni stable isotope are introduced for monitoring the KD level (between 150 mL/g to 330 mL/g). Radiotracer 137 Cs and 58 Ni are used to quantify the

  5. Optimizing the management of neuromyelitis optica and spectrum disorders in resource poor settings: Experience from the Mangalore demyelinating disease registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekha Pandit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In resource-poor settings, the management of neuromyelitis optica (NMO and NMO spectrum (NMOS disorders is limited because of delayed diagnosis and financial constraints. Aim: To device a cost-effective strategy for the management of NMO and related disorders in India. Materials and Methods: A cost-effective and disease-specific protocol was used for evaluating the course and treatment outcome of 70 consecutive patients. Results: Forty-five patients (65% had a relapse from the onset and included NMO (n = 20, recurrent transverse myelitis (RTM; n = 10, and recurrent optic neuritis (ROPN; n = 15. In 38 (84.4% patients presenting after multiple attacks, the diagnosis was made clinically. Only 7 patients with a relapsing course were seen at the onset and included ROPN (n = 5, NMO (n = 1, and RTM (n = 1. They had a second attack after a median interval of 1 ± 0.9 years, which was captured through our dedicated review process. Twenty-five patients had isolated longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM, of which 20 (80% remained ambulant at follow-up of 3 ± 1.9 years. Twelve patients (17% with median expanded disability status scale (EDSS of 8.5 at entry had a fatal outcome. Serum NMO-IgG testing was done in selected patients, and it was positive in 7 of 18 patients (39%. Irrespective of the NMO-IgG status, the treatment compliant patients (44.4% showed significant improvement in EDSS (P ≤ 0.001. Conclusions : Early clinical diagnosis and treatment compliance were important for good outcome. Isolated LETM was most likely a post-infectious demyelinating disorder in our set-up. NMO and NMOS disorders contributed to 14.9% (45/303 of all demyelinating disorders in our registry.

  6. Increased materiality judgments in financial accounting and external audit:A critical comparison between German and international standard setting

    OpenAIRE

    Müller-Burmeister, Cristina; Velte, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The materiality principle supports the information function of accounting in order to enhance investors' decisions. Therefore, materiality guides the entity to present relevant information and to prevent information overload. This decision is mostly subjective and is based primarily on the individual's judgement in applying vague legal concepts. This could result in a greater expectation gap between management information and investors' understanding. The EU accounting directive 2013/34/EU st...

  7. Results and analysis of reactor-material experiments on ex-vessel corium quench and dispersal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; McUmber, L.M.; Sienicki, J.J.; Squarer, D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of reactor material experiments and related analysis are described in which molten corium is injected into a mock-up of the reactor cavity region of a PWR. The experiments address exvessel interactions such as steam generation (for those cases in which water is present), water and corium dispersal from the cavity, hydrogen generation, direct atmosphere heating by dispersed corium, and debrids characterization. Test results indicate efficiencies of steam generation by corium quench ranging up to 65%. Corium sweepout of up to 62% of the injected material was found for those conditions in which steam generation flowrate was augmented by vessel blowdown. The dispersed corium caused very little direct heating of the atmosphere for the configuration employing a trap at the exit of the cavity-to-containment pathway. Corium sweepout phenomena were modeled for high-pressure blowdown conditions, and the results applied to the full-size reactor system predict essentially complete sweepout of corium from the reactor cavity. (orig.)

  8. Results and analysis of reactor-material experiments on ex-vessel corium quench and dispersal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; McUmber, L.M.; Sienicki, J.J.; Squarer, D.

    1984-01-01

    Results of reactor-material experiments and related analysis are described in which molten corium is injected into a mock-up of the reactor cavity region of a PWR. The experiments address ex-vessel interactions such as steam generation (for those cases in which water is present), water and corium dispersal from the cavity, hydrogen generation, direct atmosphere heating by dispersed corium, and debris characterization. Test results indicate efficiencies of steam generation by corium quench ranging up to 65%. Corium sweepout of up to 62% of the injected material was found for those conditions in which steam generation flowrate was augmented by vessel blowdown. The dispersed corium caused very little direct heating of the atmosphere for the configuration employing a trap at the exit of the cavity-to-containment pathway. Corium sweepout phenomena were modeled for high-pressure blowdown conditions, and the results applied to the full-size reactor system predict essentially complete sweepout of corium from the reactor cavity

  9. Elderly Men’s Experience of Information Material about Melanoma—A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Rosengren

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is an aggressive disease that has been increasing worldwide. Public education is trying to focus on reducing intense sun exposure and raise awareness of signs and symptoms to prevent illness. The aim of the study was to describe and analyze elderly men’s (over 65 years experience of an information booklet regarding malignant melanoma. The study comprised of a total of 15 interviews with elderly men. The interviews were analyzed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Respect for the individuals was a main concern in the study. One category, Security—to act, and three subcategories, Availability—to use, Clarity—to understand, and Awareness—to know, were identified to describe the men’s experiences of information material about melanoma. By using person-centered care, based on a holistic approach focusing on men’s need for security to act on specific risk factors and to do skin self-examination, health could be improved. The results of this study could help other health organizations to develop information material to prevent illness, such as for skin self-examination. Strategies concerning educating, preparing, and training health professionals in interpersonal communication skills should be implemented in healthcare organizations to meet patients’ information needs about illness to develop continuous learning and quality improvement.

  10. Radon and material radiopurity assessment for the NEXT double beta decay experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebrián, S.; Dafni, T.; González-Díaz, D.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Luzón, G.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Villar, J. A. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc, Paseo de los Ayerbe s/n, 22880 Canfranc Estación, Huesca (Spain); Pérez, J. [Instituto de Física Teórica, UAM/CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bandac, I. [Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc, Paseo de los Ayerbe s/n, 22880 Canfranc Estación, Huesca (Spain); Labarga, L. [Dpto. de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Álvarez, V.; Cárcel, S.; Cervera, A.; Díaz, J.; Ferrario, P.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; López-March, N. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC & Universitat de València, C/ Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); and others

    2015-08-17

    The ”Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC” (NEXT), intended to investigate the neutrinoless double beta decay using a high-pressure xenon gas TPC filled with Xe enriched in {sup 136}Xe at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory in Spain, requires ultra-low background conditions demanding an exhaustive control of material radiopurity and environmental radon levels. An extensive material screening process is underway for several years based mainly on gamma-ray spectroscopy using ultra-low background germanium detectors in Canfranc but also on mass spectrometry techniques like GDMS and ICPMS. Components from shielding, pressure vessel, electroluminescence and high voltage elements and energy and tracking readout planes have been analyzed, helping in the final design of the experiment and in the construction of the background model. The latest measurements carried out will be presented and the implication on NEXT of their results will be discussed. The commissioning of the NEW detector, as a first step towards NEXT, has started in Canfranc; in-situ measurements of airborne radon levels were taken there to optimize the system for radon mitigation and will be shown too.

  11. Influence of transmutation and high neutron exposure on materials used in fission-fusion correlation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.

    1990-07-01

    This paper explores the response of three different materials to high fluence irradiation as observed in recent fusion-related experiments. While helium at fusion-relevant levels influences the details of the microstructure of Fe--Cr--Ni alloys somewhat, the resultant changes in swelling and tensile behavior are relatively small. Under conditions where substantially greater-than-fusion levels of helium are generated, however, an extensive refinement of microstructure can occur, leading to depression of swelling at lower temperatures and increased strengthening at all temperatures studied. The behavior of these alloys is dominated by their tendency to converge to saturation microstructures which encourage swelling. Irradiations of nickel are dominated by its tendency to develop a different type of saturation microstructure that discourages further void growth. Swelling approaches saturation levels that are remarkably insensitive to starting microstructure and irradiation temperature. The rate of approach to saturation is very sensitive to variables such as helium, impurities, dislocation density and displacement rate, however. Copper exhibits a rather divergent response depending on the property measured. Transmutation of copper to nickel and zinc plays a large role in determining electrical conductivity but almost no role in void swelling. Each of these three materials offers different challenges in the interpretation of fission-fusion correlation experiments

  12. Challenges in interprofessional collaboration: experiences of care providers and policymakers in a newly set-up Dutch assault centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, Elza; Lo Fo Wong, Sylvie; Teerling, Anne; Hutschemaekers, Giel; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine

    2018-03-01

    Sexual and family violence are problems that affect many women and men, and the negative health consequences of violence are numerous. As adequate acute interprofessional care can prevent negative health consequences and improve forensic medical examination, a Centre for Sexual and Family Violence was set up. We aimed to improve our understanding of the challenges in interprofessional collaboration in a newly set-up centre for sexual and family violence. We conducted a qualitative study with semi-structured interviews about the experiences with interprofessional collaboration of 16 stakeholders involved in the Centre for Sexual and Family Violence Nijmegen. Participants were selected by purposive sampling. Participants found that the interprofessional collaboration had improved communication and competences. However, there were challenges too. Firstly, the interprofessional collaboration had brought parties closer together, but the collaboration also forced professionals to strongly define their boundaries. Mutual trust and understanding needed to be built up. Secondly, a balance had to be struck between pursuing the shared vision - which was to improve quality of care for victims - and giving space to organizations' and professionals' own interest. Thirdly, care for victims of sexual and family violence could be demanding on healthcare providers in an emotional sense, which might jeopardize professional's initial motivation for joining the Centre for Sexual and Family Violence Nijmegen. The interprofessional collaboration in an assault centre improves quality of care for victims, but there are also challenges. The tasks of an assault centre are to create opportunities to discuss professional roles and professional interests, to build up good interpersonal relations in which trust and understanding can grow, to formulate a strong and shared victim-centred vision and to support care providers with training, feedback and supervision. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring

  13. New set of convective heat transfer coefficients established for pools and validated against CLARA experiments for application to corium pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, B., E-mail: benedicte.michel@irsn.fr

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A new set of 2D convective heat transfer correlations is proposed. • It takes into account different horizontal and lateral superficial velocities. • It is based on previously established correlations. • It is validated against recent CLARA experiments. • It has to be implemented in a 0D MCCI (molten core concrete interaction) code. - Abstract: During an hypothetical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) or Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) severe accident with core meltdown and vessel failure, corium would fall directly on the concrete reactor pit basemat if no water is present. The high temperature of the corium pool maintained by the residual power would lead to the erosion of the concrete walls and basemat of this reactor pit. The thermal decomposition of concrete will lead to the release of a significant amount of gases that will modify the corium pool thermal hydraulics. In particular, it will affect heat transfers between the corium pool and the concrete which determine the reactor pit ablation kinetics. A new set of convective heat transfer coefficients in a pool with different lateral and horizontal superficial gas velocities is modeled and validated against the recent CLARA experimental program. 155 tests of this program, in two size configurations and a high range of investigated viscosity, have been used to validate the model. Then, a method to define different lateral and horizontal superficial gas velocities in a 0D code is proposed together with a discussion about the possible viscosity in the reactor case when the pool is semi-solid. This model is going to be implemented in the 0D ASTEC/MEDICIS code in order to determine the impact of the convective heat transfer in the concrete ablation by corium.

  14. Modeling decisions from experience: How models with a set of parameters for aggregate choices explain individual choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Sharma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the paradigms (called “sampling paradigm” in judgment and decision-making involves decision-makers sample information before making a final consequential choice. In the sampling paradigm, certain computational models have been proposed where a set of single or distribution parameters is calibrated to the choice proportions of a group of participants (aggregate and hierarchical models. However, currently little is known on how aggregate and hierarchical models would account for choices made by individual participants in the sampling paradigm. In this paper, we test the ability of aggregate and hierarchical models to explain choices made by individual participants. Several models, Ensemble, Cumulative Prospect Theory (CPT, Best Estimation and Simulation Techniques (BEAST, Natural-Mean Heuristic (NMH, and Instance-Based Learning (IBL, had their parameters calibrated to individual choices in a large dataset involving the sampling paradigm. Later, these models were generalized to two large datasets in the sampling paradigm. Results revealed that the aggregate models (like CPT and IBL accounted for individual choices better than hierarchical models (like Ensemble and BEAST upon generalization to problems that were like those encountered during calibration. Furthermore, the CPT model, which relies on differential valuing of gains and losses, respectively, performed better than other models during calibration and generalization on datasets with similar set of problems. The IBL model, relying on recency and frequency of sampled information, and the NMH model, relying on frequency of sampled information, performed better than other models during generalization to a challenging dataset. Sequential analyses of results from different models showed how these models accounted for transitions from the last sample to final choice in human data. We highlight the implications of using aggregate and hierarchical models in explaining individual choices

  15. Experience with low-cost telemedicine in three different settings. Recommendations based on a proposed framework for network performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Richard; Vladzymyrskyy, Anton; Zolfo, Maria; Bonnardot, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Background Telemedicine has been used for many years to support doctors in the developing world. Several networks provide services in different settings and in different ways. However, to draw conclusions about which telemedicine networks are successful requires a method of evaluating them. No general consensus or validated framework exists for this purpose. Objective To define a basic method of performance measurement that can be used to improve and compare teleconsultation networks; to employ the proposed framework in an evaluation of three existing networks; to make recommendations about the future implementation and follow-up of such networks. Methods Analysis based on the experience of three telemedicine networks (in operation for 7–10 years) that provide services to doctors in low-resource settings and which employ the same basic design. Findings Although there are many possible indicators and metrics that might be relevant, five measures for each of the three user groups appear to be sufficient for the proposed framework. In addition, from the societal perspective, information about clinical- and cost-effectiveness is also required. The proposed performance measurement framework was applied to three mature telemedicine networks. Despite their differences in terms of activity, size and objectives, their performance in certain respects is very similar. For example, the time to first reply from an expert is about 24 hours for each network. Although all three networks had systems in place to collect data from the user perspective, none of them collected information about the coordinator's time required or about ease of system usage. They had only limited information about quality and cost. Conclusion Measuring the performance of a telemedicine network is essential in understanding whether the network is working as intended and what effect it is having. Based on long-term field experience, the suggested framework is a practical tool that will permit

  16. Experience with low-cost telemedicine in three different settings. Recommendations based on a proposed framework for network performance evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Wootton

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine has been used for many years to support doctors in the developing world. Several networks provide services in different settings and in different ways. However, to draw conclusions about which telemedicine networks are successful requires a method of evaluating them. No general consensus or validated framework exists for this purpose.To define a basic method of performance measurement that can be used to improve and compare teleconsultation networks; to employ the proposed framework in an evaluation of three existing networks; to make recommendations about the future implementation and follow-up of such networks.Analysis based on the experience of three telemedicine networks (in operation for 7–10 years that provide services to doctors in low-resource settings and which employ the same basic design.Although there are many possible indicators and metrics that might be relevant, five measures for each of the three user groups appear to be sufficient for the proposed framework. In addition, from the societal perspective, information about clinical- and cost-effectiveness is also required. The proposed performance measurement framework was applied to three mature telemedicine networks. Despite their differences in terms of activity, size and objectives, their performance in certain respects is very similar. For example, the time to first reply from an expert is about 24 hours for each network. Although all three networks had systems in place to collect data from the user perspective, none of them collected information about the coordinator's time required or about ease of system usage. They had only limited information about quality and cost.Measuring the performance of a telemedicine network is essential in understanding whether the network is working as intended and what effect it is having. Based on long-term field experience, the suggested framework is a practical tool that will permit organisations to assess the performance of

  17. Irradiation capability of Japanese materials test reactor for water chemistry experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Satoshi; Hata, Kuniki; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Nakamura, Takehiko

    2012-09-01

    Appropriate understanding of water chemistry in the core of LWRs is essential as chemical species generated due to water radiolysis by neutron and gamma-ray irradiation govern corrosive environment of structural materials in the core and its periphery, causing material degradation such as stress corrosion cracking. Theoretical model calculation such as water radiolysis calculation gives comprehensive understanding of water chemistry at irradiation field where we cannot directly monitor. For enhancement of the technology, accuracy verification of theoretical models under wide range of irradiation conditions, i.e. dose rate, temperature etc., with well quantified in-pile measurement data is essential. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has decided to launch water chemistry experiments for obtaining data that applicable to model verification as well as model benchmarking, by using an in-pile loop which will be installed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). In order to clarify the irradiation capability of the JMTR for water chemistry experiments, preliminary investigations by water radiolysis / ECP model calculations were performed. One of the important irradiation conditions for the experiments, i.e. dose rate by neutron and gamma-ray, can be controlled by selecting irradiation position in the core. In this preliminary study, several representative irradiation positions that cover from highest to low absorption dose rate were chosen and absorption dose rate at the irradiation positions were evaluated by MCNP calculations. As a result of the calculations, it became clear that the JMTR could provide the irradiation conditions close to the BWR. The calculated absorption dose rate at each irradiation position was provided to water radiolysis calculations. The radiolysis calculations were performed under various conditions by changing absorption dose rate, water chemistry of feeding water etc. parametrically. Qualitatively, the concentration of H 2 O 2 , O 2 and

  18. Effects of Suicide Awareness Material on Implicit Suicide Cognition: A Laboratory Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Florian; Till, Benedikt; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the increasing adoption of suicide awareness campaigns to prevent suicide, little is known about the effective construction of awareness messages used and on their impact on suicidal cognition. We hypothesized that media reporting on an individual overcoming a suicidal crisis increases the automatic association between "life" and self. University students (N = 112) were randomly allocated to one of three groups in a laboratory experiment. Participants allocated to treatment group 1 or group 2 read awareness material about a person coping with suicidal ideation by getting professional help. The only difference between the two groups was the amount of social similarity (low vs. high) between the protagonist and the participants. The control group read an article unrelated to suicide. Awareness material increased implicit cognition in terms of a strengthening of self-life associations. This effect was restricted to participants scoring low on wishful identification with the suicidal protagonist. This finding suggests that only individuals who do not wishfully identify with a protagonist going through difficult life circumstances benefit from the awareness material in terms of suicidal cognition. These findings provide a rich basis for further research and have potentially high relevance to the construction of suicide-awareness messages.

  19. Combining computation and experiment to accelerate the discovery of new hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Donald

    2009-03-01

    The potential of emerging technologies such as fuel cells (FCs) and photovoltaics for environmentally-benign power generation has sparked renewed interest in the development of novel materials for high density energy storage. For applications in the transportation sector, the demands placed upon energy storage media are especially stringent, as a potential replacement for fossil-fuel-powered internal combustion engines -- namely, the proton exchange membrane FC -- utilizes hydrogen as a fuel. Although hydrogen has about three times the energy density of gasoline by weight, its volumetric energy density (even at 700 bar) is roughly a factor of six smaller. Consequently, the safe and efficient storage of hydrogen has been identified as one of the key materials-based challenges to realizing a transition to FC vehicles. This talk will present an overview of recent efforts at Ford aimed at developing new materials for reversible, solid state hydrogen storage. A tight coupling between first-principles modeling and experiments has greatly accelerated our efforts, and several examples illustrating the benefits of this approach will be presented.

  20. Pupils' Activities in a Multimaterial Learning Environment in Craft subject A Pilot Study using an Experience Sampling Method based on a Mobile Application in Classroom Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Jaatinen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates holistic craft processes in craft education with an instrument for data-collection and self-assessment. Teaching in a study context is based on co-teaching and a design process, highlighted by the Finnish Basic Education Core Curriculum 2014. The school architecture and web-based learning environment is combined. Division for textiles and technical work is no longer supported in this multimaterial learning environment. The aim of the study is to 1 make pupils’ holistic craft processes visible in everyday classroom practices with information collected by a mobile-application and 2 point out the curriculum topics that are covered during everyday classroom practices as defined by the teachers. The data is collected using an Experience Sampling Method with a gamified learning analytics instrument. Teachers’ classroom activities were used as the backbone for the thematic mapping of the craft curriculum. Preliminary measurements were carried out in a Finnish primary school in grades 5–6 (age 10–12, n = 125 during a four-week period in October-November 2016. The list of classroom activities was updated after the four weeks’ experiment and was tested in March-May 2017 with all the pupils of the pilot school (N = 353. The key findings were that a for pupils the self-assessment was easy as a technical process but there were several factors in the everyday classroom settings that made the process challenging and b it was relatively difficult for teachers to describe the classroom activities in terms of the new curriculum; however, after four weeks they could not only described the activities in more details but had also developed new activities that supported the ideas of the new curriculum better.Keywords: multi-material craft, learning environment, holistic craft process, experience sampling method

  1. Experiences of registered nurses who supervise international nursing students in the clinical and classroom setting: an integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Louise; Pront, Leeanne; Giles, Tracey M

    2016-06-01

    To examine the literature reporting the experiences and perceptions of registered nurses who supervise international nursing students in the clinical and classroom setting. Nursing education relies on clinical experts to supervise students during classroom and clinical education, and the quality of that supervision has a significant impact on student development and learning. Global migration and internationalisation of nursing education have led to increasing numbers of registered nurses supervising international nursing students. However, a paucity of relevant literature limits our understanding of these experiences. An integrative literature review. Comprehensive database searches of CINAHL, Informit, PubMed, Journals@Ovid, Findit@flinders and Medline were undertaken. Screening of 179 articles resulted in 10 included for review. Appraisal and analysis using Whittemore and Knafl's (Journal of Advanced Nursing, 52, 2005, 546) five stage integrative review recommendations was undertaken. This review highlighted some unique challenges for registered nurses supervising international nursing students. Identified issues were, a heightened sense of responsibility, additional pastoral care challenges, considerable time investments, communication challenges and cultural differences between teaching and learning styles. It is possible that these unique challenges could be minimised by implementing role preparation programmes specific to international nursing student supervision. Further research is needed to provide an in-depth exploration of current levels of preparation and support to make recommendations for future practice, education and policy development. An awareness of the specific cultural learning needs of international nursing students is an important first step to the provision of culturally competent supervision for this cohort of students. There is an urgent need for education and role preparation for all registered nurses supervising international nursing

  2. How policy on employee involvement in work reintegration can yield its opposite: employee experiences in a Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, Karin; Meershoek, Agnes; de Rijk, Angelique; Nijhuis, Frans

    2013-04-01

    Canada has a long tradition of involving employee representatives in developing work reintegration policies and expects this to positively affect employee involvement to improve work reintegration success. The purpose of this study was to examine employee involvement in reintegration in a Canadian province as experienced by employees. Fourteen semi-structured interviews were held with employees in a healthcare organization. The interview topic list was based on a review of local reintegration policy documents and literature. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using ethnographic methodology. Employees do not feel in control of their reintegration trajectory. In the phase of reporting sickness absence, they wrestle with a lack of understanding on how to report in sick. In the phase of reintegration planning and coordination, they hesitate to get involved in the organization of reintegration. In the phase of reintegration plan execution, employees encounter unfulfilled expectations on interventions. Employee involvement in the organization of reintegration makes them responsible for the development of reintegration trajectories. However, they consider themselves often incapable of completing this in practice. Moreover, employees experience that their contribution can boomerang on them. • It is not that employees are not able to think along or decide on their reintegration trajectory but rather they are expected to do so at times when they cannot oversee their illness and/or recovery trajectory. • Settings out reintegration procedures that are inflexible in practice do not recognize that employee involvement in work reintegration trajectories can develop over time. • The disability management professional has a central role in organizing and supporting employee involvement in work reintegration, however, the employees do not experience this is indeed happening.

  3. The analysis of mathematics teachers' learning on algebra function limit material based on teaching experience difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma'rufi, Budayasa, I. Ketut; Juniati, Dwi

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the analysis of mathematics teachers' learning on algebra function limit material based on teaching experience difference. The purpose of this study is to describe the analysis of mathematics teacher's learning on limit algebraic functions in terms of the differences of teaching experience. Learning analysis focused on Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) of teachers in mathematics on limit algebraic functions related to the knowledge of pedagogy. PCK of teachers on limit algebraic function is a type of specialized knowledge for teachers on how to teach limit algebraic function that can be understood by students. Subjects are two high school mathematics teacher who has difference of teaching experience they are one Novice Teacher (NP) and one Experienced Teacher (ET). Data are collected through observation of learning in the class, videos of learning, and then analyzed using qualitative analysis. Teacher's knowledge of Pedagogic defined as a knowledge and understanding of teacher about planning and organizing of learning, and application of learning strategy. The research results showed that the Knowledge of Pedagogy on subject NT in mathematics learning on the material of limit function algebra showed that the subject NT tended to describe procedurally, without explaining the reasons why such steps were used, asking questions which tended to be monotonous not be guiding and digging deeper, and less varied in the use of learning strategies while subject ET gave limited guidance and opportunities to the students to find their own answers, exploit the potential of students to answer questions, provide an opportunity for students to interact and work in groups, and subject ET tended to combine conceptual and procedural explanation.

  4. Keefektifan setting TPS dalam pendekatan discovery learning dan problem-based learning pada pembelajaran materi lingkaran SMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Hidayati

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the effectiveness of setting Think Pair Share (TPS in the approach to discovery learning and problem-based learning in terms of student achievement, mathematical communication skills, and interpersonal skills of the student.  This study was a quasi-experimental study using the pretest-posttest nonequivalent group design. The research population comprised all Year VIII students of SMP Negeri 1 Yogyakarta. The research sample was randomly selected from eight classes, two classes were elected. The instrument used in this study is the learning achievement test, a test of mathematical communication skills, and interpersonal skills student questionnaires. To test the effectiveness of setting Think Pair Share (TPS in the approach to discovery learning and problem-based learning, the one sample t-test was carried out. Then, to investigate the difference in effectiveness between the setting Think Pair Share (TPS in the approach to discovery learning and problem-based learning, the Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA was carried out. The research findings indicate that the setting TPS discovery approach to learning and problem-based approach to learning (PBL is effective in terms of learning achievement, mathematical communication skills, and interpersonal skills of the students. No difference in effectiveness between setting TPS discovery approach to learning and problem-based learning (PBL in terms of learning achievement, mathematical communication skills, and interpersonal skills of the students. Keywords: TPS setting in discovery learning approach, in problem-based learning, academic achievement, mathematical communication skills, and interpersonal skills of the student

  5. Deformation of volcanic materials by pore pressurization: analog experiments with simplified geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, David; Bursik, Marcus

    2018-03-01

    The pressurization of pore fluids plays a significant role in deforming volcanic materials; however, understanding of this process remains incomplete, especially scenarios accompanying phreatic eruptions. Analog experiments presented here use a simple geometry to study the mechanics of this type of deformation. Syrup was injected into the base of a sand medium, simulating the permeable flow of fluids through shallow volcanic systems. The experiments examined surface deformation over many source depths and pressures. Surface deformation was recorded using a Microsoft® Kinect™ sensor, generating high-spatiotemporal resolution lab-scale digital elevation models (DEMs). The behavior of the system is controlled by the ratio of pore pressure to lithostatic loading (λ =p/ρ g D). For λ 10, fluid expulsion from the layer was much faster, vertically fracturing to the surface with larger pressure ratios yielding less deformation. The temporal behavior of deformation followed a characteristic evolution that produced an approximately exponential increase in deformation with time until complete layer penetration. This process is distinguished from magmatic sources in continuous geodetic data by its rapidity and characteristic time evolution. The time evolution of the experiments compares well with tilt records from Mt. Ontake, Japan, in the lead-up to the deadly 2014 phreatic eruption. Improved understanding of this process may guide the evolution of magmatic intrusions such as dikes, cone sheets, and cryptodomes and contribute to caldera resurgence or deformation that destabilizes volcanic flanks.

  6. Analysis of materials from MSFC LDEF experiments. Final report, February 1990-July 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.B.

    1991-07-01

    In preparation for the arrival of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) samples, a material testing and handling approach was developed for the evaluation of the materials. A configured lab was made ready for the de-integration of the LDEF experiments. The lab was prepared to clean room specifications and arranged with the appropriate clean benches, tables, lab benches, clean room tools, particulate counter, and calibrated and characterized analytical instrumentation. Clean room procedures were followed. Clean room attire and shoe cleaning equipment were selected and installed for those entering. Upon arrival of the shipping crates they were taken to the lab, logged in, and opened for examination. The sample trays were then opened for inspection and test measurements. The control sample measurements were made prior to placement into handling and transport containers for the flight sample measurements and analysis. Both LDEF flight samples and LDEF type materials were analyzed and tested for future flight candidate material evaluation. Both existing and newly purchased equipment was used for the testing and evaluation. Existing Space Simulation Systems had to be upgraded to incorporate revised test objectives and approaches. Fixtures such as special configured sample holders, water, power and LN2 feed-throughs, temperature measurement and control, front surface mirrors for reflectance and deposition, and UV grade windows had to be designed, fabricated, and installed into systems to achieve the revised requirements. New equipment purchased for LDEF analysis was incorporated into and/or used with existing components and systems. A partial list of this equipment includes a portable monochromator, enhanced UV System, portable helium leak detector for porosity and leak measurements, new turbo pumping system, vacuum coaster assembly, cryopumps, and analytical and data acquisition equipment

  7. A set of triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance experiments for structural characterization of organophosphorus compounds in mixture samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskela, Harri, E-mail: Harri.T.Koskela@helsinki.fi [VERIFIN, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P triple-resonance NMR pulse experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of organophosphorus (OP) compounds in complex matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selective extraction of {sup 1}H, {sup 31}P, and {sup 13}C chemical shifts and connectivities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More precise NMR identification of OP nerve agents and their degradation products. - Abstract: The {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C correlation NMR spectroscopy utilizes J{sub CH} couplings in molecules, and provides important structural information from small organic molecules in the form of carbon chemical shifts and carbon-proton connectivities. The full potential of the {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C correlation NMR spectroscopy has not been realized in the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) related verification analyses due to the sample matrix, which usually contains a high amount of non-related compounds obscuring the correlations of the relevant compounds. Here, the results of the application of {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P triple-resonance NMR spectroscopy in characterization of OP compounds related to the CWC are presented. With a set of two-dimensional triple-resonance experiments the J{sub HP}, J{sub CH} and J{sub PC} couplings are utilized to map the connectivities of the atoms in OP compounds and to extract the carbon chemical shift information. With the use of the proposed pulse sequences the correlations from the OP compounds can be recorded without significant artifacts from the non-OP compound impurities in the sample. Further selectivity of the observed correlations is achieved with the application of phosphorus band-selective pulse in the pulse sequences to assist the analysis of multiple OP compounds in mixture samples. The use of the triple-resonance experiments in the analysis of a complex sample is shown with a test mixture containing typical scheduled OP compounds, including the characteristic degradation

  8. The Dynamics of Visual Art Dialogues: Experiences to Be Used in Hospital Settings with Visual Art Enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt-Maj Wikström

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Given that hospitals have environmental enrichment with paintings and visual art arrangement, it would be meaningful to develop and document how hospital art could be used by health professionals. Methods. The study was undertaken at an art site in Sweden. During 1-hour sessions, participants (=20 get together in an art gallery every second week five times. Results. According to the participants a new value was perceived. From qualitative analyses, three themes appear: raise association, mentally present, and door-opener. In addition 72% of the participants reported makes me happy and gives energy and inspiration, and 52% reported that dialogues increase inspiration, make you involved, and stimulate curiosity. Conclusion. The present study supported the view that visual art dialogue could be used by health care professionals in a structured manner and that meaningful art stimulation, related to a person’s experiences, could be of importance for the patients. Implementing art dialogues in hospital settings could be a fruitful working tool for nurses, a complementary manner of patient communication.

  9. The effect of drive frequency and set point amplitude on tapping forces in atomic force microscopy: simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legleiter, Justin

    2009-01-01

    In tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), a sharp probe tip attached to an oscillating cantilever is allowed to intermittently strike a surface. By raster scanning the probe while monitoring the oscillation amplitude of the cantilever via a feedback loop, topographical maps of surfaces with nanoscale resolution can be acquired. While numerous studies have employed numerical simulations to elucidate the time-resolved tapping force between the probe tip and surface, until recent technique developments, specific read-outs from such models could not be experimentally verified. In this study, we explore, via numerical simulation, the impact of imaging parameters, i.e. set point ratio and drive frequency as a function of resonance, on time-varying tip-sample force interactions, which are directly compared to reconstructed tapping forces from real AFM experiments. As the AFM model contains a feedback loop allowing for the simulation of the entire scanning process, we further explore the impact that various tip-sample force have on the entire imaging process.

  10. "Looking and Listening-In": A Methodological Approach to Generating Insights into Infants' Experiences of Early Childhood Education and Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumsion, Jennifer; Goodfellow, Joy

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe an observational approach, "looking and listening-in," that we have used to try to understand the experience of an infant in an Australian family day-care home. The article is drawn from a larger study of infants' experiences of early childhood education and care settings. In keeping with the mosaic…

  11. Elongational viscometry and bubble inflation experiments of two HDPE materials with different molecular structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Eggen, Svein; Malmberg, Anneli

    2002-01-01

    The most common materials used for manufacturing of bottles and containers for household and industrial packaging has been single reactor Chromium-catalyst HDPE materials. These materials etc.......The most common materials used for manufacturing of bottles and containers for household and industrial packaging has been single reactor Chromium-catalyst HDPE materials. These materials etc....

  12. Analysis of an out-of-pile experiment for materials redistribution under core disruptive accident condition of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuo; Ninokata, Hisashi; Shimizu, Akinao

    1995-01-01

    Calculation of one of the SIMBATH experiments was performed using the SIMMER-II code. The experiments were intended to simulate the fuel pin disintegration, the molten materials relocation and following materials redistribution that could occur during core disruptive accidents assumed in fast breeder reactors. The calculation by SIMMER-II showed that the incorporated step-wise fuel pin disintegration model and the modified particle jamming model were capable of reproducing the course of materials relocation within the identified ranges of the parameters which governed the blockages formation, i.e. the characteristic radius of solid particles jamming and/or sieving out in the flow and the effective particle viscosity. In particular the final materials redistribution calculated by SIMMER-II very well reproduced the experiment. This fact made it possible to interpret theoretically the mechanisms of flow blockages formation and related materials redistribution. (author)

  13. A Set of English Instructional Materials Using Task-Based Learning for News Production Management Study Program in STMM “MMMTC” Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geovanna Gistha Wicita

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The News Production Management Study Program (NPMSP in STMM “MMTC” Yogyakarta is a study program that has an English subject in the third semester. Due to the lack of time and materials for the students, English, which they will use a lot in journalism, becomes their barrier in learning. Therefore, this research attempted to develop a set of English instructional materials using task-based learning for the third semester students of the NPMSP STMM “MMTC” Yogyakarta. This research aimed to answer how the materials are developed and what the materials look like. To gather the information, the researcher adopted Borg & Gall’s (1986 Research and Development (R&D method which was combined with Kemp’s instructional design model (1977 covering eight flexible steps. Due to time and financial constraints, only five steps of R&D were conducted in designing the materials. To gather the information, the researcher conducted some interviews. After designing the materials, the interview was conducted. The interview results showed that the designed materials were good, appropriate, and applicable. Nine suggestions were obtained to revise the materials which covered the level of difficulty of the text, the content of the exercises, the overview of the learning materials, teaching media, lesson plans, instructions, layout, and material implementation. The materials consist of six units. Each unit contains five sessions, namely “What’s Up?”, “Entering the Newsroom”, “Journalists’ Project”, “Entering the News Editor Room”, and “Lesson Learned”.   DOI: https://doi.org/10.24071/llt.2015.180107

  14. Effects of crack front curvature on J–R curve testing using clamped SE(T) specimens of homogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yifan; Zhou, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analyses (FEA) of clamped single-edge tension (SE(T)) specimens are performed to investigate the impact of the crack front curvature on the elastic compliance, compliance rotation correction factor and average J-integral evaluated over the crack front. Specimens with six average crack lengths (i.e. a_a_v_e/W = 0.2–0.7) and three thickness-to-width ratios (i.e. B/W = 0.5, 1 and 2) are analyzed. The curved crack front is assumed to be bowed symmetrically and characterized by a power-law expression with a wide range of curvatures. Several crack front straightness requirements for SE(B) and C(T) specimens specified in BS7448, ISO and ASTM E1820 standards are reviewed. Based on results of the numerical investigation, new crack front straightness criteria for the SE(T) specimen are proposed in the context of the nine-point measurement by using as a criterion that the errors in the estimated compliance and average J values should be no more than five percent. The proposed criteria depend on both a_a_v_e/W and B/W, and are more advantageous than those specified in the BS, ISO and ASTM standards in terms of controlling the differences in J and compliance between the specimens with curved and straight crack fronts. - Highlights: • Investigate the impacts of crack front curvature on the compliance, rotation correction factor and J for SE(T) specimens. • Validate the applicabilities of crack front straightness criteria specified in the seven test standards on SE(T) specimens. • Recommend new crack front straightness criteria for the SE(T) specimen.

  15. Validation of the Instructional Materials Motivation Survey (IMMS) in a self-directed instructional setting aimed at working with technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loorbach, N.R.; Peters, O.; Karreman, Joyce; Steehouder, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    The ARCS Model of Motivational Design has been used myriad times to design motivational instructions that focus on attention, relevance, confidence and satisfaction in order to motivate students. The Instructional Materials Motivation Survey (IMMS) is a 36-item situational measure of people's

  16. Gamma-ray spectrometry of ultra low levels of radioactivity within the material screening program for the GERDA experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budjás, D; Gangapshev, A M; Gasparro, J; Hampel, W; Heisel, M; Heusser, G; Hult, M; Klimenko, A A; Kuzminov, V V; Laubenstein, M; Maneschg, W; Simgen, H; Smolnikov, A A; Tomei, C; Vasiliev, S I

    2009-05-01

    In present and future experiments in the field of rare events physics a background index of 10(-3) counts/(keV kg a) or better in the region of interest is envisaged. A thorough material screening is mandatory in order to achieve this goal. The results of a systematic study of radioactive trace impurities in selected materials using ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in the framework of the GERDA experiment are reported.

  17. Spectrum and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of pathogens causing urinary tract infection experience in a tertiary care setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjad, A.; Mirza, I.A.; Abbasi, S.A.; Farwa, U.; Sattar, A.; Qureshi, Z.A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the spectrum and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of pathogens causing urinary tract infection from the samples received at AFIP Rawalpindi. Place and duration of study. The study was carried out at Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology from January 2010 to June 2010. Material and Method: This was descriptive cross-sectional study. A total of 500 bacterial isolates out of 2050 urine culture samples, for a period of six month were included in the study. Indentification was carried out by standard biochemical profile of the organisms. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of isolated organisms were performed by disk diffusion method as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute. Results Out of the culture positive cases, gram-negative bacteria constituted the largest group with a total of 434 (87%) isolates, while gram-positive bacteria constituted only 44 (8.8%) isolates. E. coli was the most common isolate accounting for 63% of the total positive bacterial cultures followed by Klebsiella spp (9%) and P. aernginosa (7%). Susceptibility pattern of E. coli revealed that 96% of isolates were sensitive to imipenem, 91% to piperacillin-tazobactam and 87% to Nitrofurantoin. For Klebsiella spp, 86% of Isolates were susceptible to Imipenem and 71 % to piperacillin-tazobactam. As regards acinetobacter spp, 94% of Isolates were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and 70 % to Imipenem an piperacilline-sulbactam. Antibiogram of P. aeruginosa revealed that 94% of isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime and 86% to imipenem. Nitrofurantoin was the most effective urinary antibiotic in case of enterococcus spp as 85% of isolates were susceptible to this compound. Conclusion: From the present study we conclude that E. coli was the predominant urinary pathogen in our set up. The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of E. coli revealed that majority of isolates were susceptible to imipenem and piperacilline

  18. Conception and initial experiences with the information system for materials in need of control - ISUS; Konzeption und erste Erfahrungen mit dem Informations-System-Ueberwachungsbeduerftige Stoffe - ISUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narz, T.

    1997-12-31

    This article presents an information systems for the control of hazardous materials in enterprises. Experiences in the sectors occupational safety, hazardous materials, waste management are described. (SR)

  19. An Optimization Study on Listening Experiments to Improve the Comparability of Annoyance Ratings of Noise Samples from Different Experimental Sample Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Guoqing; Lu, Kuanguang; Shi, Xiaofan

    2018-03-08

    Annoyance ratings obtained from listening experiments are widely used in studies on health effect of environmental noise. In listening experiments, participants usually give the annoyance rating of each noise sample according to its relative annoyance degree among all samples in the experimental sample set if there are no reference sound samples, which leads to poor comparability between experimental results obtained from different experimental sample sets. To solve this problem, this study proposed to add several pink noise samples with certain loudness levels into experimental sample sets as reference sound samples. On this basis, the standard curve between logarithmic mean annoyance and loudness level of pink noise was used to calibrate the experimental results and the calibration procedures were described in detail. Furthermore, as a case study, six different types of noise sample sets were selected to conduct listening experiments using this method to examine the applicability of it. Results showed that the differences in the annoyance ratings of each identical noise sample from different experimental sample sets were markedly decreased after calibration. The determination coefficient ( R ²) of linear fitting functions between psychoacoustic annoyance (PA) and mean annoyance (MA) of noise samples from different experimental sample sets increased obviously after calibration. The case study indicated that the method above is applicable to calibrating annoyance ratings obtained from different types of noise sample sets. After calibration, the comparability of annoyance ratings of noise samples from different experimental sample sets can be distinctly improved.

  20. Materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Evaluating the parameters of reactor structure materials absorption by means of a new kind integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemer, B.; Dittse, K.; Fehrrann, K.; Khyuttet', G.; Kumpf, G.; Lemann, E.

    1984-01-01

    Integral experiment of a new type is conducted for determination of the effective cross sections of structural material absorption in fast reactors. Its essence is that absorption cross sections are determined directly from the measured central coefficients of reactivities in the special fast inserting lattice SEG-4 with energy-independent neutron importance function. Parameters of the system, method of measurements, advantages of the method as compared with Ksub(infinity)=I method are described. The results of measurements for Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Mo and W are presented. Problems of mass dependence of the sample are discussed. Conclusion on universality of the suggested method is made on the basis of comparing the obtained results with data of calculations conducted by using different libraries of nuclear data

  2. Physics-Based Simulation and Experiment on Blast Protection of Infill Walls and Sandwich Composites Using New Generation of Nano Particle Reinforced Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshidat, Mohammad

    A critical issue for the development of nanotechnology is our ability to understand, model, and simulate the behavior of small structures and to make the connection between nano structure properties and their macroscopic functions. Material modeling and simulation helps to understand the process, to set the objectives that could guide laboratory efforts, and to control material structures, properties, and processes at physical implementation. These capabilities are vital to engineering design at the component and systems level. In this research, experimental-computational-analytical program was employed to investigate the performance of the new generation of polymeric nano-composite materials, like nano-particle reinforced elastomeric materials (NPREM), for the protection of masonry structures against blast loads. New design tools for using these kinds of materials to protect Infill Walls (e.g. masonry walls) against blast loading were established. These tools were also extended to cover other type of panels like sandwich composites. This investigation revealed that polymeric nano composite materials are strain rate sensitive and have large amount of voids distributed randomly inside the materials. Results from blast experiments showed increase in ultimate flexural resistance achieved by both unreinforced and nano reinforced polyurea retrofit systems applied to infill masonry walls. It was also observed that a thin elastomeric coating on the interior face of the walls could be effective at minimizing the fragmentation resulting from blast. More conclusions are provided with recommended future research.

  3. Atmosphere surface storm track response to resolved ocean mesoscale in two sets of global climate model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, R. Justin; Msadek, Rym; Kwon, Young-Oh; Booth, James F.; Zarzycki, Colin

    2018-05-01

    It has been hypothesized that the ocean mesoscale (particularly ocean fronts) can affect the strength and location of the overlying extratropical atmospheric storm track. In this paper, we examine whether resolving ocean fronts in global climate models indeed leads to significant improvement in the simulated storm track, defined using low level meridional wind. Two main sets of experiments are used: (i) global climate model Community Earth System Model version 1 with non-eddy-resolving standard resolution or with ocean eddy-resolving resolution, and (ii) the same but with the GFDL Climate Model version 2. In case (i), it is found that higher ocean resolution leads to a reduction of a very warm sea surface temperature (SST) bias at the east coasts of the U.S. and Japan seen in standard resolution models. This in turn leads to a reduction of storm track strength near the coastlines, by up to 20%, and a better location of the storm track maxima, over the western boundary currents as observed. In case (ii), the change in absolute SST bias in these regions is less notable, and there are modest (10% or less) increases in surface storm track, and smaller changes in the free troposphere. In contrast, in the southern Indian Ocean, case (ii) shows most sensitivity to ocean resolution, and this coincides with a larger change in mean SST as ocean resolution is changed. Where the ocean resolution does make a difference, it consistently brings the storm track closer in appearance to that seen in ERA-Interim Reanalysis data. Overall, for the range of ocean model resolutions used here (1° versus 0.1°) we find that the differences in SST gradient have a small effect on the storm track strength whilst changes in absolute SST between experiments can have a larger effect. The latter affects the land-sea contrast, air-sea stability, surface latent heat flux, and the boundary layer baroclinicity in such a way as to reduce storm track activity adjacent to the western boundary in the N

  4. DEM Simulation of Biaxial Compression Experiments of Inherently Anisotropic Granular Materials and the Boundary Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Xia Tong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of discrete element method (DEM numerical simulations is significantly dependent on the particle-scale parameters and boundary conditions. To verify the DEM models, two series of biaxial compression tests on ellipse-shaped steel rods are used. The comparisons on the stress-strain relationship, strength, and deformation pattern of experiments and simulations indicate that the DEM models are able to capture the key macro- and micromechanical behavior of inherently anisotropic granular materials with high fidelity. By using the validated DEM models, the boundary effects on the macrodeformation, strain localization, and nonuniformity of stress distribution inside the specimens are investigated using two rigid boundaries and one flexible boundary. The results demonstrate that the boundary condition plays a significant role on the stress-strain relationship and strength of granular materials with inherent fabric anisotropy if the stresses are calculated by the force applied on the wall. However, the responses of the particle assembly measured inside the specimens are almost the same with little influence from the boundary conditions. The peak friction angle obtained from the compression tests with flexible boundary represents the real friction angle of particle assembly. Due to the weak lateral constraints, the degree of stress nonuniformity under flexible boundary is higher than that under rigid boundary.

  5. Material handling systems for use in glovebox lines: A survey of Department of Energy facility experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teese, G.D.; Randall, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Complex Reconfiguration Study has recommended that a new manufacturing facility be constructed to replace the Rocky Flats Plant. In the new facility, use of an automated material handling system for movement of components would reduce both the cost and radiation exposure associated with production and maintenance operations. Contamination control would be improved between process steps through the use of airlocks and portals. Part damage associated with improper transport would be reduced, and accountability would be increased. In-process workpieces could be stored in a secure vault, awaiting a request for parts at a production station. However, all of these desirable features rely on the proper implementation of an automated material handling system. The Department of Energy Weapons Production Complex has experience with a variety of methods for transporting discrete parts in glovebox lines. The authors visited several sites to evaluate the existing technologies for their suitability for the application of plutonium manufacturing. Technologies reviewed were Linear motors, belt conveyors, roller conveyors, accumulating roller conveyors, pneumatic transport, and cart systems. The sites visited were The Idaho National Engineering laboratory, the Hanford Site, and the Rocky Flats Plant. Linear motors appear to be the most promising technology observed for the movement of discrete parts, and further investigation is recommended

  6. Experience of quality control for material accountancy analysis in Pu fuel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Mika; Satoh, Mitsuhiro; Ohnishi, Sumitaka; Suzuki, Toru

    2003-01-01

    Destructive analysis for material accountancy purpose should maintain higher precision referring the International Target Value (ITV). Quality control for the analysis is effective tool to maintain the analytical precision in routine analysis as well as to improve its performance. Since isotope dilution mass spectrometry for the determination of Plutonium and Uranium content and its isotopic composition has launched in the laboratory of Plutonium Fuel Center (PFC) of JNC, comprehensive quality control system has gradually growing up, which currently consists of bias detecting, random error monitoring and human error preventing system. Preventing analysis bias is the most important to maintain long-term performance of measurement. To make bias detecting capability robust, PFC is participating to several intercomparison programs regarding DA samples. Random error monitoring system is another important system to maintain high performance of each routine analysis operation, which composes functions to detect abnormal dispersion of each result and to confirm the state of health of operation of mass spectrometers by measurement of standard materials. To avoid human error during operation process, introduction of computer control system as much extent as possible is practical approach. In this paper, the comprehensive quality control system is introduced and the experiences gained so far are summarized for discussion. (author)

  7. Application of nanostructural materials in electro optical measuring sets of big powers based on usage of optical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihov, Aidar I.; Tljavlin, Anfar Z.; Kusimov, Salavat M.

    2005-06-01

    Optically transparent nanostructural materials show to themselves a heightened interest owing to display in them the new physic mechanical properties. Variation of structure of the materials received by methods of intensive plastic deformation, results in variation of many fundamental parameters. Among them special interest was caused with variations of fundamental magnetic characteristics. One of them is the magnetization of saturation, which is usually structurally tolerant, but reflects changes in an atomic-crystal structure of solids. Even in the first probing of the transparent nanostructures, received by intensive deformation by torsion of samples, was found that the magnetization of saturation was revealed at room temperature in comparison with coarse-grained samples. High-power measuring devices are based on Faraday effect, representing itself rotation of a plane of polarization of linearly polarized light in optical active substances under action of a magnetic field. Application of nanostructural materials in the optical insulator, which is the main part of the measuring device, allows improving the measuring characteristics of instruments qualitatively. Brought losses in Faraday cell make 0,35 -0,89 dB instead of 0,7 - I,2 dB, and value of the backward losses makes not less than 62 dB instead of 55 dB. Undoubtedly, improvement of the given parameters allows making the measuring operations with the greater accuracy, reducing both absolute, and relative errors.

  8. Pre-conceptual design activities for the materials plasma exposure experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumsdaine, Arnold; Rapp, Juergen; Varma, Venugopal; Bjorholm, Thomas; Bradley, Craig; Caughman, John; Duckworth, Robert; Goulding, Richard; Graves, Van; Giuliano, Dominic; Lessard, Timothy; McGinnis, Dean; Meitner, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The development of long-pulse nuclear fusion devices requires testing plasma facing components at reactor relevant conditions. • The pre-conceptual design of a proposed linear plasma facility is presented. • Engineering considerations for multiple systems—plasma source and heating, magnet, vacuum, water cooling, and target, are presented. - Abstract: The development of next step fusion facilities such as DEMO or a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) requires first closing technology gaps in some critical areas. Understanding the material-plasma interface is necessary to enable the development of divertors for long-pulse plasma facilities. A pre-conceptual design for a proposed steady-state linear plasma device, the Materials Plasma Exposure Experiment (MPEX), is underway. A helicon plasma source along with ion cyclotron and electron Bernstein wave heating systems will produce ITER divertor relevant plasma conditions with steady-state parallel heat fluxes of up to 40 MW/m"2 with ion fluxes up to 10"2"4/m"2 s on target. Current plans are for the device to use superconducting magnets to produce 1–2 T fields. As a steady-state device, active cooling will be required for components that interact with the plasma (targets, limiters, etc.), as well as for other plasma facing components (transport regions, vacuum tanks, diagnostic ports). Design concepts for the vacuum system, the cooling system, and the plasma heating systems have been completed. The device will include the capability for handling samples that have been neutron irradiated in order to consider the multivariate effects of neutrons, plasma, and high heat-flux on the microstructure of divertor candidate materials. A vacuum cask, which can be disconnected from the high field environment in order to perform in-vacuo diagnosis of the surface evolution is also planned for the facility.

  9. Pre-conceptual design activities for the materials plasma exposure experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, Arnold, E-mail: lumsdainea@ornl.gov; Rapp, Juergen; Varma, Venugopal; Bjorholm, Thomas; Bradley, Craig; Caughman, John; Duckworth, Robert; Goulding, Richard; Graves, Van; Giuliano, Dominic; Lessard, Timothy; McGinnis, Dean; Meitner, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The development of long-pulse nuclear fusion devices requires testing plasma facing components at reactor relevant conditions. • The pre-conceptual design of a proposed linear plasma facility is presented. • Engineering considerations for multiple systems—plasma source and heating, magnet, vacuum, water cooling, and target, are presented. - Abstract: The development of next step fusion facilities such as DEMO or a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) requires first closing technology gaps in some critical areas. Understanding the material-plasma interface is necessary to enable the development of divertors for long-pulse plasma facilities. A pre-conceptual design for a proposed steady-state linear plasma device, the Materials Plasma Exposure Experiment (MPEX), is underway. A helicon plasma source along with ion cyclotron and electron Bernstein wave heating systems will produce ITER divertor relevant plasma conditions with steady-state parallel heat fluxes of up to 40 MW/m{sup 2} with ion fluxes up to 10{sup 24}/m{sup 2} s on target. Current plans are for the device to use superconducting magnets to produce 1–2 T fields. As a steady-state device, active cooling will be required for components that interact with the plasma (targets, limiters, etc.), as well as for other plasma facing components (transport regions, vacuum tanks, diagnostic ports). Design concepts for the vacuum system, the cooling system, and the plasma heating systems have been completed. The device will include the capability for handling samples that have been neutron irradiated in order to consider the multivariate effects of neutrons, plasma, and high heat-flux on the microstructure of divertor candidate materials. A vacuum cask, which can be disconnected from the high field environment in order to perform in-vacuo diagnosis of the surface evolution is also planned for the facility.

  10. Post procedural complications of cardiac implants done in a resource limited setting under 'C' arm: A single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandra, A; Aggarwal, Vivek; Kumar, Sandeep; Nagesh, I V

    2018-04-01

    Cardiology interventions in peripheral hospitals is a challenging task where cardiologist have to fight against time and limited resources. Most of the sudden cardiac deaths occur due to arrhythmia and heart blocks/sinus node dysfunction. Our study is a single peripheral center experience of cardiac devices implantation using a 'C' Arm. The aim of this study was to post procedural complications of cardiac implants done in aresource limited setting under 'C' arm. This study is done at a peripheral cardiology center with no cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL) facilities. Consecutive patients reporting to cardiology center, between Jan 2015 and Oct 2016, with a definite indication for cardiac device implant were included in the study. All the procedure of implantation was done in the operation theatre under 'C' arm under local anesthesia with continuous cardiac monitoring and critical care back up. Total 58 device implantations were done from Jan 2015 to Oct 2016. The mean age of the patients was 67.15 ± 10.85 years. Males constituted almost two third (68.9%) of patients. The commonest indication for device implantation was sinus node dysfunction in 60.34% followed by complete heart block in 25.86% and ventricular tachycardia in 12.06%. No post procedure infection was observed in our study. Device implantation constitute a major group of life saving interventions in cardiology practice. Our study has emphasised that when appropriate aseptic measures are taken during device implantation at peripheral centres, the complications rate are comparable to interventions done at advance cardiac centres.

  11. Breaking bad news in clinical setting - health professionals' experience and perceived competence in Southwestern Nigeria: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Philip Babatunde; Abayomi, Olukayode; Johnson, Peter O; Oloyede, Taofeeq; Oyelekan, Abimbola A A

    2013-01-01

    Communication skills are vital in clinical settings because the manner in which bad news is delivered could be a huge determinant of responses to such news; as well as compliance with beneficial treatment option. Information on training, institutional guidelines and protocols for breaking bad news (BBN) is scarce in Nigeria. We assessed the training, experience and perceived competence of BBN among medical personnel in southwestern Nigeria. The study was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted out among doctors and nurses in two healthcare institutions in southwestern Nigeria using an anonymous questionnaire (adapted from the survey by Horwitz et al.), which focused on the respondents training, awareness of protocols in BBN; and perceived competence (using a Five-Point Likert Scale) in five clinical scenarios. We equally asked the respondents about an instance of BBN they have recently witnessed. A total of 113 of 130 selected (response rate 86.9%) respondents were studied. Eight (7.1%) of the respondents knew of the guidelines on BBN in the hospital in which they work. Twenty-three (20.3%) respondents claimed knowledge of a protocol. The median perceived competence rating was 4 out of 5 in all the clinical scenarios. Twenty-five (22.1%) respondents have had a formal training in BBN and they generally had significant higher perceived competence rating (P = 0.003-0.021). There is poor support from fellow workers during instances of BBN. It appears that the large proportion of the respondents in this study were unconsciously incompetent in BBN in view of the low level of training and little or no knowledge of well known protocols for BBN even though self-rated competence is high. Continuous medical education in communication skills among health personnel in Nigeria is advocated.

  12. SU-F-P-33: Combining Research and Professional Practice in the Clinical Setting: A Medical Physicist Personal Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Tarjuelo, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To initiate a discussion on the current and evolving role of Medical Physicists based on author’s professional and research experience in patient safety and quality control. Methods: Several professionals of the departments of Medical Physics and Radiation Oncology, chiefly devoted to clinical tasks, began a research program on patient safety and quality control in a framework provided by the implementation of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). We performed studies on virtual simulation for IORT, in vivo dosimetry, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), statistical process control (SPC), and receiver operating characteristics of dosimetric equipment. This was done with the support of our research foundation and different grants while continuing with our departmental clinical routine involving about 1600 annual treatments with two linacs and different brachytherapy techniques. Results: We published 5 papers in international journals in the last two years. This author conducted a doctoral research which resulted in a dissertation in 2015. The extra time spent after treatments was essential to succeed. Funding and support achieved via our foundation played a crucial role; but this would have not been possible without punctual external mentoring and partnership. FMEA conclusions were able to be implemented only with staff commitment; however, conclusions concerning equipment cannot be easily communicated to manufacturers. These tasks required extra training in the appropriated methods. Conclusion: Research needed the support of a dedicated foundation, which would have been very difficult to obtain with the sole participation of our departments. FMEA and SPC results may need engagement of staff and manufacturers, respectively, hard to achieve without strong recommendations or even a regulatory framework. All these fields need evolution of Medical Physicists’ roles and additional training. Devotion to both clinical tasks and research could be unfeasible

  13. Losing connections and receiving support to reconnect: experiences of frail older people within care programmes implemented in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindels, Jill; Cox, Karen; De La Haye, Jean; Mevissen, Ger; Heijing, Servé; van Schayck, Onno C P; Widdershoven, Guy; Abma, Tineke A

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether care provided in the care programmes matched the needs of older people. Care programmes were implemented in primary-care settings in the Netherlands to identify frail older people and to prevent further deterioration of health. In total, 23 older people participated in in-depth interviews. Within this study, three older people participated as co-researchers; they gathered and analysed the data together with the academic researchers. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. Two categories emerged from the data: 'Losing connections' and 'Receiving support to reconnect.' 'Losing connections' reflects the needs of older people and 'Receiving support to reconnect' reflects their experience and the appreciated aspects of the provided care. A relationship of trust with the practice nurse (PN) appeared to be an important aspect of care, as it fostered the sharing of feelings and issues other than physical or medical problems that could not be shared with the general practitioner. The PNs are experienced as connectors, who help to restore feelings of connectedness and older peoples' access to resources in the community. The relationship with the PN was experienced as valuable because of the feelings of 'connectedness' it created. Through this connectedness, older people could discuss feelings of loneliness, depression and frustration in receiving and acquiring the appropriate resources and services with the PNs. Furthermore, the relationship with the PN helped the older people to gain access to other health professionals and services. The results imply that care for frail older people should include an awareness of the importance of the trusting relationship. Nurses can play a vital role in creating a trusting relationship and are able to bridge the gap between older people and other professionals and services. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Assessing the rebound effect using a natural experiment setting: Evidence from the private transportation sector in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steren, Aviv; Rubin, Ofir D.; Rosenzweig, Stav

    2016-01-01

    Subsidizing energy-efficient technologies is considered by energy and environmental organizations to be one of the most effective policies for decreasing energy consumption. In the transportation sector such policies are becoming ever more popular, and have been implemented in a considerable number of countries in recent years. Because these policies promote energy-efficient cars with lower usage costs, they may rebound and increase the distances traveled by households that have switched to energy-efficient cars. From an econometric perspective, a subsidization policy can be used as a valid instrument to identify the households’ choice of energy efficiency levels of the cars they own. This identification, in turn, can be utilized to account for endogeneity in the estimation of a rebound effect. The present study uses a natural experiment setting of such a policy implemented in Israel in 2009. The empirical results indicate a fairly large average rebound effect of 40%. The results also indicate that while the policy indeed encouraged the purchase of energy-efficient cars, households that bought a new or used car during the surveyed period did not generate a rebound effect of a different magnitude compared with other households that did not. We discuss the implications of our findings. - Highlights: •Subsidizing energy-efficient cars has become a popular policy in many countries. •We are unaware of studies identifying rebound via cars’ subsidization policy. •We explored a rebound in light of such a policy in Israel. •Household expenditure survey data, fuel prices and car characteristics were employed. •We found an average rebound effect of 40%.

  15. SU-F-P-33: Combining Research and Professional Practice in the Clinical Setting: A Medical Physicist Personal Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Tarjuelo, J [Consorcio Hospitalario Provincial de Castello, Castello de la Plana (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To initiate a discussion on the current and evolving role of Medical Physicists based on author’s professional and research experience in patient safety and quality control. Methods: Several professionals of the departments of Medical Physics and Radiation Oncology, chiefly devoted to clinical tasks, began a research program on patient safety and quality control in a framework provided by the implementation of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). We performed studies on virtual simulation for IORT, in vivo dosimetry, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), statistical process control (SPC), and receiver operating characteristics of dosimetric equipment. This was done with the support of our research foundation and different grants while continuing with our departmental clinical routine involving about 1600 annual treatments with two linacs and different brachytherapy techniques. Results: We published 5 papers in international journals in the last two years. This author conducted a doctoral research which resulted in a dissertation in 2015. The extra time spent after treatments was essential to succeed. Funding and support achieved via our foundation played a crucial role; but this would have not been possible without punctual external mentoring and partnership. FMEA conclusions were able to be implemented only with staff commitment; however, conclusions concerning equipment cannot be easily communicated to manufacturers. These tasks required extra training in the appropriated methods. Conclusion: Research needed the support of a dedicated foundation, which would have been very difficult to obtain with the sole participation of our departments. FMEA and SPC results may need engagement of staff and manufacturers, respectively, hard to achieve without strong recommendations or even a regulatory framework. All these fields need evolution of Medical Physicists’ roles and additional training. Devotion to both clinical tasks and research could be unfeasible

  16. The patient experience of patient-centered communication with nurses in the hospital setting: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Stephanie; Jordan, Zoe

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review is to synthesize the eligible evidence of patients' experience of engaging and interacting with nurses, in the medical-surgical ward setting.This review will consider the following questions: Communication is a way in which humans make sense of the world around them. Communication takes place as an interactive two-way process or interaction, involving two or more people and can occur by nonverbal, verbal, face-to-face or non-face-to-face methods. Effective communication is described to occur when the sender of a message sends their message in a way that conveys the intent of their message and then is understood by the receiver of the message. As a result of the communication from both the sender and the receiver of the message a shared meaning is created between both parties.Communication can therefore be viewed as a reciprocal process. In the health care literature the terms communication and interaction are used interchangeably.Communication failures between clinicians are the most common primary cause of errors and adverse events in health care. Communication is a significant factor in patient satisfaction and complaints about care. Communication plays an integral role in service quality in all service professions including health care professions.Within healthcare, quality care has been defined by the Institute of Medicine as 'care that is safe, effective, timely, efficient, equitable and patient-centred'. Patient-centered care is defined as 'care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs and values, and ensuring that patient's values guide all clinical decisions. Patient centered-care encompasses the 'individual experiences of a patient, the clinical service, the organizational and the regulatory levels of health care'. At the individual patient level, patient-centered care is care that is 'provided in a respectful manner, assures open and ongoing sharing of useful information in an

  17. Pulling an intruder from a granular material: a novel depinning experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional impact experiments by Clark et al. [2] identified the source of inertial drag to be caused by ‘collisions’ with a latent force network, leading to large fluctuations of the force experienced by the impactor. These collisions provided the major drag on an impacting intruder until the intruder was nearly at rest. As a complement, we consider controlled pull-out experiments where a buried intruder is pulled out of a material, starting from rest. This provides a means to better understand the non-inertial part of the drag force, and to explore the mechanisms associated with the force fluctuations. To some extent, the pull out process is a time reversed version of the impact process. In order to visualize this pulling process, we use 2D photoelastic disks from which circular intruders of different radii are pulled out. We present results about the dynamics of the intruder and the structures of the force chains inside the granular system as captured by slow and high speed imaging.

  18. Methodological developments and materials in salt-rock preparation for irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.; Van Wees, H.; Miralles, L.

    1991-01-01

    For the first time synthetic salt-rock samples have been produced. Production and preparation of those samples and of other types of rock-salt for experiments and observation require many special handlings. We applied technical knowledge already developed by the HPT Laboratory of the Geology Department of the Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (high pressure techniques, salt-rock preparation), and by the workshops of the ECN, Petten, and FDO, Amsterdam (mechanical precision). Procedures have been applied and/or modified to solve specific problems. Many of them were never reported before. Moreover, new techniques have been developed. Rock-salt samples have been machined, sawn, ground, glued, etc., with a maximum of precision, a minimum of damage and in dry conditions (without water). Etching, peeling and thin section production has been carried out on irradiated and unirradiated samples. Valves, end pieces, jackets, etc. have been tested and/or produced. These handlings were directed to produce samples for the HAW experiment. Their development required not only knowledge, but also a lot of trial, failures and time. To avoid repetition of this effort, the procedures, materials, instruments and their characteristics are described in detail in this report

  19. Robotic Materials Handling in Space: Mechanical Design of the Robot Operated Materials Processing System HitchHiker Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voellmer, George

    1997-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Robot Operated Materials Processing System (ROMPS) that flew aboard STS-64 in September, 1994. The ROMPS robot transported pallets containing wafers of different materials from their storage racks to a furnace for thermal processing. A system of tapered guides and compliant springs was designed to deal with the potential misalignments. The robot and all the sample pallets were locked down for launch and landing. The design of the passive lockdown system, and the interplay between it and the alignment system are presented.

  20. The quasi-harmonic ultrasonic polar scan for material characterization: experiment and numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersemans, Mathias; Martens, Arvid; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Degrieck, Joris; Pyl, Lincy; Zastavnik, Filip; Sol, Hugo; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2015-04-01

    Conventionally, the ultrasonic polar scan (UPS) records the amplitude or time-of-flight in transmission using short ultrasonic pulses for a wide range of incidence angles, resulting in a fingerprint of the critical bulk wave angles of the material at the insonified spot. Here, we investigate the use of quasi-harmonic ultrasound (bursts) in a polar scan experiment, both experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the nature of the fingerprint drastically changes, and reveals the positions of the leaky Lamb angles. To compare with experiments, both plane wave and bounded beam simulations have been performed based on the recursive stiffness matrix method. Whereas the plane wave computations yield a pure Lamb wave angle fingerprint, this is no longer valid for the more realistic case of a bounded beam. The experimental recordings are fully supported by the bounded beam simulations. To complement the traditional amplitude measurement, experimental and numerical investigations have been performed to record, predict and analyze the phase of the transmitted ultrasonic beam. This results in the conceptual introduction of the 'phase polar scan', exposing even more intriguing and detailed patterns. In fact, the combination of the amplitude and the phase polar scan provides the complete knowledge about the complex transmission coefficient for every possible angle of incidence. This comprehensive information will be very valuable for inverse modeling of the local elasticity tensor based on a single UPS experiment. Finally, the UPS method has been applied for the detection of an artificial delamination. Compared to the pulsed UPS, the quasi-harmonic UPS (both the amplitude and phase recording) shows a superior sensitivity to the presence of a delamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Material Surface Characteristics and Plasma Performance in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Matthew James

    The performance of a tokamak plasma and the characteristics of the surrounding plasma facing component (PFC) material surfaces strongly influence each other. Despite this relationship, tokamak plasma physics has historically been studied more thoroughly than PFC surface physics. The disparity is particularly evident in lithium PFC research: decades of experiments have examined the effect of lithium PFCs on plasma performance, but the understanding of the lithium surface itself is much less complete. This latter information is critical to identifying the mechanisms by which lithium PFCs affect plasma performance. This research focused on such plasma-surface interactions in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX), a spherical torus designed to accommodate solid or liquid lithium as the primary PFC. Surface analysis was accomplished via the novel Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) diagnostic system. In a series of experiments on LTX, the MAPP x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) capabilities were used for in vacuo interrogation of PFC samples. This represented the first application of XPS and TDS for in situ surface analysis of tokamak PFCs. Surface analysis indicated that the thin (dLi ˜ 100nm) evaporative lithium PFC coatings in LTX were converted to Li2O due to oxidizing agents in both the residual vacuum and the PFC substrate. Conversion was rapid and nearly independent of PFC temperature, forming a majority Li2O surface within minutes and an entirely Li2O surface within hours. However, Li2O PFCs were still capable of retaining hydrogen and sequestering impurities until the Li2 O was further oxidized to LiOH, a process that took weeks. For hydrogen retention, Li2O PFCs retained H+ from LTX plasma discharges, but no LiH formation was observed. Instead, results implied that H+ was only weakly-bound, such that it almost completely outgassed as H 2 within minutes. For impurity sequestration, LTX plasma performance

  2. Field experiments on the use of phase changing materials, insulation materials and passive solar radiation in the built environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Entrop, Alexis Gerardus; Brouwers, Jos; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; McCarthy, J.; Foliente, G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an experimental research facility to assess the effectiveness of Phase Change Materials (PCM), that can be used for passive solar heating. Four test boxes are constructed representing the conventional and future Dutch building practices regarding insulation

  3. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  4. Skylab experiments. Volume 3: Materials science. [Skylab experiments on metallurgy, crystal growth, semiconductors, and combustion physics in weightless environment for high school level education

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The materials science and technology investigation conducted on the Skylab vehicle are discussed. The thirteen experiments that support these investigations have been planned to evaluate the effect of a weightless environment on melting and resolidification of a variety of metals and semiconductor crystals, and on combustion of solid flammable materials. A glossary of terms which define the space activities and a bibliography of related data are presented.

  5. Study of the structure and development of the set of reference materials of composition and structure of heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Chabina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of research: There are two sizes (several microns and nanodimensional of strengthening j'-phase in single-crystal heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys, used for making blades of modern gas turbine engines (GTD. For in-depth study of structural and phase condition of such alloys not only qualitative description of created structure is necessary, but quantitative analysis of alloy components geometrical characteristics. Purpose of the work: Development of reference material sets of heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloy composition and structure. Research methods: To address the measurement problem of control of structural and geometrical characteristics of single-crystal heat resisting and intermetallic alloys by analytical microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis the research was carried out using certified measurement techniques on facilities, entered in the Register of Measurement Means of the Russian Federation. The research was carried out on microsections, foils and plates, cut in the plane {100}. Results: It is established that key parameters, defining the properties of these alloys are particle size of strengthening j' -phase, the layer thickness of j-phase between them and parameters of phases lattice. Metrological requirements for reference materials of composition and structure of heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys are formulated. The necessary and sufficient reference material set providing the possibility to determine the composition and structure parameters of single-crystal heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys is defined. The developed RM sets are certified as in-plant reference materials. Conclusion: The reference materials can be used for graduation of spectral equipment when conducting element analysis of specified class alloys; for calibration of means of measuring alloy structure parameters; for measurement of alloys phases lattice parameters; for structure reference pictures

  6. A Pilot Examination of the Methods Used to Counteract Insider Threat Security Risks Associated with the Use of Radioactive Materials in the Research and Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsenov, B G; Emery, R J; Whitehead, L W; Gonzalez, J Reingle; Gemeinhardt, G L

    2018-03-01

    While many organizations maintain multiple layers of security control methodologies to prevent outsiders from gaining unauthorized access, persons such as employees or contractors who have been granted legitimate access can represent an "insider threat" risk. Interestingly, some of the most notable radiological events involving the purposeful contamination or exposure of individuals appear to have been perpetrated by insiders. In the academic and medical settings, radiation safety professionals focus their security efforts on (1) ensuring controls are in place to prevent unauthorized access or removal of sources, and (2) increasing security controls for the unescorted accessing of large sources of radioactivity (known as "quantities of concern"). But these controls may not completely address the threat insiders represent when radioactive materials below these quantities are present. The goal of this research project was to characterize the methodologies currently employed to counteract the insider security threat for the misuse or purposeful divergence of radioactive materials used in the academic and medical settings. A web-based survey was used to assess how practicing radiation safety professionals in academic and medical settings anticipate, evaluate, and control insider threat security risks within their institutions. While all respondents indicated that radioactive sources are being used in amounts below quantities of concern, only 6 % consider insider threat security issues as part of the protocol review for the use of general radioactive materials. The results of this survey identify several opportunities for improvement for institutions to address security gaps.

  7. Integral activation experiment of fusion reactor materials with d-Li neutrons up to 55 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Moellendorff, Ulrich von [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Wada, Masayuki [Business Automation Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    An integral activation experiment of fusion reactor materials with a deuteron-lithium neutron source was performed. Since the maximum energy of neutrons produced was 55 MeV, the experiment with associated analysis was one of the first attempts for extending the energy range beyond 20 MeV. The following keywords represent the present study: d-Li neutrons, 55 MeV, dosimetry, SAND-II, spectrum adjustment, LA-150, MCNP, McDeLi, IFMIF, fusion reactor materials, integral activation experiment, low-activation, F82H, vanadium-alloy, IEAF, ALARA, and sequential charged particle reaction. (author)

  8. Exposure to space radiation of high-performance infrared multilayer filters and materials technology experiments (A0056)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, J. S.; Hunneman, R.; Whatley, A.; Lipscombe, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Infrared multilayer interface filter which were used in satellite radiometers were examined. The ability of the filters to withstand the space environment in these applications is critical. An experiment on the LDEF subjects the filters to authoritative spectral measurements following space exposure to ascertain their suitability for spacecraft use and to permit an understanding of degradation mechanisms. The understanding of the effects of prolonged space exposure on spacecraft materials, surface finishes, and adhesive systems is important to the spacecraft designer. Materials technology experiments and experiment on infrared multilayer filters are discussed.

  9. The development of the first set of Brazilian reference materials for the petroleum sector; O desenvolvimento dos primeiros materiais de referencia nacionais para o setor de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucchini, Ricardo R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Agrupamento de Materiais de Referencia

    2004-07-01

    The petroleum sector uses a number of standardized tests to characterize raw materials and products. The development of in-company programs for assurance of measurement quality, the increasing need to demonstrate proficiency by means of certification schemes or by widely accepted metrological practices, have been promoting a more intensive use of certified reference materials, in calibration as well as in validation of measurement methods and also in order to show the qualification of the laboratories. In this paper it is presented the preparation, performed by IPT's Reference Materials Group, of the first set of reference materials specially developed considering the needs of the petroleum community. Briefly, are presented the identification of the demands from the users, selection of matrices, homogeneity tests and stability studies, and the certification of the new reference materials, which are four diesel fuel oils with certified sulfur contents and one material with flash point certified by TAG and Pensky-Martens methods. It is presented a summary of the certification process, performed by means of a combined effort of several professionals that are now working at laboratories of research institutions, refineries and other industries, universities, fuel monitoring facilities and in National Petroleum Agency. (author)

  10. Recycling of Pre-Washed Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator Fly Ash in the Manufacturing of Low Temperature Setting Geopolymer Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, three samples of municipal solid waste incinerators fly ash (MSWI-FA have been stabilized in systems containing coal fly ash to create geopolymers through a polycondensation reaction. Monolithic products have been obtained with both MSWI fly ash as received and after the partial removal of chloride and sulfate by water washing. The polycondensation products have been characterized qualitatively by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and quantitatively, through the determination of the volume of reacted water and silicate. Furthermore, the heavy metals and chloride releases together with the physico-mechanical properties have been evaluated on the hardened products. In conclusion, considering the technological and environmental performances of the obtained geopolymers, they could be suitable for many non-structural applications, such as backfilling of abandoned quarries, decorative materials or brick fireplaces, hearths, patios, etc.

  11. Recycling of Pre-Washed Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator Fly Ash in the Manufacturing of Low Temperature Setting Geopolymer Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Messina, Francesco; Santoro, Luciano; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-08-12

    In this work, three samples of municipal solid waste incinerators fly ash (MSWI-FA) have been stabilized in systems containing coal fly ash to create geopolymers through a polycondensation reaction. Monolithic products have been obtained with both MSWI fly ash as received and after the partial removal of chloride and sulfate by water washing. The polycondensation products have been characterized qualitatively by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and quantitatively, through the determination of the volume of reacted water and silicate. Furthermore, the heavy metals and chloride releases together with the physico-mechanical properties have been evaluated on the hardened products. In conclusion, considering the technological and environmental performances of the obtained geopolymers, they could be suitable for many non-structural applications, such as backfilling of abandoned quarries, decorative materials or brick fireplaces, hearths, patios, etc.

  12. Does the number of choice sets matter? Results from a web survey applying a discrete choice experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Mickael; Kjær, Trine; Lauridsen, Jørgen Trankjær

    2011-01-01

    choice sets presented to each respondent on response rate, self-reported choice certainty, perceived choice difficulty, willingness-to-pay (WTP) estimates, and response variance. A sample of 1053 respondents was exposed to 5, 9 or 17 choice sets in a DCE eliciting preferences for dental services. Our...... results showed no differences in response rates and no systematic differences in the respondents' self-reported perception of the uncertainty of their DCE answers. There were some differences in WTP estimates suggesting that estimated preferences are to some extent context-dependent, but no differences...... in standard deviations for WTP estimates or goodness-of-fit statistics. Respondents exposed to 17 choice sets had somewhat higher response variance compared to those exposed to 5 choice sets, indicating that cognitive burden may increase with the number of choice sets beyond a certain threshold. Overall, our...

  13. OECD MCCI project enhancing instrumentation for reactor materials experiments, Rev. 0 September 3, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomperski, S.; Basu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Reactor safety experiments for studying the reactions of a molten core (corium) with water and/or concrete involve materials at extremely high temperature. Such high temperature severely restricts the types of sensors that can be employed to measure characteristics of the corium itself. Yet there is great interest in improving instrumentation so that the state of the melt can be established with more precision. In particular, it would be beneficial to increase both the upper range limit and accuracy of temperature measurements. The poor durability of thermocouples at high temperature is also an important issue. For experiments involving a water-quenched melt, direct measurements of the growth rate of the crust separating the melt and water would be of great interest. This is a key element in determining the nature of heat transfer between the melt and coolant. Despite its importance, no one has been able to directly measure the crust thickness during such tests. This paper considers three specialized sensors that could be introduced to enhance melt characterization: (1) A commercially fabricated, single point infrared temperature measurement with the footprint of a thermowell. A lens assembly and fiber optic cable linked to a receiver and amplifier measures the temperature at the base of a tungsten thermowell. The upper range limit is 3000 C and accuracy is ±0.25% of the reading. (2) In-house development of an ultrasonic temperature sensor that would provide multipoint measurements at temperatures up to ∼3000 C. The sensors are constructed from tungsten rods and have a high temperature durability that is superior to that of thermocouples. (3) In-house development of an ultrasonic probe to measure the growth rate of the corium crust. This ultrasonic sensor would include a tungsten waveguide that transmits ultrasonic pulses up through the corium melt towards the crust and detects reflections from the melt/crust interface. A measurement of the echo time delay would

  14. European experiences of the proposed ASTM test method for crack arrest toughness of ferritic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jutla, T.; Lidbury, D.P.G.; Ziebs, J.; Zimmermann, C.

    1986-01-01

    The proposed ASTM test method for measuring the crack arrest toughness of ferritic materials using wedge-loaded, side-grooved, compact specimens was applied to three steels: A514 bridge steel, A588 bridge steel, and A533B pressure vessel steel. Five sets of results from different laboratories are discussed here. Notches were prepared by spark erosion, although root radii varied from ∝0.1-1.5 mm. Although fast fractures were successfully initiated, arrest did not occur in a significant number of cases. The results showed no obvious dependence of crack arrest toughness, K a , (determined by a static analysis) on crack initiation toughness, K 0 . It was found that K a decreases markedly with increasing crack jump distance. A limited amount of further work on smaller specimens of the A533B steel showed that lower K a values tended to be recorded. It is concluded that a number of points relating to the proposed test method and notch preparation are worthy of further consideration. It is pointed out that the proposed validity criteria may screen out lower bound data. Nevertheless, for present practical purposes, K a values may be regarded as useful in providing an estimate of arrest toughness - although not necessarily a conservative estimate. (orig./HP)

  15. Use of blog as a supplementary study material resource in dentistry: An Indian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thavarajah Rooban

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Social networking sites (SNS are emerging as an alternate teaching resource. The reach and access characteristics of SNS for a noninstitutional, academic blog in an Indian setting has not been documented and this manuscript aim to address this lacunae. Materials and Methods: A blog for oral histology, an integral basic dental subject and its Facebook promotional page was created. The access characteristics were observed using Google analytics. The Facebook promotional pages of the blog access characteristics are presented. Results: A total of 582 people visited the blog during the study period. Majority of them used Google Chrome from desktop/laptop to access the blog. There were 2723 page visits in all. Visitors from 36 countries and 99 cities across the globe accessed the blog. In all through Facebook, the promotional page reached 36,543 people. The total number of people engaged through Facebook promotion page was 10,757. Conclusion: Access characteristics of the noninstitutional, academic blog have been described for the first time in dentistry. The lessons learnt through this exercise would be helpful in designing e-mentoring courses as well promotional pages of such events in the future. The necessity of making the mentors and students to adapt to e-learning and digital learning resources before drawing such programs is highlighted.

  16. The Determination of the Optimal Material Proportion in Natural Fiber-Cement Composites Using Design of Mixture Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Aramphongphun Chuckaphun; Ungtawondee Kampanart; Chaysuwan Duangrudee

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to determine the optimal material proportion in a natural fiber-cement composite as an alternative to an asbestos fibercement composite while the materials cost is minimized and the properties still comply with Thai Industrial Standard (TIS) for applications of profile sheet roof tiles. Two experimental sets were studied in this research. First, a three-component mixture of (i) virgin natural fiber, (ii) synthetic fiber and (iii) cement was studied while the proportion of c...

  17. Modelling the effects of phase change materials on the energy use in buildings. Results of Experiments and System Dynamics Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prins, J.

    2012-02-15

    The current era is in need for more and more sustainable energy solutions. Phase Change Materials (PCM's) are a solution for a more sustainable build environment because they can help to reduce the energy use of buildings during heating and cooling of the indoor air. This paper presents the results of recent experiments that have been executed with test boxes. In addition a System Dynamics model has been developed to find out how PCM's can be used efficiently without testing in reality. The first experiment, in which PCM's were applied in a concrete floor, shows a reduction of peak temperatures with 4C {+-} 0.7C on maximum temperatures and over 1.5C {+-} 0.7C on minimum temperatures during warm periods. The model confirmed these findings, although the predicted reductions were slightly. During the second experiment more PCM's were applied by mounting them into the walls using gypsum plasterboard to increase the latent heat capacity. Remarkably, both the experimental set-up as the model showed that the increase of PCM's (of almost 98%) causes hardly any difference compared to the first situation. Adapting the exterior in a way to absorb more solar energy, increases the average indoor temperature but decreases the reduction of peak temperatures. Again the model confirmed these findings of the experiment. These results show that the effect of PCM's varies on different climatological contexts and with different construction components physics. This means no straight forward advice on the use of PCM's for a building design can be given. The solution for this problem is provided by the model, showing that the effects of PCM's can be modelled in order to use PCM's in an effective way in different climatological contexts and with different characteristics of construction components. The research shows that a simple model is already capable of predicting PCM performance in test boxes with reasonable accuracy. Therefore it can be

  18. Materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available . It is generally included as part of a structurally insulated panel (SIP) where the foam is sandwiched between external skins of steel, wood or cement. Cement composites Cement bonded composites are an important class of building materials. These products... for their stone buildings, including the Egyptians, Aztecs and Inca’s. As stone is a very dense material it requires intensive heating to become warm. Rocks were generally stacked dry but mud, and later cement, can be used as a mortar to hold the rocks...

  19. Thermochemolysis and the Search for Organic Material on Mars Onboard the MOMA Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisson, Marietta; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Glavin, Daniel; Freissinet, Carolinette; Pinnick, Veronica; Goetz, Walter; Stambouli, Moncef; Belmahdi, Imene; Coll, Patrice; Stalport, Fabien; Grand, Noël; Brinckerhoff, William; Goesmann, Fred; Raulin, François; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Following the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard the Curiosity rover, the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment onboard the future ExoMars 2018 mission will continue to investigate the organic composition of the martian subsurface. MOMA will have the advantage of extracting the sample from as deep as 2 meters below the martian surface where the deleterious effects of radiation and oxidation on organic matter are minimized. To analyse the wide range of organic compounds (volatile and non-volatile compounds) potentially present in the martian soil, MOMA includes two operational modes: UV laser desorption / ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (LDI-ITMS) and pyrolysis gas chromatography ion trap mass spectrometry (pyr-GC-ITMS). In order to analyse refractory organic compounds and chirality, samples which undergo GC-ITMS analysis may be derivatized beforhands, consisting in the reaction of the sample components with specific chemical reagents (MTBSTFA [1], DMF-DMA [2] or TMAH [3]). To prove the feasibility of the derivatization within the MOMA conditions we have adapated our laboratory procedure for the space conditions (temperature, time, pressure and size). Goal is optimize our detection limits and increase the range of the organic compounds that MOMA will be able to detect. Results of this study, show that Thermochemolysis is one of the most promising technique onboard MOMA to detect organic material. References : [1] Buch, A. et al. (2009) J Chrom. A, 43, 143-151. [2] Freissinet, C. et al. (2013) J Chrom. A, 1306, 731-740. [3] Geffroy-Rodier, C. et al. (2009) JAAP, 85, 454-459.

  20. (Q)SAR tools for priority setting: A case study with printed paper and board food contact material substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bossuyt, Melissa; Van Hoeck, Els; Raitano, Giuseppa; Manganelli, Serena; Braeken, Els; Ates, Gamze; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Van Miert, Sabine; Benfenati, Emilio; Mertens, Birgit; Rogiers, Vera

    2017-04-01

    Over the last years, more stringent safety requirements for an increasing number of chemicals across many regulatory fields (e.g. industrial chemicals, pharmaceuticals, food, cosmetics, …) have triggered the need for an efficient screening strategy to prioritize the substances of highest concern. In this context, alternative methods such as in silico (i.e. computational) techniques gain more and more importance. In the current study, a new prioritization strategy for identifying potentially mutagenic substances was developed based on the combination of multiple (quantitative) structure-activity relationship ((Q)SAR) tools. Non-evaluated substances used in printed paper and board food contact materials (FCM) were selected for a case study. By applying our strategy, 106 out of the 1723 substances were assigned 'high priority' as they were predicted mutagenic by 4 different (Q)SAR models. Information provided within the models allowed to identify 53 substances for which Ames mutagenicity prediction already has in vitro Ames test results. For further prioritization, additional support could be obtained by applying local i.e. specific models, as demonstrated here for aromatic azo compounds, typically found in printed paper and board FCM. The strategy developed here can easily be applied to other groups of chemicals facing the same need for priority ranking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Eliciting preferences for priority setting in genetic testing: a pilot study comparing best-worst scaling and discrete-choice experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Severin, Franziska; Schmidtke, Jörg; Mühlbacher, Axel; Rogowski, Wolf H

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing number of genetic tests available, decisions have to be made on how to allocate limited health-care resources to them. Different criteria have been proposed to guide priority setting. However, their relative importance is unclear. Discrete-choice experiments (DCEs) and best-worst scaling experiments (BWSs) are methods used to identify and weight various criteria that influence orders of priority. This study tests whether these preference eliciting techniques can be used f...

  2. ACTIVITY OF HEALTH EDUCATION AIMED AT PREVENTING WORK ACCIDENTS WITH NEEDLESTICK MATERIALS: EXPERIENCE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Vangeris Silva Fernandes de Lima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health services are composed of complex work environments. For this reason, they present several risks to the health of workers and also of people being treated at these places. Among these risks, one that is peculiar to health services is the risk of occupational accidents with biological material involving sharps. Objective: This study aimed to describe a health education activity conducted in a Health Center of the Federal District, Brazil. Methods: This is an experience report that discusses the final paper of the discipline “Administration Applied to Nursing and Internship”, offered by the Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Brasilia. A lecture was prepared, aimed at health workers and support staff, on general aspects of occupational accidents involving sharps, as well as preventive aspects. Results: In each clinical room of the Health Center were fixed two posters: the first discussing the proper disposal of sharps and the second, in turn, was a message of reflection. 31 professionals attended the lecture as listeners. Conclusion: We understand the validity of the lecture delivered, based on scientific studies that highlight the need and shortage of health education activities that address the prevention of occupational accidents involving sharps among Health Professionals. Additionally, it is important mentioning that such activity demand was estimated by the workers of the Health Center in study.

  3. Design and conception of an experiment setup for X-Ray absorption spectroscopy on radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabane, A.

    1997-01-01

    In the field of the nuclear cycle waste management, the law of december 30, 1991(article 4) gives the frame of the research programs to be conducted. This should lead to o political decision concerning the end of the nuclear fuel cycle. To date, efforts are coordinated by three research groups: PRACTIS, GEDEON and FORPRO. This work, dealing with the development of a radioactive cell for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy measurements (XAS) is part of PRACTIS goals. It devises into two parts that deal with the conception of the experiment setup (Chapter I) and with the first test that been carried out with X-ray Absorption measurements on radioactive materials (Chapter II), respectively. An introduction on the nuclear fuel cycle and the use of synchrotron radiation for XAS is also given. More precisely, in the first part of this work, we deal with the difficulties that are related to the development of such devises for radioactive samples on a synchrotron beam line. Two constrains have to be taken into account: the technical aspect and the safety aspect. In the second part, we consider the use of grabbing additional structural information on the actinide complexes, both in liquid and solid phases (as amorphous phases for instance). These data on the local order (EXAFS), as well as on the electronic information that can be obtained (XANES) are to be completed with results of the other probing techniques. (author)

  4. Phase Change Materials-Assisted Heat Flux Reduction: Experiment and Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein J. Akeiber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials (PCM in the construction industry became attractive because of several interesting attributes, such as thermo-physical parameters, open air atmospheric condition usage, cost and the duty structure requirement. Thermal performance optimization of PCMs in terms of proficient storage of a large amount of heat or cold in a finite volume remains a challenging task. Implementation of PCMs in buildings to achieve thermal comfort for a specific climatic condition in Iraq is our main focus. From this standpoint, the present paper reports the experimental and numerical results on the lowering of heat flux inside a residential building using PCM, which is composed of oil (40% and wax (60%. This PCM (paraffin, being plentiful and cost-effective, is extracted locally from waste petroleum products in Iraq. Experiments are performed with two rooms of identical internal dimensions in the presence and absence of PCM. A two-dimensional numerical transient heat transfer model is developed and solved using the finite difference method. A relatively simple geometry is chosen to initially verify the numerical solution procedure by incorporating in the computer program two-dimensional elliptic flows. It is demonstrated that the heat flux inside the room containing PCM is remarkably lower than the one devoid of PCM.

  5. Provision and Dissemination of Easy-To-Read Materials: An experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Amini

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available -Patient education is one of the most important factors for the provision of patients and their families' rights at health centers. Some of the benefits of patient education include: Increasing the level of health literacy, developing self-care skills in chronic diseases, increasing knowledge about conditions, improving the quality of care and helping the patient to achieve more self-sufficiency and reducing health care costs. Medical Librarians can help health professionals and nurses to promote community health by identifying useful information as well as writing them in plain language. This paper reports an experience about creating a nongovernmental center for the provision and dissemination of easy-to-read materials. It is hoped that launching and supporting such centers, in addition to promoting community health, will guarantee the patients' rights to access high quality and authentic health educational resources. This can also provide a field for the participation of various health groups and the activities of graduates of the above fields.

  6. Instructor Experiences with a Social Networking Site in a Higher Education Setting: Expectations, Frustrations, Appropriation, and Compartmentalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veletsianos, George; Kimmons, Royce; French, Karen D.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners have suggested that the use of social networking sites in formal education may be a worthwhile endeavor. Toward this goal, emerging learning platforms have included social networking features. Nevertheless, empirical literature examining user experiences, and more specifically instructor experiences, with these tools…

  7. Students' Experiences of Attending an Innovative Occupational Therapy Professional Practice Placement in a Childcare Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mong-lin; Brown, Ted; Etherington, Jamie

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated occupational therapy students' experiences of their alternative fieldwork placement at one childcare center where there was no established occupational therapy service. A semi-structured focus group interview explored four students' placement experiences. The interview was audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and content…

  8. Change Management Model for Implementing an Effective First-Year Experience Program in the Community College Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joy C.

    2015-01-01

    This study provides evidence that systematic management of change can facilitate the implementation of first-year experience programming that leads to improved results in retention and student success for community college students. The study includes four major themes: (a) first-year experience, (b) change management, (c) change leadership, and…

  9. Permeable Barrier Materials for Strontium Immobilization: - UFA Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity. - Column Sorption Experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moody, T

    1996-01-01

    Selected materials were tested to emulate a permeable barrier and to examine the: (1) capture efficiency of these materials relating to the immobilization of strontium-90 and hexavalent chromium in Hanford groundwater...

  10. Traffic model for commercial payloads in the Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA). [market research in commercial space processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietzel, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    One hundred individuals representing universities, technical institutes, government agencies, and industrial facilities were surveyed to determine potential commercial use of a self-contained, automated assembly for the space processing of materials during frequent shuttle flights for the 1981 to 1987 period. The approach used and the results of the study are summarized. A time time-phased projection (traffic model) of commercial usage of the materials experiment assembly is provided.

  11. Smoke/Sulfates, Clouds and Radiation Experiment in Brazil (SCAR-B) Data Set Version 5.5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SCAR_B_G8_FIRE data are Smoke/Sulfates, Clouds and Radiation Experiment in Brazil, GOES-8 ABBA Diurnal Fire Product (1995 Fire Season) data.Smoke/Sulfates, Clouds...

  12. How do Millennial Engineering and Technology Students Experience Learning Through Traditional Teaching Methods Employed in the University Setting?

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to document and analyze how Millennial engineering and technology students experience learning in large lecture classrooms. To help achieve this purpose, perceptions Millennials have toward traditional teaching methods employed in large lecture classes were analyzed and discussed. Additionally, this study documented how Millennials experienced technology within large lecture classrooms. A learning model depicting how Millennials experience learning within the larg...

  13. Online communication in a rehabilitation setting: Experiences of patients with chronic conditions using a web portal in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdan, Jose; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Berg, Sarah Warny

    2017-12-01

    To gain insight into the experiences of patients with long-term conditions enrolled in an online rehabilitation programme using a web portal. Danish outpatients were recruited from a rehabilitation department and were granted access to a web portal which included an online rehabilitation programme with key information, clinical advice, and self-management activities. After two weeks, patients were invited to participate in focus groups. A topic guide was used to explore this new online rehabilitation programme in relation to participants' experiences. Fourteen participants, ranging from 42 to 72 years old, were allocated into three focus groups. Participants mainly reported negative experiences by the following four themes: 'patients' experiences', 'technical aspects', 'areas for improvement', and 'digitalization added value'. Participants mainly reported negative experiences and suggested combining both face-to-face consultations with online care by user-friendly web portals. This will ensure a positive contribution from digital communication tools to rehabilitation. Patients' experiences should be considered in the design of web portals in rehabilitation which could help healthcare organizations when developing online rehabilitation programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Investing in organisational culture: nursing students' experience of organisational learning culture in aged care settings following a program of cultural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grealish, Laurie; Henderson, Amanda

    2016-10-01

    Concerns around organisational learning culture limit nursing student placements in aged care settings to first year experiences. Determine the impact of an extended staff capacity building program on students' experiences of the organisational learning culture in the aged care setting. Pre and post-test design. A convenience sample of first, second and third year Bachelor of Nursing students attending placements at three residential aged care facilities completed the Clinical Learning Organisational Culture Survey. Responses between the group that attended placement before the program (n = 17/44; RR 38%) and the group that attended following the program (n = 33/72; RR 45%) were compared. Improvements were noted in the areas of recognition, accomplishment, and influence, with decreases in dissatisfaction. Organisational investment in building staff capacity can produce a positive learning culture. The aged care sector offers a rich learning experience for students when staff capacity to support learning is developed.

  15. Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes - Romanian experience: Master - Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, S.; Valeca, M.

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the Master Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan are: 1. To deliver higher education and training in the following specific domains, such as: Powders Technology and Ceramic Materials, Techniques of Structural Analysis, Composite Materials, Semiconductor Materials and Components, Metals and Metallic Alloys, Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Nuclear Materials, The Engineering of Special Nuclear Materials, 2. To train managers of the Nuclear Waste Products and Nuclear Safety, 3. To qualify in ICT Systems for Nuclear Process Guidance, 4. To qualify in Environmental Protection System at the Level of Nuclear Power Stations, 5. To train managers for Quality Assurance of Nuclear Energetic Processes, 6. To deliver higher education and training regarding the International Treatises, Conventions and Settlements in force in the field of nuclear related activities. (author)

  16. Cryogenic Considerations for Superconducting Magnet Design for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Demko, Dr. Jonathan A [LeTourneau University, Texas; Lumsdaine, Arnold [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; McGinnis, William Dean [ORNL; Bjorholm, Thomas P [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine long term performance of plasma facing components such as diverters and first walls for fusion devices, next generation plasma generators are needed. A Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) has been proposed to address this need through the generation of plasmas in front of the target with electron temperatures of 1-15 eV and electron densities of 1020 to 1021 m-3. Heat fluxes on target diverters could reach 20 MW/m2. In order generate this plasma, a unique radio frequency helicon source and heating of electrons and ions through Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) has been proposed. MPEX requires a series of magnets with non-uniform central fields up to 2 T over a 5m length in the heating and transport region and 1 T uniform central field over a 1-m length on a diameter of 1.3 m. Given the field requirements, superconducting magnets are under consideration for MPEX. In order to determine the best construction method for the magnets, the cryogenic refrigeration has been analyzed with respect to cooldown and operational performance criteria for open-cycle and closed-cycle systems, capital and operating costs of these system, and maturity of supporting technology such as cryocoolers. These systems will be compared within the context of commercially available magnet constructions to determine the most economical method for MPEX operation. The current state of the MPEX magnet design including details on possible superconducting magnet configurations will be presented.

  17. Losing connections and receiving support to reconnect: experiences of frail older people within care programmes implemented in primary care settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, J.; Cox, K.; De La Haye, J.; Mevissen, G.; Heijing, S.; van Schayck, O.C.P.; Widdershoven, G.; Abma, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate whether care provided in the care programmes matched the needs of older people. Background: Care programmes were implemented in primary-care settings in the Netherlands to identify frail older people and to prevent further

  18. Online communication in a rehabilitation setting: Experiences of patients with chronic conditions using a web portal in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerdan de Las Heras, Jose Manuel; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Warny, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    mainly reported negative experiences and suggested combining both face-to-face consultations with online care by user-friendly web portals. This will ensure a positive contribution from digital communication tools to rehabilitation. Practice implications Patients’ experiences should be considered......Abstract Objective To gain insight into the experiences of patients with long-term conditions enrolled in an online rehabilitation programme using a web portal. Methods Danish outpatients were recruited from a rehabilitation department and were granted access to a web portal which included...... in the design of web portals in rehabilitation which could help healthcare organizations when developing online rehabilitation programmes. Keywords CommunicationWeb portalPatient's experienceseHealthRehabilitation...

  19. Online communication in a rehabilitation setting: Experiences of patients with chronic conditions using a web portal in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerdan de Las Heras, Jose Manuel; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Warny, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    an online rehabilitation programme with key information, clinical advice, and self-management activities. After two weeks, patients were invited to participate in focus groups. A topic guide was used to explore this new online rehabilitation programme in relation to participants’ experiences. Results...... Fourteen participants, ranging from 42 to 72 years old, were allocated into three focus groups. Participants mainly reported negative experiences by the following four themes: ‘patients’ experiences’, ‘technical aspects’, ‘areas for improvement’, and ‘digitalization added value’. Conclusion Participants...

  20. Training experience to improve and reinforce associated aspects to the control room operators' behaviour in the simulator setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago Lucas Soriano, A.

    2002-01-01

    The experience, explained below, is based on the latest works carried out in TECNATOM, to improve the behaviour of the control room personnel, by an effective involvement of the operators in their own improvement, in which they create their own expectations and the instructors are only guides and advisors in a working place very close to the reality, that is, the simulator. The experience mainly deals with aspects such as: Teamwork, effective communications, use of procedures, self-checking, decision making, diagnose, motivation and other aspects that are present in the control room. (author)

  1. Research reactors for power reactor fuel and materials testing - Studsvik's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1998-01-01

    Presently Studsvik's R2 test reactor is used for BWR and PWR fuel irradiations at constant power and under transient power conditions. Furthermore tests are performed with defective LWR fuel rods. Tests are also performed on different types of LWR cladding materials and structural materials including post-irradiation testing of materials irradiated at different temperatures and, in some cases, in different water chemistries and on fusion reactor materials. In the past, tests have also been performed on HTGR fuel and FBR fuel and materials under appropriate coolant, temperature and pressure conditions. Fuel tests under development include extremely fast power ramps simulating some reactivity initiated accidents and stored energy (enthalpy) measurements. Materials tests under development include different types of in-pile tests including tests in the INCA (In-Core Autoclave) facility .The present and future demands on the test reactor fuel in all these cases are discussed. (author)

  2. Glycaemic control of diabetic patients in an urban primary health care setting in Sarawak: the Tanah Puteh Health Centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J S; Rahimah, N

    2004-08-01

    Achieving glycaemic goals in diabetics has always been a problem, especially in a developing country with inadequate facilities such as in Sarawak in Malaysia. There are no reported studies on the control of diabetes mellitus in a diabetic clinic in the primary health care setting in Sarawak. This paper describes the profile of 1031 patients treated in Klinik Kesihatan Tanah Puteh Health Centre. The mean age was 59 years, the mean BMI 27 kg/m2. There was a female preponderance and mainly type-2 diabetes. Mean HbA1c was 7.4%. Glycaemic control was optimal in 28% (HbA1c 7.5%). Reasonable glycaemic control can be achieved in the primary health care setting in Sarawak.

  3. Some techniques and results from high-pressure shock-wave experiments utilizing the radiation from shocked transparent materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQueen, R.G.; Fritz, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    It has been known for many years that some transparent materials emit radiation when shocked to high pressures. This property was used to determine the temperature of shocked fused and crystal quartz, which in turn allowed the thermal expansion of SiO 2 at high pressure and also the specific heat to be calculated. Once the radiative energy as a function of pressure is known for one material it is shown how this can be used to determine the temperature of other transparent materials. By the nature of the experiments very accurate shock velocities can be measured and hence high quality equation of state data obtained. Some techniques and results are presented on measuring sound velocities from symmetrical impact of nontransparent materials using radiation emitting transparent analyzers, and on nonsymmetrical impact experiments on transparent materials. Because of special requirements in the later experiments, techniques were developed that lead to very high-precision shock-wave data. Preliminary results, using these techniques are presented for making estimates of the melting region and the yield strength of some metals under strong shock conditions

  4. Sol-Gel Synthesis of a Biotemplated Inorganic Photocatalyst: A Simple Experiment for Introducing Undergraduate Students to Materials Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Yue, Yuanzheng; He, Wen

    2012-01-01

    As part of a laboratory course, undergraduate students were asked to use baker's yeast cells as biotemplate in preparing TiO[subscript 2] powders and to test the photocatalytic activity of the resulting materials. This laboratory experience, selected because of the important environmental implications of soft chemistry and photocatalysis, provides…

  5. Inspection of the coupling part material degradation. Some experiences and results from SKODA JS related to internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this presentation some experiences and results from SKODA JS, related to internals, are reported. Sketches of the construction of WWER 440 RPV and internal's materials, including chemical composition are given. The results of hardness tests on internal parts are reported as well as some changes in the construction of internal parts which were made to improve their crack and fracture properties

  6. Political strategies in difficult times - The "backstage" experience of Swedish politicians on formal priority setting in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garpenby, Peter; Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    This paper contributes to the knowledge on the governing of healthcare in a democratic context in times of austerity. Resource allocation in healthcare is a highly political issue but the political nature of healthcare is not always made clear and the role of politicians is often obscure. The absence of politicians in rationing/disinvestment arrangements is usually explained with blame-shifting arguments; they prefer to delegate "the burden of responsibility" to administrative agencies or professionals. Drawing on a case where Swedish regional politicians involved themselves in setting priorities at a more detailed level than previously, the findings suggest that the subject of "blame avoidance" is more complicated than usually assumed. A qualitative case study was designed, involving semi-structured interviews with 14 regionally elected politicians in one Swedish health authority, conducted in June 2011. The interviews were analysed through a thematic analysis in accordance with the "framework approach" by Ritchie and Lewis. Findings show that an overarching strategy among the politicians was to appear united and to suppress conflict, which served to underpin the vital strategy of bringing the medical profession into the process. A key finding is the importance that politicians, when appearing "backstage", attach to the prevention of blame from the medical profession. This case illustrates that one has to take into account that priority settings requires various types of skills and knowledges - not only technical but also political and social. Another important lesson points toward the need to broaden the political leadership repertoire, as leadership in the case of priority setting is not about politicians being all in or all out. The results suggest that in a priority-setting process it is of importance to have politics on-board at an early stage to secure loyalty to the process, although not necessarily being involved in all details. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  7. Determination of material parameters by comparison of 3D simulations and 3D experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jin

    microstructure and the measured microstructure in a global manner. The proposed method is demonstrated on a simple case to fit two material parameters: the liquid diffusion coefficient and the capillary length of a hypoeutectic Al-Cu alloy, and a complicated case to fit hundreds of material parameters......: the reduced grain boundary mobilities of pure iron. Results show that the proposed method is capable of providing reliable measurements of material parameters that are difficult to measure in traditional ways and can determine many - possibly all relevant - values of material parameters simultaneously...

  8. Challenging Thoughts, Changing Minds: Preservice Teachers' Reflections on Their Experience Working in an Alternative School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Brooke; Moore, Brandon; Dexter Torti, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to use critical reflective journaling practices to explore the experiences of preservice teachers working in a juvenile justice education program called the Reach Academy. Using a qualitative case study design, the researchers explored how 48 preservice teachers utilized critical reflective journaling to examine their own…

  9. Illness experiences of diabetes in the context of malaria in settings experiencing double burden of disease in southeastern Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metta, Emmy; Bailey, Ajay; Kessy, Flora; Geubbels, Eveline; Haisma, Hinke

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tanzania is doubly burdened with both non-communicable and infectious diseases, but information on how Tanzanians experience the co-existence of these conditions is limited. Using Kleinman's eight prompting questions the study synthesizes explanatory models from patients to describe

  10. Nanoparticle Synthesis, Characterization, and Ecotoxicity: A Research-Based Set of Laboratory Experiments for a General Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaris, Zoe N.; Freitas, Daniel N.; Mac, Karen; Gerner, Kyle T.; Nameth, Catherine; Wheeler, Korin E.

    2017-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were developed to introduce first-year chemistry students to nanoscience through a green chemistry approach. Students made and characterized the stability of silver nanoparticles using two different methods: UV-visible spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. They then assessed the ecotoxicity of silver…

  11. Feasibility of Pb phytoextraction using nano-materials assisted ryegrass: Results of a one-year field-scale experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shu-Xuan; Jin, Yu; Liu, Wei; Li, Xiliang; Shen, Shi-Gang; Ding, Ling

    2017-04-01

    The effect of the combined application of nano-hydroxyapatite (NHAP) or nano-carbon black (NCB) on the phytoextraction of Pb by ryegrass was investigated as an enhanced remediation technique for soils by field-scale experiment. After the addition of 0.2% NHAP or NCB to the soil, temporal variation of the uptake of Pb in aboveground parts and roots were observed. Ryegrass shoot concentrations of Pb were lower with nano-materials application than without nano-materials for the first month. However, the shoot concentrations of Pb were significantly increased with nano-materials application, in particular NHAP groups. The ryegrass root concentrations of Pb were lower with nano-materials application for the first month. These results indicated that nano-materials had significant effects on stabilization of lead, especially at the beginning of the experiment. Along with the experimental proceeding, phytotoxicity was alleviated after the incorporation of nano-materials. The ryegrass biomass was significantly higher with nano-materials application. Consequently, the Pb phytoextraction potential of ryegrass significantly increased with nano-materials application compared to the gounps without nano-materials application. The total removal rates of soil Pb were higher after combined application of NHAP than NCB. NHAP is more suitable than NCB for in-situ remediation of Pb-contaminated soils. The ryegrass translocation factor exhibited a marked increase with time. It was thought that the major role of NHP and NBA might be to alleviate the Pb phytotoxicity and increase biomass of plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The RaDIATE High-Energy Proton Materials Irradiation Experiment at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, Kavin; et al.

    2017-05-01

    The RaDIATE collaboration (Radiation Damage In Accelerator Target Environments) was founded in 2012 to bring together the high-energy accelerator target and nuclear materials communities to address the challenging issue of radiation damage effects in beam-intercepting materials. Success of current and future high intensity accelerator target facilities requires a fundamental understanding of these effects including measurement of materials property data. Toward this goal, the RaDIATE collaboration organized and carried out a materials irradiation run at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer facility (BLIP). The experiment utilized a 181 MeV proton beam to irradiate several capsules, each containing many candidate material samples for various accelerator components. Materials included various grades/alloys of beryllium, graphite, silicon, iridium, titanium, TZM, CuCrZr, and aluminum. Attainable peak damage from an 8-week irradiation run ranges from 0.03 DPA (Be) to 7 DPA (Ir). Helium production is expected to range from 5 appm/DPA (Ir) to 3,000 appm/DPA (Be). The motivation, experimental parameters, as well as the post-irradiation examination plans of this experiment are described.

  13. Experience of the Russian Federation in the field of the nuclear material control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The paper deals with the develop met of new approaches concerning safeguards for specific nuclear materials, specific facilities which used Russian technology and design and situation of storing the nuclear materials. The role od IAEA safeguards is emphasised in view of verification and inspection of all the related issues

  14. Experience of work with radioactive materials and nuclear fuel at the reactor WWR-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltseva, R.M.; Petukhov, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    In the report there are considered questions concerning the handling with fresh and spent fuel, experimental devices, containing high enriched uranium, being fissile materials of the bulk form, radioisotopes, obtained in the reactor, and radioactive waste, formed during the operation of the reactor, and organization of storage, account and control of radioactive and fissile materials is described. (author)

  15. Pennsylvania's technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material experiences and studies of the oil and gas industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, David J

    2015-02-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's experiences and ongoing studies related to technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in the oil and gas industry. It has been known for many years that Pennsylvania's geology is unique, with several areas having relatively high levels of natural uranium and thorium. In the 1950s, a few areas of the state were evaluated for commercial uranium production. In the late 1970s, scoping studies of radon in homes prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Bureau of Radiation Protection (BRP) to begin planning for a larger state-wide radon study. The BRP and Oil and Gas Bureau also performed a TENORM study of produced water in the early 1990s for a number of conventional oil and gas wells. More recently, BRP and the Bureau of Solid Waste developed radiation monitoring regulations for all Pennsylvania solid waste disposal facilities. These were implemented in 2001, prompting another evaluation of oil and gas operations and sludge generated from the treatment of conventionally produced water and brine but mainly focused on the disposal of TENORM solid waste in the state's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D landfills. However, since 2008, the increase in volumes of gas well wastewater and levels of Ra observed in the unconventional shale gas well flow