WorldWideScience

Sample records for materials laboratory eleventh

  1. High Temperature Materials Laboratory, Eleventh Annual Report: October 1997 through September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasto, A.E.; Russell, B.J.

    2000-03-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its eleventh year of operation as a designated US Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document profiles the historical growth of the HTML User and Fellowship Programs since their inception in 1987. Growth of the HTML programs has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements and by the number of days of instrument use (user days) since the HTML began operation.A total of 522 agreements (351 industry,156 university,and 15 other federal agency) are now in effect (452 nonproprietary and 70 proprietary). This represents an increase of 75 user agreements since the last reporting period (for FY 1997). A state-by-state summary of the nonproprietary user agreements is given in Appendix A. Forty-six states are represented. During FY 1998, the HTML User Program evaluated 80 nonproprietary proposals (32 from industry, 45 from universities, and 3 from other government facilities) and several proprietary proposals. Appendix B provides a detailed breakdown of the nonproprietary proposals received during FY 1998. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about 95% of those proposals, sometimes after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the committee. This annual report discusses activities in the individual user centers as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users, proposals, and publications as well as summaries of the nonproprietary research projects active during 1998.

  2. Eleventh symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Eleventh Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences was held on May 3--5, 1993, at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These proceedings include the program, list of participants, and the papers that were presented during the eight technical sessions held at this meeting. This symposium was organized into eight technical sessions: Surfaces and interfaces; thermophysical properties and processes; inelastic behavior; nondestructive characterization; multiphase flow and thermal processes; optical and other measurement systems; stochastic processes; and large systems and control. Individual projects were processed separately for the databases

  3. Eleventh symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Solid mechanics and processing: Analysis, measurement and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Eleventh Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences was held on May 3--5, 1993, at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These proceedings include the program, list of participants, and the papers that were presented during the eight technical sessions held at this meeting. This symposium was organized into eight technical sessions: Surfaces and interfaces; thermophysical properties and processes; inelastic behavior; nondestructive characterization; multiphase flow and thermal processes; optical and other measurement systems; stochastic processes; and large systems and control. Individual projects were processed separately for the databases.

  4. RADMIL - eleventh annual report for 1996/97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    RADMIL is a local authority monitoring organisation which provides an effective and efficient means of investigating Lancashire`s radiological environment countrywide. This eleventh annual report covers the sources of radiation, radiological protection in the UK, environmental monitoring by government agencies and industry and an interpretation of the RADMIL monitoring results. (UK).

  5. RADMIL - eleventh annual report for 1996/97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    RADMIL is a local authority monitoring organisation which provides an effective and efficient means of investigating Lancashire's radiological environment countrywide. This eleventh annual report covers the sources of radiation, radiological protection in the UK, environmental monitoring by government agencies and industry and an interpretation of the RADMIL monitoring results. (UK)

  6. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

  7. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  8. High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The six user centers in the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML), a DOE User Facility, are dedicated to solving materials problems that limit the efficiency...

  9. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  10. Eleventh international conference on boron chemistry. Programme and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Abstracts of reports at the Eleventh International Conference on Boron Chemistry are presented. Born chemistry as a connecting bridge between many fields maintains one of the leading positions in modern chemistry. Methods of synthesis of different boron compounds, properties of the compounds, their use in other regions of chemistry and medicine are widely presented in reports.

  11. Eleventh international conference on boron chemistry. Programme and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Abstracts of reports at the Eleventh International Conference on Boron Chemistry are presented. Born chemistry as a connecting bridge between many fields maintains one of the leading positions in modern chemistry. Methods of synthesis of different boron compounds, properties of the compounds, their use in other regions of chemistry and medicine are widely presented in reports [ru

  12. Exploring the Deep-Level Reasoning Questions Effect during Vicarious Learning among Eighth to Eleventh Graders in the Domains of Computer Literacy and Newtonian Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholson, Barry; Witherspoon, Amy; Morgan, Brent; Brittingham, Joshua K.; Coles, Robert; Graesser, Arthur C.; Sullins, Jeremiah; Craig, Scotty D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper tested the deep-level reasoning questions effect in the domains of computer literacy between eighth and tenth graders and Newtonian physics for ninth and eleventh graders. This effect claims that learning is facilitated when the materials are organized around questions that invite deep-reasoning. The literature indicates that vicarious…

  13. Collaboration and peer tutoring in chemistry laboratory education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, N.; Harskamp, E.G.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of collaborative learning with hints and peer tutoring with hints, and individual learning with hints in chemistry laboratory education in a secondary school. A total of 96 eleventh graders participated in this study. The study has a randomized

  14. Eleventh Semiannual Report of the Commission to the Congress, January 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Gordon

    1952-01-31

    The document represents the eleventh semiannual Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) report to Congress. The report sums up the major activities and developments in the national atomic energy program covering the period July - December 1951. Part II covers financial aspects and Part III, Applications in Plant Science.

  15. Materials Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dionne

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

  16. An eleventh-century Egyptian guide to the universe the book of curiosities

    CERN Document Server

    Rapoport, Yossef

    2013-01-01

    The Book of Curiosities is an eleventh-century Arabic account of the heavens and the Earth, illustrated by remarkable maps and astronomical diagrams. This authoritative edition and translation opens a unique window onto the geographical and astrological knowledge of medieval Islam.

  17. Im. A. F. Zasyad'ko coal mine during the eleventh five year plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvyagil' skii, E.L.

    1985-08-01

    The achievements of this mine are chronicled, which began production in December 1958, throughout the eleventh five year plan, showing how the annual targets for coal output, roadway drivage, savings in energy and materials, output per manshift and cost price of coal were met and improved upon in each of the five years. The factors which made possible these achievements in productivity and efficiency are described and include: use of modern equipment and systems, increased mechanization, on-site education and training, improved discipline, reduced absenteeism, incentive schemes and, above all, the full involvement of the coal mine in the program of socialist competition. The social infrastructure supporting the coal mine and its workforce is also described.

  18. Jordanian Seventh- And Eleventh-Grade Students' Views on Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazzi, Khaled

    2017-01-01

    Using a mixed methods approach, this study was conducted in Jordanian schools to determine the perceptions of seventh- and eleventh-grade students toward citizenship. Specifically, the study determined what students believe are the attributes of a good citizen, what activities they participate in that are related to good citizenship, and what…

  19. Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1986-01-23

    The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

  20. 76 FR 7131 - Safety Zones; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Fireworks Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ...-AA00 Safety Zones; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Fireworks Events AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... permanent safety zones to ensure public safety during annual firework displays at various locations in the... events, delete events that are no longer occurring, add new unlisted annual fireworks events to the...

  1. Materials Behavior Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to evaluate mechanical properties of materials including metals, intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, and ceramic-matrix composites under typical...

  2. The Eleventh Quadrennial Review of Military Compensation. Supporting Research Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    factors in both the FICA tax that is avoided and the value of future Social Security benefits that are foregone. Using actuarial estimates of 1.9 to 2.5...savings to more gross pay. 23. The mathematical presentation of this formal model is in Appendix C. The Eleventh Quadrennial Review of Military...the mathematical equations underlying the model developed in the section called “Exploring other factors of compensation: A formal model of military

  3. The Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing - LAMP - is a clean-room research facility run and operated by Pr. Gary Rubloff's group. Research activities focus...

  4. Proceedings of the eleventh Symposium of Atomic Energy Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovszky, Istvan

    2001-12-01

    The present volume contains 57 papers, presented on the eleventh Symposium of Atomic Energy Research, held in Csopak, Hungary, 24-28 September 2001. The papers are presented in their original form, i. e. no corrections or modifications were carried out. The content of this volume is divided into thematic groups: Improvement of Neutron Physical Codes and Methods, Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics, Thermal-Hydraulics, Spent Fuel - Criticality Radiation, Fuel Behaviour, Spent Fuel Transmutation, Evaluation of Reactor Physical Measurements, Core Design-Core Calculations-according to the presentation sequence on the Symposium (Author)

  5. Virtual Reality for Materials Design Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to research and develop materials through applied virtual reality to enable interactive "materials-by-design." Extensive theoretical and computational...

  6. 78 FR 69007 - Special Local Regulations; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public...: ``ITU World Triathlon'' occurring late April or early May at Bonita Cove and Ventura Cove in Mission Bay... participants and an exact geographical description of the areas are published by the Eleventh Coast Guard...

  7. Ghana Chemical Society eleventh national annual conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The publication contains the programme and abstracts of the eleventh annual conference of the Ghana Chemical Society. The aim of the conference was to examine the role of chemistry and the strategic role of chemistry practitioners in the overall development of Ghana in the twenty first century. Abstracts presented have been grouped in the following order: welcome address, professional lecture on the future direction of the Ghana Chemical Society, conference programme, plenary lectures on the role of chemistry in the critical areas of the economy such as energy, environment, education, health, agriculture, special seminar on chemistry and society highlighting the role of chemistry in fire prevention, crime detection, water quality, customs operations, scientific papers and selected industrial processes. A total of twenty five abstracts have been presented. (E.A.A)

  8. Ghana Chemical Society eleventh national annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The publication contains the programme and abstracts of the eleventh annual conference of the Ghana Chemical Society. The aim of the conference was to examine the role of chemistry and the strategic role of chemistry practitioners in the overall development of Ghana in the twenty first century. Abstracts presented have been grouped in the following order: welcome address, professional lecture on the future direction of the Ghana Chemical Society, conference programme, plenary lectures on the role of chemistry in the critical areas of the economy such as energy, environment, education, health, agriculture, special seminar on chemistry and society highlighting the role of chemistry in fire prevention, crime detection, water quality, customs operations, scientific papers and selected industrial processes. A total of twenty five abstracts have been presented. (E.A.A)

  9. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-06-01

    The Summary Report of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the Minutes of the Meeting (Part I); the papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting (Part II); and the discussions on the review of the national programmes (Part III)

  10. Eleventh annual conference of the CFD Society of Canada (CFD 2003). Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollivier-Gooch, C.

    2003-01-01

    The Eleventh Annual Conference of the CFD Society of Canada, CFD 2003, was held in Vancouver, British Columbia from May 28-30, 2003. The conference was attended by 125 delegates from twelve countries. In addition to traditional CFD applications in vehicle aerodynamics and turbulent flow, the conference also showcased a number of less traditional application areas, including fuel cells, biofluids, multi-phase flows, and flows in porous media

  11. The Effect of Implementing the Experiential Learning Model in Listening Comprehension for the Eleventh Graders at SMAN 1 Telaga Biru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Tahir

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to investigate the effectiveness of the experiential learning in listening comprehension with the focus on the implementation of the class story using language experience at SMAN 1 Telaga Biru. As the pre-experimental research, this study involved one class consisted of 27 students in the eleventh graders. However, most of the students of the eleventh graders in this school have some problems in their listening comprehension. This current research, therefore, aims at finding the result of the students’ listening comprehension by using experiential learning in focusing on the class story using language experience for the eleventh graders at SMAN 1 Telaga Biru and defining the students’ achievement in listening comprehension by using experiential learning focusing on the class story using language experience.  This study also explored the learners’ listening comprehension by analyzing the result of the students’ pre-test and post-test. It was found that the mean of the pre-test was 60 while the mean of the post-test was 80,6. By analyzing this result, it indicated that the post-test was higher than the pre-test. In conclusion, the finding of this research showed that teaching listening in the eleventh graders of SMAN 1 Telaga Biru using experiential learning in focusing on the class story using language experience was effective to teach students’ listening comprehension. Therefore, it can be suggested that it was an alternative way to use of experiential learning focusing on the class story using language experience in teaching listening.

  12. Colima: The eleventh entity most competitive of the country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Orozco Plascencia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the I Report of the State Competitiveness 2006, the State of Colima is considered to be the eleventh federal entity more competitive of the country. Number obtained in the favorable results in the national ranking of competitiveness, due to it got a third position to have with a System of Rights Reliable and Objective, besides it got three fifth positions: Sustainable Management of the Environment, Market of Efficient Factors and Precursor Sectors of the World Class, besides of a eighth position to count on a Dynamic Economic and Stables Indicators. Nevertheless, there are some indicators that showed unfavorable results for the entity, for instance, Colima got the 30th place in the factor of Achievement of the International Relations, the 27th position to count on a bad Political and Functional System, and the 24th place to have an Efficient and Effective Government. On average of the sectorial competitiveness, the Pharmaceutical and High-Tech sector holds the fifth position in the national ranking, in order to the priorities for the location of the business investment; the Manufactures are located in the sixth Place; the Textile sector in the eighth, and the more straggler ones like the Agribusiness and Tourism in the ninth position, respectively. Finally, the sensitivity of the investments above an increase of 10% relative to the 120 quantitative variables that revealed that Colima could pass from the eleventh to the third position, this like a result to increase its investment in 3,228 million of pesos for the entity, or increase in 30% the amount per capita for each member of the PEA, equivalent to 12,300 pesos average for employee.

  13. US-Russian laboratory-to-laboratory cooperation in nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, M.; Augustson, R.; Horton, R.

    1995-01-01

    Under the guidance of the Department of Energy (DOE), six DOE laboratories have initiated a new program of cooperation with the Russian Federation's nuclear institutes. The purpose of the program is to accelerate progress toward a common goal shared by both the US and Russia--to reduce the risks of nuclear weapons proliferation, including such threats as theft, diversion, and unauthorized possession of nuclear materials, by strengthening systems of nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting. This new program is called the Laboratory-to-Laboratory Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (Lab-to-Lab MPC and A) Program. It is designed to complement other US-Russian MPC and A programs such as the government-to-government (Nunn-Lugar) programs. The Lab-to-Lab MPC and A program began in 1994 with pilot projects at two sites: Arzamas-16 and the Kurchitov Institute. This paper presents an overview of the Laboratory-to-Laboratory MPC and A Program. It describes the background and need for the program; the objectives and strategy; the participating US and Russian laboratories, institutes and enterprises; highlights of the technical work; and plans for the next several years

  14. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-07-01

    The Summary Report - Part II of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - includes reports on development of fast reactors in France from 1977 to 1978; review of the activities related to fast reactors in Germany; status of fast breeder reactors development in Belgium and Netherlands; status of activities related to fast reactors in USSR, Japan USA, UK and Italy.

  15. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The Summary Report - Part II of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - includes reports on development of fast reactors in France from 1977 to 1978; review of the activities related to fast reactors in Germany; status of fast breeder reactors development in Belgium and Netherlands; status of activities related to fast reactors in USSR, Japan USA, UK and Italy

  16. Affect and Cognition in the Writing Processes of Eleventh Graders: A Study of Concentration and Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Linda Miller

    1991-01-01

    Investigates the writing experience of 40 eleventh graders and examines the social and pedagogical circumstances contributing to their limited concentration and motivation. Finds that emotion disrupts sustained and thoughtful attention to writing. Demonstrates the psychological toll of limited concentration, negative self-view, and limited…

  17. A new nuclear materials laboratory at Queen's University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.A.; Daymond, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    The Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (RMTL) at Queen's University and the results of commissioning tests are described. RMTL uses energetic protons (up to 8MeV) to simulate fast neutron damage in materials for reactor components. The laboratory is also capable of He implantation (up to 12 MeV) to simulate the effects of transmutation He in reactor components. The $17.5M laboratory comprises a new building, a 4MV tandem accelerator, two electron microscopes, mechanical testing and specimen preparation equipment, and a radiation detection laboratory. RMTL focusses on studying dynamic effects of irradiation (irradiation creep, irradiation growth, irradiation induced swelling, fatigue under irradiation) in-situ. (author)

  18. Development of guided inquiry-based laboratory worksheet on topic of heat of combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofiani, D.; Nurhayati; Sunarya, Y.; Suryatna, A.

    2018-03-01

    Chemistry curriculum reform shows an explicit shift from traditional approach to scientific inquiry. This study aims to develop a guided inquiry-based laboratory worksheet on topic of heat of combustion. Implementation of this topic in high school laboratory is new because previously some teachers only focused the experiment on determining the heat of neutralization. The method used in this study was development research consisted of three stages: define, design, and develop. In the define stage, curriculum analysis and material analysis were performed. In the design stage, laboratory optimization and product preparation were conducted. In the development stage, the product was evaluated by the experts and tested to a total of 20 eleventh-grade students. The instruments used in this study were assessment sheet and students’ response questionnaire. The assessment results showed that the guided inquiry-based laboratory worksheet has very good quality based on the aspects of content, linguistic, and graphics. The students reacted positively to the use of this guided inquiry-based worksheet as demonstrated by the results from questionnaire. The implications of this study is the laboratory activity should be directed to development of scientific inquiry skills in order to enhance students’ competences as well as the quality of science education.

  19. Eleventh congress of the South African Society of Nuclear Medicine : programme and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    The volume contains the abstracts of papers and poster sessions presented at the eleventh biennial congress of the South African Society of Nuclear Medicine that was held at the CSIR Conference Centre in Pretoria from 1-4 October 2004, and was preceded by a workshop on nuclear medicine in endocrinology and molecular imaging. The workshop papers are not included. Forty-nine presentations are indexed. One presentation was excluded.

  20. Science laboratory behavior strategies of students relative to performance in and attitude to laboratory work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okebukola, Peter Akinsola

    The relationship between science laboratory behavior strategies of students and performance in and attitude to laboratory work was investigated in an observational study of 160 laboratory sessions involving 600 class five (eleventh grade) biology students. Zero-order correlations between the behavior strategies and outcome measures reveal a set of low to strong relationships. Transmitting information, listening and nonlesson related behaviors exhibited low correlations with practical skills and the attitude measure. The correlations between manipulating apparatus and observation with practical skills measures were found to be strong. Multiple correlation analysis revealed that the behaviors of students in the laboratories observed accounted for a large percentage of the variance in the scores on manipulative skills and a low percentage on interpretation of data, responsibility, initiative, and work habits. One significant canonical correlation emerged. The loadings on this canonical variate indicate that the practical skills measures, i.e., planning and design, manipulative skills and conduct of experiments, observation and recording of data, and attitude to laboratory work made primary contributions to the canonical relationship. Suggestions as to how students can be encouraged to go beyond cookbook-like laboratories and develop a more favorable attitude to laboratory work are made.

  1. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ''The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.'' The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers

  2. European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy. Summaries of contributions, eleventh annual conference, Paris-Orsay, July 10-13, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Summaries are presented of talks given at the eleventh conference of the European group for atomic spectroscopy. Topics covered include: lifetimes; collisions; line shape; hyperfine structure; isotope shifts; saturation spectroscopy; Hanle effect; Rydberg levels; quantum beats; helium and helium-like atoms; metrology; and molecules. (GHT)

  3. Materials accounting at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkkila, B.H.; Roberts, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the accounting system used at the Los Alamos National Laboratory by the Los Alamos Nuclear Material Accounting and Safeguards System (MASS). This system processes accounting data in real time for bulk materials, discrete items, and materials undergoing dynamic processing. The following topics are covered in this chapter: definitions; nuclear material storage; nuclear material storage; computer system; measurement control program; inventory differences; and current programs and future plans

  4. Proceedings of the eleventh international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoeda, Mikio

    2004-07-01

    This report is the Proceedings of 'the Eleventh International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions' which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders Under the IEA Implementing Agreement on the Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors, and the Japan-US Fusion Collaboration Framework. This workshop was held in Tokyo, Japan on December 15-17, 2003. About thirty experts from China, EU, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Russia and USA attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included 1) evolutions in ceramic breeder blanket design, 2) progress in ceramic breeder material development, 3) irradiation testing, 4) breeder material properties, 5) out-of-pile pebble bed experiment, 6) modeling of the thermal, mechanical and tritium transfer behavior of pebble beds and 7) interfacing issues of solid breeder blanket. In the workshop, information exchange was performed for designs of solid breeder blankets and test blankets in EU, Russia and Japan, recent results of irradiation tests, HICU, EXOTIC-8 and the irradiation tests by IVV-2M, modeling study on tritium release behavior of Li 2 TiO 3 and so on, fabrication technology developments and characterization of the Li 2 TiO 3 and Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles, research on measurements and modeling of thermo-mechanical behaviors of Li 2 TiO 3 and Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles, and interfacing issues, such as, fabrication technology for blanket box structure, neutronics experiments of blanket mockups by fusion neutron source and tritium recovery system. The 26 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercialization LMFBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology of fuel fabrication, PHENIX fuel pins testing, heterogeneous cores, in service inspection of fuel elements, regulations and licensing, and related OECD activities. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BR-10, BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, RAPSODIE and PHENIX

  6. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-09-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercialization LMFBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology of fuel fabrication, PHENIX fuel pins testing, heterogeneous cores, in service inspection of fuel elements, regulations and licensing, and related OECD activities. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BR-10, BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, RAPSODIE and PHENIX.

  7. MDOT Materials Laboratories : Environmental Management Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this EMP was to develop and implement a comprehensive Environmental : Management Plan for MDOT Materials Laboratories. This goal was achieved through : perfonnance of environmental audits to identify potential environmental impacts, and b...

  8. Survey and analysis of materials research and development at selected federal laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J.E.; Fink, C.R.

    1984-04-01

    This document presents the results of an effort to transfer existing, but relatively unknown, materials R and D from selected federal laboratories to industry. More specifically, recent materials-related work at seven federal laboratories potentially applicable to improving process energy efficiency and overall productiviy in six energy-intensive manufacturing industries was evaluated, catalogued, and distributed to industry representatives to gauge their reaction. Laboratories surveyed include: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Material Laboratory (AFWAL). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Flight Center (NASA Marshall), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Industries included in the effort are: aluminum, cement, paper and allied products, petroleum, steel and textiles.

  9. Minutes of the eleventh INDC meeting Vienna, 16-20 June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiftah, S.

    1981-07-01

    The International Nuclear Data Committee met at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, for its eleventh meeting, on 16-20 June 1980. The meeting was attended by 13 committee members, 7 advisors and 15 observers from 15 countries and 3 international organizations. The Committee reviewed the nuclear data activities of the IAEA, in Member States and in Nuclear Data Centres during the 18 months since its last meeting in Bucharest, October 1978. The committee also discussed critically the nuclear data programmes for the next 18 months. The official Minutes include summaries of the discussions of the agenda items, full reports of subcommittees, list of actions, together with lists of participants and subcommittees membership

  10. Proceedings of the eleventh annual conference on fossil energy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R. [comp.

    1997-12-01

    The objective of the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. These proceedings contain 34 papers organized under the following topical sections: Ceramic composites and functional materials; Ceramics, new alloys, and functional materials; and New alloys. Also included is a summary of a workshop on materials issues in low emission boilers and in high efficiency coal-fired cycles. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Eleventh ORNL personnel dosimetry intercomparison study, May 22-23, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaja, R.E.; Oyan, R.; Sims, C.S.

    1986-07-01

    The Eleventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during May 22-23, 1985. Dosimeter badges from 44 participating organizations were mounted on Lucite block phantoms and exposed to four mixed-radiation fields with neutron dose equivalents around 5 mSv and gamma dose equivalents between 0.1 and 0.7 mSv. Results of this study indicated that no participants had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron exposure at the provided dose equivalent levels, and very few had difficulty obtaining indication of gamma exposure at dose equivalents as low as 0.10 mSv. Average neutron results for all dosimeter types were within 20% of reference values with no obvious spectrum dependence. Different dosimeter types (albedo, direct interaction TLD, film, recoil track, and combination albedo-track) with 10 or more reported measurements provided average results within 35% of reference values for all spectra. With regard to precision, about 80% of the reported neutron results had single standard deviations within 10% at the means which indicates that precision is not a problem relative to accuracy for most participants. Average gamma results were greater than reference values by factors of 1.07 to 1.52 for the four exposures with TLD systems being more accurate than film. About 80% of all neutron results and 67% of all gamma results met regulatory standards for measurement accuracy and approximately 70% of all neutron data satisfied national dosimetry accreditation criteria for accuracy plus precision. In general, neutron dosimeter performance observed in this intercomparison was much improved compared to that observed in the prior studies while gamma dosimeter performance was about the same

  12. High-Frequency Microwave Processing of Materials Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Conducts research on high-frequency microwave processing of materials using a highpower, continuous-wave (CW), 83-GHz, quasi-optical beam system for rapid,...

  13. Critical and strategic materials proceedings of the laboratory study group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    These Proceedings serve to identify the appropriate role for the DOE-BES-DMS Laboratory program concerning critical and strategic materials, identify and articulate high priority DOE-BES-DMS target areas so as to maximize programmatic responsiveness to national needs concerning critical and strategic materials, and identify research, expertise, and resources (including Collaborative Research Centers) that are relevant to critical and strategic materials that is either underway or in place under the DOE-BES-DMS Laboratory program. Laboratory statements of collaborative research are given

  14. A new nuclear materials laboratory at Queen's University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.A.; Daymond, M.R., E-mail: holt@queensu.ca, E-mail: daymond@queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (RMTL) at Queen's University and the results of commissioning tests are described. RMTL uses energetic protons (up to 8MeV) to simulate fast neutron damage in materials for reactor components. The laboratory is also capable of He implantation (up to 12 MeV) to simulate the effects of transmutation He in reactor components. The $17.5M laboratory comprises a new building, a 4MV tandem accelerator, two electron microscopes, mechanical testing and specimen preparation equipment, and a radiation detection laboratory. RMTL focusses on studying dynamic effects of irradiation (irradiation creep, irradiation growth, irradiation induced swelling, fatigue under irradiation) in-situ. (author)

  15. Exploring scientific creativity of eleventh-grade students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jia-Chi

    2002-04-01

    Although most researchers focus on scientists' creativity, students' scientific creativity should be considered, especially for high school and college students. It is generally assumed that most professional creators in science emerge from amateur creators. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between students' scientific creativity and selected variables including creativity, problem finding, formulating hypotheses, science achievement, the nature of science, and attitudes toward science for finding significant predictors of eleventh grade students' scientific creativity. A total of 130 male eleventh-grade students in three biology classes participated in this study. The main instruments included the Test of Divergent Thinking (TDT) for creativity measurement, the Creativity Rating Scale (CRS) and the Creative Activities and Accomplishments Check Lists (CAACL ) for measurement of scientific creativity, the Nature of Scientific Knowledge Scale (NSKS) for measurement of the nature of science, and the Science Attitude Inventory II (SAI II) for measurement of attitudes toward science. In addition, two instruments on measuring students' abilities of problem finding and abilities of formulating hypotheses were developed by the researcher in this study. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, Pearson product-moment correlations, and stepwise multiple regressions. The major findings suggested the following: (1) students' scientific creativity significantly correlated with some of selected variables such as attitudes toward science, problem finding, formulating hypotheses, the nature of science, resistance to closure, originality, and elaboration; (2) four significant predictors including attitudes toward science, problem finding, resistance to closure, and originality accounted for 48% of the variance of students' scientific creativity; (3) there were big differences between students with a higher and a lower degree of scientific

  16. The Contribution of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Mapping to Eleventh-Grade Students Understanding of Cellular Respiration Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al khawaldeh, Salem A.; Al Olaimat, Ali M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study conducted to investigate the contribution of conceptual change texts, accompanied by concept mapping instruction to eleventh-grade students' understanding of cellular respiration concepts, and their retention of this understanding. Cellular respiration concepts test was developed as a result of examination of related literature…

  17. An inter-laboratory comparison of Si isotope reference materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, B.C.; Aggarwal, J.; André, L.; Baxter, B.; Beucher, C.; Brzezinski, M.A.; Engström, E.; Georg, R.B.; Land, M.; Leng, M.J.; Opfergelt, S.; Rodushkin, I.; Sloane, H.J.; Van den Boorn, S.H.J.M.; Vroon, P.Z.; Cardinal, D.

    2007-01-01

    Three Si isotope materials have been used for an inter-laboratory comparison exercise to ensure reproducibility between international laboratories investigating natural Si isotope variations using a variety of chemical preparation methods and mass spectrometric techniques. These proposed standard

  18. Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H 3 or C 14 . The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994

  19. Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H{sup 3} or C{sup 14}. The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994.

  20. The Implementation of Cooperative Integrated Reading and Composition (CIRC Method in Teaching Narrative Text to Improve Students’ Reading Comprehension at the Eleventh Grade Students of MAN 2 Model Makassar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmayanti Darmayanti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to improve the reading comprehension of eleventh grade students at MAN 2 Model Makassar by using CIRC Method. CIRC Method is chosen to practice the communication in the target language. The research problems are: (1. Does the use of CIRC method improve reading comprehension of the eleventh grade students of MAN 2 Model Makassar? (2. Are the students interested in teaching Narrative text through CIRC method of the eleventh grade students of MAN 2 Model Makassar? The objectives of the research were (1 to find out whether or not the use of CIRC method can improve reading comprehension of the eleventh grade students of MAN 2 Model Makassar. (2 to find out the students’ interest toward teaching Narrative text through CIRC method. The research applied Quasi-experimental Design. The population of the research was the Eleventh Grade students of MAN 2 Model Makassar in academic year 2013/2014. The sample was IPS 2 as Experimental Group consisting of 33 students and IPA 2 as Control Group consisting of 37 students, with the total sample 70 students. The researcher used Cluster Random Sampling, two classes of the eleventh grade of MAN 2 Model Makassar were took as the experimental class and the control class. The experimental class taught by using CIRC Method while the control class taught by conventional learning method. The data were collected through reading tests namely Pre test and Post test, that were analyzed by using SPSS 20.0 version. The result of the data showed that there was significant difference between the students’ score who were taught CIRC method and non CIRC method. It proven by the mean score of the experimental group that was higher than control group in the post test. The result of the test indicated that using CIRC method significantly improved the students’ reading comprehension. Then, the questionnaires were analyzed by using Likert Scale that showed the students were interested in learning English

  1. Eleventh Arab Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasr, N.

    2012-01-01

    The Arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy is an important station where Arab researchers and scientists meet to present the results of their scientific and applied research activities, to exchange views, experiences and knowledge and to strengthen the bonds of cooperation among them. Under this framework, the Arab Atomic Energy Agency organized the eleventh Arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy in cooperation with the Ministry of Science and Communications of the Republic of Sudan and the Sudan Atomic Energy Commission in Khartoum city during the period of 23-27 December 2012. The sessions of the conference included scientific papers, in addition to specialized lectures on topics of particular importance in the field of peaceful applications of atomic energy followed by panel discussions.

  2. Fresh biological reference materials. Use in inter laboratory studies and as CRMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boer, J.

    1999-01-01

    Biological reference materials were prepared and packed in tins and glass jars to be used in inter laboratory studies on chlorobiphenyls and organochlorine pesticides, and trace metals, respectively. The materials were homogenised, sterilised and packed as wet tissue, which is unique for the purpose of inter laboratory studies and offers the advantage of studying the extraction and destruction steps of the analytical methods. In addition to their use in inter laboratory studies, some materials have been prepared or are being prepared as certified reference material for chlorobiphenyl analysis. (author)

  3. Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Material Transfer Agreements are appropriate for exchange of materials into or out of the Frederick National Laboratory for research or testing purposes, with no collaborative research by parties involving the materials.

  4. JCOMM Expert Team on Sea Ice (ETSI), Third Session Steering Group for the Global Digital Sea Ice Data Bank (GDSIDB) Eleventh Session

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    ...); Terms of reference of the task team on provision of MSI in polar regions; Report of the IMO/IHO/WMO Correspondence Group on Arctic MSI Services presented at the Eleventh Session of the IMO/COMSAR...

  5. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydraulic laboratories, and to the Inter-Agency Sedimentation Project. (c) References. (1) AR 37-20. (2) AR... ordinary business channels. (3) Performance of the work will not interfere with provisions of services... with the same procedures as apply to Division Materials Laboratories. (3) Inter-Agency Sedimentation...

  6. The hot cell laboratories for material investigations of the Institute for Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehrig, H W

    1998-10-01

    Special facilities for handling and testing of irradiated specimens are necessary, to perform the investigation of activated material. The Institute for Safety Research has two hot cell laboratories: - the preparation laboratory and - the materials testing laboratory. This report is intended to give an overview of the available facilities and developed techniques in the laboratories. (orig.)

  7. Standard reference materials analysis for MINT Radiocarbon Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noraishah Othman; Kamisah Alias; Nasasni Nasrul

    2004-01-01

    As a follow-up to the setting up of the MINT Radiocarbon Dating facility. an exercise on the IAEA standard reference materials was carried out. Radiocarbon laboratories frequently used these 8 natural samples to verify their systems. The materials were either pretreated or analysed directly to determine the activity of 14 C isotopes of the five samples expressed in % Modern (pMC) terms and to make recommendations on further use of these materials. We present the results of the five materials and discuss the analyses that were undertaken. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of Hazardous Material Management Safety in the Chemical Laboratory in BATAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur-Rahmah-Hidayati

    2005-01-01

    The management safety of the hazardous material (B3) in the chemical laboratory of BATAN was evaluated. The evaluation is necessary to be done because B3 is often used together with radioactive materials in the laboratory, but the attention to the safety aspect of B3 is not paid sufficiently in spite of its big potential hazard. The potential hazard generated from the nature of B3 could be flammable, explosive, oxidative, corrosive and poisonous. The handling of B3 could be conducted by enforcing the labelling and classification in the usage and disposal processes. Some observations of the chemical laboratory of BATAN show that the management safety of hazardous material in compliance with the government regulation no. 74 year 2001 has not been dully conducted. The management safety of B3 could be improved by, designating one who has adequate skill in hazardous material safety specially as the B3 safety officer, providing the Material Safety Data Sheet that is updated periodically to use in the laboratory and storage room, updating periodically the inventory of B3, performing training in work safety periodically, and monitoring the ventilation system intensively in laboratory and storage room. (author)

  9. Artificial intelligence in the materials processing laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials science and engineering provides a vast arena for applications of artificial intelligence. Advanced materials research is an area in which challenging requirements confront the researcher, from the drawing board through production and into service. Advanced techniques results in the development of new materials for specialized applications. Hand-in-hand with these new materials are also requirements for state-of-the-art inspection methods to determine the integrity or fitness for service of structures fabricated from these materials. Two problems of current interest to the Materials Processing Laboratory at UAH are an expert system to assist in eddy current inspection of graphite epoxy components for aerospace and an expert system to assist in the design of superalloys for high temperature applications. Each project requires a different approach to reach the defined goals. Results to date are described for the eddy current analysis, but only the original concepts and approaches considered are given for the expert system to design superalloys.

  10. Materials characterization capabilities at DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories and Production Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyper, J.W.

    1984-06-01

    The materials characterization and analytical chemistry capabilities at the 11 DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories or Production Plants have been surveyed and compared. In general, all laboratories have similar capabilities and equipment. Facilities or capabilities that are unique or that exist at only a few laboratories are described in detail

  11. The Effect of Implementing the Experiential Learning Model in Listening Comprehension for the Eleventh Graders at SMAN 1 Telaga Biru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    This study is aimed to investigate the effectiveness of the experiential learning in listening comprehension with the focus on the implementation of the class story using language experience at SMAN 1 Telaga Biru. As the pre-experimental research, this study involved one class consisted of 27 students in the eleventh graders. However, most of the…

  12. High Temperature Materials Laboratory third annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1990-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its third year of operation as a designated DOE User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the user program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions who have executed user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 88 nonproprietary agreements (40 university and 48 industry) and 20 proprietary agreements (1 university, 19 industry) are now in effect. Sixty-eight nonproprietary research proposals (39 from university, 28 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and 8 proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1990 are summarized.

  13. Automation software for a materials testing laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    The software environment in use at the NASA-Lewis Research Center's High Temperature Fatigue and Structures Laboratory is reviewed. This software environment is aimed at supporting the tasks involved in performing materials behavior research. The features and capabilities of the approach to specifying a materials test include static and dynamic control mode switching, enabling multimode test control; dynamic alteration of the control waveform based upon events occurring in the response variables; precise control over the nature of both command waveform generation and data acquisition; and the nesting of waveform/data acquisition strategies so that material history dependencies may be explored. To eliminate repetitive tasks in the coventional research process, a communications network software system is established which provides file interchange and remote console capabilities.

  14. Material handling for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittman, P.; Roybal, J.; Durrer, R.; Gordon, D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper will present the design and application of material handling and automation systems currently being developed for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Nuclear Material Storage Facility (NMSF) renovation project. The NMSF is a long-term storage facility for nuclear material in various forms. The material is stored within tubes in a rack called a basket. The material handling equipment range from simple lift assist devices to more sophisticated fully automated robots, and are split into three basic systems: a Vault Automation System, an NDA automation System, and a Drum handling System. The Vault Automation system provides a mechanism to handle a basket of material cans and to load/unload storage tubes within the material vault. In addition, another robot is provided to load/unload material cans within the baskets. The NDA Automation System provides a mechanism to move material within the small canister NDA laboratory and to load/unload the NDA instruments. The Drum Handling System consists of a series of off the shelf components used to assist in lifting heavy objects such as pallets of material or drums and barrels

  15. Occupational exposures at nuclear power plants. Eleventh annual report of the Isoe programme, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The ISOE Programme was created by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in 1992 to promote and co-ordinate international co-operative undertakings in the area of worker protection at nuclear power plants. The programme provides experts in occupational radiation protection with a forum for communication and exchange of experience. The ISOE databases enable the analysis of occupational exposure data from the 452 commercial nuclear power plants participating in the programme (representing some 90 per cent of the world's total operating commercial reactors). The Eleventh Annual Report of the ISOE Programme summarises achievements made during 2001 and compares annual occupational exposure data. Principal developments in ISOE participating countries are also described. (author)

  16. Laboratory investigations into fracture propagation characteristics of rock material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, B. N. V. Siva; Murthy, V. M. S. R.

    2018-04-01

    After Industrial Revolution, demand of materials for building up structures have increased enormously. Unfortunately, failures of such structures resulted in loss of life and property. Rock is anisotropic and discontinuous in nature with inherent flaws or so-called discontinuities in it. Rock is apparently used for construction in mining, civil, tunnelling, hydropower, geothermal and nuclear sectors [1]. Therefore, the strength of the structure built up considering rockmass as the construction material needs proper technical evaluation during designing stage itself to prevent and predict the scenarios of catastrophic failures due to these inherent fractures [2]. In this study, samples collected from nine different drilling sites have been investigated in laboratory for understanding the fracture propagation characteristics in rock. Rock material properties, ultrasonic velocities through pulse transmission technique and Mode I Fracture Toughness Testing of different variants of Dolomites and Graywackes are determined in laboratory and the resistance of the rock material to catastrophic crack extension or propagation has been determined. Based on the Fracture Toughness values and the rock properties, critical Energy Release Rates have been estimated. However further studies in this direction is to be carried out to understand the fracture propagation characteristics in three-dimensional space.

  17. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry.

  18. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry

  19. Improving Eleventh Graders’ Reading Comprehension Through Text Coding and Double Entry Organizer Reading Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Mahecha

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we report on an innovation project developed with a group of eleventh graders at a public school in Bogotá. Its aim was to encourage students to improve reading comprehension of texts in English. It was conducted taking into account students' needs, interests and level of English. To do it, we implemented two reading strategies: text coding and double entry organizer. We observed the students' attitudes during two lesson plans, compared their level of comprehension before and after using the reading strategies and asked them to self-evaluate their performance. At the end, we could see their improvement, how they enjoyed doing the activities and became more confident.

  20. Trackless tack coat materials : a laboratory evaluation performance acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop, demonstrate, and document laboratory procedures that could be used by the : Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) to evaluate non-tracking tack coat materials. The procedures would be used to : qualify...

  1. Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukacka, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R&D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O&M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R&D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with U.S. geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

  2. Fundamentals of passive nondestructive assay of fissionable material: laboratory workbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, T.D.; Augustson, R.H.; Parker, J.L.; Walton, R.B.; Atwell, T.L.; Umbarger, C.J.; Burns, C.E.

    1975-02-01

    This workbook is a supplement to LA-5651-M, ''Fundamentals of Passive Nondestructive Assay of Fissionable Material'' which is the text used during the Nondestructive Assay Training Session given by Group A-1 of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. It contains the writeups used during the six laboratory sessions covering basic gamma-ray principles, quantitative gamma-ray measurements, uranium enrichment measurements, equipment holdup measurements, basic neutron principles, and quantitative neutron assay

  3. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  4. The Mars Science Laboratory Organic Check Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, J. E.; Mogensen, C. T.; VonderHeydt, M. O.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. M.; Johnson, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Organic Check Material (OCM) has been developed for use on the Mars Science Laboratory mission to serve as a sample standard for verification of organic cleanliness and characterization of potential sample alteration as a function of the sample acquisition and portioning process on the Curiosity rover. OCM samples will be acquired using the same procedures for drilling, portioning and delivery as are used to study martian samples with The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite during MSL surface operations. Because the SAM suite is highly sensitive to organic molecules, the mission can better verify the cleanliness of Curiosity's sample acquisition hardware if a known material can be processed through SAM and compared with the results obtained from martian samples.

  5. Presentation of the Nuclear Material Metrology Laboratory (LAMMAN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arpigny, S.; Biscarrat, C.; Ruas, A.; Viallesoubranne, C.; Hanssens, A.; Roche, C.

    2008-01-01

    The EQRAIN Uranium or Plutonium programmes (Evaluation of the Quality of Analysis Results in the Nuclear Industry) have led to the creation of round-robins, which require reference solutions of uranyl nitrate or of plutonium nitrate to be made available. The samples are fabricated and packaged, and their benchmark values determined, by the Nuclear Material Metrology Laboratory in the Atalante facility. All the operations are carried out by highly precise weighing, including correction for air buoyancy. In order to guarantee the preservation of reference samples, a laser-sealing apparatus is used to condition the final solutions in ampoules. Random tests to check the concentration of uranium or plutonium are carried out on a certain number of ampoules after the sealing step. The analysis are performed on a photo-gravimetric analysis line (in glove box for Pu) based on the titanium potentiometric analysis method. The ampoules are then packaged and delivered to the participating laboratories. The French nuclear laboratories participating in the EQRAIN programs belong to the Cea and to the AREVA Group, with activities covering the entire fuel cycle. They have been joined by new participants from European, Japanese and South American laboratories

  6. Presentation of the Nuclear Material Metrology Laboratory (LAMMAN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpigny, S.; Biscarrat, C.; Ruas, A.; Viallesoubranne, C. [CEA/DEN/DRCP/SE2A/LAMM, Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Hanssens, A.; Roche, C. [CEA/DEN/DRCP/CETAMA Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The EQRAIN Uranium or Plutonium programmes (Evaluation of the Quality of Analysis Results in the Nuclear Industry) have led to the creation of round-robins, which require reference solutions of uranyl nitrate or of plutonium nitrate to be made available. The samples are fabricated and packaged, and their benchmark values determined, by the Nuclear Material Metrology Laboratory in the Atalante facility. All the operations are carried out by highly precise weighing, including correction for air buoyancy. In order to guarantee the preservation of reference samples, a laser-sealing apparatus is used to condition the final solutions in ampoules. Random tests to check the concentration of uranium or plutonium are carried out on a certain number of ampoules after the sealing step. The analysis are performed on a photo-gravimetric analysis line (in glove box for Pu) based on the titanium potentiometric analysis method. The ampoules are then packaged and delivered to the participating laboratories. The French nuclear laboratories participating in the EQRAIN programs belong to the Cea and to the AREVA Group, with activities covering the entire fuel cycle. They have been joined by new participants from European, Japanese and South American laboratories.

  7. High Temperature Materials Laboratory Thirteenth Annual Report: October 1999 Through September 2000; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasto, AE

    2001-01-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) is designed to assist American industries, universities, and governmental agencies develop advanced materials by providing a skilled staff and numerous sophisticated, often one-of-a-kind pieces of materials characterization equipment. It is a nationally designated user facility sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) office of Transportation Technologies, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Physically, it is a 64,500-ft(sup 2) building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HTML houses six ''user centers,'' which are clusters of specialized equipment designed for specific types of properties measurements. The HTML was conceived and built in the mid-1980s in response to the oil embargoes of the 1970s. The concept was to build a facility that would allow direct work with American industry, academia, and government laboratories in providing advanced high-temperature materials such as structural ceramics for energy-efficient engines. The HTML's scope of work has since expanded to include other, non-high-temperature materials of interest to transportation and other industries

  8. Fundamentals of passive nondestructive assay of fissionable material: laboratory workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, T.D.; Augustson, R.H.; Parker, J.L. Walton, R.B.; Atwell, T.L.; Umbarger, C.J.; Burns, C.E.

    1975-02-01

    This workbook is a supplement to LA-5651-M, ''Fundamentals of Passive Nondestructive Assay of Fissionable Material'' which is the text used during the Nondestructive Assay Training Session given by Group A-1 of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. It contains the writeups used during the six laboratory sessions covering basic gamma-ray principles, quantitative gamma-ray measurements, uranium enrichment measurements, equipment holdup measurements, basic neutron principles, and quantitative neutron assay.

  9. The Trope Tank: A Laboratory with Material Resources for Creative Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Montfort

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2014v10n2p53 Principles for organizing and making use of a laboratory with material computing resources are articulated. This laboratory, the Trope Tank, is a facility for teaching, research, and creative collaboration and offers hardware (in working condition and set up for use from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, including videogame systems, home computers, and an arcade cabinet. To aid in investigating the material history of texts, the lab has a small 19th century letterpress, a typewriter, a print terminal, and dot-matrix printers. Other resources include controllers, peripherals, manuals, books, and software on physical media. These resources are used for teaching, loaned for local exhibitions and presentations, and accessed by researchers and artists. The space is primarily a laboratory (rather than a library, studio, or museum, so materials are organized by platform and intended use. Textual information about the historical contexts of the available systems, and resources are set up to allow easy operation, and even casual use, by researchers, teachers, students, and artists.

  10. Preparation for microgravity - The role of the Microgravity Material Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J. Christopher; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Meyer, Maryjo B.; Glasgow, Thomas K.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Microgravity Material Science Laboratory using physical and mathematical models to delineate the effects of gravity on processes of scientific and commercial interest are discussed. Where possible, transparent model systems are used to visually track convection, settling, crystal growth, phase separation, agglomeration, vapor transport, diffusive flow, and polymer reactions. Materials studied include metals, alloys, salts, glasses, ceramics, and polymers. Specific technologies discussed include the General Purpose furnace used in the study of metals and crystal growth, the isothermal dendrite growth apparatus, the electromagnetic levitator/instrumented drop tube, the high temperature directional solidification furnace, the ceramics and polymer laboratories and the center's computing facilities.

  11. ENHANCING THE LISTENING MOTIVATION AND ACHIEVEMENT OF THE ELEVENTH GRADERS BY USING DRAMA MOVIES VIEWING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suramto Suramto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate whether or not there was a significant differencein students’ listening motivation and achievement after they were taught by dramamovies viewing technique. The objects of the study were 60 eleventh graders. A quasiexperimental design was used in this study.Data were collected by using motivationquestionnaire and listening achievement tests. The results showed that the students whowere treated by drama movies viewing technique achieved higher mean score inlistening motivation (80.57 and listening achievement (81.46. Drama movies viewingtechnique also gave contribution in listening motivation (31.9% and listeningachievement (61.8%.Keywords: drama movies viewing techniques, listening motivation, and listeningAchievement.

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Working Reference Material Production Pla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Amy; Thronas, Denise; Marshall, Robert

    1998-11-04

    This Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Working Reference Material Production Plan was written for LLNL by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to address key elements of producing seven Pu-diatomaceous earth NDA Working Reference Materials (WRMS). These WRMS contain low burnup Pu ranging in mass from 0.1 grams to 68 grams. The composite Pu mass of the seven WRMS was designed to approximate the maximum TRU allowable loading of 200 grams Pu. This document serves two purposes: first, it defines all the operations required to meet the LLNL Statement of Work quality objectives, and second, it provides a record of the production and certification of the WRMS. Guidance provided in ASTM Standard Guide C1128-89 was used to ensure that this Plan addressed all the required elements for producing and certifying Working Reference Materials. The Production Plan was written to provide a general description of the processes, steps, files, quality control, and certification measures that were taken to produce the WRMS. The Plan identifies the files where detailed procedures, data, quality control, and certification documentation and forms are retained. The Production Plan is organized into three parts: a) an initial section describing the preparation and characterization of the Pu02 and diatomaceous earth materials, b) middle sections describing the loading, encapsulation, and measurement on the encapsulated WRMS, and c) final sections describing the calculations of the Pu, Am, and alpha activity for the WRMS and the uncertainties associated with these quantities.

  13. Multiyear Program Plan for the High Temperature Materials Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvid E. Pasto

    2000-03-17

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) prepared a Technology Roadmap describing the challenges facing development of higher fuel efficiency, less polluting sport utility vehicles, vans, and commercial trucks. Based on this roadmap, a multiyear program plan (MYPP) was also developed, in which approaches to solving the numerous challenges are enumerated. Additional planning has been performed by DOE and national laboratory staff, on approaches to solving the numerous challenges faced by heavy vehicle system improvements. Workshops and planning documents have been developed concerning advanced aerodynamics, frictional and other parasitic losses, and thermal management. Similarly, the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program has developed its own multiyear program plan. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory, a major user facility sponsored by OHVT, has now developed its program plan, described herein. Information was gathered via participation in the development of OHVT's overall Technology Roadmap and MYPP, through personal contacts within the materials-user community, and from attendance at conferences and expositions. Major materials issues for the heavy vehicle industry currently center on trying to increase efficiency of (diesel) engines while at the same time reducing emissions (particularly NO{sub x} and particulates). These requirements dictate the use of increasingly stronger, higher-temperature capable and more corrosion-resistant materials of construction, as well as advanced catalysts, particulate traps, and other pollution-control devices. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a technique which will certainly be applied to diesel engines in the near future, and its use represents a formidable challenge, as will be described later. Energy-efficient, low cost materials processing methods and surface treatments to improve wear, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also required.

  14. Technical performance of cementitious grouting materials for ONKALO. Laboratory tests 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raivio, P.; Hansen, J.

    2007-09-01

    During 2006 the development of high and low-pH cementitious grouts for fractures > 100 μm designed for the ONKALO rock was continued within the LPHTEK/IMAproject. The main focus in laboratory was to study high pH micro cement grouts. The low pH (≥ 11.0) of the cementitious grout material is required in deep repository as natural pH plume deriving from pure cement paste is very high and moves via ground water circulation in bedrock. This may be deleterious to the protective covers of nuclear waste. The objective to study high pH grouts in laboratory was to optimise their composition and to get preliminary test results. Low pH grouts based on Portland cement + micro silica were also studied further in laboratory to understand their behaviour more thoroughly in different conditions and due to quality changes in materials and to compare the laboratory results with the field results. Alternative fine-grained glass material was briefly studied to replace silica in low pH grout. Low and high pH rock bolt mortars were also developed and tested to get the preliminary test results. The results of the 2006 laboratory work are presented in this report. The high pH micro cement mix U1 with no silica, mix 5/5 with moderate silica and low pH mix P308B rich in silica show generally good properties at fresh and hardening stage at +12 deg C. Lower temperature gives weaker strength build-up with all the mixes and weakens especially the Marsh fluidity and penetration ability of the mixes 5/5 and P308B as bulk density rises a little at lower temperature. Cement quality variation and insufficient mixing may also weaken the properties of all mixes. Deformation of the hardened mixes was observed in laboratory tests. This may weaken their durability if cracks are formed in the grouts at later ages and need to be studied more thoroughly. (orig.)

  15. Status report on US-Russian laboratory-to-laboratory cooperation in nuclear materials protection, control and accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, M.

    1996-01-01

    In April 1994, a new program of cooperation on nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) was initiated between (1) the US Department of Energy and its laboratories and (2) nuclear institutes and enterprises of the Russian Federation. The program is called the Laboratory-to-Laboratory Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting Program (Lab-to-Lab MPC and A Program); it is one of several, complementary US-Russian MPC and A programs. The purpose of the Lab-to-Lab MPC and A Program is to accelerate progress toward a goal that is vital to the national security interests of both countries: reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation by strengthening MPC and A systems. In its first two years, the program has made significant progress and has expanded to include many additional Russian participants. It has also fostered a spirit of mutual understanding, partnership, and respect between US and Russian nuclear specialists, which has paved the way for advances in other MPC and A and nuclear security cooperative efforts. This paper reviews the current status of the program. In addition to summarizing the background and objectives of the program, the paper describes highlights of recent work and outlines future directions for Lab-to-Lab MPC and A cooperation

  16. Intervention of hydrogen analysis laboratory for radioactive materials study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, N.; Vinces, H.; Figueroa, S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the practice was the measurement of the hydrogen concentration on structural material from the Central Nuclear Atucha I (CNA-I) cooling channels using a LECO gas analyser. Original samples were previously separated into fractions at the Laboratiorio para Ensayos de Post-Irradiacion (LAPEP), Centro Atomico Ezeiza. The practice and the preliminary conditions of the laboratory and equipment to reduce the occupational dose for personnel and the work area contamination are described in this paper. In addition to the training activity for workers, the radiological control performed during the intervention and procedure followed to decontaminate LECO and the laboratory are summarized here. (authors)

  17. Quality manual for Laboratories of the Nuclear Materials Characterization Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.

    1991-05-01

    This publication presents the first Quality Manual for the Laboratories at the Nuclear Materials Characterization Division. The Manual describes the laboratories, its organization structure, fields of activities, personnel records, equipments, maintenance and calibration. The main aspects concerning quality assurance in the analysis were discussed. The whole system of receiving, identifying and processing analysis of the samples is shown. Since there are many information to be contained in several subjects of the Quality Manual, there were produced separate documents that are cross referenced in the manual. (author)

  18. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  19. Formal training program for nuclear material custodians at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.D.

    1979-01-01

    Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) has established a formal training program for nuclear material (NM) custodians. The program, designed to familiarize the custodian with the fundamental concepts of proper nuclear materials control and accountability, is conducted on a semiannual basis. The program is prepared and presented by the Safeguards and Materials Management Section of HEDL and covers 14 subjects on accountability, documentation, transportation, custodian responsibilities, and the safeguarding of nuclear material

  20. Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, D.M.; Boring, A.M. [comps.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory`s defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location.

  1. Progress on laboratory studies of the immobilisation of plutonium contaminated materials (pcm)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awmack, A.F.; Hemingway, K.

    1984-09-01

    This report describes progress on laboratory scale investigations into immobilisation of Plutonium Contaminated Materials for the year ending August 1984. The work is a continuation of that previously reported though some new work is also included. The samples tested were shredded plastic materials and latex. Three areas of work are covered (1) ISO Leach Tests (2) Radiolysis and degradation of organic materials (3) Equilibrium Leach Tests. (author)

  2. Multiyear Program Plan for the High Temperature Materials Laboratory; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvid E. Pasto

    2000-01-01

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) prepared a Technology Roadmap describing the challenges facing development of higher fuel efficiency, less polluting sport utility vehicles, vans, and commercial trucks. Based on this roadmap, a multiyear program plan (MYPP) was also developed, in which approaches to solving the numerous challenges are enumerated. Additional planning has been performed by DOE and national laboratory staff, on approaches to solving the numerous challenges faced by heavy vehicle system improvements. Workshops and planning documents have been developed concerning advanced aerodynamics, frictional and other parasitic losses, and thermal management. Similarly, the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program has developed its own multiyear program plan. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory, a major user facility sponsored by OHVT, has now developed its program plan, described herein. Information was gathered via participation in the development of OHVT's overall Technology Roadmap and MYPP, through personal contacts within the materials-user community, and from attendance at conferences and expositions. Major materials issues for the heavy vehicle industry currently center on trying to increase efficiency of (diesel) engines while at the same time reducing emissions (particularly NO(sub x) and particulates). These requirements dictate the use of increasingly stronger, higher-temperature capable and more corrosion-resistant materials of construction, as well as advanced catalysts, particulate traps, and other pollution-control devices. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a technique which will certainly be applied to diesel engines in the near future, and its use represents a formidable challenge, as will be described later. Energy-efficient, low cost materials processing methods and surface treatments to improve wear, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also required

  3. An Efficient Procedure for Removal and Inactivation of Alpha-Synuclein Assemblies from Laboratory Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousset, Luc; Brundin, Patrik; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat; Melki, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Preformed α-synuclein fibrils seed the aggregation of soluble α-synuclein in cultured cells and in vivo. This, and other findings, has kindled the idea that α-synuclein fibrils possess prion-like properties. As α-synuclein fibrils should not be considered as innocuous, there is a need for decontamination and inactivation procedures for laboratory benches and non-disposable laboratory material. We assessed the effectiveness of different procedures designed to disassemble α-synuclein fibrils and reduce their infectivity. We examined different commercially available detergents to remove α-synuclein assemblies adsorbed on materials that are not disposable and that are most found in laboratories (e.g. plastic, glass, aluminum or stainless steel surfaces). We show that methods designed to decrease PrP prion infectivity neither effectively remove α-synuclein assemblies adsorbed to different materials commonly used in the laboratory nor disassemble the fibrillar form of the protein with efficiency. In contrast, both commercial detergents and SDS detached α-synuclein assemblies from contaminated surfaces and disassembled the fibrils. We describe three cleaning procedures that effectively remove and disassemble α-synuclein seeds. The methods rely on the use of detergents that are compatible with most non-disposable tools in a laboratory. The procedures are easy to implement and significantly decrease any potential risks associated to handling α-synuclein assemblies.

  4. Desain dan Implementasi Virtual Laboratory Materi Osilator Analog berbasis IC OP-AMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYIFAUL FUADA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Laboratorium virtual merupakan salah satu platform laboratorium modern yang dapat mendukung kegiatan praktikum yang berjalan secara tradisional (Hand-on Laboratory.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendesain dan mengimplementasikan Virtual Laboratory pada materi pembangkit sinyal dengan subtopik: Wien Bridge sebagai osilator RC, Hartley dan Colpitts sebagai osilator LC dan Astable Multivibrator sebagai osilator relaksasi,yang dibangun berbasis IC Operational Amplifier (OP-AMP.Jenis penelitian ini merupakan R&Dyang terdiri dari enam tahapan, yaitu:konsep, desain, pengumpulan bahan, pembuatan, pengujian dan pendistribusian. Aplikasi perangkat lunak berbasis dekstop ini telah diuji secara fungsional dengan 6 (enam aspek parameter yakni:uji polaritas kapastor; uji wiring; uji mode frekuensi dan mode perioda pada alat ukur frequency generator; uji specific decission pada trainer kit osilator hartley dan colpitts; uji kesesuaian antara frekuensi ouput dari masing-masing osilator dengan perhitungan teorema dan hasil percobaan sesungguhnya; dan uji kualitas media. Hasil secara keseluruhan telah sesuai dengan ekspektasi didalam story board. Kata kunci: IC OP-AMP, Osilator analog, Laboratorium virtual ABSTRACT The Virtual Laboratory is as one of modern laboratory platform which able to supportthe hand-on worklab. The goal of this research are for designing and implementing a Virtual Laboratory of signal generator material with subtopics i.e. the Wien Bridge as an RC oscillator, the Hartley and Colpitts as LC oscillator and the astable multivibrator as relaxation oscillator which assembled based on Operational Amplifier Integrated Circuit (OP-AMP.This research is R&D type which consists of six stages, i.e. concept, design, materials collection, assembling, testing and distribution. This desktop-based software application has been functionally tested with six aspect of parameters such as: capacitor polarity testing; wiring testing; testing of frequency

  5. International Atomic Energy Agency consultants' group meeting on C-14 reference materials for radiocarbon laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanski, K.

    2001-01-01

    This publication describes the 14 C intercomparison study co-ordinated by the IAEA. Five intercomparison materials have been prepared and distributed among 137 participating laboratories. By February 20, 1991, results have been received from 69 laboratories (39 of them representing liquid scintillation counting, 25 - gas counting, and 6 - accelerator mass spectrometry). This publication presents measurement results and their discussion along with description of the materials and methodology

  6. Proceedings of the of the Eleventh Workshop on Language Descriptions, Tools and Applications (LDTA 2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eleventh Workshop on Language Descriptions, Tools and Applications (LDTA 2011), held in Saarbrücken, Germany on March 26 & 27, 2011. LDTA is a two-day satellite event of ETAPS (European Joint Conferences on Theory and Practice of Software) and organized...... in cooperation with ACM SIGPLAN. LDTA is an application and tool-oriented workshop focused on grammarware---software based on grammars in some form. Grammarware applications are typically language processing applications and traditional examples include parsers, program analyzers, optimizers and translators......, as well as techniques and tools, to the test in a new way in the form of the LDTA Tool Challenge. Tool developers were invited to participate in the Challenge by developing solutions to a range of language processing tasks over a simple but evolving set of imperative programming languages. Tool challenge...

  7. Certification of biological reference materials: participation of the Neutron Activation Laboratory (LAN-IPEN/CNEN-SP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ticianelli, Regina B.; Figueiredo, Ana Maria G.

    2007-01-01

    Analytical laboratories have as one of their important goals to demonstrate their competence allowing international acceptance and comparison of analytical data. The IPEN Neutron Activation Laboratory (LAN-IPEN) has implemented its Quality Assurance Program which comprises, among other activities, the participation in intercomparison runs. As a part of this Quality Assurance Program, LAN-IPEN has participated in interlaboratorial trials to analyze two biological candidate reference materials: INCT-CF-3 Corn Flour and INCT-SBF-4 Soya Bean Flour from the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry And Technology (Warszawa, Poland). The elements Br, Ca, Co, Cs, Fe, K, Na, Rb and Zn were analyzed in the candidate reference materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The performance of the laboratory was statistically evaluated in relation to the consensus values for these materials using the Z-Score test. This laboratory evaluation method has been accepted as a standard by ISO/IUPAC. In the present study, adequate Z-Score values (|Z|<2) were observed for all of the analyzed elements, confirming the accuracy of the nuclear methodology employed. The contribution of LAN-IPEN in the certification of the reference materials analyzed was very important, since the results provided were used in the statistical evaluation of the certified value. (author)

  8. Materials capability review Los Alamos National Laboratory, May 3-6, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    , environment for conducting science, technology and engineering. The specific charge for the Materials Capability Review is to assess the Los Alamos Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled, 'First Principles Predictive Capabilities for Transuranic Materials: Mott Insulators to Correlated Metals' using the criteria performance, quality, and relevance for the current status of the project. The committee is requested to provide advice on future direction of the project.

  9. Spherical wave particle velocities in geologic materials from laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizek, J.C.; Florence, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    Particle velocity records that describe spherical waves in rock simulants, tuffs, salt, and granite have been obtained in laboratory experiments. The records aid the modeling of constitutive equations for continuum mechanics codes used in DNA containment research. The technique has also been applied to investigate containment-related problems involving material poperties, failure criteria, scaling, decoupling, and residual strain field relaxation. 22 figures

  10. Irradiation probe and laboratory for irradiated material evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutny, S.; Kupca, L.; Beno, P.; Stubna, M.; Mrva, V.; Chmelo, P.

    1975-09-01

    The survey and assessment are given of the tasks carried out in the years 1971 to 1975 within the development of methods for structural materials irradiation and of a probe for the irradiation thereof in the A-1 reactor. The programme and implementation of laboratory tests of the irradiation probe are described. In the actual reactor irradiation, the pulse tube length between the pressure governor and the irradiation probe is approximately 20 m, the diameter is 2.2 mm. Temperature reaches 800 degC while the pressure control system operates at 20 degC. The laboratory tests (carried out at 20 degC) showed that the response time of the pressure control system to a stepwise pressure change in the irradiation probe from 0 to 22 at. is 0.5 s. Pressure changes were also studied in the irradiation probe and in the entire system resulting from temperature changes in the irradiation probe. Temperature distribution in the body of the irradiation probe heating furnace was determined. (B.S.)

  11. Influence of Decontaminating Agents and Swipe Materials on Laboratory Simulated Working Surfaces Wet Spilled with Sodium Pertechnetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchata, Suman; Lavanya, K; Shivanand, Bhushan

    2017-01-01

    Decontamination of various working surfaces with sodium pertechnetate minor spillage is essential for maintaining good radiation safety practices as well as for regulatory compliance. To observe the influences of decontaminating agents and swipe materials on different type of surfaces used in nuclear medicine laboratory work area wet spilled with 99m-technetium (99mTc) sodium pertechnetate. Lab-simulated working surface materials. Experimental study design. Direct decontamination method on dust-free lab simulated new working surfaces [stainless steel, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Perspex, resin] using four decontaminating agents [tap water, soap water (SW), Radiacwash, and spirit] with four different swipe material [cotton, tissue paper (TP), Whatman paper (WP), adsorbent sheet (AS)] was taken 10 samples (n = 10) for each group. Parametric test two-way analysis of variance is used with significance level of 0.005, was used to evaluate statistical differences between different group of decontaminating agent and swipe material, and the results are expressed in mean ± SD. Decontamination factor is calculated after five cleaning for each group. A total of 160 samples result calculated using four decontaminating agent (tap water, SW, Radiacwash, and spirit), four swipe material (cotton, TP, WP, and AS) for commonly used surface (stainless steel, PVC, Perspex, resin) using direct method by 10 samples (n = 10) for each group. Tap water is the best decontaminating agent compared with SW, Radiac wash and spirit for the laboratory simulated stainless steel, PVC, and Perspex surface material, whereas in case of resin surface material, SW decontaminating agent is showing better effectiveness. Cotton is the best swipe material compared to WP-1, AS and TP for the stainless steel, PVC, Perspex, and resin laboratory simulated surface materials. Perspex and stainless steel are the most suitable and recommended laboratory surface material compared to PVC and resin in nuclear medicine

  12. Directory of national competent authorities' approval certificates for package design, special form material and shipment of radioactive material. 2000 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    Safety in the transport of radioactive material is dependent on packaging appropriate for the contents being shipped, rather than on operational and/or administrative actions required on the package. The grater the radiological risk posed by the material being moved, the more stringent become the performance for the packaging that can be authorised to contain it. These principles have been expanded since 1061 into a set of regulations that are responsible for safety moving the ever-growing number and complexity of radioactive material shipments throughout the world. The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material are incorporated into UN regulations, as well as the requirements of other international transport organizations. This is the eleventh report published by the IAEA since implementing its database on package approval certificates (PACKTRAM) at the recommendation of the Transport safety Standards Advisory Committee (TRANSSAC). Through the PACKTRAM database, the IAEA collects administrative and technical information provided by the issuing competent authority about package approval certificates

  13. GPR Laboratory Tests For Railways Materials Dielectric Properties Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca De Chiara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In railways Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR studies, the evaluation of materials dielectric properties is critical as they are sensitive to water content, to petrographic type of aggregates and to fouling condition of the ballast. Under the load traffic, maintenance actions and climatic effects, ballast condition change due to aggregate breakdown and to subgrade soils pumping, mainly on existing lines with no sub ballast layer. The main purpose of this study was to validate, under controlled conditions, the dielectric values of materials used in Portuguese railways, in order to improve the GPR interpretation using commercial software and consequently the management maintenance planning. Different materials were tested and a broad range of in situ conditions were simulated in laboratory, in physical models. GPR tests were performed with five antennas with frequencies between 400 and 1800 MHz. The variation of the dielectric properties was measured, and the range of values that can be obtained for different material condition was defined. Additionally, in situ GPR measurements and test pits were performed for validation of the dielectric constant of clean ballast. The results obtained are analyzed and the main conclusions are presented herein.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  15. Testing Plastic Deformations of Materials in the Introductory Undergraduate Mechanics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Kroger, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Normally, a mechanics laboratory at the undergraduate level includes an experiment to verify compliance with Hooke's law in materials, such as a steel spring and an elastic rubber band. Stress-strain curves are found for these elements. Compression in elastic bands is practically impossible to achieve due to flaccidity. A typical experiment for…

  16. Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, D.M.; Boring, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory's defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location

  17. The Impact of Differentiated Instructional Materials on English Language Learner (ELL) Students' Comprehension of Science Laboratory Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manavathu, Marian; Zhou, George

    2012-01-01

    Through a qualitative research design, this article investigates the impacts of differentiated laboratory instructional materials on English language learners' (ELLs) laboratory task comprehension. The factors affecting ELLs' science learning experiences are further explored. Data analysis reveals a greater degree of laboratory task comprehension…

  18. Establishment of a clean laboratory for ultra trace analysis of nuclear materials in safeguards environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzawa, Yukiko; Magara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has established a cleanroom facility with cleanliness of ISO Class 5: the Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research (CLEAR). It was designed to be used for the analysis of nuclear materials in environmental samples mainly for the safeguards, in addition to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification and research on environmental sciences. The CLEAR facility was designed to meet conflicting requirements of a cleanroom and for handling of nuclear materials according to Japanese regulations, i.e., to avoid contamination from outside and to contain nuclear materials inside the facility. This facility has been intended to be used for wet chemical treatment, instrumental analysis and particle handling. A fume-hood to provide a clean work surface for handling of nuclear materials was specially designed. Much attention was paid to the selection of construction materials for use to corrosive acids. The performance of the cleanroom and analytical background in the laboratory are discussed. This facility has satisfactory specification required for joining the International Atomic Energy Agency Network of Analytical Laboratories. It can be concluded that the CLEAR facility enables analysis of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials at sub-pictogram level in environmental samples. (author)

  19. Testing capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloy, S.A.; James, M.R.; Sommer, W.F.

    1999-01-01

    Spallation neutron sources expose materials to high energy (>100 MeV) proton and neutron spectra. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of radiation damage in a lower energy neutron flux from fission or fusion reactors on the mechanical properties of materials, very little work has been performed on the effects that exposure to a spallation neutron spectrum has on the mechanical properties of materials. These effects can be significantly different than those observed in a fission or fusion reactor spectrum because exposure to high energy protons and neutrons produces more He and H along with the atomic displacement damage. Los Alamos National Laboratory has unique facilities to study the effects of spallation radiation damage on the mechanical properties of materials. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has a pulsed linear accelerator which operates at 800 MeV and 1 mA. The Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF) located at the end of this accelerator is designed to allow the irradiation of components in a proton beam while water cooling these components and measuring their temperature. After irradiation, specimens can be investigated at hot cells located at the Chemical Metallurgy Research Building. Wing 9 of this facility contains 16 hot cells set up in two groups of eight, each having a corridor in the center to allow easy transfer of radioactive shipments into and out of the hot cells. These corridors have been used to prepare specimens for shipment to collaborating laboratories such as PNNL, ORNL, BNL, and the Paul Scherrer Institute to perform specialized testing at their hot cells. The LANL hot cells contain capabilities for opening radioactive components and testing their mechanical properties as well as preparing specimens from irradiated components

  20. Assessment of the quality of test results from selected civil engineering material testing laboratories in Tanzania

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbawala, SJ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Civil and geotechnical engineering material testing laboratories are expected to produce accurate and reliable test results. However, the ability of laboratories to produce accurate and reliable test results depends on many factors, among others...

  1. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  2. Reactivity between carbon cathode materials and electrolyte based on industrial and laboratory data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chauke, L

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between electrolyte and carbon cathodes during the electrolytic production of aluminium decreases cell life. This paper describes the interaction between carbon cathode materials and electrolyte, based on industrial and laboratory data...

  3. Laboratory Studies of Cometary Materials - Continuity Between Asteroid and Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Walker, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory analysis of cometary samples have been enabled by collection of cometary dust in the stratosphere by high altitude aircraft and by the direct sampling of the comet Wild-2 coma by the NASA Stardust spacecraft. Cometary materials are composed of a complex assemblage of highly primitive, unprocessed interstellar and primordial solar system materials as well as a variety of high temperature phases that must have condensed in the inner regions of the protoplanetary disk. These findings support and contradict conclusions of comet properties based solely on astronomical observations. These sample return missions have instead shown that there is a continuity of properties between comets and asteroids, where both types of materials show evidence for primitive and processed materials. Furthermore, these findings underscore the importance and value of direct sample return. There will be great value in comparing the findings of the Stardust cometary coma sample return mission with those of future asteroid surface sample returns OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa II as well as future comet nucleus sample returns.

  4. High Temperature Materials Laboratory fourth annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1991-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its fourth year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the user program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions who have executed user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 118 nonproprietary agreements (62 university and 56 industry) and 28 proprietary agreements (2 university, 26 industry) are now in effect. Five other government facilities have also participated in the user program. Sixty-free nonproprietary research proposals (38 from university, 26 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and four proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1991 are summarized.

  5. Incident involving radioactive material at IAEA Safeguards Laboratory - No radioactivity released to environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Pressure build-up in a small sealed sample bottle in a storage safe resulted in plutonium contamination of a storage room at about 02:30 today at the IAEA's Safeguards Analytical Laboratory in Seibersdorf. All indications are that there was no release of radioactivity to the environment. Further monitoring around the laboratory will be undertaken. No one was working in the laboratory at the time. The Laboratory's safety system detected plutonium contamination in the storage room where the safe was located and in two other rooms - subsequently confirmed by a team of IAEA radiation protection experts. The Laboratory is equipped with multiple safety systems, including an air-filtering system to prevent the release of radioactivity to the environment. There will be restricted access to the affected rooms until they are decontaminated. A full investigation of the incident will be conducted. The IAEA has informed the Austrian regulatory authority. The IAEA's Laboratory in Seibersdorf is located within the complex of the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf (ARC), about 35 km southeast of Vienna. The laboratory routinely analyses small samples of nuclear material (uranium or plutonium) as part of the IAEA's safeguards verification work. (IAEA)

  6. Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk

  7. Laboratory scale stabilization of N-springs groundwater strontium-90 using phosphatic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, T.E.; Petersen, S.W.; Torne, E.G.; Vlcakova, J.; Higginbotham, J.F.

    1996-09-01

    This document presents the results of a laboratory study designed to evaluate the ability of phosphatic materials to sorb strontium-90 from soil and groundwater. This study was initiated to investigate the potential use of phosphatic materials as permeable geochemical barriers for groundwater contaminated with strontium-90. Groundwater discharges to the Columbia River create potential human food chain hazards; therefore, it is imperative to immobilize the contamination before it reaches the river. Phosphate materials have been proven by various researchers to be chemical compounds that combine with contaminant metals forming into insoluble metal-phosphate minerals. These minerals are stable and insoluble under normal soil conditions

  8. Readability assessment of online urology patient education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Marc; Svider, Peter F; Agarwal, Nitin; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Jackson, Imani M

    2013-03-01

    The National Institutes of Health, American Medical Association, and United States Department of Health and Human Services recommend that patient education materials be written at a fourth to sixth grade reading level to facilitate comprehension. We examined and compared the readability and difficulty of online patient education materials from the American Urological Association and academic urology departments in the Northeastern United States. We assessed the online patient education materials for difficulty level with 10 commonly used readability assessment tools, including the Flesch Reading Ease Score, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook, New Dale-Chall Test, Coleman-Liau index, New Fog Count, Raygor Readability Estimate, FORCAST test and Fry score. Most patient education materials on the websites of these programs were written at or above the eleventh grade reading level. Urological online patient education materials are written above the recommended reading level. They may need to be simplified to facilitate better patient understanding of urological topics. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of hemoglobin typing control materials for laboratory investigation of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornprasert, Sakorn; Tookjai, Monthathip; Punyamung, Manoo; Pongpunyayuen, Panida; Jaiping, Kanokwan

    2016-01-01

    To date, the hemoglobin (Hb) typing control materials for laboratory investigation of thalassemia with low (1.8%-3.2%) and high (4%-6%) levels of HbA2 are available but there are no Hb typing quality control materials for analysis of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies which are highly prevalent in South-East Asian countries. The main aim of the present study was to develop the lyophilized Hb typing control materials for laboratory investigation of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies that are commonly found in South-East Asia. Erythrocytes of blood samples containing Hb Bart's, HbH, HbE, HbF, Hb Constant Spring (CS), Hb Hope, and Hb Q-Thailand were washed and dialysed with 0.85% saline solution. The erythrocytes were then lysed in 5% sucrose solution. The lyophilized Hb typing control materials were prepared by using a freeze drying (lyophilization) method. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of lyophilized Hb was performed after the storage at -20 °C for 1 year and also after reconstitution and storage at 4 or -20 °C for 30 days. In addition, the Hb analysis was compared between the three different methods of HPLC, low pressure liquid chromatography (LPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Following a year of storage at -20 °C, the HPLC chromatograms of lyophilized Hb typing control materials showed similar patterns to the equivalent fresh whole blood. The stability of reconstituted Hb typing control materials was also observed through 30 days after reconstitution and storage at -20 °C. Moreover, the Hb typing control materials could be analyzed by three methods, HPLC, LPLC and CE. Even a degraded peak of HbCS was found on CE electropherogram. The lyophilized Hb typing control materials could be developed and used as control materials for investigation of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies.

  10. Materials and Methods for Streamlined Laboratory Analysis of Environmental Samples, FY 2016 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addleman, Raymond S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Naes, Benjamin E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McNamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olsen, Khris B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chouyyok, Wilaiwan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Willingham, David G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spigner, Angel C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies upon laboratory analysis of environmental samples (typically referred to as “swipes”) collected during on-site inspections of safeguarded facilities to support the detection and deterrence of undeclared activities. Unfortunately, chemical processing and assay of the samples is slow and expensive. A rapid, effective, and simple extraction process and analysis method is needed to provide certified results with improved timeliness at reduced costs (principally in the form of reduced labor), while maintaining or improving sensitivity and efficacy. To address these safeguard needs the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) explored and demonstrated improved methods for environmental sample (ES) analysis. Improvements for both bulk and particle analysis were explored. To facilitate continuity and adoption, the new sampling materials and processing methods will be compatible with existing IAEA protocols for ES analysis. PNNL collaborated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which performed independent validation of the new bulk analysis methods and compared performance to traditional IAEA’s Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) protocol. ORNL efforts are reported separately. This report describes PNNL’s FY 2016 progress, which was focused on analytical application supporting environmental monitoring of uranium enrichment plants and nuclear fuel processing. In the future the technology could be applied to other safeguard applications and analytes related to fuel manufacturing, reprocessing, etc. PNNL’s FY 2016 efforts were broken into two tasks and a summary of progress, accomplishments and highlights are provided below. Principal progress and accomplishments on Task 1, Optimize Materials and Methods for ICP-MS Environmental Sample Analysis, are listed below. • Completed initial procedure for rapid uranium extraction from ES swipes based upon carbonate-peroxide chemistry (delivered to ORNL for

  11. Decontamination efficiency of a sheet of vinyl wall paper as a surface material in radioisotope laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuhiko; Funadera, Kanako

    1989-01-01

    It has long been desired to prevent surface materials from cracking in a radioisotope laboratory. We applied a sheet of nonflammable wall paper, vinyl cloth, as a surface material to cover concrete wall. It was sufficiently resistant to the reinforced concrete wall cracking. The efficiency of the decontamination of the vinyl cloth was compared with those of stainless steel, iron and painted plates. The contamination and decontamination indices were determined in these surface materials after contamination with [ 32 P]orthophosphate (pH 3, 7 and 11) for 0 to 48 h. Both of the indices of the vinyl cloth were higher than those of the other materials. Further, it was confirmed that the vinyl cloth was resistant to acid and alkaline conditions and radioisotopes could not be permeable. The wipe off efficiency was also investigated in these materials by use of several decontamination detergents. In any reagents tested, the wipe of efficiency of the vinyl cloth was more than 80%. Thus, the vinyl cloth could be used for the surface material and is one of good surface materials in a radioisotope laboratory. (author)

  12. High Temperature Materials Laboratory sixth annual report, October 1992--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1993-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its sixth year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the User Program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions executing user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 172 nonproprietary agreements (88 university and 84 industry) and 35 proprietary agreements, (2 university, 33 industry) are now in effect. Six other government facilities have also participated in the User Program. Thirty-eight states are represented by these interactions. Ninety-four nonproprietary research proposals (44 from universities, 47 from industry, and 3 from other government facilities) and three proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Nonproprietary research projects active in FY 1993 are summarized.

  13. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory materials in inventory natural and enriched uranium management and storage costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebeker, R.L.

    1995-11-01

    On July 13, 1994, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) was requested to develop a planning process that would result in management policies for dealing with nuclear materials in inventory. In response to this request, EM launched the Materials In Inventory (MIN) Initiative. A Headquarters Working Group was established to develop the broad policy framework for developing MIN management policies. MIN activities cover essentially all nuclear materials within the DOE complex, including such items as spent nuclear fuel, depleted uranium, plutonium, natural and enriched uranium, and other materials. In August 1995, a report discussing the natural and enriched uranium portion of the Initiative for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was published. That report, 'Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Materials-in-Inventory, Natural and Enriched Uranium'.' identified MIN under the control of Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company at the INEL. Later, additional information related to the costs associated with the storage of MIN materials was requested to supplement this report. This report provides the cost information for storing, disposing, or consolidating the natural and enriched uranium portion of the MIN materials at the INEL. The information consists of eight specific tables which detail present management costs and estimated costs of future activities

  14. Radioactivity decontamination of materials commonly used as surfaces in general-purpose radioisotope laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Natalia M; Tesán, Fiorella C; Zubillaga, Marcela B; Salgueiro, María J

    2014-12-01

    In accord with as-low-as-reasonably-achievable and good-manufacturing-practice concepts, the present study evaluated the efficiency of radioactivity decontamination of materials commonly used in laboratory surfaces and whether solvent spills on these materials affect the findings. Four materials were evaluated: stainless steel, a surface comprising one-third acrylic resin and two-thirds natural minerals, an epoxy cover, and vinyl-based multipurpose flooring. Radioactive material was eluted from a (99)Mo/(99m)Tc generator, and samples of the surfaces were control-contaminated with 37 MBq (100 μL) of this eluate. The same procedure was repeated with samples of surfaces previously treated with 4 solvents: methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, acetone, and ethanol. The wet radioactive contamination was allowed to dry and then was removed with cotton swabs soaked in soapy water. The effectiveness of decontamination was defined as the percentage of activity removed per cotton swab, and the efficacy of decontamination was defined as the total percentage of activity removed, which was obtained by summing the percentages of activity in all the swabs required to complete the decontamination. Decontamination using our protocol was most effective and most efficacious for stainless steel and multipurpose flooring. Moreover, treatment with common organic solvents seemed not to affect the decontamination of these surfaces. Decontamination of the other two materials was less efficient and was interfered with by the organic solvents; there was also great variability in the overall results obtained for these other two materials. In expanding our laboratory, it is possible for us to select those surface materials on which our decontamination protocol works best. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  15. Field and laboratory investigations on pavement backfilling material for micro-trenching in cold regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hashemian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Micro-trenching is an innovative utility installation method that involves creating a narrow trench to place cable or conduit in the road pavement. Compared to other installation methods, micro-trenching provides minimal disturbance to the community and surrounding environment. Despite the advantages of micro-trenching, it is not widely accepted by municipalities because of its potential to damage the existing pavement. Quality of backfilling is an important factor in long-term sustainability of the micro-trench, particularly in cold regions. This paper investigates the performance of two typical micro-trench backfilling methods in cold climates by studying a pilot project in a parking lot in Edmonton, Alberta, followed by a laboratory evaluation of the material used. For this purpose, the installations were monitored through ground-penetrating radar, optical time-domain reflectometer, and visual observations for three years. The monitoring results revealed that conduit had significant vertical movement inside the trench; several premature failures were also observed in the backfilling material. Laboratory investigation showed that the backfilling material did not meet the criteria for use in cold climates, and micro-trench performance could be enhanced using alternative materials. Keywords: Micro-trench, Pavement backfilling material, Fiber optic installation, Ground-penetrating radar

  16. Special from encapsulation for radioactive material shipments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaich, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Special Form encapsulation has been used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to ship radioactive solids for the past fifteen years. A family of inexpensive stainless steel containers has been developed and tested to meet the USA Department of Transportation (DOT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations concerning radioactive material shipments as Special Form

  17. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory April 29-May 2, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses Capability Reviews to assess the quality and institutional integration of science, technology and engineering (STE) and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of LANL STE. The capabilities are deliberately chosen to be crosscutting over the Laboratory and therefore will include experimental, theoretical and simulation disciplines from multiple line organizations. Capability Reviews are designed to provide a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. The principal product of the Capability Review is the report that includes the review committee's assessments, recommendations, and recommendations for STE.

  18. Writing Material in Chemical Physics Research: The Laboratory Notebook as Locus of Technical and Textual Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Chad

    2010-01-01

    This article, drawing on ethnographic study in a chemical physics research facility, explores how notebooks are used and produced in the conduct of laboratory science. Data include written field notes of laboratory activity; visual documentation of "in situ" writing processes; analysis of inscriptions, texts, and material artifacts produced in the…

  19. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  20. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research

  1. Management of nuclear materials in an R ampersand D environment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, R.G.; Roth, S.B.; Jones, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary R ampersand D organization and, as such, its nuclear materials inventory is diverse. Accordingly, major inventories of isotopes such as Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-242, U-235, Th, tritium, and deuterium, and lesser amounts of isotopes of Am, Cm, Np and exotic isotopes such as berkelium must be managed in accordance with Department of Energy Orders and Laboratory policies. Los Alamos also acts as a national resource for many one-of-a-kind materials which are supplied to universities, industry, and other government agencies within the US and throughout the world. Management of these materials requires effective interaction and communication with many nuclear materials custodians residing in over forty technical groups as well as effective interaction with numerous outside organizations. This paper discusses the role, philosophy, and organizational structure of Nuclear Materials Management at Los Alamos and also briefly presents results of two special nuclear materials management projects: 1- Revision of Item Description Codes for use in the Los Alamos nuclear material data base and 2- The recommendation of new economic discard limits for Pu-239. 2 refs., 1 fig

  2. "20 years of progress in highway safety" : verslag van the Eleventh International Technical Conference on Experimental Safety Vehicles ESV, Washington D.C., 12-15 May 1987 : achtergronden en overzicht van de ontwikkelingen tot juli 1988.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, L.T.B. van

    1988-01-01

    A report of a visit to the 'eleventh international conference on experimental safety vehicles, washington, 12-15 may 1987' is given in this publication. Some of the technical papers presented at the conference are described and commented upon: (the opening address, the status reports and the panel

  3. The correlation between concept mastery and stage of moral reasoning student using socio-scientific issues on reproductive system material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, T. A.; Saefudin; Priyandoko, D.

    2018-05-01

    This research aims to analyze the correlation between concept mastery and moral stages of students. The research method using a correlational study with stratified random sampling technique. The population in this research is all of eleventh grade students in Senior High School Bandung. Data were collected from 297 eleventh grade students of three Senior High School in Bandung with use the instrument in the form of examination and stage of moral reasoning questionnaire. The stage of moral reasoning in this research consists of two student’s moral reasoning categories based on 16 questionnaire as the indicators from Jones et al. (2007). The results of this research shows that the average of eleventh grade student’s moral reasoning stage is the advanced stage. The results of this research shows that the concept mastery and the stage of moral reasoning indicates that there are 0.370 0f a positive correlation. This research provides an overview of eleventh grade student about concept mastery and stage of moral reasoning using socio-scientific issues.

  4. Biology Factual Knowledge at Eleventh Grade of Senior High School Students in Pacitan based on Favorite Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustiana, I. A.; Paidi; Mercuriani, I. S.

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the Biology factual knowledge at eleventh grade of senior high school students in Pacitan based on favorite schools. This research was a descriptive research by using survey method. The population in this study was all of senior high school students in Pacitan. The sampling technique used purposive sampling technique and obtained 3 favorite schools and 3 non-favorite schools. The technique of collecting data used test form which was as the instrument of the research. Data analysis technique used Mann-Whitney U test. Based on the test, it was obtained p = 0,000 (p <0,05) so there was a significant difference between the factual knowledge of the students in the favorite schools and non-favorite schools in Pacitan. The factual knowledge of students in favorite schools was higher with an average of 5.32 while non-favorite schools were obtained an average of 4.36.

  5. Cometary Materials Originating from Interstellar Ices: Clues from Laboratory Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresneau, A.; Mrad, N. Abou; LS d’Hendecourt, L.; Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T.; Danger, G. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM UMR-CNRS 7345, F-13397 Marseille (France); Flandinet, L.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Vuitton, V.; Thissen, R., E-mail: gregoire.danger@univ-amu.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IPAG, Grenoble F-38000 (France)

    2017-03-10

    We use laboratory experiments to derive information on the chemistry occurring during the evolution of astrophysical ices from dense molecular clouds to interplanetary objects. Through a new strategy that consists of coupling very high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), we investigate the molecular content of the organic residues synthesized from different initial ice compositions. We also obtain information on the evolution of the soluble part of the residues after their over-irradiation. The results give insight into the role of water ice as a trapping and diluting agent during the chemical evolution. They also give information about the importance of the amount of ammonia in such ices, particularly regarding its competition with the carbon chemistry. All of these results allow us to build a first mapping of the evolution of soluble organic matter based on its chemical and physical history. Furthermore, our results suggest that interstellar ices should lead to organic materials enriched in heteroatoms that present similarities with cometary materials but strongly differ from meteoritic organic material, especially in their C/N ratios.

  6. Cometary Materials Originating from Interstellar Ices: Clues from Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresneau, A.; Abou Mrad, N.; d'Hendecourt, L. LS; Duvernay, F.; Flandinet, L.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Vuitton, V.; Thissen, R.; Chiavassa, T.; Danger, G.

    2017-03-01

    We use laboratory experiments to derive information on the chemistry occurring during the evolution of astrophysical ices from dense molecular clouds to interplanetary objects. Through a new strategy that consists of coupling very high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), we investigate the molecular content of the organic residues synthesized from different initial ice compositions. We also obtain information on the evolution of the soluble part of the residues after their over-irradiation. The results give insight into the role of water ice as a trapping and diluting agent during the chemical evolution. They also give information about the importance of the amount of ammonia in such ices, particularly regarding its competition with the carbon chemistry. All of these results allow us to build a first mapping of the evolution of soluble organic matter based on its chemical and physical history. Furthermore, our results suggest that interstellar ices should lead to organic materials enriched in heteroatoms that present similarities with cometary materials but strongly differ from meteoritic organic material, especially in their C/N ratios.

  7. The Mars Science Laboratory Organic Check Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Von der Heydt, Max O.; Mogensen, Claus T.; Canham, John; Harpold, Dan N.; Johnson, Joel; Errigo, Therese; Glavin, Daniel P.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2012-09-01

    Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover carries a set of five external verification standards in hermetically sealed containers that can be sampled as would be a Martian rock, by drilling and then portioning into the solid sample inlet of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite. Each organic check material (OCM) canister contains a porous ceramic solid, which has been doped with a fluorinated hydrocarbon marker that can be detected by SAM. The purpose of the OCM is to serve as a verification tool for the organic cleanliness of those parts of the sample chain that cannot be cleaned other than by dilution, i.e., repeated sampling of Martian rock. SAM possesses internal calibrants for verification of both its performance and its internal cleanliness, and the OCM is not used for that purpose. Each OCM unit is designed for one use only, and the choice to do so will be made by the project science group (PSG).

  8. Astrophysics Laboratory-Based Lecture Material Development of Solarscope with Integration and Interconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asih Melati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of laboratory-based lecture materials with integrated and interconnected value is a requirement for study and practical materials and in line with the vision and mission of UIN Sunan Kalijaga. As a result, the optimization of laboratory’s equipment is urgently needed. Although UIN Sunan Kalijaga Laboratory have had Solarscope telescope – which have a guidebook in German language – for six years, it was not optimally used even it can be used to satisfy the desires to observe astronomical objects economically, accurately and easy to operate. Based on above, this research propose to create a lab-work module for Solarscope with integration and interconnection value. This research used 4D methodology (Define, Design, Develop and Disseminate and have passed the assessment and validation phase from material, media and integrated-interconnected value experts. The data analysis of the module which was mapped by Sukarja into 5 scale mark resulted in good grade in the module assessment by material experts with 80% from the ideal mark with most of the complaint is in the formula typing which is not clear in its derivative. The module assessment by media experts scored very good grade with 88.89% from the ideal mark regarding the content and the figures of the module. Lastly, from the integrated-interconnected value experts marked in good grade with 73.50% from the ideal mark and suggested the addition of supported Al-Qur’an verses and relevant exclamation of the Al-Qur’an’s passages. With all of these assessment results, this module can be used as the material of astrophysics lab-work and for supporting students’ researches with integration-interconnection value and enhance the university’s book collection which will support the vision and mission of UIN Sunan Kalijaga

  9. The influence of lisping material in pelletizing and agglomeration of fine coal pieces in laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrencovski, Angele; Andreevski, Borche

    1998-01-01

    The work presents a part of laboratory results realized in academy of Firebug, carried on pelletizing and agglomeration of waste material, fine coal from thermal power station, using different lisping materials. Specially the influence of these materials in getting solid fuel, small briquette, formed by rolling press is analyzed. Special interest is attended to their characteristics: hardness and resistance. (Author)

  10. Materials Science Division HVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.

    1981-10-01

    The ANL-Materials Science Division High Voltage Electron Microscope-Tandem Facility is a unique national research facility available to scientists from industry, universities, and other national laboratories, following a peer evaluation of their research proposals by the Facility Steering Committee. The principal equipment consists of a Kratos EM7 1.2-MV high voltage electron microscope, a 300-kV Texas Nuclear ion accelerator, and a National Electrostatics 2-MV Tandem accelerator. Ions from both accelerators are transmitted into the electron microscope through the ion-beam interface. Recent work at the facility is summarized

  11. Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia's facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns

  12. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a containment level-III laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Kym S; Burdz, Tamara V; Turenne, Christine Y; Sharma, Meenu K; Kabani, Amin M; Wolfe, Joyce N

    2005-01-24

    In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3) laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating/chemical fixation) may not consistently kill MTB organisms. An inclusive viability study (n = 226) was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7%) of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80 degrees C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18), resulting in 0% viability. This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation) or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a CL3 laboratory. This process is vital to establish in

  13. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a Containment Level-III Laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabani Amin M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3 laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating /chemical fixation may not consistently kill MTB organisms. Methods An inclusive viability study (n = 226 was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Results Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7% of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80°C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18, resulting in 0% viability. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a

  14. OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS WITH BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS IN CLINICAL ANALYSIS LABORATORY: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Azevedo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accidents involving biological material can cause diseases to the professional healthcare and also bring psychosocial effects. The aim of this study was to characterize the accidents occurring with biological material with professional of clinical laboratories of Sinop-MT. Data were collected by a questionnaire consisting of sociodemographic and health variables. 21 (87.5% of respondents stated that they never suffered any kind of accident. One of the injured workers reported that there was involvement in your emotional life. It is observed underreporting of occupational accidents by employees affected, making it difficult to increase research on the subject and actions about the problem.

  15. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

  16. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmagadda, M.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the former Alba Craft Laboratory site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios (Yu et al. 1993). The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  17. US/Russian laboratory-to-laboratory program in materials protection, control and accounting at the RRC Kurchatov Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhoruchkin, V.; Roumiansev, A.; Shmelev, V.

    1996-01-01

    Six US DOE Laboratories are carrying out a program of cooperation with the Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute (RRC KI) to improve the capabilities and facilities in nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC ampersand A). In 1995, the primary emphasis of this program was the implementation of improved physical protection at a demonstration building at RRC KI, and the upgrading of the computerized MC ampersand A system, diagnostic instrumentation, and physical inventory procedures at a critical assembly within this building. Work continues in 1996 at the demonstration building but now also has begun at the two Kurchatov buildings which constitute the Central Storage Facility (CSF). At this facility, there will be upgrades in the physical inventory taking procedures, a test and evaluation of gamma-ray isotopic measurements, evaluations of nuclear material portal monitors and neutron-based measurement equipment as well as development of an improved computerized materials accounting system, implementation of bar code printing and reading equipment, development of tamper indicating device program, and substantial improvements in physical protection. Also, vulnerability assessments begun in 1995 are being extended to additional high priority facilities at Kurchatov

  18. Modelling of the physical behaviour of water saturated clay barriers. Laboratory tests, material models and finite element application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergesson, L.; Johannesson, L.E.; Sanden, T.; Hernelind, J.

    1995-09-01

    This report deals with laboratory testing and modelling of the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) properties of water saturated bentonite based buffer materials. A number of different laboratory tests have been performed and the results are accounted for. These test results have lead to a tentative material model, consisting of several sub-models, which is described in the report. The tentative model has partly been adapted to the material models available in the finite element code ABAQUS and partly been implemented and incorporated in the code. The model that can be used for ABAQUS calculations agrees with the tentative model with a few exceptions. The model has been used in a number of verification calculations, simulating different laboratory tests, and the results have been compared with actual measurements. These calculations show that the model generally can be used for THM calculations of the behaviour of water saturated buffer materials, but also that there is still a lack of some understanding. It is concluded that the available model is relevant for the required predictions of the THM behaviour but that a further improvement of the model is desirable

  19. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory May 4-7, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoniette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g ., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors. LANL has defined fourteen

  20. Hazardous materials management and control program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory - environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhower, B.M.; Oakes, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    In the Federal Register of May 19, 1980, the US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated final hazardous waste regulations according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. The major substantive portions of these regulations went into effect on November 19, 1980, and established a federal program to provide comprehensive regulation of hazardous waste from its generation to its disposal. In an effort to comply with these regulations, a Hazardous Materials Management and Control Program was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program is administered by two Hazardous Materials Coordinators, who together with various support groups, ensure that all hazardous materials and wastes are handled in such a manner that all personnel, the general public, and the environment are adequately protected

  1. A review of building energy efficiency in China during “Eleventh Five-Year Plan” period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Xiangfei; Lu Shilei; Wu Yong

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing building energy consumption, the improvement of building energy efficiency (BEE) becomes a key part of the reduction of energy intensity in the “Eleventh Five-Year Plan” period (during 2006 and 2010) in China. For this reason, the China central government has enforced and implemented a series of policies to promote BEE. Based on the analysis of main characteristics of BEE development in China and developmental routes of BEE, this paper systematically explored six fiscal incentive policies. Meanwhile, four specific programs involving new building, existing residential building, government office building and large-scale public building, and applications of renewable energy in building were investigated. Besides, the key factors of BEE development and BEE developmental stages were analyzed. The research revealed the present progress of implementation on BEE policies, and identified the drawbacks of the present BEE mechanism. Moreover, four proposals were recommended to enhance the development of BEE in the next “Five-Year Plan” period. - Highlights: ▶ Characteristics of China's building energy efficiency (BEE) are analyzed. ▶ Explores developmental routes, policies and programs for BEE. ▶ Implementing and developing progresses of BEE policy are revealed. ▶ Drawbacks and proposals concerning BEE are pointed out.

  2. Mesoscale Laboratory Models of the Biodegradation of Municipal Landfill Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borglin, S. E.; Hazen, T. C.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Zawislanski, P. T.

    2001-12-01

    Stabilization of municipal landfills is a critical issue involving land reuse, leachate treatment, and odor control. In an effort to increase landfill stabilization rates and decrease leachate treatment costs, municipal landfills can be operated as active aerobic or anaerobic bioreactors. Rates of settling and biodegradation were compared in three different treatments of municipal landfill materials in laboratory-scale bioreactors. Each of the three fifty-five-gallon clear acrylic tanks was fitted with pressure transducers, thermistors, neutron probe access tubes, a leachate recirculation system, gas vents, and air injection ports. The treatments applied to the tanks were (a) aerobic (air injection with leachate recirculation and venting from the top), (b) anaerobic (leachate recirculation with passive venting from the top), and (c) a control tank (passive venting from the top and no leachate recirculation). All tanks contained a 10-cm-thick layer of pea gravel at the bottom, overlain by a mixture of fresh waste materials on the order of 5-10 cm in size to an initial height of 0.55 m. Concentrations of O2, CO2 and CH4 were measured at the gas vent, and leachate was collected at the bottom drain. The water saturation in the aerobic and anaerobic tanks averaged 17 % and the control tank averaged 1 %. Relative degradation rates between the tanks were monitored by CO2 and CH4 production rates and O2 respiration rates. Respiration tests on the aerobic tank show a decrease in oxygen consumption rates from 1.3 mol/day at 20 days to 0.1 mol/day at 300 days, indicating usable organics are being depleted. The anaerobic tank produced measurable methane after 300 days that increased to 41% by volume after 370 days. Over the test period, the aerobic tank settled 30 %, the anaerobic tank 18.5 %, and the control tank 11.1 %. The concentrations of metals, nitrate, phosphate, and total organic carbon in the aerobic tank leachate are an order of magnitude lower than in the anaerobic

  3. General Motors and the University of Michigan smart materials and structures collaborative research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brei, Diann; Luntz, Jonathan; Shaw, John; Johnson, Nancy L.; Browne, Alan L.; Alexander, Paul W.; Mankame, Nilesh D.

    2007-04-01

    The field of Smart Materials and Structures is evolving from high-end, one-of-a-kind products for medical, military and aerospace applications to the point of viability for mainstream affordable high volume products for automotive applications. For the automotive industry, there are significant potential benefits to be realized including reduction in vehicle mass, added functionality and design flexibility and decrease in component size and cost. To further accelerate the path from basic research and development to launched competitive products, General Motors (GM) has teamed with the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan (UM) to establish a $2.9 Million Collaborative Research Laboratory (CRL) in Smart Materials and Structures. Researchers at both GM and UM are working closely together to create leap-frog technologies which start at conceptualization and proceed all the way through demonstration and handoff to product teams, thereby bridging the traditional technology gap between industry and academia. In addition to Smart Device Technology Innovation, other thrust areas in the CRL include Smart Material Maturity with a basic research focus on overcoming material issues that form roadblocks to commercialism and Mechamatronic System Design Methodology with an applied focus on development tools (synthesis and analysis) to aid the engineer in application of smart materials to system engineering. This CRL is a global effort with partners across the nation and world from GM's Global Research Network such as HRL Laboratories in California and GM's India Science Lab in Bangalore, India. This paper provides an overview of this new CRL and gives examples of several of the projects underway.

  4. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR).DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  5. Medical Laboratory Technician--Microbiology, 10-3. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the second of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  6. Interim report on the laboratory and theoretical work in modeling the drained and undrained behavior of buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergesson, L.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the continuous work of modeling the geotechnical properties of buffer materials. Some results of laboratory work with drained and undrained tests are described as well as the material models that these test have yielded. The effective stress concept and its relevance is discussed. The technique to apply the models in calculations using the finite element program ABAQUS is described. Some calculations of laboratory verification tests are shown and the results compared. Finally two examples of scenario calculations are shown. The work has led to three material models that can be used in ABAQUS calculations. All parameters for these models are not fully known and a continuation of the work is required. These models are not suitable for all situations and the relevance and need for further developments are presently investigated. (au)

  7. Fusion Materials Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiffen, F. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Melton, Stephanie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The realization of fusion energy is a formidable challenge with significant achievements resulting from close integration of the plasma physics and applied technology disciplines. Presently, the most significant technological challenge for the near-term experiments such as ITER, and next generation fusion power systems, is the inability of current materials and components to withstand the harsh fusion nuclear environment. The overarching goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) fusion materials program is to provide the applied materials science support and understanding to underpin the ongoing Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science fusion energy program while developing materials for fusion power systems. In doing so the program continues to be integrated both with the larger United States (US) and international fusion materials communities, and with the international fusion design and technology communities.This document provides a summary of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 activities supporting the Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Materials Research for Magnetic Fusion Energy (AT-60-20-10-0) carried out by ORNL. The organization of this report is mainly by material type, with sections on specific technical activities. Four projects selected in the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicitation of late 2011 and funded in FY2012-FY2014 are identified by “FOA” in the titles. This report includes the final funded work of these projects, although ORNL plans to continue some of this work within the base program.

  8. High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program: 19th Annual Report, October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasto, Arvid [ORNL

    2007-08-01

    Annual Report contains overview of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program and includes selected highlights of user activities for FY2006. Report is submitted to individuals within sponsoring DOE agency and to other interested individuals.

  9. Investigation of laboratory test procedures for assessing the structural capacity of geogrid-reinforced aggregate base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this research was to identify a laboratory test method that can be used to quantify improvements in structural capacity of aggregate base materials reinforced with geogrid. For this research, National Cooperative Highway Research Pro...

  10. Annual report: Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories, fiscal year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaeh, R.A.

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1992. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included. Topics covered in this report include highlights for fiscal year 1992, personnel, procurements (small business procurements, disadvantaged business procurements, woman-owned business procurements, New Mexico commercial business procurements, Bay area commercial business procurements), commitments by states and foreign countries, and transportation activities. Also listed are the twenty-five commercial contractors receiving the largest dollar commitments, commercial contractors receiving commitments of $1,000 or more, integrated contractor and federal agency commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California, and transportation commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California.

  11. Laboratory quality assurance and its role in the safeguards analytical laboratory evaluation (SALE) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvin, W.L.; Pietri, C.E.

    1981-07-01

    Since the late 1960's, strong emphasis has been given to quality assurance in the nuclear industry, particularly to that part involved in nuclear reactors. This emphasis has had impact on the analytical chemistry laboratory because of the importance of analytical measurements in the certification and acceptance of materials used in the fabrication and construction of reactor components. Laboratory quality assurance, in which the principles of quality assurance are applied to laboratory operations, has a significant role to play in processing, fabrication, and construction programs of the nuclear industry. That role impacts not only process control and material certification, but also safeguards and nuclear materials accountability. The implementation of laboratory quality assurance is done through a program plan that specifies how the principles of quality assurance are to be applied. Laboratory quality assurance identifies weaknesses and deficiencies in laboratory operations and provides confidence in the reliability of laboratory results. Such confidence in laboratory measurements is essential to the proper evaluation of laboratories participating in the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (SALE) Program

  12. Application of the Materials Requirement Planning (MRP in the Pharmaceutical Laboratory Oriente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Saumell–Fonseca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the logistics management of any business organization the allocation of material resources is very important, both for its dynamic approach to the internal processes of the company, as the pursuit of customer satisfaction, enabling the fulfillment of their goals efficiently and effectively. In this context, are used with effective results the models of Material’s Requirements Planning (MRP which allow to plan and control the demands for materials and production capacities in companies, conjugating with orders’s delivery dates, so is a tool proven effective, especially in the conditions of the Cuban economy. The present work has as objective to apply a MRP model in drugs manufacturing in the Company Laboratory Oriente in Santiago de Cuba, based on a theoretical and practical analysis for application of MRP tool using the WinQSB software. 

  13. High Temperature Materials Laboratory seventh annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennery, V.J.; Teague, P.A.

    1994-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its seventh year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the User Program has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements since the HTML began operation in 1987. A total of 193 nonproprietary agreements (91 industry and 102 university) and 41 proprietary agreements (39 industry and two university) are now in effect. This represents an increase of 21 nonproprietary user agreements during FY 1994. Forty-one states are represented by these users. During FY 1994, the HTML User Program evaluated 106 nonproprietary proposals (46 from industry, 52 from universities, and 8 from other government facilities) and 8 proprietary proposals. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about ninety-five percent of those evaluated proposals, sometimes after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the Committee. This annual report discusses FY 1994 activities in the individual user centers, as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users and their proposals and FY 1994 publications, and summarizes nonproprietary research projects active in FY 1994.

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Oxide Material Representation in the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) Program, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, D C; Dodson, K

    2004-06-30

    The Materials Identification and Surveillance (MIS) program was established within the 94-1 R&D Program to confirm the suitability of plutonium-bearing materials for stabilization, packaging, and long-term storage under DOE-STD-3013-2000. Oxide materials from different sites were chemically and physically characterized. The adequacy of the stabilization process parameters of temperature and duration at temperature (950 C and 2 hours) for eliminating chemical reactivity and reducing the moisture content to less than 0.5 weight percent were validated. Studies also include surveillance monitoring to determine the behavior of the oxides and packaging materials under storage conditions. Materials selected for this program were assumed to be representative of the overall inventory for DOE sites. The Quality Assurance section of the DOE-STD-3013-2000 required that each site be responsible for assuring that oxides packaged according to this standard are represented by items in the MIS characterization program. The purpose of this document is to define the path for determining if an individual item is ''represented'' in the MIS Program and to show that oxides being packaged at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are considered represented in the MIS program. The methodology outlined in the MIS Representation Document (LA-14016-MS) for demonstrating representation requires concurrence of the MIS working Group (MIS-WG). The signature page on this document provides for the MIS-WG concurrence.

  15. Laboratory Reference Spectroscopy of Icy Satellite Candidate Surface Materials (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, J. B.; Jamieson, C. S.; Shirley, J. H.; Pitman, K. M.; Kariya, M.; Crandall, P.

    2013-12-01

    The bulk of our knowledge of icy satellite composition continues to be derived from ultraviolet, visible and infrared remote sensing observations. Interpretation of remote sensing observations relies on availability of laboratory reference spectra of candidate surface materials. These are compared directly to observations, or incorporated into models to generate synthetic spectra representing mixtures of the candidate materials. Spectral measurements for the study of icy satellites must be taken under appropriate conditions (cf. Dalton, 2010; also http://mos.seti.org/icyworldspectra.html for a database of compounds) of temperature (typically 50 to 150 K), pressure (from 10-9 to 10-3 Torr), viewing geometry, (i.e., reflectance), and optical depth (must manifest near infrared bands but avoid saturation in the mid-infrared fundamentals). The Planetary Ice Characterization Laboratory (PICL) is being developed at JPL to provide robust reference spectra for icy satellite surface materials. These include sulfate hydrates, hydrated and hydroxylated minerals, and both organic and inorganic volatile ices. Spectral measurements are performed using an Analytical Spectral Devices FR3 portable grating spectrometer from .35 to 2.5 microns, and a Thermo-Nicolet 6500 Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer from 1.25 to 20 microns. These are interfaced with the Basic Extraterrestrial Environment Simulation Testbed (BEEST), a vacuum chamber capable of pressures below 10-9 Torr with a closed loop liquid helium cryostat with custom heating element capable of temperatures from 30-800 Kelvins. To generate optical constants (real and imaginary index of refraction) for use in nonlinear mixing models (i.e., Hapke, 1981 and Shkuratov, 1999), samples are ground and sieved to six different size fractions or deposited at varying rates to provide a range of grain sizes for optical constants calculations based on subtractive Kramers-Kronig combined with Hapke forward modeling (Dalton and

  16. Tungsten alloy research at the US Army Materials Technology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowding, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that recent research into tungsten heavy alloys at the U. S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory (MTL) has explored many areas of processing and process development. The recrystallization and respheroidization of tungsten grains in a heavily cold worked heavy alloy has been examined and resulted in the identification of a method of grain refinement. Another area of investigation has been lightly cold worked. It was determined that it was possible to increase the strength and hardness of the tungsten grains by proper hat treatment. MTL has been involved in the Army's small business innovative research (SBIR) program and several programs have been funded. Included among these are a method of coating the tungsten powders with the alloying elements and the development of techniques of powder injection molding of heavy alloys

  17. Composites Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose of the Composites Characterization Laboratory is to investigate new and/or modified matrix materials and fibers for advanced composite applications both...

  18. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1993 and research proposal for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birnbaum, H.K.

    1993-03-01

    The materials research laboratory program is about 30% of total Materials Science and Engineering effort on the Univ. of Illinois campus. Coordinated efforts are being carried out in areas of structural ceramics, grain boundaries, field responsive polymeric and organic materials, molecular structure of solid-liquid interfaces and its relation to corrosion, and x-ray scattering science.

  19. Alternative buffer material. Status of the ongoing laboratory investigation of reference materials and test package 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, Daniel; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern; Lydmark, Sara; Jaegerwall, Sara; Pedersen, Karsten; Hansen, Staffan

    2011-07-01

    Bentonite clay is part of the Swedish KBS-3 design of final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Wyoming bentonite with the commercial name MX-80 (American Colloid Co) has long been the reference for buffer material in the KBS-3 concept. Extending the knowledge base of alternative buffer materials will make it possible to optimize regarding safety, availability and cost. For this reason the field experiment Alternative Buffer Material (ABM) was started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2006. The experiment includes three medium-scale test packages, each consisting of a central steel tube with heaters, and a buffer of compacted clay. Eleven different clays were chosen for the buffers to examine effects of smectite content, interlayer cations and overall iron content. Also bentonite pellets with and without additional quartz are being tested. The buffer in package 1 had been subjected to wetting by formation water and heating for more than two years (at 130 deg C for ∼ 1 year) when it was retrieved and analyzed. The main purposes of the project were to characterise the clays with respect to hydro-mechanical properties, mineralogy and chemical composition and to identify any differences in behaviour or long term stability. The diversity of clays and the heater of steel also make the experiment suitable for studies of iron-bentonite interactions. This report concerns the work accomplished up to now and is not to be treated as any final report of the project

  20. Alternative buffer material. Status of the ongoing laboratory investigation of reference materials and test package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Daniel [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Lydmark, Sara; Jaegerwall, Sara; Pedersen, Karsten [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden); Hansen, Staffan [LTH Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Bentonite clay is part of the Swedish KBS-3 design of final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Wyoming bentonite with the commercial name MX-80 (American Colloid Co) has long been the reference for buffer material in the KBS-3 concept. Extending the knowledge base of alternative buffer materials will make it possible to optimize regarding safety, availability and cost. For this reason the field experiment Alternative Buffer Material (ABM) was started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2006. The experiment includes three medium-scale test packages, each consisting of a central steel tube with heaters, and a buffer of compacted clay. Eleven different clays were chosen for the buffers to examine effects of smectite content, interlayer cations and overall iron content. Also bentonite pellets with and without additional quartz are being tested. The buffer in package 1 had been subjected to wetting by formation water and heating for more than two years (at 130 deg C for {approx} 1 year) when it was retrieved and analyzed. The main purposes of the project were to characterise the clays with respect to hydro-mechanical properties, mineralogy and chemical composition and to identify any differences in behaviour or long term stability. The diversity of clays and the heater of steel also make the experiment suitable for studies of iron-bentonite interactions. This report concerns the work accomplished up to now and is not to be treated as any final report of the project.

  1. Energetics Laboratory Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These energetic materials laboratories are equipped with explosion proof hoods with blow out walls for added safety, that are certified for safe handling of primary...

  2. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah [Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Nor Zaini [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  3. Construction and equipment requirements for installations and laboratories handling unsealed radioactive materials in low and medium activity - Proposal of an Israeli standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Shlomo, A; Schlesinger, T; Barshad, M [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    1993-10-01

    Working with unsealed radioactive materials involves risks of internal or external exposure to ionizing radiation. Exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation involves adverse health effects and must be prevented or at least reduced to reasonable levels. Radiation sources in this work are unsealed radioactive materials, that may be solids, liquid or in gaseous states, and in varying toxic levels. Various works and actions that are performed on the unsealed radioactive materials have varying potentials of dispersion, contamination and exposure, so that the combination of the type of work activity, isotope characteristics and physical state dictate the internal and external exposure risks. In order to limit the exposure of the personnel of installations and laboratories which deals with unsealed radioactive materials, national and international authorities and organizations standards and procedures for the requirements of construction and equipment of such installations and laboratories. This document means to be a proposal for an Israeli standard requirements for equipment and construction of installations working with low and medium activity unsealed radioactive materials. The targets for defining the, construction and equipment, requirements are: a. Safety and proper protection of personnel and public from external and internal exposure while the work is done properly. Proper protection against the risk of contaminating the environment. c. Standardization of requirements. d. Proper design of installations and laboratories. e. Supply means for evaluation and reduction of construction costs.The equipment detailed here refers to fixed (none movable) equipment which is a part of the construction of the laboratory or installation, unless specified otherwise. The document starts with a review of the recommendations of some international organizations (WHO, IAEA, NRPB) for construction and equipment requirements for these laboratories and installations. Then the

  4. Inter-laboratory analysis of selected genetically modified plant reference materials with digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobnik, David; Demšar, Tina; Huber, Ingrid; Gerdes, Lars; Broeders, Sylvia; Roosens, Nancy; Debode, Frederic; Berben, Gilbert; Žel, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR), as a new technology in the field of genetically modified (GM) organism (GMO) testing, enables determination of absolute target copy numbers. The purpose of our study was to test the transferability of methods designed for quantitative PCR (qPCR) to dPCR and to carry out an inter-laboratory comparison of the performance of two different dPCR platforms when determining the absolute GM copy numbers and GM copy number ratio in reference materials certified for GM content in mass fraction. Overall results in terms of measured GM% were within acceptable variation limits for both tested dPCR systems. However, the determined absolute copy numbers for individual genes or events showed higher variability between laboratories in one third of the cases, most possibly due to variability in the technical work, droplet size variability, and analysis of the raw data. GMO quantification with dPCR and qPCR was comparable. As methods originally designed for qPCR performed well in dPCR systems, already validated qPCR assays can most generally be used for dPCR technology with the purpose of GMO detection. Graphical abstract The output of three different PCR-based platforms was assessed in an inter-laboratory comparison.

  5. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science program report, Weapons Resarch and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, L.

    1997-03-01

    This report is the annual progress report for the Chemistry Materials Science Program: Weapons Research and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development. Twenty-one projects are described separately by their principal investigators.

  6. China energy-water nexus: Assessing the water-saving synergy effects of energy-saving policies during the eleventh Five-year Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Alun; Teng, Fei; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy and water limit China’s sustainable development. • Current energy policies fail to address water saving issues. • The energy-water coefficient is estimated for both direct use and indirect use. • Water saving effects associated with energy-saving policies is calculated. • Water-energy nexus should be enhanced in key industrial sectors. - Abstract: Energy and water have become major factors limiting sustainable development in China. Energy efficiency and optimization of water management are critical for the healthy growth of the Chinese economy. Current national energy policies fail to adequately address water use issues. Similarly, current water policies do not consider the impact of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Consequently, few studies have investigated the relationship between energy consumption and water use. The present study analyzes the energy-water nexus in Chinese industries using input–output tables. Coefficients that characterize the relationship between energy consumption and water are used to describe the supply-consumption relationship between the water supply and primary energy sectors. Next, we calculate the water-saving effects associated with the enforcement of energy-saving policies in selected industrial sectors during the eleventh Five-year Plan, from 2005 to 2010. These calculations address the ferrous metals, non-ferrous metals, petrochemical engineering, building materials, and electricity industries as well as key light industries. Our findings indicate that energy-saving efforts in these industries will result in savings in water consumption. This study suggests that a cooperative relationship between water and energy conservation efforts should be an important factor in creating policies that encourage simultaneous savings of both resources. Additionally, the study indicates that government should promote water- and energy-saving techniques in key industrial sectors to encourage

  7. Isotope materials availability and services for target production at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratledge, J.E.; Dahl, T.L.; Ottinger, C.L.; Aaron, W.S.; Adair, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    Materials available through the Isotope Distribution Program include separated stable isotopes, byproduct radioisotopes, and research quantities of source and special nuclear materials. Isotope products are routinely available in the forms listed in the product description section of the Isotopes Products and Services Catalog distributed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Different forms can be provided in some cases, usually at additional cost. Routinely available services include cyclotron target irradiations, fabrication of special physical forms, source encapsulation, ion implantation, and special purifications. Materials and services that are not offered as part of the routine distribution program may be made available from commercial sources in the United States. Specific forms of isotopic research materials include thin films and foils for use as accelerator targets, metal or other compounds in the form of bars or wires, and metal foils. Methods of fabrication include evaporation, sputtering, rolling, electrolytic deposition, pressing, sintering, and casting. High-purity metal forms of plutonium, americium, and curium are prepared by vacuum reduction/distillation. Both fissionable and nonfissionable neutron dosimeters are prepared for determining the neutron energy spectra, flux, and fluence at various locations within a reactor. Details on what materials are available and how the materials and related services can be obtained from ORNL are described. (orig.)

  8. Clement’s New Clothes. The Destruction of Old S. Clemente in Rome, the Eleventh-Century Frescoes, and the Cult of (AntiPope Clement III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Yawn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the early 1100s, the fifth-century church of S. Clemente in Rome was buried beneath an entirely new basilica.  Inspired by suggestions published by Tommaso di Carpegna Falconieri (1998 and Valentino Pace (2007, the present article considers the possibility that this radical intervention constituted an act of damnatio memoriae or, better, of deletio memoriae, an obliteration of memory prompted by the nascent cult of miracles associated with Pope Paschal II’s enemy and rival, (antipope Clement III.  Clement III (Wibert of Ravenna died in 1100, not long after the execution of an extensive fresco cycle in the early Christian basilica celebrating the miracles and cult of the first-century pope and martyr St. Clement I of Rome.  Resonances between these images and the prodigia attributed to Clement III may have invited analogies between the two Clements, especially during the turbulent early years of Paschal II’s pontificate, when Paschal, alarmed by reports of his adversary’s miracles, had Clement III’s corpse exhumed and thrown into the Tiber. The perceived correspondences between the first-century pope and his eleventh-century namesake may have extended to their postmortem resting places – Clement I was martyred by being thrown into the Black Sea – as well as to their shared attributes, particularly the pontifical vestments and white hair prominently displayed in the frescoes. These attributes disappear in the early twelfth-century mosaic of Clement I on the apsidal arch of the new, upper church, where the saint is instead represented as a young man with dark hair, a dark beard, and an apostle’s clothing.  This extreme makeover in a work securely associable with Roman reform-party sponsorship effectively dissociated Clement I from the painted images in the earlier church and, very probably, from his eleventh-century namesake in the Tiber.

  9. Laboratory safety handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, E.L.; Watterson, C.A.; Chemerys, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Safety, defined as 'freedom from danger, risk, or injury,' is difficult to achieve in a laboratory environment. Inherent dangers, associated with water analysis and research laboratories where hazardous samples, materials, and equipment are used, must be minimized to protect workers, buildings, and equipment. Managers, supervisors, analysts, and laboratory support personnel each have specific responsibilities to reduce hazards by maintaining a safe work environment. General rules of conduct and safety practices that involve personal protection, laboratory practices, chemical handling, compressed gases handling, use of equipment, and overall security must be practiced by everyone at all levels. Routine and extensive inspections of all laboratories must be made regularly by qualified people. Personnel should be trained thoroughly and repetitively. Special hazards that may involve exposure to carcinogens, cryogenics, or radiation must be given special attention, and specific rules and operational procedures must be established to deal with them. Safety data, reference materials, and texts must be kept available if prudent safety is to be practiced and accidents prevented or minimized.

  10. Effects of Suicide Awareness Material on Implicit Suicide Cognition: A Laboratory Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Florian; Till, Benedikt; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the increasing adoption of suicide awareness campaigns to prevent suicide, little is known about the effective construction of awareness messages used and on their impact on suicidal cognition. We hypothesized that media reporting on an individual overcoming a suicidal crisis increases the automatic association between "life" and self. University students (N = 112) were randomly allocated to one of three groups in a laboratory experiment. Participants allocated to treatment group 1 or group 2 read awareness material about a person coping with suicidal ideation by getting professional help. The only difference between the two groups was the amount of social similarity (low vs. high) between the protagonist and the participants. The control group read an article unrelated to suicide. Awareness material increased implicit cognition in terms of a strengthening of self-life associations. This effect was restricted to participants scoring low on wishful identification with the suicidal protagonist. This finding suggests that only individuals who do not wishfully identify with a protagonist going through difficult life circumstances benefit from the awareness material in terms of suicidal cognition. These findings provide a rich basis for further research and have potentially high relevance to the construction of suicide-awareness messages.

  11. Standard Practice for Laboratory Screening of Metallic Containment Materials for Use With Liquids in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1980-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers several laboratory test procedures for evaluating corrosion performance of metallic containment materials under conditions similar to those that may occur in solar heating and cooling systems. All test results relate to the performance of the metallic containment material only as a part of a metal/fluid pair. Performance in these laboratory test procedures, taken by itself, does not necessarily constitute an adequate basis for acceptance or rejection of a particular metal/fluid pair in solar heating and cooling systems, either in general or in a particular design. This practice is not intended to preclude the use of other screening tests, particularly when those tests are designed to more closely simulate field service conditions. 1.2 This practice describes apparatus and procedures for several tests, any one or more of which may be used to evaluate the deterioration of the metallic containment material in a metal/fluid pair. The procedures are designed to permit simulation, heating...

  12. Improving Eleventh Graders' Reading Comprehension through Text Coding and Double Entry Organizer Reading Strategies (Mejoramiento de la comprensión lectora de estudiantes de grado once mediante las estrategias de lectura de codificación de texto y organizador de doble entrada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahecha, Rocío; Urrego, Stella; Lozano, Erika

    2011-01-01

    In this article we report on an innovation project developed with a group of eleventh graders at a public school in Bogotá. Its aim was to encourage students to improve reading comprehension of texts in English. It was conducted taking into account students' needs, interests and level of English. To do it, we implemented two reading strategies:…

  13. MaRIE; a proposed materials facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, M.A.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    This presentation will describe the current definition of a proposed new facility called MaRIE at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The concept is of decadal scope and is predicated on the collocation of a fourth-generation X-ray light source with a proton accelerator spallation neutron source and complementary synthesis and characterization capabilities. MaRIE is an acronym which stands for Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes. The facility has been conceived partly in response to the increasing role that control science is expected to play in materials research compared to observation science. If new materials are to be implemented in a timely fashion for the most aggressive conditions of proposed fission and fusion energy applications they will have to rely, at least in part, on models, simulations and scientific insight. Validation of these models will require measurements at spatial and temporal scales that have only recently become enabled by the latest generations of light sources. A hallmark of the MaRIE concept is an emphasis on in situ studies (under extreme neutron, photon and ion irradiation conditions) of the phenomena that lead to swelling, phase transformations, thermal properties and corrosion. Insights and data, relevant to atomistic and quantum mechanical models, are major goals, as well as the facilitation of rapid materials discovery. It is hoped that this presentation will solicit input on aspects of the facility definition that should be strengthened or diminished to meet the needs of the fission community. (authors)

  14. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  15. Educational and laboratory base for the expert training on physical protection of nuclear materials: the requirements and experience of practical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarev, P.V.; Pogozhin, N.S.; Ryzhukhin, D.V.; Tolstoy, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In expert training on physical protection of nuclear materials (NMPP) an educational and laboratory base has special importance. In these laboratories the students receive practical skills concerning physical protection systems (PPS). The basic requirements for creating such base are formulated in a certain educational program implemented at an educational institution. Thus it is necessary to take into account the following features of a modern nuclear object PPS: restriction of an object visiting with the purpose of acquaintance with features of a certain object PPS; dynamical change of PPS component nomenclature; increase of use of computer facilities for managing all PPS subsystems; increase of integration degree of separate subsystems in a uniform PPS complex; high cost of PPS components. Taking that into consideration a university, which assumes to begin the expert training on NMPP, is compelled to solve the following tasks: creation of its own laboratory base. The implementation of practical occupations with visiting a nuclear object cannot be executed practically; definition of quantity and structure of educational laboratories. Thus the features of the implemented educational plan should be taken into account in addition; optimization of expenses on laboratory creation. The regular updating of laboratory equipment structure is impossible in a practical manner. Therefore unique correct decision is to supply laboratories with the equipment, which uses the typical technological decisions on performing the basic PPS functions (detection, delay, estimation of a situation, neutralization); development of laboratory work conducting procedures (laboratory practical works); technical support of the created laboratories. The certain experience of solving the listed tasks is accumulated at the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University) (MEPhl) while implementing 'Physical Protection, Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials' master

  16. Some relevant parameters for assessing fire hazards of combustible mine materials using laboratory scale experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litton, Charles D; Perera, Inoka E; Harteis, Samuel P; Teacoach, Kara A; DeRosa, Maria I; Thomas, Richard A; Smith, Alex C

    2018-04-15

    When combustible materials ignite and burn, the potential for fire growth and flame spread represents an obvious hazard, but during these processes of ignition and flaming, other life hazards present themselves and should be included to ensure an effective overall analysis of the relevant fire hazards. In particular, the gases and smoke produced both during the smoldering stages of fires leading to ignition and during the advanced flaming stages of a developing fire serve to contaminate the surrounding atmosphere, potentially producing elevated levels of toxicity and high levels of smoke obscuration that render the environment untenable. In underground mines, these hazards may be exacerbated by the existing forced ventilation that can carry the gases and smoke to locations far-removed from the fire location. Clearly, materials that require high temperatures (above 1400 K) and that exhibit low mass loss during thermal decomposition, or that require high heat fluxes or heat transfer rates to ignite represent less of a hazard than materials that decompose at low temperatures or ignite at low levels of heat flux. In order to define and quantify some possible parameters that can be used to assess these hazards, small-scale laboratory experiments were conducted in a number of configurations to measure: 1) the toxic gases and smoke produced both during non-flaming and flaming combustion; 2) mass loss rates as a function of temperature to determine ease of thermal decomposition; and 3) mass loss rates and times to ignition as a function of incident heat flux. This paper describes the experiments that were conducted, their results, and the development of a set of parameters that could possibly be used to assess the overall fire hazard of combustible materials using small scale laboratory experiments.

  17. Stress-strain relation of bentonite at undrained shear. Laboratory tests to investigate the influence of material composition and test technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Ann; Boergesson, Lennart; Johannesson, Lars-Erik (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This report describes a laboratory study conducted to update the material model of the buffer material used in the analyses of the effect of a rock shear through a deposition hole. The study considers some new conditions and is especially focused on the reference case with MX-80Ca developed for SR-Site (MX-80 ion exchanged to Ca). The material model is based on relations between density, swelling pressure, shear strength and rate of strain. The reference model is described by Boergesson et al. (2010). The laboratory study is focused on undrained stress-strain-strength properties, which have been studied mainly by conducting triaxial tests and unconfined compression tests. The test results are compared to the earlier measurements and models which show that the new results fit very well into the general picture and models. For the new conditions suitable values of constants included in the model are proposed

  18. Stress-strain relation of bentonite at undrained shear. Laboratory tests to investigate the influence of material composition and test technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueck, Ann; Boergesson, Lennart; Johannesson, Lars-Erik

    2010-12-01

    This report describes a laboratory study conducted to update the material model of the buffer material used in the analyses of the effect of a rock shear through a deposition hole. The study considers some new conditions and is especially focused on the reference case with MX-80Ca developed for SR-Site (MX-80 ion exchanged to Ca). The material model is based on relations between density, swelling pressure, shear strength and rate of strain. The reference model is described by Boergesson et al. (2010). The laboratory study is focused on undrained stress-strain-strength properties, which have been studied mainly by conducting triaxial tests and unconfined compression tests. The test results are compared to the earlier measurements and models which show that the new results fit very well into the general picture and models. For the new conditions suitable values of constants included in the model are proposed

  19. Laboratory-scale bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil of Kuwait with soil amendment materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, B H; Chino, H; Tsuji, H; Kunito, T; Nagaoka, K; Otsuka, S; Yamashita, K; Matsumoto, S; Oyaizu, H

    1997-10-01

    A huge amount of oil-contaminated soil remains unremediated in the Kuwait desert. The contaminated oil has the potentiality to cause pollution of underground water and to effect the health of people in the neighborhood. In this study, laboratory scale bioremediation experiments were carried out. Hyponex (Hyponex, Inc.) and bark manure were added as basic nutrients for microorganisms, and twelve kinds of materials (baked diatomite, microporous glass, coconut charcoal, an oil-decomposing bacterial mixture (Formula X from Oppenheimer, Inc.), and eight kinds of surfactants) were applied to accelerate the biodegradation of oil hydrocarbons. 15% to 33% of the contaminated oil was decomposed during 43 weeks' incubation. Among the materials tested, coconut charcoal enhanced the biodegradation. On the contrary, the addition of an oil-decomposing bacterial mixture impeded the biodegradation. The effects of the other materials were very slight. The toxicity of the biodegraded compounds was estimated by the Ames test and the tea pollen tube growth test. Both of the hydrophobic (dichloromethane extracts) and hydrophilic (methanol extracts) fractions showed a very slight toxicity in the Ames test. In the tea pollen tube growth test, the hydrophobic fraction was not toxic and enhanced the growth of pollen tubes.

  20. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities: materials and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundergan, C.D.; Mead, P.L.

    1977-08-01

    Materials and process activities have emphasized the balance between research and development necessary to provide materials compatible with the extreme environments and performance requirements associated with nuclear ordnance. Specific technical areas which have continuing emphasis include metallurgy, composites, surface characterization and thin films, polymers, ceramics, and high-temperature characterization. Complete processing and fabrication facilities assure the capability for early evaluation and use of tailored materials. Efforts are focused on material applications involving structural and electronic materials, thermal and electrical insulation, radiation shields, and shock mitigation. Key elements in these efforts are functionability, reliability, and longevity. This interdisciplinary approach to scientific materials engineering results from the recognition that many disciplines are required to understand, characterize, and apply materials, and from the fact that material design is an essential element in meeting the objectives of quality, functionality, and life. In effect, the responsibility of a materials group extends beyond the development of a material into the understanding and description of its behavior in the extreme environments to which it will be subjected

  1. Materials technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betten, P.

    1989-01-01

    Argonne is actively involved in the research and development of new materials research and development (R ampersand D). Five new materials technologies have been identified for commercial potential and are presented in this paper as follows: (1) nanophase materials, (2) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of ceramics, (3) superconductivity developments and technology transfer mechanisms, and (4) COMMIX computer code modeling for metal castings, and (5) tribology using ion-assisted deposition (IAB). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  2. Description of the Structural Materials Information Center being established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, B.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a Structural aging Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to identify potential structural safety issues related to continued service of nuclear power plants and to establish criteria for evaluating and resolving these issues. One of the tasks in this program focuses on the establishment of a Structural Materials Information Center where data and information on the time variation of concrete and concrete-related material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors will be collected and assembled into a database. This database will be used to assist in the prediction of potential long-term deterioration of critical structural components in nuclear power plants and to establish limits on hostile environmental exposure for these structures and materials. Materials property data and information will be collected at the Structural Materials Information Center from open literature, published references, and identifiable sources. Initially, the database will include portland cement concrete, metallic reinforcement, prestressing tendon and structural steel materials. Then, as data and information for other material systems are obtained, the database will be expanded and updated. The database will be developed and presented in two complementary formats. The Structural Materials Handbook will be published in four volumes as an expandable, hard copy handbook. The Materials Electronic Database will be developed to reflect the same information as contained in the handbook, but will be formatted for use on an IBM or IBM-compatible personal computer

  3. Compact acoustic levitation device for studies in fluid dynamics and material science in the laboratory and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    An ultrasonic levitation device operable in both ordinary ground-based as well as in potential space-borne laboratories is described together with its various applications in the fields of fluid dynamics, material science, and light scattering. Some of the phenomena which can be studied by this instrument include surface waves on freely suspended liquids, the variations of the surface tension with temperature and contamination, the deep undercooling of materials with the temperature variations of their density and viscosity, and finally some of the optical diffraction properties of transparent substances.

  4. Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratzel, A.C. III

    1998-09-01

    This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

  5. Analytical Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Analytical Labspecializes in Oil and Hydraulic Fluid Analysis, Identification of Unknown Materials, Engineering Investigations, Qualification Testing (to support...

  6. Modern clinical laboratory diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakhovskij, I.S.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory diagnosis is auxillary medical discipline studying specific laboratory symptoms of diseases, revealed by investigations of materials taken from patients. The structure of laboratory servie in our country and abroad, items of laboratory investigations, organizational principles are described. Attention is being given to the cost of analyses, the amount of conducted investigations, methods of result presentation, problems of accuracy, quality control and information content

  7. A new ion-beam laboratory for materials research at the Slovak University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, Pavol; Dobrovodský, Jozef; Vaňa, Dušan; Beňo, Matúš; Závacká, Anna; Muška, Martin; Halgaš, Radoslav; Minárik, Stanislav; Riedlmajer, Róbert

    2017-10-01

    An ion beam laboratory (IBL) for materials research has been commissioned recently at the Slovak University of Technology within the University Science Park CAMBO located in Trnava. The facility will support research in the field of materials science, physical engineering and nanotechnology. Ion-beam materials modification (IBMM) as well as ion-beam analysis (IBA) are covered and deliverable ion energies are in the range from tens of keV up to tens of MeV. Two systems have been put into operation. First, a high current version of the HVEE 6 MV Tandetron electrostatic tandem accelerator with duoplasmatron and cesium sputtering ion sources, equipped with two end-stations: a high-energy ion implantation and IBA end-station which includes RBS, PIXE and ERDA analytical systems. Second, a 500 kV implanter equipped with a Bernas type ion source and two experimental wafer processing end-stations. The facility itself, operational experience and first IBMM and IBA experiments are presented together with near-future plans and ongoing development of the IBL.

  8. Material model for shear of the buffer - evaluation of laboratory test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergesson, Lennart; Dueck, Ann; Johannesson, Lars-Erik

    2010-12-01

    The report describes the material model of bentonite used for analysing a rock shear through a deposition hole. The old model used in SR-Can has been considerably changed. The new reference model that has been developed for SR-Site is described and motivated. The relevant properties of the buffer that affect the response to a rock shear are (in addition to the bentonite type) the density (which yields a swelling pressure), the shear strength, the stiffness before the maximum shear stress is reached and the shear rate, which also affects the shear strength. Since the shear caused by an earthquake is very fast and the hydraulic conductivity of the bentonite is very low there is no possibility for the pore water in the water saturated bentonite to be redistributed. Since the compressibility of water and particles are negligible, the bentonite can be modelled as a solid material that cannot change volume but only exhibit shear deformations. A proper and simple model that behaves accordingly is a model with von Mises' stress modelled as a function of the strain (stress-strain model). The model is elastic-plastic with an E-modulus that determines the behaviour until the material starts yielding whereupon the plastic strain is modelled as a function of von Mises' stress and added to the elastic strain. Included in the model is also a strain rate dependency of the stress-strain relation, which ranges between the strain rates 10 -6 1/s 3 1/s. The reference material model is derived from a large number of laboratory tests made on different bentonites at different strain rates, densities and with different techniques. Since it cannot be excluded that the exchangeable cat-ions in the Na-bentonite MX-80 is exchanged to calcium-ions the Ca-bentonite Deponit CaN is proposed to be used as reference material. The overall conclusion is that a relevant and probably also slightly conservative material model of Ca-converted MX-80 is derived, presented and well motivated

  9. An Evaluation of the Instruction Carried out with Printed Laboratory Materials Designed in Accordance with 5E Model: Reflection of Light and Image on a Plane Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvaci, Hakan Sevki; Yildiz, Mehmet; Bakirci, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a print laboratory material based on 5E model of constructivist learning approach to teach reflection of light and Image on a Plane Mirror. The effect of the instruction which conducted with the designed print laboratory material on academic achievements of prospective science and technology teachers and their attitudes towards…

  10. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  11. Laser materials processing applications at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, R.S.; Dragon, E.P.; Hackel, R.P.; Kautz, D.D.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    High power and high radiance laser technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) such as copper-vapor lasers, solid-state slab lasers, dye lasers, harmonic wavelength conversion of these lasers, and fiber optic delivery systems show great promise for material processing tasks. Evaluation of models suggests significant potential for tenfold increases in welding, cutting, and drilling performance, as well as capability for applications in emerging technologies such as micromachining, surface treatment, and stereolithography. Copper and dye laser systems are currently being developed at LLNL for uranium enrichment production facilities. The goals of this program are to develop low-cost, reliable and maintainable industrial laser systems. Chains of copper lasers currently operate at more than 1.5 kW output and achieve mean time between failures of more than 1,000 hours. The beam quality of copper vapor lasers is approximately three times the diffraction limit. Dye lasers have near diffraction limited beam quality at greater than 1.0 kW. Diode laser pumped, Nd:YAG slab lasers are also being developed at LLNL. Current designs achieve powers of greater than 1.0 kW and projected beam quality is in the two to five times diffraction limited range. Results from cutting and drilling studies in titanium and stainless steel alloys show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye and copper-vapor lasers. High radiance beams produce low distortion and small heat-affected zones. The authors have accomplished very high aspect ratio holes in drilling tests (> 60: 1) and features with micron scale (5-50 μm) sizes. Other, traditionally more difficult, materials such as copper, aluminum and ceramics will soon be studied in detail

  12. NDE Acoustic Microscopy Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to develop advanced, more effective high-resolution micro-NDE materials characterization methods using scanning acoustic microscopy. The laboratory's...

  13. Degradation of sustainable mulch materials in two types of soil under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Jaime; González, Sara; Moreno, Carmen; Aceituno, Patricia; Campos, Juan; Meco, Ramón; María Moreno, Marta

    2017-04-01

    Mulching is a technique used in cultivation worldwide, especially for vegetable crops, for reducing weed growth, minimising or eliminating soil erosion, and often for enhancing total yields. Manufactured plastic films, mainly polyethylene (PE), have been widely used for this purpose due to their excellent mechanical properties, light weight and relatively low prices in recent years. However, the use of PE is associated with serious environmental problems related to its petrochemical origin and its long shelf-life, which causes a waste problem in our crop fields. For this reason, the use of biodegradable mulch materials (biopolymers and papers) as alternative to PE is increasing nowadays, especially in organic farming. However, these materials can suffer an undesirable early degradation (and therefore not fulfilling their function successfully), greatly resulting from the type of soil. For this reason, this study aimed to analyse the degradation pattern of different mulch materials buried in two types of soils, clay and sand, under laboratory conditions (25°C, dark surroundings, constant humidity). The mulch materials used were: 1) black polyethylene (15 µm); black biopolymers (15 µm): 2) maize starch-based, 3) potato starch-based, 4) polylactic acid-based, 5) black paper, 85 g/m2. Periodically (every 15-20 days), the weight and surface loss of the different materials were recorded. The results indicate that mulch degradation was earlier and higher in the clay soil, especially in the paper and in the potato starch-based materials, followed by the maize starch-based mulch, while polylactic acid-based suffered the least and the latest degradation. Keywords: mulch, biodegradable, biopolymer, paper, degradation. Acknowledgements: the research was funded by Project RTA2011-00104-C04-03 from the INIA (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness).

  14. Laboratory Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Material from the Columbia River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavrinec, John; Pearson, Walter H.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, J. R.; Lee, Cheegwan; Hall, Kathleen D.; Romano, Brett A.; Miller, Martin C.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2007-05-07

    Dredging of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about dredging-related impacts on Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) in the estuary, mouth of the estuary, and nearshore ocean areas adjacent to the Columbia River. The Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers engaged the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to review the state of knowledge and conduct studies concerning impacts on Dungeness crabs resulting from disposal during the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and annual maintenance dredging in the mouth of the Columbia River. The present study concerns potential effects on Dungeness crabs from dredged material disposal specific to the mouth of the Columbia River.

  15. Implementing Debate To Improve The Speaking Skill Of The Eleventh Grade Students Of SMK 17 Agustus 1945 Muncar Banyuwangi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwan Ridwan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at improving the student’ Speaking skill by implementing debate. The result problem is “how can English debate improve the speaking skill of the eleventh grade students of SMK 17 Agustus 1945 Muncar Banyuwangi?” The researcher stated the problem because of the result of pre liminary study. The average classical score was 50.00 in a 0-100 scale. All of them had not reached the criteria of success. They did not feel self confident in speaking English. and it  opposited with the target of SMK. The class room action research (CAR aims to discover teaching and learning strategy which suited to the learner’s style and to solve the teacher’s problem in finding appropriate technique in teaching. The research taken in SMK 17 Agustus 1945 Muncar Banyuwangi on 39 students of eleventh grade of AK1 was conducted in two cycles with the phases of planning, implementation, observation, and reflection. The instruments that used for data collection were observation form, questioner and students opinion about debate. The teaching learning procedure was divided into three steps; pre activity, main activity, and post activity. The researcher found that the implementation of debate could improve the students’ speaking skill. It was proved by the result of the students’ speaking score. The average classical score in preliminary study was 50.00. They had improvement from the first cycle, but did not fulfill the criteria of success that was 66.66. That was still under KKM. And it was found in the second cycle that the classical score was 83.33, and it could create the teaching and learning process relaxed, enjoyable atmosphere to speak spontaneously without nervous, and able to motivate student to be brave in speaking. The students’ speaking skill can be improved through debate with these following procedures: 1 The teacher introduced the Australasia debate model, stated the aim of the activity. 2 The teacher explained the procedures

  16. San Francisco District Laboratory (SAN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program CapabilitiesFood Analysis SAN-DO Laboratory has an expert in elemental analysis who frequently performs field inspections of materials. A recently acquired...

  17. Energy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Argonne National Laboratory Toggle Navigation Toggle Search Energy Batteries and Energy Storage Energy Systems Modeling Materials for Energy Nuclear Energy Renewable Energy Smart Laboratory About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Energy Environment National

  18. Safeguards training at Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, D.A.

    1986-10-01

    Safeguarding our country's nuclear materials against theft or diversion is extremely important due to their significantly strategic value. In addition, nuclear materials also have an extremely high monetary value. The term ''safeguards'' is defined as an integrated system of physical protection, accountability, and material control measures designed to deter, prevent, detect, and respond to unauthorized possession and use of special nuclear materials. An aggressive Safeguards program, therefore, employs both good security measures and a strong material control and accountability system. For effective internal control of nuclear materials, having people qualified in the many aspects of safeguards and accountability is essential. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), this goal is accomplished through a Laboratory-wide Safeguards Awareness Program. All PNL staff members receive a level of Safeguards training appropriate to their particular function within the Laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the unique training opportunities this topic provides and how the training goals are accomplished through the various training courses given to the staff members

  19. Medical Laboratory Technician--Hematology, Serology, Blood Banking & Immunohematology, 10-4. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the third of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  20. A measurement evaluation program to support nuclear material control and accountability measurements in Brazilian laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Fabio C.; Mason, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A measurement evaluation program (MEP) is one of a number of valuable tools that analytical chemists can use to ensure that the data produced in the laboratory are fit for their intended purpose and consistent with expected performance values at a given time. As such, participation in a MEP is an important indicator of the quality of analytical data, and is recognized as such by independent regulatory and/or accreditation bodies. With the intent to implement such a program in Brazil, in November 2012 the Nuclear Energy Commission of Brazil (CNEN), with support from the Department of Energy of the United States' (US-DOE International Safeguards and Engagement Program), decided to initiate a technical cooperation project aiming at organizing a Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program (SMEP) for Brazilian facilities. The project, entitled Action Sheet 23, was formalized under the terms of the Agreement between the US-DOE and the CNEN concerning research and development in nuclear material control, accountancy, verification, physical protection, and advanced containment and surveillance technologies for International Safeguards Applications. The work, jointly performed by the CNEN's Safeguards Laboratory (LASAL) and the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), has the objective to strengthen the traceability of accountability measurements and ensure adequate quality of safeguards measurements for facilities within Brazil, utilizing test samples characterized and provided by NBL. Recommendations to participants included measurement frequency, number of results per sample and format for reporting results using ISO methods for calculating and expressing measurement uncertainties. In this paper, we discuss the main steps taken by CNEN and NBL aiming at implementing such a program and the expected results, in particular the impact of uncertainty estimation on the evaluation of performance of each participant laboratory. The program is considered by Brazilian safeguards authorities

  1. A measurement evaluation program to support nuclear material control and accountability measurements in Brazilian laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Fabio C., E-mail: fabio@ird.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mason, Peter, E-mail: peter.mason@ch.doe.gov [New Brunswick Laboratory (DOE/NBL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A measurement evaluation program (MEP) is one of a number of valuable tools that analytical chemists can use to ensure that the data produced in the laboratory are fit for their intended purpose and consistent with expected performance values at a given time. As such, participation in a MEP is an important indicator of the quality of analytical data, and is recognized as such by independent regulatory and/or accreditation bodies. With the intent to implement such a program in Brazil, in November 2012 the Nuclear Energy Commission of Brazil (CNEN), with support from the Department of Energy of the United States' (US-DOE International Safeguards and Engagement Program), decided to initiate a technical cooperation project aiming at organizing a Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program (SMEP) for Brazilian facilities. The project, entitled Action Sheet 23, was formalized under the terms of the Agreement between the US-DOE and the CNEN concerning research and development in nuclear material control, accountancy, verification, physical protection, and advanced containment and surveillance technologies for International Safeguards Applications. The work, jointly performed by the CNEN's Safeguards Laboratory (LASAL) and the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), has the objective to strengthen the traceability of accountability measurements and ensure adequate quality of safeguards measurements for facilities within Brazil, utilizing test samples characterized and provided by NBL. Recommendations to participants included measurement frequency, number of results per sample and format for reporting results using ISO methods for calculating and expressing measurement uncertainties. In this paper, we discuss the main steps taken by CNEN and NBL aiming at implementing such a program and the expected results, in particular the impact of uncertainty estimation on the evaluation of performance of each participant laboratory. The program is considered by Brazilian safeguards

  2. Metallurgical Laboratory and Components Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In the field of metallurgy, TTC is equipped to run laboratory tests on track and rolling stock components and materials. The testing lab contains scanning-electron,...

  3. Survival of organic materials in hypervelocity impacts of ice on sand, ice, and water in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Mark J; Bowden, Stephen A; Cole, Michael; Price, Mark C; Parnell, John

    2014-06-01

    The survival of organic molecules in shock impact events has been investigated in the laboratory. A frozen mixture of anthracene and stearic acid, solvated in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), was fired in a two-stage light gas gun at speeds of ~2 and ~4 km s(-1) at targets that included water ice, water, and sand. This involved shock pressures in the range of 2-12 GPa. It was found that the projectile materials were present in elevated quantities in the targets after impact and in some cases in the crater ejecta as well. For DMSO impacting water at 1.9 km s(-1) and 45° incidence, we quantify the surviving fraction after impact as 0.44±0.05. This demonstrates successful transfer of organic compounds from projectile to target in high-speed impacts. The range of impact speeds used covers that involved in impacts of terrestrial meteorites on the Moon, as well as impacts in the outer Solar System on icy bodies such as Pluto. The results provide laboratory evidence that suggests that exogenous delivery of complex organic molecules from icy impactors is a viable source of such material on target bodies.

  4. Radiation safety requirements for radionuclide laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In accordance with the section 26 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/91) the safety requirements to be taken into account in planning laboratories and other premises, which affect safety in the use of radioactive materials, are confirmed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety. The guide specifies the requirements for laboratories and storage rooms in which radioactive materials are used or stored as unsealed sources. There are also some general instructions concerning work procedures in a radionuclide laboratory

  5. Testing plastic deformations of materials in the introductory undergraduate mechanics laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo-Kröger, C M

    2012-01-01

    Normally, a mechanics laboratory at the undergraduate level includes an experiment to verify compliance with Hooke's law in materials, such as a steel spring and an elastic rubber band. Stress-strain curves are found for these elements. Compression in elastic bands is practically impossible to achieve due to flaccidity. A typical experiment for the complete loading-unloading cycle is to subject a tubular object to torsion. This paper suggests simple experiments for studying properties concerning elasticity and plasticity in elements of common use, subjected to stretching or compression, and also torsion reinforcing. The experiments use plastic binders, rubber bands and metal springs under a moderate load. This paper discusses an experiment with an original device to measure torsion deformations as a function of applied torques, which permitted construction of the hysteresis cycle for a rubber hose and various tubes. Another experiment was designed to define the temporal recovery of a plastic spring with initial stretching. A simple mathematical model was developed to explain this phenomenon. (paper)

  6. Virtual laboratory learning media development to improve science literacy skills of mechanical engineering students on basic physics concept of material measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannati, E. D.; Setiawan, A.; Siahaan, P.; Rochman, C.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to determine the description of virtual laboratory learning media development to improve science literacy skills of Mechanical Engineering students on the concept of basic Physics. Quasi experimental method was employed in this research. The participants of this research were first semester students of mechanical engineering in Majalengka University. The research instrument was readability test of instructional media. The results of virtual laboratory learning media readability test show that the average score is 78.5%. It indicates that virtual laboratory learning media development are feasible to be used in improving science literacy skill of Mechanical Engineering students in Majalengka University, specifically on basic Physics concepts of material measurement.

  7. The Extraterrestrial Materials Simulation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    In contrast to fly-by and orbital missions, in situ missions face an incredible array of challenges in near-target navigation, landing site selection, descent, landing, science operations, sample collection and handling, drilling, anchoring, subsurface descent, communications, and contamination. The wide range of materials characteristics and environments threaten mission safety and success. For example, many physical properties are poorly characterized, including strength, composition, heterogeneity, phase change, texture, thermal properties, terrain features, atmospheric interaction, and stratigraphy. Examples of the range of materials properties include, for example: (1) Comets, with a possible compressive strength ranging from a light fluff to harder than concrete: 10(exp 2) to 10 (exp 8) Pa; (2) Europa, including a possible phase change at the surface, unknown strength and terrain roughness; and (3) Titan, with a completely unknown surface and possible liquid ocean. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Safeguards training at Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years considerable attention has been given to upgrading security education programs at facilities across the country. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), a Laboratory-wide Safeguard Awareness Training Program has been established in order to raise the cognizance of the entire staff with regard to safeguards issues and concerns. This aggressive safeguards program involves a strong interface of physical security measure and material control and accountability systems. Within PNL, four distinct audiences were defined and a needs assessment analysis performed for each to determine specific training requirements. The target audiences identified were: material balance area (MBA) custodians, managers of material balance areas, material handlers, and new employees. Five safeguards training courses were created to meet the needs of those audiences. This paper discusses the development of the Safeguards Awareness Program at PNL and its benefits to the Laboratory

  9. Clearance Laboratory - Capability and measurement sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.; Lauridsen, B.; Silva, J.; Soegaard-Hansen, J.; Warming, L.

    2005-08-01

    A new low-level Clearance Laboratory has been built at the Risoe-site. Building materials with a low content of naturally occurring radionuclides have been used. To minimize transport of radon gas from soil into the laboratory the foundation has been supplied with a membrane. The laboratory has been equipped with two high-efficiency germanium detectors. These detectors will be used for clearance measurements on the predicted amount of 15,000 - 18,000 tonnes of non-active or nearly non-active materials, which will originate from the decommissioning of all the nuclear facilities at the Risoe-site. They will be used also for clearance measurements on buildings and land. Objects and materials to be measured for clearance are placed on a rotation table that can carry up to one tonne and can rotate once a minute to simulate some averaging of inhomogeneously distributed activity. Sensitivity and background measurements reveal that measuring times of 20 - 50 minutes would normally be sufficient to detect radionuclide concentrations of only a small fraction of the nuclide-specific clearance levels with a sufficiently low uncertainty. Probability calculations of the measurement capacity of the Clearance Laboratory indicate that the mean value of the total measuring time for all materials that potentially can be cleared would be 13 years with a 95% probability of being less than 25 years. The mean value of the annual amount of materials that can be measured in the laboratory is 600 tonnes with a 95% probability of being less than 1,200 tonnes. If needed, there is room for additional measuring systems to increase the capacity of the laboratory. (au)

  10. Clearance Laboratory - Capability and measurement sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.; Lauridsen, B.; Silva, J.; Soegaard-Hansen, J.; Warming, L.

    2005-09-01

    A new low-level Clearance Laboratory has been built at the Risoe-site. Building materials with a low content of naturally occurring radionuclides have been used. To minimize transport of radon gas from soil into the laboratory the foundation has been supplied with a membrane. The laboratory has been equipped with two high-efficiency germanium detectors. These detectors will be used for clearance measurements on the predicted amount of 15,000 - 18,000 tonnes of non-active or nearly non-active materials, which will originate from the decommissioning of all the nuclear facilities at the Risoe-site. They will be used also for clearance measurements on buildings and land. Objects and materials to be measured for clearance are placed on a rotation table that can carry up to one tonne and can rotate once a minute to simulate some averaging of inhomogeneously distributed activity. Sensitivity and background measurements reveal that measuring times of 20 - 50 minutes would normally be sufficient to detect radionuclide concentrations of only a small fraction of the nuclide-specific clearance levels with a sufficiently low uncertainty. Probability calculations of the measurement capacity of the Clearance Laboratory indicate that the mean value of the total measuring time for all materials that potentially can be cleared would be 13 years with a 95% probability of being less than 25 years. The mean value of the annual amount of materials that can be measured in the laboratory is 600 tonnes with a 95% probability of being less than 1,200 tonnes. If needed, there is room for additional measuring systems to increase the capacity of the laboratory. (au)

  11. Medical Laboratory Assistant. Laboratory Occupations Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for medical laboratory assistant is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each…

  12. Laboratory studies and model simulations of sorbent material behavior for an in-situ passive treatment barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloysius, D.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a study combining laboratory experiments and model simulations in support of the design and construction of a passive treatment barrier (or filter wall) for retarding the migration of Sr-90 within a water-bearing surficial sand and gravel layer. Preliminary evaluation was used to select materials for column testing. A one-dimensional finite-difference model was used to simulate the laboratory column results and extrapolation of the calibrated model was then used to assess barrier performance over extended time frames with respect to Sr-90 breakthrough and loading on the filter media. The final results of the study showed that 20 by 50 mesh clinoptilolite will attenuate Sr-90 with a maximum life expentancy of approximately 10 years. This time period is based on allowable limits of Sr-90 activity on the filter media and is also a function of site-specific conditions

  13. Laboratory evidence of MTBE biodegradation in Borden aquifer material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Mario; Butler, Barbara J.; Church, Clinton D.; Barker, James F.; Nadarajah, Nalina

    2003-02-01

    Mainly due to intrinsic biodegradation, monitored natural attenuation can be an effective and inexpensive remediation strategy at petroleum release sites. However, gasoline additives such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) can jeopardize this strategy because these compounds often degrade, if at all, at a slower rate than the collectively benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the xylene (BTEX) compounds. Investigation of whether a compound degrades under certain conditions, and at what rate, is therefore important to the assessment of the intrinsic remediation potential of aquifers. A natural gradient experiment with dissolved MTBE-containing gasoline in the shallow, aerobic sand aquifer at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden (Ontario, Canada) from 1988 to 1996 suggested that biodegradation was the main cause of attenuation for MTBE within the aquifer. This laboratory study demonstrates biologically catalyzed MTBE degradation in Borden aquifer-like environments, and so supports the idea that attenuation due to biodegradation may have occurred in the natural gradient experiment. In an experiment with batch microcosms of aquifer material, three of the microcosms ultimately degraded MTBE to below detection, although this required more than 189 days (or >300 days in one case). Failure to detect the daughter product tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in the field and the batch experiments could be because TBA was more readily degradable than MTBE under Borden conditions.

  14. Computerized real-time materials accountability system for safeguards material control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.F.; Affel, R.G.; Austin, H.C.; Nichols, J.P.; Stoutt, B.H.; Wachter, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    A real-time, computer-based system is described which provides safeguards material control at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Originally installed in 1972 to provide computerized real-time fissile materials accountability for criticality control purposes, the system has been expanded to provide accountability of all source and nuclear materials (SNM) and to utilize the on-line inventory files in support of the Laboratory physical protection and surveillance procedures. (auth)

  15. 48 CFR 1523.303-72 - Care of laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Care of laboratory animals... Material and Material Safety Data 1523.303-72 Care of laboratory animals. Contracting officers shall insert the clause at 1552.223-72, Care of Laboratory Animals, in all contracts involving the use of...

  16. Characterization of a backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF Baclo Project - Phase 3 Laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Dueck, Ann; Ohlsson, Lars (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    A backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF, which origin from Milos, Greece, has been investigated. The material was delivered both as granules and as pellets. The investigation described in this report aimed to characterize the material and evaluate if it can be used in a future repository. The following investigations have been done and are presented in this report: 1. Standard laboratory tests. Water content, liquid limit and swelling potential are examples on standard tests that have been performed. 2. Block manufacturing. The block compaction properties of the material have been determined. A first test was performed in laboratory but also tests in large scale have been performed. After finishing the test phase, 60 tons of blocks were manufactured at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB. The blocks will be used in large scale laboratory tests at Aespoe HRL. 3. Mechanical parameters. The compressibility of the material was investigated with oedometer tests (four tests) where the load was applied in steps after saturation. The evaluated oedometer modulus varied between 34.50 MPa. Tests were made to evaluate the elastic parameters of the material (E, nu). Altogether three tests were made on specimens with dry densities of about 1,710 kg/m3. The evaluated E-modulus and Poisson's ratio varied between 231-263 MPa and 0.16-0.19 respectively. The strength of the material, both the compressive strength and the tensile strength were measured on specimens compacted to different dry densities. The test results yielded a relation between density and the two types of strength. Furthermore, tests have been made in order to determine the compressibility of the unsaturated filling of pellets. Two tests were made where the pellets were loosely filled in a Proctor cylinder and then compressed at a constant rate of strain during continuously measurement of the applied load. 4. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity. There is, as expected, a very clear influence of the dry density on the

  17. Inorganic Coatings Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The inorganic Coatings Lab provides expertise to Navy and Joint Service platforms acquisition IPTs to aid in materials and processing choices which balance up-front...

  18. Effects of Water Bottle Materials and Filtration on Bisphenol A Content in Laboratory Animal Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Jennifer A; Nguyen, Jenny Q T; Kentner, Amanda C; Brenhouse, Heather C

    2017-05-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in the polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins that are found in laboratory animal husbandry materials including cages and water bottles. Concerns about BPA exposure in humans has led to investigations that suggest physiologic health risks including disruptions to the endocrine system and CNS. However, the extent of exposure of laboratory animals to BPA in drinking water is unclear. In the first study, we compared the amount of BPA contamination in water stored in plastic bottles used in research settings with that in glass bottles. The amount of BPA that leached into water was measured across several time points ranging from 24 to 96 h by using a BPA ELISA assay. The results showed that considerable amounts of BPA (approximately 0.15 μg/L) leached from polycarbonate bottles within the first 24 h of storage. In the second study, BPA levels were measured directly from water taken from filtered compared with unfiltered taps. We observed significantly higher BPA levels in water from unfiltered taps (approximately 0.40 μg/L) compared with taps with filtration systems (approximately 0.04 μg/L). Taken together, our findings indicate that the use of different types of water bottles and water sources, combined with the use of different laboratory products (food, caging systems) between laboratories, likely contribute to decreased rigor and reproducibility in research. We suggest that researchers consider reporting the types of water bottles used and that animal care facilities educate staff regarding the importance of flushing nonfiltered water taps when filling animal water bottles.

  19. Eleventh ITER negotiations meeting (N-11) and twelfth negotiators' standing sub-group meeting (NSSG-12)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Delong

    2005-01-01

    The Eleventh ITER Negotiations Meeting (N-11) and the Twelfth Negotiators' Standing Sub-Group (NSSG-12 convened on October 19-25, 2005 at the Kempinski Hotel Chengdu, Sichuan Province. China was the host of this meeting. Delegations from China, the European Union, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the United States of America, as well as members from the International Team, met there to continue their work to reach agreement on the joint implementation of the ITER international fusion energy R and D project. The delegations accepted the Vice Minister of Science and Technology, Mr. LIU Yanhua, and State Councillor, Mr. SHI Dinghuan as Moderators for N-11 and NSSG-12, respectively, and Mr. LUO Delong as Secretary for both meetings. At the Meeting, delegates discussed and made substantial progress on a full range of legal, technical, and administrative topics, including staffing for ITER, policies for managing the project and its procurements, and the continuing joint drafting of the agreement on establishing the international ITER Organization to implement the project. Delegates also explored the possibility of India joining the Negotiations. In the light of the reports presented to the Meeting from the recent joint exploratory mission to India, delegates identified a series of steps for the near future leading towards a possible agreement among all the Parties to India's accession. The Negotiations Meeting also discussed the progress report of NSSG and forward planning and future tasks. The Negotiators agreed that substantial progress was made on all topics, and delegations are optimistic that the Joint Implementation Agreement and related Annexes and instruments could be initialed in spring of 2006. As decided by all delegations, the next Twelfth ITER Negotiations Meeting will be held in Korea on 6 December, 2005

  20. Materials accounting at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, N.J.; Erkkila, B.H.; Kelso, H.F.

    1985-01-01

    The materials accounting system at Los Alamos has evolved from an ''80-column'' card system to a very sophisticated near-real-time computerized nuclear material accountability and safeguards system (MASS). The present hardware was designed and acquired in the late 70's and is scheduled for a major upgrade in Fiscal Year 1986. The history of the system from 1950 through the DYMAC of the late 70's up to the present will be discussed. The philosophy of the system along with the details of the system will be covered. This system has addressed the integrated problems of management, control, and accounting of nuclear material successfully

  1. Guidelines to Language Teaching in Classroom and Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iodice, Don R.

    Guidelines for evaluating, establishing, and administrating classroom and laboratory language programs are offered in this report. Attention is focused on the language laboratory, with sections on its use, scheduling, materials and texts, preparation of audio materials, preparation of tests, supervision, discipline, and maintenance. Briefer…

  2. Materials at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory

  3. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities: auxiliary capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The primary responsibility of the environmental health function is the evaluation and control of hazardous materials and conditions. The evaluation and control of toxic materials, nonionizing radiation such as laser beams and microwaves, and ionizing radiation such as from radiation machines and radioactive sources, are examples of the activities of environmental health programs. A chemical laboratory is operated for the analysis of toxic and radioactive substances and for the bioassay program to provide an index of internal exposure of personnel to toxic and radioactive materials. Instrumentation support and development is provided for environmental health activities. A dosimetry program is maintained to measure personnel exposure to external ionizing radiation. A radiation counting laboratory is maintained. Reentry safety control and effluent documentation support are provided for underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. A radiation training program is provided for laboratory personnel which covers all areas of radiation protection, from working with radioactive materials to radiation-producing machines. The information science activity functions within the framework of Sandia Laboratories' technical libraries. Information science is oriented toward the efficient dissemination of information to technical and administrative personnel. Computerized systems are used to collect, process and circulate books, reports, and other literature. Current-awareness, reference, translation, and literature-search services are also provided

  4. Materials accounting at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, N.J.; Erkkila, B.H.; Kelso, H.F.

    1985-01-01

    The materials accounting system at Los Alamos has evolved from an ''80-column'' card system to a very sophisticated near-real-time computerized nuclear material accountability and safeguards system (MASS). The present hardware was designed and acquired in the late 70's and is scheduled for a major upgrade in fiscal year 1986. The history of the system from 1950 through the DYMAC of the late 70's up to the present will be discussed. The philosophy of the system along with the details of the system will be covered. This system has addressed the integrated problems of management, control, and accounting of nuclear material successfully. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. Laboratory Handbook Electronics

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    Laboratory manual 1966 format A3 with the list of equipment cables, electronic tubes, chassis, diodes transistors etc. One of CERN's first material catalogue for construction components for mechanical and electronic chassis.

  6. Tour of Los Alamos Safeguards R and D laboratories: demonstration and use of NDA instruments and material control and accounting simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    A description is presented of the nondestructive assay techniques and instrumentation for measuring the fissile content of fuel assemblies and fuel components. The course participants had a hands-on tour of this instrumentation and material accounting and control systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory

  7. Eleventh interim status report: Model 9975 O-Ring fixture long-term leak performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperature. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF.

  8. Multi-MW accelerator target material properties under proton irradiation at Brookhaven National Laboratory linear isotope producer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, N.; Ludewig, H.; Kirk, H.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Zhong, Z.; Zhong, H.; Makimura, S.; Yoshimura, K.; Bennett, J. R. J.; Kotsinas, G.; Kotsina, Z.; McDonald, K. T.

    2018-05-01

    The effects of proton beams irradiating materials considered for targets in high-power accelerator experiments have been studied using the Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) 200 MeV proton linac. A wide array of materials and alloys covering a wide range of the atomic number (Z) are being scoped by the high-power accelerator community prompting the BNL studies to focus on materials representing each distinct range, i.e. low-Z, mid-Z and high-Z. The low range includes materials such as beryllium and graphite, the midrange alloys such as Ti-6Al-4V, gum metal and super-Invar and finally the high-Z range pure tungsten and tantalum. Of interest in assessing proton irradiation effects are (a) changes in physiomechanical properties which are important in maintaining high-power target functionality, (b) identification of possible limits of proton flux or fluence above which certain materials cease to maintain integrity, (c) the role of material operating temperature in inducing or maintaining radiation damage reversal, and (d) phase stability and microstructural changes. The paper presents excerpt results deduced from macroscopic and microscopic post-irradiation evaluation (PIE) following several irradiation campaigns conducted at the BNL 200 MeV linac and specifically at the isotope producer beam-line/target station. The microscopic PIE relied on high energy x-ray diffraction at the BNL NSLS X17B1 and NSLS II XPD beam lines. The studies reveal the dramatic effects of irradiation on phase stability in several of the materials, changes in physical properties and ductility loss as well as thermally induced radiation damage reversal in graphite and alloys such as super-Invar.

  9. Characterization of a backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF Baclo Project - Phase 3 Laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Dueck, Ann; Ohlsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    A backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF, which origin from Milos, Greece, has been investigated. The material was delivered both as granules and as pellets. The investigation described in this report aimed to characterize the material and evaluate if it can be used in a future repository. The following investigations have been done and are presented in this report: 1. Standard laboratory tests. Water content, liquid limit and swelling potential are examples on standard tests that have been performed. 2. Block manufacturing. The block compaction properties of the material have been determined. A first test was performed in laboratory but also tests in large scale have been performed. After finishing the test phase, 60 tons of blocks were manufactured at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB. The blocks will be used in large scale laboratory tests at Aespoe HRL. 3. Mechanical parameters. The compressibility of the material was investigated with oedometer tests (four tests) where the load was applied in steps after saturation. The evaluated oedometer modulus varied between 34.50 MPa. Tests were made to evaluate the elastic parameters of the material (E, ν). Altogether three tests were made on specimens with dry densities of about 1,710 kg/m 3 . The evaluated E-modulus and Poisson's ratio varied between 231-263 MPa and 0.16-0.19 respectively. The strength of the material, both the compressive strength and the tensile strength were measured on specimens compacted to different dry densities. The test results yielded a relation between density and the two types of strength. Furthermore, tests have been made in order to determine the compressibility of the unsaturated filling of pellets. Two tests were made where the pellets were loosely filled in a Proctor cylinder and then compressed at a constant rate of strain during continuously measurement of the applied load. 4. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity. There is, as expected, a very clear influence of the dry density on the

  10. Radiological design of hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unruh, C.M.

    1976-04-01

    The fundamental design objectives for a laboratory where work with highly radioactive and highly toxic materials, such as plutonium and transplutonium nuclides, is performed are (1) to accomplish the purpose of the laboratory; (2) to protect the environment, (3) to provide safe working conditions; and (4) to keep radiation exposure to staff as low as practicable. The major planning and design features of a well engineered plutonium or transplutonium laboratory are given

  11. Radiological design of hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unruh, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental design objectives for a laboratory where work with highly radioactive and highly toxic materials, such as plutonium and transplutonium nuclides, is performed, are (1) to accomplish the purpose of the laboratory, (2) to protect the environment, (3) to provide safe working conditions, and (4) to keep radiation exposure to staff as low as practicable. The major planning and design features of well-engineered plutonium or transplutonium laboratory are given. (author)

  12. Laboratory corrosion tests on candidate high-level waste container materials: Results from the Belgian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Kursten, B.; Iseghem, P. Van

    2004-01-01

    The Belgian SAFIR-2 concept foresees the geological disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste in stainless steel containers and overpacks placed in a concrete gallery backfilled with Boom clay or a bentonite-type backfill. In addition to earlier in situ experiments, we used a laboratory approach to investigate the corrosion properties of selected stainless steels in Boom clay and bentonite environments. In the SAFIR-2 concept, AISI 316L hMo is the main candidate overpack material. As an alternative, we also investigated the higher alloyed stainless steel UHB 904L. Our study focused on localised corrosion and in particular pitting. We used cyclic potentiodynamic polarisation measurements to determine the pit nucleation potential E NP and the protection potential E PP . The evolution of the corrosion potential with time was determined by monitoring the open circuit potential in synthetic clay-water over extended periods. In this paper we present and discuss some results from our laboratory programme, focusing on long-term interactions between the stainless steel overpack and the backfill materials. We describe in particular the influence of chloride and thio-sulphate ions on the pitting corrosion behaviour. The results show that, under geochemical conditions typical for geological disposal, i.e. [Cl-] ∼ 30 mg/L for a Boom clay backfill and [Cl-] ∼ 90 mg/L for a bentonite backfill, neither AISI 316L hMo nor UHB 904L is expected to present pitting problems. An important factor in the long-term prediction of the corrosion behaviour however, is the robustness of the model for the evolution of the geochemistry of the backfill. Indeed, at chloride levels higher than 1000 mg/L, we predict pitting corrosion for AISI 316L hMo. (authors)

  13. Waste minimization activities in the Materials Fabrication Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.

    1991-08-01

    The mission of the Materials Fabrication Division (MFD) is to provide fabrication services and technology in support of all programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). MFD involvement is called for when fabrication activity requires levels of expertise, technology, equipment, process development, hazardous processes, security, or scheduling that is typically not commercially available. Customers are encouraged to utilize private industry for fabrication activity requiring routine processing or for production applications. Our waste minimization (WM) program has been directed at source reduction and recycling in concert with the working definition of waste minimization used by EPA. The principal focus of WM activities has been on hazardous wastes as defined by RCRA, however, all pollutant emissions into air, water and land are being considered as part of the program. The incentives include: (1) economics, (2) regulatory conformance, (3) public image and (4) environmental concern. This report discusses the waste minimization program at LLNL

  14. Wet chemical analysis with a laboratory robotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkett, S.D.; Dyches, G.M.; Spencer, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Emphasis on laboratory automation has increased in recent years. The desire to improve analytical reliability, increase productivity, and reduce exposure of personnel to hazardous materials has been fundamental to this increase. The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) performs research and development on nuclear materials. Development of methods to increase efficiency and safety and to reduce exposure of personnel to radioactive materials is an ongoing process at our site. Robotic systems offer a potentially attractive way to achieve these goals

  15. Students' Psychosocial Perception of Science Laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data was obtained with the Science Laboratory Environment Questionnaire, administered on 338 third year science students. Four factors were found to influence students' perception of their science laboratory environment. Two distinct material environments emerged, which have not been reported in the literature.

  16. Software engineering laboratory series: Annotated bibliography of software engineering laboratory literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morusiewicz, Linda; Valett, Jon

    1992-01-01

    This document is an annotated bibliography of technical papers, documents, and memorandums produced by or related to the Software Engineering Laboratory. More than 100 publications are summarized. These publications cover many areas of software engineering and range from research reports to software documentation. This document has been updated and reorganized substantially since the original version (SEL-82-006, November 1982). All materials have been grouped into eight general subject areas for easy reference: (1) the Software Engineering Laboratory; (2) the Software Engineering Laboratory: Software Development Documents; (3) Software Tools; (4) Software Models; (5) Software Measurement; (6) Technology Evaluations; (7) Ada Technology; and (8) Data Collection. This document contains an index of these publications classified by individual author.

  17. Sample requirements and design of an inter-laboratory trial for radiocarbon laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, Charlotte; Carmi, Israel; Cook, Gordon; Gulliksen, Steinar; Harkness, Doug; Heinemeier, Jan; McGee, Edward; Naysmith, Philip; Possnert, Goran; Scott, Marian; Plicht, Hans van der; Strydonck, Mark van

    2000-01-01

    An on-going inter-comparison programme which is focused on assessing and establishing consensus protocols to be applied in the identification, selection and sub-sampling of materials for subsequent 14 C analysis is described. The outcome of the programme will provide a detailed quantification of the uncertainties associated with 14 C measurements including the issues of accuracy and precision. Such projects have become recognised as a fundamental aspect of continuing laboratory quality assurance schemes, providing a mechanism for the harmonisation of measurements and for demonstrating the traceability of results. The design of this study and its rationale are described. In summary, a suite of core samples has been defined which will be made available to both AMS and radiometric laboratories. These core materials are representative of routinely dated material and their ages span the full range of the applied 14 C time-scale. Two of the samples are of wood from the German and Irish dendrochronologies, thus providing a direct connection to the master dendrochronological calibration curve. Further samples link this new inter-comparison to past studies. Sample size and precision have been identified as being of paramount importance in defining dating confidence, and so several core samples have been identified for more in-depth study of these practical issues. In addition to the core samples, optional samples have been identified and prepared specifically for either AMS and/or radiometric laboratories. For AMS laboratories, these include bone, textile, leather and parchment samples. Participation in the study requires a commitment to a minimum of 10 core analyses, with results to be returned within a year

  18. Chemical laboratory hazardous waste management at a DOE multiprogram national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, P.J.

    1990-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) Multiprogram Energy Laboratory, is establishing a program for management of diverse small-quantity laboratory waste generated on site. Although the main emphasis of this program is ''cradle-to-grave'' tracking and treatment of hazardous chemical waste and mixed waste, low-level radioactive and transuranic (TRU) waste is also being included. With the program in operation, more than 95% of all regulated waste will be treated or destroyed on site. The cost savings will return the original investment in under six years and decrease the liability to PNL and DOE -- a benefit with a potentially greater economic value. Tracking of hazardous waste will be mediated by a computer-based inventory and tracking system. The system will track all hazardous materials from receipt through final disposition, whether the material is destroyed or treated for disposal. It will allow user access to handling and hazards information as well as provide an updated inventory by location, user, and hazard type. Storage and treatment of waste will be performed by at least four facilities, made operational in three phases. 6 figs

  19. High Temperature Materials Laboratory Thirteenth Annual Report: October 1999 Through September 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasto, AE

    2001-11-07

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program continued to work with industrial, academic, and governmental users this year, accepting 86 new projects and developing 50 new user agreements. The table on the following page presents the breakdown of these statistics. The figure on page 2 depicts the continued growth in user agreements and user projects. You may note that our total number of proposals is nearing 1000, and we expect to achieve this number in our first proposal review meeting of FY 2001. The large number of new agreements bodes well for the future. A list of proposals to the HTML follows this section; at the end of the report, we present a list of agreements between HTML and universities and industries, broken down by state. Program highlights this year included several outstanding user projects (some of which are discussed in later sections), the annual meeting of the HTML Programs Senior Advisory Committee, the completion of a formal Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP), and finalization of a purchase agreement with JEOL for a new-generation electron microscope.

  20. PIE technology on mechanical tests for HTTR core component and structural materials developed at Research Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizaki, Minoru; Honda, Junichi; Usami, Kouji; Ouchi, Asao; Oeda, Etsuro; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2001-02-01

    The high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) with the target operation temperature of 950degC established the first criticality on November, 1998 based on a large amount of R and D results on fuel and materials. In such R and D works, the development of reactor materials are one of the key issues from the view point of reactor environments such as extremely high temperature, neutron irradiation and so on for the HTTR. The Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) had carried out much kind of post irradiation examinations (PIEs) on core component and pressure vessel materials for during more than a quarter century. And obtained data played an important role in development, characterization and licensing of those materials for the HTTR. This paper describes the PIE technology developed at RHL and typical results on mechanical tests such as elevated temperature tensile and creep rupture tests for Hasteloy-X, Incolloy 800H and so on, and Charpy impact, J IC fracture toughness, K Id fracture toughness and small punch tests for normalized and tempered 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel from historical view. In addition, an electrochemical test technique established for investigating the irradiation embrittlement mechanism on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel is also mentioned. (author)

  1. Building and Benefiting from Member State Laboratory Capacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications implement a number of activities that are designed to enhance and capitalize upon the capacities of Member States’ laboratories worldwide. The Nuclear Sciences and Applications (NA) laboratories strengthen Member States’ analytical capacities through activities such as proficiency tests and inter-laboratory comparisons, and share the capacities of Member States’ laboratories with other Member States through the coordination of relevant networks and participation in the IAEA Collaborating Centre scheme. An example of these activities is the collaborative work carried out by the Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (TEL). The TEL cooperates with the IAEA Environment Laboratories in Monaco to distribute 92 types of reference materials for characterizing radionuclides, stable isotopes, trace elements or organic contaminants. These materials serve as international standards for establishing and evaluating the reliability and accuracy of analytical measurements. This collaborative work between NA laboratories, Member States and laboratories around the globe contribute to the IAEA’s mandate of fostering scientific and technical exchanges for the peaceful use of nuclear science and technology throughout the world

  2. Interior Architectural Requirements for Electronic Circuits and its Applications Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElDib, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the pivotal role of the Interior Architecture As one of the scientific disciplines minute to complete the Architectural Sciences, which relied upon the achievement and development of facilities containing scientific research laboratories, in terms of planning and design, particularly those containing biological laboratories using radioactive materials, adding to that, the application of the materials or raw materials commensurate with each discipline of laboratory and its work nature, and by the discussion the processing of design techniques and requirements of interior architecture dealing with Research Laboratory for electronic circuits and their applications with the making of its prototypes

  3. Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, G.; Blanc, J.Y.; Duwe, R.

    2003-01-01

    The European Working Group on ' Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling' is firmly established as the major contact forum for the nuclear R and D facilities at the European scale. The yearly plenary meetings intend to: - Exchange experience on analytical methods, their implementation in hot cells, the methodologies used and their application in nuclear research; - Share experience on common infrastructure exploitation matters such as remote handling techniques, safety features, QA-certification, waste handling; - Promote normalization and co-operation, e.g., by looking at mutual complementarities; - Prospect present and future demands from the nuclear industry and to draw strategic conclusions regarding further needs. The 41. plenary meeting was held in CEA Saclay from September 22 to 24, 2003 in the premises and with the technical support of the INSTN (National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology). The Nuclear Energy Division of CEA sponsored it. The Saclay meeting was divided in three topical oral sessions covering: - Post irradiation examination: new analysis methods and methodologies, small specimen technology, programmes and results; - Hot laboratory infrastructure: decommissioning, refurbishment, waste, safety, nuclear transports; - Prospective research on materials for future applications: innovative fuels (Generation IV, HTR, transmutation, ADS), spallation source materials, and candidate materials for fusion reactor. A poster session was opened to transport companies and laboratory suppliers. The meeting addressed in three sessions the following items: Session 1 - Post Irradiation Examinations. Out of 12 papers (including 1 poster) 7 dealt with surface and solid state micro analysis, another one with an equally complex wet chemical instrumental analytical technique, while the other four papers (including the poster) presented new concepts for digital x-ray image analysis; Session 2 - Hot laboratory infrastructure (including waste theme) which was

  4. Design of the Laboratory-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orton, Robert D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smart, John E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes a design for a laboratory-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide (PuO2) for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production, as well as for use as exercise and reference materials. This capability will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including PuO2 dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and re-conversion to PuO2 by calcination.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory new generation standard nuclear material storage container - the SAVY4000 design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, Timothy Amos

    2010-01-01

    Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based standard involving storage of nuclear material (RD003). This RD003 requirements document has sense been updated to reflect requirements as identified with recently issued DOE M 441.1-1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual'. The new packaging manual was issued at the encouragement of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board with a clear directive for protecting the worker from exposure due to loss of containment of stored materials. The Manual specifies a detailed and all inclusive approach to achieve a high level of protection; from package design and performance requirements, design life determinations of limited life components, authorized contents evaluations, and surveillance/maintenance to ensure in use package integrity over time. Materials in scope involve those stored outside an approved engineered-contamination barrier that would result in a worker exposure of in excess of 5 rem Committed Effective Does Equivalent (CEDE). Key aspects of meeting the challenge as developed around the SAVY-3000 vented storage container design will be discussed. Design performance and acceptance criteria against the manual, bounding conditions as established that the user must ensure are met to authorize contents in the package (based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide), interface as a safety class system within the facility under the LANL plutonium facility DSA, design life determinations for limited life components, and a sense of design specific surveillance program

  6. Laboratory of High resolution gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez G, A.; Giber F, J.; Rivas C, I.; Reyes A, B.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Nuclear Experimentation of the Nuclear Systems Management requests the collaboration of the Engineering unit for the supervision of the execution of the work of the High resolution Gamma spectrometry and low bottom laboratory, using the hut of the sub critic reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. This laboratory has the purpose of determining the activity of special materials irradiated in nuclear power plants. In this report the architecture development, concepts, materials and diagrams for the realization of this type of work are presented. (Author)

  7. U.S./Russian Laboratory-to-Laboratory MPC ampersand A Program at the VNIITF Institute, Chelyabinsk-70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teryohin, V.; Tzygankov, G.; Blasy, J.

    1995-07-01

    The All Russian Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF) is one of the major sites in the nuclear weapons complex in Russia. The site contains a number of research facilities which use nuclear material as well as facilities active in disassembly and disposition of nuclear weapons. Chelyabinsk-70 (C-70) also has ties to the major nuclear materials production facilities in the Urals region of Russia. Under the U.S./Russian Laboratory -to- Laboratory cooperative program, enhanced safeguards systems are being implemented, initially at a reactor test area that contains two pulse reactors and a nuclear material storage facility. C-70 is developing an extensive computerized system that integrates the physical security alarm station with elements of the nuclear material control system. Under the Lab-to-Lab program, the existing systems will bi augmented with Russian and US technologies. The integrated MPC ampersand A system for the test facilities will be demonstrated to US and Russian audiences when completed and follow-on work at additional C-70 facilities will be identified. This paper will describe the on-going activities and describe the cooperative effort between the Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Sandia, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Brookhaven US Department of Energy National Laboratories in support of VNIITF

  8. U.S./Russian laboratory-to-laboratory MPC and A program at the VNIITF Institute, Chelyabinsk-70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teryohin, V.; Tzygankov, G.; Blasy, J.

    1996-01-01

    The All Russian Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF) is one of the major sites in the nuclear weapons complex in Russia. The site contains a number of research facilities which use nuclear material as well as facilities active in disassembly and disposition of nuclear weapons. Chelyabinsk-70 (C-70) also has ties to the major nuclear materials production facilities in the Urals region of Russia. Under the US/Russian Laboratory-to-Laboratory cooperative program, enhanced safeguards systems are being implemented, initially at a reactor test area that contains two pulse reactors and a nuclear material storage facility. C-70 is developing an extensive computerized system that integrates the physical security alarm station with elements of the nuclear material control system. Under the Lab-to-Lab program, the existing systems will be augmented with Russian and US technologies. The integrated MPC and A system for the test facilities will be demonstrated to US and Russian audiences when completed and follow-on work at additional C-70 facilities will be identified. This paper will describe the on-going activities and describe the cooperative effort between the Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Sandia, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Brookhaven US Department of Energy National Laboratories in support of VNIITF

  9. US/Russian laboratory-to-laboratory MPC ampersand A Program at the VNIITF Institute, Chelyabinsk-70 May 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsygankov, G.; Churikov, Y.; Teryokhin, V.

    1996-01-01

    The AR Russian Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF), also called Chelyabinsk-70, is one of two Russian federal nuclear centers established to design, test and support nuclear weapons throughout their life cycle. The site contains research facilities which use nuclear materials, two experimental plants which manufacture prototype samples for nuclear weapons, and a site for various ground tests. Chelyabinsk-70 also has cooperative relationships with the major nuclear materials production facilities in the Urals region of Russia. Chelyabinsk-70 has been participating in the US/Russian Laboratory-to-laboratory cooperative program for approximately one year. Six US Department of Energy Laboratories are carrying out a program of cooperation with VNIITF to improve the capabilities and facilities for nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting (MPC ampersand A) at VNIITF. A Safeguards Effectiveness Evaluation Workshop was conducted at VNIITF in July, 1995. Enhanced safeguards systems are being implemented, initially at a reactor test area that contains three pulse reactors. Significant improvements to physical security and access control systems are under way. C-70 is developing an extensive computerized system that integrates the physical security alarm station with elements of the nuclear material control system. The existing systems will be augmented with Russian and US technologies. This paper will describe the on-going activities and describe the cooperative effort between the Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Sandia, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Brookhaven US Department of Energy National Laboratories and VNIITF

  10. 21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug products for compliance...

  11. Safety in laboratories: Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Ajaz; Farooq, A Jan; Qadri, Gj; S A, Tabish

    2008-07-01

    Health and safety in clinical laboratories is becoming an increasingly important subject as a result of emergence of highly infectious diseases such as Hepatitis and HIV. A cross sectional study was carried out to study the safety measures being adopted in clinical laboratories of India. Heads of laboratories of teaching hospitals of India were subjected to a standardized, pretested questionnaire. Response rate was 44.8%. only 60% of laboratories had person in-charge of safety in laboratory. Seventy three percent of laboratories had safety education program regarding hazards. In 91% of laboratories staff is using protective clothing while working in laboratories. Hazardous material regulations are followed in 78% of laboratories. Regular health check ups are carried among laboratory staff in 43.4% of laboratories.Safety manual is available in 56.5% of laboratories. 73.9% of laboratories are equipped with fire extinguishers. Fume cupboards are provided in 34.7% of laboratories and they are regularly checked in 87.5% of these laboratories. In 78.26% of laboratories suitable measures are taken to minimize formation of aerosols.In 95.6% of laboratories waste is disposed off as per bio-medical waste management handling rules. Laboratory of one private medical college was accredited with NABL and safety parameters were better in that laboratory. Installing safety engineered devices apparently contributes to significant decrease in injuries in laboratories; laboratory safety has to be a part of overall quality assurance programme in hospitals. Accreditation has to be made necessary for all laboratories.

  12. DebriSat Pre Preshot Laboratory Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-27

    INTEGRATION DIVISION OFFICE OF EVP/SSG Shant Kenderian, DIRECTOR DEPT MATERIALS PROCESSING DEPT SPACE MATERIALS LABORATORY ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY ...UNCLASSIFIED Norman Fitz-Coy University of Florida nfc @ufl.edu Heather Cowardin NASA-JSC heather.cowardin@nasa.gov Brian Roebuck AEDC

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory summary plan to fabricate mixed oxide lead assemblies for the fissile material disposition program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buksa, J.J.; Eaton, S.L.; Trellue, H.R.; Chidester, K.; Bowidowicz, M.; Morley, R.A.; Barr, M.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes an approach for using existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-fabrication and plutonium processing capabilities to expedite and assure progress in the MOX/Reactor Plutonium Disposition Program. Lead Assembly MOX fabrication is required to provide prototypic fuel for testing in support of fuel qualification and licensing requirements. It is also required to provide a bridge for the full utilization of the European fabrication experience. In part, this bridge helps establish, for the first time since the early 1980s, a US experience base for meeting the safety, licensing, safeguards, security, and materials control and accountability requirements of the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In addition, a link is needed between the current research and development program and the production of disposition mission fuel. This link would also help provide a knowledge base for US regulators. Early MOX fabrication and irradiation testing in commercial nuclear reactors would provide a positive demonstration to Russia (and to potential vendors, designers, fabricators, and utilities) that the US has serious intent to proceed with plutonium disposition. This report summarizes an approach to fabricating lead assembly MOX fuel using the existing MOX fuel-fabrication infrastructure at the Laboratory

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory summary plan to fabricate mixed oxide lead assemblies for the fissile material disposition program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buksa, J.J.; Eaton, S.L.; Trellue, H.R.; Chidester, K.; Bowidowicz, M.; Morley, R.A.; Barr, M.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes an approach for using existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-fabrication and plutonium processing capabilities to expedite and assure progress in the MOX/Reactor Plutonium Disposition Program. Lead Assembly MOX fabrication is required to provide prototypic fuel for testing in support of fuel qualification and licensing requirements. It is also required to provide a bridge for the full utilization of the European fabrication experience. In part, this bridge helps establish, for the first time since the early 1980s, a US experience base for meeting the safety, licensing, safeguards, security, and materials control and accountability requirements of the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In addition, a link is needed between the current research and development program and the production of disposition mission fuel. This link would also help provide a knowledge base for US regulators. Early MOX fabrication and irradiation testing in commercial nuclear reactors would provide a positive demonstration to Russia (and to potential vendors, designers, fabricators, and utilities) that the US has serious intent to proceed with plutonium disposition. This report summarizes an approach to fabricating lead assembly MOX fuel using the existing MOX fuel-fabrication infrastructure at the Laboratory.

  15. Accelerated laboratory weathering of acrylic lens materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Thomas; Richter, Steffen; Kogler, René; Pasierb, Mike; Walby, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Flat samples from various poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) formulations were subjected to outdoor weathering in Arizona and Florida, EMMAQUA® accelerated outdoor weathering, and two accelerated laboratory weathering procedures at 3 Sun irradiance which, imitate dry (Arizona) and wet (Florida) conditions. The main mode of degradation is yellowing and not the generation of haze for any weathering procedure within the investigated radiant exposure. Higher UV absorber concentrations lead to smaller changes in optical properties and in the resulting relative concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) module efficiencies. Comparison of sample properties after various weathering procedures reveals that the influence of weathering factors other than radiant exposure depends on the sample as well.

  16. High Temperature Materials Laboratory eight and ninth annual reports, October 1994 through September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasto, A.E.; Russell, B.J.

    1997-10-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its ninth year of operation as a designated US Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document profiles the historical growth of the HTML User and Fellowship Programs since their inception in 1987. Growth of the HTML programs has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements, and by the number of days of instrument use (user days) since the HTML began operation. A total of 276 nonproprietary agreements (135 industry, 135 university, and 6 other federal agency) and 56 proprietary agreements are now in effect. This represents an increase of 70 nonproprietary user agreements since the last reporting period (for FY 1994). A state-by-state summary of these nonproprietary user agreements is given in Appendix A, and an alphabetical listing is provided in Appendix B. Forty-four states are represented by these users. During FY 1995 and 1996, the HTML User Program evaluated 145 nonproprietary proposals (62 from industry, 82 from universities, and 1 from other government facilities) and several proprietary proposals. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about 95% of those proposals, frequently after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the committee. This annual report discusses activities in the individual user centers, as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users, proposals, and publications as well as summaries of the nonproprietary research projects active during 1995 and 1996.

  17. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this contractual effort is the development and demonstration of a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system to meet the unique needs of the Department of Energy (DOE) for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system will be designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganics, and explosive materials. The planned laboratory system will consist of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site's specific needs

  18. Space Solar Cell Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Measures, characterizes, and analyzes photovoltaic materials and devices. The primary focus is the measurement and characterization of solar cell response...

  19. Investigation of salt distribution in porous stone material using paper pulp poultices under laboratory condititions and on site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egartner, Isabel; Sass, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The presented investigation is part of a longer-term project which deals with the influence of salt and moisture on weathering of historic stonework. The main investigation object in the field is a part of the 300 hundred year old boundary wall of the Worchester College in Oxford, UK. A range of non-destructive techniques were applied in course of field campaigns, e.g. mapping of weathering phenomena; handheld moisture sensors; and salt sampling by paper pulp poultices. In a second step we investigated the behaviour and distribution of water and salt solution in a porous material, similar to the limestone of the College wall, under laboratory condititions. Limestone cube samples (5x5x5 cm) were soaked first with ultrapure H2O and second with different concentration of saline solutions of NaCl and Na2SO4. During the dehydration process of the stone cubes a multi-method approach including sampling by drilling, paper pulp poultices, handheld moisture sensor, conductivity sensor and Ion Chromatography (IC) were applied to investigate the moisture and salt content and distribution within the samples. The laboratory analyses were carried out at the department of applied geoscience of the Technical University of Graz, Austria. The main aim was to investigate the effectivity of the paper pulp poultices in soaking up salts from the stone samples and to use the results of the laboratory analysis to interpret and calibrate the field work results from the College wall in Oxford. Keywords: Salt weathering, paper pulp poultices, cultural heritage, field work and laboratory investigation

  20. Readability of patient education materials in ophthalmology: a single-institution study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew M; Muir, Kelly W; Rosdahl, Jullia A

    2016-08-03

    Patient education materials should be written at a level that is understandable for patients with low health literacy. The aims of this study are (1) to review the literature on readability of ophthalmic patient education materials and (2) to evaluate and revise our institution's patient education materials about glaucoma using evidence-based guidelines on writing for patients with low health literacy. A systematic search was conducted on the PubMed/MEDLINE database for studies that have evaluated readability level of ophthalmic patient education materials, and the reported readability scores were assessed. Additionally, we collected evidence-based guidelines for writing easy-to-read patient education materials, and these recommendations were applied to revise 12 patient education handouts on various glaucoma topics at our institution. Readability measures, including Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), and word count were calculated for the original and revised documents. The original and revised versions of the handouts were then scored in random order by two glaucoma specialists using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument, a grading scale used to evaluate suitability of health information materials for patients. Paired t test was used to analyze changes in readability measures, word count, and SAM score between original and revised handouts. Finally, five glaucoma patients were interviewed to discuss the revised materials, and patient feedback was analyzed qualitatively. Our literature search included 13 studies that evaluated a total of 950 educational materials. Among the mean FKGL readability scores reported in these studies, the median was 11 (representing an eleventh-grade reading level). At our institution, handouts' readability averaged a tenth-grade reading level (FKGL = 10.0 ± 1.6), but revising the handouts improved their readability to a sixth-grade reading level (FKGL = 6.4 ± 1.2) (p readability and suitability of

  1. An analog integrated circuit design laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Mondragon-Torres, A.F.; Mayhugh, Jr.; Pineda de Gyvez, J.; Silva-Martinez, J.; Sanchez-Sinencio, E.

    2003-01-01

    We present the structure of an analog integrated circuit design laboratory to instruct at both, senior undergraduate and entry graduate levels. The teaching material includes: a laboratory manual with analog circuit design theory, pre-laboratory exercises and circuit design specifications; a reference web page with step by step instructions and examples; the use of mathematical tools for automation and analysis; and state of the art CAD design tools in use by industry. Upon completion of the ...

  2. Chemical research at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a research and development laboratory located 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. It has more than 200 programs in basic and applied sciences and an Industrial Technology Development Center to help move its technologies to the industrial sector. At Argonne, basic energy research is supported by applied research in diverse areas such as biology and biomedicine, energy conservation, fossil and nuclear fuels, environmental science, and parallel computer architectures. These capabilities translate into technological expertise in energy production and use, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, and waste minimization and environmental remediation, which can be shared with the industrial sector. The Laboratory`s technologies can be applied to help companies design products, substitute materials, devise innovative industrial processes, develop advanced quality control systems and instrumentation, and address environmental concerns. The latest techniques and facilities, including those involving modeling, simulation, and high-performance computing, are available to industry and academia. At Argonne, there are opportunities for industry to carry out cooperative research, license inventions, exchange technical personnel, use unique research facilities, and attend conferences and workshops. Technology transfer is one of the Laboratory`s major missions. High priority is given to strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness through research and development partnerships with industry that capitalize on Argonne`s expertise and facilities. The Laboratory is one of three DOE superconductivity technology centers, focusing on manufacturing technology for high-temperature superconducting wires, motors, bearings, and connecting leads. Argonne National Laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Interlaboratory control among INCO-DEV MYCOTOX PROJECT LABORATORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A Vargas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Work Package 1 “ Development and standardization of effective analytical tools for mycotoxin (aflatoxins B1, B2  G1, G2  ochratoxin A, zearalenone, fumonisin B1, B2  and tricothecenes determination in wheat and maize”  aim to implement the interlaboratory control between the partners laboratories from Brazil, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina as part of the objectives of INCO-DEV MYCOTOX PROJECT 2003-2005  “The Development of a Food Quality Management System for the Control of Mycotoxins in cereal Production and Processing Chains in Latin America South Cone Countries”.  The ojectives of the interlaboratory control were: evaluate the performance of the laboratories and the main difficulties encountered in performing the analytical procedure for mycotoxins  determination in maize and wheat; contribute to the harmonization of analytical procedures of the partners laboratories and contribute to the laboratory’s proficiency in mycotoxin analysis.  Maize reference materials for aflatoxins and zearealenone were prepared and used to the implementation of the interlaboratory control.  In summary, the preparation of these samples involved: milling (<20 mesh, homogeneization, analysis to verify the homogeneity of the bulk material and packing (labelled vacuum “sachets” or plastic bottles and mycotoxin analysis.  The homogeneity of the material was investigated by the analysis of variance – ANOVA- according to International Harmonized Protocol for the Proficiency testing of (ChemicalAnalytical Laboratories as established by ISO 43-1 – Annex at 95% of confidence level by calculating an F-statistic ans Ss/ÿ (ÿ =15%. All batches of test material were stored under – 18ºC and protected from light prior to and after packaging.  Aflatoxins in the test materials were determinated by immunoaffinity with liquid chromatography (LC with pos-column derivatization and thin layer chromatography (TLC.  Zearalenone in the test materials

  4. Post-test analysis of lithium-ion battery materials at Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareno, Javier; Dietz-Rago, Nancy; Bloom, Ira

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical performance is often limited by surface and interfacial reactions at the electrodes. However, routine handling of samples can alter the very surfaces that are the object of study. Our approach combines standardized testing of batteries with sample harvesting under inert atmosphere conditions. Cells of different formats are disassembled inside an Argon glove box with controlled water and oxygen concentrations below 2 ppm. Cell components are characterized in situ, guaranteeing that observed changes in physicochemical state are due to electrochemical operation, rather than sample manipulation. We employ a complementary set of spectroscopic, microscopic, electrochemical and metallographic characterization to obtain a complete picture of cell degradation mechanisms. The resulting information about observed degradation mechanisms is provided to materials developers, both academic and industrial, to suggest new strategies and speed up the Research & Development cycle of Li-ion and related technologies. This talk will describe Argonne's post-test analysis laboratory, with an emphasis on capabilities and opportunities for collaboration. Cell disassembly, sample harvesting procedures and recent results will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies, Hybrid and Electric Systems, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Implementation of the CNEN's safeguards laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, S.G. de

    1986-01-01

    The International Safeguards Agreements between Brazil and others countries has been concluded with the participation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (AIEA), and involve the Physical Protection and Control of Nuclear Material activities, which set up the National Safeguards System. The Safeguards Laboratory was constructed to the implementation and maintenance of this National Safeguards System, under responsability of CNEN's Safeguards Division, in order to carry out measurements of nuclear materials under safeguards. Technical requirements applied to the construction, setting up and operation of the laboratory are showed. The first results refer to the implementation of safeguards methods and techniques, as well as its participation within international scientific and technical co-operation programs in the safeguards area, through of them we wait its credencement by the AIEA as Regional Safeguards Laboratory for every countries of the Latin America. (Author) [pt

  6. Quality assurance of laboratory work and clinical use of laboratory tests in general practice in norway: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thue, Geir; Jevnaker, Marianne; Gulstad, Guri Andersen; Sandberg, Sverre

    2011-09-01

    Virtually all the general practices in Norway participate in the Norwegian Quality Improvement of Laboratory Services in Primary Care, NOKLUS. In order to assess and develop NOKLUS's services, it was decided to carry out an investigation in the largest participating group, general practices. In autumn 2008 a questionnaire was sent to all Norwegian general practices asking for feedback on different aspects of NOKLUS's main services: contact with medical laboratory technologists, sending of control materials, use and maintenance of practice-specific laboratory binders, courses, and testing of laboratory equipment. In addition, attitudes were elicited towards possible new services directed at assessing other technical equipment and clinical use of tests. Responses were received from 1290 of 1552 practices (83%). The great majority thought that the frequency of sending out control material should continue as at present, and they were pleased with the feedback reports and follow-up by the laboratory technologists in the counties. Even after many years of practical experience, there is still a need to update laboratory knowledge through visits to practices, courses, and written information. Practices also wanted quality assurance of blood pressure meters and spirometers, and many doctors wanted feedback on their use of laboratory tests. Services regarding quality assurance of point-of-care tests, guidance, and courses should be continued. Quality assurance of other technical equipment and of the doctor's clinical use of laboratory tests should be established as part of comprehensive quality assurance.

  7. Rain Erosion/Measurement Impact Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FARM Rain Erosion/Impact Measurement Lab develops solutions for deficiencies in the ability of materials, coatings and designs to withstand a severe operational...

  8. Geoacoustic Physical Model Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Fabricates three-dimensional rough surfaces (e.g., fractals, ripples) out of materials such as PVC or wax to simulate the roughness properties associated...

  9. The integral fast reactor fuels reprocessing laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolson, R.D.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.; Slawecki, M.A.; Miller, W.E.

    1986-09-01

    The processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel utilizes pyrochemical fuel reprocessing steps. These steps include separation of the fission products from uranium and plutonium by electrorefining in a fused salt, subsequent concentration of uranium and plutonium for reuse, removal, concentration, and packaging of the waste material. Approximately two years ago a facility became operational at Argonne National Laboratory-Illinois to establish the chemical feasibility of proposed reprocessing and consolidation processes. Sensitivity of the pyroprocessing melts to air oxidation necessitated operation in atmosphere-controlled enclosures. The Integral Fast Reactor Fuels Reprocessing Laboratory is described

  10. Safety analysis report: packages. Argonne National Laboratory SLSF test train shipping container, P-1 shipment. Fissile material. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, C.A.

    1975-06-01

    The package is used to ship an instrumented test fuel bundle (test train) containing fissile material. The package assembly is Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Model R1010-0032. The shipment is fissile class III. The packaging consists of an outer carbon steel container into which an inner container is placed; the inner container is separated from the outer container by urethane foam cushioning material. The test train is supported in the inner container by a series of transverse supports spaced along the length of the test train. Both the inner and outer containers are closed with bolted covers. The covers do not seal the containers in a leaktight manner. The gross weight of the shipment is about 8350 lb. The unirradiated fissile material content is less than 3 kg of UO 2 of up to 93.2 percent enrichment. This is a Type A quantity (transport group III and less than 3 curies) of radioactive material which does not require shielding, cooling or heating, or neutron absorption or moderation functions in its packaging. The maximum exterior dimensions of the container are 37 ft 11 in. long, 24 1 / 2 in. wide, and 19 3 / 4 in. high

  11. Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-11-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines were derived for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Environmental Restoration (ER) site in Davis, California. The guideline derivation was based on a dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. The US Department of Energy (DOE) residual radioactive material guideline computer code was used in this evaluation. This code implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three potential site utilization scenarios were considered with the assumption that following ER action, the site will be used without radiological restrictions. The defined scenarios vary with regard to use of the site, time spent at the site, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded, provided that the soil concentrations of these radionuclides at the LEHR site do not exceed the scenario-specific values calculated by this study. Except for the extent of the contaminated zone (which is very conservative), assumptions used are as site-specific as possible, given available information. The derived guidelines are single- radionuclide guidelines and are linearly proportional to the dose limit used in the calculations. In setting the actual residual soil contamination guides for the LEHR site, DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors such as whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate, as well as using site-specific inputs to computer models based on data not yet fully determined

  12. A report on recent progress of Central Analytical Laboratory (NRI Rez plc.) for upgrading capabilities for identification of illicit nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Z.; Sus, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the first half of the 90's, the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) -- in close co-operation with other state organizations and following the IAEA's extended safeguards system - strengthened its attention to the development of procedures for the characterization of unknown nuclear materials. This problem become important in the context of increasing danger of illicit trafficking of nuclear material which emerged with the political changes in former 'Comecon' countries during late 80's and 90's. Particular attention has been drawn to the upgrade of the counter-potential in possible transit countries situated in Central Europe. The Central Analytical Laboratory as the main Czech institution working in the field of nuclear material analytical chemistry participated in the development and upgrading of analytical procedures for detailed identification and characterization of nuclear material samples. The special methods for the determination of uranium content, isotopic composition, swipe sample analysis, determination of age and long-lived radioisotopes were developed. In second half of the 90's within the IAEA Project entitled 'Special Analytical Methods for Determination of Traces Radioactivity and Detection of Undeclared Nuclear Activities' basic procedures were prepared for the determination of: - selected isotopes of the natural disintegration series in the samples of water, sediments and technological waste solutions after termination of the uranium ores mining, - age of uranium and plutonium materials based on the 230 Th/ 234 Th, 226 Ra/ 234 U and 241 Am/ 241 Pu pairs, studies on the application of the 231 Pa/ 235 U pair were started. In 1998 PHARE PH5.01/95 project, 'Assistance in setting up special analytical services including a data bank for analysis of radioactive substances and nuclear materials of unknown origin' was started. The project was funded from the European Commission's PHARE Programme. The activities were performed at the

  13. New Brunswick Laboratory progress report, October 1994--September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The mission of the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) of the A. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to serve as the National Certifying Authority for nuclear reference materials and to provide an independent Federal technical staff and laboratory resource performing nuclear material measurement, safeguards, and non-proliferation functions in support of multiple program sponsors. This annual report describes accomplishments achieved in carrying out NBL's assigned missions

  14. Designing easy DNA extraction: Teaching creativity through laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susantini, Endang; Lisdiana, Lisa; Isnawati; Tanzih Al Haq, Aushia; Trimulyono, Guntur

    2017-05-01

    Subject material concerning Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid (DNA) structure in the format of creativity-driven laboratory practice offers meaningful learning experience to the students. Therefore, a laboratory practice in which utilizes simple procedures and easy-safe-affordable household materials should be promoted to students to develop their creativity. This study aimed to examine whether designing and conducting DNA extraction with household materials could foster students' creative thinking. We also described how this laboratory practice affected students' knowledge and views. A total of 47 students participated in this study. These students were grouped and asked to utilize available household materials and modify procedures using hands-on worksheet. Result showed that this approach encouraged creative thinking as well as improved subject-related knowledge. Students also demonstrated positive views about content knowledge, social skills, and creative thinking skills. This study implies that extracting DNA with household materials is able to develop content knowledge, social skills, and creative thinking of the students. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(3):216-225, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Nuclear Materials Characterization in the Materials and Fuels Complex Analytical Hot Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriquez, Michael

    2009-01-01

    As energy prices skyrocket and interest in alternative, clean energy sources builds, interest in nuclear energy has increased. This increased interest in nuclear energy has been termed the 'Nuclear Renaissance'. The performance of nuclear fuels, fuels and reactor materials and waste products are becoming a more important issue as the potential for designing new nuclear reactors is more immediate. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Analytical Laboratory Hot Cells (ALHC) are rising to the challenge of characterizing new reactor materials, byproducts and performance. The ALHC is a facility located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the INL Site. It was built in 1958 as part of the former Argonne National Laboratory West Complex to support the operation of the second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). It is part of a larger analytical laboratory structure that includes wet chemistry, instrumentation and radiochemistry laboratories. The purpose of the ALHC is to perform analytical chemistry work on highly radioactive materials. The primary work in the ALHC has traditionally been dissolution of nuclear materials so that less radioactive subsamples (aliquots) could be transferred to other sections of the laboratory for analysis. Over the last 50 years though, the capabilities within the ALHC have also become independent of other laboratory sections in a number of ways. While dissolution, digestion and subdividing samples are still a vitally important role, the ALHC has stand alone capabilities in the area of immersion density, gamma scanning and combustion gas analysis. Recent use of the ALHC for immersion density shows that extremely fine and delicate operations can be performed with the master-slave manipulators by qualified operators. Twenty milligram samples were tested for immersion density to determine the expansion of uranium dioxide after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. The data collected confirmed modeling analysis with very tight

  16. ABACC's laboratory intercomparison program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Esteban, Adolfo; Almeida, Silvio G. de; Araujo, Radier M. de; Rocha, Zildete

    1996-01-01

    A Laboratory Intercomparison Program involving Brazilian and Argentine laboratories, with the special participation of New Brunswick Laboratory - DOE and IAEA Seibersdorf Safeguards Laboratory, was implanted by ABACC having as main purpose to qualify a network to provide analytical services to this Agency on its role as administrator of the Common System of Accountability and Control of Nuclear Materials. For the first round robin of this Program, 15 laboratories were invited to perform elemental analysis on UO 2 samples, by using any desired method. Thirteen confirmed the participation and 10 reported the results. After an evaluation of the results by using a Two-Way Variance Analysis applied to a nested error model, it was found that 5 of them deviate less than 0.1% from the reference value established for the UO 2 uranium contents, being thus situated within the limits adopted for the target values, while the remaining ones reach a maximal deviation of 0.44%. The outcome of this evaluation, was sent to the laboratories, providing them with a feedback to improve their performance by applying corrective actions to the detected sources of errors or bias related to the methods techniques and procedures. (author)

  17. Biosafety in the Laboratory: Prudent Practices for the Handling and Disposal of Infectious Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    psittacosis, lymphogranuloma animal disease diagnostic laboratory). Biosafety Level venereum (LGV), and trachoma are documented APPENDIX A I11 hazards and...127 see also Facilities Lymphogranuloma venereum , 110-111 Laboratory practices academic laboratories, 68-69 M Biosafety Level 1, 90 Biosafety Level

  18. Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulthess, J.L.; Rosenberg, K.E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the efforts to ensure nuclear energy remains a viable option for the United States. A significant portion of these efforts are related to post-irradiation examinations (PIE) of highly activated fuel and materials that are subject to the extreme environment inside a nuclear reactor. As the lead national laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a rich history, experience, workforce and capabilities for performing PIE. However, new advances in tools and techniques for performing PIE now enable understanding the performance of fuels and materials at the nano-scale and smaller level. Examination at this level is critical since this is the scale at which irradiation damage occurs. The INL is on course to adopt these advanced tools and techniques to develop a comprehensive nuclear fuels and materials characterization capability that is unique in the world. Because INL has extensive PIE capabilities currently in place, a strong foundation exist to build upon as new capabilities are implemented and work load increases. In the recent past, INL has adopted significant capability to perform advanced PIE characterization. Looking forward, INL is planning for the addition of two facilities that will be built to meet the stringent demands of advanced tools and techniques for highly activated fuels and materials characterization. Dubbed the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) and Advanced Post Irradiation Examination Capability, these facilities are next generation PIE laboratories designed to perform the work of PIE that cannot be performed in current DOE facilities. In addition to physical capabilities, INL has recently added two significant contributors to the Advanced Test Reactor-National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF), Oak Ridge National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley.

  19. Development of a laboratory niche Web site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimenstein, Izak B; Dimenstein, Simon I

    2013-10-01

    This technical note presents the development of a methodological laboratory niche Web site. The "Grossing Technology in Surgical Pathology" (www.grossing-technology.com) Web site is used as an example. Although common steps in creation of most Web sites are followed, there are particular requirements for structuring the template's menu on methodological laboratory Web sites. The "nested doll principle," in which one object is placed inside another, most adequately describes the methodological approach to laboratory Web site design. Fragmentation in presenting the Web site's material highlights the discrete parts of the laboratory procedure. An optimally minimal triad of components can be recommended for the creation of a laboratory niche Web site: a main set of media, a blog, and an ancillary component (host, contact, and links). The inclusion of a blog makes the Web site a dynamic forum for professional communication. By forming links and portals, cloud computing opens opportunities for connecting a niche Web site with other Web sites and professional organizations. As an additional source of information exchange, methodological laboratory niche Web sites are destined to parallel both traditional and new forms, such as books, journals, seminars, webinars, and internal educational materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Materials characterization center workshop on compositional and microstructural analysis of nuclear waste materials. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, J.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Shade, J.W.; Thomas, M.T.

    1981-06-01

    The purpose of the Workshop on Compositional and Microstructural Analysis of Nuclear Waste Materials, conducted November 11 and 12, 1980, was to critically examine and evaluate the various methods currently used to study non-radioactive, simulated, nuclear waste-form performance. Workshop participants recognized that most of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) test data for inclusion in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook will result from application of appropriate analytical procedures to waste-package materials or to the products of performance tests. Therefore, the analytical methods must be reliable and of known accuracy and precision, and results must be directly comparable with those from other laboratories and from other nuclear waste materials. The 41 participants representing 18 laboratories in the United States and Canada were organized into three working groups: Analysis of Liquids and Solutions, Quantitative Analysis of Solids, and Phase and Microstructure Analysis. Each group identified the analytical methods favored by their respective laboratories, discussed areas needing attention, listed standards and reference materials currently used, and recommended means of verifying interlaboratory comparability of data. The major conclusions from this workshop are presented

  1. Building Design Guidelines of Interior Architecture for Bio safety Levels of Biology Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElDib, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the pivotal role of the Interior Architecture As one of the scientific disciplines minute to complete the Architectural Sciences, which relied upon the achievement and development of facilities containing scientific research laboratories, in terms of planning and design, particularly those containing biological laboratories using radioactive materials, adding to that, the application of the materials or raw materials commensurate with each discipline of laboratory and its work nature, and by the discussion the processing of design techniques and requirements of interior architecture dealing with Research Laboratory for electronic circuits an their applications with the making of its prototypes

  2. Certificate of Waiver Laboratory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CLIA requires all laboratories that examine materials derived from the human body for diagnosis, prevention, or treatment purposes to be certified by the Secretary...

  3. ABACC laboratories quality assurance through Secondary Standards Exchange Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidicini, Olga Mafra; Thompson, Jay; Soriano, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In September 1999, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), with assistance from the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) of the U.S. Department of Energy, started a new cooperative activity with, among other objectives, the production and characterization of a traceable uranium secondary standard and the performance of the Third Round Robin for ABACC's laboratory network. Brazil and Argentina have fabricated UO 2 pellets for use as a secondary standard. Samples from the two batches were sent to NBL for the determination of the reference values for both uranium concentration (%U) and isotopic composition for each batch. ABACC and NBL then organized the Third ABACC Round Robin for Brazilian and Argentine laboratories that are part of the ABACC network. The laboratories comprising the network can be used to analyze real samples collected during the ABACC inspections. The Brazilian and Argentine pellets were distributed to all the laboratories together with the protocol to be followed for the uranium concentration analysis, the forms for reporting the measurement results, and natural UO 2 pellets (CETAMA OU1) to be used as reference material. For the laboratories with capability of measuring isotopics, NBL reference material CRM 125-A was provided. Several laboratories from each country provided results. As soon as the measurement results were sent to the organizers, they were statistically evaluated by NBL. During a meeting held at ABACC headquarters with the participation of NBL representatives, the ABACC technical support officer, and representatives of all the participant laboratories, the results were discussed and compared with the reference values. All the laboratories had the occasion, in an open discussion, to explain and show the difficulties and problems they faced during the exercise. ABACC had the opportunity not only to judge the quality of the measurements these laboratories performed, but also to determine

  4. Significance of material analysis in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Most industries need to have laboratories to meet production, customer and statutory requirements. Failure to have such a service would result in production losses, material failures and customer complaints leading to expensive claims for damages. Laboratory functions are to monitor production processes, certify the end product and assist in trouble shooting production problems and material failures. This means that laboratories are an essential part of industry and need to have access to a wide range of instrumentation (XRF, XRD, AES, ICP, SEM, etc). Monitoring and reporting on the industries environmental licences for effluent and emissions is also the responsibility of the laboratory. Licence exceedance leads to heavy fines and continual exceedance would result in plant closure. The mining industry relies heavily on laboratories to certify that the material meets the customer specification. The large tonnages involved means that small errors in composition can result in losses amounting to many thousands of dollars. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  5. 2016 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cafferty, Kara Grace

    2017-01-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2015, through October 31, 2016.

  6. An analytical laboratory to facilitate international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, B.E.; Muellner, P.; Deron, S.

    1976-01-01

    Member States which have concluded safeguards agreements accept safeguards on part or all of their nuclear facilities and nuclear materials. The Agreements enable the Agency to make inspections in order to verify the location, identity, quantity and composition of all safeguarded nuclear material. The independent analysis of samples of safeguards material is an essential part of the verification process. A new analytical laboratory has been made available to the Agency by the Austrian Government. This facility is staffed by the Agency with scientists and technicians from five Member States. Design criteria for the laboratory were defined by the Agency. Construction was carried out under the project management of the Oesterreichische Studiengesellschaft fuer Atomenergie Ges.m.b.H. Scientific equipment was procured by the Agency. Samples of feed and product material from the nuclear fuel cycle will constitute the main work load. Irradiated and unirradiated samples of uranium, plutonium and mixtures of both will be analysed for concentration and isotopic composition. Since highly diluted solutions of spent fuel will be the most active beta-gamma samples, shielded and remote manipulation facilities are not necessary. Ptentiometry, mass spectrometry and coulometry are the main techniques to be employed. Gravimetry, alpha and gamma spectrometry and emission spectroscopy will also be utilized as required. It is not intended that this laboratory, should carry the whole burden of the Agency's safeguards analytical work, but that it should function as a member of a network of international laboratories which has been set up by the Agency for this purpose. (author)

  7. Uranium reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donivan, S.; Chessmore, R.

    1987-07-01

    The Technical Measurements Center has prepared uranium mill tailings reference materials for use by remedial action contractors and cognizant federal and state agencies. Four materials were prepared with varying concentrations of radionuclides, using three tailings materials and a river-bottom soil diluent. All materials were ground, dried, and blended thoroughly to ensure homogeneity. The analyses on which the recommended values for nuclides in the reference materials are based were performed, using independent methods, by the UNC Geotech (UNC) Chemistry Laboratory, Grand Junction, Colorado, and by C.W. Sill (Sill), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Several statistical tests were performed on the analytical data to characterize the reference materials. Results of these tests reveal that the four reference materials are homogeneous and that no large systematic bias exists between the analytical methods used by Sill and those used by TMC. The average values for radionuclides of the two data sets, representing an unbiased estimate, were used as the recommended values for concentrations of nuclides in the reference materials. The recommended concentrations of radionuclides in the four reference materials are provided. Use of these reference materials will aid in providing uniform standardization among measurements made by remedial action contractors. 11 refs., 9 tabs

  8. The Influence of Laboratory Safety on Capital Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses state and federal legislation concerning the handling of dangerous materials and its impact on the design of college and university buildings. Lists federal legislation affecting laboratory safety, the objectives of each act, and the influence of each act on laboratory safety. (IRT)

  9. Comparison of different strategies for decommissioning a tritium laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kris Dylst

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Between 2003 and 2009 two rooms that served as tritium laboratory at SCK-CEN and its ventilation system were decommissioned. Initially, the decommissioning strategy was to free release as much materials as possible. The low free release limit imposed by the Belgian authorities made decommissioning of the first laboratory room very labor intensive. Timing restrictions forced us to use a different strategy for the ventilation system. Steel that could not be easily decontaminated was disposed to a nuclear melting facility. Compared to similar work done on steel in the lab, the new strategy took less than 80% of the man hours in only 40% of the calendar days. For the second laboratory a similar strategy was used: contaminated steel was disposed to a nuclear melting facility, other materials that could not be easily decontaminated were disposed as nuclear waste. Compared to the first laboratory the decommissioning was done in less than 40% of the time using merely one third of the man hours, although at the expense of extra waste generation. Economically, as far as not easily decontaminated materials are concerned, steel is best disposed to a nuclear melting and it is worth to invest in the decontamination of other materials. (author)

  10. Determination of carbon-14 in environmental level, solid reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blowers, Paul, E-mail: paul.blowers@cefas.co.uk [Cefas Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom); Caborn, Jane, E-mail: jane.a.caborn@nnl.co.uk [NNL, Springfields, Salwick, Preston, Lancashire, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Dell, Tony [Veterinary Laboratories Agency, New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey, KT15 3NB (United Kingdom); Gingell, Terry [DSTL, Radiation Protection Services, Crescent Road, Alverstoke, Gosport, Hants, PO12 2DL (United Kingdom); Harms, Arvic [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Long, Stephanie [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, 3 Clonskeagh Square, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14, Ireland (United Kingdom); Sleep, Darren [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Stewart, Charlie [UKAEA (Waste Management Group), Chemical Support Services, D1310/14, Dounreay, Thurso, Caithness, KW14 7TZ (United Kingdom); Walker, Jill [Radiocarbon Dating, The Old Stables, East Lockinge, Wantage, Oxon OX12 8QY (United Kingdom); Warwick, Phil E. [GAU-Radioanalytical, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, European Way, Southampton, SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    An intercomparison exercise to determine the {sup 14}C activity concentrations in a range of solid, environmental level materials was conducted between laboratories in the UK. IAEA reference materials, C2, C6 and C7, and an in-house laboratory QA material were dispatched in 2006 to ten laboratories comprising of members of the Analyst Informal Working Group (AIWG) and one other invited party. The laboratories performed the determinations using a number of techniques, and using the results each one was evaluated in terms of levels of precision, sensitivity and limits of detection. The results of the study show that all techniques are capable of successfully analysing {sup 14}C in environmental level materials, however, a shortage of certified environmental reference materials exists. The suitability of the IAEA reference materials and other material for use as reference materials was also assessed.

  11. Determination of carbon-14 in environmental level, solid reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blowers, Paul; Caborn, Jane; Dell, Tony; Gingell, Terry; Harms, Arvic; Long, Stephanie; Sleep, Darren; Stewart, Charlie; Walker, Jill; Warwick, Phil E.

    2011-01-01

    An intercomparison exercise to determine the 14 C activity concentrations in a range of solid, environmental level materials was conducted between laboratories in the UK. IAEA reference materials, C2, C6 and C7, and an in-house laboratory QA material were dispatched in 2006 to ten laboratories comprising of members of the Analyst Informal Working Group (AIWG) and one other invited party. The laboratories performed the determinations using a number of techniques, and using the results each one was evaluated in terms of levels of precision, sensitivity and limits of detection. The results of the study show that all techniques are capable of successfully analysing 14 C in environmental level materials, however, a shortage of certified environmental reference materials exists. The suitability of the IAEA reference materials and other material for use as reference materials was also assessed.

  12. Research laboratories annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The 1990-1991 activities, of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission's research laboratories, are presented in this report. The main fields of interest are chemistry and material sciences, life and environmental sciences, nuclear physics and technology

  13. Production of liquid transport fuel from cellulose material (wood). III Laboratory preparation of wood sugars and fermentation to ethanol and yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitworth, D A; Harwood, V D

    1977-10-25

    A laboratory procedure is described for hydrolyzing cellulose material to sugars by the use of hot sulfuric acid. The procedure has been used routinely for assessing raw materials. Raw materials used were radiata pine (fresh wood and decayed thinnings), pine needles, sawdust from old dumps, newspaper, cardboard, beech wood, and coconut wood. The neutralized sugar-liquors produced, supplemented with fertilizer grade nutrients, were fermented with bakers' yeast and gave near optimal conversion of hexoses to ethanol and of pentoses to protein biomass. From 100 g radiata pine (wood: bark mix 85:15) 25 ml (20 g) of ethanol and 2 g yeast biomass were routinely produced, although fermentation rates were lower than with pure sugars. The results, however, clearly showed that, by a hot dilute sulfure acid hydrolysis followed by a yeast fermentation process, cellulose resources avaliable in New Zealand are suitable for conversion to ethanol. 5 table, 1 figure.

  14. Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This Annual Report describes the activities of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington for the year ending approximately April 30, 1982. As in previous years we report here on a strong nuclear physics research program based upon use of the Laboratory's principal facility, an FN tandem and injector accelerator system. Other major elements of the Laboratory's current program include the hydrogen parity mixing experiment, intermediate-energy experiments conducted at Los Alamos and elsewhere, an accelerator mass spectrometry program emphasizing 10 Be and 14 C measurements on environmental materials, and a number of researches carried out by Laboratory members working collaboratively at other institutions both in this country and abroad

  15. Legacy material work-off project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloan, T.J.; Baker, D.H. IV

    1999-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and its subcontractors recently completed a nine-month legacy material clean-up effort. Legacy materials were defined as chemicals, hazardous, non-hazardous, and both hazardous and radioactive (mixed), that no longer served a programmatic use and had no identified individual owner within the Laboratory. Once personnel identified the legacy materials, the items were transferred to Solid Waste Operation's (EM-SWO) control. Upon completing this process, the responsible division-level manager was required to certify that all non-radioactive hazardous and non-hazardous materials and acceptable mixed legacy materials had been identified and transferred to EM-SWO for proper handling or disposal. The major expense in this project was the cost of actual chemical and radiological analysis. This expense was the result of items not having an identified individual owner. The major benefit of this project is that LANL is now in an excellent position to implement its Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Plan, which requires the implementation of safe work practices, including requirements for removing unused items when vacating workspaces. Effective implementation of ISM will go a long way toward ensuring that legacy materials are no longer an issue at the Laboratory

  16. Contribution of the radiation hygiene laboratories network in physical protection of radiation materials in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milu, C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Ministry of Health and Family from Romania has its own radiation protection network, including 23 radiation hygiene laboratories (RHLs), within the Institutes of Public Health-Bucharest, Iassy, Cluj-Napoca and Timisoara and the Directions of Public Health from Arges county, Bihor, Brasov, Mures, Maramures, Cluj, Sibiu, Harghita, Suceava, lassy, Bacau, Neamt, Galati, Constanta, Prahova, Dolj, Caras-Severin, Timis and Bucharest City. The RHLs network has 170 persons (physicians, physicists, engineers, chemists, biologists and technicians) and it is technically co-ordinated by the RHL in the Institute of Public Health-Bucharest. Within the local or national activities for physical protection of radioactive materials, the RHLs network closely co-operates with the Ministry of Internal Affairs (MAI) and with the nuclear regulatory authority, named the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). In the particular case of theft, sabotage or illicit traffic of radioactive materials, usually the MAI has the main role in the co-ordination of intervention actions of the three authorities. The RHLs network contributes by the expertise of its staff and by using its intervention facilities. The specific tasks for the RHLs network are: identification of the type and size of the radioactive material (by direct dosimetry and/or by gamma spectroscopy); dose reconstructions for the involved persons, the intervention personnel and the population; health management for overexposed persons and the medical response, including biological dosimetry and epidemiological studies. Recent special situations in this field, were: theft of some fuel (defect) tablets of natural uranium, from a production factory; the illicit traffic of radioactive materials, in transition to Western European Countries; an unauthorized decommissioning of a furnace, determining the uncontrolled dispersion of about 30 cobalt-60 sealed sources and the radiation exposure of nearly 20

  17. Development of the Global Measles Laboratory Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, David; Brown, David; Sanders, Ray

    2003-05-15

    The routine reporting of suspected measles cases and laboratory testing of samples from these cases is the backbone of measles surveillance. The Global Measles Laboratory Network (GMLN) has developed standards for laboratory confirmation of measles and provides training resources for staff of network laboratories, reference materials and expertise for the development and quality control of testing procedures, and accurate information for the Measles Mortality Reduction and Regional Elimination Initiative. The GMLN was developed along the lines of the successful Global Polio Laboratory Network, and much of the polio laboratory infrastructure was utilized for measles. The GMLN has developed as countries focus on measles control activities following successful eradication of polio. Currently more than 100 laboratories are part of the global network and follow standardized testing and reporting procedures. A comprehensive laboratory accreditation process will be introduced in 2002 with six quality assurance and performance indicators.

  18. Plating laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seamster, A.G.; Weitkamp, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The lead plating of the prototype resonator has been conducted entirely in the plating laboratory at SUNY Stony Brook. Because of the considerable cost and inconvenience in transporting personnel and materials to and from Stony Brook, it is clearly impractical to plate all the resonators there. Furthermore, the high-beta resonator cannot be accommodated at Stony Brook without modifying the set up there. Consequently the authors are constructing a plating lab in-house

  19. Safety evaluation for packaging 222-S laboratory cargo tank for onetime type B material shipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to evaluate and document the safety of the onetime shipment of bulk radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory cargo tank (222-S cargo tank). The 222-S cargo tank is a US Department of Transportation (DOT) MC-312 specification (DOT 1989) cargo tank, vehicle registration number HO-64-04275, approved for low specific activity (LSA) shipments in accordance with the DOT Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). In accordance with the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1A, Chapter III (RL 1988), an equivalent degree of safety shall be provided for onsite shipments as would be afforded by the DOT shipping regulations for a radioactive material package. This document demonstrates that this packaging system meets the onsite transportation safety criteria for a onetime shipment of Type B contents

  20. National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) open facilities for scientific community: new methods for polymeric materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cristiane A.; Santos, Ramon H.Z. dos; Bernardes, Juliana S.; Gouveia, Rubia F.

    2015-01-01

    National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) at the National Center for Energy and Materials (CNPEM) presents open facilities for scientific public in some areas. In this work will be discussed the facilities for mainly the polymeric community, as well as new methods for the characterization. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) surfaces were characterized by X-ray microtomography and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results obtained by microtomography have shown that these surfaces present different contrasts when compared with the bulk. These differences are correlated with the formation of an oxidized layer at the polymer surface, which consequently have a greater X-ray attenuation. This hypothesis is confirmed by XPS, which shows LDPE surface layers are richer in carbonyl, carboxyl and vinyl groups than the bulk. This work presents that microtomography can be used as a new method for detection and characterization of polymer surface oxidation. (author)

  1. Materials research for PMI at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Chad; Edmondson, Philip; Meyer, Fred; Bannister, Mark; Garrison, Lauren; Unocic, Kinga; Hu, Xunxiang; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-11-01

    In order to improve the scientific understanding of how materials' structure influences plasma-materials interactions (PMI) and the material response to plasma effects, we have performed a series of ion- and neutron-irradiation experiments on tungsten (W). Single- and polycrystal tungsten developed second phase Re +Os precipitates due to transmutation from High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) neutron irradiation. The microstructure of these precipitates was investigated with electron and atom probe microscopy, while mechanical testing found a significant degradation in materials properties, such as toughness and strength, which will degrade PMI performance. We have also used a beam-deceleration module on an electron-cyclotron resonance ion source beamline at ORNL to study the effects of W crystallography (specifically surface normal) and the effect of beam incidence angle and beam energy on surface morphology after irradiation. Ongoing plasma-exposure experiments and neutron-irradiation campaigns will be described. Supported by ORNL LDRD program, and Office of Fusion Energy Science, US Department of Energy.

  2. On-line monitoring of toxic materials in sewage at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auyong, M.; Cate, J.L. Jr.; Rueppel, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important for industry to prevent releases of potentially toxic material to the environment. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has developed a system to monitor its sewage effluent on a continuous basis. A representative fraction of the total waste stream leaving the Plant is passed through a detection assembly consisting of an x-ray fluorescence unit which detects high levels of metals, sodium iodide crystal detectors that scan the sewage for the presence of elevated levels of radiation, and an industrial probe for pH monitoring. With the aid of a microprocessor, the data collected is reduced and analyzed to determine whether levels are approaching established environmental limits. Currently, if preset pH or radiation levels are exceeded, a sample of the suspect sewage is automatically collected for further analysis, and an alarm is sent to a station where personnel can be alerted to respond on a 24-hour basis. In the same manner, spectral data from the x-ray fluorescence unit will be routed through the 24-hour alarm system as soon as evaluation of the unit is complete. The design of the system and operational experience is discussed

  3. LANMAS alpha configured for Sandia National Laboratories and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woychick, M.R.; Bracey, J.T.; Kern, E.A.; Alvarado, A.

    1993-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Westinghouse Hanford Company have been working jointly for the past 2 years to develop LANMAS (Local Area Network Material Accountability System), the next generation of a US Department of Energy nuclear material accountability system. LANMAS is being designed to reflect the broad-based needs of the US Department of Energy's Material Control ampersand Accountability and Nuclear Materials Management communities, and its developers believe that significant cost savings can be achieved by implementing LANMAS complex-wide, where feasible. LANMAS is being designed so that it is transportable to appropriate US Department of Energy sites. To accomplish this, LANMAS will be configurable to local site work culture. Many US Department of Energy sites are interested in the LANMAS project, and several have participated in its development; some have committed resources. The original LANMAS project team included representatives from the Hanford Site and Los Alamos. As of June 1993, the following sites have also supported the project: Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque; Sandia National Laboratory Livermore; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory; and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. In addition, LANMAS is being targeted as a candidate for the US Department of Energy Complex 21, a project designed to restructure the nation's nuclear weapons complex

  4. An analytical chemistry laboratory's experiences under Department of Energy Order 5633.3 - a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) order 5633.3, Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials, initiated substantial changes to the requirements for operations involving nuclear materials. In the opinion of this author, the two most significant changes are the clarification of and the increased emphasis on the concept of graded safeguards and the implementation of performance requirements. Graded safeguards recognizes that some materials are more attractive than others to potential adversary actions and, thus, should be afforded a higher level of integrated safeguards effort. An analytical chemistry laboratory, such as the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), typically has a small total inventory of special nuclear materials compared to, for example, a production or manufacturing facility. The NBL has a laboratory information management system (LIMS) that not only provides the sample identification and tracking but also incorporates the essential features of MC ampersand A required of NBL operations. As a consequence of order 5633.3, NBL had to modify LIMS to accommodate material attractiveness information for the logging process, to reflect changes in the attractiveness as the material was processed through the laboratory, and to enable inventory information to be accumulated by material attractiveness as the material was processed through the laboratory, and to enable inventory information to be accumulated by material attractiveness codes

  5. Experience of Brazilian safeguards analytical laboratory in DA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, J.H.B.; Araujo, R.M.S.; Pereira, J.C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Brazilian Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, inaugurated in September 1983, performs uranium analysis in samples of nuclear materials taken during national safeguards inspections as well as in samples taken during ABACC's inspections performed in Argentina. The Laboratory analyzes Intercomparison samples provided by IAEA, NBL, ABACC, CEN and EQRAIN. The method used to perform uranium analysis is the Davies and Gray/NBL. All the steps of the analytical procedures, such as chemical kinetics of the reactions and instrumental parameters, are rigorously controlled. An internal Quality Control of the measurements is made by means of analysis of Certified Reference Materials and the performance of the results meets the ESARDA's Target Values for Random and Systematic Components both in Intercomparison Samples and in samples taken during inspections. The typical precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, and accuracy obtained in a routine basis for nuclear grade materials is 0.1% and 0.14% respectively. The performance of the results obtained are comparable to the best international laboratories which perform uranium analysis in nuclear materials for safeguards purposes. (author)

  6. Secondary School Chemistry Teacher's Current Use of Laboratory Activities and the Impact of Expense on Their Laboratory Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesdorfer, Sarah B.; Livermore, Robin A.

    2018-01-01

    In the United States with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)'s emphasis on learning science while doing science, laboratory activities in the secondary school chemistry continues to be an important component of a strong curriculum. Laboratory equipment and consumable materials create a unique expense which chemistry teachers and schools…

  7. FTIR Laboratory in Support of the PV Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Bhattacharya, R.; Xu, Y.; Li, X.; Wang, Q.

    2005-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) Laboratory supports the Solar Energy Technologies Program through the measurement and characterization of solar energy-related materials and devices. The FTIR technique is a fast, accurate, and reliable method for studying molecular structure and composition. This ability to identify atomic species and their bonding environment is a powerful combination that finds use in many research and development efforts. A brief overview of the technical approach used is contained in Section 2 of this report. Because of its versatility and accessibility, the FTIR Laboratory is a valuable contributor to the Solar Energy Technologies Program. The laboratory provides support for, and collaborates with, several in-house programs as well as our industry and university partners. By the end of FY 2004, the FTIR Laboratory performed over 1100 measurements on PV-related materials. These contributions resulted in conference and workshop presentations and several peer-reviewed publications. A brief summary of a few of these efforts is contained in Section 3 of this report

  8. Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) enables engineers to develop manufacturing processes for producing advanced battery materials in sufficient...

  9. Test Production of Anti-Corrosive Paint in Laboratory Scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thein Thein Win, Daw; Khin Aye Tint, Daw; Wai Min Than, Daw

    2003-02-01

    The main purpose of this project is to produce the anti-corrosive paint in laboratory scale. In these experiments, local raw materials, natural resin (shellac), pine oil, turpentine and ethyl alcohol wer applied basically. Laboratory trials were undrtaken to determine the suitablity of raw materials ane their composition for anti-corrosive paint manufacture.The results obtained show that the anti-corrosive paint from experiment No.(30) is suitable for steel plate and this is also considered commercially economics

  10. Factors influencing biosafety level and lai among the staff of medical laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kozajda; Karolina Bródka; Irena Szadkowska-Stańczyk

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to assess the biological risks of medical laboratory employees with particular focus on laboratory acquired infection (LAI), activities having the greatest risk, accidents with biological material, post exposure procedure, preventive measures and workers' knowledge about biological exposure. Materials and Methods: The study involved 9 laboratories. A questionnaire survey was attended by 123 employees and 9 heads of these units with the use of two questionn...

  11. Laboratory Modelling of Volcano Plumbing Systems: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Olivier; Holohan, Eoghan P.; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Burchardt, Steffi

    2015-04-01

    Earth scientists have, since the XIX century, tried to replicate or model geological processes in controlled laboratory experiments. In particular, laboratory modelling has been used study the development of volcanic plumbing systems, which sets the stage for volcanic eruptions. Volcanic plumbing systems involve complex processes that act at length scales of microns to thousands of kilometres and at time scales from milliseconds to billions of years, and laboratory models appear very suitable to address them. This contribution reviews laboratory models dedicated to study the dynamics of volcano plumbing systems (Galland et al., Accepted). The foundation of laboratory models is the choice of relevant model materials, both for rock and magma. We outline a broad range of suitable model materials used in the literature. These materials exhibit very diverse rheological behaviours, so their careful choice is a crucial first step for the proper experiment design. The second step is model scaling, which successively calls upon: (1) the principle of dimensional analysis, and (2) the principle of similarity. The dimensional analysis aims to identify the dimensionless physical parameters that govern the underlying processes. The principle of similarity states that "a laboratory model is equivalent to his geological analogue if the dimensionless parameters identified in the dimensional analysis are identical, even if the values of the governing dimensional parameters differ greatly" (Barenblatt, 2003). The application of these two steps ensures a solid understanding and geological relevance of the laboratory models. In addition, this procedure shows that laboratory models are not designed to exactly mimic a given geological system, but to understand underlying generic processes, either individually or in combination, and to identify or demonstrate physical laws that govern these processes. From this perspective, we review the numerous applications of laboratory models to

  12. Storage and disposition of weapons usable fissile materials (FMD) PEIS: Blending of U-233 to <12% or <5% enrichment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Data report, Draft: Version 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaber, E.L.

    1995-08-01

    Uranium-233 (U-233), a uranium isotope, is a fissionable material capable of fueling nuclear reactors or being utilized in the manufacturing of nuclear weapons. As such, it is controlled as a special nuclear material. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) currently store the Department of Energy's (DOE's) supply of unirradiated U-233 fuel materials. Irradiated U-233 is covered by the national spent nuclear fuel (SNF) program and is not in the scope of this report. The U-233 stored at ORNL is relatively pure uranium oxide in the form of powder or monolithic solids. This material is currently stored in stainless steel canisters of variable lengths measuring about 3 inches in diameter. The ORNL material enrichment varies with some material containing considerable amounts of U-235. The INEL material is fuel from the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Program and consists of enriched uranium and thorium oxides in zircaloy cladding. The DOE inventory of U-233 contains trace quantities of U-232, and daughter products from the decay of U-232 and U-233, resulting in increased radioactivity over time. These increased levels of radioactivity generally result in the need for special handling considerations

  13. Liability of Science Educators for Laboratory Safety. NSTA Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Teachers Association (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory investigations are essential for the effective teaching and learning of science. A school laboratory investigation ("lab") is an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data…

  14. The University of New Mexico/Sandia National Laboratories small-angle scattering laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieker, T.P.; Hubbard, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    The University of New Mexico/Sandia National Laboratories small-angle scattering laboratory provides a wide q-range, 3x10 -4 Angstrom -1 -1 , for the structural analysis of materials on length scales from a few angstrom to ∼0.1 μm. The wide q-range is accomplished by combining data from a Bonse-Hart spectrometer (3x10 -4 Angstrom -1 -2 Angstrom -1 ) and a 5 m pinhole (3x10 -3 Angstrom -1 -1 ) instrument. Automation of the data acquisition systems along with a variety of sample environments and sample changers yields flexible, high throughput instruments. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  15. Neutron activation analysis and ICP-AES to determine metal traces in antarctic krill. CNEA laboratories participation in the certification of a reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smichowski, Patricia N.; Farias, Silvia S.; Resnizky, Sara M.; Marrero, Julieta G.

    1999-01-01

    For the international certification of a reference material based on krill, As and Hg were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis and Br, Co and Se by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. Inductive coupling plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn. The results, which are in good agreement with those obtained by other laboratories, are discussed

  16. Establishment of a clean chemistry laboratory at JAERI. Clean laboratory for environmental analysis and research (CLEAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzawa, Yukiko; Magara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; and others

    2003-02-01

    The JAERI has established a facility with a cleanroom: the Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research (CLEAR). This report is an overview of the design, construction and performance evaluation of the CLEAR in the initial stage of the laboratory operation in June 2001. The CLEAR is a facility to be used for analyses of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental samples for the safeguards, for the CTBT verification and for researches on environmental sciences. One of the special features of the CLEAR is that it meets double requirements of a cleanroom and for handling of nuclear materials. As another feature of the CLEAR, much attention was paid to the construction materials of the cleanroom for trace analysis of metal elements using considerable amounts of corrosive acids. The air conditioning and purification system, specially designed experimental equipment to provide clean work surfaces, utilities and safety systems are also demonstrated. The potential contamination from the completed cleanroom atmosphere during the analytical procedure was evaluated. It can be concluded that the CLEAR has provided a suitable condition for reliable analysis of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials and other heavy elements in environmental samples. (author)

  17. A Solar System Perspective on Laboratory Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2002-01-01

    Planetary science deals with a wide variety of natural materials in a wide variety of environments. These materials include metals, minerals, ices, gases, plasmas, and organic chemicals. In addition, the newly defined discipline of astrobiology introduces biological materials to planetary science. The environments range from the interiors of planets with megapascal pressures to planetary magnetospheres, encompassing planetary mantles, surfaces, atmospheres, and ionospheres. The interplanetary environment includes magnetic and electrical fields, plasma, and dust. In order to understand planetary processes over these vast ranges, the properties of materials must be known, and most of the necessary information comes from the laboratory. Observations of the bodies and materials in the Solar System are accomplished over the full range of the electromagnetic spectrum by remote sensing from Earth or spacecraft. Comets exemplify this; molecular and atomic identifications are made from the hard ultraviolet to radio wavelengths, while X-rays are emitted as comets interact with the solar wind. Gamma rays from the surfaces of the Moon and asteroids are diagnostic of the mineral and ice content of those bodies; eventually, gamma rays will also be observed by probes to comets. A number of planetary materials are available in the laboratory for extensive Study: rocks from the Moon, Mars, several asteroids, as well as dust from comets (and perhaps the Kuiper Belt) are closely studied at every level, including atomic (isotopic). Even pre-solar interstellar grains isolated from meteorites are scrutinized for composition and crystalline structure. Beyond the materials themselves, various agents and processes have altered them over the 4.6-Gy age of the Solar System. Solar radiation, solar wind particles, trapped magnetospheric particles, cosmic rays, and micrometeoroid impacts have produced chemical, physical, and morphological changes in the atmospheres and on the surfaces of all

  18. Development and use of reference materials and quality control materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-04-01

    Current knowledge is summarized on correct use of commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) and reference materials (RMs). Acknowledged are also the limitations and restrictions analysts have to face if they want to apply quality control. The concept of in-house RMs or quality control materials (QCMs) is advocated to supplement the use of CRMs for quality control purposes. On hand advice on how to select, prepare, characterize and use these QCMs is given from the experts' perspective. Several scenarios are described to make this concept widely applicable to: advanced laboratories with CRMs with validated analytical techniques available, laboratories with less experience and facilities, as well as cases were labile compounds and unstable matrices are involved. Each scenario considers different approaches to overcome the lack of appropriate CRMs and advise on the preparation of QCMs, which might fit the particular purpose

  19. Development and use of reference materials and quality control materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    Current knowledge is summarized on correct use of commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) and reference materials (RMs). Acknowledged are also the limitations and restrictions analysts have to face if they want to apply quality control. The concept of in-house RMs or quality control materials (QCMs) is advocated to supplement the use of CRMs for quality control purposes. On hand advice on how to select, prepare, characterize and use these QCMs is given from the experts' perspective. Several scenarios are described to make this concept widely applicable to: advanced laboratories with CRMs with validated analytical techniques available, laboratories with less experience and facilities, as well as cases were labile compounds and unstable matrices are involved. Each scenario considers different approaches to overcome the lack of appropriate CRMs and advise on the preparation of QCMs, which might fit the particular purpose.

  20. The radioactive waste management at IAEA laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deron, S.; Ouvrard, R.; Hartmann, R.; Klose, H.

    1992-10-01

    The report gives a brief description of the nature of the radioactive wastes generated at the IAEA Laboratories in Seibersdorf, their origin and composition, their management and monitoring. The management of the radioactive waste produced at IAEA Laboratories in Seibersdorf is governed by the Technical Agreements of 1985 between the IAEA and the Austrian Health Ministry. In the period of 1982 to 1991 waste containers of low activity and radiotoxicity generated at laboratories other than the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL) were transferred to the FZS waste treatment and storage plant: The total activity contained in these drums amounted to < 65 MBq alpha activity; < 1030 MBq beta activity; < 2900 MBq gamma activity. The radioactive waste generated at SAL and transferred to the FZs during the same period included. Uranium contaminated solid burnable waste in 200 1 drums, uranium contaminated solid unburnable waste in 200 1 drums, uranium contaminated liquid unburnable waste in 30 1 bottles, plutonium contaminated solid unburnable waste in 200 1 drums. In the same period SAL received a total of 146 Kg uranium and 812 g plutonium and exported out of Austria, unused residues of samples. The balance, i.e.: uranium 39 kg, plutonium 133 g constitutes the increase of the inventory of reference materials, and unused residues awaiting export, accumulated at SAL and SIL fissile store as a result of SAL operation during this 10 year period. The IAEA reexports all unused residues of samples of radioactive and fissile materials analyzed at his laboratories, so that the amount of radioactive materials ending in the wastes treated and stored at FZS is kept to a minimum. 5 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  1. The complete larval development of Eurypanopeus canalensis Abele and Kim, 1989 (Crustacea: Brachyura: Panopeidae described from laboratory reared material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo U. García-Guerrero

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The estuarine panopeid crab Eurypanopeus canalensis Abele and Kim, 1989, is an eastern tropical Pacific species with a known distribution from the southeastern Gulf of California, Mexico, to Panama. Its complete larval development is fully described and illustrated from laboratory-reared material. The four zoeal stages and the megalopa are compared with two congeneric species from the West Atlantic, E. abbreviatus (Stimpson, 1860 and E. depressus (Smith, 1869. The main differences between larvae of E. canalensis and those of these two species include telson setation and the presence/absence of a stout hook-like spine in the megalopae cheliped ischium.

  2. 19 CFR 151.54 - Testing by Customs laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing by Customs laboratory. 151.54 Section 151.54 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... Other Metal-Bearing Materials § 151.54 Testing by Customs laboratory. Samples taken in accordance with...

  3. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Materials Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Materials Science, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585 106, India; Veeco-India Nanotechnology Laboratory, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 064, India; R&D Centre Premier Explosives Pvt. Ltd., Hyderabad 500 015, India ...

  4. New Brunswick Laboratory. Progress report, October 1995--September 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    Fiscal year (FY) 1996 was a very good year for New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), whose major sponsor is the Office of Safeguards and Security (NN-51) in the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, Office of Security Affairs. Several projects pertinent to the NBL mission were completed, and NBL's interactions with partners and customers were encouraging. Among the partners with which NBL interacted in this report period were the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), NN-51. Environmental Program Group of the DOE Chicago Operations Office, International Safeguards Project Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Ukraine Working Group, Fissile Materials Assurance Working Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Belgium, Brazilian/Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, and other DOE facilities and laboratories. NBL staff publications, participation in safeguards assistance and other nuclear programs, development of new reference materials, involvement in the updating and refinement of DOE documents, service in enhancing the science education of others, and other related activities enhanced NBL's status among DOE laboratories and facilities. Noteworthy are the facts that NBL's small inventory of nuclear materials is accurately accounted for, and, as in past years, its materials and human resources were used in peaceful nuclear activities worldwide

  5. New Brunswick Laboratory. Progress report, October 1995--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Fiscal year (FY) 1996 was a very good year for New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), whose major sponsor is the Office of Safeguards and Security (NN-51) in the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, Office of Security Affairs. Several projects pertinent to the NBL mission were completed, and NBL`s interactions with partners and customers were encouraging. Among the partners with which NBL interacted in this report period were the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), NN-51. Environmental Program Group of the DOE Chicago Operations Office, International Safeguards Project Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Ukraine Working Group, Fissile Materials Assurance Working Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Belgium, Brazilian/Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, and other DOE facilities and laboratories. NBL staff publications, participation in safeguards assistance and other nuclear programs, development of new reference materials, involvement in the updating and refinement of DOE documents, service in enhancing the science education of others, and other related activities enhanced NBL`s status among DOE laboratories and facilities. Noteworthy are the facts that NBL`s small inventory of nuclear materials is accurately accounted for, and, as in past years, its materials and human resources were used in peaceful nuclear activities worldwide.

  6. 2016 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cafferty, Kara Grace [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2015, through October 31, 2016.

  7. Experimental study of a laboratory concrete material representative of containment buildings: desorption isotherms and permeability determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semete, P.; Fevrier, B.; Delorme, J.; Sanahuja, J.; Desgree, P.; Le Pape, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The isotherm sorption curve is a first order parameter for the calculations of concrete drying and/or creep using Finite Element Analysis. An experimental campaign was undertaken by EDF MMC in order to characterize the first desorption isotherm at room temperature of a laboratory material representative of concrete containment buildings. Long term drying tests were carried out on cement paste and on three samples geometries on concrete (with radial and axial one-dimensional drying on thin disks and multi-dimensional drying on Representative Elementary Volumes). The measurements results (porosity, densities and mass loss curves) are provided and the isotherms obtained for the four different configurations are compared. Several analyses of the results are proposed including the assessment of a criterion for the determination of the moisture content final balance (estimation of the asymptotic mass loss) and the back-analysis of equivalent permeability. (authors)

  8. Ames Laboratory site environmental report, Calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Laboratory conducts fundamental research in the physical, chemical, materials, and mathematical sciences and engineering which underlie energy generating, conversion, transmission and storage technologies, environmental improvement, and other technical areas essential to national needs. These efforts will be maintained so as to contribute to the achievement of the vision of DOE and, more specifically, to increase the general levels of knowledge and technical capabilities, to prepare engineering and physical sciences students for the future, both academia and industry, and to develop new technologies and practical applications from our basic scientific programs that will contribute to a strengthening of the US economy. The Laboratory approaches all its operations with the safety and health of all workers as a constant objective and with genuine concern for the environment. The Laboratory relies upon its strengths in materials synthesis and processing, materials reliability, chemical analysis, chemical sciences, photosynthesis, materials sciences, metallurgy, high-temperature superconductivity, and applied mathematical sciences to conduct the long term basic and intermediate range applied research needed to solve the complex problems encountered in energy production, and utilization as well as environmental restoration and waste management. Ames Laboratory will continue to maintain a very significant and highly beneficial pre-college math and science education program which currently serves both teachers and students at the middle school and high school levels. Our technology transfer program is aided by joint efforts with ISU's technology development and commercialization enterprise and will sustain concerted efforts to implement Cooperative Research and Development Agreements, industrially sponsored Work for Others projects. and scientific personnel exchanges with our various customers

  9. Annotated bibliography of Software Engineering Laboratory literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morusiewicz, Linda; Valett, Jon D.

    1991-01-01

    An annotated bibliography of technical papers, documents, and memorandums produced by or related to the Software Engineering Laboratory is given. More than 100 publications are summarized. These publications cover many areas of software engineering and range from research reports to software documentation. All materials have been grouped into eight general subject areas for easy reference: The Software Engineering Laboratory; The Software Engineering Laboratory: Software Development Documents; Software Tools; Software Models; Software Measurement; Technology Evaluations; Ada Technology; and Data Collection. Subject and author indexes further classify these documents by specific topic and individual author.

  10. Educational ultrasound nondestructive testing laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, Vladimir; Zagorski, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials course was developed for applied engineering technology students at Drexel University's Goodwin College of Professional Studies. This three-credit, hands-on laboratory course consists of two parts: the first part with an emphasis on the foundations of NDE, and the second part during which ultrasound NDE techniques are utilized in the evaluation of parts and materials. NDE applications are presented and applied through real-life problems, including calibration and use of the latest ultrasonic testing instrumentation. The students learn engineering and physical principles of measurements of sound velocity in different materials, attenuation coefficients, material thickness, and location and dimensions of discontinuities in various materials, such as holes, cracks, and flaws. The work in the laboratory enhances the fundamentals taught during classroom sessions. This course will ultimately result in improvements in the educational process ["The greater expectations," national panel report, http://www.greaterexpectations.org (last viewed February, 2008); R. M. Felder and R. Brent "The intellectual development of Science and Engineering Students. Part 2: Teaching to promote growth," J. Eng. Educ. 93, 279-291 (2004)] since industry is becoming increasingly reliant on the effective application of NDE technology and the demand on NDE specialists is increasing. NDE curriculum was designed to fulfill levels I and II NDE in theory and training requirements, according to American Society for Nondestructive Testing, OH, Recommended Practice No. SNT-TC-1A (2006).

  11. State of laboratory manual instruction in California community college introductory (non-majors) biology laboratory instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Michelle

    College students must complete a life science course prior to graduation for a bachelor's degree. Generally, the course has lecture and laboratory components. It is in the laboratory where there are exceptional opportunities for exploration, challenge and application of the material learned. Optimally, this would utilize the best of inquiry based approaches. Most community colleges are using a home-grown or self written laboratory manual for the direction of work in the laboratory period. Little was known about the motivation, development and adaptation of use. It was also not known about the future of the laboratory manuals in light of the recent learning reform in California Community Colleges, Student Learning Outcomes. Extensive interviews were conducted with laboratory manual authors to determine the motivation, process of development, who was involved and learning framework used in the creation of the manuals. It was further asked of manual authors their ideas about the future of the manual, the development of staff and faculty and finally, the role Student Learning Outcomes would play in the manual. Science faculty currently teaching the non-majors biology laboratories for at least two semesters were surveyed on-line about actual practice of the manual, assessment, manual flexibility, faculty training and incorporation of Student Learning Outcomes. Finally, an evaluation of the laboratory manual was done using an established Laboratory Task Analysis Instrument. Laboratory manuals were evaluated on a variety of categories to determine the level of inquiry instruction done by students in the laboratory section. The results were that the development of homegrown laboratory manuals was done by community colleges in the Los Angeles and Orange Counties in an effort to minimize the cost of the manual to the students, to utilize all the exercises in a particular lab and to effectively utilize the materials already owned by the department. Further, schools wanted to

  12. Multisensory Integration for Pilot Spatial Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    1993-0022). Wright-Patterson AFB, OH: Air Force Armstrong Laboratories. Gilson, R.D., Ventola, R.W., & Fenton , R.E. (1975). A kinesthetic...Ventola, R.W., & Fenton , R.E. (1975). A kinesthetic-tactual display for stall deterrence. In Eleventh Annual Conference on Manual Control (NASA TM...M., L) 2 = Impact (H, M, L) 3 = Persistence/Difficulty to work-around (H, M., L) 4 = Overall Severity: 1=Severe, 2=Major, 3=Minor, 4= Cosmetic

  13. Radioactive sources in chemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Radioactive sources including all radioactive materials exceeding exemption levels have to be registered in national databases according to international standards based on the recommendations ICRP 60 and a proper licensing should take place as described for example in the 96/29/EURATOM. In spite of that, unregistered sources could be found, usually due to the fact that the owner is not aware of radiation characteristics of sources. The material inventories of chemical laboratories are typical and most frequent example where radioactive sources could be found. Five different types of sources could be identified. The most frequent type are chemicals, namely thorium and uranium compounds. They are used not due to their radioactivity but due to their chemical properties. As for all other sources a stringent control is necessary in order to assure their safe use. Around hundred of stored radioactive chemical items were found during inspections of such laboratories performed by the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration or qualified experts in a period December 2006 - July 2007. Users of such chemicals are usually not aware that thorium and uranium chemicals are radioactive and, as unsealed sources, they could be easily spilled out and produce contamination of persons, surfaces, equipment etc. The external exposure as well as the internal exposure including exposure due to inhalation could be present. No knowledge about special precautions is usually present in laboratories and leads to underestimating of a potential risk and unintentional exposure of the laboratory personnel, students etc. Due to the long decay times in decay series of Th -232, U-238 and U- 235 the materials are also radioactive today. Even more, in case of thorium chemicals the radioactivity increased substantially from the time of their production. The implementation of safety measures has been under way and includes a survey of the qualified experts, establishment of organizational structure in a

  14. Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Materials Characterization Facility enables detailed measurements of the properties of ceramics, polymers, glasses, and composites. It features instrumentation...

  15. Updating Classifications of Ceramic Dental Materials: A Guide to Material Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Edward A; Figueira, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The indications for and composition of today's dental ceramic materials serve as the basis for determining the appropriate class of ceramics to use for a given case. By understanding the classifications, composition, and characteristics of the latest all-ceramic materials, which are presented in this article in order of most to least conservative, dentists and laboratory technicians can best determine the ideal material for a particular treatment.

  16. Commercial and Advertising Art. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Floyd

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 12 terminal objectives for a basic commercial and advertising art course. The materials were developed for a two-semester (2 hours daily) course to enable tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade students to develop competencies in the care and use of…

  17. Integrating the ChE Curriculum via a Recurring Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilius, Matthew B.; Tu, Raymond S.; Anderson, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    A recurring framework has been integrated throughout the curriculum via a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) platform. This laboratory is introduced during the material and energy balance course, and subsequent courses can use these results when explaining more advanced concepts. Further, this laboratory gives students practical experience…

  18. Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

    2010-05-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

  19. Needs analysis and project schedule for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Health Physics Analysis Laboratory (HPAL) upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhea, T.A.; Rucker, T.L.; Stafford, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    This report is a needs assessment and project schedule for the Health Physics Analysis Laboratory (HPAL) upgrade project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). After reviewing current and projected HPAL operations, two custom-developed laboratory information management systems (LIMS) for similar facilities were reviewed; four commercially available LIMS products were also evaluated. This project is motivated by new regulations for radiation protection and training and by increased emphasis on quality assurance (QA). HPAL data are used to: protect the health of radiation workers; document contamination levels for transportation of radioactive materials and for release of materials to the public for uncontrolled use; and verify compliance with environmental emission regulations. Phase 1 of the HPAL upgrade project concentrates on four types of counting instruments which support in excess of 90% of the sample workload at the existing central laboratories. Phase 2 is a refinement phase and also integrates summary-level databases on the central Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) VAX. Phase 3 incorporates additional instrument types and integrates satellite laboratories into the HPAL LIMS. Phase 1 will be a multi-year, multimillion dollar project. The temptation to approach the upgrade of the HPAL program in a piece meal fashion should be avoided. This is a major project, with clearly-defined goals and priorities, and should be approached as such. Major programmatic and operational impacts will be felt throughout HSE as a result of this upgrade, so effective coordination with key customer contacts will be critical

  20. In-situ capability of ion beam modification and characterization of materials at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, N.; Nastasi, M.; Tesmer, J.R.; Hollander, M.G.; Evans, C.R.; Maggiore, C.J.; Levine, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    The capability of in-situ ion beam modification and characterization of materials developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. A beam-line from a 3 MV tandem accelerator and a beam-line from a 200 kV ion implanter are joined together in an in-situ target chamber. The chamber is equipped with a cold and hot sample stage with a temperature range from -100 to 500 C. The angular (sample spin and basal rotation) motions and translational motions of the sample stage are controlled by a multi-axis goniometer. This chamber provides a unique capability to conduct a temperature dependent experiment of ion irradiation and sequential backscattering and channeling analysis. The efficiency and reliability of in-situ ion beam techniques are demonstrated by two examples, irradiation damage in (100) MgAl 2 O 4 spinel crystals and ion-beam-induced densification of zirconia sol-gel thin films

  1. Factors influencing biosafety level and lai among the staff of medical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kozajda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to assess the biological risks of medical laboratory employees with particular focus on laboratory acquired infection (LAI, activities having the greatest risk, accidents with biological material, post exposure procedure, preventive measures and workers' knowledge about biological exposure. Materials and Methods: The study involved 9 laboratories. A questionnaire survey was attended by 123 employees and 9 heads of these units with the use of two questionnaires for laboratory workers and the managers. Results: 32.5% of the respondents (40 persons had an accident at least once. Needlestick or a broken glass injury covered 18.7% respondents (23 persons, while splashing the skin, mucous membranes or conjunctivae related to 22.8% (28 persons. Among the employees who had an accident, only 45% of the respondents (18 persons reported this to the manager. Microbes dominant in the biological material were known only to 57 respondents (46.3%, less than half could correctly give an example of a disease (57 persons, 46.3%. More than half of the respondents admitted that they do not know all of the possible routes of infection while working in the laboratory (68 persons, 55.3%. Conclusions: In the study population, a high incidence of accidents was observed, usually during blood sampling and transfer of biological material. Condition of the workers' equipment with personal protective measures and laboratory facilities in devices to reduce the risk of infection and procedures for handling the potentially infectious material should be considered as insufficient. Lack of basic knowledge of the employees about biohazards at workplaces was shown. Med Pr 2013;64(4:473–486

  2. ICP/AES radioactive sample analyses at Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, C.L.; Hara, F.T.

    1986-03-01

    Inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES) analyses of radioactive materials at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began about three years ago upon completion of the installation of a modified Applied Research Laboratory (ARL) 3560. Funding for the purchase and installation of the ICP/AES was provided by the Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center (MCC) established at PNL by the Department of Energy in 1979. MCC's objective is to ensure that qualified materials data are available on waste materials. This paper is divided into the following topics: (1) Instrument selection considerations; (2) initial installation of the simultaneous system with the source stand enclosed in a 1/2'' lead-shielded glove box; (3) retrofit installation of the sequential spectrometer; and (4) a brief discussion on several types of samples analyzed. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab

  3. Inadequate Information in Laboratory Test Requisition in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study examined the pattern of deficiencies in the laboratory test requisition by doctors at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria, with a view to suggesting strategies of reducing error rates in laboratory test requisition. Materials and Method: The study generated data through ...

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. V V Deshpande1 M M Patil1 S C Navale2 V Ravi1. Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008, India; Polymer Science and Engineering Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008, India ...

  5. Validation in the cytopathology laboratory: its time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Lori A; Shalkham, John

    2007-08-01

    The cytology laboratory has traditionally performed a relatively small variety of tests. The testing processes employed were generally manually performed and included preparation of glass slide materials, staining of these slides, coverslipping, and microscopic evaluation of the cellular material. Instrumentation in the cytology laboratory was very limited and included a centrifuge, membrane filtration system, and possibly an automated staining machine. If instruments were added, for example, a liquid based preparation device or an automated coverslipping device; the instruments were rarely checked to assure they were operating properly before implementation into clinical practice. In addition, little documentation was maintained with regards to the instrument performance evaluation process. Increasing automation and expansion of testing options have changed how cytopathology is practiced. There are many new devices employed for the preparation of specimens, staining and coverslipping of slides, and evaluation of cellular material. The increasing use of molecular testing methods in cytopathology further adds to the changing landscape of cytopathology. New instrumentation and testing methods are routinely being introduced and the cytopathology laboratory must assure that the testing performed is accurate and consistent. Cytopathology laboratory professionals need to appreciate the value of validation of the tests we perform and the instruments we use in order to best serve the patient. Our clinical laboratory colleagues have traditionally performed validation on both instruments and test methods before using them for clinical testing. If cytopathology wants to perform the complex testing being introduced and effectively utilize new instrumentation, we need to understand the value of validation and how we apply validation to our laboratory practice. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Storage and disposition of weapons usable fissile materials (FMD) PEIS: Blending of U-233 to {lt}12% or {lt}5% enrichment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Data report, Draft: Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaber, E.L.

    1995-08-01

    Uranium-233 (U-233), a uranium isotope, is a fissionable material capable of fueling nuclear reactors or being utilized in the manufacturing of nuclear weapons. As such, it is controlled as a special nuclear material. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) currently store the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) supply of unirradiated U-233 fuel materials. Irradiated U-233 is covered by the national spent nuclear fuel (SNF) program and is not in the scope of this report. The U-233 stored at ORNL is relatively pure uranium oxide in the form of powder or monolithic solids. This material is currently stored in stainless steel canisters of variable lengths measuring about 3 inches in diameter. The ORNL material enrichment varies with some material containing considerable amounts of U-235. The INEL material is fuel from the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Program and consists of enriched uranium and thorium oxides in zircaloy cladding. The DOE inventory of U-233 contains trace quantities of U-232, and daughter products from the decay of U-232 and U-233, resulting in increased radioactivity over time. These increased levels of radioactivity generally result in the need for special handling considerations.

  7. Laboratory Exercise to Evaluate Hay Preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, R. L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a laboratory exercise designed to demonstrate the effects of moisture on hay preservation products in a manner that does not require large amounts of equipment or instructor time. Materials, procedures, and probable results are discussed. (CW)

  8. Work of the IAEA laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    Most of the IAEA laboratory facilities a r e now in full operation, and work has begun on a number of problems that can best be dealt with by an international centre. The laboratory at Seibersdorf, about 30 km from the Agency's headquarters in Vienna, started functioning in October last year, and a certain amount of work is also being done with a few facilities installed in the headquarters building. During the past year laboratory work has steadily increased and several programmes are now fully established. The Agency's laboratory is not intended to be a centre of independent research; in the main, its scope is governed by the scientific requirements of the Agency's programmes of assistance to its Member States and its role in connection with safety and security in atomic energy work. The functions of the laboratory are thus limited to (a) measurement of radionuclides and preparation of radioactive standards, (b) calibration and adaptation of measuring equipment, (c) quality control of special materials for nuclear technology, (d) measurement and analyses in connection with the Agency's safeguards and health and safety programme, and (e) services to Member States that can be provided with the facilities established for these tasks

  9. The Pond Is Our Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, Barbara Turco

    1978-01-01

    This science teacher's laboratory is a pond within walking distance of his school that provides a stimulating environment for exploring the natural world. With simple materials students practice making careful observations, taking measurements and compiling and graphing information for their science studies. They also extend their pond experiences…

  10. VALIDATION OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY (MC and A) SYSTEM EFFECTIVENESS TOOL (MSET) AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY (INL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meppen, Bruce; Haga, Roger; Moedl, Kelley; Bean, Tom; Sanders, Jeff; Thom, Mary Alice

    2008-01-01

    A Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) Functional Model has been developed to describe MC and A systems at facilities possessing Category I or II Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Emphasis is on achieving the objectives of 144 'Fundamental Elements' in key areas ranging from categorization of nuclear material to establishment of Material Balance Areas (MBAs), controlling access, performing quality measurements of inventories and transfers, timely reporting all activities, and detecting and investigating anomalies. An MC and A System Effectiveness Tool (MSET), including probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology for evaluating MC and A effectiveness and relative risk, has been developed to accompany the Functional Model. The functional model and MSET were introduced at the 48th annual International Nuclear Material Management (INMM) annual meeting in July, 20071,2. A survey/questionnaire is used to accumulate comprehensive data regarding the MC and A elements at a facility. Data is converted from the questionnaire to numerical values using the DELPHI method and exercises are conducted to evaluate the overall effectiveness of an MC and A system. In 2007 a peer review was conducted and a questionnaire was completed for a hypothetical facility and exercises were conducted. In the first quarter of 2008, a questionnaire was completed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and MSET exercises were conducted. The experience gained from conducting the MSET exercises at INL helped evaluate the completeness and consistency of the MC and A Functional Model, descriptions of fundamental elements of the MC and A Functional Model, relationship between the MC and A Functional Model and the MC and A PRA tool and usefulness of the MSET questionnaire data collection process

  11. Can post-eradication laboratory containment of wild polioviruses be achieved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, Walter R.; Gary, Howard E.; Sanders, Raymond; van Loon, Anton M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of containment is to prevent reintroduction of wild polioviruses from laboratories into polio-free communities. In order to achieve global commitment to laboratory containment the rationale should be clear and compelling; the biosafety levels should be justified by the risks; and the objectives should be realistic. Absolute containment can never be assured. Questions of intentional or unintentional non-compliance can never be wholly eliminated. Effective laboratory containment is, however, a realistic goal. Prevention of virus transmission through contaminated laboratory materials is addressed by WHO standards for biosafety. The principal challenge is to prevent transmission through unrecognized infectious laboratory workers. Such transmission is possible only if the following conditions occur: infectious and potentially infectious materials carrying wild poliovirus are present in the laboratory concerned; a laboratory operation exposes a worker to poliovirus; a worker is susceptible to an infection that results in the shedding of poliovirus; and the community is susceptible to poliovirus infections. At present it is difficult to envisage the elimination of any of these conditions. However, the risks of the first three can be greatly reduced so as to create a formidable barrier against poliovirus transmission to the community. Final biosafety recommendations must await post-eradication immunization policies adopted by the international community. PMID:12075368

  12. Buried waste containment system materials. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, J.R.; Shaw, P.G.

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the results of a test program to validate the application of a latex-modified cement formulation for use with the Buried Waste Containment System (BWCS) process during a proof of principle (POP) demonstration. The test program included three objectives. One objective was to validate the barrier material mix formulation to be used with the BWCS equipment. A basic mix formula for initial trials was supplied by the cement and latex vendors. The suitability of the material for BWCS application was verified by laboratory testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A second objective was to determine if the POP BWCS material emplacement process adversely affected the barrier material properties. This objective was met by measuring and comparing properties of material prepared in the INEEL Materials Testing Laboratory (MTL) with identical properties of material produced by the BWCS field tests. These measurements included hydraulic conductivity to determine if the material met the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements for barriers used for hazardous waste sites, petrographic analysis to allow an assessment of barrier material separation and segregation during emplacement, and a set of mechanical property tests typical of concrete characterization. The third objective was to measure the hydraulic properties of barrier material containing a stop-start joint to determine if such a feature would meet the EPA requirements for hazardous waste site barriers

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogliani, Harold O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  14. Sandia Laboratories plutonium protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, E.A.; Miyoshi, D.S.; Gutierrez, F.D.

    1977-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories is developing an improved plutonium protection system (PPS) to demonstrate new concepts for enhancing special nuclear materials safeguards. PPS concepts include separation of functions, real-time item accountability and improved means for control of materials, activities and personnel access. Physical barriers and a secure communications network are designed into the system to offer greater protection against sabotage, diversion and theft attempts. Prototype systems are being constructed at Hanford, Washington and Albuquerque, New Mexico and will be subjected to a comprehensive testing and evaluation program

  15. SALE: Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, D.J.; Bush, W.J.; Dolan, C.A.

    1976-09-01

    The Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (SALE) program implements an industry-wide quality control and evaluation system aimed at identifying and reducing analytical chemical measurement errors. Samples of well-characterized materials are distributed to laboratory participants at periodic intervals for determination of uranium or plutonium concentration and isotopic distributions. The results of these determinations are statistically-evaluated, and each participant is informed of the accuracy and precision of his results in a timely manner. The SALE computer code which produces the report is designed to facilitate rapid transmission of this information in order that meaningful quality control will be provided. Various statistical techniques comprise the output of the SALE computer code. Assuming an unbalanced nested design, an analysis of variance is performed in subroutine NEST resulting in a test of significance for time and analyst effects. A trend test is performed in subroutine TREND. Microfilm plots are obtained from subroutine CUMPLT. Within-laboratory standard deviations are calculated in the main program or subroutine VAREST, and between-laboratory standard deviations are calculated in SBLV. Other statistical tests are also performed. Up to 1,500 pieces of data for each nuclear material sampled by 75 (or fewer) laboratories may be analyzed with this code. The input deck necessary to run the program is shown, and input parameters are discussed in detail. Printed output and microfilm plot output are described. Output from a typical SALE run is included as a sample problem

  16. Laboratory and In-Flight In-Situ X-ray Imaging and Scattering Facility for Materials, Biotechnology and Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    We propose a multifunctional X-ray facility for the Materials, Biotechnology and Life Sciences Programs to visualize formation and behavior dynamics of materials, biomaterials, and living organisms, tissues and cells. The facility will combine X-ray topography, phase micro-imaging and scattering capabilities with sample units installed on the goniometer. This should allow, for the first time, to monitor under well defined conditions, in situ, in real time: creation of imperfections during growth of semiconductors, metal, dielectric and biomacromolecular crystals and films, high-precision diffraction from crystals within a wide range of temperatures and vapor, melt, solution conditions, internal morphology and changes in living organisms, tissues and cells, diffraction on biominerals, nanotubes and particles, radiation damage, also under controlled formation/life conditions. The system will include an ultrabright X-ray source, X-ray mirror, monochromator, image-recording unit, detectors, and multipurpose diffractometer that fully accommodate and integrate furnaces and samples with other experimental environments. The easily adjustable laboratory and flight versions will allow monitoring processes under terrestrial and microgravity conditions. The flight version can be made available using a microsource combined with multilayer or capillary optics.

  17. The coming age of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Exciting prospects of food factories in the desert and the use of nuclear energy for industrial processes rivalling in importance the achievement of the first chain reaction were among the forecasts of Alvin M. Weinberg, Director of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, at the eleventh session of the General Conference. His lecture on 'The Coming Age of Nuclear Energy', with its emphasis on the task of producing really cheap energy, was one of the three in a scientific series

  18. The coming age of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-12-15

    Exciting prospects of food factories in the desert and the use of nuclear energy for industrial processes rivalling in importance the achievement of the first chain reaction were among the forecasts of Alvin M. Weinberg, Director of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, at the eleventh session of the General Conference. His lecture on 'The Coming Age of Nuclear Energy', with its emphasis on the task of producing really cheap energy, was one of the three in a scientific series

  19. Sea materials experimental plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This Seal Materials Performance Test Plan describes the plan for testing materials that will be used to seal a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The need for sealing and backfilling the repository and the use of various sealing materials are described. The seal materials include mined salt backfills, cementitious bulkheads and plugs, and earthen backfills. The laboratory testing program for characterizing the behavior and performance of these materials is described. This report includes plans for screening materials, evaluating candidate materials to be tested, and testing a representative set of materials

  20. Results of the Interlaboratory Exercise CNS/CIEMAT-2008 among Environmental Radioactivity Laboratories (Phosphogypsum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M. L.; Barrera, M.; Valino, F.

    2010-01-01

    The document describes the outcome of the CSN/CIEMAT-2008 interlaboratory test comparison among environmental radioactivity laboratories. The exercise was organised according to the ISO-43 and the ISO/IUPAC/AOAC. Aphosphogypsum material was used as a test sample, in an attempt to evaluate the performance of the laboratories analyzing NORM (Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Materials). The analysis required were: U-238, Th-234, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-214, Bi-214, Pb-210, Po-210, Th-232 and U-235, and also gross alpha and gross beta activities. Reference values have been established according to the method of consensus of expert laboratories, with four international laboratories of credited experience: IAEA Seibersdorf, IAEA MEL, IRSN-Orsay and Sta.Teresa ENEA. The results of the exercise were computed for 34 answering laboratories and their analytical performance was assessed using the z-score. Robust statistics of the participants results was applied to obtain the median and standard deviation, to achieve a more complete and objective study of the laboratories performance. The exercise has shown an homogeneous behaviour of laboratories, being statistical parameters from the results close to the assigned Reference Values. Participant laboratories have demonstrated their ability to determine natural radionuclides in phosphogypsum samples (NORM material) with a satisfactory quality level. The scheme has also allowed examining the capability of laboratories to determine the activities of natural radionuclides at the equilibrium. (Author) 10 refs.

  1. External Quality Assurance: Annual Proficiency Test on 15N and 13C isotopic abundance in plant materials [Activities of the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Eight out of twelve laboratories (67%) participating in the nitrogen analysis reported 15 N-data within the control limits for the enriched plant sample and eight out of nine (89%) participating laboratories for carbon analysis reported 13 C isotopic abundance results within the control limits for this test sample. The reported analytical data and WEPAL evaluation of the 15 N enriched plant material produced by SWMCNL is shown. All participants received a certificate of participation. Worldwide comparison of stable 15 N and 13 C isotope measurements will provide confidence in the laboratory's analytical performance and is hence an invaluable tool for external quality control. It is hoped that in the future more stable isotope laboratories will make use of this unique opportunity to assess their analytical performance and provide evidence of the high quality of their analytical data

  2. Factors influencing biosafety level and LAI among the staff of medical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozajda, Anna; Bródka, Karolina; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, Irena

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the biological risks of medical laboratory employees with particular focus on laboratory acquired infection (LAI), activities having the greatest risk, accidents with biological material, post exposure procedure, preventive measures and workers' knowledge about biological exposure. The study involved 9 laboratories. A questionnaire survey was attended by 123 employees and 9 heads of these units with the use of two questionnaires for laboratory workers and the managers. 32.5% of the respondents (40 persons) had an accident at least once. Needlestick or a broken glass injury covered 18.7% respondents (23 persons), while splashing the skin, mucous membranes or conjunctivae related to 22.8% (28 persons). Among the employees who had an accident, only 45% of the respondents (18 persons) reported this to the manager. Microbes dominant in the biological material were known only to 57 respondents (46.3%), less than half could correctly give an example of a disease (57 persons, 46.3%). More than half of the respondents admitted that they do not know all of the possible routes of infection while working in the laboratory (68 persons, 55.3%). In the study population, a high incidence of accidents was observed, usually during blood sampling and transfer of biological material. Condition of the workers' equipment with personal protective measures and laboratory facilities in devices to reduce the risk of infection and procedures for handling the potentially infectious material should be considered as insufficient. Lack of basic knowledge of the employees about biohazards at workplaces was shown.

  3. Materials Test Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — When completed, the Materials Test Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will meet mission need. MTS will provide the only fast-reactor-like irradiation...

  4. Propulsion materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Edward J. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Sullivan, Rogelio A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Gibbs, Jerry L. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  5. Termination of Safeguards for Accountable Nuclear Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzemer, Michael; Carvo, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Termination of safeguards ends requirements of Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) and thereby removes the safeguards basis for applying physical protection requirements for theft and diversion of nuclear material, providing termination requirements are met as described. Department of Energy (DOE) M 470.4 6 (Nuclear Material Control and Accountability [8/26/05]) stipulates: 1. Section A, Chapter I (1)( q) (1): Safeguards can be terminated on nuclear materials provided the following conditions are met: (a) 'If the material is special nuclear material (SNM) or protected as SNM, it must be attractiveness level E and have a measured value.' (b) 'The material has been determined by DOE line management to be of no programmatic value to DOE.' (c) 'The material is transferred to the control of a waste management organization where the material is accounted for and protected in accordance with waste management regulations. The material must not be collocated with other accountable nuclear materials.' Requirements for safeguards termination depend on the safeguards attractiveness levels of the material. For attractiveness level E, approval has been granted from the DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) Safeguards and Security (S and S). In some cases, it may be necessary to dispose of nuclear materials of attractiveness level D or higher. Termination of safeguards for such materials must be approved by the Departmental Element (this is the DOE Headquarters Office of Nuclear Energy) after consultation with the Office of Security.

  6. Laboratory directed research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  7. Commercialization of a DOE Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, Barry A.

    2008-01-01

    On April 1, 1998, Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCLinc) began business as an employee-owned, commercial, applied research laboratory offering services to both government and commercial clients. The laboratory had previously been a support laboratory to DoE's gaseous diffusion plant in Oak Ridge (K-25). When uranium enrichment was halted at the site, the laboratory was expanded to as an environmental demonstration center and served from 1992 until 1997 as a DOE Environmental User Facility. In 1997, after the laboratory was declared surplus, it was made available to the employee group who operated the laboratory for DOE as a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. This paper describes briefly the process of establishing the business. Attributes that contributed to the success of MCLinc are described. Some attention is given to lessons learned and to changes that could facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. Lessons learnt: as with any business venture, operation over time has revealed that some actions taken by the laboratory founders have contributed to its successful operation while others were not so successful. Observations are offered in hopes that lessons learned may suggest actions that will facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. First, the decision to vest significant ownership of the business in the core group of professionals operating the business is key to its success. Employee-owners of the laboratory have consistently provided a high level of service to its customers while conducting business in a cost-efficient manner. Secondly, an early decision to provide business support services in-house rather than purchasing them from support contractors on site have proven cost-effective. Laboratory employees do multiple tasks and perform overhead tasks in addition to their chargeable technical responsibilities. Thirdly, assessment of technical capabilities in view of market needs and a decision to offer these

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050, China; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235, China; Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China; State Key Laboratory of Crystal Material, Shandong ...

  9. Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svingor, E.; Molnar, M.; Palcsu, L.; Futo, I.; Rinyu, L.; Mogyorosi, M.; Major, Z.; Bihari, A.; Vodila, G.; Janovics, R.; Papp, L.; Major, I.

    2010-01-01

    1. Introduction. The Hertelendi Laboratory for Environmental Studies (HEKAL) belongs to the Section of Environmental and Earth Sciences. It is a multidisciplinary laboratory dedicated to environmental research, to the development of nuclear analytical methods and to systems technology. During its existence of more than 15 years it has gained some reputation as a prime laboratory of analytical techniques, working with both radio- and stable isotopes. It has considerable expertise in isotope concentration measurements, radiocarbon dating, tritium measurements, in monitoring radioactivity around nuclear facilities and in modelling the movement of radionuclides in the environment. Many of its projects are within the scope of interest of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant. Our research activity is mainly concerned with the so-called environmental isotopes. This term denotes isotopes, both stable and radioactive, that are present in the natural environment either as a result of natural processes or of human activities. In environmental research isotopes are generally applied either as tracers or as age indicators. An ideal tracer is defined as a substance that behaves in the system studied exactly as the material to be traced as far as the examined parameters are concerned, but has at least one property that distinguishes it from the traced material. The mass number of an isotope is such an ideal indicator. In 2007 the laboratory assumed the name of Dr. Ede Hertelendi to honour the memory of the reputed environmental physicist who founded the group and headed it for many years. The current core of the laboratory staff is made up of his pupils and coworkers. This team was like a family to him. The group owes it to his fatherly figure that it did not fall apart after his death, but advanced with intense work and tenacity during the last decade. One of his first pupils, Mihaly Veres returned to the laboratory as a private entrepreneur and investor in 2005, and in the framework of

  10. Environmental materials and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    A workshop that explored materials and interfaces research needs relevant to national environmental concerns was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purposes of the workshop were to refine the scientific research directions being planned for the Materials and Interface Program in the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) and further define the research and user equipment to the included as part of the proposed Environmental and Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL). Three plenary information sessions served to outline the background, objectives, and status of the MSRC and EMSL initiatives; selected specific areas with environmentally related materials; and the status of capabilities and facilities planned for the EMSL. Attention was directed to four areas where materials and interface science can have a significant impact on prevention and remediation of environmental problems: in situ detection and characterization of hazardous wastes (sensors), minimization of hazardous waste (separation membranes, ion exchange materials, catalysts), waste containment (encapsulation and barrier materials), and fundamental understanding of contaminant transport mechanisms. During all other sessions, the participants were divided into three working groups for detailed discussion and the preparation of a written report. The working groups focused on the areas of interface structure and chemistry, materials and interface stability, and materials synthesis. These recommendations and suggestions for needed research will be useful for other researchers in proposing projects and for suggesting collaborative work with MSRC researchers. 1 fig

  11. Clinical laboratory waste management in Shiraz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarian, Mehrdad; Motazedian, Nasrin; Palenik, Charles John

    2012-06-01

    Clinical laboratories are significant generators of infectious waste, including microbiological materials, contaminated sharps, and pathologic wastes such as blood specimens and blood products. Most waste produced in laboratories can be disposed of in the general solid waste stream. However, improper management of infectious waste, including mixing general wastes with infectious wastes and improper handling or storage, could lead to disease transmission. The aim of this study was to assess waste management processes used at clinical laboratories in Shiraz, Iran. One hundred and nine clinical laboratories participated In this cross sectional study, Data collection was by questionnaire and direct observation. Of the total amount of waste generated, 52% (by weight) was noninfectious domestic waste, 43% was non-sharps infectious waste and 5% consisted of sharps. There was no significant relationship between laboratory staff or manager education and the score for quality of waste collection and disposal at clinical laboratories. Improvements in infectious waste management processes should involve clearer, more uniformly accepted definitions of infectious waste and increased staff training.

  12. Virtual laboratory for radiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiftikci, A.; Kocar, C.; Tombakoglu, M.

    2009-01-01

    Simulation of alpha, beta and gamma radiation detection and measurement experiments which are part of real nuclear physics laboratory courses was realized with Monte Carlo method and JAVA Programming Language. As being known, establishing this type of laboratories are very expensive. At the same time, highly radioactive sources used in some experiments carries risk for students and also for experimentalists. By taking into consideration of those problems, the aim of this study is to setup a virtual radiation laboratory with minimum cost and to speed up the training of radiation physics for students with no radiation risk. Software coded possesses the nature of radiation and radiation transport with the help of Monte Carlo method. In this software, experimental parameters can be changed manually by the user and experimental results can be followed synchronous in an MCA (Multi Channel Analyzer) or an SCA (Single Channel Analyzer). Results obtained in experiments can be analyzed by these MCA or SCA panels. Virtual radiation laboratory which is developed in this study with reliable results and unlimited experimentation capability seems as an useful educational material. Moreover, new type of experiments can be integrated to this software easily and as a result, virtual laboratory can be extended.

  13. Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Layered materials play an important role in nuclear waste management and environmental cleanup. Better understanding of radionuclide interactions with those materials is critical for engineering high-performance materials for various applications. This presentation will provide an overview on radionuclide interactions with two general categories of layered materials - cationic clays and anionic clays - from a perspective of nanopore confinement. Nanopores are widely present in layered materials, either as the interlayers or as inter-particle space. Nanopore confinement can significantly modify chemical reactions in those materials. This effect may cause the preferential enrichment of radionuclides in nanopores and therefore directly impact the mobility of the radionuclides. This effect also implies that conventional sorption measurements using disaggregated samples may not represent chemical conditions in actual systems. The control of material structures on ion exchange, surface complexation, and diffusion in layered materials will be systematically examined, and the related modeling approaches will be discussed. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, which is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the DOE under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  14. NVN 5694 intra laboratory validation. Feasibility study for interlaboratory- validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voors, P.I.; Baard, J.H.

    1998-11-01

    Within the project NORMSTAR 2 a number of Dutch prenormative protocols have been defined for radioactivity measurements. Some of these protocols, e.g. the Dutch prenormative protocol NVN 5694, titled Methods for radiochemical determination of polonium-210 and lead-210, have not been validated, neither by intralaboratory nor interlaboratory studies. Validation studies are conducted within the framework of the programme 'Normalisatie and Validatie van Milieumethoden 1993-1997' (Standardization and Validation of test methods for environmental parameters) of the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Physical Planning and the Environment (VROM). The aims of this study were (a) a critical evaluation of the protocol, (b) investigation on the feasibility of an interlaboratory study, and (c) the interlaboratory validation of NVN 5694. The evaluation of the protocol resulted in a list of deficiencies varying from missing references to incorrect formulae. From the survey by interview it appeared that for each type of material, there are 4 to 7 laboratories willing to participate in a interlaboratory validation study. This reflects the situation in 1997. Consequently, if 4 or 6 (the minimal number) laboratories are participating and each laboratory analyses 3 subsamples, the uncertainty in the repeatability standard deviation is 49 or 40 %, respectively. If the ratio of reproducibility standard deviation to the repeatability standard deviation is equal to 1 or 2, then the uncertainty in the reproducibility standard deviation increases from 42 to 67 % and from 34 to 52 % for 4 or 6 laboratories, respectively. The intralaboratory validation was established on four different types of materials. Three types of materials (milkpowder condensate and filter) were prepared in the laboratory using the raw material and certified Pb-210 solutions, and one (sediment) was obtained from the IAEA. The ECN-prepared reference materials were used after testing on homogeneity. The pre-normative protocol can

  15. Proceedings of the Eleventh Radiation Physics and Protection Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The proceeding contains of 404 pages, the available maertial of 35 contributions: and covering of conference topics: Plenary, Invited, Keynote Talks. Nuclear Power Plant Accident. Cosmogenic Radionuclides. Waste Storage and Disposal Solutions. Radiation Medical Physics. Radiation Detection and Measurements. Radioactive in Building Materials. Radiation Protection Regulations and public Protection. Environmental Radioactivity.

  16. Worldwide Laboratory Comparison on the Determination of Radionuclides in IAEA-446 Baltic Sea Seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Radiometrics Laboratory of the IAEA Environment Laboratories in Monaco has been providing quality products and services for the past forty years, including the organization of interlaboratory comparisons, the production of reference and certified reference materials and the provision of training. More than 45 reference materials have been produced, including a wide range of marine sample matrices and radionuclide concentrations. As part of these activities, a new interlaboratory comparison was organized to provide participating laboratories with the opportunity to test the performance of their analytical methods on a seaweed sample with elevated radionuclide levels due to the effects of the Chernobyl accident on the Baltic Sea region. The material used in the analysis of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in seaweed was the bladder wrack (Fucus vesiculosus). It is expected that the sample, after successful certification, will be issued as a certified reference material for analysing radionuclides in seaweed. The participating laboratories were informed that the IAEA publication would contain a list of the laboratories and the results and descriptions of the interlaboratory comparisons, but that the results would not be attributed to individual laboratories

  17. Worldwide Laboratory Comparison on the Determination of Radionuclides in IAEA-446 Baltic Sea Seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-15

    The Radiometrics Laboratory of the IAEA Environment Laboratories in Monaco has been providing quality products and services for the past forty years, including the organization of interlaboratory comparisons, the production of reference and certified reference materials and the provision of training. More than 45 reference materials have been produced, including a wide range of marine sample matrices and radionuclide concentrations. As part of these activities, a new interlaboratory comparison was organized to provide participating laboratories with the opportunity to test the performance of their analytical methods on a seaweed sample with elevated radionuclide levels due to the effects of the Chernobyl accident on the Baltic Sea region. The material used in the analysis of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in seaweed was the bladder wrack (Fucus vesiculosus). It is expected that the sample, after successful certification, will be issued as a certified reference material for analysing radionuclides in seaweed. The participating laboratories were informed that the IAEA publication would contain a list of the laboratories and the results and descriptions of the interlaboratory comparisons, but that the results would not be attributed to individual laboratories.

  18. Laboratory quality improvement in Thailand's northernmost provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitvittaya, S; Suksai, U; Suksripanich, O; Pobkeeree, V

    2010-01-01

    In Thailand nearly 1000 public health laboratories serve 65 million people. A qualified indicator of a good quality laboratory is Thailand Medical Technology Council certification. Consequently, Chiang Rai Regional Medical Sciences Center established a development program for laboratory certification for 29 laboratories in the province. This paper seeks to examine this issue. The goal was to improve laboratory service quality by voluntary participation, peer review, training and compliance with standards. The program consisted of specific activities. Training and workshops to update laboratory staffs' quality management knowledge were organized. Staff in each laboratory performed a self-assessment using a standard check-list to evaluate ten laboratory management areas. Chiang Rai Regional Medical Sciences Center staff supported the distribution of quality materials and documents. They provided calibration services for laboratory equipment. Peer groups performed an internal audit and successful laboratories received Thailand Medical Technology Council certification. By December 2007, eight of the 29 laboratories had improved quality sufficiently to be certified. Factors that influenced laboratories' readiness for quality improvement included the number of staff, their knowledge, budget and staff commitment to the process. Moreover, the support of each hospital's laboratory working group or network was essential for success. There was no clear policy for supporting the program. Laboratories voluntarily conducted quality management using existing resources. A bottom-up approach to this kind of project can be difficult to accomplish. Laboratory professionals can work together to illustrate and highlight outcomes for top-level health officials. A top-down, practical approach would be much less difficult to implement. Quality certification is a critical step for laboratory staff, which also encourages them to aspire to international quality standards like ISO. The

  19. Baseline Assessment of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Reference Material and Proficiency Testing/External Quality Assurance Material Commutability: A Vitamin D Standardization Program Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, Karen W; Sempos, Christopher T; Tai, Susan S-C; Camara, Johanna E; Wise, Stephen A; Eckfeldt, John H; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Carter, Graham D; Jones, Julia; Myers, Gary L; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Miller, W Greg; Bachmann, Lorin M; Young, Ian S; Pettit, Juanita; Caldwell, Grahame; Liu, Andrew; Brooks, Stephen P J; Sarafin, Kurtis; Thamm, Michael; Mensink, Gert B M; Busch, Markus; Rabenberg, Martina; Cashman, Kevin D; Kiely, Mairead; Galvin, Karen; Zhang, Joy Y; Kinsella, Michael; Oh, Kyungwon; Lee, Sun-Wha; Jung, Chae L; Cox, Lorna; Goldberg, Gail; Guberg, Kate; Meadows, Sarah; Prentice, Ann; Tian, Lu; Brannon, Patsy M; Lucas, Robyn M; Crump, Peter M; Cavalier, Etienne; Merkel, Joyce; Betz, Joseph M

    2017-09-01

    The Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) coordinated a study in 2012 to assess the commutability of reference materials and proficiency testing/external quality assurance materials for total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in human serum, the primary indicator of vitamin D status. A set of 50 single-donor serum samples as well as 17 reference and proficiency testing/external quality assessment materials were analyzed by participating laboratories that used either immunoassay or LC-MS methods for total 25(OH)D. The commutability test materials included National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 972a Vitamin D Metabolites in Human Serum as well as materials from the College of American Pathologists and the Vitamin D External Quality Assessment Scheme. Study protocols and data analysis procedures were in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The majority of the test materials were found to be commutable with the methods used in this commutability study. These results provide guidance for laboratories needing to choose appropriate reference materials and select proficiency or external quality assessment programs and will serve as a foundation for additional VDSP studies.

  20. Simplified Laboratory Runoff Procedure (SLRP): Procedure and Application

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The Simplified Laboratory Runoff Procedure (SLRP) was developed to provide a faster, less expensive approach to evaluate surface runoff water quality from dredged material placed in an upland environment...

  1. Development status of post irradiation examination techniques at the JMTR Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, M.; Ohsawa, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Umino, A.; Shimizu, M.; Satoh, H.; Oyamada, R.

    1992-01-01

    Hot laboratory at Oarai Research Establishment was founded to examine the objects mainly irradiated at JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) and has been operated since 1971. A wide variety of post-irradiation examinations (PIE) is available using the hot laboratory. Continuous efforts are made to develop new PIE techniques to accommodate the user's requirements. The following are main techniques recently developed in the hot laboratory; 1. Remote capsule assembly including remote weld of irradiated objects for reirradiation in JMTR. 2. Fracture toughness tests of reactor component materials. 3. Creep tests of heat resistance alloys in high temperature conditions. 4. Tests of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). 5. Examination techniques of miniaturized test specimens. This report describes an outline of the hot laboratory with main emphasis on the new PIE techniques. (author)

  2. Safety Design Requirements for The Interior Architecture of Scientific Research Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElDib, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses one of the primary objectives of interior architecture design of research laboratories (specially those using radioactive materials) where it should provide a safe, accessible environment for laboratory personnel to conduct their work. A secondary objective is to allow for maximum flexibility for safe research. Therefore, health and safety hazards must be anticipated and carefully evaluated so that protective measures can be incorporated into the interior architectural design of these facilities wherever possible. The interior architecture requirements discussed in this paper illustrate some of the basic health and safety design features required for new and remodeled laboratories.The paper discusses one of the primary objectives of interior architecture design of research laboratories (specially those using radioactive materials) where it should provide a safe, accessible environment for laboratory personnel to conduct their work. A secondary objective is to allow for maximum flexibility for safe research. Therefore, health and safety hazards must be anticipated and carefully evaluated so that protective measures can be incorporated into the interior architectural design of these facilities wherever possible. The interior architecture requirements discussed in this paper illustrate some of the basic health and safety design features required for new and remodeled laboratories.

  3. Upgrades of Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory hot cell facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, R.L.; DesChane, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory operates the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PITL) and the 324 Shielded Materials Facility (SMF). These hot cell facilities provide diverse capabilities for the postirradiation examination and testing of irradiated reactor fuels and materials. The primary function of these facilities is to determine failure mechanisms and effects of irradiation on physical and mechanical properties of reactor components. The purpose of this paper is to review major equipment and facility upgrades that enhance customer satisfaction and broaden the engineering capabilities for more diversified programs. These facility and system upgrades are providing higher quality remote nondestructive and destructive examination services with increased productivity, operator comfort, and customer satisfaction

  4. Essay of accelerator R and D in a small laboratory of an university. Head ion IH linac for fusion material. 1983-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    The linear accelerator of Inter-Digital H type (IH linac) is known to have a high shunt impedance. Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors of Tokyo Institute of Technology introduced an IH linac for fusion materials irradiation test in 1983. The beam injector was a tandem electrostatic accelerator. The IH linac was designed and fabricated based on the developmental work at Institute for Nuclear Study of University of Tokyo. The processes of component alignment, cold test and start-up operation are described. Educational aspect of the project is also reviewed. (K.Y.)

  5. Hydrogen and the materials of a sustainable energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalbowitz, M. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    The National Educator`s Workshop (NEW): Update 96 was held October 27--30, 1996, and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This was the 11th annual conference aimed at improving the teaching of material science, engineering and technology by updating educators and providing laboratory experiments on emerging technology for teaching fundamental and newly evolving materials concepts. The Hydrogen Education Outreach Activity at Los Alamos National Laboratory organized a special conference theme: Hydrogen and the Materials of a Sustainable Energy Future. The hydrogen component of the NEW:Update 96 offered the opportunity for educators to have direct communication with scientists in laboratory settings, develop mentor relationship with laboratory staff, and bring leading edge materials/technologies into the classroom to upgrade educational curricula. Lack of public education and understanding about hydrogen is a major barrier for initial implementation of hydrogen energy technologies and is an important prerequisite for acceptance of hydrogen outside the scientific/technical research communities. The following materials contain the papers and view graphs from the conference presentations. In addition, supplemental reference articles are also included: a general overview of hydrogen and an article on handling hydrogen safely. A resource list containing a curriculum outline, bibliography, Internet resources, and a list of periodicals often publishing relevant research articles can be found in the last section.

  6. Siberian Chemical Combine laboratory project work plan, fiscal year 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, R.E.; Acobyan, R.; Shropsire, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Siberian Chemical Combine (SKhK), Laboratory Project Work Plan (Plan) is intended to assist the US Laboratory Project Team, and Department of Energy (DOE) staff with the management of the FY99 joint material protection control and accounting program (MPC and A) for enhancing nuclear material safeguards within the Siberian Chemical Combine. The DOE/Russian/Newly Independent States, Nuclear Material Task Force, uses a project work plan document for higher-level program management. The SKhK Plan is a component of the Russian Defense related Sites' input to that document. In addition, it contains task descriptions and a Gantt Chart covering the FY99 time-period. This FY99 window is part of a comprehensive, Project Status Gantt Chart for tasking and goal setting that extends to the year 2003. Secondary and tertiary levels of detail are incorporated therein and are for the use of laboratory project management. The SKhK Plan is a working document, and additions and modifications will be incorporated as the MPC and A project for SKhK evolves

  7. Creative Report Writing in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Inspires Nonmajors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henary, Maged; Owens, Eric A.; Tawney, Joseph G.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory-based courses require students to compose reports based on the performed experiments to assess their overall understanding of the presented material; unfortunately, the sterile and formulated nature of the laboratory report disinterests most students. As a result, the outcome is a lower-quality product that does not reveal full…

  8. Keeping the Momentum and Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, Robert Ernest; Dion, Heather M.; Dry, Donald E.; Kinman, William Scott; LaMont, Stephen Philip; Podlesak, David; Tandon, Lav

    2016-01-01

    LANL has 70 years of experience in nuclear forensics and supports the community through a wide variety of efforts and leveraged capabilities: Expanding the understanding of nuclear forensics, providing training on nuclear forensics methods, and developing bilateral relationships to expand our understanding of nuclear forensic science. LANL remains highly supportive of several key organizations tasked with carrying forth the Nuclear Security Summit messages: IAEA, GICNT, and INTERPOL. Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements. Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material and environmental forensic characterization. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met. Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  9. Keeping the Momentum and Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Robert Ernest [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dion, Heather M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dry, Donald E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kinman, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); LaMont, Stephen Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Podlesak, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-22

    LANL has 70 years of experience in nuclear forensics and supports the community through a wide variety of efforts and leveraged capabilities: Expanding the understanding of nuclear forensics, providing training on nuclear forensics methods, and developing bilateral relationships to expand our understanding of nuclear forensic science. LANL remains highly supportive of several key organizations tasked with carrying forth the Nuclear Security Summit messages: IAEA, GICNT, and INTERPOL. Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements. Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material and environmental forensic characterization. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met. Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  10. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Three - Appendix F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix F. Appendix F is essentially a photocopy of the ORNL researchers' laboratory notebooks from the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL).

  11. Process waste assessment for the Radiography Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1994-07-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate the Radiography Laboratory, located in Building 923. It documents the processes, identifies the hazardous chemical waste streams generated by these processes, recommends possible ways to minimize waste, and serves as a reference for future assessments of this facility. The Radiography Laboratory provides film radiography or radioscopy (electronic imaging) of weapon and nonweapon components. The Radiography Laboratory has six x-ray machines and one gamma ray source. It also has several other sealed beta- and gamma-ray isotope sources of low microcurie (μCi) activity. The photochemical processes generate most of the Radiography Laboratory's routinely generated hazardous waste, and most of that is generated by the DuPont film processor. Because the DuPont film processor generates the most photochemical waste, it was selected for an estimated material balance

  12. LEAN LABORATORY APPROACHES FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE IN FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmana Naik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A lean laboratory is one which is focused on testing products and materials to deliver results in the most efficient way in terms of cost or speed or both; primarily focused on improving measurable performance and reducing costs. The goal of a lean laboratory is to use less effort, less resources and less time to test incoming samples. Laboratories have a critical role to play in establishing and improving process capability and key performance indicator (KPI of the organization. There are inevitably many opinions as to what a lean lab actually is; here is one version fr om. Quality assurance laboratories are crucial to the success of organization and this effectiveness needs to be measurable and demonstrable. To facilitate this, a method of measuring a laboratory's progress towards complete deployment has been created by lean tools. These tools allow laboratories to conduct gap analysis and identify opportunities for improvement.

  13. Final characterization report for the 108-F Biological Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    This report provides a compilation of characterization data for the 108-F Biological Laboratory collected during the period of May 7, 1996 through August 29, 1996. The 108-F Biology Laboratory is located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The characterization activities were organized and implemented to evaluate the radiological status of the laboratory and to identify hazardous materials. This report reflects the current conditions and status of the laboratory. Information in this report is intended to be utilized to prepare an accurate cost estimate for building demolition, to aid in planning decontamination and demolition activities, and allow proper disposal of demolition debris

  14. Annotated bibliography of software engineering laboratory literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, David; Bristow, John; Smith, Don

    1994-01-01

    This document is an annotated bibliography of technical papers, documents, and memorandums produced by or related to the Software Engineering Laboratory. Nearly 200 publications are summarized. These publications cover many areas of software engineering and range from research reports to software documentation. This document has been updated and reorganized substantially since the original version (SEL-82-006, November 1982). All materials have been grouped into eight general subject areas for easy reference: (1) The Software Engineering Laboratory; (2) The Software Engineering Laboratory: Software Development Documents; (3) Software Tools; (4) Software Models; (5) Software Measurement; (6) Technology Evaluations; (7) Ada Technology; and (8) Data Collection. This document contains an index of these publications classified by individual author.

  15. Reinventing Material Science - Continuum Magazine | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    by Sandia National Laboratories Reinventing Material Science It's not often that scientists set out pursuing in the field of material science. The vision of the center is to revolutionize the discovery of new material science. "In the old days, if you wanted somebody to calculate the properties of a

  16. Laboratory Technology Research: Abstracts of FY 1996 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing/manufacturing research, and sustainable environments.

  17. LLNL X-ray Calibration and Standards Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The LLNL X-ray Calibration and Standards Laboratory is a unique facility for developing and calibrating x-ray sources, detectors, and materials, and for conducting x-ray physics research in support of our weapon and fusion-energy programs

  18. Rapid Radiochemical Methods for Asphalt Paving Material ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Brief Validated rapid radiochemical methods for alpha and beta emitters in solid matrices that are commonly encountered in urban environments were previously unavailable for public use by responding laboratories. A lack of tested rapid methods would delay the quick determination of contamination levels and the assessment of acceptable site-specific exposure levels. Of special concern are matrices with rough and porous surfaces, which allow the movement of radioactive material deep into the building material making it difficult to detect. This research focuses on methods that address preparation, radiochemical separation, and analysis of asphalt paving materials and asphalt roofing shingles. These matrices, common to outdoor environments, challenge the capability and capacity of very experienced radiochemistry laboratories. Generally, routine sample preparation and dissolution techniques produce liquid samples (representative of the original sample material) that can be processed using available radiochemical methods. The asphalt materials are especially difficult because they do not readily lend themselves to these routine sample preparation and dissolution techniques. The HSRP and ORIA coordinate radiological reference laboratory priorities and activities in conjunction with HSRP’s Partner Process. As part of the collaboration, the HSRP worked with ORIA to publish rapid radioanalytical methods for selected radionuclides in building material matrice

  19. 2101-M Laboratory Wastewater stream-specific report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    The proposed wastestream designation for the 2101-M Laboratory Wastewater is that it is not a dangerous waste, pursuant to the Washington (State) Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations*. This proposed designation is based on applying both process knowledge and sample data to the WAC 173-303 requirements for the three types of dangerous waste: (1) listed, (2) criteria, and (3) characteristic dangerous waste. Current operations in the 2101-M Facility use very little, if any, materials that might lead to the disposal of regulated wastes in the 2101-M Laboratory Wastewater. The activities that are now being conducted in the facility are limited to soil testing, soil sample archiving, stores warehousing and staff work in administrative offices. Chemical constituents present in the old data set that may be of potential regulatory concern are likely due to discontinued previous activities (such as the Basalt Waste isolation Program). Process knowledge used in this report was based on such things as present operating knowledge of the facility and Material Safety Data Sheets for all chemical products stored or used in the laboratory. Sample data consists of samples taken between September 9, 1985 and January 26, 1987

  20. The design of hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The need for specialized laboratories to handle radioactive substances of high activity has increased greatly due to the expansion of the nuclear power industry and the widespread use of radioisotopes in scientific research and technology. Such laboratories, which are called hot laboratories, are specially designed and equipped to handle radioactive materials of high activity, including plutonium and transplutonium elements. The handling of plutonium and transplutonium elements presents special radiation-protection and safety problems because of their high specific activity and high radiotoxicity. Therefore, the planning, design, construction and operation of hot laboratories must meet the stringent safety, containment, ventilation, shielding, criticality control and fire-protection requirements. The IAEA has published two manuals in its Safety Series, one on the safety aspects of design and equipment of hot laboratories (SS No.30) and the other on the safe handling of plutonium (SS No.39). The purpose of the symposium in Otaniemi was to collect information on recent developments in the safety features of hot laboratories and to review the present state of knowledge. A number of new developments have taken place as the result of growing sophistication in the philosophy of radiation protection as given in the ICRP recommendations (Report No.22) and in the Agency's basic safety standards (No.9). The topics discussed were safety features of planning and design, air cleaning, transfer and transport systems, criticality control, fire protection, radiological protection, waste management, administrative arrangements and operating experience

  1. Environmental Measurements Laboratory program review, December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volchok, H.L.; de Planque, G.

    1984-03-01

    This volume contains all of the written material that was submitted to the panel of Reviewers in advance of a Program Review conducted by the US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) December 7-9, 1983. In addition to a general introduction there are nineteen papers grouped into the five broad program categories covering all of the scientific and engineering projects of the Laboratory: Natural Radioactivity and Radiation, Anthropogenic Radioactivity and Radiation, Non-nuclear, Quality Assurance, and Development and Support. These short articles, for the most part, focus on the rationale for EML's involvement in each project, emphasizing their relevance to the EML and Department of Energy missions. Project results and their interpretation were presented at the Review and can be found in the material referenced in this volume

  2. Purpose of the Materials Characterization Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1984-09-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is the experimental arm of the Materials Characterization Organization (MCO), which was established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in FY 1980 to ensure high quality characterization and qualification of waste package materials essential to the reliable performance of DOE nuclear waste management programs. MCC is responsible for publishing key test methods and data in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook (DOE/TIC-11400). It sponsors a continuing series of workshops that address materials characterization test method issues. It supplies well-characterized reference and testing materials for use by the DOE nuclear waste management programs. It develops generic test methods and supports the repository waste package projects in developing selected site-specific test methods and performing confirmatory testing of these methods. When these test methods are approved by the MRB they constitute the formal tests to be used by laboratories to test and qualify materials, evaluate waste package components, and assure compliance with standards and/or specifications for the final product

  3. Development of mobile radiological assessment laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, R.N.; Saindane, Shashank S.; Jain, Amit; Parmar, Jayesh; Narsaiah, M.V.R.; Pote, M.B.; Murali, S.; Chaudhury, Probal

    2018-01-01

    During any emergency situations real-time radiation measurements and the fast analysis of the measured radiological data are of crucial importance. The newly developed mobile vehicle based laboratory known as 'Radiological Assessment Laboratory' (RAL) can be used for real time measurements in different radiation emergency scenarios, such as the release of radioactive materials from a radiological/nuclear incident, during search of an orphan source or during radioisotope transportation. RAL is equipped with several high sensitive detectors/systems such as NaI(Tl) gamma spectrometers, large size plastic scintillators and air-sampler, along with GPS and data transfer capability through GSM modem

  4. Water Quality & Pollutant Source Monitoring: Field and Laboratory Procedures. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on techniques and instrumentation used to develop data in field monitoring programs and related laboratory operations concerned with water quality and pollution monitoring. Topics include: collection and handling of samples; bacteriological, biological, and chemical field and laboratory methods; field…

  5. Polymers for nuclear materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvinen, G.; Benicewicz, B.; Duke, J.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The use of open-celled microcellular foams as solid sorbents for metal ions and other solutes could provide a revolutionary development in separation science. Macroreticular and gel-bead materials are the current state-of-the-art for solid sorbents to separate metal ions and other solutes from solution. The new polymer materials examined in this effort offer a number of advantages over the older materials that can have a large impact on industrial separations. The advantages include larger usable surface area in contact with the solution, faster sorption kinetics, ability to tailor the uniform cell size to a specific application, and elimination of channeling and packing instability

  6. Application of flipped classroom pedagogy to the human gross anatomy laboratory: Student preferences and learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleagle, Timothy R; Borcherding, Nicholas C; Harris, Jennie; Hoffmann, Darren S

    2017-12-28

    To improve student preparedness for anatomy laboratory dissection, the dental gross anatomy laboratory was transformed using flipped classroom pedagogy. Instead of spending class time explaining the procedures and anatomical structures for each laboratory, students were provided online materials to prepare for laboratory on their own. Eliminating in-class preparation provided the opportunity to end each period with integrative group activities that connected laboratory and lecture material and explored clinical correlations. Materials provided for prelaboratory preparation included: custom-made, three-dimensional (3D) anatomy videos, abbreviated dissection instructions, key atlas figures, and dissection videos. Data from three years of the course (n = 241 students) allowed for analysis of students' preferences for these materials and detailed tracking of usage of 3D anatomy videos. Students reported spending an average of 27:22 (±17:56) minutes preparing for laboratory, similar to the 30 minutes previously allocated for in-class dissection preparation. The 3D anatomy videos and key atlas figures were rated the most helpful resources. Scores on laboratory examinations were compared for the three years before the curriculum change (2011-2013; n = 242) and three years after (2014-2016; n = 241). There was no change in average grades on the first and second laboratory examinations. However, on the final semi-cumulative laboratory examination, scores were significantly higher in the post-flip classes (P = 0.04). These results demonstrate an effective model for applying flipped classroom pedagogy to the gross anatomy laboratory and illustrate a meaningful role for 3D anatomy visualizations in a dissection-based course. Anat Sci Educ. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  7. An analysis of laboratory activities found in "Applications In Biology/Chemistry: A Contextual Approach to Laboratory Science"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Sandra Sue

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively determine whether the material found in ABC promotes scientific inquiry through the inclusion of science process skills, and to quantitatively determine the type (experimental, comparative, or descriptive) and character (wet-lab, paper and pencil, model, or computer) of laboratory activities. The research design allowed for an examination of the frequency and type of science process skills required of students in 79 laboratory activities sampled from all 12 units utilizing a modified 33-item laboratory analysis inventory (LAI) (Germane et al, 1996). Interrater reliability for the science process skills was completed on 19 of the laboratory activities with a mean score of 86.1%. Interrater reliability for the type and character of the laboratory, on the same 19 laboratory activities, was completed with mean scores of 79.0% and 96.5%, respectively. It was found that all laboratory activities provide a prelaboratory activity. In addition, the science process skill category of student performance is required most often of students with the skill of learning techniques or manipulating apparatus occurring 99% of the time. The science process skill category observed the least was student planning and design, occurring only 3% of the time. Students were rarely given the opportunity to practice science process skills such as developing and testing hypotheses through experiments they have designed. Chi-square tests, applied at the .05 level of significance, revealed that there was a significant difference in the type of laboratory activities; comparative laboratory activities appeared more often (59%). In addition the character of laboratory activities, "wet-lab" activities appeared more often (90%) than any of the others.

  8. Reference material IAEA 413: Major, minor and trace elements in algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Reference materials are a basic requirement for any sort of quantitative chemical and radiochemical analysis. Laboratories need them for calibration and quality control throughout their analytical work. The IAEA started to produce reference materials in the early 1960s to meet the needs of the analytical laboratories in its Member States that required reference materials for quality control of their measurements. The initial efforts were focused on the preparation of environmental reference materials containing anthropogenic radionuclides for use by those laboratories employing nuclear analytical techniques. These reference materials were characterized for their radionuclide content through interlaboratory comparison involving a core group of some 10 to 20 specialist laboratories. The success of these early exercises led the IAEA to extend its activities to encompass both terrestrial and marine reference materials containing primordial radionuclides and trace elements. Today, the IAEA has more than 90 reference materials and maintains a customer base of about 5000 members from more than 85 Member States. Within the frame of IAEA activities in production and certification of RM, this report describes the certification of the IAEA 413: Major, minor and trace elements in algae. Details are given on methodologies and data evaluation

  9. 222-S LABORATORY FUME HOOD TESTING STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RUELAS, B.H.

    2007-01-01

    The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing chemicals within the subject fume hood. Following the event, testing of the fume hood was conducted to assess the performance of the fume hood. Based on observations from the testing, it was deemed appropriate to conduct performance evaluations of other fume hoods within the laboratory

  10. Materials Department annual report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewell, A; Hansen, N

    1995-04-01

    The annual report describes the work of the Materials Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1994. The work is presented in three main chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. The report includes lists of staff members, guests, post docs and PhD students. There are detailed lists of the published work which has resulted from the projects. (au) (37 ills.).

  11. Materials Department annual report for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, B.F.; Hansen, N. [eds.

    1996-04-01

    The annual report describes the work of the Materials Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1995. The work is presented in three main chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. The report includes lists of staff members, guests, post docs and PhD students. There are detailed lists of the published work which has resulted from the projects. (au) 53 ills.

  12. Materials Department annual report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsewell, A.; Hansen, N.

    1995-04-01

    The annual report describes the work of the Materials Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1994. The work is presented in three main chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. The report includes lists of staff members, guests, post docs and PhD students. There are detailed lists of the published work which has resulted from the projects. (au) (37 ills.)

  13. Materials Department annual report for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, B.F.; Hansen, N.

    1996-04-01

    The annual report describes the work of the Materials Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1995. The work is presented in three main chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. The report includes lists of staff members, guests, post docs and PhD students. There are detailed lists of the published work which has resulted from the projects. (au) 53 ills

  14. Materials Department. Annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsewell, A.; Hansen, N.

    1992-03-01

    Selected activities of the Materials Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1991 are described. The work is presented in three chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. A survey is given of the Department's participation in international collaboration and of its activities within education and training. Furthermore, the main figures outlining the funding and expenditure of the Department are given. Lists of staff members, visiting scientists, publications, lectures and poster presentations are included. (au)

  15. Fusion program research materials inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, T.K.; Wiffen, F.W.; Davis, J.W.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory maintains a central inventory of research materials to provide a common supply of materials for the Fusion Reactor Materials Program. This will minimize unintended material variations and provide for economy in procurement and for centralized record keeping. Initially this inventory is to focus on materials related to first-wall and structural applications and related research, but various special purpose materials may be added in the future. The use of materials from this inventory for research that is coordinated with or otherwise related technically to the Fusion Reactor Materials Program of DOE is encouraged

  16. Tolerance of High Inorganic Mercury of Perna viridis : Laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tolerance of High Inorganic Mercury of Perna viridis : Laboratory Studies of Its Accumulation, Depuration and Distribution. ... coefficient, indicating that it could act as one of the excretion routes for Hg and it can be proposed as a sensitive biomonitoring material for Hg. The fecal materials released by the mussel had elevated ...

  17. Material control evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddoups, I.G.; Anspach, D.A.; Abbott, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in the Department of Energy's (DOE) scope of work have stimulated several laboratories and commercial companies to develop and apply technology to enhance nuclear material control. Accountability, inventory, radiation exposure, and insider protection concerns increase as many DOE facilities require increased storage. This paper summarizes a study of the existing material control technologies. The goal of the study is to identify, characterize, and quantify the trade-offs associated with using these technologies to provide real-time information on stored nuclear material that in turn supports decreasing the frequency of inventories conducted by site personnel

  18. Contamination confinement system of irradiated materials handling laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobao, A. dos S.T.; Araujo, J.A. de; Camilo, R.L.

    1988-06-01

    A study to prevent radioctivity release in lab scale is presented. As a basis for the design all the limits established by the IAEA for ventilation systems were observed. An evaluation of the different parameters involved in the design have been made, resulting in the especification of the working areas, ducts and filtering systems in order to get the best conditions for the safe handling of irradiated materials. (author) [pt

  19. Heat conductivity of buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergesson, L.; Fredrikson, Anders; Johannesson, L.E.

    1994-11-01

    The report deals with the thermal conductivity of bentonite based buffer materials. An improved technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of buffer materials is described. Measurements of FLAC calculations applying this technique have led to a proposal of how standardized tests should be conducted and evaluated. The thermal conductivity of bentonite with different void ratio and degree of water saturation has been determined in the following different ways: * Theoretically according to three different investigations by other researchers. * Laboratory measurements with the proposed method. * Results from back-calculated field tests. Comparison and evaluation showed that these results agreed very well, when the buffer material was almost water saturated. However, the influence of the degree of saturation was not very well predicted with the theoretical methods. Furthermore, the field tests showed that the average thermal conductivity in situ of buffer material (compacted to blocks) with low degree of water saturation was lower than expected from laboratory tests. 12 refs, 29 figs, 11 tabs

  20. ITER EDA newsletter. V. 8, no. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    This ITER EDA Newsletter contains summary reports on the eleventh meeting of the ITER diagnostic expert group in Cadarache, France, on the ITER JCT presentation at the international conference on fusion reactor materials in Colorado Springs, USA and on the seventh workshop on plasma edge theory in fusion devices in Tajimi, Japan. Individual abstracts are prepared for the three contributions

  1. Medical diagnostic laboratories provisioning of services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahi Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Diagnostic services have a very important role to play in medical decision-making, which have an impact on the nation′s health status. The understanding of Indian diagnostic services provisioning has certain literature gaps. Aims: This study focused on understanding the functioning of provision of diagnostic services by Indian diagnostic laboratories. Materials and Methods: Exploratory field visits and literature review were used as tools to understand the Indian health system. Results: Indian diagnostic laboratory can be classified into various categories based on the type of services provided and governance. The difference in their financing, resources, quality assurance of services and patient access to services was found in these different laboratories. Conclusions: It was concluded from the study that patient′s access to laboratory services is affected by the functioning of laboratories in terms of governance, financing, resources, quality assurance of services and patient services.

  2. Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, J.L.

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the research, development, and demonstration activities that ensure nuclear energy remains a viable energy option for the United States. Fuel and material development through fabrication, irradiation, and characterization play a significant role in accomplishing the research needed to support nuclear energy. All fuel and material development requires the understanding of irradiation effects on the fuel performance and relies on irradiation experiments ranging from tests aimed at targeted scientific questions to integral effects under representative and prototypic conditions. The DOE recently emphasized a solution-driven, goal-oriented, science-based approach to nuclear energy development. Nuclear power systems and materials were initially developed during the latter half of the 20th century and greatly facilitated by the United States ability and willingness to conduct large-scale experiments. Fifty-two research and test reactors with associated facilities for performing fabrication and pre and post irradiation examinations were constructed at what is now Idaho National Laboratory (INL), another 14 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and a few more at other national laboratory sites. Building on the scientific advances of the last several decades, our understanding of fundamental nuclear science, improvements in computational platforms, and other tools now enable technological advancements with less reliance on large-scale experimentation.

  3. Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, J.L.; Robert D. Mariani; Rory Kennedy; Doug Toomer

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the research, development, and demonstration activities that ensure nuclear energy remains a viable energy option for the United States. Fuel and material development through fabrication, irradiation, and characterization play a significant role in accomplishing the research needed to support nuclear energy. All fuel and material development requires the understanding of irradiation effects on the fuel performance and relies on irradiation experiments ranging from tests aimed at targeted scientific questions to integral effects under representative and prototypic conditions. The DOE recently emphasized a solution-driven, goal-oriented, science-based approach to nuclear energy development. Nuclear power systems and materials were initially developed during the latter half of the 20th century and greatly facilitated by the United States’ ability and willingness to conduct large-scale experiments. Fifty-two research and test reactors with associated facilities for performing fabrication and pre and post irradiation examinations were constructed at what is now Idaho National Laboratory (INL), another 14 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and a few more at other national laboratory sites. Building on the scientific advances of the last several decades, our understanding of fundamental nuclear science, improvements in computational platforms, and other tools now enable technological advancements with less reliance on large-scale experimentation.

  4. Materials science and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    During FY-96, work within the Materials Science and Engineering Thrust Area was focused on material modeling. Our motivation for this work is to develop the capability to study the structural response of materials as well as material processing. These capabilities have been applied to a broad range of problems, in support of many programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These studies are described in (1) Strength and Fracture Toughness of Material Interfaces; (2) Damage Evolution in Fiber Composite Materials; (3) Flashlamp Envelope Optical Properties and Failure Analysis; (4) Synthesis and Processing of Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite; and (5) Room Temperature Creep Compliance of Bulk Kel-E.

  5. External Quality Assurance: Annual Proficiency Test on {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C isotopic abundance in plant materials [Activities of the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Seibersdorf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, Martina [Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Joint FAO/IAEA Division for Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Eight out of twelve laboratories (67%) participating in the nitrogen analysis reported {sup 15}N-data within the control limits for the enriched plant sample and eight out of nine (89%) participating laboratories for carbon analysis reported {sup 13}C isotopic abundance results within the control limits for this test sample. The reported analytical data and WEPAL evaluation of the {sup 15}N enriched plant material produced by SWMCNL is shown. All participants received a certificate of participation. Worldwide comparison of stable {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C isotope measurements will provide confidence in the laboratory's analytical performance and is hence an invaluable tool for external quality control. It is hoped that in the future more stable isotope laboratories will make use of this unique opportunity to assess their analytical performance and provide evidence of the high quality of their analytical data.

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1984-FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-11-01

    In this plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to be committed to scientific and technological research that is based on technical excellence and innovation and that provides a foundation for and a stimulus to broader and more sustained economic growth. DOE is being asked to assist in establishing a new program for Laboratory cooperation with industry, beginning with an initial focus on materials science. The current Institutional Plan thus projects growth in the materials science area as well as in other basic physical science areas and suggests a new initiative designed to extend the various technology transfer activities and to make them more effective by using ORNL as the trial Laboratory for some of these different approaches. This Institutional Plan projects a stable future for ORNL, with only modest amounts of growth in selected areas of research for the FY 1984-FY 1989 planning cycle. Summaries of the overall picture of the proposed budget and personnel levels for the current planning cycle are included. Scientific programs, laboratory resource development, and private sector interactions are discussed

  7. MSRR Rack Materials Science Research Rack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Shawn

    2017-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a research facility developed under a cooperative research agreement between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) for materials science investigations on the International Space Station (ISS). The MSRR is managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The MSRR facility subsystems were manufactured by Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE) and integrated with the ESA/EADS-Astrium developed Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) at the MSFC Space Station Integration and Test Facility (SSITF) as part of the Systems Development Operations Support (SDOS) contract. MSRR was launched on STS-128 in August 2009, and is currently installed in the U. S. Destiny Laboratory Module on the ISS. Materials science is an integral part of developing new, safer, stronger, more durable materials for use throughout everyday life. The goal of studying materials processing in space is to develop a better understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms involved, and how they differ in the microgravity environment of space. To that end, the MSRR accommodates advanced investigations in the microgravity environment of the ISS for basic materials science research in areas such as solidification of metals and alloys. MSRR allows for the study of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials. MSRR is a highly automated facility with a modular design capable of supporting multiple types of investigations. Currently the NASA-provided Rack Support Subsystem provides services (power, thermal control, vacuum access, and command and data handling) to the ESA developed Materials

  8. Applied programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This document overviews the areas of current research at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Technology transfer and the user facilities are discussed. Current topics are presented in the areas of applied physics, chemical science, material science, energy efficiency and conservation, environmental health and mathematics, biosystems and process science, oceanography, and nuclear energy. (GHH)

  9. The DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program 8 years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, R.; Kershisnik, R.; Taylor, T.; Grothaus, G.; Loesch, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    The DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program was implemented in 1986. Currently, the program is conducting its seventeenth performance testing session for whole body personnel dosimeters. All but two DOE laboratories have gained accreditation for their whole body personnel dosimetry systems. Several test situations which were anticipated in the early stages of DOELAP have not materialized. In addition, the testing standard for whole body personnel dosimetry systems is under review and revision. In the near future, the accreditation programs for extremity dosimetry and bioassay will be implemented. This presentation summarizes the status and anticipated direction of the DOE whole body and extremity dosimetry and bioassay laboratory accreditation program

  10. 10 CFR 32.71 - Manufacture and distribution of byproduct material for certain in vitro clinical or laboratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certain in vitro clinical or laboratory testing under general license. 32.71 Section 32.71 Energy NUCLEAR... certain in vitro clinical or laboratory testing under general license. An application for a specific... only by physicians, veterinarians in the practice of veterinary medicine, clinical laboratories or...

  11. Materials Research Department Annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winther, Grethe; Hansen, N [eds.

    1999-04-01

    Selected activities of the Materials Research Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1998 are described. The scientific work is presented in five chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering, Materials Technology, Materials Chemistry and Fusion Materials. A survey is given of the Departments collaboration with national and international industries and research institutions. Furthermore, the main figures outlining the funding and expenditure of the Department are given. Lists of staff members, visiting scientists and educational activities are included. (au) 165 refs.

  12. Materials Research Department Annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, Grethe; Hansen, N.

    1999-04-01

    Selected activities of the Materials Research Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1998 are described. The scientific work is presented in five chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering, Materials Technology, Materials Chemistry and Fusion Materials. A survey is given of the Departments collaboration with national and international industries and research institutions. Furthermore, the main figures outlining the funding and expenditure of the Department are given. Lists of staff members, visiting scientists and educational activities are included. (au)

  13. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  14. Package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In the past all of the package testing that was performed at PNL was done on prototype or mocked up radioactive material packaging. Presently, we are developing the capability to perform testing on non-radioactive material packaging. The testing on the non-radioactive material packaging will be done to satisfy the new performance oriented packaging requirements (DOT Docket HM-181, 1991). This paper describes the equipment used to perform the performance oriented packaging tests and also describes some testing capability for testing radioactive material packaging

  15. Validation criteria of an internal dosimetry laboratory in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro L, M. de las M.

    2014-10-01

    People working with radioactive materials, under certain circumstances (e.g. not using the proper protective equipment, an incident not covered, etc.) could be incorporated into the body. The radiation protection programs include direct measurement methods -in vivo- or indirect -in vitro- or both, to know that radioactive material is incorporated into the body. The monitoring measurements of internal contamination or (Radio-bioassay) are carried out with the purpose of determining the amount of radioactive material incorporated in the body; estimate the effective dose and committed dose; management administration of radiation protection; appropriate medical management; and to provide the data necessary for the legal requirements and the preservation of records. The measurement methods used in the monitoring of internal contamination must be validated by the combination of the following processes: calibration, using standards reference materials and/or simulators; execute systematic research, using control samples; and intercomparison between laboratories and performance tests. In this paper the validation criteria of an internal dosimetry laboratory in vivo are presented following the information provided by the standard ANSI N13-30-1996 and ISO/TEC 17025-2005 as are the criteria of facilities, staff training, interpretation of measurements, performance criteria for monitoring of internal contamination in vivo, results reporting and records retention. Thereby we achieve standardized quantitative performance criteria of truthfulness, accuracy and detection limit and a consensus on statistical definitions to establish the validation plan of a monitoring laboratory of internal contamination in vivo. (Author)

  16. Shielded analytical laboratory activities supporting waste isolation programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.J.

    1985-08-01

    The Shielded Analytical Laboratory (SAL) is a six cell manipulator-equipped facility which was built in 1962 as an addition to the 325 Radiochemistry Bldg. in the 300 Area at Hanford. The facility provides the capability for handling a wide variety of radioactive materials and performing chemical dissolutions, separations and analyses on nuclear fuels, components, waste forms and materials from R and D programs

  17. Enabling In-Theater Processes for Indigenous, Recycled, and Reclaimed Material Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    plastic , chemicals, food, cloth , oil, grease, biological materials, animal and agricultural waste, and sludge. It is expected that one of these...ARL-TR-7560 ● DEC 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Enabling In-Theater Processes for Indigenous, Recycled , and Reclaimed Material...ARL-TR-7560 ● DEC 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Enabling In-Theater Processes for Indigenous, Recycled , and Reclaimed Material

  18. Materials Department. Annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsewell, A.; Hansen, N.

    1991-07-01

    Selected activities of the Materials Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1990 are described. The work is presented in three chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. A survey is given of the Department's participation in international collaboration and of its activities within education and training. Furthermore, the main figures outlining the funding and expenditure of the Department are given. Lists of staff members, visiting scientists, publications, lectures and poster presentations are included. (author) 91 refs., 46 ills

  19. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 27; Issue 5 ... The electrical performances of thin film material can be improved largely by dopants. ... Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Jinan 250022, PR China; The State Key Laboratory of Material Composite and Advanced ...

  20. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... maintenance. Each laboratory must have and follow written procedures to ensure that equipment is routinely... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where...) Laboratory Controls § 212.60 What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process...

  1. The quality of veterinary in-clinic and reference laboratory biochemical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishniw, Mark; Pion, Paul D; Maher, Tammy

    2012-03-01

    Although evaluation of biochemical analytes in blood is common in veterinary practice, studies assessing the global quality of veterinary in-clinic and reference laboratory testing have not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of biochemical testing in veterinary laboratories using results obtained from analyses of 3 levels of assayed quality control materials over 5 days. Quality was assessed by comparison of calculated total error with quality requirements, determination of sigma metrics, use of a quality goal index to determine factors contributing to poor performance, and agreement between in-clinic and reference laboratory mean results. The suitability of in-clinic and reference laboratory instruments for statistical quality control was determined using adaptations from the computerized program, EZRules3. Reference laboratories were able to achieve desirable quality requirements more frequently than in-clinic laboratories. Across all 3 materials, > 50% of in-clinic analyzers achieved a sigma metric ≥ 6.0 for measurement of 2 analytes, whereas > 50% of reference laboratory analyzers achieved a sigma metric ≥ 6.0 for measurement of 6 analytes. Expanded uncertainty of measurement and ± total allowable error resulted in the highest mean percentages of analytes demonstrating agreement between in-clinic and reference laboratories. Owing to marked variation in bias and coefficient of variation between analyzers of the same and different types, the percentages of analytes suitable for statistical quality control varied widely. These findings reflect the current state-of-the-art with regard to in-clinic and reference laboratory analyzer performance and provide a baseline for future evaluations of the quality of veterinary laboratory testing. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  2. Certification of an iron metal reference material for neutron dosimetry (EC nuclear reference material 524)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingelbrecht, C.; Pauwels, J.; Lievens, F.

    1993-01-01

    Iron metal, of > 99.996% nominal purity, in the form of 0.1 mm thick foil and of 0.5 mm diameter wire has been certified for its manganese and cobalt mass fractions. The certified value of the cobalt mass fraction ( -1 ) is based on 39 accepted results from five laboratories using two different methods. The certified value of the manganese mass fraction ( -1 ) is based on 41 accepted results from five laboratories using three different methods. The overall purity was also verified. The material is intended to be used as a reference material in neutron dosimetry. (authors). 8 refs., 9 tabs., 2 figs

  3. Survey of Laboratories and Implementation of the Federal Defense Laboratory Diversification Program. Annex B. Department of the Navy Domestic Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    overseas laboratories. Dental capabilities include oral microbiology, manufacturing technology for unique (dental prosthetic ) items, dental materials...with the National Center of Excellence in Metalworking to rectify production problems in manufacturing low loss, high pressure valves used in...34 Proceedings of the ASTE Fifth Symposium on Composite Materials: Fatigue and Fracture , May 1993. Chen, J. S. J., T. J. Praisner, L. A. Fields, R. T. Norhold and

  4. Certification of a new biological reference material - Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) and homogeneity study by NAA on this and other candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybczynski, Rajmund; Polkowska-Motrenko, Halina; Samczynski, Zbigniew; Szopa, Zygmunt; Kulisa, Krzysztof; Wasek, Marek

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the laboratory's participation in the interlaboratory comparison run where the laboratory applied neutron activation analysis aimed at certification of the candidate reference material. Data evaluation and statistical treatment steps are discussed. The report also describes homogeneity study on the reference material and provides details of the analytical procedures

  5. Application of engineered sorbent barriers Summary of Laboratory Data for FY 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, H.D.; Jones, E.O.

    1989-09-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted in FY 1988 Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine the effect of contact time, pH, solution to solid ratio, and particle size on the performance of a number of materials in adsorbing radioactive cobalt, strontium, and cesium. The laboratory studies were conducted to provide background information useful in designing an engineered sorbent barrier, which restricts the migration of radionuclides from low-level waste sites. Understanding how the variables affect the adsorption of ions on the sorbent materials is the key to estimating the performance of sorbent barriers under a variety of conditions. The scope of the studies was limited to three radionuclides and four sorbent materials, but the general approach can be used to evaluate other radionuclides and conditions. The sorbent materials evaluated in this study included clinoptilolite, activated carbon, bentonite clay, and Savannah River soil. The clinoptilolite and activated carbon were identified in previous studies as the most cost-effective materials for sorption of the three radionuclides under consideration. The bentonite clay was evaluated as a component of the barrier that could be used to modify the permeability of the barrier system. The Savannah River soil was used to represent soil from a humid site. 3 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Hot Chemistry Laboratory decommissioning activities at IPEN/CNEN-SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilo, Ruth L.; Lainetti, Paulo E.O.

    2009-01-01

    IPEN's fuel cycle activities were accomplished in laboratory and pilot plant scale and most facilities were built in the 70-80 years. Nevertheless, radical changes of the Brazilian nuclear policy in the beginning of 90's determined the interruption of several fuel cycle activities and facilities shutdown. Since then, IPEN has faced the problem of the pilot plants decommissioning considering that there was no experience/expertise in this field at all. In spite of this, some laboratory and pilot plant decommissioning activities have been performed in IPEN in the last years, even without previous experience and training support. One of the first decommissioning activities accomplished in IPEN involved the Hot Chemistry Laboratory. This facility was built in the beginning of the 80's with the proposal of supporting research and development in the nuclear chemistry area. It was decided to settle a new laboratory in the place where the Hot Chemistry Laboratory was installed, being necessary its total releasing from the radioactive contamination point of view. The previous work in the laboratory involved the manipulation of samples of irradiated nuclear fuel, besides plutonium-239 and uranium-233 standard solutions. There were 5 glove-boxes in the facility but only 3 were used with radioactive material. The glove-boxes contained several devices and materials, besides the radioactive compounds, such as: electric and electronic equipment, metallic and plastic pieces, chemical reagents, liquid and solid radioactive wastes, etc. The laboratory's decommissioning process was divided in 12 steps. This paper describes the procedures, problems faced and results related to the Hot Chemistry Laboratory decommissioning operations and its reintegration as a new laboratory of the Chemical and Environmental Technology Center (CQMA) - IPEN-CNEN/SP. (author)

  7. Status report of AMS sample preparation laboratory at GADAM Centre, Gliwice, Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrowska, N., E-mail: natalia.piotrowska@polsl.pl [GADAM Centre of Excellence, Department of Radioisotopes, Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice (Poland)

    2013-01-15

    The laboratory for {sup 14}C AMS sample preparation in the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory has gradually evolved since its start in 1999 to cater for an increase in volume and variety of radiocarbon dating samples. To date, nearly 2000 graphite targets have been produced from materials such as plant macrofossils, charcoal, peat, bones, shells and wood. The equipment comprises a station for chemical preparation and high vacuum lines for production, purification and graphitization of sample carbon dioxide. The present capacity allows preparation of up to 400 targets annually for the needs of scientific projects and external orders for radiocarbon dating continuously received by the GADAM Centre of Excellence. The laboratory's sample preparation protocols and recent improvements are described and its performance during the 10 years of activity is discussed in terms of parameters obtained from reference materials prepared in this laboratory and demonstrated with a few science applications.

  8. Expansion design for a radioactive sources handling laboratory type II class B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez S, P. S.; Monroy G, F.; Alanis, J.

    2013-10-01

    The Radioactive Wastes Research Laboratory (RWRL) of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico), at the moment has three sections: instrumental analysis, radioactive material processes, counting and a license type II class C, to manipulate radioactive material. This license limits the open sources handling to 300 kBq for radionuclides of very high radio-toxicity as the Ra-226, for what is being projected the license extension to type II class B, to be able to manage until 370 MBq of this radionuclides type, and the Laboratory, since the location where is the RWRL have unused area. This work presents a proposal of the RWRL expansion, taking into account the current laboratory sections, as well as the established specifications by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). The current planes of the RWRL and the expansion proposal of the laboratory are presented. (Author)

  9. Mudflow utilization for construction materials of tertiary irrigation canal lining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azis, Subandiyah; Kustamar

    2017-11-01

    Mudflow in Siring Village, Sidoarjo Regency, Indonesia, has been in eruption since May 29, 2006. It still shows irregular large bursts which loaded in a sludge reservoir with capacity of 59 million m3. From 2007 until 2015, there were more than 20 studies which concluded that the mudflow could be used as a mixture of building materials. However, the studies were not detailed and needed further research. This research aims to investigate the use of mudflow as tertiary irrigation canal lining material. This research comes with several laboratory tests to obtain a mixture that is solid and water-resistant. The methods that were used are descriptive methods as follows: 1). Sampling of mudflow, to be analyzed in Material Testing Laboratory. 2). Sampling of soil at research site, to be analyzed in Soil Mechanics Laboratory 3). Mixing of materials which are consist of mudflow and other materials and doing strength test in the laboratory. 4). Installation of tertiary irrigation canal lining using materials that have been tested. 5). Observation of lining's strength inactive soil pressure-bearing and its impermeability. It is expected that the results of this research will be applied extensively throughout the tertiary irrigation canals, so mudflow can be utilized as raw materials that are environmentally friendly, which are able to help preserving the environment, also to reduce the removal of sand / rock in the river, which has been used for lining materials, that benefits in preventing damage to the river ecosystem.

  10. Laboratory-performance criteria for in situ waste-stabilization materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Weidner, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is investigating a variety of in situ placement methods, grout materials, and characterization techniques for the stabilization of buried low-level transuranic-contaminated waste at Department of Energy sites. In situ stabilization involves underground injection or placement of substances to isolate, treat, or contain buried contaminants. Performance criteria were developed to evaluate various candidate stabilization materials for both long-term stabilization and interim stabilization or retrieval. The criteria are go/no-go, ready, and preliminary. The criterion go/no-go eliminates technologies that are not applicable for in situ treatment of buried waste. The criterion ready indicates that the technology is sufficiently developed and proven to be field demonstrated full-scale. The criterion preliminary indicates the prospective technologies to be potentially applicable to in situ buried waste stabilization, but further development is needed before the technology is ready for field-scale demonstration

  11. Fusion Materials Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiffen, Frederick W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Noe, Susan P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The realization of fusion energy is a formidable challenge with significant achievements resulting from close integration of the plasma physics and applied technology disciplines. Presently, the most significant technological challenge for the near-term experiments such as ITER, and next generation fusion power systems, is the inability of current materials and components to withstand the harsh fusion nuclear environment. The overarching goal of the ORNL fusion materials program is to provide the applied materials science support and understanding to underpin the ongoing DOE Office of Science fusion energy program while developing materials for fusion power systems. In doing so the program continues to be integrated both with the larger U.S. and international fusion materials communities, and with the international fusion design and technology communities.

  12. Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-16

    Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White Martin H. Moore Brian J. Melde Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Interfacial...ABSTRACT Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White, Martin H. Moore, Brian J. Melde Center for Bio/Molecular Science

  13. Materials handbook for fusion energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. W.; Marchbanks, M. F.

    A materials data book for use in the design and analysis of components and systems in near term experimental and commercial reactor concepts has been created by the Office of Fusion Energy. The handbook is known as the Materials Handbook for Fusion Energy Systems (MHFES) and is available to all organizations actively involved in fusion related research or system designs. Distribution of the MHFES and its data pages is handled by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), while its direction and content is handled by McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company — St. Louis (MDAC-STL). The MHFES differs from other handbooks in that its format is geared more to the designer and structural analyst than to the materials scientist or materials engineer. The format that is used organizes the handbook by subsystems or components rather than material. Within each subsystem is information pertaining to material selection, specific material properties, and comments or recommendations on treatment of data. Since its inception a little more than a year ago, over 80 copies have been distributed to over 28 organizations consisting of national laboratories, universities, and private industries.

  14. Building a Laboratory-Scale Biogas Plant and Verifying its Functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleman, Tomáš; Fiala, Jozef; Blinová, Lenka; Gerulová, Kristína

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the process of building a laboratory-scale biogas plant and verifying its functionality. The laboratory-scale prototype was constructed in the Department of Safety and Environmental Engineering at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, of the Slovak University of Technology. The Department has already built a solar laboratory to promote and utilise solar energy, and designed SETUR hydro engine. The laboratory is the next step in the Department's activities in the field of renewable energy sources and biomass. The Department is also involved in the European Union project, where the goal is to upgrade all existed renewable energy sources used in the Department.

  15. Advanced Industrial Materials Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stooksbury, F.

    1994-06-01

    The mission of the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) program is to commercialize new/improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. Program investigators in the DOE national laboratories are working with about 100 companies, including 15 partners in CRDA's. Work is being done on intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy-consuming process industries. The aim of the AIM program is to bring materials from basic research to industrial application to strengthen the competitive position of US industry and save energy.

  16. Quality assurance and quality control in light stable isotope laboratories: A case study of Rio Grande, Texas, water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2009-01-01

    New isotope laboratories can achieve the goal of reporting the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty for the same material analysed decades apart by (1) writing their own acceptance testing procedures and putting them into their mass spectrometric or laser-based isotope-ratio equipment procurement contract, (2) requiring a manufacturer to demonstrate acceptable performance using all sample ports provided with the instrumentation, (3) for each medium to be analysed, prepare two local reference materials substantially different in isotopic composition to encompass the range in isotopic composition expected in the laboratory and calibrated them with isotopic reference materials available from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), (4) using the optimum storage containers (for water samples, sealing in glass ampoules that are sterilised after sealing is satisfactory), (5) interspersing among sample unknowns local laboratory isotopic reference materials daily (internationally distributed isotopic reference materials can be ordered at three-year intervals, and can be used for elemental analyser analyses and other analyses that consume less than 1 mg of material) - this process applies to H, C, N, O, and S isotope ratios, (6) calculating isotopic compositions of unknowns by normalising isotopic data to that of local reference materials, which have been calibrated to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials, (7) reporting results on scales normalised to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials (where they are available) and providing to sample submitters the isotopic compositions of internationally distributed isotopic reference materials of the same substance had they been analysed with unknowns, (8) providing an audit trail in the laboratory for analytical results - this trail commonly will be in electronic format and might include a laboratory

  17. REFERENCE MATERIALS SYSTEM OF SCIENTIFIC METHODICAL CENTRE OF STATE SERVICE OF REFERENCE MATERIALS FOR COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES OF SUBSTANCES AND MATERIALS URAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR METROLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Osinseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1960s UNIIM performs research in the field of needs in reference materials of composition and properties of substances and materials (RM as well as develops it. During the research UNIIM has developed 757 types of RMs for metrological measurement assurance of factors of composition and properties of substance and materials for test laboratories of chemical, pharmaceutical, fuel, food industry, agriculture, metallurgy and ecological monitoring laboratories. List ofRMs enlarges thanks to development of UNIIM standards and transmission measurement facility from State standards of units. Taking into account the actual requirements in the field of measurements, the UNIIM's key destination is to assure the accuracy and the metrological traceability of measurements. The present-day system of RMs to be developed in UNIIM includes RMs of composition of inorganic and organic compounds and their solutions, fuels, stable isotopic materials, water, grounds, food products, biomaterials, nanomaterials, metals, alloys and other materials offerrous and non-ferrous industry, RMs of properties (thermodynamic, magnetic, physical-chemical, technical of substances and materials. The present article considers history of RMs list development which were created by UNIIM and the strategy of this direction.

  18. Organics on Mars : Laboratory studies of organic material under simulated martian conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kate, Inge Loes ten

    2006-01-01

    The search for organic molecules and traces of life on Mars has been a major topic in planetary science for several decades, and is the future perspective of several missions to Mars. In order to determine where and what those missions should be looking for, laboratory experiments under simulated

  19. Materials Research Department annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, B.F.; Hansen, N.

    1997-04-01

    Selected activities of the Materials Research Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1996 are described. The scientific work is presented in four chapters: Materials Science, Materials Chemistry, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. A survey is given of the Department's participation in international collaboration and of its activities within education and training. Furthermore, the main figures outlining the funding and expenditure of the Department are given. Lists of staff members, visiting scientists, publications and other Department activities are included. (au)

  20. Materials Research Department annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, B.F.; Hansen, N.

    1998-04-01

    Selected activities of the Materials Research Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1997 are described. The scientific work is presented in four chapters: Materials Science, Materials Chemistry, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. A survey is given of the Department's participation in international collaboration and of its activities within education and training. Furthermore, the main figures outlining the funding and expenditure of the Department are given. Lists of staff members, visiting scientists, publications and other Department activities are included. (au)

  1. Tales from the Mars Science Laboratory Thermal Protection System Development (or, Try Not to Panic When Your Heatshield Material Disappears)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Helen H.

    2018-01-01

    In 2012, the entry vehicle for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission was the largest and heaviest vehicle flown to another planet, designed to be able to withstand the largest heat fluxes in the Martian atmosphere ever attempted. The heatshield material that had been successfully used for all previous Mars missions had been baselined in the design, but during the development and qualification testing demonstrated catastrophic and unexplained failures. With only 10 months remaining before the original launch date, the TPS team led by NASA Ames designed and implemented a first-ever tiled, ablative heatshield. Highlights from MSL of the testing difficulties and innovations required to execute a new heatshield design will be presented, along with a sneak peak of the Mars 2020 mission.

  2. Mockup of an automated material transport system for remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    An Automated Material Transport System (AMTS) was identified for transport of samples within a Material and Process Control Laboratory (MPCL). The MPCL was designed with a dry sample handling laboratory and a wet chemistry analysis laboratory. Each laboratory contained several processing gloveboxes. The function of the AMTS was to automate the handling of materials, multiple process samples, and bulky items between process stations with a minimum of operator intervention and with minimum o[ waiting periods and nonproductive activities. This paper discusses the system design features, capabilities and results of initial testing. The overall performance of the AMTS is very good. No major problems or concerns were identified. System commands are simple and logical making the system user friendly. Operating principle and design of individual components is simple. With the addition of various track modules, the system can be configured in most any configuration. The AMTS lends itself very well for integration with other automated systems or products. The AMTS is suited for applications involving light payloads which require multiple sample and material handling, lot tracking, and system integration with other products

  3. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    College of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004, China; Guangxi Key Laboratory of Information Materials, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004, China; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Luoyang Institute of Science and ...

  4. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This generated great interest in the development of these heteroatom structured materials through different processing routes. ... of Materials Science, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, India; Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Yokohama 226, Japan ...

  5. Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS): A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Karen S.; Auping, Judith V.; Megargle, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    In the late 70's, a refurbishment of the analytical laboratories serving the Materials Division at NASA Lewis Research Center was undertaken. As part of the modernization efforts, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) was to be included. Preliminary studies indicated a custom-designed system as the best choice in order to satisfy all of the requirements. A scaled down version of the original design has been in operation since 1984. The LIMS, a combination of computer hardware, provides the chemical characterization laboratory with an information data base, a report generator, a user interface, and networking capabilities. This paper is an account of the processes involved in designing and implementing that LIMS.

  6. Korogwe Research Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    . It is a large vaccine trial programme simultaneously conducted in several countries in Africa funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The laboratory is an extension to a district hospital placed quite isolated and rural in the north-eastern part of Tanzania. It’s close to the equator and the climate...... and ceiling have been separated leaving a large space for natural ventilation creating a general chimney effect. To provide independent backup water supply all rainwater falling on the roof is collected and directed through a sand filter into a 100m3 subterranean water tank. All constructions, details...... and materials have been carefully selected to last a long time even in a future situation with limited maintenance. Except from the high-end lab equipment only local available materials have been used. All major spaces are reached from colonnades surrounding an inner calm and cool garden space equipped...

  7. Evaluation of NAA laboratory results in inter-comparison on determination of trace elements in food and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diah Dwiana Lestiani; Syukria Kurniawati; Natalia Adventini

    2012-01-01

    Inter-comparison program is a good tool for improving quality and to enhance the accuracy and precision of the analytical techniques. By participating in this program, laboratories could demonstrate their capability and ensuring the quality of analysis results generated by analytical laboratories. The Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Nuclear Technology Center for Materials and Radiometry-PTNBR laboratory participated in inter-comparison tests organized by NAA working group. Inter-comparison BATAN 2009 was the third inter-laboratory analysis test within that project. The participating laboratories were asked to analyze for trace elements using neutron activation analysis as the primary technique. Three materials were distributed to the participants representing foodstuff, and environmental material samples. Samples were irradiated in rabbit facility of G.A. Siwabessy reactor with neutron flux ~ 10 13 n.cm -2 .s -1 , and counted with HPGe detector of gamma spectrometry. Several trace elements in these samples were detected. The accuracy and precision evaluation based on International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) criteria was applied. In this paper the PTNBR NAA laboratory results is evaluated. (author)

  8. A 5-day method for determination of soluble silicon concentrations in nonliquid fertilizer materials using a sodium carbonate-ammonium nitrate extractant followed by visible spectroscopy with heteropoly blue analysis: single-laboratory validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Dennis; Rodrigues, Hugh; Kinsey, Charles; Korndörfer, Gaspar; Pereira, Hamilton; Buck, Guilherme; Datnoff, Lawrence; Miranda, Stephen; Provance-Bowley, Mary

    2013-01-01

    A 5-day method for determining the soluble silicon (Si) concentrations in nonliquid fertilizer products was developed using a sodium carbonate (Na2CO3)-ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) extractant followed by visible spectroscopy with heteropoly blue analysis at 660 nm. The 5-Day Na2CO3-NH4NO3 Soluble Si Extraction Method can be applied to quantify the plant-available Si in solid fertilizer products at levels ranging from 0.2 to 8.4% Si with an LOD of 0.06%, and LOQ of 0.20%. This Si extraction method for fertilizers correlates well with plant uptake of Si (r2 = 0.96 for a range of solid fertilizers) and is applicable to solid Si fertilizer products including blended products and beneficial substances. Fertilizer materials can be processed as received using commercially available laboratory chemicals and materials at ambient laboratory temperatures. The single-laboratory validation of the 5-Day Na2CO3-NH4NO3 Soluble Si Extraction Method has been approved by The Association of American Plant Food Control Officials for testing nonliquid Si fertilizer products.

  9. The management of radioactive waste in laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLintock, I.S.

    1996-01-01

    Many laboratories in universities, colleges, research institutions and hospitals produce radioactive wastes. The recently-coined term for them is small users of radioactive materials, to distinguish them from concerns such as the nuclear industry. Until recently the accepted official view was that small users had few problems in disposing of their radioactive wastes. This misconception was dispelled in 1991 by the 12th Annual Report of the Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee. This book includes a description of the principles of the management and disposal of radioactive wastes from these laboratories. Its main intention, however, is to provide practical information and data for laboratory workers as well as for those responsible for management and ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes. I hope that it succeeds in this intention. (UK)

  10. Nuclear forensics: a comprehensive model action plan for Nuclear Forensics Laboratory in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshmukh, A.V.; Nyati, S.; Fatangre, N.M.; Raghav, N.K.; Reddy, P.G.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear forensic is an emerging and highly specialized discipline which deals with nuclear investigation and analysis of nuclear or radiological/radioactive materials. Nuclear Forensic analysis includes various methodology and analytical methods along with morphology, physical, chemical, elemental and isotopic analysis to characterize and develop nuclear database for the identification of unknown nuclear or radiological/radioactive material. The origin, source history, pathway and attribution of unknown radioactive/nuclear material is possible with certainty through Nuclear Forensics. Establishment of Nuclear Forensic Laboratory and development of expertise for nuclear investigation under one roof by developing the nuclear data base and laboratory network is need of the hour to ably address the problems of all the law enforcement and nuclear agencies. The present study provides insight in Nuclear Forensics and focuses on an urgent need for a comprehensive plan to set up Nuclear Forensic Laboratory across India. (author)

  11. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyeon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jeters, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonheyo, George T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  12. Crack growth determination on laboratory components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    In order to aid design and support remanent life assessment of plant components operating at elevated temperatures, the reliability of the analytical methods, which translate materials data procured from the laboratory to the behaviour of actual components, requires validation. Such a validation can of course be interpreted from operating plant, however the potential risks involved encourage the development of out of plant techniques for the validation of representative components. For meaningful validation, these techniques need careful control and high accuracy which can best be achieved in a laboratory environment. As the laboratory component test should be designed to simulate actual plant conditions as closely as possible, the direct extension of the results to the plant component case requires scaling up. Consequently the successful development of such a test may even lead to the advantageous situation where it could form an alternative to the conventional route where, for example, it may not be possible to obtain the plant component's metallurgical structure in a conventional specimen or, alternatively, when too many assumptions are required in the analysis when translating to different geometries and stress systems. Under these conditions, in spite of the more sophisticated test requirements, it may prove more reasonable to opt for the more representative laboratory component data for use in design or lifetime prediction. The present work describes the application of the component validation test philosophy to the problem of crack growth under two rather different loading conditions. In both cases, crack growth is measured using the direct current potential drop (PD) technique on tubular metallic components containing artificial defects, however the plant conditions to be simulated lead to either creep or thermal fatigue. The creep studies on Alloy 800H support heat exchanger design for nuclear plant, solar towers and chemical plant, whereas the work on the

  13. Trial operation of material protection, control, and accountability systems at two active nuclear material handling sites within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skripka, G.; Vatulin, V.; Yuferev, V.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses Russian Federal Nuclear Center (RFNC)-VNIIEF activities in the area of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) procedures enhancement. The goal of such activities is the development of an automated systems for MPC and A at two of the active VNIIEF research sites: a research (reactor) site and a nuclear material production facility. The activities for MPC and A system enhancement at both sites are performed in the framework of a VNIIEF-Los Alamos National Laboratory contract with participation from Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and PANTEX Plant in accordance with Russian programs supported by MinAtom. The American specialists took part in searching for possible improvement of technical solutions, ordering equipment, and delivering and testing the equipment that was provided by the Americans

  14. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamza, A V; Lesuer, D R

    2006-01-03

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The initial emphasis of the NSCL has been on development of scientific solutions in support of target fabrication for the NIF laser and other stockpile stewardship experimental platforms. Particular emphasis has been placed on the design and development of innovative new materials and structures for use in these targets. Projects range from the development of new high strength nanocrystalline alloys to graded density materials to high Z nanoporous structures. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and train personnel for Lab programs such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT), and Nonproliferation, Arms control and International security (NAI). The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory.

  15. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  16. Materials R&D-student internships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, R.B.; Jiles, D.C.; Chumbley, L.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This program has as an objective the conduct of programmatic research for the Advanced Industrial Concepts Materials Program while training minority graduate students in the process. Well-known demographics indicate that minorities will constitute an increasing fraction of our future work force. Consequently, efforts have been initiated to increase the fraction of minorities and women who choose technical career paths. Included are a wide ranging set of programs beginning with pre-school education, progressing through efforts to retain students in technical paths in grades K-12 and undergraduate education, and ending with encouraging graduate education. The Materials R & D - Student Internships is a unique approach in the latter category. Here, we have focused on a particular area of applied materials research, the Advanced Industrial Concepts Materials Program. Our goal, then, is to educate minority graduate students in the context of this program. The Ames Laboratory was selected as a site for this pilot project since it is a DOE national laboratory, located on the campus of a major research university, which includes in its research interests programs with a strong technological flavor.

  17. Internet, Multimedia and Virtual Laboratories in a 'Third World' Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Najera, Julian Antonio; Rivas Rossi, Marta; Mendez-Estrada, Victor Hugo

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of low-cost multimedia courses and materials for use on the Internet, as well as virtual laboratories, at the Universidad Estatal a Distancia (Costa Rica). Explains how simultaneous production of traditional printed materials and online courses, outsourcing, and the use of HTML and Java can reduce costs for developing…

  18. Quality control of parasitology stool examination in Tabriz clinical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shahram Khademvatan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of quality control program was to make doctors and laboratory personnel trust in laboratory results and consequently increasing confidence in laboratory achievements. The quality assurance means raising the level of quality in all tests that lead to raising the level of work efficiency and laboratories including minimum expense for society and minimum time for lab personnel. This study aimed to assess and determine the accuracy and precision of results in Tabriz medical diagnostic laboratories. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 790 stool samples were selected randomly and tested by standard methods.Student t- test, SPSS software and sensitivity and accuracy formulas were used for data analysis. Results: The sensitivity was 62%, 22% and 8% with 95% confidence intervals for worm's eggs, protozoan cysts and trophozoite detection respectively. Conclusion: To elevate quality assurance in clinical diagnostic laboratory, monitoring and check of the laboratories by standard methods continually should be done.

  19. HMPT: Basic Radioactive Material Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-29

    Hazardous Materials and Packaging and Transportation (HMPT): Basic Radioactive Material Transportation Live (#30462, suggested one time) and Test (#30463, required initially and every 36 months) address the Department of Transportation’s (DOT’s) function-specific [required for hazardous material (HAZMAT) handlers, packagers, and shippers] training requirements of the HMPT Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Labwide training. This course meets the requirements of 49 CFR 172, Subpart H, Section 172.704(a)(ii), Function-Specific Training.

  20. Potential of Laboratory Execution Systems (LESs) to Simplify the Application of Business Process Management Systems (BPMSs) in Laboratory Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Sebastian; Göde, Bernd; Gu, Xiangyu; Stoll, Norbert; Thurow, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    Modern business process management (BPM) is increasingly interesting for laboratory automation. End-to-end workflow automation and improved top-level systems integration for information technology (IT) and automation systems are especially prominent objectives. With the ISO Standard Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) 2.X, a system-independent and interdisciplinary accepted graphical process control notation is provided, allowing process analysis, while also being executable. The transfer of BPM solutions to structured laboratory automation places novel demands, for example, concerning the real-time-critical process and systems integration. The article discusses the potential of laboratory execution systems (LESs) for an easier implementation of the business process management system (BPMS) in hierarchical laboratory automation. In particular, complex application scenarios, including long process chains based on, for example, several distributed automation islands and mobile laboratory robots for a material transport, are difficult to handle in BPMSs. The presented approach deals with the displacement of workflow control tasks into life science specialized LESs, the reduction of numerous different interfaces between BPMSs and subsystems, and the simplification of complex process modelings. Thus, the integration effort for complex laboratory workflows can be significantly reduced for strictly structured automation solutions. An example application, consisting of a mixture of manual and automated subprocesses, is demonstrated by the presented BPMS-LES approach.