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Sample records for material volumetric compression

  1. Triaxial extensometer for volumetric strain measurement in a hydro-compression loading test for foam materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Bo; Xu, Ming-long; Zhao, Tian-fei; Zhang, Zhi-jun; Lu, Tian-jian

    2010-01-01

    A new strain gauge-based triaxial extensometer (radial extensometers x, y and axial extensometer z) is presented to improve the volumetric strain measurement in a hydro-compression loading test for foam materials. By the triaxial extensometer, triaxial deformations of the foam specimen can be measured directly, from which the volumetric strain is determined. Sensitivities of the triaxial extensometer are predicted using a finite-element model, and verified through experimental calibrations. The axial extensometer is validated by conducting a uniaxial compression test in aluminium foam and comparing deformation measured by the axial extensometer to that by the advanced optical 3D deformation analysis system ARAMIS; the result from the axial extensometer agrees well with that from ARAMIS. A new modus of two-wire measurement and transmission in a hydrostatic environment is developed to avoid the punching and lead sealing techniques on the pressure vessel for the hydro-compression test. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the triaxial extensometer is determined through an experimental test. An application in an aluminium foam hydrostatic compression test shows that the triaxial extensometer is effective for volumetric strain measurement in a hydro-compression loading test for foam materials

  2. Characterizing volumetric deformation behavior of naturally occuring bituminous sand materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available newly proposed hydrostatic compression test procedure. The test procedure applies field loading conditions of off-road construction and mining equipment to closely simulate the volumetric deformation and stiffness behaviour of oil sand materials. Based...

  3. Shock compression of geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, S; Braithwaite, C; Williamson, D; Jardine, A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the shock compression of geological materials is important for many applications, and is particularly important to the mining industry. During blast mining the response to shock loading determines the wave propagation speed and resulting fragmentation of the rock. The present work has studied the Hugoniot of two geological materials; Lake Quarry Granite and Gosford Sandstone. For samples of these materials, the composition was characterised in detail. The Hugoniot of Lake Quarry Granite was predicted from this information as the material is fully dense and was found to be in good agreement with the measured Hugoniot. Gosford Sandstone is porous and undergoes compaction during shock loading. Such behaviour is similar to other granular material and we show how it can be described using a P-a compaction model.

  4. Transient refractory material dissolution by a volumetrically-heated melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Jean Marie, E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ratel, Gilles [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Combeau, Hervé [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, Lorraine University, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Gaus-Liu, Xiaoyang; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We describe a test investigating ceramic dissolution by a molten non-eutectic melt. • The evolution of the interface temperature between melt and refractory is measured. • A theoretical model describing dissolution kinetics is proposed. • When dissolution stops, interface temperature is the liquidus temperature of the melt. - Abstract: The present work addresses the question of corium–ceramic interaction in a core catcher during a core-melt accident in a nuclear power plant. It provides an original insight into transient aspects concerning dissolution of refractory material by a volumetrically heated pool. An experiment with simulant material (LIVECERAM) is presented. Test results clearly show that dissolution of solid refractory material can occur in a non-eutectic melt at a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the refractory material. During the dissolution transient, the interface temperature rises above the liquidus temperature, corresponding to the instantaneous average composition of the melt pool. With constant power dissipation in the melt and external cooling of the core-catcher, a final steady-state situation is reached. Dissolution stops when the heat flux (delivered by the melt to the refractory) can be removed by conduction through the residual thickness of the ceramic, with T{sub interface} = T{sub liquidus} (calculated for the average composition of the final liquid pool). The final steady state corresponds to a uniform pool composition and uniform interface temperature distribution. Convection in the pool is governed by natural thermal convection and the heat flux distribution is therefore similar to what would be obtained for a single component pool. An interpretation of the experiment with two model-based approaches (0D and 1D) is presented. The mass transfer kinetics between the interface and the bulk is controlled by a diffusion sublayer within the boundary layer. During the dissolution transient

  5. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYSIS OF VOLUMETRIC STRAINS IN POROUS MATERIALS IN TERMS OF WATER FREEZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusin Z.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the differential analysis of volumetric strain (DAVS. The method allows measurements of volumetric deformations of capillary-porous materials caused by water-ice phase change. The VSE indicator (volumetric strain effect, which under certain conditions can be interpreted as the minimum degree of phase change of water contained in the material pores, is proposed. The test results (DAVS for three materials with diversified microstructure: clinker brick, calcium-silicate brick and Portland cement mortar were compared with the test results for pore characteristics obtained with the mercury intrusion porosimetry.

  6. Compressibility of air in fibrous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    The dynamic compressibility of air in fibrous materials has been computed for two assumed configurations of fibers which are close to the geometry of real fiber materials. Models with parallel cylinders placed in a regular square lattice and placed randomly are treated. For these models...... the compressibility is computed approximately from the diameter and mean distances between cylinders. This requires calculation of the air temperature, which is calculated for cylinders in a regular lattive by the Wigner-Seitz cell approximation. In the case of random placement, the calculation is done by a summation...... over thermal waves from all fibers, and by a self-consistent procedure. Figuren of the compressibility in the frequency range 10-100 000 Hz, are given for diameter of the cylinders of 6.8 µm, and mean distances between them from 50 to 110 µm, which corresponds to glass wool with a density of 40 to 16...

  7. Compressive Failure of Fibre Reinforced Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2003-01-01

    Compressive failure of uni-directional fibre composites by the kink band mechanism is analysed taking into account effects of residual stresses. Two criteria for determining the strength of the composite material have been investigated: Kink band formation at a bifurcation stress in a composite...... with perfectly aligned fibres, and kink band formation at a peak stress in a composite with a band of imperfect material....

  8. Impact of errors in recorded compressed breast thickness measurements on volumetric density classification using volpara v1.5.0 software

    OpenAIRE

    Waade, G; Highnam, R; Hauge, I; McEntee, M; Hofvind, S; Denton, E; Kelly, J; Sarwar, J; Hogg, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been demonstrated to predict breast cancer risk. It has been proposed that it could be used for stratifying screening pathways and recommending additional imaging. Volumetric density tools use the recorded compressed breast thickness (CBT) of the breast measured at the x-ray unit in their calculation, however the accuracy of the recorded thickness can vary. The aim of this study was to investigate whether inaccuracies in recorded CBT impact upon volumetric de...

  9. Compression Characteristics of Solid Wastes as Backfill Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Li; Jixiong Zhang; Rui Gao

    2016-01-01

    A self-made large-diameter compression steel chamber and a SANS material testing machine were chosen to perform a series of compression tests in order to fully understand the compression characteristics of differently graded filling gangue samples. The relationship between the stress-deformation modulus and stress-compression degree was analyzed comparatively. The results showed that, during compression, the deformation modulus of gangue grew linearly with stress, the overall relationship bet...

  10. Full-field mapping of internal strain distribution in red sandstone specimen under compression using digital volumetric speckle photography and X-ray computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingtao Mao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is always desirable to know the interior deformation pattern when a rock is subjected to mechanical load. Few experimental techniques exist that can represent full-field three-dimensional (3D strain distribution inside a rock specimen. And yet it is crucial that this information is available for fully understanding the failure mechanism of rocks or other geomaterials. In this study, by using the newly developed digital volumetric speckle photography (DVSP technique in conjunction with X-ray computed tomography (CT and taking advantage of natural 3D speckles formed inside the rock due to material impurities and voids, we can probe the interior of a rock to map its deformation pattern under load and shed light on its failure mechanism. We apply this technique to the analysis of a red sandstone specimen under increasing uniaxial compressive load applied incrementally. The full-field 3D displacement fields are obtained in the specimen as a function of the load, from which both the volumetric and the deviatoric strain fields are calculated. Strain localization zones which lead to the eventual failure of the rock are identified. The results indicate that both shear and tension are contributing factors to the failure mechanism.

  11. Compressive Failure Mechanisms in Layered Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim Dalsten

    Two important failure modes in fiber reinforced composite materials in cluding layers and laminates occur under loading conditions dominated by compression in the layer direction. These two distinctly different failure modes are 1. buckling driven delamination 2. failure by strain localization...... or on cylindrical substrates modeling the delamination as an interface fracture mechanical problem. Here attention is directed towards double-curved substrates, which introduces a new non-dimensional combination of geometric parameters. It is shown for a wide range of parameters that by choosing the two....... This has some impact on the convergence rate for decreasing mesh size in the load vs. end shortening response for a rectangular block of material. Especially in the immediate post critical range the convergence rate may be slow. The capabilities of the model to deal with more complicated structural...

  12. Investigation on molecular interaction of amino acids in aqueous disodium hydrogen phosphate solutions with reference to volumetric and compressibility measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Harsh; Singla, Meenu; Jindal, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Densities and speeds of sound of amino acids in aqueous disodium hydrogen phosphate. • Partial molar volumes and compressibility of transfer. • Positive values of transfer volume indicates interactions between ions of amino acids and TSC. • Ion–hydrophilic and hydrophilic–hydrophilic interactions are present. • Pair-wise interactions are dominant in the mixtures. -- Abstract: The interactions of amino acids glycine (Gly), L-alanine (Ala), and L-valine (Val) with disodium hydrogen phosphate (DSHP) as a function of temperature have been investigated by combination of volumetric and acoustic measurements. Densities (ρ) and speeds of sound (u) of amino acids in aqueous solutions of disodium hydrogen phosphate have been measured at T = (288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15 and 308.15) K and atmospheric pressure. The apparent molar volume (V ϕ ), the partial molar volume (V ϕ 0 ) and standard partial molar volumes of transfer (ΔV ϕ 0 ) for amino acids from water to aqueous disodium hydrogen phosphate solutions have been calculated from density data. Partial molar adiabatic compressibility (κ ϕ,s ) and partial molar adiabatic compressibility of transfer (Δκ ϕ,S 0 ) have been calculated from speed of sound data. The pair (V AB , κ AB ) and triplet (V ABB , κ ABB ) interaction coefficient have been calculated from both the properties. The results have been explained based on competing patterns of interactions of co-solvents and the solute

  13. Solvation of ionic liquids based on N-methyl-N-alkyl morpholinium cations in dimethylsulfoxide – volumetric and compressibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowski, Łukasz; Kloskowski, Adam; Czub, Jacek; Namieśnik, Jacek; Warmińska, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • In DMSO both volumes and compressibilities of ionic liquids were studied. • Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for all studied ionic liquids. • V Φ of DMSO solutions of [Mor 1,R ][TFSI] decrease with increasing IL concentration. • Results indicate that [Mor 1,R ][TFSI] are structure breakers in dimethylsulfoxide. • Obtained results are the consequence of the cation size of the ionic liquid. - Abstract: The density and sound velocity of the solutions of ionic liquids based on N-alkyl-N-methyl-morpholinium cations, N-ethyl-N-methylmorpholinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, N-butyl-N-methylmorpholinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, N-methyl-N-octyl-morpholinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide and N-decyl-N-methylmorpholinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide in dimethylsulfoxide were measured at T = (298.15 to 318.15) K and at atmospheric pressure. The apparent molar volume and apparent molar compressibility values were evaluated from density and sound velocity values and fitted to the Masson equation from which the partial molar volume and partial molar isentropic compressibility of the ILs at infinite dilution were also calculated at working temperatures. By using the density values, the limiting apparent molar expansibilities were estimated. The effect of the alkyl chain length of the ILs and experimental temperature on these thermodynamic properties is discussed. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations were used to interpret the measured properties in terms of interactions of ILs with solvent molecules. Both, volumetric measurements results and molecular dynamics simulations for ionic liquids in dimethylsulfoxide were compared and discussed with results obtained for the same IL in acetonitrile

  14. Compression device for feeding a waste material to a reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul M.; Faller, Kenneth M.; Bauer, Edward J.

    2001-08-21

    A compression device for feeding a waste material to a reactor includes a waste material feed assembly having a hopper, a supply tube and a compression tube. Each of the supply and compression tubes includes feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends. A feed-discharge valve assembly is located between the feed-outlet end of the compression tube and the reactor. A feed auger-screw extends axially in the supply tube between the feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends thereof. A compression auger-screw extends axially in the compression tube between the feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends thereof. The compression tube is sloped downwardly towards the reactor to drain fluid from the waste material to the reactor and is oriented at generally right angle to the supply tube such that the feed-outlet end of the supply tube is adjacent to the feed-inlet end of the compression tube. A programmable logic controller is provided for controlling the rotational speed of the feed and compression auger-screws for selectively varying the compression of the waste material and for overcoming jamming conditions within either the supply tube or the compression tube.

  15. Optical Addressing of Multi-Colour Photochromic Material Mixture for Volumetric Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-08-01

    This is the first study to demonstrate that colour transformations in the volume of a photochromic material (PM) are induced at the intersections of two control light channels, one controlling PM colouration and the other controlling decolouration. Thus, PM colouration is induced by position selectivity, and therefore, a dynamic volumetric display may be realised using these two control lights. Moreover, a mixture of multiple PM types with different absorption properties exhibits different colours depending on the control light spectrum. Particularly, the spectrum management of the control light allows colour-selective colouration besides position selectivity. Therefore, a PM-based, full-colour volumetric display is realised. We experimentally construct a mixture of two PM types and validate the operating principles of such a volumetric display system. Our system is constructed simply by mixing multiple PM types; therefore, the display hardware structure is extremely simple, and the minimum size of a volume element can be as small as the size of a molecule. Volumetric displays can provide natural three-dimensional (3D) perception; therefore, the potential uses of our system include high-definition 3D visualisation for medical applications, architectural design, human-computer interactions, advertising, and entertainment.

  16. Free-breathing volumetric fat/water separation by combining radial sampling, compressed sensing, and parallel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkert, Thomas; Feng, Li; Sodickson, Daniel K; Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Kai Tobias

    2017-08-01

    Conventional fat/water separation techniques require that patients hold breath during abdominal acquisitions, which often fails and limits the achievable spatial resolution and anatomic coverage. This work presents a novel approach for free-breathing volumetric fat/water separation. Multiecho data are acquired using a motion-robust radial stack-of-stars three-dimensional GRE sequence with bipolar readout. To obtain fat/water maps, a model-based reconstruction is used that accounts for the off-resonant blurring of fat and integrates both compressed sensing and parallel imaging. The approach additionally enables generation of respiration-resolved fat/water maps by detecting motion from k-space data and reconstructing different respiration states. Furthermore, an extension is described for dynamic contrast-enhanced fat-water-separated measurements. Uniform and robust fat/water separation is demonstrated in several clinical applications, including free-breathing noncontrast abdominal examination of adults and a pediatric subject with both motion-averaged and motion-resolved reconstructions, as well as in a noncontrast breast exam. Furthermore, dynamic contrast-enhanced fat/water imaging with high temporal resolution is demonstrated in the abdomen and breast. The described framework provides a viable approach for motion-robust fat/water separation and promises particular value for clinical applications that are currently limited by the breath-holding capacity or cooperation of patients. Magn Reson Med 78:565-576, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Filtration and compression of organic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Keiding, Kristian

    is to use more simple systems. Dextran-MnO2 particles and polystyrene particles with a water-swollen polyacrylic acid shell have therefore been synthesised. These particles have been filtered and used to study the non-linear filtration behaviour. The compressibility of the formed cake has been investigated......The conventional filtration theory has been based on filtrations of incompressible particles such as anatase, kaolin and clay. The filtration models have later been used for organic slurries but can often not explain the observed experimental data. At constant pressure, the filtrate volume does...... and the discrepancy between the filtration theory and the observed filtration behaviour explained as a time-dependent collapse of the formed cake (creep). Thus, the creep phenomenon has been adopted in the conventional filtration models and it will be shown that the model can be used to simulate filtration data...

  18. A measurement method for piezoelectric material properties under longitudinal compressive stress–-a compression test method for thin piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Lae-Hyong; Lee, Dae-Oen; Han, Jae-Hung

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new compression test method for piezoelectric materials to investigate changes in piezoelectric properties under the compressive stress condition. Until now, compression tests of piezoelectric materials have been generally conducted using bulky piezoelectric ceramics and pressure block. The conventional method using the pressure block for thin piezoelectric patches, which are used in unimorph or bimorph actuators, is prone to unwanted bending and buckling. In addition, due to the constrained boundaries at both ends, the observed piezoelectric behavior contains boundary effects. In order to avoid these problems, the proposed method employs two guide plates with initial longitudinal tensile stress. By removing the tensile stress after bonding a piezoelectric material between the guide layers, longitudinal compressive stress is induced in the piezoelectric layer. Using the compression test specimens, two important properties, which govern the actuation performance of the piezoelectric material, the piezoelectric strain coefficients and the elastic modulus, are measured to evaluate the effects of applied electric fields and re-poling. The results show that the piezoelectric strain coefficient d 31 increases and the elastic modulus decreases when high voltage is applied to PZT5A, and the compression in the longitudinal direction decreases the piezoelectric strain coefficient d 31 but does not affect the elastic modulus. We also found that the re-poling of the piezoelectric material increases the elastic modulus, but the piezoelectric strain coefficient d 31 is not changed much (slightly increased) by re-poling

  19. Shock compression synthesis of hard materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willson, C.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to adapt the high explosives technology that was developed in conjunction with nuclear weapons programs to subjecting materials to ultra-high pressures and to explore the utility of this technique for the synthesis of hard materials. The research was conducted in collaboration with researchers at the University of Texas, Texas Tech University and Pantex (Mason and Hanger Corp.). The group designed, modeled, built, and tested a new device that allows quantitative recovery of grams of material that have been subjected to unprecedented pressures. The modeling work was done at Texas Tech and Pantex. The metal parts and material samples were made at the University of Texas, and Pantex machined the explosives, assembled the devices and conducted the detonations. Sample characterization was carried out at the University of Texas and Texas Tech.

  20. Impact of errors in recorded compressed breast thickness measurements on volumetric density classification using volpara v1.5.0 software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waade, Gunvor Gipling; Highnam, Ralph; Hauge, Ingrid H R; McEntee, Mark F; Hofvind, Solveig; Denton, Erika; Kelly, Judith; Sarwar, Jasmine J; Hogg, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Mammographic density has been demonstrated to predict breast cancer risk. It has been proposed that it could be used for stratifying screening pathways and recommending additional imaging. Volumetric density tools use the recorded compressed breast thickness (CBT) of the breast measured at the x-ray unit in their calculation; however, the accuracy of the recorded thickness can vary. The aim of this study was to investigate whether inaccuracies in recorded CBT impact upon volumetric density classification and to examine whether the current quality control (QC) standard is sufficient for assessing mammographic density. Raw data from 52 digital screening mammograms were included in the study. For each image, the clinically recorded CBT was artificially increased and decreased in increments of 1 mm to simulate measurement error, until ±15% from the recorded CBT was reached. New images were created for each 1 mm step in thickness resulting in a total of 974 images which then had volpara density grade (VDG) and volumetric density percentage assigned. A change in VDG was observed in 38.5% (n = 20) of mammograms when applying ±15% error to the recorded CBT and 11.5% (n = 6) was within the QC standard prescribed error of ±5 mm. The current QC standard of ±5 mm error in recorded CBT creates the potential for error in mammographic density measurement. This may lead to inaccurate classification of mammographic density. The current QC standard for assessing mammographic density should be reconsidered.

  1. Force Field Benchmark of the TraPPE_UA for Polar Liquids: Density, Heat of Vaporization, Dielectric Constant, Surface Tension, Volumetric Expansion Coefficient, and Isothermal Compressibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Rojas, Edgar; Aguilar-Pineda, Jorge Alberto; Pérez de la Luz, Alexander; de Jesús González, Edith Nadir; Alejandre, José

    2018-02-08

    The transferable potential for a phase equilibria force field in its united-atom version, TraPPE_UA, is evaluated for 41 polar liquids that include alcohols, thiols, ethers, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, and esters to determine its ability to reproduce experimental properties that were not included in the parametrization procedure. The intermolecular force field parameters for pure components were fit to reproduce experimental boiling temperature, vapor-liquid coexisting densities, and critical point (temperature, density, and pressure) using Monte Carlo simulations in different ensembles. The properties calculated in this work are liquid density, heat of vaporization, dielectric constant, surface tension, volumetric expansion coefficient, and isothermal compressibility. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed in the gas and liquid phases, and also at the liquid-vapor interface. We found that relative error between calculated and experimental data is 1.2% for density, 6% for heat of vaporization, and 6.2% for surface tension, in good agreement with the experimental data. The dielectric constant is systematically underestimated, and the relative error is 37%. Evaluating the performance of the force field to reproduce the volumetric expansion coefficient and isothermal compressibility requires more experimental data.

  2. A direct Eulerian method for the simulation of multi-material compressible flows with material sliding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motte, R.; Braeunig, J.P.; Peybernes, M.

    2012-01-01

    As the simulation of compressible flows with several materials is essential for applications studied within the CEA-DAM, the authors propose an approach based on finite volumes with centred variables for the resolution of compressible Euler equations. Moreover, they allow materials to slide with respect to each other as it is the case for water and air, for example. A conservation law is written for each material in a hybrid grid, and a condition of contact between materials under the form of fluxes is expressed. It is illustrated by the case of an intense shock propagating in water and interacting with an air bubble which will be strongly deformed and compressed

  3. A study of binder materials subjected to isentropic compression loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Clint Allen; Orler, E. Bruce; Sheffield, Steve A.; Gustavsen, Rick L.; Sutherland, Gerrit; Baer, Melvin R.; Hooks, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Binders such as Estane, Teflon, Kel F and HTPB are typically used in heterogeneous explosives to bond polycrystalline constituents together as an energetic composite. Combined theoretical and experimental studies are underway to unravel the mechanical response of these materials when subjected to isentropic compression loading. Key to this effort is the determination of appropriate constitutive and EOS property data at extremely high stress-strain states as required for detailed mesoscale modeling. The Sandia Z accelerator and associated diagnostics provides new insights into mechanical response of these nonreactive constituents via isentropic ramp-wave compression loading. Several thicknesses of samples, varied from 0.3 to 1.2 mm, were subjected to a ramp load of ∼42 Kbar over 500 ns duration using the Sandia Z-machine. Profiles of transmitted ramp waves were measured at window interfaces using conventional VISAR. Shock physics analysis is then used to determine the nonlinear material response of the binder materials. In this presentation we discuss experimental and modeling details of the ramp wave loading ICE experiments designed specifically for binder materials.

  4. Stress Distribution in Graded Cellular Materials Under Dynamic Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic compression behaviors of density-homogeneous and density-graded irregular honeycombs are investigated using cell-based finite element models under a constant-velocity impact scenario. A method based on the cross-sectional engineering stress is developed to obtain the one-dimensional stress distribution along the loading direction in a cellular specimen. The cross-sectional engineering stress is contributed by two parts: the node-transitive stress and the contact-induced stress, which are caused by the nodal force and the contact of cell walls, respectively. It is found that the contact-induced stress is dominant for the significantly enhanced stress behind the shock front. The stress enhancement and the compaction wave propagation can be observed through the stress distributions in honeycombs under high-velocity compression. The single and double compaction wave modes are observed directly from the stress distributions. Theoretical analysis of the compaction wave propagation in the density-graded honeycombs based on the R-PH (rigid-plastic hardening idealization is carried out and verified by the numerical simulations. It is found that stress distribution in cellular materials and the compaction wave propagation characteristics under dynamic compression can be approximately predicted by the R-PH shock model.

  5. Hyperelastic Material Properties of Mouse Skin under Compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiang Wang

    Full Text Available The skin is a dynamic organ whose complex material properties are capable of withstanding continuous mechanical stress while accommodating insults and organism growth. Moreover, synchronized hair cycles, comprising waves of hair growth, regression and rest, are accompanied by dramatic fluctuations in skin thickness in mice. Whether such structural changes alter skin mechanics is unknown. Mouse models are extensively used to study skin biology and pathophysiology, including aging, UV-induced skin damage and somatosensory signaling. As the skin serves a pivotal role in the transfer function from sensory stimuli to neuronal signaling, we sought to define the mechanical properties of mouse skin over a range of normal physiological states. Skin thickness, stiffness and modulus were quantitatively surveyed in adult, female mice (Mus musculus. These measures were analyzed under uniaxial compression, which is relevant for touch reception and compression injuries, rather than tension, which is typically used to analyze skin mechanics. Compression tests were performed with 105 full-thickness, freshly isolated specimens from the hairy skin of the hind limb. Physiological variables included body weight, hair-cycle stage, maturity level, skin site and individual animal differences. Skin thickness and stiffness were dominated by hair-cycle stage at young (6-10 weeks and intermediate (13-19 weeks adult ages but by body weight in mature mice (26-34 weeks. Interestingly, stiffness varied inversely with thickness so that hyperelastic modulus was consistent across hair-cycle stages and body weights. By contrast, the mechanics of hairy skin differs markedly with anatomical location. In particular, skin containing fascial structures such as nerves and blood vessels showed significantly greater modulus than adjacent sites. Collectively, this systematic survey indicates that, although its structure changes dramatically throughout adult life, mouse skin at a given

  6. The entire dural sinus tree is compressed in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension: a longitudinal, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohr, Axel; Bindeballe, Jan; Riedel, Christian; Jansen, Olav [University Clinic of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Department of Neuroradiology, Kiel (Germany); Baalen, Andreas van [University Clinic of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Department of Neuropediatrics, Kiel (Germany); Bartsch, Thorsten [University Clinic of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Department of Neurology, Kiel (Germany); Doerner, Lutz [University Clinic of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Department of Neurosurgery, Kiel (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    The objective of this study was to explore the volumetric alterations of dural sinuses in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Standardized cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used in 17 patients prior to and following treatment of IIH and in seven controls. Magnetic resonance venographies (MRV) were employed for (a) judgement of circumscript dural sinus stenoses and (b) computation of sinus volumes. Cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the superior sagittal sinuses (SSS) were measured on T2-weighted images. Results of the initial MRIs were compared to those on follow-up MRIs and to results of controls. Stenoses of the transverse sinuses (TS) resulting in cranial venous outflow obstruction (CVOO) were present in 15/17 (88%) patients, normalizing in 7/15 cases (47%) after treatment of IIH. CVOO was not detected in the control group. Segmentation of MRV revealed decreased dural sinus volumes in patients with IIH as compared to controls (P = 0.018). Sinus volumes increased significantly with normalization of intracranial pressure independent from disappearing of TS stenoses (P = 0.007). The CSA of the SSS were normal on the initial MRIs of patients with IIH and increased on follow-up after treatment (P < 0.001). However, volumetries displayed overlap in patients and controls. Patients with IIH not only exhibit bilateral stenoses of the TS as has been reported, but volume changes of their entire dural sinus system also occur. The potential etiopathological and diagnostic roles of these changes are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Development of Knitted Materials Selection for Compression Underwear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The presented research deals with the development of comfortable male underwear taking into account the development of pattern block methods and the analysis of the relationships existing between the compression pressure, the knitted materials properties, and some push-up effects. The main aim of this study is to achieve the technical selection of the materials based on KES-FB evaluations.The ease value has been used as the main index to connect the structural design of underwear, on one hand, and the body sizes, on other hand. A “bodyshell” system for testing the soft tissue of male bodies by FlexiForce sensor has been implemented. The pressures under the shells at six different places on the male body with ease changing have been tested.The collected results including maximum-possible pressure and material tensile indexes measured thanks to KES-FB have been analyzed in order to find the most relevant indexes of the material properties. A mathematical equations based on relationships combining theoretical model with practical application have been established. These equations will be helpful for the consumers and designers to select “the suitable knitting materials for male underwear” and they can be used too in the perspective of parameterization in CAD, in order to improve product developments efficiency.

  8. Material Compressing Test of the High Polymer Part Used in Draft Gear of Heavy Load Locomotive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yangang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the actual load cases of heavy load locomotive, the material compressing tests of the high polymer parts used in the locomotive are researched. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing are acquired by means of comparing the many results of the material compressing tests under different test condition. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing is nonlinear in large range of strain, but the relationship is approximately linear in small range of strain. The material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are compared through the tests. The results show that the compressing property of the material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are almost same. The research offers the foundation to study the structure elasticity of the draft gear.

  9. Compression deformation of WC: atomistic description of hard ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qing; Song, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xuemei; Liang, Shuhua; Wang, Haibin; Nie, Zuoren

    2017-11-01

    The deformation characteristics of WC, as a typical hard ceramic material, were studied on the nanoscale using atomistic simulations for both the single-crystal and polycrystalline forms under uniaxial compression. In particular, the effects of crystallographic orientation, grain boundary coordination and grain size on the origin of deformation were investigated. The deformation behavior of the single-crystal and polycrystalline WC both depend strongly on the orientation towards the loading direction. The grain boundaries play a significant role in the deformation coordination and the potential high fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline WC. In contrast to conventional knowledge of ceramics, maximum strength was obtained at a critical grain size corresponding to the turning point from a Hall-Petch to an inverse Hall-Petch relationship. For this the mechanism of the combined effect of dislocation motion within grains and the coordination of stress concentration at the grain boundaries were proposed. The present work has moved forward our understanding of plastic deformability and the possibility of achieving a high strength of nanocrystalline ceramic materials.

  10. Force Field Benchmark of Organic Liquids: Density, Enthalpy of Vaporization, Heat Capacities, Surface Tension, Isothermal Compressibility, Volumetric Expansion Coefficient, and Dielectric Constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleman, Carl; van Maaren, Paul J; Hong, Minyan; Hub, Jochen S; Costa, Luciano T; van der Spoel, David

    2012-01-10

    The chemical composition of small organic molecules is often very similar to amino acid side chains or the bases in nucleic acids, and hence there is no a priori reason why a molecular mechanics force field could not describe both organic liquids and biomolecules with a single parameter set. Here, we devise a benchmark for force fields in order to test the ability of existing force fields to reproduce some key properties of organic liquids, namely, the density, enthalpy of vaporization, the surface tension, the heat capacity at constant volume and pressure, the isothermal compressibility, the volumetric expansion coefficient, and the static dielectric constant. Well over 1200 experimental measurements were used for comparison to the simulations of 146 organic liquids. Novel polynomial interpolations of the dielectric constant (32 molecules), heat capacity at constant pressure (three molecules), and the isothermal compressibility (53 molecules) as a function of the temperature have been made, based on experimental data, in order to be able to compare simulation results to them. To compute the heat capacities, we applied the two phase thermodynamics method (Lin et al. J. Chem. Phys.2003, 119, 11792), which allows one to compute thermodynamic properties on the basis of the density of states as derived from the velocity autocorrelation function. The method is implemented in a new utility within the GROMACS molecular simulation package, named g_dos, and a detailed exposé of the underlying equations is presented. The purpose of this work is to establish the state of the art of two popular force fields, OPLS/AA (all-atom optimized potential for liquid simulation) and GAFF (generalized Amber force field), to find common bottlenecks, i.e., particularly difficult molecules, and to serve as a reference point for future force field development. To make for a fair playing field, all molecules were evaluated with the same parameter settings, such as thermostats and barostats

  11. Compression for the management of venous leg ulcers: which material do we have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsch, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    Compression therapy is the most important basic treatment modality in venous leg ulcers. The review focusses on the materials which are used: 1. Compression bandages, 2. Compression stockings, 3. Self-adjustable Velcro-devices, 4. Compression pumps, 5. Hybrid devices. Compression bandages, usually applied by trained staff, provide a wide spectrum of materials with different elastic properties. To make bandaging easier, safer and more effective, most modern bandages combine different material components. Self-management of venous ulcers has become feasible by introducing double compression stockings ("ulcer kits") and self-adjustable Velcro devices. Compression pumps can be used as adjunctive measures, especially for patients with restricted mobility. The combination of sustained and intermittent compression ("hybrid device") is a promising new tool. The interface pressure corresponding to the dosage of compression therapy determines the hemodynamic efficacy of each device. In order to reduce ambulatory venous hypertension compression pressures of more than 50 mm Hg in the upright position are desirable. At the same time pressure should be lower in the resting position in order to be tolerated. This prerequisite may be fulfilled by using inelastic, short stretch material including multicomponent bandages and cohesive surfaces, all characterized by high stiffness. Such materials do not give way when calf muscles contract during walking which leads to high peaks of interface pressure ("massaging effect"). © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Compression of pulsed electron beams for material tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metel, Alexander S.

    2018-03-01

    In order to strengthen the surface of machine parts and investigate behavior of their materials exposed to highly dense energy fluxes an electron gun has been developed, which produces the pulsed beams of electrons with the energy up to 300 keV and the current up to 250 A at the pulse width of 100-200 µs. Electrons are extracted into the accelerating gap from the hollow cathode glow discharge plasma through a flat or a spherical grid. The flat grid produces 16-cm-diameter beams with the density of transported per one pulse energy not exceeding 15 J·cm-2, which is not enough even for the surface hardening. The spherical grid enables compression of the beams and regulation of the energy density from 15 J·cm-2 up to 15 kJ·cm-2, thus allowing hardening, pulsed melting of the machine part surface with the further high-speed recrystallization as well as an explosive ablation of the surface layer.

  13. The relationship between compressive strength and flexural strength of pavement geopolymer grouting material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Han, X. X.; Ge, J.; Wang, C. H.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the relationship between compressive strength and flexural strength of pavement geopolymer grouting material, 20 groups of geopolymer grouting materials were prepared, the compressive strength and flexural strength were determined by mechanical properties test. On the basis of excluding the abnormal values through boxplot, the results show that, the compressive strength test results were normal, but there were two mild outliers in 7days flexural strength test. The compressive strength and flexural strength were linearly fitted by SPSS, six regression models were obtained by linear fitting of compressive strength and flexural strength. The linear relationship between compressive strength and flexural strength can be better expressed by the cubic curve model, and the correlation coefficient was 0.842.

  14. A materials test system for static compression at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korellis, J. S.; Steinhaus, C. A.; Totten, J. J.

    1992-06-01

    This report documents modifications to our existing computer-controlled compression testing system to allow elevated temperature testing in an evacuated environment. We have adopted an 'inverse' design configuration where the evacuated test volume is located within the induction heating coil, eliminating the expense and minimizing the evacuation time of a much larger traditional vacuum chamber.

  15. Re-irradiation of metastatic spinal cord compression: A feasibility study by volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for in-field recurrence creating a dosimetric hole on the central canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Bignardi, Mario; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Lattuada, Paola; Santoro, Armando; Urso, Gaetano; Vigorito, Sabrina; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-01-01

    When local recurrences arise within an irradiated region involving metastatic spinal cord compression, the dose limit to the spinal cord reduces the chance to re-treat the patient by 3D-conformational RT technique. The possibility of using volumetric modulated arc RT by RapidArc was evaluated for dose sparing at spinal cord level and preserving target coverage. A clinically satisfactory PTV coverage and dose sparing to the spinal cord were obtained. An upcoming trial on patients will provide clinical outcomes.

  16. Particle Engineering of Excipients for Direct Compression: Understanding the Role of Material Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Sharad; Meiser, Felix; Morton, David; Larson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Tablets represent the preferred and most commonly dispensed pharmaceutical dosage form for administering active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Minimizing the cost of goods and improving manufacturing output efficiency has motivated companies to use direct compression as a preferred method of tablet manufacturing. Excipients dictate the success of direct compression, notably by optimizing powder formulation compactability and flow, thus there has been a surge in creating excipients specifically designed to meet these needs for direct compression. Greater scientific understanding of tablet manufacturing coupled with effective application of the principles of material science and particle engineering has resulted in a number of improved direct compression excipients. Despite this, significant practical disadvantages of direct compression remain relative to granulation, and this is partly due to the limitations of direct compression excipients. For instance, in formulating high-dose APIs, a much higher level of excipient is required relative to wet or dry granulation and so tablets are much bigger. Creating excipients to enable direct compression of high-dose APIs requires the knowledge of the relationship between fundamental material properties and excipient functionalities. In this paper, we review the current understanding of the relationship between fundamental material properties and excipient functionality for direct compression.

  17. Using compression calorimetry to characterize powder compaction behavior of pharmaceutical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Ira S; Friedman, Ross A; Wurster, Dale Eric

    2010-02-01

    The process by which pharmaceutical powders are compressed into cohesive compacts or tablets has been studied using a compression calorimeter. Relating the various thermodynamic results to relevant physical processes has been emphasized. Work, heat, and internal energy change values have been determined with the compression calorimeter for common pharmaceutical materials. A framework of equations has been proposed relating the physical processes of friction, reversible deformation, irreversible deformation, and inter-particle bonding to the compression calorimetry values. The results indicate that irreversible deformation dominated many of the thermodynamic values, especially the net internal energy change following the compression-decompression cycle. The relationships between the net work and the net heat from the complete cycle were very clear indicators of predominating deformation mechanisms. Likewise, the ratio of energy stored as internal energy to the initial work input distinguished the materials according to their brittle or plastic deformation tendencies. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Effect of compression on reactivity of plutonium based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.; Marotta, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis was made to determine if criticality could occur due to compression of bare spheres of Pu and PuO 2 (solid or powdered) during a high-speed impact accident of an air transportable plutonium package. It was calculated that an initial k/sub eff/ less than 0.70 would not result in a critical condition (less than 0.97); thus, a conservative max permissible design value of k/sub eff/ for a Pu air transportable package is 0.70

  19. Analysis of thermal energy storage material with change-of-phase volumetric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom proposed hybrid power system includes photovoltaic arrays with nickel hydrogen batteries for energy storage and solar dynamic collectors driving Brayton heat engines with change-of-phase Thermal Energy Storage (TES) devices. A TES device is comprised of multiple metallic, annular canisters which contain a eutectic composition LiF-CaF2 Phase Change Material (PCM) that melts at 1040 K. A moderately sophisticated LiF-CaF2 PCM computer model is being developed in three stages considering 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D canister geometries, respectively. The 1-D model results indicate that the void has a marked effect on the phase change process due to PCM displacement and dynamic void heat transfer resistance. Equally influential are the effects of different boundary conditions and liquid PCM natural convection. For the second stage, successful numerical techniques used in the 1-D phase change model are extended to a 2-D (r,z) PCM containment canister model. A prototypical PCM containment canister is analyzed and the results are discussed.

  20. Hugoniot elastic limits and compression parameters for brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gust, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    The physical properties of brittle materials are of interest because of the rapidly expanding use of these material in high-pressure and shock wave techology, e.g., geophysics and explosive compaction as well as military applications. These materials are characterized by unusually high sonic velocities, have large dynamic impedances and exhibit large dynamic yield strengths

  1. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibo Yao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Powder metallurgy (P/M technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred.

  2. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-03-04

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred.

  3. Volumetric and isentropic compressibility behaviour of aqueous solutions of (polyvinylpyrrolidone + sodium citrate) at T = (283.15 to 308.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Ziamajidi, Fatemeh

    2007-01-01

    The apparent specific volumes and isentropic compressibilities have been determined for polyvinylpyrrolidone in aqueous solutions of sodium citrate by density and sound velocity measurements at T = (283.15 to 308.15) K at atmospheric pressure. The results show a positive transfer volume of PVP from an aqueous solution to an aqueous sodium citrate solution. For low concentrations of PVP, the apparent specific volumes of PVP in water increased along with an increase in the polymer mass fraction, while in aqueous sodium citrate solutions decreased along with an increase in the polymer mass fraction. For high concentrations of PVP, the apparent specific volumes of PVP in water and in aqueous sodium citrate solutions were independent of the polymer mass fraction. The apparent specific isentropic compressibility of PVP is negative at T = (283.15 and 288.15) K, which imply that the water molecules around the PVP molecules are less compressible than the water molecules in the bulk solutions. The positive values of apparent specific isentropic compressibility at T = (298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K imply that the water molecules around the PVP molecules are more compressible than the water molecules in the bulk solutions. Finally, it was found that the apparent specific isentropic compressibility of PVP increases as the concentration of sodium citrate increases

  4. Dynamic compressive mechanical response of a soft polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical behaviour of a soft polymer material (Clear Flex 75) was studied using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus. Mechanical properties have been determined at moderate to high strain rates. Real time deformation and fracture were recorded using a high-speed camera.

  5. Assessment of compressive failure process of cortical bone materials using damage-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Theng Pin; R Koloor, S S; Djuansjah, J R P; Abdul Kadir, M R

    2017-02-01

    The main failure factors of cortical bone are aging or osteoporosis, accident and high energy trauma or physiological activities. However, the mechanism of damage evolution coupled with yield criterion is considered as one of the unclear subjects in failure analysis of cortical bone materials. Therefore, this study attempts to assess the structural response and progressive failure process of cortical bone using a brittle damaged plasticity model. For this reason, several compressive tests are performed on cortical bone specimens made of bovine femur, in order to obtain the structural response and mechanical properties of the material. Complementary finite element (FE) model of the sample and test is prepared to simulate the elastic-to-damage behavior of the cortical bone using the brittle damaged plasticity model. The FE model is validated in a comparative method using the predicted and measured structural response as load-compressive displacement through simulation and experiment. FE results indicated that the compressive damage initiated and propagated at central region where maximum equivalent plastic strain is computed, which coincided with the degradation of structural compressive stiffness followed by a vast amount of strain energy dissipation. The parameter of compressive damage rate, which is a function dependent on damage parameter and the plastic strain is examined for different rates. Results show that considering a similar rate to the initial slope of the damage parameter in the experiment would give a better sense for prediction of compressive failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Compressibility of tableting materials and properties of tablets with glyceryl behenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mužíková Jitka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the compressibility of directly compressible tableting materials with dry binders, spray-dried lactose and microcrystalline cellulose, and glyceryl dibehenate at various concentrations. Compressibility was evaluated by means of the energy profile of compression and tensile strength of tablets. Release rate of the active ingredient, salicylic acid, from the tablets was also examined. In the case of microcrystalline cellulose, a higher concentration of glyceryl dibehenate increased the strength of tablets, while this did not occur in the case of spray-dried lactose. Increasing concentration of glyceryl dibehenate prolonged the release of salicylic acid; however, no statistically significant difference was found compared to the type of the dry binder used

  7. Compression fatigue of Wind Turbine Blade composites materials and damage mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fraisse, Anthony; Brøndsted, Povl

    According to the new IEC 61400-5-rev0 recommendation, which is under preparation it will be required to qualify wind turbine blade (WTB) composite materials in fatigue at R=0.1, R=-1, and R=10. As a minimum fatigue at R=-1 is required. This is a consequence of the ever-growing blades, where gravity...... driven edgewise bending introduces significant fully reversed cycling at the leading and trailing edges. Therefore, material manufacturer and WTB manufacturer demand test results of highest reliability and reproducibility. However, these equirements for compression-compression and tensioncompression...

  8. Determination of material constants of vertically aligned carbon nanotube structures in compressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yupeng; Kang, Junmo; Choi, Jae-Boong; Nam, Jae-Do; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2015-01-01

    Different chemical vapour deposition (CVD) fabrication conditions lead to a wide range of variation in the microstructure and morphologies of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which actually determine the compressive mechanical properties of CNTs. However, the underlying relationship between the structure/morphology and mechanical properties of CNTs is not fully understood. In this study, we characterized and compared the structural and morphological properties of three kinds of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays from different CVD fabrication methods and performed monotonic compressive tests for each VACNT array. The compressive stress–strain responses and plastic deformation were first compared and analyzed with nanotube buckling behaviours. To quantify the compressive properties of the VACNT arrays, a strain density energy function was used to determine their intrinsic material constants. Then, the structural and morphological effects on the quantified material constants of the VACNTs were statistically investigated and analogized to cellular materials with an open-cell model. The statistical analysis shows that density, defect degree, and the moment of inertia of the CNTs are key factors in the improvement of the compressive mechanical properties of VACNT arrays. This approach could allow a model-driven CNT synthesis for engineering their mechanical behaviours. (paper)

  9. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  10. Analysis of Deformation and Equivalent Stress during Biomass Material Compression Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guiying; Wei, Hetao; Zhang, Zhien; Yu, Shaohui; Wang, Congzhe; Huang, Guowen

    2018-02-01

    Ansys is adopted to analyze mold deformation and stress field distribution rule during the process of compressing biomass under pressure of 20Mpa. By means of unit selection, material property setting, mesh partition, contact pair establishment, load and constraint applying, and solver setting, the stress and strain of overall mold are analyzed. Deformation and equivalent Stress of compression structure, base, mold, and compression bar were analyzed. We can have conclusions: The distribution of stress forced on compressor is not completely uniform, where the stress at base is slightly decreased; the stress and strain of compression bar is the largest, and stress concentration my occur at top of compression bar, which goes against compression bar service life; the overall deformation of main mold is smaller; although there is slight difference between upper and lower part, the overall variation is not obvious, but the stress difference between upper and lower part of main mold is extremely large so that reaches to 10 times; the stress and strain in base decrease in circular shape, but there is still stress concentration in ledge, which goes against service life; contact stress does not distribute uniformly, there is increasing or decreasing trend in adjacent parts, which is very large in some parts. in constructing both.

  11. The influence of double nested layer waviness on compression strength of carbon fiber composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.M.

    1997-01-01

    As advanced composite materials having superior physical and mechanical properties are being developed, optimization of their production processes in eagerly being sought. One of the most common defect in production of structural composites is layer waviness. Layer waviness is more pronounced in thick section flat and cylindrical laminates that are extensively used in missile casings, submersibles and space platforms. Layer waviness undulates the entire layers of a multidirectional laminate in through-the-thickness direction leading to gross deterioration of its compression strength. This research investigates the influence of multiple layer waviness in a double nest formation on the compression strength of a composite laminate. Different wave fractions of wave 0 degree centigrade layer fabricated in IM/85510-7 carbon - epoxy composite laminate on a steel mold using single step fabrication procedure. The laminate was cured on a heated press according to specific curing cycle. Static compression testing was performed using NASA short block compression fixture on an MTS servo Hydraulic machine. The purpose of these tests was to determine the effects of multiple layer wave regions on the compression strength of composite laminate. The experimental and analytical results revealed that up to about 35% fraction of wave 0 degree layer exceeded 35%. This analysis indicated that the percentage of 0 degree wavy layer may be used to estimate the reduction in compression strength of a composite laminate under restricted conditions. (author)

  12. Correlation between the electric and acoustic signals emitted during compression of brittle materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermioni D. Pasiou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An experimental protocol is described including a series of uni¬axial compression tests of three brittle materials (marble, mortar and glass. The Acoustic Emission (AE technique and the Pressure Stimulated Currents (PSC one are used since the recordings of both techniques are strongly related to the formation of cracking in brittle materials. In the present paper, the correlation of these techniques is investigated, which is finally proven to be very satisfactory.

  13. Evaluation of thermal energy storage materials for advanced compressed air energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaloudek, F.R.; Wheeler, K.R.; Marksberry, L.

    1983-03-01

    Advanced Compressed-Air Energy Storage (ACAS) plants have the near-term potential to reduce the fuel consumption of compressed-air plants from 33 to 100%, depending upon their design. Fuel is saved by storing some or all of the heat of compression as sensible heat which is subsequently used to reheat the compressed air prior to expansion in the turbine generator. The thermal storage media required for this application must be low cost and durable. The objective of this project was to screen thermal store materials based on their thermal cycle durability, particulate formation and corrosion resistant characteristics. The materials investigated were iron oxide pellets, Denstone pebbles, cast-iron balls, and Dresser basalt rock. The study specifically addressed the problems of particle formation and thermal ratcheting of the materials during thermal cycling and the chemical attack on the materials by the high temperature and moist environment in an ACAS heat storage bed. The results indicate that from the durability standpoint Denstone, cast iron containing 27% or more chromium, and crushed Dresser basalt would possibly stand up to ACAS conditions. If costs are considered in addition to durability and performance, the crushed Dresser basalt would probably be the most desirable heat storage material for adiabatic and hybrid ACAS plants, and more in-depth longer term thermal cycling and materials testing of Dresser basalt is recommended. Also recommended is the redesign and costing analysis of both the hybrid and adiabatic ACAS facilities based upon the use of Dresser basalt as the thermal store material.

  14. Volumetric composition of nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Lilholt, Hans; Mannila, Juha

    2015-01-01

    is presented, using cellulose/epoxy and aluminosilicate/polylactate nanocomposites as case materials. The buoyancy method is used for the accurate measurements of materials density. The accuracy of the method is determined to be high, allowing the measured nanocomposite densities to be reported with 5...... significant figures. The plotting of the measured nanocomposite density as a function of the nanofibre weight content is shown to be a first good approach of assessing the porosity content of the materials. The known gravimetric composition of the nanocomposites is converted into a volumetric composition...

  15. Thermodynamics of the interactions of a homologous series of some amino acids with trimethylamine N-oxide: Volumetric, compressibility, and calorimetric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Sinjan; Kishore, Nand

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Thermodynamics of interaction of amino acids with trimethy N-oxide (TMAO) studied. → Partial molar properties in aqueous osmolyte provide interaction details. → Volumes, compressibilites, enthalpies indicate predominant hydrophobic interactions. → TMAO exerts its effect both by preferential hydration and hydrophobic interactions. → Results suggest hydrophobic interactions lead to destabilization of the protein. - Abstract: The values of apparent molar volume V 2,φ and apparent molar compressibility K S,2,φ of glycine, L-alanine, DL-α-amino-n-butyric acid, L-valine, and L-leucine have been determined in the aqueous solution of 1 mol . kg -1 and 2 mol . kg -1 trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) solutions by density and sound velocity measurements. Isothermal titration calorimetry has been employed to determine the values of heats of dilution q of the aqueous solutions of these amino acids in TMAO at temperatures from T = 288.15 K to T = 308.15 K. These data have been used to calculate values of the infinite dilution standard partial molar volume (V 2,m 0 ), standard partial molar isentropic compressibility (K S,2,m 0 ) and limiting enthalpy of dilution (Δ dil H o ) of the amino acids in aqueous TMAO solutions. The standard partial molar volumes of transfer (Δ tr V 2,m 0 ), isentropic compressibility of transfer (Δ tr K S,2,m 0 ), and enthalpy of dilution of transfer (Δ tr Δ dil H o ) of amino acids from water to aqueous TMAO solutions have been calculated from the measured quantities for these thermodynamic quantities. The linear correlation of V 2,m 0 for a homologous series of amino acids has been utilized to calculate the contribution of the charged end groups (NH 3 + , COO - ), CH 2 groups, and the other alkyl chains of the amino acids to V 2,m 0 . The results for the partial molar properties of transfer from water to aqueous TMAO solutions have been interpreted in terms of ion-ion, ion-polar, hydrophilic-hydrophobic, and hydrophobic

  16. (Vapour + liquid) equilibria, volumetric and compressibility behaviour of binary and ternary aqueous solutions of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, methyl potassium malonate, and ethyl potassium malonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Mahdavi, Adibeh

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► VLE and volumetry of binary and ternary [C 6 mim][Cl], MPM and EPM aqueous solutions. ► Constant a w lines show small negative deviation from the linear isopiestic relation. ► Solute–water interactions follow the order: EPM > MPM > [C 6 mim][Cl]. ► MPM and EPM have a very weak salting-out effect on [C 6 mim][Cl] aqueous solutions. - Abstract: (Vapour + liquid) equilibrium data (water activity, vapour pressure, osmotic coefficient, and activity coefficient) of binary aqueous solutions of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C 6 mim][Cl]), methyl potassium malonate, and ethyl potassium malonate and ternary {[C 6 mim][Cl] + methyl potassium malonate} and {[C 6 mim][Cl] + ethyl potassium malonate} aqueous solutions were obtained through the isopiestic method at T = 298.15 K. These results reveal that the ionic liquid behaves as surfactant-like and aggregates in aqueous solutions at molality about 0.4 mol · kg −1 . The constant water activity lines of all the ternary systems investigated show small negative deviations from the linear isopiestic relation (Zdanovskii–Stokes–Robinson rule) derived using the semi-ideal hydration model. The density and speed of sound measurements were carried out on solutions of methyl potassium malonate and ethyl potassium malonate in water and of [C 6 mim][Cl] in aqueous solutions of 0.25 mol · kg −1 methyl potassium malonate and ethyl potassium malonate at T = (288.15 to 308.15) K at atmospheric pressure. From the experimental density and speed of sound data, the values of the apparent molar volume, apparent molar isentropic compressibility and excess molar volume were evaluated and from which the infinite dilution apparent molar volume and infinite dilution apparent molar isentropic compressibility were calculated at each temperature. Although, there are no clear differences between the values of the apparent molar volume of [C 6 mim][Cl] in pure water and in methyl potassium malonate or ethyl

  17. Thermodynamics of the ternary systems: (water + glycine, L-alanine and L-serine + di-ammonium hydrogen citrate) from volumetric, compressibility, and (vapour + liquid) equilibria measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Gholamireza, Afsaneh

    2011-01-01

    The apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibility of glycine, L-alanine and L-serine in water and in aqueous solutions of (0.500 and 1.00) mol . kg -1 di-ammonium hydrogen citrate {(NH 4 ) 2 HCit} and those of (NH 4 ) 2 HCit in water have been obtained over the (288.15 to 313.15) K temperature range at 5 K intervals at atmospheric pressure from measurements of density and ultrasonic velocity. The apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility values at infinite dilution of the investigated amino acids have been obtained and their variations with temperature and their transfer properties from water to aqueous solutions of (NH 4 ) 2 HCit have also been obtained. The results have been interpreted in terms of the hydration of the amino acids. In the second part of this work, water activity measurements by the isopiestic method have been carried out on the aqueous solutions of {glycine + (NH 4 ) 2 HCit}, {alanine + (NH 4 ) 2 HCit}, and {serine + (NH 4 ) 2 HCit} at T = 298.15 K at atmospheric pressure. From these measurements, values of vapour pressure, osmotic coefficient, activity coefficient and Gibbs free energy were obtained. The effect of the type of amino acids on the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of the systems investigated has been studied. The experimental water activities have been correlated successfully with the segment-based local composition Wilson model. Furthermore, the thermodynamic behaviour of the ternary solutions investigated has been studied by using the semi-ideal hydration model and the linear concentration relations have been tested by comparing with the isopiestic measurements for the studied systems at T = 298.15 K.

  18. Thermodynamics of the ternary systems: (water + glycine, L-alanine and L-serine + di-ammonium hydrogen citrate) from volumetric, compressibility, and (vapour + liquid) equilibria measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat, E-mail: rahsadeghi@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholamireza, Afsaneh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibility of glycine, L-alanine and L-serine in water and in aqueous solutions of (0.500 and 1.00) mol . kg{sup -1} di-ammonium hydrogen citrate {l_brace}(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace} and those of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit in water have been obtained over the (288.15 to 313.15) K temperature range at 5 K intervals at atmospheric pressure from measurements of density and ultrasonic velocity. The apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility values at infinite dilution of the investigated amino acids have been obtained and their variations with temperature and their transfer properties from water to aqueous solutions of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit have also been obtained. The results have been interpreted in terms of the hydration of the amino acids. In the second part of this work, water activity measurements by the isopiestic method have been carried out on the aqueous solutions of {l_brace}glycine + (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace}, {l_brace}alanine + (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace}, and {l_brace}serine + (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace} at T = 298.15 K at atmospheric pressure. From these measurements, values of vapour pressure, osmotic coefficient, activity coefficient and Gibbs free energy were obtained. The effect of the type of amino acids on the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of the systems investigated has been studied. The experimental water activities have been correlated successfully with the segment-based local composition Wilson model. Furthermore, the thermodynamic behaviour of the ternary solutions investigated has been studied by using the semi-ideal hydration model and the linear concentration relations have been tested by comparing with the isopiestic measurements for the studied systems at T = 298.15 K.

  19. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  20. The failure of brittle materials under overall compression: Effects of loading rate and defect distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Bhasker

    The constitutive behaviors and failure processes of brittle materials under far-field compressive loading are studied in this work. Several approaches are used: experiments to study the compressive failure behavior of ceramics, design of experimental techniques by means of finite element simulations, and the development of micro-mechanical damage models to analyze and predict mechanical response of brittle materials under far-field compression. Experiments have been conducted on various ceramics, (primarily on a transparent polycrystalline ceramic, aluminum oxynitride or AlON) under loading rates ranging from quasi-static (˜ 5X10-6) to dynamic (˜ 200 MPa/mus), using a servo-controlled hydraulic test machine and a modified compression Kolsky bar (MKB) technique respectively. High-speed photography has also been used with exposure times as low as 20 ns to observe the dynamic activation, growth and coalescence of cracks and resulting damage zones in the specimen. The photographs were correlated in time with measurements of the stresses in the specimen. Further, by means of 3D finite element simulations, an experimental technique has been developed to impose a controlled, homogeneous, planar confinement in the specimen. The technique can be used in conjunction with a high-speed camera to study the in situ dynamic failure behavior of materials under confinement. AlON specimens are used for the study. The statically pre-compressed specimen is subjected to axial dynamic compressive loading using the MKB. Results suggest that confinement not only increases the load carrying capacity, it also results in a non-linear stress evolution in the material. High-speed photographs also suggest an inelastic deformation mechanism in AlON under confinement which evolves more slowly than the typical brittle-cracking type of damage in the unconfined case. Next, an interacting micro-crack damage model is developed that explicitly accounts for the interaction among the micro-cracks in

  1. Equation of state and shock compression of carbon-hydrogen and other ablator materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Militzer, B.; Whitley, H.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic compression experiments in planetary interior studies and fusion sciences often implement carbon-hydrogen or other low-Z elements or compounds as ablators. Accurate quantum simulations of these materials enables theoretical investigation of the equation of state (EOS) over temperatures and pressures that are difficult to access experimentally, and can help guide the design of targets for future experiments. In this work, we use path integral Monte Carlo and density functional molecular dynamics to calculate the equation of state of a series of hydrocarbons and other low-Z materials (B, B4C, and BN). For the hydrocarbon with C:H=1:1, we predict the pressure-compression profile to agree remarkably with experiments at low pressures. At high pressures, we find the Hugoniot curve displays a single compression maximum of 4.7 that corresponds to K-shell ionization. This is slightly higher than that of glow-discharge polymers but both occur at the same pressure (0.47 Gbar). We study the linear mixing approximation for the EOS of hydrocarbons and demonstrate its validity at stellar core conditions. We examine the sensitivity of the fusion yield to the EOS of these candidate ablator materials in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of a direct-drive implosion. We also make detailed comparisons of the EOS and atomic and electronic structure of C and BN, which is useful for systematic improvement of existing EOS models. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Use of phase change materials during compressed air expansion for isothermal CAES plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, B.; Presciutti, A.; Morini, E.; Filipponi, M.; Nicolini, A.; Rossi, F.

    2017-11-01

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) plants are designed to store compressed air into a vessel or in an underground cavern and to expand it in an expansion turbine when energy demand is high. An innovative CAES configuration recently proposed is the isothermal process. Several methods to implement isothermal CAES configuration are under investigation. In this framework, the present paper deals with the experimental testing of phase change materials (PCM) during compressed air expansion phase. The experimental investigation was carried out by means of an apparatus constituted by a compression section, a steel pressure vessel, to which an expansion valve is connected. The initial internal absolute pressure was equal to 5 bar to avoid moisture condensation and the experimental tests were carried out with two paraffin-based PCM amounts (0.05 kg and 0.1 kg). Results show that the temperature change during air expansion decreases with increasing the PCM amount inside the vessel. With the use of PCM during expansions an increase of the expansion work occurs. The increase is included in the range from 9.3% to 18.2%. In every test there is an approach to the isothermal values, which represent the maximum theoretical value of the obtainable expansion work.

  3. Volumetric and compressibility behaviour of ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate in organic solvents at T = 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafarani-Moattar, Mohammed Taghi [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Excellence of Science for New Materials and Clean Chemistry, Daneshgah Street, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, East Azarbyjan 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: zafarani47@yahoo.com; Shekaari, Hemayat [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Excellence of Science for New Materials and Clean Chemistry, Daneshgah Street, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, East Azarbyjan 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    Density and speed of sound measurements have been made on the systems containing the ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF{sub 6}]) and some organic solvents having a wide range of dielectric constants. Similar studies have been carried out for tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate ([TBA][PF{sub 6}]), which has common anion ([PF{sub 6}]{sup -}) with the studied ionic liquid. For the systems investigated, the apparent molar volumes and apparent molar isentropic compressibilities were determined and fitted to the Redlich-Mayer and the Pitzer equations from which the corresponding limiting values were obtained. These limiting values were used to obtain some information about ion-solvent interactions. Furthermore, using the ionic limiting apparent volume values for [TBA]{sup +} from the literature and limiting apparent molar volume for the ionic liquid and [TBA][PF{sub 6}] obtained in this work, the ionic limiting apparent molar volume values for the cation [BMIM]{sup +} in different organic solvents were also estimated.

  4. Influence of Fines Content on Consolidation and Compressibility Characteristics of Granular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiński, Mirosław J.; Wdowska, Małgorzata K.; Jaroń, Łukasz

    2017-10-01

    Various behaviour of soil under loading results to large extent from kind of soil considered. There is a lot of literature concerning pure sand or plastic clays, while little is known about materials, which are from classification point of view, between those soils. These materials can be considered as cohesionless soils with various fines content. The paper present results of tests carried out in large consolidometer on three kinds of soil, containing 10, 36 and 97% of fines content. Consolidation, permeability and compressibility characteristics were determined. Analysis of the test results allowed to formulate conclusion concerning change in soil behaviour resulting from fines content.

  5. Compressive Strength of EN AC-44200 Based Composite Materials Strengthened with α-Al2O3 Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurzawa A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of compressive strength investigations of EN AC-44200 based aluminum alloy composite materials reinforced with aluminum oxide particles at ambient and at temperatures of 100, 200 and 250°C. They were manufactured by squeeze casting of the porous preforms made of α-Al2O3 particles with liquid aluminum alloy EN AC-44200. The composite materials were reinforced with preforms characterized by the porosities of 90, 80, 70 and 60 vol. %, thus the alumina content in the composite materials was 10, 20, 30 and 40 vol.%. The results of the compressive strength of manufactured materials were presented and basing on the microscopic observations the effect of the volume content of strengthening alumina particles on the cracking mechanisms during compression at indicated temperatures were shown and discussed. The highest compressive strength of 470 MPa at ambient temperature showed composite materials strengthened with 40 vol.% of α-Al2O3 particles.

  6. Technological characteristics of compressed earth blocks for its use as a building material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Villalba, Luz Stella; Camacho-Perez, Nancy; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Becerra-Becerra, Javier; Esmeralda Corredor-Pulido, Dery; Fort, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    We present here an innovative building technique, which uses ecological, inexpensive and environmentally friendly materials. These compressed earth blocks seem to be very good for building purposes and that is why we have characterized three types of compressed earth blocks (CEB, named by their color as yellow, grey and red) mineralogically by means of X ray diffraction XRD and scanning electron microscopy SEM (both blocks and raw materials), petrographically by polarizing optical light microscopy POLM, and SEM, and, mainly, petrophysically: their hydric, physical and physico-mechanical properties by means of determining their capillary water absorption, porosity (open or accessible to water, pore size distribution and micro/macroporosity), and densities, color and ultrasound velocity (together with anisotropy). The particularities of these analyzed materials show that some varieties are more durable than others, and that all of them can be used as building materials with some restrictions related to their appropriate placing in the structures and the exposure to water. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by the GEOMATERIALES (S2009/MAT-1629) and CONSOLIDER-TCP (CSD2007-0058) programmes. Thanks also to the UCM (Complutense University of Madrid) Research Group "Alteración y conservación de los materiales pétreos del patrimonio" / Alteration and conservation of heritage stone materials (ref. 921349).

  7. The strength of compressed structures with CFRP materials reinforcement when exceeding the cross-section size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polskoy, Petr; Mailyan, Dmitry; Georgiev, Sergey; Muradyan, Viktor

    2018-03-01

    The increase of high-rise construction volume or «High-Rise Construction» requires the use of high-strength concrete and that leads to the reduction in section size of structures and to the decrease in material consumption. First of all, it refers to the compressed elements for which, when the transverse dimensions are reduced, their flexibility and deformation increase but the load bearing capacity decreases. Growth in construction also leads to the increase of repair and restoration works or to the strengthening of structures. The most effective method of their strengthening in buildings of «High-Rise Construction» is the use of composite materials which reduces the weight of reinforcement elements and labour costs on execution of works. In this article the results of experimental research on strength and deformation of short compressed reinforced concrete structures, reinforced with external carbon fiber reinforcement, are presented. Their flexibility is λh=10, and the cross-section dimensions ratio b/h is 2, that is 1,5 times more, than recommended by standards in Russia. The following research was being done for three kinds of strained and deformed conditions with different variants of composite reinforcement. The results of the experiment proved the real efficiency of composite reinforcement of the compressed elements with sides ratio equal to 2, increasing the bearing capacity of pillars till 1,5 times. These results can be used for designing the buildings of different number of storeys.

  8. Assessing mesoscale material response under shock & isentropic compression via high-resolution line-imaging VISAR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Clint Allen; Furnish, Michael David; Podsednik, Jason W.; Reinhart, William Dodd; Trott, Wayne Merle; Mason, Joshua

    2003-10-01

    Of special promise for providing dynamic mesoscale response data is the line-imaging VISAR, an instrument for providing spatially resolved velocity histories in dynamic experiments. We have prepared two line-imaging VISAR systems capable of spatial resolution in the 10-20 micron range, at the Z and STAR facilities. We have applied this instrument to selected experiments on a compressed gas gun, chosen to provide initial data for several problems of interest, including: (1) pore-collapse in copper (two variations: 70 micron diameter hole in single-crystal copper) and (2) response of a welded joint in dissimilar materials (Ta, Nb) to ramp loading relative to that of a compression joint. The instrument is capable of resolving details such as the volume and collapse history of a collapsing isolated pore.

  9. On Identification of Critical Material Attributes for Compression Behaviour of Pharmaceutical Diluent Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyi Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As one of the commonly-used solid dosage forms, pharmaceutical tablets have been widely used to deliver active drugs into the human body, satisfying patient’s therapeutic requirements. To manufacture tablets of good quality, diluent powders are generally used in formulation development to increase the bulk of formulations and to bind other inactive ingredients with the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs. For formulations of a low API dose, the drug products generally consist of a large fraction of diluent powders. Hence, the attributes of diluents become extremely important and can significantly influence the final product property. Therefore, it is essential to accurately characterise the mechanical properties of the diluents and to thoroughly understand how their mechanical properties affect the manufacturing performance and properties of the final products, which will build a sound scientific basis for formulation design and product development. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of the mechanical properties of the widely-used pharmaceutical diluent powders, including microcrystalline cellulose (MCC powders with different grades (i.e., Avicel PH 101, Avicel PH 102, and DG, mannitol SD 100, lactose monohydrate, and dibasic calcium phosphate, were performed. The powder compressibility was assessed with Heckel and Kawakita analyses. The material elastic recovery during decompression and in storage was investigated through monitoring the change in the dimensions of the compressed tablets over time. The powder hygroscopicity was also evaluated to examine the water absorption ability of powders from the surroundings. It was shown that the MCC tablets exhibited continuous volume expansion after ejection, which is believed to be induced by (1 water absorption from the surrounding, and (2 elastic recovery. However, mannitol tablets showed volume expansion immediately after ejection, followed by the material shrinkage in storage. It is

  10. Perovskite SrCo0.9 Nb0.1 O3-δ as an Anion-Intercalated Electrode Material for Supercapacitors with Ultrahigh Volumetric Energy Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Liu, Yu; Su, Chao; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Meilin; Shao, Zongping

    2016-08-08

    We have synthesized and characterized perovskite-type SrCo0.9 Nb0.1 O3-δ (SCN) as a novel anion-intercalated electrode material for supercapacitors in an aqueous KOH electrolyte, demonstrating a very high volumetric capacitance of about 2034.6 F cm(-3) (and gravimetric capacitance of ca. 773.6 F g(-1) ) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1) while maintaining excellent cycling stability with a capacity retention of 95.7 % after 3000 cycles. When coupled with an activated carbon (AC) electrode, the SCN/AC asymmetric supercapacitor delivered a specific energy density as high as 37.6 Wh kg(-1) with robust long-term stability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Comparison of antimicrobial activities and compressive strength of alginate impression materials following disinfection procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwahab, Zahraa

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of disinfecting solution when incorporated into alginate powder instead of water against some microorganisms and on compressive strength of alginate. For measuring antimicrobial activity of alginate, 60 alginate specimens were prepared and divided into two groups: One with water incorporated in the mix (control) and the other with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate incorporated in the mix instead of water. The tested microorganisms were: gram +ve cocci, gram -ve bacilli and yeast (each group 10 samples). For measuring compressive strength, 20 specimens of alginate were divided into two groups: One with water incorporated in the mix (control) and the other with chlorhexidine incorporated in the mix. The statistical analysis of antimicrobial efficacy of alginate was performed with Mann-Whitney U-test, which revealed very high significant difference when comparing among groups (p 0.05). The incorporation of disinfecting agents into impression materials could serve an important role in dental laboratory infection control and it had no adverse effect on compressive strength of the hydrocolloid alginate. The risk of transmitting pathogenic microorganisms to dental laboratories via impression has been considered a topic of importance for a number of years.

  12. Design and Simulation of a Vapour Compression Refrigeration System Using Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Raju

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper details the design and simulation of a solar powered vapour compression refrigeration system. The effect of a phase change material, in this case ice, on a vapour compression refrigeration system powered by solar panels is discussed. The battery and solar panels were sized to allow the system to function as an autonomous unit for a minimum of 12 hours. It was concluded that the presence of a phase change material in the refrigeration system caused a considerable increase in both the on and off time of the compressor. The ratio by which the on time increased was greater than the ratio by which the off time was increased. There was a 219% increase in the on time, a 139% increase in the compressor off time and a 3.5% increase in compressor work accompanied by a 5.5% reduction in COP. Thus, under conditions where there is enough load in the system to cause the initial on and off times of the compressor to be comparable, the presence of a phase change material may result in a greater on period than an off period for the compressor.

  13. Integrated processing for the treatment of materials applied to thermal compression of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.G; Esquivel, M. R

    2009-01-01

    In this work, AB 5 intermetallics are synthesized by low energy mechanical alloying according to: AB 5 + AB 5 = AB 5 . The obtained intermetallics are annealed at 600 oC to optimize both the microstructural and hydrogen sorption properties. Then, the material is applied to the design of schemes for thermal compression of hydrogen (TCH). These results are obtained within the frame of a research project related to Energy and Environment and focused on the replacement on fossil supply systems by a hydrogen based one. [es

  14. Characterization of Compressive Properties of Polymer Foam Materials Using DIC and a Modified Arcan Fixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taher, Siavash Talebi; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    bidirectional loading conditions that are not possible with conventional Arcan fixtures. The MAF is attached to a standard universal test machine, equiped with an environmental chamber, using specially designed grips that do not constrain the specimen wrt. rotations, and hence reduces paristic effects due......, a “correction factor” for the measured surface strain is determined using nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA). The paper will focus on the characterization of the compressive material properties including the MAF setup, test specimen design, experimental procedure and validated experimental results....

  15. DEM Simulation of Biaxial Compression Experiments of Inherently Anisotropic Granular Materials and the Boundary Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Xia Tong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of discrete element method (DEM numerical simulations is significantly dependent on the particle-scale parameters and boundary conditions. To verify the DEM models, two series of biaxial compression tests on ellipse-shaped steel rods are used. The comparisons on the stress-strain relationship, strength, and deformation pattern of experiments and simulations indicate that the DEM models are able to capture the key macro- and micromechanical behavior of inherently anisotropic granular materials with high fidelity. By using the validated DEM models, the boundary effects on the macrodeformation, strain localization, and nonuniformity of stress distribution inside the specimens are investigated using two rigid boundaries and one flexible boundary. The results demonstrate that the boundary condition plays a significant role on the stress-strain relationship and strength of granular materials with inherent fabric anisotropy if the stresses are calculated by the force applied on the wall. However, the responses of the particle assembly measured inside the specimens are almost the same with little influence from the boundary conditions. The peak friction angle obtained from the compression tests with flexible boundary represents the real friction angle of particle assembly. Due to the weak lateral constraints, the degree of stress nonuniformity under flexible boundary is higher than that under rigid boundary.

  16. Factors that influence the tribocharging of pulverulent materials in compressed-air devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S; Medles, K; Mihalcioiu, A; Beleca, R; Dragan, C; Dascalescu, L [Laboratory of Aerodynamic Studies, University of Poitiers, University Institute of Technology, Angouleme, 16021 (France)], E-mail: ldascalescu@iutang.univ-poitiers.fr

    2008-12-01

    Tribocharging of pulverulent materials in compressed-air devices is a typical multi-factorial process. This paper aims at demonstrating the interest of using the design of experiments methodology in association with virtual instrumentation for quantifying the effects of various process varaibles and of their interactions, as a prerequisite for the development of new tribocharging devices for industrial applications. The study is focused on the tribocharging of PVC powders in compressed-air devices similar to those employed in electrostatic painting. A classical 2 full-factorial design (3 factors at two levels) was employed for conducting the experiments. The response function was the charge/mass ratio of the material collected in a modified Faraday cage, at the exit of the tribocharging device. The charge/mass ratio was found to increase with the injection pressure and the vortex pressure in the tribocharging device, and to decrease with the increasing of the feed rate. In the present study an in-house design of experiments software was employed for statistical analysis of experimental data and validation of the experimental model.

  17. Factors that influence the tribocharging of pulverulent materials in compressed-air devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S; Medles, K; Mihalcioiu, A; Beleca, R; Dragan, C; Dascalescu, L

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of pulverulent materials in compressed-air devices is a typical multi-factorial process. This paper aims at demonstrating the interest of using the design of experiments methodology in association with virtual instrumentation for quantifying the effects of various process varaibles and of their interactions, as a prerequisite for the development of new tribocharging devices for industrial applications. The study is focused on the tribocharging of PVC powders in compressed-air devices similar to those employed in electrostatic painting. A classical 2 full-factorial design (3 factors at two levels) was employed for conducting the experiments. The response function was the charge/mass ratio of the material collected in a modified Faraday cage, at the exit of the tribocharging device. The charge/mass ratio was found to increase with the injection pressure and the vortex pressure in the tribocharging device, and to decrease with the increasing of the feed rate. In the present study an in-house design of experiments software was employed for statistical analysis of experimental data and validation of the experimental model.

  18. Materials science. Assembly of micro/nanomaterials into complex, three-dimensional architectures by compressive buckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Yan, Zheng; Jang, Kyung-In; Huang, Wen; Fu, Haoran; Kim, Jeonghyun; Wei, Zijun; Flavin, Matthew; McCracken, Joselle; Wang, Renhan; Badea, Adina; Liu, Yuhao; Xiao, Dongqing; Zhou, Guoyan; Lee, Jungwoo; Chung, Ha Uk; Cheng, Huanyu; Ren, Wen; Banks, Anthony; Li, Xiuling; Paik, Ungyu; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Huang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yihui; Rogers, John A

    2015-01-09

    Complex three-dimensional (3D) structures in biology (e.g., cytoskeletal webs, neural circuits, and vasculature networks) form naturally to provide essential functions in even the most basic forms of life. Compelling opportunities exist for analogous 3D architectures in human-made devices, but design options are constrained by existing capabilities in materials growth and assembly. We report routes to previously inaccessible classes of 3D constructs in advanced materials, including device-grade silicon. The schemes involve geometric transformation of 2D micro/nanostructures into extended 3D layouts by compressive buckling. Demonstrations include experimental and theoretical studies of more than 40 representative geometries, from single and multiple helices, toroids, and conical spirals to structures that resemble spherical baskets, cuboid cages, starbursts, flowers, scaffolds, fences, and frameworks, each with single- and/or multiple-level configurations. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Unreacted equation of states of typical energetic materials under static compression: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Zhaoyang; Zhao Jijun

    2016-01-01

    The unreacted equation of state (EOS) of energetic materials is an important thermodynamic relationship to characterize their high pressure behaviors and has practical importance. The previous experimental and theoretical works on the equation of state of several energetic materials including nitromethane, 1,3,5-trinitrohexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazacyclooctane (HMX), hexanitrostilbene (HNS), hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW or CL-20), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105), triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB), 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene (DADNE or FOX-7), and trinitrotoluene (TNT) are reviewed in this paper. The EOS determined from hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic compressions are discussed and compared. The theoretical results based on ab initio calculations are summarized and compared with the experimental data. (topical review)

  20. Influence of Curing Humidity on the Compressive Strength of Gypsum-Cemented Similar Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiming Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analogous simulation experiment is widely used in geotechnical and mining engineering. However, systematic errors derived from unified standard curing procedure have been underestimated to some extent. In this study, 140 gypsum-cemented similar material specimens were chosen to study their curing procedure with different relative humidity, which is 10%–15%, 40%, 60%, and 80%, respectively. SEM microstructures and XRD spectra were adopted to detect the correlation between microstructures and macroscopic mechanical strength during curing. Our results indicated that the needle-like phases of similar materials began to develop in the early stage of the hydration process through intersecting with each other and eventually transformed into mat-like phases. Increase of humidity may inhibit the development of needle-like phases; thus the compressive strength changes more smoothly, and the time required for the material strength to reach the peak value will be prolonged. The peak strength decreases along with the increase of humidity while the humidity is higher than 40%; however, the reverse tendency was observed if the humidity was lower than 40%. Finally, we noticed that the material strength usually reaches the peak value when the water content continuously reduces and tends towards stability. Based on the above observation, a curing method determination model and experimental strength predication method for gypsum-cemented similar materials were proposed.

  1. Modeling of material properties of piezoelectric ceramics taking into account damage development under static compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, M; Nishikata, T; Okayasu, M

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out static compression tests in the poling direction for PZT ceramics and evaluated the material properties by measuring the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and electrostatic capacity at regular intervals. Then the variation in the material properties up to fracture was clarified. Also, the development of internal damage was also clarified quantitatively by evaluating a damage variable on the basis of the continuum damage mechanics. The damage variable was calculated from the ratio of the elastic coefficient to its initial value. In the present paper, the development of internal damage was formulated as an evolution equation of the damage variable. In the formulation, a threshold stress leading to the onset of damage was considered. Moreover, the variation in material properties was related to the damage variable and formulated as material functions of the damage variable. The development of internal damage and the variation in material properties were simulated by the equations proposed in the present paper and the validity of the equations was verified by comparing the predictions with experimental results. (paper)

  2. The variation in elastic modulus throughout the compression of foam materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yongle; Amirrasouli, B.; Razavi, S.B.; Li, Q.M.; Lowe, T.; Withers, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive experimental study of the variation in apparent unloading elastic modulus of polymer (largely elastic), aluminium (largely plastic) and fibre-reinforced cement (quasi-brittle) closed-cell foams throughout uniaxial compression. The results show a characteristic “zero-yield-stress” response and thereafter a rapid increase in unloading modulus during the supposedly “elastic” regime of the compressive stress–strain curve. The unloading modulus then falls with strain due to the localised cell-wall yielding or failure in the pre-collapse stage and the progressive cell crushing in the plateau stage, before rising sharply during the densification stage which is associated with global cell crushing and foam compaction. A finite element model based on the actual 3D cell structure of the aluminium foam imaged by X-ray computed tomography (CT) predicts an approximately linear fall of elastic modulus from zero strain until a band of collapsed cells forms. It shows that the subsequent gradual decrease in modulus is caused by the progressive collapse of cells. The elastic modulus rises sharply after the densification initiation strain has been reached. However, the elastic modulus is still well below that of the constituent material even when the “fully” dense state is approached. This work highlights the fact that the unloading elastic modulus varies throughout compression and challenges the idea that a constant elastic modulus can be applied in a homogenised foam model. It is suggested that the most representative value of elastic modulus may be obtained by extrapolating the measured unloading modulus to zero strain.

  3. [Comparative investigation of compressive resistance of glass-cermet cements used as a core material in post-core systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, E; Cetiner, S; Koçak, F

    1989-09-01

    In post-core applications, addition to the cast designs restorations that are performed on fabrication posts with restorative materials are being used. To improve the physical properties of glass-ionomer cements that are popular today, glass-cermet cements have been introduced and those materials have been proposed to be an alternative restorative material in post-core applications. In this study, the compressive resistance of Ketac-Silver as a core material was investigated comparatively with amalgam and composite resins.

  4. Exergy analysis of an adiabatic compressed air energy storage system using a cascade of phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessier, Michael J.; Floros, Michael C.; Bouzidi, Laziz; Narine, Suresh S.

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic compressed air energy storage is an emerging energy storage technology with excellent power and storage capacities. Currently, efficiencies are approximately 70%, in part due to the issue of heat loss during the compression stage. An exergy analysis is presented on a novel adiabatic compressed air energy storage system design utilizing a cascade of PCMs (phase change materials) for waste heat storage and recovery. The melting temperatures and enthalpies of the PCMs were optimized for this system and were shown to be dependent on the number of PCMs, the number of compression stages, and the maximum compression ratio. Efficiencies of storage and recovery using this approach are predicted to be as high as 85%, a 15% increase over current designs which do not incorporate PCMs. - Highlights: • A compressed air energy storage plant using phase change materials is proposed. • Increasing number of phase change materials increases roundtrip exergy efficiency. • A thermodynamic model allows melting points and latent heats required to be predicted.

  5. Demonstration test results of organic materials' volumetric reduction using bio-ethanol, thermal decomposition and burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Masahisa

    2013-01-01

    To discover technologies that can be utilized for decontamination work and verify their effects, economic feasibility, safety, and other factors, the Ministry of the Environment launched the 'FY2011 Decontamination Technology Demonstrations Project' to publicly solicit decontamination technologies that would be verified in demonstration tests and adopted 22 candidates. JAEA was commissioned by the Ministry of the Environment to provide technical assistance related to these demonstrations. This paper describes the volume reduction due to bio-ethanol, thermal decomposition and burning of organic materials in this report. The purpose of this study is that to evaluate a technique that can be used as biomass energy source, while performing volume reduction of contamination organic matter generated by decontamination. An important point of volume reduction technology of contaminated organic matter, is to evaluate the mass balance in the system. Then, confirming the mass balance of radioactive material and where to stay is important. The things that are common to all technologies, are ensuring that the radioactive cesium is not released as exhaust gas, etc.. In addition, it evaluates the cost balance and energy balance in order to understand the applicability to the decontamination of volume reduction technology. The radioactive cesium remains in the carbides when organic materials are carbonized, and radioactive cesium does not transfer to bio-ethanol when organic materials are processed for bio-ethanol production. While plant operating costs are greater if radioactive materials need to be treated, if income is expected by business such as power generation, depreciation may be calculated over approximately 15 years. (authors)

  6. Discrete fracture in quasi-brittle materials under compressive and tensile stress states

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Klerck, PA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for modelling discrete fracture in geomaterials under tensile and compressive stress fields has been developed based on a Mohr-Coulomb failure surface in compression and three independent anisotropic rotating crack models in tension...

  7. Standard test method for compressive (crushing) strength of fired whiteware materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers two test procedures (A and B) for the determination of the compressive strength of fired whiteware materials. 1.2 Procedure A is generally applicable to whiteware products of low- to moderately high-strength levels (up to 150 000 psi or 1030 MPa). 1.3 Procedure B is specifically devised for testing of high-strength ceramics (over 100 000 psi or 690 MPa). 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. Scaling impact and shock-compression response for porous materials: Application to planetary formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, R.

    2016-12-01

    A thermodynamic model based on the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state does a good job of describing the response of porous materials to impact, so can provide insights into the accretion and cohesion of planetesimals too small to be significantly held together by gravity (e.g., tens of km or less in average diameter). The model identifies an offset in Hugoniot pressure (ΔPH) due to porosity that is found to be in agreement with experimental shock-compression measurements for samples having a wide range of initial porosities. Assuming the Grüneisen parameter (γ) is proportional to volume (γ/V = constant), the relative offset in Hugoniot pressure as a function of initial porosity (φ = 1 - V0/V0por) and compression (η = 1 - V/V0) is ΔPH/PH = γ0 φ/[2(1 - φ) - γ0 (φ + η(1 - φ))] where subscripts 0 and por represent zero-pressure (non-porous) conditions and a porous sample, respectively. This additional thermal pressure at a given volume is due to the extra internal energy and corresponding temperature increase associated with collapsing pores (Fig. 1: near-identical curves for φ = 0.001 and 0.01). This result can be interpreted as indicating that upon collapse individual pores create hot spots with temperatures of order 103-104K above the background, suggesting that impact into an initially porous target can result in cohesion due to partial melting and vaporization. Moreover, the waste heat associated with pore closure far exceeds the dissipation in shock loading of non-porous material, reflecting the ability of a porous target to absorb and dissipate impact energy. The Mie-Grüneisen model along with analysis of waste heat thus provides a scaling for planetesimal impact that might explain how rock and regolith accrete into a gravitationally bound planet. Fig. 1. Porosity-induced anomaly in Hugoniot temperature per unit of porosity, shown as a function of compression for samples with initial porosity φ = 0.001 (green), 0.01 (blue) and 0.1 (gold) assuming

  9. Analisis Kekuatan Tangki CNG Ditinjau dengan Material Logam Lapis Komposit pada Kapal Pengangkut Compressed Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aulia Firmansah

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pada penelitian ini, dilakukan analisa perbandingan pada kekuatan pressure vessel compressed natural gas. Pressure vessel yang digunakan yaitu tipe satu dan tipe tiga, tipe satu adalah tabung menggunakan material logam yaitu Carbon Steel SA 516 Grade 70 dan Aluminium Alloy T6-6061. Pada tabung tipe tiga material menggunakan Aluminium Alloy T6-6061 dengan lapisan Komposit (Carbon Fibre – Epoxy pada seluruh tabung (full wrapped. Sudut orientasi serat yang digunakan 54.73560 dan terdiri dari 4 lapis komposit yang membungkus aluminium. Variasi yang dilakukan pada tebal komposit yaitu 25% komposit, 50% komposit, dan 75% komposit. Pressure vessel mendapat perlakuan internal pressure sebesar 125 bar dan temperatur -300C. Analisa dilakukan dengan dua metode yaitu dengan perhitungan manual dan software finite element method (NASTRAN 2010. Dari hasil perhitungan tersebut tabung tipe satu dengan material logam terbukti aman karena memenuhi dari faktor keamanan yang ditentukan tetapi pressure vessel sangat berat. Pada tabung tipe tiga lamina dengan komposisi 75% komposit dan 50% komposit dinyatakan aman karena memenuhi dari kriteria tegangan maksimum. Sedangkan pada komposisi 25% komposit lamina mengalami kegagalan yang disebabkan terlalu rendahnya lapisan komposit. Dari keseluruhan hasil perhitungan dan analisa didapatkan komposisi ideal pressure vessel yaitu 75% komposit dan 25% aluminium dari tebal keseluruhan sehingga menghasilkan tegangan yang sangat kecil dan memiliki berat yang paling ringan.

  10. Amorphous MoS3 Infiltrated with Carbon Nanotubes as an Advanced Anode Material of Sodium-Ion Batteries with Large Gravimetric, Areal, and Volumetric Capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Hualin [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Wang, Lu [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Deng, Shuo [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Zeng, Xiaoqiao [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL 60439 USA; Nie, Kaiqi [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Duchesne, Paul N. [Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax NS B3H 4R2 Canada; Wang, Bo [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Liu, Simon [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 Canada; Zhou, Junhua [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Zhao, Feipeng [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Han, Na [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Zhang, Peng [Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax NS B3H 4R2 Canada; Zhong, Jun [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Sun, Xuhui [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Li, Youyong [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Li, Yanguang [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 China; Lu, Jun [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL 60439 USA

    2016-11-17

    The search for earth-abundant and high-performance electrode materials for sodium-ion batteries represents an important challenge to current battery research. 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, particularly MoS2, have attracted increasing attention recently, but few of them so far have been able to meet expectations. In this study, it is demonstrated that another phase of molybdenum sulfide—amorphous chain-like MoS3—can be a better choice as the anode material of sodium-ion batteries. Highly compact MoS3 particles infiltrated with carbon nanotubes are prepared via the facile acid precipitation method in ethylene glycol. Compared to crystalline MoS2, the resultant amorphous MoS3 not only exhibits impressive gravimetric performance—featuring excellent specific capacity (≈615 mA h g-1), rate capability (235 mA h g-1 at 20 A g-1), and cycling stability but also shows exceptional volumetric capacity of ≈1000 mA h cm-3 and an areal capacity of >6.0 mA h cm-2 at very high areal loadings of active materials (up to 12 mg cm-2). The experimental results are supported by density functional theory simulations showing that the 1D chains of MoS3 can facilitate the adsorption and diffusion of Na+ ions. At last, it is demonstrated that the MoS3 anode can be paired with an Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode to afford full cells with great capacity and cycling performance.

  11. Effects of material properties and speed of compression on microbial survival and tensile strength in diclofenac tablet formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayorinde, J O; Itiola, O A; Odeniyi, M A

    2013-03-01

    A work has been done to study the effects of material properties and compression speed on microbial survival and tensile strength in diclofenac tablet formulations. Tablets were produced from three formulations containing diclofenac and different excipients (DC, DL and DDCP). Two types of machines (Hydraulic hand press and single punch press), which compress the tablets at different speeds, were used. The compression properties of the tablets were analyzed using Heckel and Kawakita equations. A 3-dimensional plot was produced to determine the relationship between the tensile strength, compression speed and percentage survival of Bacillus subtilis in the diclofenac tablets. The mode of consolidation of diclofenac was found to depends on the excipient used in the formulation. DC deformed mainly by plastic flow with the lowest Py and Pk values. DL deformed plastically at the initial stage, followed by fragmentation at the later stage of compression, whereas DDCP deformed mainly by fragmentation with the highest Py and Pk values. The ranking of the percentage survival of B. subtilis in the formulations was DDCP > DL > DC, whereas the ranking of the tensile strength of the tablets was DDCP > DL > DC. Tablets produced on a hydraulic hand press with a lower compression speed had a lower percentage survival of microbial contaminants than those produced on a single punch press, which compressed the tablets at a much higher speed. The mode of consolidation of the materials and the speed at which tablet compression is carried out have effects on both the tensile strength of the tablets and the extent of destruction of microbial contaminants in diclofenac tablet formulations.

  12. Development of modifications to the material point method for the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, A.R. II [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering and Process Dept.

    1997-07-01

    The material point method (MPM) is an evolution of the particle in cell method where Lagrangian particles or material points are used to discretize the volume of a material. The particles carry properties such as mass, velocity, stress, and strain and move through a Eulerian or spatial mesh. The momentum equation is solved on the Eulerian mesh. Modifications to the material point method are developed that allow the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their dynamic interactions. A single layer of material points through the thickness is used to represent a membrane. The constitutive equation for the membrane is applied in the local coordinate system of each material point. Validation problems are presented and numerical convergence is demonstrated. Fluid simulation is achieved by implementing a constitutive equation for a compressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid and by solution of the energy equation. The fluid formulation is validated by simulating a traveling shock wave in a compressible fluid. Interactions of the fluid and membrane are handled naturally with the method. The fluid and membrane communicate through the Eulerian grid on which forces are calculated due to the fluid and membrane stress states. Validation problems include simulating a projectile impacting an inflated airbag. In some impact simulations with the MPM, bodies may tend to stick together when separating. Several algorithms are proposed and tested that allow bodies to separate from each other after impact. In addition, several methods are investigated to determine the local coordinate system of a membrane material point without relying upon connectivity data.

  13. Effects of Leaching Behavior of Calcium Ions on Compression and Durability of Cement-Based Materials with Mineral Admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, An; Chao, Sao-Jeng; Lin, Wei-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of calcium ions increases the porosity of cement-based materials, consequently resulting in a negative effect on durability since it provides an entry for aggressive harmful ions, causing reinforcing steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of leaching behavior of calcium ions on the compression and durability of cement-based materials. Since the parameters influencing the leaching behavior of cement-based materials are unclear and diverse, this paper focuses on the influence of added mineral admixtures (fly ash, slag and silica fume) on the leaching behavior of calcium ions regarding compression and durability of cemented-based materials. Ammonium nitrate solution was used to accelerate the leaching process in this study. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis were employed to analyze and compare the cement-based material compositions prior to and after calcium ion leaching. The experimental results show that the mineral admixtures reduce calcium hydroxide quantity and refine pore structure through pozzolanic reaction, thus enhancing the compressive strength and durability of cement-based materials. PMID:28809247

  14. A Novel CAE Method for Compression Molding Simulation of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composite Sheet Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyang Song

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Its high-specific strength and stiffness with lower cost make discontinuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (FRT materials an ideal choice for lightweight applications in the automotive industry. Compression molding is one of the preferred manufacturing processes for such materials as it offers the opportunity to maintain a longer fiber length and higher volume production. In the past, we have demonstrated that compression molding of FRT in bulk form can be simulated by treating melt flow as a continuum using the conservation of mass and momentum equations. However, the compression molding of such materials in sheet form using a similar approach does not work well. The assumption of melt flow as a continuum does not hold for such deformation processes. To address this challenge, we have developed a novel simulation approach. First, the draping of the sheet was simulated as a structural deformation using the explicit finite element approach. Next, the draped shape was compressed using fluid mechanics equations. The proposed method was verified by building a physical part and comparing the predicted fiber orientation and warpage measurements performed on the physical parts. The developed method and tools are expected to help in expediting the development of FRT parts, which will help achieve lightweight targets in the automotive industry.

  15. Microstructure, characterizations, functionality and compressive strength of cement-based materials using zinc oxide nanoparticles as an additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nochaiya, Thanongsak [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Sekine, Yoshika [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Choopun, Supab [Applied Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Chaipanich, Arnon, E-mail: arnon.chaipanich@cmu.ac.th [Advanced Cement-Based Materials Research Unit, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-05-05

    Highlights: • Nano zinc oxide was used as an additive material. • Microstructure and phase characterization of pastes were characterized using SEM and XRD. • TGA and FTIR were also used to determine the hydration reaction. • Compressive strength of ZnO mixes was found to increase at 28 days. - Abstract: Zinc oxide nanoparticles as a nanophotocatalyst has great potential for self-cleaning applications in concrete structures, its effects on the cement hydration, setting time and compressive strength are also important when using it in practice. This paper reports the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles, as an additive material, on properties of cement-based materials. Setting time, compressive strength and porosity of mortars were investigated. Microstructure and morphology of pastes were characterized using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Moreover, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) were also used to determine the hydration reaction. The results show that Portland cement paste with additional ZnO was found to slightly increase the water requirement while the setting time presented prolongation period than the control mix. However, compressive strength of ZnO mixes was found to be higher than that of PC mix up to 15% (at 28 days) via filler effect. Microstructure, XRD and TGA results of ZnO pastes show less hydration products before 28 days but similar at 28 days. In addition, FTIR results confirmed the retardation when ZnO was partially added in Portland cement pastes.

  16. Microstructure, characterizations, functionality and compressive strength of cement-based materials using zinc oxide nanoparticles as an additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nochaiya, Thanongsak; Sekine, Yoshika; Choopun, Supab; Chaipanich, Arnon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nano zinc oxide was used as an additive material. • Microstructure and phase characterization of pastes were characterized using SEM and XRD. • TGA and FTIR were also used to determine the hydration reaction. • Compressive strength of ZnO mixes was found to increase at 28 days. - Abstract: Zinc oxide nanoparticles as a nanophotocatalyst has great potential for self-cleaning applications in concrete structures, its effects on the cement hydration, setting time and compressive strength are also important when using it in practice. This paper reports the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles, as an additive material, on properties of cement-based materials. Setting time, compressive strength and porosity of mortars were investigated. Microstructure and morphology of pastes were characterized using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Moreover, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) were also used to determine the hydration reaction. The results show that Portland cement paste with additional ZnO was found to slightly increase the water requirement while the setting time presented prolongation period than the control mix. However, compressive strength of ZnO mixes was found to be higher than that of PC mix up to 15% (at 28 days) via filler effect. Microstructure, XRD and TGA results of ZnO pastes show less hydration products before 28 days but similar at 28 days. In addition, FTIR results confirmed the retardation when ZnO was partially added in Portland cement pastes

  17. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ai-juan; Yuan, Zhi-long; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Lin-tao; Li, Jun-ming; Liu, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH 2 PO 4 . However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics. - Highlights: • High packing density and amorphous hydrated phase improved the compressive strength. • Residual KH 2 PO 4 and poor bonding phase lower the compressive strength. • MPCBC fabricated with optimized parameters had the highest compressive strength

  18. Fixation of waste materials in grouts. Part II. An empirical equation for estimating compressive strength for grouts from different wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallent, O.K.; McDaniel, E.W.; Godsey, T.T.

    1986-04-01

    Compressive strength data for grouts prepared from three different nuclear waste materials have been correlated. The wastes include ORNL low-level waste (LLW) solution, Hanford Facility Waste (HFW) solution, and Hanford cladding removal waste (CRW) slurry. Data for the three wastes can be represented with a 0.96 coefficient of correlation by the following equation: S = -9.56 + 9.27 D/I + 18.11/C + 0.010 R, where S denotess 28-d compressive strength, in mPa; D designates Waste concentration, fraction of the original; I is ionic strength; C denotes Attapulgite-150 clay content of dry blend, in wt %; and R is the mix ratio, kg/m 3 . The equation may be used to estimate 28-d compressive strengths of grouts prepared within the compositional range of this investigation

  19. Effect of compressibility on the hypervelocity penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W. J.; Chen, X. W.; Chen, P.

    2018-02-01

    We further consider the effect of rod strength by employing the compressible penetration model to study the effect of compressibility on hypervelocity penetration. Meanwhile, we define different instances of penetration efficiency in various modified models and compare these penetration efficiencies to identify the effects of different factors in the compressible model. To systematically discuss the effect of compressibility in different metallic rod-target combinations, we construct three cases, i.e., the penetrations by the more compressible rod into the less compressible target, rod into the analogously compressible target, and the less compressible rod into the more compressible target. The effects of volumetric strain, internal energy, and strength on the penetration efficiency are analyzed simultaneously. It indicates that the compressibility of the rod and target increases the pressure at the rod/target interface. The more compressible rod/target has larger volumetric strain and higher internal energy. Both the larger volumetric strain and higher strength enhance the penetration or anti-penetration ability. On the other hand, the higher internal energy weakens the penetration or anti-penetration ability. The two trends conflict, but the volumetric strain dominates in the variation of the penetration efficiency, which would not approach the hydrodynamic limit if the rod and target are not analogously compressible. However, if the compressibility of the rod and target is analogous, it has little effect on the penetration efficiency.

  20. Compressive Strength of EN AC-44200 Based Composite Materials Strengthened with α-Al2O3 Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Kurzawa A.; Kaczmar J. W.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents results of compressive strength investigations of EN AC-44200 based aluminum alloy composite materials reinforced with aluminum oxide particles at ambient and at temperatures of 100, 200 and 250°C. They were manufactured by squeeze casting of the porous preforms made of α-Al2O3 particles with liquid aluminum alloy EN AC-44200. The composite materials were reinforced with preforms characterized by the porosities of 90, 80, 70 and 60 vol. %, thus the alumina content in the co...

  1. Research into material behaviour of the polymeric samples obtained after 3D-printing and subjected to compression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Mikhail A.; Kosatchyov, Nikolay V.; Petrov, Pavel A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper represents the results of the study concerning the investigation of the influence of the filling grade (material density) on the force characteristic during the uniaxial compression test of the cylindrical polymer probes produced by additive technology based on FDM. The authors have shown that increasing of the filling grate follows to the increase of the deformation forces. However, the dependency is not a linear function and characterized by soft-elastic model of material behaviour, which is typical for polymers partly crystallized structure.

  2. Saline Cavern Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage Using Sand as Heat Storage Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Haemmerle

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adiabatic compressed air energy storage systems offer large energy storage capacities and power outputs beyond 100MWel. Salt production in Austria produces large caverns which are able to hold pressure up to 100 bar, thus providing low cost pressurized air storage reservoirs for adiabatic compressed air energy storage plants. In this paper the results of a feasibility study is presented, which was financed by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency, with the objective to determine the adiabatic compressed air energy storage potential of Austria’s salt caverns. The study contains designs of realisable plants with capacities between 10 and 50 MWel, applying a high temperature energy storage system currently developed at the Institute for Energy Systems and Thermodynamics in Vienna. It could be shown that the overall storage potential of Austria’s salt caverns exceeds a total of 4GWhel in the year 2030 and, assuming an adequate performance of the heat exchanger, that a 10MWel adiabatic compressed air energy storage plant in Upper Austria is currently feasible using state of the art thermal turbomachinery which is able to provide a compressor discharge temperature of 400 °C.

  3. Simultaneous boundary value and material parameter estimation using imperfect compression data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Rensburg, GJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Data is available for different hard metal samples tested in compression using a modified tensile test specimen. Three strain gauges were placed 120 degrees apart around the circumference of the centre of the test section. The spread of the strain...

  4. Solvent evaporation induced graphene powder with high volumetric capacitance and outstanding rate capability for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaozhe; Raj, Devaraj Vasanth; Zhou, Xufeng; Liu, Zhaoping

    2018-04-01

    Graphene-based electrode materials for supercapacitors usually suffer from poor volumetric performance due to the low density. The enhancement of volumetric capacitance by densification of graphene materials, however, is usually accompanied by deterioration of rate capability, as the huge contraction of pore size hinders rapid diffusion of electrolytes. Thus, it is important to develop suitable pore size in graphene materials, which can sustain fast ion diffusion and avoid excessive voids to acquire high density simultaneously for supercapacitor applications. Accordingly, we propose a simple solvent evaporation method to control the pore size of graphene powders by adjusting the surface tension of solvents. Ethanol is used instead of water to reduce the shrinkage degree of graphene powder during solvent evaporation process, due to its lower surface tension comparing with water. Followed by the assistance of mechanical compression, graphene powder having high compaction density of 1.30 g cm-3 and a large proportion of mesopores in the pore size range of 2-30 nm is obtained, which delivers high volumetric capacitance of 162 F cm-3 and exhibits outstanding rate performance of 76% capacity retention at a high current density of 100 A g-1 simultaneously.

  5. Supplementary Material for: Compressing an Ensemble With Statistical Models: An Algorithm for Global 3D Spatio-Temporal Temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    One of the main challenges when working with modern climate model ensembles is the increasingly larger size of the data produced, and the consequent difficulty in storing large amounts of spatio-temporally resolved information. Many compression algorithms can be used to mitigate this problem, but since they are designed to compress generic scientific datasets, they do not account for the nature of climate model output and they compress only individual simulations. In this work, we propose a different, statistics-based approach that explicitly accounts for the space-time dependence of the data for annual global three-dimensional temperature fields in an initial condition ensemble. The set of estimated parameters is small (compared to the data size) and can be regarded as a summary of the essential structure of the ensemble output; therefore, it can be used to instantaneously reproduce the temperature fields in an ensemble with a substantial saving in storage and time. The statistical model exploits the gridded geometry of the data and parallelization across processors. It is therefore computationally convenient and allows to fit a nontrivial model to a dataset of 1 billion data points with a covariance matrix comprising of 1018 entries. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.

  6. Volumetric composition in composites and historical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans; Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The obtainable volumetric composition in composites is of importance for the prediction of mechanical and physical properties, and in particular to assess the best possible (normally the highest) values for these properties. The volumetric model for the composition of (fibrous) composites gives...... guidance to the optimal combination of fibre content, matrix content and porosity content, in order to achieve the best obtainable properties. Several composite materials systems have been shown to be handleable with this model. An extensive series of experimental data for the system of cellulose fibres...... and polymer (resin) was produced in 1942 – 1944, and these data have been (re-)analysed by the volumetric composition model, and the property values for density, stiffness and strength have been evaluated. Good agreement has been obtained and some further observations have been extracted from the analysis....

  7. Solidification/stabilization of ASR fly ash using Thiomer material: Optimization of compressive strength and heavy metals leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin Woong; Choi, Angelo Earvin Sy; Park, Hung Suck

    2017-12-01

    Optimization studies of a novel and eco-friendly construction material, Thiomer, was investigated in the solidification/stabilization of automobile shredded residue (ASR) fly ash. A D-optimal mixture design was used to evaluate and optimize maximum compressive strength and heavy metals leaching by varying Thiomer (20-40wt%), ASR fly ash (30-50wt%) and sand (20-40wt%). The analysis of variance was utilized to determine the level of significance of each process parameters and interactions. The microstructure of the solidified materials was taken from a field emission-scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy that confirmed successful Thiomer solidified ASR fly ash due to reduced pores and gaps in comparison with an untreated ASR fly ash. The X-ray diffraction detected the enclosed materials on the ASR fly ash primarily contained sulfur associated crystalline complexes. Results indicated the optimal conditions of 30wt% Thiomer, 30wt% ASR fly ash and 40wt% sand reached a compressive strength of 54.9MPa. For the optimum results in heavy metals leaching, 0.0078mg/LPb, 0.0260mg/L Cr, 0.0007mg/LCd, 0.0020mg/L Cu, 0.1027mg/L Fe, 0.0046mg/L Ni and 0.0920mg/L Zn were leached out, being environmentally safe due to being substantially lower than the Korean standard leaching requirements. The results also showed that Thiomer has superiority over the commonly used Portland cement asa binding material which confirmed its potential usage as an innovative approach to simultaneously synthesize durable concrete and satisfactorily pass strict environmental regulations by heavy metals leaching. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Equilibrium stability of a cylindrical body subject to the internal structure of the material and inelastic behaviour of the completely compressed matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsev, D. V.; Perunov, N. S.; Sviridova, E. N.

    2018-03-01

    The mathematical model describing the stress-strain state of a cylindrical body under the uniform radial compression effect is constructed. The model of the material is the porous medium model. The compressed skeleton of the porous medium possesses hardening elastic-plastic properties. Deforming of the porous medium under the specified compressive loads is divided into two stages: elastic deforming of the porous medium and further elastic-plastic deforming of the material with completely compressed matrix. The analytical relations that define the fields of stress and displacement at each stage of the deforming are obtained. The influence of the porosity and other physical, mechanical and geometric parameters of the construction on the size of the plastic zone is evaluated. The question of the ground state equilibrium instability is investigated within the framework of the three-dimensional linearized relationships of the stability theory of deformed bodies.

  9. Compressive strength, flexural strength and thermal conductivity of autoclaved concrete block made using bottom ash as cement replacement materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongkeo, Watcharapong; Thongsanitgarn, Pailyn; Pimraksa, Kedsarin; Chaipanich, Arnon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Autoclaved aerated concrete were produced using coal bottom ash as a cement replacement material. ► Coal bottom ash was found to enhance concrete strengths. ► Thermal conductivity of concrete was not significantly affected. ► X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis show tobermorite formation. -- Abstract: The bottom ash (BA) from Mae Moh power plant, Lampang, Thailand was used as Portland cement replacement to produce lightweight concrete (LWC) by autoclave aerated concrete method. Portland cement type 1, river sand, bottom ash, aluminium powder and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH) 2 ) were used in this study. BA was used to replace Portland cement at 0%, 10%, 20% and 30% by weight and aluminium powder was added at 0.2% by weight in order to produce the aerated concrete. Compressive strength, flexural and thermal conductivity tests were then carried out after the concrete were autoclaved for 6 h and left in air for 7 days. The results show that the compressive strength, flexural strength and thermal conductivity increased with increased BA content due to tobermorite formation. However, approximately, 20% increase in both compressive (up to 11.61 MPa) and flexural strengths (up to 3.16 MPa) was found for mixes with 30% BA content in comparison to just around 6% increase in the thermal conductivity. Thermogravimetry analysis shows C–S–H formation and X-ray diffraction confirm tobermorite formation in bottom ash lightweight concrete. The use of BA as a cement replacement, therefore, can be seen to have the benefit in enhancing strength of the aerated concrete while achieving comparatively low thermal conductivity when compared to the results of the control Portland cement concrete.

  10. Size scale dependence of compressive instabilities in layered composites in the presence of stress gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    The compressive strength of unidirectionally or layer-wise reinforced composite materials in direction parallel to their reinforcement is limited by micro-buckling instabilities. Although the inherent compressive strength of a given material micro-structure can easily be determined by assessing its...... compressive stress but also on spatial stress or strain gradients, rendering failure initiation size scale dependent. The present work demonstrates and investigates the aforementioned effect through numerical simulations of periodically layered structures withnotches and holes under bending and compressive...... loads, respectively. The presented results emphasize the importance of the reinforcing layer thickness on the load carrying capacity of the investigated structures, at a constant volumetric fraction of the reinforcement. The observed strengthening at higher values of the relative layer thickness...

  11. An anti-diffusive Lagrange-Remap scheme for multi-material compressible flows with an arbitrary number of components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokh Samuel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method dedicated to the simulation of interface flows involving an arbitrary number m of compressible components. Our task is two-fold: we first introduce a m-component flow model that generalizes the two-material five-equation model of [2,3]. Then, we present a discretization strategy by means of a Lagrange-Remap [8,10] approach following the lines of [5,7,12]. The projection step involves an anti-dissipative mechanism derived from [11,12]. This feature allows to prevent the numerical diffusion of the material interfaces. We present two-dimensional simulation results of three-material flow. Nous proposons une méthode de simulation pour des écoulements comportant un nombre arbitraire m de composants compressibles séparés par des interfaces. Nous procdons en deux tapes : tout d’abord nous introduisons un modèle d’écoulementm composants qui généralise le modèle à cinq équations de [2,3]. Ensuite nous présentons une stratégie de discrétisation de type Lagrange-Projection [8,10] inspirée de [5,7,12]. La phase de projection met en œuvre une technique de transport anti-diffusive [11,12] qui permet de limiter la diffusion numérique des interfaces matérielles. Nous présentons des résultats de calcul bidimensionnel d’écoulement à trois composants.

  12. Volumetric and superficial characterization of carbon activated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Garcia S, I.; Jimenez B, J.; Solache R, M.; Lopez M, B.; Bulbulian G, S.; Olguin G, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    The activated carbon is the resultant material of the calcination process of natural carbonated materials as coconut shells or olive little bones. It is an excellent adsorbent of diluted substances, so much in colloidal form, as in particles form. Those substances are attracted and retained by the carbon surface. In this work is make the volumetric and superficial characterization of activated carbon treated thermically (300 Centigrade) in function of the grain size average. (Author)

  13. Shock compression behavior of bi-material powder composites with disparate melting temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Swift, Damian; Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kuntz, Joshua; Kumar, Mukul

    2014-01-01

    Laser driven experiments were used to investigate the shock compression behavior of powder processed Bismuth/Tungsten (Bi/W) composite samples. The constituents provide different functionality to the composite behavior as Bi could be shock melted at the pressures attained in this work, while the W could not. Samples were prepared by uniaxial pressing, and the relative density was measured as a function of particle size, applied pressure, and composition for both hot and cold pressing conditions. This resulted in sample densities between 73% and 99% of the theoretical maximum density, and also noticeable differences in microstructure in the hot and cold pressed samples. The compression waves were generated with a 1.3 × 1.3 mm square spot directly onto the surface of the sample, using irradiances between 10 12 and 10 13  W/cm 2 , which resulted in calculated peak pressures between 50 and 150 GPa within a few micrometers. Sample recovery and post-mortem analysis revealed the formation of a crater on the laser drive surface, and the depth of this crater corresponded to the depth to which the Bi had been melted. The melt depth was found to be primarily a function of residual porosity and composition, and ranged from 167 to 528 μm. In general, a higher porosity led to a larger melt depth. Direct numerical simulations were performed, and indicated that the observed increase in melt depth for low-porosity samples could be largely attributed to increased heating associated with work done for pore collapse. However, the relative scaling was sensitive to composition, with low volume fraction Bi samples exhibiting a much stronger dependence on porosity than high Bi content samples. Select samples were repeated using an Al foil ablator, but there were no noticeable differences ensuring that the observed melting was indeed pressure-driven and was not a result of direct laser heating. The resultant microstructures and damage near the spall surface were also investigated

  14. Implementación de un plan de verificación de material volumétrico en la Sección Química de la EEAOC (Tucumán, R. Argentina Plan for volumetric material verification in Sección Química of EEAOC (Tucumán, R. Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Navarro

    Full Text Available Se describe un plan de verificación de material volumétrico, y como ejemplo, un procedimiento para matraces aforados, de fácil realización, para garantizar la confiabilidad de los resultados de ensayos, asegurando además el cumplimiento con los requerimientos establecidos por el Instituto Argentino de Normalización y Certificación (IRAM en su norma IRAM 301:2005 (ISO/IEC 17025:2005, aplicada a la acreditación de laboratorios de ensayos.A volumetric material verification plan which can be easily followed and an example of its practical application to the assessment of volumetric flasks are reported. The procedure would guarantee the reliability of analysis results, while ensuring that laboratories meet the requirements established by IRAM 301:2005 (ISO/IEC 17025:2005 standard.

  15. Experimental Investigation and Prediction of Compressive Strength of Ultra-High Performance Concrete Containing Supplementary Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC has superior mechanical properties and durability to normal strength concrete. However, the high amount of cement, high environmental impact, and initial cost are regarded as disadvantages, restricting its wider application. Incorporation of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs in UHPC is an effective way to reduce the amount of cement needed while contributing to the sustainability and cost. This paper investigates the mechanical properties and microstructure of UHPC containing fly ash (FA and silica fume (SF with the aim of contributing to this issue. The results indicate that, on the basis of 30% FA replacement, the incorporation of 10% and 20% SF showed equivalent or higher mechanical properties compared to the reference samples. The microstructure and pore volume of the UHPCs were also examined. Furthermore, to minimise the experimental workload of future studies, a prediction model is developed to predict the compressive strength of the UHPC using artificial neural networks (ANNs. The results indicate that the developed ANN model has high accuracy and can be used for the prediction of the compressive strength of UHPC with these SCMs.

  16. Isentropic/shock compression and recovery methodology for materials using high-amplitude laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B.R., E-mail: maddox3@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Park, H.-S., E-mail: park1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lu, C.-H., E-mail: chiahuilu@gmail.com [University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Remington, B.A., E-mail: remington2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Prisbrey, S., E-mail: prisbrey1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Kad, B., E-mail: bkad@ucsd.edu [University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Luo, R., E-mail: luorwga@gmail.com [General Atomics, 3483 Dunhill Street, San Diego, CA 92121-1200 (United States); Meyers, M.A., E-mail: mameyers@eng.ucsd.edu [University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Abstarct: A new method of subjecting samples to high-amplitude laser pulses with durations in the ns range and recovering them for characterization is presented. It is applied to tantalum monocrystals and nanocrystals that are subjected to controlled and prescribed ramp loading configurations, creating a quasi-isentropic loading in the front that is retained up to 40 μm into the specimen. This is enabled by the use of a reservoir into which six laser beams impinge simultaneously, thereby creating plasma in a reservoir, from which the pulse is launched into the metal. This technique enables, with proper wave trapping devices, the recovery of the specimens for subsequent characterization. Successful experiments conducted in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, U. of Rochester, generated pressure pulses with initial amplitudes ranging from 15 to 110 GPa and initial durations of ∼3 ns. The quasi-isotropic loading minimizes thermal effects at the front surface. The compression history of the recovered samples is measured using velocity interferometry from an Al-coated LiF witness target on the same shot driven by a separate, but equivalent set of laser beams. These experimental measurements are compared with computations using a radiation hydrodynamics code. Recovered samples are investigated using optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. The laser damage to the surface is characterized.

  17. An artificial compressibility CBS method for modelling heat transfer and fluid flow in heterogeneous porous materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malan, AG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available to modelling both forced convection as well as heat transfer and fluid flow through heterogeneous saturated porous materials via an edge-based finite volume discretization scheme. A volume-averaged set of local thermal disequilibrium governing equations...

  18. Integration of phase change materials in compressed hydrogen gas systems: Modelling and parametric analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik

    2016-01-01

    to the phase change material, mainly occurs after the fueling is completed, resulting in a hydrogen peak temperature higher than 85 C and a lower fueled mass than a gas-cooled system. Such a mass reduction accounts for 12% with respect to the case of a standard tank system fueled at 40 C. A parametric analysis...

  19. A compressed hydrogen gas storage system with an integrated phase change material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Jørgensen, Jens Erik

    2015-01-01

    below the critical temperature of 85 °C, while filling the hydrogen at ambient temperature. Results show that a 10-mm-thick layer of paraffin wax can absorb enough heat to reduce the adiabatic temperature by 20 K when compared to a standard Type IV tank. The heat transfer from the gas to the phase...... change material, mainly occurs after the fueling is completed, resulting in a higher hydrogen peak temperature inside the tank and a lower fuelled mass than a gas-cooled system. Such a mass reduction accounts for 12% with respect to the case of a standard tank system fuelled at -40 °C....

  20. Coaxial volumetric velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio; Jux, Constantin; Sciacchitano, Andrea

    2018-06-01

    This study describes the working principles of the coaxial volumetric velocimeter (CVV) for wind tunnel measurements. The measurement system is derived from the concept of tomographic PIV in combination with recent developments of Lagrangian particle tracking. The main characteristic of the CVV is its small tomographic aperture and the coaxial arrangement between the illumination and imaging directions. The system consists of a multi-camera arrangement subtending only few degrees solid angle and a long focal depth. Contrary to established PIV practice, laser illumination is provided along the same direction as that of the camera views, reducing the optical access requirements to a single viewing direction. The laser light is expanded to illuminate the full field of view of the cameras. Such illumination and imaging conditions along a deep measurement volume dictate the use of tracer particles with a large scattering area. In the present work, helium-filled soap bubbles are used. The fundamental principles of the CVV in terms of dynamic velocity and spatial range are discussed. Maximum particle image density is shown to limit tracer particle seeding concentration and instantaneous spatial resolution. Time-averaged flow fields can be obtained at high spatial resolution by ensemble averaging. The use of the CVV for time-averaged measurements is demonstrated in two wind tunnel experiments. After comparing the CVV measurements with the potential flow in front of a sphere, the near-surface flow around a complex wind tunnel model of a cyclist is measured. The measurements yield the volumetric time-averaged velocity and vorticity field. The measurements of the streamlines in proximity of the surface give an indication of the skin-friction lines pattern, which is of use in the interpretation of the surface flow topology.

  1. SU-G-JeP3-13: Use of Volumetric Indices to Study the Viability of Respiratory Gating in Conjunction with Abdominal Compression in the Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tumors Using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Under the Conditions of Controlled Breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, H; Gomez, J [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM TG-76 report advises lung patients experiencing tumor motion >5mm to use some form of motion management with even smaller limit for complex/special procedures like SBRT. Generally, either respiratory gating or abdominal compression is used for motion management. In this retrospective study, we are using an innovative index, Volumetric Indices (VI) = (GTVnn AND GTV{sub 50+}Xmm)/(GTVnn) to quantify how much of the tumor remains within 1, 2, and 3mm margins throughout the breathing cycle using GTV{sub 50+}Xmm margin on GTV{sub 50}[nn=0,10,20,…90]. Using appropriate limits, VI can provide tumor motion information and to check if RPM gates could have been used in conjunction with abdominal compression to better manage tumor motion. Methods: 64 SBRT patients with a total of 67 lung tumors were studied. 4DCT scans were taken, fully capturing tumor motion throughout the 10 phases of the breathing cycle. For each phase, Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) was segmented and appropriates structures were defined to determine VI values. For the 2mm margin, VI values less than 0.95 for peripheral lesions and 0.97 for central lesions indicate tumor movement greater than 4mm. VI values for 1mm and 3mm margins were also analyzed signifying tumor motion of 2mm & 6mm, respectively. Results: Of the 64 patients, 35 (55%) had motion greater than 4mm & could have benefited from respiratory gating. For 5/8 (63%) middle lobe lesions, 21/27 (78%) lower lobe lesions, and 10/32 (31%) upper lobe lesions, gating could have resulted in smaller ITV. 32/55 (58%) peripheral lesions and 4/12 (33%) central lesions could have had gating. Average ITV decreased by 1.25cc (11.43%) and average VI increased by 0.11. Conclusion: Out of 64 patients, 55% exhibited motion greater than 4mm even with abdominal compression. Even with abdominalcompression, lung tumors can move >4mm as the degree of pressure which a patient can tolerate, is patient specific.

  2. Relationship between electrical conductivity anisotropy and fabric anisotropy in granular materials during drained triaxial compressive tests: a numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qifei; Revil, André; Li, Zhaofeng; Wang, Yu-Hsing

    2017-07-01

    The anisotropy of granular media and its evolution during shearing are important aspects required in developing physics-based constitutive models in Earth sciences. The development of relationships between geoelectrical properties and the deformation of porous media has applications to the monitoring of faulting and landslides. However, such relationships are still poorly understood. In this study, we first investigate the definition of the electrical conductivity anisotropy tensor of granular materials in presence of surface conductivity of the grains. Fabric anisotropy is related to the components of the fabric tensor. We define an electrical anisotropy factor based on the Archie's exponent second-order symmetric tensor m of granular materials. We use numerical simulations to confirm a relationship between the evolution of electrical and fabric anisotropy factors during shearing. To realize the simulations, we build a virtual laboratory in which we can easily perform synthetic experiments. We first simulate drained compressive triaxial tests of loose and dense granular materials (porosity 0.45 and 0.38, respectively) using the discrete element method. Then, the electrical conductivity tensor of a set of deformed synthetic samples is computed using the finite-difference method. The numerical results show that shear strains are responsible for a measurable anisotropy in the bulk conductivity of granular media. The observed electrical anisotropy response, during shearing, is distinct for dense and loose synthetic samples. Electrical and fabric anisotropy factors exhibit however a unique linear correlation, regardless of the shear strain and the initial state (porosity) of the synthetic samples. The practical implication of this finding confirms the usefulness of the electrical conductivity method in studying the fabric tensor of granular media. This result opens the door in using time-lapse electrical resistivity to study non-intrusively the evolution of anisotropy

  3. Volumetric analysis of bone substitute material performance within the human sinus cavity of former head and neck cancer patients: A prospective, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Jonas; Eichler, Kathrin; Barbeck, Mike; Lerner, Henriette; Stübinger, Stefan; Seipel, Catherine; Vogl, Thomas J; Kovács, Adorján F; Ghanaati, Shahram; Sader, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    In numerous animal and human studies, it could be detected that in bone augmentation procedures, material's physicochemical characteristics can influence the cellular inflammatory pattern and therefore the integration in the host tissue. Histological, histomorphometrical, and clinical analyses of the integration of the biomaterial in the surrounding tissue are well established methodologies; however, they do not make a statement on volume and density changes of the augmented biomaterial. The aim of the present study was to assess the volume and density of a xenogeneic (Bio-Oss ® , BO) and a synthetic (NanoBone ® , NB) bone substitute material in split-mouth sinus augmentations in former tumor patients to complete histological and histomorphometrical assessment. Immediately and 6 months after sinus augmentation computed tomography scans were recorded, bone grafts were marked, and the volume was calculated with radiologic RIS-PACS software (General Electric Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, Great Britain) to determine the integration and degradation behavior of both biomaterials. Radiographic analysis revealed a volume reduction of the initial augmented bone substitute material (i.e. 100%) to 77.36 (±11.68) % in the BO-group, respectively, 75.82 (±22.28) % in the NB-group six months after augmentation. In both materials, the volume reduction was not significant. Bone density significantly increased in both groups. The presented radiological investigation presents a favorable method to obtain clinically relevant information concerning the integration and degradation behavior of bone substitute materials.

  4. Supplementary Material for: Compressing an Ensemble With Statistical Models: An Algorithm for Global 3D Spatio-Temporal Temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano; Genton, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    algorithms can be used to mitigate this problem, but since they are designed to compress generic scientific datasets, they do not account for the nature of climate model output and they compress only individual simulations. In this work, we propose a

  5. An exponential material model for prediction of the flow curves of several AZ series magnesium alloys in tension and compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fereshteh-Saniee, F.; Barati, F.; Badnava, H.; Fallah Nejad, Kh.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The exponential model can represent flow behaviors of AZ series Mg alloys very well. ► Strain rate sensitivities of AZ series Mg alloys in compression are nearly the same. ► Effect of zinc element on tensile activation energy is higher than on compressive one. ► Activation energies of AZ80 and AZ81 in tension were greater than in compression. ► Tensile and compressive rate sensitivities of AZ80 are not close to each other. -- Abstract: This paper is concerned with flow behaviors of several magnesium alloys, such as AZ31, AZ80 and AZ81, in tension and compression. The experiments were performed at elevated temperatures and for various strain rates. In order to eliminate the effect of inhomogeneous deformation in tensile and compression tests, the Bridgeman’s and numerical correction factors were respectively employed. A two-section exponential mathematical model was also utilized for prediction of flow stresses of different magnesium alloys in tension and compression. Moreover, based on the compressive flow model proposed, the peak stress and the relevant true strain could be estimated. The true stress and strain of the necking point can also be predicted using the corresponding relations. It was found that the flow behaviors estimated by the exponential flow model were encouragingly in very good agreement with experimental findings.

  6. Volumetric formulation of lattice Boltzmann models with energy conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Sbragaglia, M.; Sugiyama, K.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze a volumetric formulation of lattice Boltzmann for compressible thermal fluid flows. The velocity set is chosen with the desired accuracy, based on the Gauss-Hermite quadrature procedure, and tested against controlled problems in bounded and unbounded fluids. The method allows the simulation of thermohydrodyamical problems without the need to preserve the exact space-filling nature of the velocity set, but still ensuring the exact conservation laws for density, momentum and energy. ...

  7. Investigating the effect of clamping force on the fatigue life of bolted plates using volumetric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeili, F.; Chakherlou, T. N.; Zehsaz, M.; Hasanifard, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of bolt clamping force on the fatigue life for bolted plates made from Al7075-T6 have been studied on the values of notch strength reduction factor obtained by volumetric approach. To attain stress distribution around the notch (hole) which is required for volumetric approach, nonlinear finite element simulations were carried out. To estimate the fatigue life, the available smooth S-N curve of Al7075-T6 and the notch strength reduction factor obtained from volumetric method were used. The estimated fatigue life was compared with the available experimental test results. The investigation shows that there is a good agreement between the life predicted by the volumetric approach and the experimental results for various specimens with different amount of clamping forces. Volumetric approach and experimental results showed that the fatigue life of bolted plates improves because of the compressive stresses created around the plate hole due to clamping force.

  8. Experimental Characterization and Material Modelling of an AZ31 Magnesium Sheet Alloy at Elevated Temperatures under Consideration of the Tension-Compression Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bouguecha, A.; Bonk, C.; Dykiert, M.

    2017-09-01

    Magnesium sheet alloys have a great potential as a construction material in the aerospace and automotive industry. However, the current state of research regarding temperature dependent material parameters for the description of the plastic behaviour of magnesium sheet alloys is scarce in literature and accurate statements concerning yield criteria and appropriate characterization tests to describe the plastic behaviour of a magnesium sheet alloy at elevated temperatures in deep drawing processes are to define. Hence, in this paper the plastic behaviour of the well-established magnesium sheet alloy AZ31 has been characterized by means of convenient mechanical tests (e. g. tension, compression and biaxial tests) at temperatures between 180 and 230 °C. In this manner, anisotropic and hardening behaviour as well as differences between the tension-compression asymmetry of the yield locus have been estimated. Furthermore, using the evaluated data from the above mentioned tests, two different yield criteria have been parametrized; the commonly used Hill’48 and an orthotropic yield criterion, CPB2006, which was developed especially for materials with hexagonal close packed lattice structure and is able to describe an asymmetrical yielding behaviour regarding tensile and compressive stress states. Numerical simulations have been finally carried out with both yield functions in order to assess the accuracy of the material models.

  9. A binder-free NiCo2O4 nanosheet/3D elastic N-doped hollow carbon nanotube sponge electrode with high volumetric and gravimetric capacitances for asymmetric supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hao; Yue, Shihong; Lu, Liang; Jin, Fengqiao; Han, Qiwei; Zhang, Xiaogang; Liu, Jie

    2017-11-09

    To increase the volumetric and gravimetric capacitances of supercapacitors, a new class of electrode materials with high electrochemical activity and favorable structures is extremely desired. In this work, a hollow novel nitrogen-doped 3D elastic single-walled carbon nanotube sponge (NSCS) which is ultra lightweight with the lowest density of 0.8 mg cm -3 , and has a high open surface structure for electrolyte accessibility and excellent compressible properties as the electrode scaffold has been successfully fabricated by the pyrolysis method which could produce the carbon nanotube sponge easily on a large scale without high-cost and time-consuming processes. Moreover, a NiCo 2 O 4 nanosheet supported on the NSCS has been successfully fabricated. The highest volumetric and gravimetric capacitance of this electrode is 790 F cm -3 at 1.43 g cm -3 and 1618 F g -1 at 0.54 g cm -3 with excellent cycling stability. The density of NiCo 2 O 4 /NSCS electrode was adjusted by mechanical compression and the most favorable density of the film for both high volumetric and gravimetric capacitances obtained was 1.21 g cm -3 . The thick NiCo 2 O 4 /NSCS film of 72 μm has been fabricated at this favorable density, presenting both high volumetric and gravimetric capacitances of 597 F cm -3 and 1074 F g -1 at 1 A g -1 , respectively, indicating that the structure of the NSCS is extremely feasible for obtaining a thick film electrode with excellent volumetric and gravimetric capacitances. Furthermore, an asymmetric supercapacitor of NiCo 2 O 4 /NSCS//NGN/CNTs was fabricated, exhibiting a high gravimetric energy density of 47.65 W h kg -1 at 536 W kg -1 and a volumetric energy density of 33.44 W h L -1 at 376.16 W L -1 .

  10. Recalculation of compression tests on damping materials in the frame of the research project QUEST; Nachrechnungen von Stauchversuchen an Daempfermaterialien im Forschungsvorhaben Quest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schopphoff, E.; Vallentin, R. [Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH (WTI), Juelich (Germany); Glutsch, S.; Hueggenberg, R. [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The mechanical design of packaging containers for radioactive material transport and storage using numerical techniques is a resilient and sufficient exact prediction of the mechanical loads due to drop accident scenarios. The correct simulation of energy dissipation of the involved shock absorbing components and materials is of main importance. The behavior of components and materials is dependent on deformation speed and environmental conditions, esp. temperature. Within the research project QUEST numerical methods based on compression test results from different damping materials are developed for the optimization of mechanical load simulation. Test results are described for polyurethane foam, wood and damping concrete. The finite element based simulation is aimed to develop and verify material models based on the experimental material reference curves.

  11. Ames Infusion Stories for NASA Annual Technology Report: Development of an Ablative 3D Quartz / Cyanate Ester Composite Multi-Functional Material for the Orion Spacecraft Compression Pad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon; Jan, Darrell Leslie; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    Vehicles re-entering Earth's atmosphere require protection from the heat of atmospheric friction. The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) has more demanding thermal protection system (TPS) requirements than the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) missions, especially in regions where the structural load passes through. The use of 2-dimensional laminate materials along with a metal insert, used in EFT1 flight test for the compression pad region, are deemed adequate but cannot be extended for Lunar return missions.

  12. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pAsian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  13. Investigation on compression behaviour of highly compacted GMZ01 bentonite with suction and temperature control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, W.M., E-mail: ye_tju@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Geotechnical and Underground Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); United Research Center for Urban Environment and Sustainable Development, The Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang, Y.W.; Chen, B.; Zheng, Z.J.; Chen, Y.G. [Key Laboratory of Geotechnical and Underground Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Cui, Y.J. [Key Laboratory of Geotechnical and Underground Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ecole des Ponts ParisTech, UR Navier/CERMES 77455 (France)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating induced volumetric change of GMZ01 bentonite depends on suction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suction has significant influence on compressibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature has slight influence on compressibility. - Abstract: In this paper, an oedometer with suction and temperature control was developed. Mechanical compaction tests have been performed on the highly compacted GMZ01 bentonite, which has been recognized as potential buffer/backfill material for construction of Chinese high-level radioactive waste (HLW) geological repository, under conditions of suction ranging from 0 to 110 MPa, temperature from 20 to 80 Degree-Sign C and vertical pressure from 0.1 to 80 MPa. Based on the test results, suction and temperature effects on compressibility parameters are investigated. Results reveal that: (1) at high suctions, heating induced an expansion, while contraction is induced by heating at low suctions. The thermal expansion coefficient of GMZ01 bentonite measured is 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Degree-Sign C{sup -1}; (2) with increasing suction, the elastic compressibility {kappa} and the plastic compressibility {lambda}(s) of the highly compacted GMZ01 bentonite decrease, while the pre-consolidation pressure increases markedly; (3) with increasing temperature, the elastic compressibility of compacted GMZ01 bentonite changes insignificantly, while the plastic compressibility {lambda}(s) slightly decreases and the yield surface tends to shrink.

  14. Investigation on compression behaviour of highly compacted GMZ01 bentonite with suction and temperature control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, W.M.; Zhang, Y.W.; Chen, B.; Zheng, Z.J.; Chen, Y.G.; Cui, Y.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Heating induced volumetric change of GMZ01 bentonite depends on suction. ► Suction has significant influence on compressibility. ► Temperature has slight influence on compressibility. - Abstract: In this paper, an oedometer with suction and temperature control was developed. Mechanical compaction tests have been performed on the highly compacted GMZ01 bentonite, which has been recognized as potential buffer/backfill material for construction of Chinese high-level radioactive waste (HLW) geological repository, under conditions of suction ranging from 0 to 110 MPa, temperature from 20 to 80 °C and vertical pressure from 0.1 to 80 MPa. Based on the test results, suction and temperature effects on compressibility parameters are investigated. Results reveal that: (1) at high suctions, heating induced an expansion, while contraction is induced by heating at low suctions. The thermal expansion coefficient of GMZ01 bentonite measured is 1 × 10 −4 °C −1 ; (2) with increasing suction, the elastic compressibility κ and the plastic compressibility λ(s) of the highly compacted GMZ01 bentonite decrease, while the pre-consolidation pressure increases markedly; (3) with increasing temperature, the elastic compressibility of compacted GMZ01 bentonite changes insignificantly, while the plastic compressibility λ(s) slightly decreases and the yield surface tends to shrink.

  15. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  16. Compression stockings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call your health insurance or prescription plan: Find out if they pay for compression stockings. Ask if your durable medical equipment benefit pays for compression stockings. Get a prescription from your doctor. Find a medical equipment store where they can ...

  17. Volumetric CT-images improve testing of radiological image interpretation skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravesloot, Cécile J., E-mail: C.J.Ravesloot@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Schaaf, Marieke F. van der, E-mail: M.F.vanderSchaaf@uu.nl [Department of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences at Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaik, Jan P.J. van, E-mail: J.P.J.vanSchaik@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Cate, Olle Th.J. ten, E-mail: T.J.tenCate@umcutrecht.nl [Center for Research and Development of Education at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Gijp, Anouk van der, E-mail: A.vanderGijp-2@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Mol, Christian P., E-mail: C.Mol@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Vincken, Koen L., E-mail: K.Vincken@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Rationale and objectives: Current radiology practice increasingly involves interpretation of volumetric data sets. In contrast, most radiology tests still contain only 2D images. We introduced a new testing tool that allows for stack viewing of volumetric images in our undergraduate radiology program. We hypothesized that tests with volumetric CT-images enhance test quality, in comparison with traditional completely 2D image-based tests, because they might better reflect required skills for clinical practice. Materials and methods: Two groups of medical students (n = 139; n = 143), trained with 2D and volumetric CT-images, took a digital radiology test in two versions (A and B), each containing both 2D and volumetric CT-image questions. In a questionnaire, they were asked to comment on the representativeness for clinical practice, difficulty and user-friendliness of the test questions and testing program. Students’ test scores and reliabilities, measured with Cronbach's alpha, of 2D and volumetric CT-image tests were compared. Results: Estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alphas) were higher for volumetric CT-image scores (version A: .51 and version B: .54), than for 2D CT-image scores (version A: .24 and version B: .37). Participants found volumetric CT-image tests more representative of clinical practice, and considered them to be less difficult than volumetric CT-image questions. However, in one version (A), volumetric CT-image scores (M 80.9, SD 14.8) were significantly lower than 2D CT-image scores (M 88.4, SD 10.4) (p < .001). The volumetric CT-image testing program was considered user-friendly. Conclusion: This study shows that volumetric image questions can be successfully integrated in students’ radiology testing. Results suggests that the inclusion of volumetric CT-images might improve the quality of radiology tests by positively impacting perceived representativeness for clinical practice and increasing reliability of the test.

  18. Refrigerants for Vapour Compression Refrigeration Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    c) Low compression ratio to give high volumetric efficiency and low power ... The normal boiling point5 is also a good indicator of the critical temperature since .... than a few minutes during maintenance and service activities. Freezing point of ...

  19. Volumetric Arterial Wall Shear Stress Calculation Based on Cine Phase Contrast MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, Wouter V.; van Ooij, Pim; Marquering, Henk; VanBavel, Ed; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo assess the accuracy and precision of a volumetric wall shear stress (WSS) calculation method applied to cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) data. Materials and MethodsVolumetric WSS vectors were calculated in software phantoms. WSS algorithm parameters were optimized

  20. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  1. Compressive strength and initial water absorption rate for cement brick containing high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as a substitutional material for sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Noorwirdawati; Din, Norhasmiza; Sheikh Khalid, Faisal; Shahidan, Shahiron; Radziah Abdullah, Siti; Samad, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Mohamad, Noridah

    2017-11-01

    The rapid growth of today’s construction sector requires high amount of building materials. Bricks, known to have solid properties and easy to handle, which leads to the variety of materials added or replaced in its mixture. In this study, high density polyethylene (HDPE) was selected as the substitute materials in the making of bricks. The reason behind the use of HDPE is because of its recyclable properties and the recycling process that do not emit hazardous gases to the atmosphere. Other than that, the use of HDPE will help reducing the source of pollution by avoiding the millions of accumulated plastic waste in the disposal sites. Furthermore, the material has high endurance level and is weatherproof. This study was carried out on experimenting the substitute materials in the mixture of cement bricks, a component of building materials which is normally manufactured using the mixture of cement, sand and water, following a certain ratios, and left dried to produce blocks of bricks. A series of three different percentages of HDPE were used, which were 2.5%, 3.0% and 3.5%. Tests were done on the bricks, to study its compressive strength and the initial water absorption rate. Both tests were conducted on the seventh and 28th day. Based on the results acquired, for compressive strength tests on the 28th day, the use of 2.5% of HDPE shown values of 12.6 N/mm2 while the use of 3.0% of HDPE shown values of 12.5 N/mm2. Onto the next percentage, 3.5% of HDPE shown values of 12.5 N/mm2.

  2. Highly Compressible Carbon Sponge Supercapacitor Electrode with Enhanced Performance by Growing Nickel-Cobalt Sulfide Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xu; Nie, Kaiwen; Ding, Xian; Dang, Liqin; Sun, Jie; Shi, Feng; Xu, Hua; Jiang, Ruibin; He, Xuexia; Liu, Zonghuai; Lei, Zhibin

    2018-03-28

    The development of compressible supercapacitor highly relies on the innovative design of electrode materials with both superior compression property and high capacitive performance. This work reports a highly compressible supercapacitor electrode which is prepared by growing electroactive NiCo 2 S 4 (NCS) nanosheets on the compressible carbon sponge (CS). The strong adhesion of the metallic conductive NCS nanosheets to the highly porous carbon scaffolds enable the CS-NCS composite electrode to exhibit an enhanced conductivity and ideal structural integrity during repeated compression-release cycles. Accordingly, the CS-NCS composite electrode delivers a specific capacitance of 1093 F g -1 at 0.5 A g -1 and remarkable rate performance with 91% capacitance retention in the range of 0.5-20 A g -1 . Capacitance performance under the strain of 60% shows that the incorporation of NCS nanosheets in CS scaffolds leads to over five times enhancement in gravimetric capacitance and 17 times enhancement in volumetric capacitance. These performances enable the CS-NCS composite to be one of the promising candidates for potential applications in compressible electrochemical energy storage devices.

  3. Need and trends of volumetric tests in recurring inspection of pressurized components in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergemann, W.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of the types of stress occurring in nuclear power plants and of practical results it has been shown that cracks in primary circuit components arise due to operating stresses in both the materials surfaces and the bulk of the materials. For this reason, volumetric materials testing is necessary in addition to surface testing. An outlook is given on the trends of volumetric testing. (author)

  4. The effect of increasing Diesel and lubricating oil contamination on the aggregate stability and compressibility of two soil materials (Ah and Bt material)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghausen, M.; Goetz, D.; Wiechmann, H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of mineral oil on two factors determining the soil mechanics properties is introduced: The water stability of the aggregates without loading and their compressibility under load, and the resulting density of storage. The unpolarized mineral oil immiscible with the water represents a 4th phase in the soil. The effect of the mineral oil on the sum of the acting forces (cohesion and adhesion forces, surface and boundary energy) and the wettability are shown with investigations, which describe the total effects. (orig.) [de

  5. Volumetric dynamic contrast enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) for preoperative assessment of the vascularity of spinal metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Carsten Ammitzbøl

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of measuring and grading the vascularity of spinal metastases using dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT). Materials and methods Prior to surgical treatment of symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression, 20 patients were examined using DCE-CT. The 320......–detector row CT scanner allowed a volumetric acquisition over a range of 16 cm, covering three to four vertebrae. Image analysis was performed at a dedicated workstation, encompassing quantitative and qualitative measurement of the arterial flow (AF) in mL/min/100mL of the vertebrae. The perfusion values...... were analysed using a single input, maximum slope model. The AF assessed by DCE-CT of affected and non-affected vertebrae will be compared, and furthermore, the correlation between AF and intraoperative blood loss will be examined. Results Preliminary results for 5 patients: In two patients the AF...

  6. Continuous assessment of carotid intima-media thickness applied to estimate a volumetric compliance using B-mode ultrasound sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascaner, A F; Craiem, D; Casciaro, M E; Graf, S; Danielo, R; Guevara, E

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that the carotid artery wall had significant movements not only in the radial but also in the longitudinal direction during the cardiac cycle. Accordingly, the idea that longitudinal elongations could be systematically neglected for compliance estimations became controversial. Assuming a dynamic change in vessel length, the standard measurement of cross-sectional compliance can be revised. In this work, we propose to estimate a volumetric compliance based on continuous measurements of carotid diameter and intima-media thickness (IMT) from B-mode ultrasound sequences. Assuming the principle of conservation of the mass of wall volume (compressibility equals zero), a temporal longitudinal elongation can be calculated to estimate a volumetric compliance. Moreover, elongations can also be estimated allowing small compressibility factors to model some wall leakage. The cross-sectional and the volumetric compliance were estimated in 45 healthy volunteers and 19 asymptomatic patients. The standard measurement underestimated the volumetric compliance by 25% for young volunteers (p < 0.01) and 17% for patients (p < 0.05). When compressibility factors different from zero were allowed, volunteers and patients reached values of 9% and 4%, respectively. We conclude that a simultaneous assessment of carotid diameter and IMT can be employed to estimate a volumetric compliance incorporating a longitudinal elongation. The cross-sectional compliance, that neglects the change in vessel length, underestimates the volumetric compliance. (paper)

  7. Tandem Gravimetric and Volumetric Apparatus for Methane Sorption Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burress, Jacob; Bethea, Donald

    Concerns about global climate change have driven the search for alternative fuels. Natural gas (NG, methane) is a cleaner fuel than gasoline and abundantly available due to hydraulic fracturing. One hurdle to the adoption of NG vehicles is the bulky cylindrical storage vessels needed to store the NG at high pressures (3600 psi, 250 bar). The adsorption of methane in microporous materials can store large amounts of methane at low enough pressures for the allowance of conformable, ``flat'' pressure vessels. The measurement of the amount of gas stored in sorbent materials is typically done by measuring pressure differences (volumetric, manometric) or masses (gravimetric). Volumetric instruments of the Sievert type have uncertainties that compound with each additional measurement. Therefore, the highest-pressure measurement has the largest uncertainty. Gravimetric instruments don't have that drawback, but can have issues with buoyancy corrections. An instrument will be presented with which methane adsorption measurements can be performed using both volumetric and gravimetric methods in tandem. The gravimetric method presented has no buoyancy corrections and low uncertainty. Therefore, the gravimetric measurements can be performed throughout an entire isotherm or just at the extrema to verify the results from the volumetric measurements. Results from methane sorption measurements on an activated carbon (MSC-30) and a metal-organic framework (Cu-BTC, HKUST-1, MOF-199) will be shown. New recommendations for calculations of gas uptake and uncertainty measurements will be discussed.

  8. Analysis of Environmental Impact for Concrete Using LCA by Varying the Recycling Components, the Compressive Strength and the Admixture Material Mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taehyoung Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a type of construction material in which cement, aggregate, and admixture materials are mixed. When cement is produced, large amounts of substances that impact the environment are emitted during limestone extraction and clinker manufacturing. Additionally, the extraction of natural aggregate causes soil erosion and ecosystem destruction. Furthermore, in the process of transporting raw materials such as cement and aggregate to a concrete production company, and producing concrete in a batch plant, substances with an environmental impact are emitted into the air and water system due to energy use. Considering the fact that the process of producing concrete causes various environmental impacts, an assessment of various environmental impact categories is needed. This study used a life cycle assessment (LCA to evaluate the environmental impacts of concrete in terms of its global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential, ozone depletion potential, photochemical ozone creation potential, and abiotic depletion potential (GWP, AP, EP, ODP, POCP, ADP. The tendency was that the higher the strength of concrete, the higher the GWP, POCP, and ADP indices became, whereas the AP and EP indices became slightly lower. As the admixture mixing ratio of concrete increased, the GWP, AP, ODP, ADP, and POCP decreased, but EP index showed a tendency to increase slightly. Moreover, as the recycled aggregate mixing ratio of concrete increased, the AP, EP, ODP, and ADP decreased, while GWP and POCP increased. The GWP and POCP per unit compressed strength (1 MPa of high strength concrete were found to be about 13% lower than that for its normal strength concrete counterpart. Furthermore, in the case of AP, EP, ODP, and ADP per unit compressed strength (1 MPa, high-strength concrete was found to be about 10%~25% lower than its normal strength counterpart. Among all the environmental impact categories, ordinary cement was found to have

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock compressed heterogeneous materials. II. The graphite/diamond transition case for astrophysics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, N.; Soulard, L.; Colombet, L.; Carrard, T.; Pellé, A.; Gillet, Ph.; Clérouin, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the shock compression of copper matrices containing a single graphite inclusion: these model systems can be related to some specific carbon-rich rocks which, after a meteoritic impact, are found to contain small fractions of nanodiamonds embedded in graphite in the vicinity of high impedance minerals. We show that the graphite to diamond transformation occurs readily for nanometer-sized graphite inclusions, via a shock accumulation process, provided the pressure threshold of the bulk graphite/diamond transition is overcome, independently of the shape or size of the inclusion. Although high diamond yields (˜80%) are found after a few picoseconds in all cases, the transition is non-isotropic and depends substantially on the relative orientation of the graphite stack with respect to the shock propagation, leading to distinct nucleation processes and size-distributions of the diamond grains. A substantial regraphitization process occurs upon release and only inclusions with favorable orientations likely lead to the preservation of a fraction of this diamond phase. These results agree qualitatively well with the recent experimental observations of meteoritic impact samples.

  10. Volumetric visualization of anatomy for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelizzari, Charles A.; Grzeszczuk, Robert; Chen, George T. Y.; Heimann, Ruth; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Ryan, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Delineation of volumes of interest for three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning is usually performed by contouring on two-dimensional sections. We explore the usage of segmentation-free volumetric rendering of the three-dimensional image data set for tumor and normal tissue visualization. Methods and Materials: Standard treatment planning computed tomography (CT) studies, with typically 5 to 10 mm slice thickness, and spiral CT studies with 3 mm slice thickness were used. The data were visualized using locally developed volume-rendering software. Similar to the method of Drebin et al., CT voxels are automatically assigned an opacity and other visual properties (e.g., color) based on a probabilistic classification into tissue types. Using volumetric compositing, a projection into the opacity-weighted volume is produced. Depth cueing, perspective, and gradient-based shading are incorporated to achieve realistic images. Unlike surface-rendered displays, no hand segmentation is required to produce detailed renditions of skin, muscle, or bony anatomy. By suitable manipulation of the opacity map, tissue classes can be made transparent, revealing muscle, vessels, or bone, for example. Manually supervised tissue masking allows irrelevant tissues overlying tumors or other structures of interest to be removed. Results: Very high-quality renditions are produced in from 5 s to 1 min on midrange computer workstations. In the pelvis, an anteroposterior (AP) volume rendered view from a typical planning CT scan clearly shows the skin and bony anatomy. A muscle opacity map permits clear visualization of the superficial thigh muscles, femoral veins, and arteries. Lymph nodes are seen in the femoral triangle. When overlying muscle and bone are cut away, the prostate, seminal vessels, bladder, and rectum are seen in 3D perspective. Similar results are obtained for thorax and for head and neck scans. Conclusion: Volumetric visualization of anatomy is useful in treatment

  11. Volumetric optoacoustic monitoring of endovenous laser treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehm, Thomas F.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Schaur, Peter; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is one of the most common medical conditions with reported prevalence estimates as high as 30% in the adult population. Although conservative management with compression therapy may improve the symptoms associated with CVI, healing often demands invasive procedures. Besides established surgical methods like vein stripping or bypassing, endovenous laser therapy (ELT) emerged as a promising novel treatment option during the last 15 years offering multiple advantages such as less pain and faster recovery. Much of the treatment success hereby depends on monitoring of the treatment progression using clinical imaging modalities such as Doppler ultrasound. The latter however do not provide sufficient contrast, spatial resolution and three-dimensional imaging capacity which is necessary for accurate online lesion assessment during treatment. As a consequence, incidence of recanalization, lack of vessel occlusion and collateral damage remains highly variable among patients. In this study, we examined the capacity of volumetric optoacoustic tomography (VOT) for real-time monitoring of ELT using an ex-vivo ox foot model. ELT was performed on subcutaneous veins while optoacoustic signals were acquired and reconstructed in real-time and at a spatial resolution in the order of 200μm. VOT images showed spatio-temporal maps of the lesion progression, characteristics of the vessel wall, and position of the ablation fiber's tip during the pull back. It was also possible to correlate the images with the temperature elevation measured in the area adjacent to the ablation spot. We conclude that VOT is a promising tool for providing online feedback during endovenous laser therapy.

  12. Uniaxial Compression of Cellular Materials at a 10-1 s-1 Strain Rate Simultaneously with Synchrotron X-ray Computed Tomographic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Brian M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The topic is presented as a series of slides. Motivation for the work included the following: X-ray tomography is a fantastic technique for characterizing a material’s starting structure as well as for non-destructive, in situ experiments to investigate material response; 3D X-ray tomography is needed to fully characterize the morphology of cellular materials; and synchrotron micro-CT can capture 3D images without pausing experiment. Among the conclusions reached are these: High-rate radiographic and tomographic imaging (0.25 s 3D frame rate) using synchrotron CT can capture full 3D images of hyper-elastic materials at a 10-2 strain rate; dynamic true in situ uniaxial loading can be accurately captured; the three stages of compression can be imaged: bending, buckling, and breaking; implementation of linear modeling is completed; meshes have been imported into LANL modeling codes--testing and validation is underway and direct comparison and validation between in situ data and modeled mechanical response is possible.

  13. Reference volumetric samples of gamma-spectroscopic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taskaev, E.; Taskaeva, M.; Grigorov, T.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the requirements for matrices of reference volumetric radiation sources necessary for detector calibration. The first stage of this determination consists in analysing some available organic and nonorganic materials. Different sorts of food, grass, plastics, minerals and building materials have been considered, taking into account the various procedures of their processing (grinding, screening, homogenizing) and their properties (hygroscopy, storage life, resistance to oxidation during gamma sterilization). The procedures of source processing, sample preparation, matrix irradiation and homogenization have been determined. A rotation homogenizing device has been elaborated enabling to homogenize the matrix activity irrespective of the vessel geometry. 33 standard volumetric radioactive sources have been prepared: 14 - on organic matrix and 19 - on nonorganic matrix. (author)

  14. CO2 Capacity Sorbent Analysis Using Volumetric Measurement Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Roger; Richardson, Tra-My Justine; Belancik, Grace; Jan, Darrell; Knox, Jim

    2017-01-01

    In support of air revitalization system sorbent selection for future space missions, Ames Research Center (ARC) has performed CO2 capacity tests on various solid sorbents to complement structural strength tests conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The materials of interest are: Grace Davison Grade 544 13X, Honeywell UOP APG III, LiLSX VSA-10, BASF 13X, and Grace Davison Grade 522 5A. CO2 capacity was for all sorbent materials using a Micromeritics ASAP 2020 Physisorption Volumetric Analysis machine to produce 0C, 10C, 25C, 50C, and 75C isotherms. These data are to be used for modeling data and to provide a basis for continued sorbent research. The volumetric analysis method proved to be effective in generating consistent and repeatable data for the 13X sorbents, but the method needs to be refined to tailor to different sorbents.

  15. Thermogravimetric Characterization of the Microstructui Composition of Polyamide Injection Molded Denture Base Material vs Conventional Compression Molded Heat-cured Denture Base Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dharrab, Ayman; Shinawi, Lana

    2016-02-01

    Thermoplastic resin polymers are widely used in medicine due to their biostability and hypoallergenic properties, making them a possible alternative to poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA). The current research examined the microstructure of a rapid injection molding system thermoplastic resin for construction of flexible denture compared with that of heat-cured PMMA. A total of 40 disk-shaped specimens (25 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were prepared and divided into two groups of 20 disks each (group I samples were of thermoplastic acrylic resin while group II was heat-cured PMMA resin). In group I, thermogravimetric analyzer showed that increasing the temperature up to 169°C resulted in about 1.3% of the material loss, and after that the material remains thermally stable up to 200°C. Group 11 showed 2.24% weight loss at 171°C, and further weight loss (12.025%) was observed on heating to 230°C. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer analysis in the range of 400-4000 cm(-1) detected the presence of an amine group (N-H) in group I samples and the presence of methylene group attached to inorganic Si as reinforcement filler (Si-CH3). Thermoplastic resin displayed excellent thermal stability and the absence of residual monomer within the polymerized material, suggesting its suitability for the fabrication dentures.

  16. Hologlyphics: volumetric image synthesis performance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Walter

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes a novel volumetric image synthesis system and artistic technique, which generate moving volumetric images in real-time, integrated with music. The system, called the Hologlyphic Funkalizer, is performance based, wherein the images and sound are controlled by a live performer, for the purposes of entertaining a live audience and creating a performance art form unique to volumetric and autostereoscopic images. While currently configured for a specific parallax barrier display, the Hologlyphic Funkalizer's architecture is completely adaptable to various volumetric and autostereoscopic display technologies. Sound is distributed through a multi-channel audio system; currently a quadraphonic speaker setup is implemented. The system controls volumetric image synthesis, production of music and spatial sound via acoustic analysis and human gestural control, using a dedicated control panel, motion sensors, and multiple musical keyboards. Music can be produced by external acoustic instruments, pre-recorded sounds or custom audio synthesis integrated with the volumetric image synthesis. Aspects of the sound can control the evolution of images and visa versa. Sounds can be associated and interact with images, for example voice synthesis can be combined with an animated volumetric mouth, where nuances of generated speech modulate the mouth's expressiveness. Different images can be sent to up to 4 separate displays. The system applies many novel volumetric special effects, and extends several film and video special effects into the volumetric realm. Extensive and various content has been developed and shown to live audiences by a live performer. Real world applications will be explored, with feedback on the human factors.

  17. Wellhead compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Joe [Sertco Industries, Inc., Okemah, OK (United States); Vazquez, Daniel [Hoerbiger Service Latin America Inc., Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Jacobs, Denis Richard [Hoerbiger do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, all wells experience a natural decline in oil and gas production. In gas wells, the major problems are liquid loading and low downhole differential pressures which negatively impact total gas production. As a form of artificial lift, wellhead compressors help reduce the tubing pressure resulting in gas velocities above the critical velocity needed to surface water, oil and condensate regaining lost production and increasing recoverable reserves. Best results come from reservoirs with high porosity, high permeability, high initial flow rates, low decline rates and high total cumulative production. In oil wells, excessive annulus gas pressure tends to inhibit both oil and gas production. Wellhead compression packages can provide a cost effective solution to these problems by reducing the system pressure in the tubing or annulus, allowing for an immediate increase in production rates. Wells furthest from the gathering compressor typically benefit the most from wellhead compression due to system pressure drops. Downstream compressors also benefit from higher suction pressures reducing overall compression horsepower requirements. Special care must be taken in selecting the best equipment for these applications. The successful implementation of wellhead compression from an economical standpoint hinges on the testing, installation and operation of the equipment. Key challenges and suggested equipment features designed to combat those challenges and successful case histories throughout Latin America are discussed below.(author)

  18. Volumetric velocimetry for fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discetti, Stefano; Coletti, Filippo

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, several techniques have been introduced that are capable of extracting 3D three-component velocity fields in fluid flows. Fast-paced developments in both hardware and processing algorithms have generated a diverse set of methods, with a growing range of applications in flow diagnostics. This has been further enriched by the increasingly marked trend of hybridization, in which the differences between techniques are fading. In this review, we carry out a survey of the prominent methods, including optical techniques and approaches based on medical imaging. An overview of each is given with an example of an application from the literature, while focusing on their respective strengths and challenges. A framework for the evaluation of velocimetry performance in terms of dynamic spatial range is discussed, along with technological trends and emerging strategies to exploit 3D data. While critical challenges still exist, these observations highlight how volumetric techniques are transforming experimental fluid mechanics, and that the possibilities they offer have just begun to be explored.

  19. Volumetric Visualization of Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Toshiyuki; Kurioka, Yoshihiro

    We propose a modeling and rendering technique of human skin, which can provide realistic color, gloss and translucency for various applications in computer graphics. Our method is based on volumetric representation of the structure inside of the skin. Our model consists of the stratum corneum and three layers of pigments. The stratum corneum has also layered structure in which the incident light is reflected, refracted and diffused. Each layer of pigment has carotene, melanin or hemoglobin. The density distributions of pigments which define the color of each layer can be supplied as one of the voxel values. Surface normals of upper-side voxels are fluctuated to produce bumps and lines on the skin. We apply ray tracing approach to this model to obtain the rendered image. Multiple scattering in the stratum corneum, reflective and absorptive spectrum of pigments are considered. We also consider Fresnel term to calculate the specular component for glossy surface of skin. Some examples of rendered images are shown, which can successfully visualize a human skin.

  20. Real-time volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddar, S

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this brief review is to review the current status of real-time 3D scintillation dosimetry and what has been done so far in this area. The basic concept is to use a large volume of a scintillator material (liquid or solid) to measure or image the dose distributions from external radiation therapy (RT) beams in three dimensions. In this configuration, the scintillator material fulfills the dual role of being the detector and the phantom material in which the measurements are being performed. In this case, dose perturbations caused by the introduction of a detector within a phantom will not be at issue. All the detector configurations that have been conceived to date used a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera to measure the light produced within the scintillator. In order to accurately measure the scintillation light, one must correct for various optical artefacts that arise as the light propagates from the scintillating centers through the optical chain to the CCD chip. Quenching, defined in its simplest form as a nonlinear response to high-linear energy transfer (LET) charged particles, is one of the disadvantages when such systems are used to measure the absorbed dose from high-LET particles such protons. However, correction methods that restore the linear dose response through the whole proton range have been proven to be effective for both liquid and plastic scintillators. Volumetric scintillation dosimetry has the potential to provide fast, high-resolution and accurate 3D imaging of RT dose distributions. Further research is warranted to optimize the necessary image reconstruction methods and optical corrections needed to achieve its full potential

  1. Volumetric dispenser for small particles from plural sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, R.A.; Miller, W.H.; Sease, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    Apparatus is described for rapidly and accurately dispensing measured volumes of small particles from a supply hopper. The apparatus includes an adjustable, vertically oriented measuring tube and orifice member defining the volume to be dispensed, a ball plug valve for selectively closing the bottom end of the orifice member, and a compression valve for selectively closing the top end of the measuring tube. A supply hopper is disposed above and in gravity flow communication with the measuring tube. Properly sequenced opening and closing of the two valves provides accurate volumetric discharge through the ball plug valve. A dispensing system is described wherein several appropriately sized measuring tubes, orifice members, and associated valves are arranged to operate contemporaneously to facilitate blending of different particles

  2. Green technology effect of injection pressure, timing and compression ratio in constant pressure heat addition cycle by an eco-friendly material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikayan, S; Sankaranarayanan, G; Karthikeyan, R

    2015-11-01

    Present energy strategies focus on environmental issues, especially environmental pollution prevention and control by eco-friendly green technologies. This includes, increase in the energy supplies, encouraging cleaner and more efficient energy management, addressing air pollution, greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change. Biofuels provide the panorama of new fiscal opportunities for people in rural area for meeting their need and also the demand of the local market. Biofuels concern protection of the environment and job creation. Renewable energy sources are self-reliance resources, have the potential in energy management with less emissions of air pollutants. Biofuels are expected to reduce dependability on imported crude oil with connected economic susceptibility, reduce greenhouse gases, other pollutants and invigorate the economy by increasing demand and prices for agricultural products. The use of neat paradise tree oil and induction of eco-friendly material Hydrogen through inlet manifold in a constant pressure heat addition cycle engine (diesel engine) with optimized engine operating parameters such as injection timing, injection pressure and compression ratio. The results shows the heat utilization efficiency for neat vegetable oil is 29% and neat oil with 15% Hydrogen as 33%. The exhaust gas temperature (EGT) for 15% of H2 share as 450°C at full load and the heat release of 80J/deg. crank angle for 15% Hydrogen energy share. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of the air effect on the resonance frequency and damping of three small assembled structures using different adhesive materials (SU8 epoxy resin and compressed gold)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouira, H; Foltête, E; Hirsinger, L; Ballandras, S

    2008-01-01

    There has been growing interest in recent years in the understanding of microsystems and the mechanical properties essential for their design. In this context, an experimental technique is proposed to characterize the structures of small dimensions composed of both silicon and lithium niobate and assembled using three different adhesive materials (SU8 (5 and 1 µm) and compressed gold) surrounded by various ambient air pressure levels. Dynamic tests were performed on three different structures used for the manufacturing of a harvesting energy microconverter. The assembled structure is mounted on a support and excited by a white noise signal via an electromagnetic shaker. The dynamic responses are recorded by a Doppler laser vibrometer and the modal parameters (obtained from the dynamic response) are identified in order to determine their evolution when the ambient air pressure inside the vacuum chamber is changed. A nonlinear modal identification is then performed. It is based on the logarithmic decrement method applied in the time–frequency domain using a wavelet transform of the time responses. The evolution of the equivalent modal frequencies and damping of the assembled structure versus time and vibration magnitude are identified for several pressure values ranging from a secondary vacuum to atmospheric pressure

  4. Inkjet printing-based volumetric display projecting multiple full-colour 2D patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Suzuki, Tomotaka; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a method to construct a full-colour volumetric display is presented using a commercially available inkjet printer. Photoreactive luminescence materials are minutely and automatically printed as the volume elements, and volumetric displays are constructed with high resolution using easy-to-fabricate means that exploit inkjet printing technologies. The results experimentally demonstrate the first prototype of an inkjet printing-based volumetric display composed of multiple layers of transparent films that yield a full-colour three-dimensional (3D) image. Moreover, we propose a design algorithm with 3D structures that provide multiple different 2D full-colour patterns when viewed from different directions and experimentally demonstrate prototypes. It is considered that these types of 3D volumetric structures and their fabrication methods based on widely deployed existing printing technologies can be utilised as novel information display devices and systems, including digital signage, media art, entertainment and security.

  5. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  6. Temporal Coding of Volumetric Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llull, Patrick Ryan

    'Image volumes' refer to realizations of images in other dimensions such as time, spectrum, and focus. Recent advances in scientific, medical, and consumer applications demand improvements in image volume capture. Though image volume acquisition continues to advance, it maintains the same sampling mechanisms that have been used for decades; every voxel must be scanned and is presumed independent of its neighbors. Under these conditions, improving performance comes at the cost of increased system complexity, data rates, and power consumption. This dissertation explores systems and methods capable of efficiently improving sensitivity and performance for image volume cameras, and specifically proposes several sampling strategies that utilize temporal coding to improve imaging system performance and enhance our awareness for a variety of dynamic applications. Video cameras and camcorders sample the video volume (x,y,t) at fixed intervals to gain understanding of the volume's temporal evolution. Conventionally, one must reduce the spatial resolution to increase the framerate of such cameras. Using temporal coding via physical translation of an optical element known as a coded aperture, the compressive temporal imaging (CACTI) camera emonstrates a method which which to embed the temporal dimension of the video volume into spatial (x,y) measurements, thereby greatly improving temporal resolution with minimal loss of spatial resolution. This technique, which is among a family of compressive sampling strategies developed at Duke University, temporally codes the exposure readout functions at the pixel level. Since video cameras nominally integrate the remaining image volume dimensions (e.g. spectrum and focus) at capture time, spectral (x,y,t,lambda) and focal (x,y,t,z) image volumes are traditionally captured via sequential changes to the spectral and focal state of the system, respectively. The CACTI camera's ability to embed video volumes into images leads to exploration

  7. Development velocity interferometer system for any reflector for measurement of mechanical properties of materials during high strain - rate compression and decompression process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, K.D.; Rav, Amit S.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2011-02-01

    Velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) has been developed to study the dynamic mechanical properties of materials subjected to high strain rates. This instrument is essentially a wide angle Michelson interferometer for measuring the Doppler shift of the monochromatic light from a laser (in our case λ 0 = 532 nm) after it gets reflected off the free surface of the moving target. A fiber optical arrangement directs the laser beam to the target and transports the scattered light signal into the interferometer. The interferometer beats the light signals reflected from the target at the two different instant of time separated by the delay (τ) decided by the length of the etalon in one of the leg of the interferometer. The interferometer signal is fed to the photomultiplier tube, the output of which is recorded in a digital storage oscilloscope. The oscilloscope record is then analysed to deduce the velocity history of moving free surface of target which is then used to determine various important mechanical properties during high strain rate compression and decompression. This instrument has been used to determine the Hugoniot elastic limit (σ HEL ), spall strength (σ s ) and dynamic yield strength (Y) of Al2024-T4 and SS304 alloys shocked to peak pressures of 4.4 GPa and 12 GPa, respectively in gas gun experiments. The σ HEL , σ s and Y determined from measured free surface velocity profiles of shocked Al2024-T4 target plate are 0.70 GPa, 1.46 GPa and 0.36 GPa, respectively. These values determined for SS304 target plate are 1.35 GPa, 2.6 GPa and 0.8 GPa, respectively. (author)

  8. Hydrogen storage in nanoporous carbon materials: myth and facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Hołyst, Robert; Terrones, Mauricio; Terrones, Humberto

    2007-04-21

    We used Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation to model the hydrogen storage in the primitive, gyroid, diamond, and quasi-periodic icosahedral nanoporous carbon materials and in carbon nanotubes. We found that none of the investigated nanoporous carbon materials satisfy the US Department of Energy goal of volumetric density and mass storage for automotive application (6 wt% and 45 kg H(2) m(-3)) at considered storage condition. Our calculations indicate that quasi-periodic icosahedral nanoporous carbon material can reach the 6 wt% at 3.8 MPa and 77 K, but the volumetric density does not exceed 24 kg H(2) m(-3). The bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes can store only up to 4.5 wt%, but with high volumetric density of 42 kg H(2) m(-3). All investigated nanoporous carbon materials are not effective against compression above 20 MPa at 77 K because the adsorbed density approaches the density of the bulk fluid. It follows from this work that geometry of carbon surfaces can enhance the storage capacity only to a limited extent. Only a combination of the most effective structure with appropriate additives (metals) can provide an efficient storage medium for hydrogen in the quest for a source of "clean" energy.

  9. Process conditions and volumetric composition in composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The obtainable volumetric composition in composites is linked to the gravimetric composition, and it is influenced by the conditions of the manufacturing process. A model for the volumetric composition is presented, where the volume fractions of fibers, matrix and porosity are calculated...... as a function of the fiber weight fraction, and where parameters are included for the composite microstructure, and the fiber assembly compaction behavior. Based on experimental data of composites manufactured with different process conditions, together with model predictions, different types of process related...... effects are analyzed. The applied consolidation pressure is found to have a marked effect on the volumetric composition. A power-law relationship is found to well describe the found relations between the maximum obtainable fiber volume fraction and the consolidation pressure. The degree of fiber...

  10. MANU. Isostatic compression of buffer blocks. Small scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to become familiar with the isostatic compression technique and to manufacture specimens to study various aspects of the manufacturing process. These included for example the effect of moisture, maximum compressive pressure, vibration, vacuum, specimen size, coating, multiple compressions and duration of load cycle on the density and other properties of bentonite specimens. Also the amount of volumetric contraction was of interest in this study together with the used mould technology. This work summarizes the tests done with isostatic compression technique during 2008. Tests were mainly carried out with MX-80 bentonite, which is a commercial product and currently the reference bentonite in the repository reference plan. Tests were made from June to November 2008 both in Finland and in Sweden. VTT made four test series in Finland. MABU Consulting Ab made two test series in Sweden. Also Posiva Oy carried out one preliminary series before this study in Finland. The test results show that there is a clear relationship between density and moisture content at all pressure levels. The calculated degree of saturation of more moist samples remained at the level of 95 -to 98 % of full saturation. It should be possible to manufacture buffer blocks with high accuracy (density, water content, degree of saturation), if similar preliminary tests are done. Tests did not support the assumption that vacuum (partial or full) in the specimen during compression increases the final density. Tests showed that pre-vibrated specimens had a slightly higher density but the difference was insignificant. Coarse raw bentonite produced the highest dry density of all sodium bentonites used. The highest dry density values were received with Minelco's Ca-bentonite, but the average water content was not extremely accurate. The following recommendations were derived from the results of this project: additional tests should be carried out to determine the relationship

  11. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately

  12. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  13. Exploring interaction with 3D volumetric displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Tovi; Wigdor, Daniel; Balakrishnan, Ravin

    2005-03-01

    Volumetric displays generate true volumetric 3D images by actually illuminating points in 3D space. As a result, viewing their contents is similar to viewing physical objects in the real world. These displays provide a 360 degree field of view, and do not require the user to wear hardware such as shutter glasses or head-trackers. These properties make them a promising alternative to traditional display systems for viewing imagery in 3D. Because these displays have only recently been made available commercially (e.g., www.actuality-systems.com), their current use tends to be limited to non-interactive output-only display devices. To take full advantage of the unique features of these displays, however, it would be desirable if the 3D data being displayed could be directly interacted with and manipulated. We investigate interaction techniques for volumetric display interfaces, through the development of an interactive 3D geometric model building application. While this application area itself presents many interesting challenges, our focus is on the interaction techniques that are likely generalizable to interactive applications for other domains. We explore a very direct style of interaction where the user interacts with the virtual data using direct finger manipulations on and around the enclosure surrounding the displayed 3D volumetric image.

  14. Volumetric, dashboard-mounted augmented display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David; Grabowski, Christopher

    2017-11-01

    The optical design of a compact volumetric display for drivers is presented. The system displays a true volume image with realistic physical depth cues, such as focal accommodation, parallax and convergence. A large eyebox is achieved with a pupil expander. The windshield is used as the augmented reality combiner. A freeform windshield corrector is placed at the dashboard.

  15. Modelling and simulation of the compressible turbulence in supersonic shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guezengar, Dominique

    1997-02-01

    This research thesis addresses the modelling of some specific physical problems of fluid mechanics: compressibility (issue of mixing layers), large variations of volumetric mass (boundary layers), and anisotropy (compression ramps). After a presentation of the chosen physical modelling and numerical approximation, the author pays attention to flows at the vicinity of a wall, and to boundary conditions. The next part addresses existing compressibility models and their application to the calculation of supersonic mixing layers. A critical assessment is also performed through calculations of boundary layers and of compression ramps. The next part addresses problems related to large variations of volumetric mass which are not taken by compressibility models into account. A modification is thus proposed for the diffusion term, and is tested for the case of supersonic boundary layers and of mixing layers with high density rates. Finally, anisotropy effects are addressed through the implementation of Explicit Algebraic Stress k-omega Turbulence models (EARSM), and their tests on previously studied cases [fr

  16. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our ...

  17. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that “DNABIT Compress” algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases. PMID:21383923

  18. Volumetric Medical Image Coding: An Object-based, Lossy-to-lossless and Fully Scalable Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danyali, Habibiollah; Mertins, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    In this article, an object-based, highly scalable, lossy-to-lossless 3D wavelet coding approach for volumetric medical image data (e.g., magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT)) is proposed. The new method, called 3DOBHS-SPIHT, is based on the well-known set partitioning in the hierarchical trees (SPIHT) algorithm and supports both quality and resolution scalability. The 3D input data is grouped into groups of slices (GOS) and each GOS is encoded and decoded as a separate unit. The symmetric tree definition of the original 3DSPIHT is improved by introducing a new asymmetric tree structure. While preserving the compression efficiency, the new tree structure allows for a small size of each GOS, which not only reduces memory consumption during the encoding and decoding processes, but also facilitates more efficient random access to certain segments of slices. To achieve more compression efficiency, the algorithm only encodes the main object of interest in each 3D data set, which can have any arbitrary shape, and ignores the unnecessary background. The experimental results on some MR data sets show the good performance of the 3DOBHS-SPIHT algorithm for multi-resolution lossy-to-lossless coding. The compression efficiency, full scalability, and object-based features of the proposed approach, beside its lossy-to-lossless coding support, make it a very attractive candidate for volumetric medical image information archiving and transmission applications. PMID:22606653

  19. Semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabel, M.; Biederer, J.; Jochens, A.; Bornemann, L.; Soza, G.; Heller, M.; Bolte, H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of tumour burden in oncology requires accurate and reproducible image evaluation. The current standard is one-dimensional measurement (e.g. RECIST) with inherent disadvantages. Volumetric analysis is discussed as an alternative for therapy monitoring of lung and liver metastases. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph node metastases in a phantom study. Materials and methods: Fifty artificial lymph nodes were produced in a size range from 10 to 55 mm; some of them enhanced using iodine contrast media. All nodules were placed in an artificial chest phantom (artiCHEST ® ) within different surrounding tissues. MDCT was performed using different collimations (1–5 mm) at varying reconstruction kernels (B20f, B40f, B60f). Volume and RECIST measurements were performed using Oncology Software (Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) and were compared to reference volume and diameter by calculating absolute percentage errors. Results: The software performance allowed a robust volumetric analysis in a phantom setting. Unsatisfying segmentation results were frequently found for native nodules within surrounding muscle. The absolute percentage error (APE) for volumetric analysis varied between 0.01 and 225%. No significant differences were seen between different reconstruction kernels. The most unsatisfactory segmentation results occurred in higher slice thickness (4 and 5 mm). Contrast enhanced lymph nodes showed better segmentation results by trend. Conclusion: The semi-automated 3D-volumetric analysis software tool allows a reliable and convenient segmentation of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom setting. Lymph nodes adjacent to tissue of similar density cause segmentation problems. For volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases in clinical routine a slice thickness of ≤3 mm and a medium soft reconstruction kernel (e.g. B40f for Siemens scan systems) may be a suitable

  20. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Karanvir; Kumar, Navin

    2015-01-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials.

  1. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Karanvir; Kumar, Navin

    2015-04-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  2. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Karanvir, E-mail: karans@iitrpr.ac.in; Kumar, Navin

    2015-04-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials.

  3. Volumetric response classification in metastatic solid tumors on MSCT: Initial results in a whole-body setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, A.M.; Fabel, M.; Freitag-Wolf, S.; Tepper, M.; Knabe, H.M.; Schäfer, J.P.; Jansen, O.; Bolte, H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine technical parameters of measurement accuracy and differences in tumor response classification using RECIST 1.1 and volumetric assessment in three common metastasis types (lung nodules, liver lesions, lymph node metastasis) simultaneously. Materials and methods: 56 consecutive patients (32 female) aged 41–82 years with a wide range of metastatic solid tumors were examined with MSCT for baseline and follow up. Images were evaluated by three experienced radiologists using manual measurements and semi-automatic lesion segmentation. Institutional ethics review was obtained and all patients gave written informed consent. Data analysis comprised interobserver variability operationalized as coefficient of variation and categorical response classification according to RECIST 1.1 for both manual and volumetric measures. Continuous data were assessed for statistical significance with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and categorical data with Fleiss kappa. Results: Interobserver variability was 6.3% (IQR 4.6%) for manual and 4.1% (IQR 4.4%) for volumetrically obtained sum of relevant diameters (p < 0.05, corrected). 4–8 patients’ response to therapy was classified differently across observers by using volumetry compared to standard manual measurements. Fleiss kappa revealed no significant difference in categorical agreement of response classification between manual (0.7558) and volumetric (0.7623) measurements. Conclusion: Under standard RECIST thresholds there was no advantage of volumetric compared to manual response evaluation. However volumetric assessment yielded significantly lower interobserver variability. This may allow narrower thresholds for volumetric response classification in the future

  4. Volumetric response classification in metastatic solid tumors on MSCT: Initial results in a whole-body setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, A.M., E-mail: a.wulff@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Fabel, M. [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Freitag-Wolf, S., E-mail: freitag@medinfo.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Medizinische Informatik und Statistik, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Tepper, M., E-mail: m.tepper@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Knabe, H.M., E-mail: h.knabe@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Schäfer, J.P., E-mail: jp.schaefer@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Jansen, O., E-mail: o.jansen@neurorad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Bolte, H., E-mail: hendrik.bolte@ukmuenster.de [Klinik für Nuklearmedizin, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Gebäude A1, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To examine technical parameters of measurement accuracy and differences in tumor response classification using RECIST 1.1 and volumetric assessment in three common metastasis types (lung nodules, liver lesions, lymph node metastasis) simultaneously. Materials and methods: 56 consecutive patients (32 female) aged 41–82 years with a wide range of metastatic solid tumors were examined with MSCT for baseline and follow up. Images were evaluated by three experienced radiologists using manual measurements and semi-automatic lesion segmentation. Institutional ethics review was obtained and all patients gave written informed consent. Data analysis comprised interobserver variability operationalized as coefficient of variation and categorical response classification according to RECIST 1.1 for both manual and volumetric measures. Continuous data were assessed for statistical significance with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and categorical data with Fleiss kappa. Results: Interobserver variability was 6.3% (IQR 4.6%) for manual and 4.1% (IQR 4.4%) for volumetrically obtained sum of relevant diameters (p < 0.05, corrected). 4–8 patients’ response to therapy was classified differently across observers by using volumetry compared to standard manual measurements. Fleiss kappa revealed no significant difference in categorical agreement of response classification between manual (0.7558) and volumetric (0.7623) measurements. Conclusion: Under standard RECIST thresholds there was no advantage of volumetric compared to manual response evaluation. However volumetric assessment yielded significantly lower interobserver variability. This may allow narrower thresholds for volumetric response classification in the future.

  5. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  6. Accurate nonlocal theory for cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Moses, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    We study soliton compression in bulk quadratic nonlinear materials at 800 nm, where group-velocity mismatch dominates. We develop a nonlocal theory showing that efficient compression depends strongly on characteristic nonlocal time scales related to pulse dispersion....

  7. Ultrahigh volumetric capacitance and cyclic stability of fluorine and nitrogen co-doped carbon microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junshuang; Lian, Jie; Hou, Li; Zhang, Junchuan; Gou, Huiyang; Xia, Meirong; Zhao, Yufeng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Tao, Lu; Gao, Faming

    2015-09-01

    Highly porous nanostructures with large surface areas are typically employed for electrical double-layer capacitors to improve gravimetric energy storage capacity; however, high surface area carbon-based electrodes result in poor volumetric capacitance because of the low packing density of porous materials. Here, we demonstrate ultrahigh volumetric capacitance of 521 F cm-3 in aqueous electrolytes for non-porous carbon microsphere electrodes co-doped with fluorine and nitrogen synthesized by low-temperature solvothermal route, rivaling expensive RuO2 or MnO2 pseudo-capacitors. The new electrodes also exhibit excellent cyclic stability without capacitance loss after 10,000 cycles in both acidic and basic electrolytes at a high charge current of 5 A g-1. This work provides a new approach for designing high-performance electrodes with exceptional volumetric capacitance with high mass loadings and charge rates for long-lived electrochemical energy storage systems.

  8. Combination volumetric and gravimetric sorption instrument for high accuracy measurements of methane adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burress, Jacob; Bethea, Donald; Troub, Brandon

    2017-05-01

    The accurate measurement of adsorbed gas up to high pressures (˜100 bars) is critical for the development of new materials for adsorbed gas storage. The typical Sievert-type volumetric method introduces accumulating errors that can become large at maximum pressures. Alternatively, gravimetric methods employing microbalances require careful buoyancy corrections. In this paper, we present a combination gravimetric and volumetric system for methane sorption measurements on samples between ˜0.5 and 1 g. The gravimetric method described requires no buoyancy corrections. The tandem use of the gravimetric method allows for a check on the highest uncertainty volumetric measurements. The sources and proper calculation of uncertainties are discussed. Results from methane measurements on activated carbon MSC-30 and metal-organic framework HKUST-1 are compared across methods and within the literature.

  9. Plant fibre composites - porosity and volumetric interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Thygesen, Anders; Lilholt, Hans

    2007-01-01

    the combination of a high fibre volume fraction, a low porosity and a high composite density is optimal. Experimental data from the literature on volumetric composition and density of four types of plant fibre composites are used to validate the model. It is demonstrated that the model provides a concept......Plant fibre composites contain typically a relative large amount of porosity, which considerably influences properties and performance of the composites. The large porosity must be integrated in the conversion of weight fractions into volume fractions of the fibre and matrix parts. A model...... is presented to predict the porosity as a function of the fibre weight fractions, and to calculate the related fibre and matrix volume fractions, as well as the density of the composite. The model predicts two cases of composite volumetric interaction separated by a transition fibre weight fraction, at which...

  10. Volumetric formulation for a class of kinetic models with energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbragaglia, M; Sugiyama, K

    2010-10-01

    We analyze a volumetric formulation of lattice Boltzmann for compressible thermal fluid flows. The velocity set is chosen with the desired accuracy, based on the Gauss-Hermite quadrature procedure, and tested against controlled problems in bounded and unbounded fluids. The method allows the simulation of thermohydrodyamical problems without the need to preserve the exact space-filling nature of the velocity set, but still ensuring the exact conservation laws for density, momentum, and energy. Issues related to boundary condition problems and improvements based on grid refinement are also investigated.

  11. Automated volumetric breast density estimation: A comparison with visual assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J.M.; Ko, E.S.; Han, B.-K.; Ko, E.Y.; Shin, J.H.; Hahn, S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare automated volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement with visual assessment according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to determine the factors influencing the agreement between them. Materials and methods: One hundred and ninety-three consecutive screening mammograms reported as negative were included in the study. Three radiologists assigned qualitative BI-RADS density categories to the mammograms. An automated volumetric breast-density method was used to measure VBD (% breast density) and density grade (VDG). Each case was classified into an agreement or disagreement group according to the comparison between visual assessment and VDG. The correlation between visual assessment and VDG was obtained. Various physical factors were compared between the two groups. Results: Agreement between visual assessment by the radiologists and VDG was good (ICC value = 0.757). VBD showed a highly significant positive correlation with visual assessment (Spearman's ρ = 0.754, p < 0.001). VBD and the x-ray tube target was significantly different between the agreement group and the disagreement groups (p = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusion: Automated VBD is a reliable objective method to measure breast density. The agreement between VDG and visual assessment by radiologist might be influenced by physical factors

  12. Combined surface and volumetric occlusion shading

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Matthias O.; Martin, Tobias; Grosset, A. V Pascal; Brownlee, Carson; Hollt, Thomas; Brown, Benjamin P.; Smith, Sean T.; Hansen, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The proposed algorithm extends the recently proposed Directional Occlusion Shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. Combined surface and volumetric occlusion shading

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Matthias O.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The proposed algorithm extends the recently proposed Directional Occlusion Shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. © 2012 IEEE.

  14. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Nagem Filho, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill ...

  15. Data Compression of Hydrocarbon Reservoir Simulation Grids

    KAUST Repository

    Chavez, Gustavo Ivan

    2015-05-28

    A dense volumetric grid coming from an oil/gas reservoir simulation output is translated into a compact representation that supports desired features such as interactive visualization, geometric continuity, color mapping and quad representation. A set of four control curves per layer results from processing the grid data, and a complete set of these 3-dimensional surfaces represents the complete volume data and can map reservoir properties of interest to analysts. The processing results yield a representation of reservoir simulation results which has reduced data storage requirements and permits quick performance interaction between reservoir analysts and the simulation data. The degree of reservoir grid compression can be selected according to the quality required, by adjusting for different thresholds, such as approximation error and level of detail. The processions results are of potential benefit in applications such as interactive rendering, data compression, and in-situ visualization of large-scale oil/gas reservoir simulations.

  16. A volumetric data system for environmental robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourtellott, J.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional, spatially organized or volumetric data system provides an effective means for integrating and presenting environmental sensor data to robotic systems and operators. Because of the unstructed nature of environmental restoration applications, new robotic control strategies are being developed that include environmental sensors and interactive data interpretation. The volumetric data system provides key features to facilitate these new control strategies including: integrated representation of surface, subsurface and above-surface data; differentiation of mapped and unmapped regions in space; sculpting of regions in space to best exploit data from line-of-sight sensors; integration of diverse sensor data (for example, dimensional, physical/geophysical, chemical, and radiological); incorporation of data provided at different spatial resolutions; efficient access for high-speed visualization and analysis; and geometric modeling tools to update a open-quotes world modelclose quotes of an environment. The applicability to underground storage tank remediation and buried waste site remediation are demonstrated in several examples. By integrating environmental sensor data into robotic control, the volumetric data system will lead to safer, faster, and more cost-effective environmental cleanup

  17. MR volumetric assessment of endolymphatic hydrops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerkov, R.; Berman, A.; Jerin, C.; Krause, E.; Dietrich, O.; Flatz, W.; Ertl-Wagner, B.; Keeser, D.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to volumetrically quantify endolymph and perilymph spaces of the inner ear in order to establish a methodological basis for further investigations into the pathophysiology and therapeutic monitoring of Meniere's disease. Sixteen patients (eight females, aged 38-71 years) with definite unilateral Meniere's disease were included in this study. Magnetic resonance (MR) cisternography with a T2-SPACE sequence was combined with a Real reconstruction inversion recovery (Real-IR) sequence for delineation of inner ear fluid spaces. Machine learning and automated local thresholding segmentation algorithms were applied for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. Test-retest reliability was assessed by the intra-class coefficient; correlation of cochlear endolymph volume ratio with hearing function was assessed by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Endolymph volume ratios could be reliably measured in all patients, with a mean (range) value of 15 % (2-25) for the cochlea and 28 % (12-40) for the vestibulum. Test-retest reliability was excellent, with an intra-class coefficient of 0.99. Cochlear endolymphatic hydrops was significantly correlated with hearing loss (r = 0.747, p = 0.001). MR imaging after local contrast application and image processing, including machine learning and automated local thresholding, enable the volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. This allows for a quantitative assessment of the effect of therapeutic interventions on endolymphatic hydrops. (orig.)

  18. MR volumetric assessment of endolymphatic hydrops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerkov, R.; Berman, A.; Jerin, C.; Krause, E. [University of Munich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, German Centre for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); Dietrich, O.; Flatz, W.; Ertl-Wagner, B. [University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Munich (Germany); Keeser, D. [University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, German Centre for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Innenstadtkliniken Medical Centre, Munich (Germany)

    2014-10-16

    We aimed to volumetrically quantify endolymph and perilymph spaces of the inner ear in order to establish a methodological basis for further investigations into the pathophysiology and therapeutic monitoring of Meniere's disease. Sixteen patients (eight females, aged 38-71 years) with definite unilateral Meniere's disease were included in this study. Magnetic resonance (MR) cisternography with a T2-SPACE sequence was combined with a Real reconstruction inversion recovery (Real-IR) sequence for delineation of inner ear fluid spaces. Machine learning and automated local thresholding segmentation algorithms were applied for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. Test-retest reliability was assessed by the intra-class coefficient; correlation of cochlear endolymph volume ratio with hearing function was assessed by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Endolymph volume ratios could be reliably measured in all patients, with a mean (range) value of 15 % (2-25) for the cochlea and 28 % (12-40) for the vestibulum. Test-retest reliability was excellent, with an intra-class coefficient of 0.99. Cochlear endolymphatic hydrops was significantly correlated with hearing loss (r = 0.747, p = 0.001). MR imaging after local contrast application and image processing, including machine learning and automated local thresholding, enable the volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. This allows for a quantitative assessment of the effect of therapeutic interventions on endolymphatic hydrops. (orig.)

  19. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  20. Mammography parameters: compression, dose, and discomfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, S.; Di Risio, C.; Andisco, D.; Rojas, R.R.; Rojas, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To confirm the importance of compression in mammography and relate it to the discomfort expressed by the patients. Materials and methods: Two samples of 402 and 268 mammographies were obtained from two diagnostic centres that use the same mammographic equipment, but different compression techniques. The patient age range was from 21 to 50 years old. (authors) [es

  1. Volumetric and superficial characterization of carbon activated; Caracterizacion volumetrica y superficial de carbon activado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Garcia S, I.; Jimenez B, J.; Solache R, M.; Lopez M, B.; Bulbulian G, S.; Olguin G, M.T. [Departamento de Quimica, Gerencia de Ciencias Basicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The activated carbon is the resultant material of the calcination process of natural carbonated materials as coconut shells or olive little bones. It is an excellent adsorbent of diluted substances, so much in colloidal form, as in particles form. Those substances are attracted and retained by the carbon surface. In this work is make the volumetric and superficial characterization of activated carbon treated thermically (300 Centigrade) in function of the grain size average. (Author)

  2. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    KAUST Repository

    Kallepitis, Charalambos

    2017-03-22

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell–material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy.

  3. Green chemistry volumetric titration kit for pharmaceutical formulations: Econoburette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Singh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Stopcock SC and Spring Sp models of Econoburette (Calibrated, RTC (NR, Ministry of Small Scale Industries, Government of India, developed for semimicro volumetric titration of pharmaceutical formulations are reported. These are economized and risk free titration where pipette is replaced by an inbuilt pipette and conical flask by inbuilt bulb. A step of pipetting of stock solution by mouth is deleted. It is used to allow solution exposure to user’s body. This risk is removed and even volatile and toxic solutions are titrated with full proof safety. Econoburette minimizes use of materials and time by 90 % and prevent discharge of polluting effluent to environment. Few acid and base samples are titrated and an analysis of experimental expenditure is described in the papers.

  4. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallepitis, Charalambos; Bergholt, Mads S.; Mazo, Manuel M.; Leonardo, Vincent; Skaalure, Stacey C.; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell-material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy.

  5. Benchmark calculations for evaluation methods of gas volumetric leakage rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, R.; Aritomi, M.; Matsuzaki, M.

    1998-01-01

    A containment function of radioactive materials transport casks is essential for safe transportation to prevent the radioactive materials from being released into environment. Regulations such as IAEA standard determined the limit of radioactivity to be released. Since is not practical for the leakage tests to measure directly the radioactivity release from a package, as gas volumetric leakages rates are proposed in ANSI N14.5 and ISO standards. In our previous works, gas volumetric leakage rates for several kinds of gas from various leaks were measured and two evaluation methods, 'a simple evaluation method' and 'a strict evaluation method', were proposed based on the results. The simple evaluation method considers the friction loss of laminar flow with expansion effect. The strict evaluating method considers an exit loss in addition to the friction loss. In this study, four worked examples were completed for on assumed large spent fuel transport cask (Type B Package) with wet or dry capacity and at three transport conditions; normal transport with intact fuels or failed fuels, and an accident in transport. The standard leakage rates and criteria for two kinds of leak test were calculated for each example by each evaluation method. The following observations are made based upon the calculations and evaluations: the choked flow model of ANSI method greatly overestimates the criteria for tests ; the laminar flow models of both ANSI and ISO methods slightly overestimate the criteria for tests; the above two results are within the design margin for ordinary transport condition and all methods are useful for the evaluation; for severe condition such as failed fuel transportation, it should pay attention to apply a choked flow model of ANSI method. (authors)

  6. Spherical composite particles of rice starch and microcrystalline cellulose: A new coprocessed excipient for direct compression

    OpenAIRE

    Limwong, Vasinee; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn; Kulvanich, Poj

    2004-01-01

    Composite particles of rice starch (RS) and microcrystalline cellulose were fabricated by spray-drying technique to be used as a directly compressible excipient. Two size fractions of microcry stalline cellulose, sieved (MCS) and jet milled (MCJ), having volumetric mean diameter (D50) of 13.61 and 40.51 μm, respectively, were used to form composite particles with RS in various mixing ratios. The composite particles produced were evaluated for their powder and compression properties. Although ...

  7. The Effect of Elevation on Volumetric Measurements of the Lower Extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordial M. Gillette

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The empirical evidence for the use of RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation has been questioned regarding its   clinical effectiveness. The component of RICE that has the least literature regarding its effectiveness is elevation. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if various positions of elevation result in volumetric changes of the lower extremity. Methodology: A randomized crossover design was used to determine the effects of the four following conditions on volumetric changes of the lower extremity: seated at the end of a table (seated, lying supine (flat, lying supine with the foot elevated 12 inches off the table (elevated, and lying prone with the knees bent to 90 degrees (prone. The conditions were randomized using a Latin Square. Each subject completed all conditions with at least 24 hours between each session. Pre and post volumetric measurements were taken using a volumetric tank. The subject was placed in one of the four described testing positions for 30 minutes. The change in weight of the displaced water was the main outcome measure. The data was analyzed using an ANOVA of the pre and post measurements with a Bonferroni post hoc analysis. The level of significance was set at P<.05 for all analyses. Results: The only statistically significant difference was between the gravity dependent position (seated and all other positions (p <.001. There was no significant difference between lying supine (flat, on a bolster (elevated, or prone with the knees flexed to 90 degrees (prone. Conclusions: From these results, the extent of elevation does not appear to have an effect on changes in low leg volume. Elevation above the heart did not significantly improve reduction in limb volume, but removing the limb from a gravity dependent position might be beneficial.

  8. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Gregson, James; Wetzstein, Gordon; Raskar, Ramesh; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  9. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  10. Volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2004-01-01

    We developed a volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol that provides combined inspiratory and expiratory volumetric imaging of the lung without increasing radiation exposure, and conducted a preliminary feasibility assessment of this protocol to evaluate diffuse lung disease with small airway abnormalities. The volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT increased the detectability of the conducting airway to the areas of air trapping (P<0.0001), and added significant information about extent and distribution of air trapping (P<0.0001)

  11. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  12. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  13. Adaptive controller for volumetric display of neuroimaging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiberg, Ben; Senseney, Justin; Caban, Jesus

    2014-03-01

    Volumetric display of medical images is an increasingly relevant method for examining an imaging acquisition as the prevalence of thin-slice imaging increases in clinical studies. Current mouse and keyboard implementations for volumetric control provide neither the sensitivity nor specificity required to manipulate a volumetric display for efficient reading in a clinical setting. Solutions to efficient volumetric manipulation provide more sensitivity by removing the binary nature of actions controlled by keyboard clicks, but specificity is lost because a single action may change display in several directions. When specificity is then further addressed by re-implementing hardware binary functions through the introduction of mode control, the result is a cumbersome interface that fails to achieve the revolutionary benefit required for adoption of a new technology. We address the specificity versus sensitivity problem of volumetric interfaces by providing adaptive positional awareness to the volumetric control device by manipulating communication between hardware driver and existing software methods for volumetric display of medical images. This creates a tethered effect for volumetric display, providing a smooth interface that improves on existing hardware approaches to volumetric scene manipulation.

  14. Mining compressing sequential problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang, T.L.; Mörchen, F.; Fradkin, D.; Calders, T.G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Compression based pattern mining has been successfully applied to many data mining tasks. We propose an approach based on the minimum description length principle to extract sequential patterns that compress a database of sequences well. We show that mining compressing patterns is NP-Hard and

  15. A compressibility based model for predicting the tensile strength of directly compressed pharmaceutical powder mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gavin K; Campbell, Jacqueline I; Roberts, Ron J

    2017-10-05

    A new model to predict the compressibility and compactability of mixtures of pharmaceutical powders has been developed. The key aspect of the model is consideration of the volumetric occupancy of each powder under an applied compaction pressure and the respective contribution it then makes to the mixture properties. The compressibility and compactability of three pharmaceutical powders: microcrystalline cellulose, mannitol and anhydrous dicalcium phosphate have been characterised. Binary and ternary mixtures of these excipients have been tested and used to demonstrate the predictive capability of the model. Furthermore, the model is shown to be uniquely able to capture a broad range of mixture behaviours, including neutral, negative and positive deviations, illustrating its utility for formulation design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental and numerical study of the failure process and energy mechanisms of rock-like materials containing cross un-persistent joints under uniaxial compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihong Cao

    Full Text Available Joints and fissures in natural rocks have a significant influence on the stability of the rock mass, and it is often necessary to evaluate strength failure and crack evolution behavior. In this paper, based on experimental tests and numerical simulation (PFC2D, the macro-mechanical behavior and energy mechanism of jointed rock-like specimens with cross non-persistent joints under uniaxial loading were investigated. The focus was to study the effect of joint dip angle α and intersection angle γ on the characteristic stress, the coalescence modes and the energy release of jointed rock-like specimens. For specimens with γ = 30° and 45°, the UCS (uniaxial compression strength, CIS (crack initiation stress and CDiS (critical dilatancy stress increase as α increases from 0° to 75°. When γ = 60° and 75°, the UCS, CIS and CDiS increase as α increases from 0° to 60° and decrease when α is over 60°. Both the inclination angle α and intersection angle γ have great influence on the failure pattern of pre-cracked specimens. With different α and γ, specimens exhibit 4 kinds of failure patterns. Both the experimental and numerical results show that the energy of a specimen has similar trends with characteristic stress as α increases.

  17. OpenCL-based vicinity computation for 3D multiresolution mesh compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachicha, Soumaya; Elkefi, Akram; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2017-03-01

    3D multiresolution mesh compression systems are still widely addressed in many domains. These systems are more and more requiring volumetric data to be processed in real-time. Therefore, the performance is becoming constrained by material resources usage and an overall reduction in the computational time. In this paper, our contribution entirely lies on computing, in real-time, triangles neighborhood of 3D progressive meshes for a robust compression algorithm based on the scan-based wavelet transform(WT) technique. The originality of this latter algorithm is to compute the WT with minimum memory usage by processing data as they are acquired. However, with large data, this technique is considered poor in term of computational complexity. For that, this work exploits the GPU to accelerate the computation using OpenCL as a heterogeneous programming language. Experiments demonstrate that, aside from the portability across various platforms and the flexibility guaranteed by the OpenCL-based implementation, this method can improve performance gain in speedup factor of 5 compared to the sequential CPU implementation.

  18. Systematic Parameterization, Storage, and Representation of Volumetric DICOM Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Felix; Selver, M Alper; Gezer, Sinem; Dicle, Oğuz; Hillen, Walter

    Tomographic medical imaging systems produce hundreds to thousands of slices, enabling three-dimensional (3D) analysis. Radiologists process these images through various tools and techniques in order to generate 3D renderings for various applications, such as surgical planning, medical education, and volumetric measurements. To save and store these visualizations, current systems use snapshots or video exporting, which prevents further optimizations and requires the storage of significant additional data. The Grayscale Softcopy Presentation State extension of the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard resolves this issue for two-dimensional (2D) data by introducing an extensive set of parameters, namely 2D Presentation States (2DPR), that describe how an image should be displayed. 2DPR allows storing these parameters instead of storing parameter applied images, which cause unnecessary duplication of the image data. Since there is currently no corresponding extension for 3D data, in this study, a DICOM-compliant object called 3D presentation states (3DPR) is proposed for the parameterization and storage of 3D medical volumes. To accomplish this, the 3D medical visualization process is divided into four tasks, namely pre-processing, segmentation, post-processing, and rendering. The important parameters of each task are determined. Special focus is given to the compression of segmented data, parameterization of the rendering process, and DICOM-compliant implementation of the 3DPR object. The use of 3DPR was tested in a radiology department on three clinical cases, which require multiple segmentations and visualizations during the workflow of radiologists. The results show that 3DPR can effectively simplify the workload of physicians by directly regenerating 3D renderings without repeating intermediate tasks, increase efficiency by preserving all user interactions, and provide efficient storage as well as transfer of visualized data.

  19. Simulation of Compressive Failure in Fiber Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badrinath; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    Kinkband formation is a non-linear phenomenon involving interacting effects of non-linear material behavior of the matrix materials and fiber buckling including fiber misalignment in fiber composites under compressive loading. Taking into account the non-linearties of the constituents a constitut......Kinkband formation is a non-linear phenomenon involving interacting effects of non-linear material behavior of the matrix materials and fiber buckling including fiber misalignment in fiber composites under compressive loading. Taking into account the non-linearties of the constituents...

  20. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Cheol Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter. In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress–strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  1. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Yeol

    2015-03-27

    In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter). In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress-strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  2. Compression for radiological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis L.

    1992-07-01

    The viewing of radiological images has peculiarities that must be taken into account in the design of a compression technique. The images may be manipulated on a workstation to change the contrast, to change the center of the brightness levels that are viewed, and even to invert the images. Because of the possible consequences of losing information in a medical application, bit preserving compression is used for the images used for diagnosis. However, for archiving the images may be compressed to 10 of their original size. A compression technique based on the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) takes the viewing factors into account by compressing the changes in the local brightness levels. The compression technique is a variation of the CCITT JPEG compression that suppresses the blocking of the DCT except in areas of very high contrast.

  3. Nanocellulose coupled flexible polypyrrole@graphene oxide composite paper electrodes with high volumetric capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Tammela, Petter; Strømme, Maria; Nyholm, Leif

    2015-02-01

    A robust and compact freestanding conducting polymer-based electrode material based on nanocellulose coupled polypyrrole@graphene oxide paper is straightforwardly prepared via in situ polymerization for use in high-performance paper-based charge storage devices, exhibiting stable cycling over 16 000 cycles at 5 A g-1 as well as the largest specific volumetric capacitance (198 F cm-3) so far reported for flexible polymer-based electrodes.A robust and compact freestanding conducting polymer-based electrode material based on nanocellulose coupled polypyrrole@graphene oxide paper is straightforwardly prepared via in situ polymerization for use in high-performance paper-based charge storage devices, exhibiting stable cycling over 16 000 cycles at 5 A g-1 as well as the largest specific volumetric capacitance (198 F cm-3) so far reported for flexible polymer-based electrodes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07251k

  4. Experimental investigation of dynamic compression and spallation of Cerium at pressures up to 6 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubareva, A. N.; Kolesnikov, S. A.; Utkin, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    In this study the experiments on one-dimensional dynamic compression of Cerium (Ce) samples to pressures of 0.5 to 6 GPa using various types of explosively driven generators were conducted. VISAR laser velocimeter was used to obtain Ce free surface velocity profiles. The isentropic compression wave was registered for γ-phase of Ce at pressures lower than 0.76 GPa that corresponds to γ-α phase transition pressure in Ce. Shock rarefaction waves were also registered in several experiments. Both observations were the result of the anomalous compressibility of γ-phase of Ce. On the basis of our experimental results the compression isentrope of Ce γ-phase was constructed. Its comparison with volumetric compression curves allowed to estimate the magnitude of shear stress at dynamic compression conditions for Ce. Spall strength measurements were also conducted for several samples. They showed a strong dependence of the spall strength of Ce on the strain rate.

  5. Experimental investigation of dynamic compression and spallation of cerium at pressures up to 6 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubareva, A N; Kolesnikov, S A; Utkin, A V

    2014-01-01

    In this study the experiments on one-dimensional dynamic compression of Cerium (Ce) samples to pressures of 0.5 to 6 GPa using various types of explosively driven generators were conducted. VISAR laser velocimeter was used to obtain Ce free surface velocity profiles. The isentropic compression wave was registered for γ-phase of Ce at pressures lower than 0.76 GPa that corresponds to γ-α phase transition pressure in Ce. Shock rarefaction waves were also registered in several experiments. Both observations were the result of the anomalous compressibility of γ-phase of Ce. On the basis of our experimental results the compression isentrope of Ce γ-phase was constructed. Its comparison with volumetric compression curves allowed to estimate the magnitude of shear stress at dynamic compression conditions for Ce. Spall strength measurements were also conducted for several samples. They showed a strong dependence of the spall strength of Ce on the strain rate.

  6. Radiological Image Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shih-Chung Benedict

    The movement toward digital images in radiology presents the problem of how to conveniently and economically store, retrieve, and transmit the volume of digital images. Basic research into image data compression is necessary in order to move from a film-based department to an efficient digital -based department. Digital data compression technology consists of two types of compression technique: error-free and irreversible. Error -free image compression is desired; however, present techniques can only achieve compression ratio of from 1.5:1 to 3:1, depending upon the image characteristics. Irreversible image compression can achieve a much higher compression ratio; however, the image reconstructed from the compressed data shows some difference from the original image. This dissertation studies both error-free and irreversible image compression techniques. In particular, some modified error-free techniques have been tested and the recommended strategies for various radiological images are discussed. A full-frame bit-allocation irreversible compression technique has been derived. A total of 76 images which include CT head and body, and radiographs digitized to 2048 x 2048, 1024 x 1024, and 512 x 512 have been used to test this algorithm. The normalized mean -square-error (NMSE) on the difference image, defined as the difference between the original and the reconstructed image from a given compression ratio, is used as a global measurement on the quality of the reconstructed image. The NMSE's of total of 380 reconstructed and 380 difference images are measured and the results tabulated. Three complex compression methods are also suggested to compress images with special characteristics. Finally, various parameters which would effect the quality of the reconstructed images are discussed. A proposed hardware compression module is given in the last chapter.

  7. Determination of Uncertainty for a One Milli Litre Volumetric Pipette

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torowati; Asminar; Rahmiati; Arif-Sasongko-Adi

    2007-01-01

    An observation had been conducted to determine the uncertainty of volumetric pipette. The uncertainty was determined from data obtained from a determine process which used method of gravimetry. Calculation result from an uncertainty of volumetric pipette the confidence level of 95% and k=2. (author)

  8. [Compression treatment for burned skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Fadhel; Lassoued, Mohamed A; Sahnoun, Mahdi; Sfar, Souad; Cheikhrouhou, Morched

    2012-02-01

    The regularity of a compressive knit is defined as its ability to perform its function in a burnt skin. This property is essential to avoid the phenomenon of rejection of the material or toxicity problems But: Make knits biocompatible with high burnet of human skin. We fabric knits of elastic material. To ensure good adhesion to the skin, we made elastic material, typically a tight loop knitted. The Length of yarn absorbed by stitch and the raw matter are changed with each sample. The physical properties of each sample are measured and compared. Surface modifications are made to these samples by impregnation of microcapsules based on jojoba oil. Knits are compressif, elastic in all directions, light, thin, comfortable, and washable for hygiene issues. In addition, the washing can find their compressive properties. The Jojoba Oil microcapsules hydrated the human burnet skin. This moisturizer is used to the firmness of the wound and it gives flexibility to the skin. Compressive Knits are biocompatible with burnet skin. The mixture of natural and synthetic fibers is irreplaceable in terms comfort and regularity.

  9. The relationship between anatomic noise and volumetric breast density for digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainprize, James G.; Tyson, Albert H.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The appearance of parenchymal/stromal patterns in mammography have been characterized as having a Wiener power spectrum with an inverse power-law shape described by the exponential parameter, β. The amount of fibroglandular tissue, which can be quantified in terms of volumetric breast density (VBD), influences the texture and appearance of the patterns formed in a mammogram. Here, a large study is performed to investigate the variations in β in a clinical population and to indicate the relationship between β and breast density. Methods: From a set of 2686 cranio-caudal normal screening mammograms, the parameter β was extracted from log-log fits to the Wiener spectrum over the range 0.15–1 mm −1 . The Wiener spectrum was calculated from regions of interest in the compression paddle contact region of the breast. An in-house computer program, Cumulus V, was used to extract the volumetric breast density and identify the compression paddle contact regions of the breast. The Wiener spectra were calculated with and without modulation transfer function (MTF) correction to determine the impact of VBD on the intrinsic anatomic noise. Results: The mean volumetric breast density was 25.5% (±12.6%) over all images. The mean β following a MTF correction which decreased the β slightly (≈−0.08) was found to be 2.87. Varying the maximum of the spatial frequency range of the fits from 0.7 to 1.0, 1.25 or 1.5 mm −1 showing small decreases in the result, although the effect of the quantum noise power component on reducing β was clearly observed at 1.5 mm −1 . Conclusions: The texture parameter, β, was found to increase with VBD at low volumetric breast densities with an apparent leveling off at higher densities. The relationship between β and VBD measured here can be used to create probabilistic models for computer simulations of detectability. As breast density is a known risk predictor for breast cancer, the correlation between β and VBD suggests that

  10. Nitrogen-Doped Holey Graphene as an Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries with High Volumetric Energy Density and Long Cycle Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiantie; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W; Dai, Liming

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen-doped holey graphene (N-hG) as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries has delivered a maximum volumetric capacity of 384 mAh cm(-3) with an excellent long-term cycling life up to 6000 cycles, and as an electrochemical capacitor has delivered a maximum volumetric energy density of 171.2 Wh L(-1) and a volumetric capacitance of 201.6 F cm(-3) . © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Spatial and volumetric changes of retroperitoneal sarcomas during pre-operative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Philip; Dickie, Colleen; Lee, David; Chung, Peter; O’Sullivan, Brian; Letourneau, Daniel; Xu, Wei; Swallow, Carol; Gladdy, Rebecca; Catton, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the positional and volumetric changes of retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS) during pre-operative external beam radiotherapy (PreRT). Material and methods: After excluding 2 patients who received chemotherapy prior to PreRT and 15 RPS that were larger than the field-of-view of cone-beam CT (CBCT), the positional and volumetric changes of RPS throughout PreRT were characterized in 19 patients treated with IMRT using CBCT image guidance. Analysis was performed on 118 CBCT images representing one image per week of those acquired daily during treatment. Intra-fraction breathing motions of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and kidneys were measured in 22 RPS patients simulated using 4D-CT. Fifteen other patients were excluded whose tumors were incompletely imaged on CBCT or who received pre-RT chemotherapy. Results: A GTV volumetric increase (mean: 6.6%, p = 0.035) during the first 2 weeks (CBCT1 vs. CBCT2) of treatment was followed by GTV volumetric decrease (mean: 4%, p = 0.009) by completion of radiotherapy (CBCT1 vs. CBCT6). Internal margins of 8.6, 15 and 15 mm in the lateral, anterior/posterior and superior/inferior directions would be required to account for inter-fraction displacements. The extent of GTV respiratory motion was significantly (p < 0.0001) correlated with more superiorly positioned tumors. Conclusion: Inter-fraction CBCT provides important volumetric and positional information of RPS which may improve PreRT quality and prompt re-planning. Planning target volume may be reduced using online soft-tissue matching to account for interfractional displacements of GTVs. Important breathing motion occurred in superiorly placed RPS supporting the utility of 4D-CT planning

  12. Erosion of water-based cements evaluated by volumetric and gravimetric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Rie; Uchida, Keiko; Momoi, Yasuko; McCabe, John F

    2003-05-01

    To compare the erosion of glass ionomer, zinc phosphate and polycarboxylate cements using volumetric and gravimetric methods. For the volumetric method, the eroded depth of cement placed in a cylindrical cavity in PMMA was measured using a dial gauge after immersion in an eroding solution. For the gravimetric method, the weight of the residue of a solution in which a cylindrical specimen had been immersed was measured. 0.02 M lactic acid solution (0.02 M acid) and 0.1 M lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer solution (0.1 M buffer) were used as eroding solutions. The pH of both solutions was 2.74 and the test period was 24 h. Ranking of eroded depth and weight of residue was polycarboxylate>zinc phosphate>glass ionomers. Differences in erosion were more clearly defined by differences in eroded depth than differences in weight of residue. In 0.02 M acid, the erosion of glass ionomer using the volumetric method was effected by the hygroscopic expansion. In 0.1 M buffer, the erosion for polycarboxylate and zinc phosphate using the volumetric method was much greater than that using the gravimetric method. This is explained by cryo-SEM images which show many holes in the surface of specimens after erosion. It appears that zinc oxide is dissolved leaving a spongy matrix which easily collapses under the force applied to the dial gauge during measurement. The volumetric method that employs eroded depth of cement using a 0.1 M buffer solution is able to quantify erosion and to make material comparisons.

  13. 4-D PET-MR with Volumetric Navigators and Compressed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedemonte, Stefano; Catana, Ciprian; Van Leemput, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid PET-MR scanners acquire multi-modal signals simultaneously, eliminating the requirement of software alignment between the MR and PET imaging data. However, the acquisition of high-resolution MR and PET images requires long scanning times, therefore movement of the subject during the acquis...

  14. How compressible is recombinant battery separator mat?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendry, C. [Hollingsworth and Vose, Postlip Mills Winchcombe (United Kingdom)

    1999-03-01

    In the past few years, the recombinant battery separator mat (RBSM) for valve-regulated lead/acid (VRLA) batteries has become the focus of much attention. Compression, and the ability of microglass separators to maintain a level of `springiness` have helped reduce premature capacity loss. As higher compressions are reached, we need to determine what, if any, damage can be caused during the assembly process. This paper reviews the findings when RBSM materials, with different surface areas, are compressed under forces up to 500 kPa in the dry state. (orig.)

  15. Materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  17. Investigation on molecular interactions of antibiotics in alcohols using volumetric and acoustic studies at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naseem, Bushra; Iftikhar, Madeeha

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Antibiotics in different alcohols are used to study their interactions in solutions. • Density and sound velocity for antibiotic solutions are measured at different temperatures. • Apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility are used to calculate partial molar quantities. • Acoustical parameters are calculated and discussed in terms of solute–solute and solute–solvent interactions. - Abstract: The density and sound velocity for pure alcohols (methanol, ethanol, iso-propanol and n-butanol) and molal solutions of nitroimidazoles (metronidazole (MNZ) and dimetridazole (DMZ) have been measured at different temperatures (293.15–313.15 K). Different volumetric and acoustical parameters like apparent molar volume (V ϕ ), partial molar volume (VЛљ ϕ ), apparent molar isentropic compressibility (K ϕ ), partial molar isentropic compressibility (KЛљ ϕ ), hydration number (n H ), acoustic impedance (Z) and intermolecular free length (L f ) of antibiotic solutions were calculated from the experimental values of density and sound velocity. The derived values have been used to explore the solute–solute and solute–solvent interactions. The V ϕ values are positive and K ϕ values are negative in both antibiotics, indicative of strong solute–solvent interactions and closely packed structure of antibiotics in alcohols. The decreasing trend of L f with increasing antibiotic concentration shows the presence of strong intermolecular interactions in solutions.

  18. Development of heat resistant geopolymer-based materials from red mud and rice husk ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Nguyen Hoc; Nhung, Le Thuy; Quyen, Pham Vo Thi Ha; Phong, Dang Thanh; Khe, Dao Thanh; Van Phuc, Nguyen

    2018-04-01

    Geopolymer is an inorganic polymer composite developed by Joseph Davidovits in 1970s. Such material has potentials to replace Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC)-based materials in the future because of its lower energy consumption, minimal CO2 emissions and lower production cost as it utilizes industrial waste resources. Hence, geopolymerization and the process to produce geopolymers for various applications like building materials can be considered as green industry. Moreover, in this study, red mud and rice husk ash were used as raw materials for geopolymeric production, which are aluminum industrial and agricultural wastes that need to be managed to reduce their negative impact to the environment. The red mud and rice husk ash were mixed with sodium silicate (water glass) solution to form geopolymer paste. The geopolymer paste was filled into 5-cm cube molds according to ASTM C109/C109M 99, and then cured at room temperature for 28 days. These products were then tested for compressive strength and volumetric weight. Results indicated that the material can be considered lightweight with a compressive strength at 28 days that are in the range of 6.8 to 15.5 MPa. Moreover, the geopolymer specimens were also tested for heat resistance at a temperature of 1000oC for 2 hours. Results suggest high heat resistance with an increase of compressive strength from 262% to 417% after exposed at high temperature.

  19. Revisiting the Fundamentals and Capabilities of the Stack Compression Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, L.M.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martin, P.A.F.

    2011-01-01

    performance by comparing the flow curves obtained from its utilisation with those determined by means of compressive testing carried out on solid cylinder specimens of the same material. Results show that mechanical testing of materials by means of the stack compression test is capable of meeting...... the increasing demand of accurate and reliable flow curves for sheet metals....

  20. Effects of volumetric expansion in molecular crystals: A quantum mechanical investigation on aspirin and paracetamol most stable polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kapil; Flurchick, Kenneth M.; Valenzano, Loredana

    2015-02-01

    This work reports a study performed at hybrid semi-empirical density functional level (B3LYP-D2*) of the physico-chemical properties of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in their most stable crystalline forms. It is shown how effects arising from volumetric expansions influence the properties of the materials. Structural, energetic, and vibrational properties are in good agreement with experimental values reported at temperatures far from 0 K. Results show that the proposed approach is reliable enough to reproduce effects of volumetric expansion on lattice energies and other measurable physico-chemical observables related to inter-molecular forces.

  1. Isostatic compression of buffer blocks. Middle scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritola, J.; Pyy, E.

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing of buffer components using isostatic compression method has been studied in small scale in 2008 (Laaksonen 2010). These tests included manufacturing of buffer blocks using different bentonite materials and different compression pressures. Isostatic mould technology was also tested, along with different methods to fill the mould, such as vibration and partial vacuum, as well as a stepwise compression of the blocks. The development of manufacturing techniques has continued with small-scale (30 %) blocks (diameter 600 mm) in 2009. This was done in a separate project: Isostatic compression, manufacturing and testing of small scale (D = 600 mm) buffer blocks. The research on the isostatic compression method continued in 2010 in a project aimed to test and examine the isostatic manufacturing process of buffer blocks at 70 % scale (block diameter 1200 to 1300 mm), and the aim was to continue in 2011 with full-scale blocks (diameter 1700 mm). A total of nine bentonite blocks were manufactured at 70 % scale, of which four were ring-shaped and the rest were cylindrical. It is currently not possible to manufacture full-scale blocks, because there is no sufficiently large isostatic press available. However, such a compression unit is expected to be possible to use in the near future. The test results of bentonite blocks, produced with an isostatic pressing method at different presses and at different sizes, suggest that the technical characteristics, for example bulk density and strength values, are somewhat independent of the size of the block, and that the blocks have fairly homogenous characteristics. Water content and compression pressure are the two most important properties determining the characteristics of the compressed blocks. By adjusting these two properties it is fairly easy to produce blocks at a desired density. The commonly used compression pressure in the manufacturing of bentonite blocks is 100 MPa, which compresses bentonite to approximately

  2. Isostatic compression of buffer blocks. Middle scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritola, J.; Pyy, E. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    Manufacturing of buffer components using isostatic compression method has been studied in small scale in 2008 (Laaksonen 2010). These tests included manufacturing of buffer blocks using different bentonite materials and different compression pressures. Isostatic mould technology was also tested, along with different methods to fill the mould, such as vibration and partial vacuum, as well as a stepwise compression of the blocks. The development of manufacturing techniques has continued with small-scale (30 %) blocks (diameter 600 mm) in 2009. This was done in a separate project: Isostatic compression, manufacturing and testing of small scale (D = 600 mm) buffer blocks. The research on the isostatic compression method continued in 2010 in a project aimed to test and examine the isostatic manufacturing process of buffer blocks at 70 % scale (block diameter 1200 to 1300 mm), and the aim was to continue in 2011 with full-scale blocks (diameter 1700 mm). A total of nine bentonite blocks were manufactured at 70 % scale, of which four were ring-shaped and the rest were cylindrical. It is currently not possible to manufacture full-scale blocks, because there is no sufficiently large isostatic press available. However, such a compression unit is expected to be possible to use in the near future. The test results of bentonite blocks, produced with an isostatic pressing method at different presses and at different sizes, suggest that the technical characteristics, for example bulk density and strength values, are somewhat independent of the size of the block, and that the blocks have fairly homogenous characteristics. Water content and compression pressure are the two most important properties determining the characteristics of the compressed blocks. By adjusting these two properties it is fairly easy to produce blocks at a desired density. The commonly used compression pressure in the manufacturing of bentonite blocks is 100 MPa, which compresses bentonite to approximately

  3. Crumpled Nitrogen-Doped Graphene for Supercapacitors with High Gravimetric and Volumetric Performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Ding, Bing; Xu, Yunling; Shen, Laifa; Dou, Hui; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2015-10-14

    Graphene is considered a promising electrochemical capacitors electrode material due to its high surface area and high electrical conductivity. However, restacking interactions between graphene nanosheets significantly decrease the ion-accessible surface area and impede electronic and ionic transfer. This would, in turn, severely hinder the realization of high energy density. Herein, we report a strategy for preparation of few-layer graphene material with abundant crumples and high-level nitrogen doping. The two-dimensional graphene nanosheets (CNG) feature high ion-available surface area, excellent electronic and ion transfer properties, and high packing density, permitting the CNG electrode to exhibit excellent electrochemical performance. In ionic liquid electrolyte, the CNG electrode exhibits gravimetric and volumetric capacitances of 128 F g(-1) and 98 F cm(-3), respectively, achieving gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of 56 Wh kg(-1) and 43 Wh L(-1). The preparation strategy described here provides a new approach for developing a graphene-based supercapacitor with high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities.

  4. Flexible MXene/Graphene Films for Ultrafast Supercapacitors with Outstanding Volumetric Capacitance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jun [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Harbin Engineering Univ., Harbin (China); Ren, Chang E. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Maleski, Kathleen [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hatter, Christine B. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Anasori, Babak [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Urbankowski, Patrick [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sarycheva, Asya [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gogotsi, Yury G. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    A strategy to prepare flexible and conductive MXene/graphene (reduced graphene oxide, rGO) supercapacitor electrodes by using electrostatic self-assembly between positively charged rGO modified with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and negatively charged titanium carbide MXene nanosheets is presented. After electrostatic assembly, rGO nanosheets are inserted in-between MXene layers. As a result, the self-restacking of MXene nanosheets is effectively prevented, leading to a considerably increased interlayer spacing. Accelerated diffusion of electrolyte ions enables more electroactive sites to become accessible. The freestanding MXene/rGO-5 wt% electrode displays a volumetric capacitance of 1040 F cm–3 at a scan rate of 2 mV s–1, an impressive rate capability with 61% capacitance retention at 1 V s–1 and long cycle life. Moreover, the fabricated binder-free symmetric supercapacitor shows an ultrahigh volumetric energy density of 32.6 Wh L–1, which is among the highest values reported for carbon and MXene based materials in aqueous electrolytes. Furthermore, this work provides fundamental insight into the effect of interlayer spacing on the electrochemical performance of 2D hybrid materials and sheds light on the design of next-generation flexible, portable and highly integrated supercapacitors with high volumetric and rate performances.

  5. Soil volumetric water content measurements using TDR technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vincenzi

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A physical model to measure some hydrological and thermal parameters in soils will to be set up. The vertical profiles of: volumetric water content, matric potential and temperature will be monitored in different soils. The volumetric soil water content is measured by means of the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR technique. The result of a test to determine experimentally the reproducibility of the volumetric water content measurements is reported together with the methodology and the results of the analysis of the TDR wave forms. The analysis is based on the calculation of the travel time of the TDR signal in the wave guide embedded in the soil.

  6. Towards ultrahigh volumetric capacitance: graphene derived highly dense but porous carbons for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ying; Xie, Xiaoying; Lv, Wei; Tang, Dai-Ming; Kong, Debin; Huang, Zhenghong; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Ishii, Takafumi; Li, Baohua; Golberg, Dmitri; Kang, Feiyu; Kyotani, Takashi; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2013-10-01

    A small volumetric capacitance resulting from a low packing density is one of the major limitations for novel nanocarbons finding real applications in commercial electrochemical energy storage devices. Here we report a carbon with a density of 1.58 g cm-3, 70% of the density of graphite, constructed of compactly interlinked graphene nanosheets, which is produced by an evaporation-induced drying of a graphene hydrogel. Such a carbon balances two seemingly incompatible characteristics: a porous microstructure and a high density, and therefore has a volumetric capacitance for electrochemical capacitors (ECs) up to 376 F cm-3, which is the highest value so far reported for carbon materials in an aqueous electrolyte. More promising, the carbon is conductive and moldable, and thus could be used directly as a well-shaped electrode sheet for the assembly of a supercapacitor device free of any additives, resulting in device-level high energy density ECs.

  7. Volumetric characteristics and compactability of asphalt rubber mixtures with organic warm mix asphalt additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Rodríguez-Alloza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA refers to technologies that reduce manufacturing and compaction temperatures of asphalt mixtures allowing lower energy consumption and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from asphalt plants. These benefits, combined with the effective reuse of a solid waste product, make asphalt rubber (AR mixtures with WMA additives an excellent environmentally-friendly material for road construction. The effect of WMA additives on rubberized mixtures has not yet been established in detail and the lower mixing/compaction temperatures of these mixtures may result in insufficient compaction. In this sense, the present study uses a series of laboratory tests to evaluate the volumetric characteristics and compactability of AR mixtures with organic additives when production/compaction temperatures are decreased. The results of this study indicate that the additives selected can decrease the mixing/compaction temperatures without compromising the volumetric characteristics and compactability.

  8. Volumetric characteristics and compactability of asphalt rubber mixtures with organic warm mix asphalt additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Alloza, A.M.; Gallego, J.

    2017-01-01

    Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) refers to technologies that reduce manufacturing and compaction temperatures of asphalt mixtures allowing lower energy consumption and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from asphalt plants. These benefits, combined with the effective reuse of a solid waste product, make asphalt rubber (AR) mixtures with WMA additives an excellent environmentally-friendly material for road construction. The effect of WMA additives on rubberized mixtures has not yet been established in detail and the lower mixing/compaction temperatures of these mixtures may result in insufficient compaction. In this sense, the present study uses a series of laboratory tests to evaluate the volumetric characteristics and compactability of AR mixtures with organic additives when production/compaction temperatures are decreased. The results of this study indicate that the additives selected can decrease the mixing/compaction temperatures without compromising the volumetric characteristics and compactability. [es

  9. Predicting clinical outcomes in chordoma patients receiving immunotherapy: a comparison between volumetric segmentation and RECIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenerty, Kathleen E.; Folio, Les R.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Marté, Jennifer L.; Gulley, James L.; Heery, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) are the current standard for evaluating disease progression or therapy response in patients with solid tumors. RECIST 1.1 calls for axial, longest-diameter (or perpendicular short axis of lymph nodes) measurements of a maximum of five tumors, which limits clinicians’ ability to adequately measure disease burden, especially in patients with irregularly shaped tumors. This is especially problematic in chordoma, a disease for which RECIST does not always adequately capture disease burden because chordoma tumors are typically irregularly shaped and slow-growing. Furthermore, primary chordoma tumors tend to be adjacent to vital structures in the skull or sacrum that, when compressed, lead to significant clinical consequences. Volumetric segmentation is a newer technology that allows tumor burden to be measured in three dimensions on either MR or CT. Here, we compared the ability of RECIST measurements and tumor volumes to predict clinical outcomes in a cohort of 21 chordoma patients receiving immunotherapy. There was a significant difference in radiologic time to progression Kaplan-Meier curves between clinical outcome groups using volumetric segmentation (P = 0.012) but not RECIST (P = 0.38). In several cases, changes in volume were earlier and more sensitive reflections of clinical status. RECIST is a useful evaluation method when obvious changes are occurring in patients with chordoma. However, in many cases, RECIST does not detect small changes, and volumetric assessment was capable of detecting changes and predicting clinical outcome earlier than RECIST. Although this study was small and retrospective, we believe our results warrant further research in this area

  10. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  11. Experiments with automata compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daciuk, J.; Yu, S; Daley, M; Eramian, M G

    2001-01-01

    Several compression methods of finite-state automata are presented and evaluated. Most compression methods used here are already described in the literature. However, their impact on the size of automata has not been described yet. We fill that gap, presenting results of experiments carried out on

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Ibna Zahid, Zubayer

    2016-01-01

    Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE) platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A tot...

  13. Characteristics and modeling of spruce wood under dynamic compression load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenacher, Germar

    2014-01-01

    Spruce wood is frequently used as an energy absorbing material in impact limiters of packages for the transportation of radioactive material. A 9m drop test onto an unyielding target is mandatory for the packages. The impact results in a dynamic compression load of the spruce wood inside the impact limiter. The lateral dilation of the wood is restrained thereby due to encasing steel sheets. This work's objective was to provide a material model for spruce wood based on experimental investigations to enable the calculation of such loading conditions. About 600 crush tests with cubical spruce wood specimens were performed to characterize the material. The compression was up to 70% and the material was assumed to be transversely isotropic. Particularly the lateral constraint showed to have an important effect: the material develops a high lateral dilation without lateral constraint. The force-displacement characteristics show a comparably low force level and no or only slight hardening. Distinctive softening occurs after the linear-elastic region when loaded parallel to the fiber. On the other hand, using a lateral constraint results in significantly higher general force levels, distinctive hardening and lateral forces. The softening effect when loaded parallel to the fiber is less distinctive. Strain rate and temperature raise or lower the strength level, which was quantified for the applicable ranges of impact limiters. The hypothesis of an uncoupled evolution of the yield surface was proposed based on the experimental findings. It postulates an independent strength evolution with deviatoric and volumetric deformation. The hypothesis could be established using the first modeling approach, the modified LS-DYNA material model MAT075. A transversely isotropic material model was developed based thereupon and implemented in LS-DYNA. The material characteristics of spruce wood were considered using a multi-surface yield criterion and a non-associated flow rule. The yield

  14. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray diffraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Foerster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  15. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray difraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Forster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  16. Fetal brain volumetry through MRI volumetric reconstruction and segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estroff, Judy A.; Barnewolt, Carol E.; Connolly, Susan A.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Fetal MRI volumetry is a useful technique but it is limited by a dependency upon motion-free scans, tedious manual segmentation, and spatial inaccuracy due to thick-slice scans. An image processing pipeline that addresses these limitations was developed and tested. Materials and methods The principal sequences acquired in fetal MRI clinical practice are multiple orthogonal single-shot fast spin echo scans. State-of-the-art image processing techniques were used for inter-slice motion correction and super-resolution reconstruction of high-resolution volumetric images from these scans. The reconstructed volume images were processed with intensity non-uniformity correction and the fetal brain extracted by using supervised automated segmentation. Results Reconstruction, segmentation and volumetry of the fetal brains for a cohort of twenty-five clinically acquired fetal MRI scans was done. Performance metrics for volume reconstruction, segmentation and volumetry were determined by comparing to manual tracings in five randomly chosen cases. Finally, analysis of the fetal brain and parenchymal volumes was performed based on the gestational age of the fetuses. Conclusion The image processing pipeline developed in this study enables volume rendering and accurate fetal brain volumetry by addressing the limitations of current volumetry techniques, which include dependency on motion-free scans, manual segmentation, and inaccurate thick-slice interpolation. PMID:20625848

  17. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, N. Andres [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Maudsley, Andrew A. [Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Gupta, Rakesh K. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Walker, Gail R. [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core Resource, Sylvester Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Padgett, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Roy, Bhaswati [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Stoyanova, Radka, E-mail: RStoyanova@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on

  18. Volumetric and MGMT parameters in glioblastoma patients: Survival analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, Georgios; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Chatzisotiriou, Athanasios; Televantou, Despina; Eleftheraki, Anastasia G; Lambaki, Sofia; Misailidou, Despina; Selviaridis, Panagiotis; Fountzilas, George

    2012-01-01

    In this study several tumor-related volumes were assessed by means of a computer-based application and a survival analysis was conducted to evaluate the prognostic significance of pre- and postoperative volumetric data in patients harboring glioblastomas. In addition, MGMT (O 6 -methylguanine methyltransferase) related parameters were compared with those of volumetry in order to observe possible relevance of this molecule in tumor development. We prospectively analyzed 65 patients suffering from glioblastoma (GBM) who underwent radiotherapy with concomitant adjuvant temozolomide. For the purpose of volumetry T1 and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) sequences were used, acquired both pre- and postoperatively (pre-radiochemotherapy). The volumes measured on preoperative MR images were necrosis, enhancing tumor and edema (including the tumor) and on postoperative ones, net-enhancing tumor. Age, sex, performance status (PS) and type of operation were also included in the multivariate analysis. MGMT was assessed for promoter methylation with Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), for RNA expression with real time PCR, and for protein expression with immunohistochemistry in a total of 44 cases with available histologic material. In the multivariate analysis a negative impact was shown for pre-radiochemotherapy net-enhancing tumor on the overall survival (OS) (p = 0.023) and for preoperative necrosis on progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.030). Furthermore, the multivariate analysis confirmed the importance of PS in PFS and OS of patients. MGMT promoter methylation was observed in 13/23 (43.5%) evaluable tumors; complete methylation was observed in 3/13 methylated tumors only. High rate of MGMT protein positivity (> 20% positive neoplastic nuclei) was inversely associated with pre-operative tumor necrosis (p = 0.021). Our findings implicate that volumetric parameters may have a significant role in the prognosis of GBM patients. Furthermore

  19. Materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available . It is generally included as part of a structurally insulated panel (SIP) where the foam is sandwiched between external skins of steel, wood or cement. Cement composites Cement bonded composites are an important class of building materials. These products... for their stone buildings, including the Egyptians, Aztecs and Inca’s. As stone is a very dense material it requires intensive heating to become warm. Rocks were generally stacked dry but mud, and later cement, can be used as a mortar to hold the rocks...

  20. Region-of-interest volumetric visual hull refinement

    KAUST Repository

    Knoblauch, Daniel; Kuester, Falko

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a region-of-interest visual hull refinement technique, based on flexible voxel grids for volumetric visual hull reconstructions. Region-of-interest refinement is based on a multipass process, beginning with a focussed visual

  1. Non-uniform volumetric structures in Richtmyer-Meshkov flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staniç, M.; McFarland, J.; Stellingwerf, R.F.; Cassibry, J.T.; Ranjan, D.; Bonazza, R.; Greenough, J.A.; Abarzhi, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    We perform an integrated study of volumetric structures in Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by moderate shocks. Experiments, theoretical analyses, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations, and ARES Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian simulations are employed to analyze RM evolution for fluids with

  2. Serial volumetric registration of pulmonary CT studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, José Silvestre; Silva, Augusto; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2008-03-01

    Detailed morphological analysis of pulmonary structures and tissue, provided by modern CT scanners, is of utmost importance as in the case of oncological applications both for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. In this case, a patient may go through several tomographic studies throughout a period of time originating volumetric sets of image data that must be appropriately registered in order to track suspicious radiological findings. The structures or regions of interest may change their position or shape in CT exams acquired at different moments, due to postural, physiologic or pathologic changes, so, the exams should be registered before any follow-up information can be extracted. Postural mismatching throughout time is practically impossible to avoid being particularly evident when imaging is performed at the limiting spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a method for intra-patient registration of pulmonary CT studies, to assist in the management of the oncological pathology. Our method takes advantage of prior segmentation work. In the first step, the pulmonary segmentation is performed where trachea and main bronchi are identified. Then, the registration method proceeds with a longitudinal alignment based on morphological features of the lungs, such as the position of the carina, the pulmonary areas, the centers of mass and the pulmonary trans-axial principal axis. The final step corresponds to the trans-axial registration of the corresponding pulmonary masked regions. This is accomplished by a pairwise sectional registration process driven by an iterative search of the affine transformation parameters leading to optimal similarity metrics. Results with several cases of intra-patient, intra-modality registration, up to 7 time points, show that this method provides accurate registration which is needed for quantitative tracking of lesions and the development of image fusion strategies that may effectively assist the follow-up process.

  3. Dual-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Wu, Junqing; Wu, Huanmei; Geneser, Sarah; Xing, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is an emerging radiation therapy modality for treatment of tumors affected by respiratory motion. However, gating significantly prolongs the treatment time, as delivery is only activated during a single respiratory phase. To enhance the efficiency of gated VMAT delivery, a novel dual-gated VMAT (DG-VMAT) technique, in which delivery is executed at both exhale and inhale phases in a given arc rotation, is developed and experimentally evaluated. Arc delivery at two phases is realized by sequentially interleaving control points consisting of MUs, MLC sequences, and angles of VMAT plans generated at the exhale and inhale phases. Dual-gated delivery is initiated when a respiration gating signal enters the exhale window; when the exhale delivery concludes, the beam turns off and the gantry rolls back to the starting position for the inhale window. The process is then repeated until both inhale and exhale arcs are fully delivered. DG-VMAT plan delivery accuracy was assessed using a pinpoint chamber and diode array phantom undergoing programmed motion. DG-VMAT delivery was experimentally implemented through custom XML scripting in Varian’s TrueBeam™ STx Developer Mode. Relative to single gated delivery at exhale, the treatment time was improved by 95.5% for a sinusoidal breathing pattern. The pinpoint chamber dose measurement agreed with the calculated dose within 0.7%. For the DG-VMAT delivery, 97.5% of the diode array measurements passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. The feasibility of DG-VMAT delivery scheme has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. By leveraging the stability and natural pauses that occur at end-inspiration and end-exhalation, DG-VMAT provides a practical method for enhancing gated delivery efficiency by up to a factor of two

  4. Volumetric breast density affects performance of digital screening mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Wanders, JO; Holland, K; Veldhuis, WB; Mann, RM; Pijnappel, RM; Peeters, PH; Van Gils, CH; Karssemeijer, N

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine to what extent automatically measured volumetric mammographic density influences screening performance when using digital mammography (DM). METHODS: We collected a consecutive series of 111,898 DM examinations (2003-2011) from one screening unit of the Dutch biennial screening program (age 50-75 years). Volumetric mammographic density was automatically assessed using Volpara. We determined screening performance measures for four density categories comparable to the Ameri...

  5. Increasing the volumetric efficiency of Diesel engines by intake pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Hans

    1933-01-01

    Development of a method for calculating the volumetric efficiency of piston engines with intake pipes. Application of this method to the scavenging pumps of two-stroke-cycle engines with crankcase scavenging and to four-stroke-cycle engines. The utility of the method is demonstrated by volumetric-efficiency tests of the two-stroke-cycle engines with crankcase scavenging. Its practical application to the calculation of intake pipes is illustrated by example.

  6. Efficiency of Compressed Air Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, Brian; Brix, Wiebke

    2011-01-01

    The simplest type of a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) facility would be an adiabatic process consisting only of a compressor, a storage and a turbine, compressing air into a container when storing and expanding when producing. This type of CAES would be adiabatic and would if the machines...... were reversible have a storage efficiency of 100%. However, due to the specific capacity of the storage and the construction materials the air is cooled during and after compression in practice, making the CAES process diabatic. The cooling involves exergy losses and thus lowers the efficiency...... of the storage significantly. The efficiency of CAES as an electricity storage may be defined in several ways, we discuss these and find that the exergetic efficiency of compression, storage and production together determine the efficiency of CAES. In the paper we find that the efficiency of the practical CAES...

  7. Soft bilateral filtering volumetric shadows using cube shadow maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatam H Ali

    Full Text Available Volumetric shadows often increase the realism of rendered scenes in computer graphics. Typical volumetric shadows techniques do not provide a smooth transition effect in real-time with conservation on crispness of boundaries. This research presents a new technique for generating high quality volumetric shadows by sampling and interpolation. Contrary to conventional ray marching method, which requires extensive time, this proposed technique adopts downsampling in calculating ray marching. Furthermore, light scattering is computed in High Dynamic Range buffer to generate tone mapping. The bilateral interpolation is used along a view rays to smooth transition of volumetric shadows with respect to preserving-edges. In addition, this technique applied a cube shadow map to create multiple shadows. The contribution of this technique isreducing the number of sample points in evaluating light scattering and then introducing bilateral interpolation to improve volumetric shadows. This contribution is done by removing the inherent deficiencies significantly in shadow maps. This technique allows obtaining soft marvelous volumetric shadows, having a good performance and high quality, which show its potential for interactive applications.

  8. Visualization and volumetric structures from MR images of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parvin, B.; Johnston, W.; Robertson, D.

    1994-03-01

    Pinta is a system for segmentation and visualization of anatomical structures obtained from serial sections reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging. The system approaches the segmentation problem by assigning each volumetric region to an anatomical structure. This is accomplished by satisfying constraints at the pixel level, slice level, and volumetric level. Each slice is represented by an attributed graph, where nodes correspond to regions and links correspond to the relations between regions. These regions are obtained by grouping pixels based on similarity and proximity. The slice level attributed graphs are then coerced to form a volumetric attributed graph, where volumetric consistency can be verified. The main novelty of our approach is in the use of the volumetric graph to ensure consistency from symbolic representations obtained from individual slices. In this fashion, the system allows errors to be made at the slice level, yet removes them when the volumetric consistency cannot be verified. Once the segmentation is complete, the 3D surfaces of the brain can be constructed and visualized.

  9. Shock absorbing properties of toroidal shells under compression, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Yuji

    1985-01-01

    The author has previously presented the static load-deflection relations of a toroidal shell subjected to axisymmetric compression between rigid plates and those of its outer half when subjected to lateral compression. In both these cases, the analytical method was based on the incremental Rayleigh-Ritz method. In this paper, the effects of compression angle and strain rate on the load-deflection relations of the toroidal shell are investigated for its use as a shock absorber for the radioactive material shipping cask which must keep its structural integrity even after accidental falls at any angle. Static compression tests have been carried out at four angles of compression, 10 0 , 20 0 , 50 0 , 90 0 and the applications of the preceding analytical method have been discussed. Dynamic compression tests have also been performed using the free-falling drop hammer. The results are compared with those in the static compression tests. (author)

  10. Design and synthesis of vanadium hydrazide gels for Kubas-type hydrogen adsorption: a new class of hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tuan K A; Webb, Michael I; Mai, Hung V; Hamaed, Ahmad; Walsby, Charles J; Trudeau, Michel; Antonelli, David M

    2010-08-25

    In this paper we demonstrate that the Kubas interaction, a nondissociative form of weak hydrogen chemisorption with binding enthalpies in the ideal 20-30 kJ/mol range for room-temperature hydrogen storage, can be exploited in the design of a new class of hydrogen storage materials which avoid the shortcomings of hydrides and physisorpion materials. This was accomplished through the synthesis of novel vanadium hydrazide gels that use low-coordinate V centers as the principal Kubas H(2) binding sites with only a negligible contribution from physisorption. Materials were synthesized at vanadium-to-hydrazine ratios of 4:3, 1:1, 1:1.5, and 1:2 and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The material with the highest capacity possesses an excess reversible storage of 4.04 wt % at 77 K and 85 bar, corresponding to a true volumetric adsorption of 80 kg H(2)/m(3) and an excess volumetric adsorption of 60.01 kg/m(3). These values are in the range of the ultimate U.S. Department of Energy goal for volumetric density (70 kg/m(3)) as well as the best physisorption material studied to date (49 kg H(2)/m(3) for MOF-177). This material also displays a surprisingly high volumetric density of 23.2 kg H(2)/m(3) at room temperature and 85 bar--roughly 3 times higher than that of compressed gas and approaching the DOE 2010 goal of 28 kg H(2)/m(3). These materials possess linear isotherms and enthalpies that rise on coverage and have little or no kinetic barrier to adsorption or desorption. In a practical system these materials would use pressure instead of temperature as a toggle and can thus be used in compressed gas tanks, currently employed in many hydrogen test vehicles, to dramatically increase the amount of hydrogen stored and therefore the range of any vehicle.

  11. Finite element modeling of deposition of ceramic material during SLM additive manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A three dimensional model for material deposition in Selective Laser Melting (SLM with application to Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic ceramic is presented. As the material is transparent to laser, dopants are added to increase the heat absorption efficiency. Based on Beer-Lambert law, a volumetric heat source model taking into account the material absorption is derived. The Level Set method with multiphase homogenization is used to track the shape of deposed bead and the thermodynamic is coupled to calculate the melting-solidification path. The shrinkage during consolidation from powder to compact medium is modeled by a compressible Newtonian constitutive law. A semi-implicit formulation of surface tension is used, which permits a stable resolution to capture the gas-liquid interface. The formation of droplets is obtained and slight waves of melt pool are observed. The influence of different process parameters on temperature distribution, melt pool profiles and bead shapes is discussed.

  12. A Solar Volumetric Receiver: Influence of Absorbing Cells Configuration on Device Thermal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Shuja, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal performance of a solar volumetric receiver incorporating the different cell geometric configurations is investigated. Triangular, hexagonal, and rectangular absorbing cells are incorporated in the analysis. The fluid volume fraction, which is the ratio of the volume of the working fluid over the total volume of solar volumetric receiver, is introduced to assess the effect of cell size on the heat transfer rates in the receiver. In this case, reducing the fluid volume fraction corresponds to increasing cell size in the receiver. SiC is considered as the cell material, and air is used as the working fluid in the receiver. The Lambert's Beer law is incorporated to account for the solar absorption in the receiver. A finite element method is used to solve the governing equation of flow and heat transfer. It is found that the fluid volume fraction has significant effect on the flow field in the solar volumetric receiver, which also modifies thermal field in the working fluid. The triangular absorbing cell gives rise to improved effectiveness of the receiver and then follows the hexagonal and rectangular cells. The second law efficiency of the receiver remains high when hexagonal cells are used. This occurs for the fluid volume fraction ratio of 0.5.

  13. WE-D-BRB-03: Current State of Volumetric Image Guidance for Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, C. [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  14. WE-D-BRB-03: Current State of Volumetric Image Guidance for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, C.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  15. Change in behavior of uniaxial compression due to degradation of salt water and freezing and thawing for rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Kobayashi, Akira; Aoyama, Shigeyasu

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the degradation on the mechanical behavior, the degraded rock samples were prepared to the uniaxial compression test. The degradation methods are divided into two types. One type is submerged in the 10% saline water (10%NaCl) for 90 days, and another one is freezing and thawing for 240 cycles. The degraded Smaland-granites were preserved in saline water. Kurihashi-granodiorite, Tage-tuff and Funyu-tuff were imposed on freezing and thawing test to make degraded state. The damage parameters were identified from the stress-strain relation obtained from the uniaxial compression tests. The damage parameters are K υ , n υ , K d , n d and B 0 . K υ and n υ are related to expansive strain. K d , n d and B 0 are subject to behavior of Young's modulus. By investigating the change in the damage parameters of the degraded rock, the effect of the degradation was tried to infer. As the results, it was inferred using the damage parameters that the Smaland-granite becomes more expansive material and the damage occurs earlier due to saline water degradation. Moreover, it was considered that the Kurihashi-granodiorite and Tage-tuff become more expansive and the axial strain at the failure decreases by freezing and thawing degradation, however the axial strain of the Funyu-tuff at the failure becomes large. It was found the proposed damage parameters can be good index for volumetric strain behavior after degradation. (author)

  16. Measurement of compressed breast thickness by optical stereoscopic photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Albert H; Mawdsley, Gordon E; Yaffe, Martin J

    2009-02-01

    The determination of volumetric breast density (VBD) from mammograms requires accurate knowledge of the thickness of the compressed breast. In attempting to accurately determine VBD from images obtained on conventional mammography systems, the authors found that the thickness reported by a number of mammography systems in the field varied by as much as 15 mm when compressing the same breast or phantom. In order to evaluate the behavior of mammographic compression systems and to be able to predict the thickness at different locations in the breast on patients, they have developed a method for measuring the local thickness of the breast at all points of contact with the compression paddle using optical stereoscopic photogrammetry. On both flat (solid) and compressible phantoms, the measurements were accurate to better than 1 mm with a precision of 0.2 mm. In a pilot study, this method was used to measure thickness on 108 volunteers who were undergoing mammography examination. This measurement tool will allow us to characterize paddle surface deformations, deflections and calibration offsets for mammographic units.

  17. Compressive strength evolution of thermally-stressed Saint Maximin limestone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, J.; Griffiths, L.; Baud, P.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Heap, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Saint Maximin quarry (Oise, France) opened in the early 1600s, and its limestone has been used extensively as masonry stone, particularly during the classical era of Parisian architecture from the 17th century onwards. Its widespread use has been due to a combination of its regional availability, its high workability, and its aesthetic appeal. Notable buildings completed using this material include sections of the Place de la Concorde and the Louvre in Paris. More recently, however, it has seen increasing use in the construction of large private residences throughout the United States as well as extensions to private institutions such as Stanford University. For any large building, fire hazard can be a substantial concern, especially in tectonically active areas where catastrophic fires may arise following large-magnitude earthquakes. Typically, house fires burn at temperatures of around 600 °C ( 1000 F). Given the ubiquity of this geomaterial as a building stone, it is important to ascertain the influence of heating on the strength of Saint Maximin limestone (SML), and in turn the structural stability of the buildings it is used in. We performed a series of compressive tests and permeability measurements on samples of SML to determine its strength evolution in response to heating to incrementally higher temperatures. We observe that the uniaxial compressive strength of SML decreases from >12 MPa at room temperature to 400 °C). We anticipate that this substantial weakening is in part a result of thermal microcracking, whereby changes in temperature induce thermal stresses due to a mismatch in thermal expansion between the constituent grains. This mechanism is compounded by the volumetric increase of quartz through its alpha - beta transition at 573 °C, and by the thermal decomposition of calcite. To track the formation of thermal microcracks, we monitor acoustic emissions, a common proxy for microcracking, during the heating of an SML sample. The

  18. Experimental analysis of volumetric wear behavioural and mechanical properties study of as cast and 1Hr homogenized Al-25Mg2Si2Cu4Ni alloy at constant load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlapur, M. D.; Mallapur, D. G.; Udupa, K. Rajendra

    2018-04-01

    In the current study, an experimental analysis of volumetric wear behaviour and mechanical properties of aluminium (Al-25Mg2Si2Cu4Ni) alloy in as cast and 1Hr homogenized with T6 heat treatment is carried out at constant load. Pin-on-disc apparatus was used to carry out sliding wear test. Mechanical properties such as tensile, hardness and compression test on as-cast and 1 hr homogenized samples are measured. Universal testing machine was used to conduct the tensile and compressive test at room temperature. Brinell hardness tester was used to conduct the hardness test. The scanning electron microscope was used to analyze the worn-out wear surfaces. Wear results and mechanical properties shows that 1Hr homogenized Al-25Mg2Si2Cu4Ni alloy samples with T6 treated had better volumetric wear resistance, hardness, tensile and compressive strength as compared to as cast samples.

  19. Imaging-genomics reveals driving pathways of MRI derived volumetric tumor phenotype features in Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, Patrick; Gutman, David A.; Dunn, William D. Jr; Holder, Chad A.; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) tumors exhibit strong phenotypic differences that can be quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the underlying biological drivers of these imaging phenotypes remain largely unknown. An Imaging-Genomics analysis was performed to reveal the mechanistic associations between MRI derived quantitative volumetric tumor phenotype features and molecular pathways. One hundred fourty one patients with presurgery MRI and survival data were included in our analysis. Volumetric features were defined, including the necrotic core (NE), contrast-enhancement (CE), abnormal tumor volume assessed by post-contrast T1w (tumor bulk or TB), tumor-associated edema based on T2-FLAIR (ED), and total tumor volume (TV), as well as ratios of these tumor components. Based on gene expression where available (n = 91), pathway associations were assessed using a preranked gene set enrichment analysis. These results were put into context of molecular subtypes in GBM and prognostication. Volumetric features were significantly associated with diverse sets of biological processes (FDR < 0.05). While NE and TB were enriched for immune response pathways and apoptosis, CE was associated with signal transduction and protein folding processes. ED was mainly enriched for homeostasis and cell cycling pathways. ED was also the strongest predictor of molecular GBM subtypes (AUC = 0.61). CE was the strongest predictor of overall survival (C-index = 0.6; Noether test, p = 4x10 −4 ). GBM volumetric features extracted from MRI are significantly enriched for information about the biological state of a tumor that impacts patient outcomes. Clinical decision-support systems could exploit this information to develop personalized treatment strategies on the basis of noninvasive imaging. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2659-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. Compressive laser ranging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Wm Randall; Barber, Zeb W; Renner, Christoffer

    2011-12-15

    Compressive sampling has been previously proposed as a technique for sampling radar returns and determining sparse range profiles with a reduced number of measurements compared to conventional techniques. By employing modulation on both transmission and reception, compressive sensing in ranging is extended to the direct measurement of range profiles without intermediate measurement of the return waveform. This compressive ranging approach enables the use of pseudorandom binary transmit waveforms and return modulation, along with low-bandwidth optical detectors to yield high-resolution ranging information. A proof-of-concept experiment is presented. With currently available compact, off-the-shelf electronics and photonics, such as high data rate binary pattern generators and high-bandwidth digital optical modulators, compressive laser ranging can readily achieve subcentimeter resolution in a compact, lightweight package.

  1. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivekanandan, Nagarajan; Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan

    2012-01-01

    A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V 20Gy and V 30Gy dose levels (range, 4.62–17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D 35% of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5–5.8%. Mean V 10Gy and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15–20 Gy) in the range of 14–16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20–25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

  2. Chitin and Chitosan as Direct Compression Excipients in Pharmaceutical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badwan, Adnan A.; Rashid, Iyad; Al Omari, Mahmoud M.H.; Darras, Fouad H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the numerous uses of chitin and chitosan as new functional materials of high potential in various fields, they are still behind several directly compressible excipients already dominating pharmaceutical applications. There are, however, new attempts to exploit chitin and chitosan in co-processing techniques that provide a product with potential to act as a direct compression (DC) excipient. This review outlines the compression properties of chitin and chitosan in the context of DC pharmaceutical applications. PMID:25810109

  3. Chitin and Chitosan as Direct Compression Excipients in Pharmaceutical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan A. Badwan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the numerous uses of chitin and chitosan as new functional materials of high potential in various fields, they are still behind several directly compressible excipients already dominating pharmaceutical applications. There are, however, new attempts to exploit chitin and chitosan in co-processing techniques that provide a product with potential to act as a direct compression (DC excipient. This review outlines the compression properties of chitin and chitosan in the context of DC pharmaceutical applications.

  4. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture in Brittle Solids and the Volumetric Strain Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, K.; Yamachi, H.

    2017-12-01

    As pointed out by Uenishi (2016 AGU Fall Meeting), source dynamics of ordinary earthquakes is often studied in the framework of 3D rupture in brittle solids but our knowledge of mechanics of actual 3D rupture is limited. Typically, criteria derived from 1D frictional observations of sliding materials or post-failure behavior of solids are applied in seismic simulations, and although mode-I cracks are frequently encountered in earthquake-induced ground failures, rupture in tension is in most cases ignored. Even when it is included in analyses, the classical maximum principal tensile stress rupture criterion is repeatedly used. Our recent basic experiments of dynamic rupture of spherical or cylindrical monolithic brittle solids by applying high-voltage electric discharge impulses or impact loads have indicated generation of surprisingly simple and often flat rupture surfaces in 3D specimens even without the initial existence of planes of weakness. However, at the same time, the snapshots taken by a high-speed digital video camera have shown rather complicated histories of rupture development in these 3D solid materials, which seem to be difficult to be explained by, for example, the maximum principal stress criterion. Instead, a (tensile) volumetric strain criterion where the volumetric strain (dilatation or the first invariant of the strain tensor) is a decisive parameter for rupture seems more effective in computationally reproducing the multi-directionally propagating waves and rupture. In this study, we try to show the connection between this volumetric strain criterion and other classical rupture criteria or physical parameters employed in continuum mechanics, and indicate that the criterion has, to some degree, physical meanings. First, we mathematically illustrate that the criterion is equivalent to a criterion based on the mean normal stress, a crucial parameter in plasticity. Then, we mention the relation between the volumetric strain criterion and the

  5. View compensated compression of volume rendered images for remote visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalgudi, Hariharan G; Marcellin, Michael W; Bilgin, Ali; Oh, Han; Nadar, Mariappan S

    2009-07-01

    Remote visualization of volumetric images has gained importance over the past few years in medical and industrial applications. Volume visualization is a computationally intensive process, often requiring hardware acceleration to achieve a real time viewing experience. One remote visualization model that can accomplish this would transmit rendered images from a server, based on viewpoint requests from a client. For constrained server-client bandwidth, an efficient compression scheme is vital for transmitting high quality rendered images. In this paper, we present a new view compensation scheme that utilizes the geometric relationship between viewpoints to exploit the correlation between successive rendered images. The proposed method obviates motion estimation between rendered images, enabling significant reduction to the complexity of a compressor. Additionally, the view compensation scheme, in conjunction with JPEG2000 performs better than AVC, the state of the art video compression standard.

  6. Comparison of the effectiveness of compression stockings and layer compression systems in venous ulceration treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawień, Arkadiusz; Cierzniakowska, Katarzyna; Cwajda-Białasik, Justyna; Mościcka, Paulina

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the research was to compare the dynamics of venous ulcer healing when treated with the use of compression stockings as well as original two- and four-layer bandage systems. Material and methods A group of 46 patients suffering from venous ulcers was studied. This group consisted of 36 (78.3%) women and 10 (21.70%) men aged between 41 and 88 years (the average age was 66.6 years and the median was 67). Patients were randomized into three groups, for treatment with the ProGuide two-layer system, Profore four-layer compression, and with the use of compression stockings class II. In the case of multi-layer compression, compression ensuring 40 mmHg blood pressure at ankle level was used. Results In all patients, independently of the type of compression therapy, a few significant statistical changes of ulceration area in time were observed (Student’s t test for matched pairs, p ulceration area in each of the successive measurements was observed in patients treated with the four-layer system – on average 0.63 cm2/per week. The smallest loss of ulceration area was observed in patients using compression stockings – on average 0.44 cm2/per week. However, the observed differences were not statistically significant (Kruskal-Wallis test H = 4.45, p > 0.05). Conclusions A systematic compression therapy, applied with preliminary blood pressure of 40 mmHg, is an effective method of conservative treatment of venous ulcers. Compression stockings and prepared systems of multi-layer compression were characterized by similar clinical effectiveness. PMID:22419941

  7. Failure behaviour of carbon/carbon composite under compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tushtev, K.; Grathwohl, G. [Universitaet Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Bremen (Germany); Koch, D. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fuer Bauweisen- und Konstruktionsforschung, Keramische Verbundstrukturen, Stuttgart (Germany); Horvath, J.

    2012-11-15

    In this work the properties of Carbon/Carbon-material are investigated under quasi-static compression and model-like characterized. The investigated material was produced by pyrolysis of a Carbon/Carbon - composite of bidirectionally reinforced fabric layers. For the compression tests, a device to prevent additional bending stress was made. The stress-strain behaviour of this material has been reproduced in various publications. This will be discussed on the fracture behaviour and compared the experimental results from the compression tests with the characteristics of tensile and shear tests. The different compression and tensile properties of stiffness, poisson and strength were assessed. Differences between the tensile and compression behaviour resulting from on-axis tests by micro buckling and crack closure and off-axis experiments by superimposed pressure normal stresses that lead to increased shear friction. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Volumetric fat-water separated T2-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasanawala, Shreyas S.; Sonik, Arvind; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J.; Venkatesan, Ramesh; Lai, Peng; Brau, Anja C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric body MRI exams often cover multiple body parts, making the development of broadly applicable protocols and obtaining uniform fat suppression a challenge. Volumetric T2 imaging with Dixon-type fat-water separation might address this challenge, but it is a lengthy process. We develop and evaluate a faster two-echo approach to volumetric T2 imaging with fat-water separation. A volumetric spin-echo sequence was modified to include a second shifted echo so two image sets are acquired. A region-growing reconstruction approach was developed to decompose separate water and fat images. Twenty-six children were recruited with IRB approval and informed consent. Fat-suppression quality was graded by two pediatric radiologists and compared against conventional fat-suppressed fast spin-echo T2-W images. Additionally, the value of in- and opposed-phase images was evaluated. Fat suppression on volumetric images had high quality in 96% of cases (95% confidence interval of 80-100%) and were preferred over or considered equivalent to conventional two-dimensional fat-suppressed FSE T2 imaging in 96% of cases (95% confidence interval of 78-100%). In- and opposed-phase images had definite value in 12% of cases. Volumetric fat-water separated T2-weighted MRI is feasible and is likely to yield improved fat suppression over conventional fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging. (orig.)

  9. Volumetric image interpretation in radiology: scroll behavior and cognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boer, Larissa; van der Schaaf, Marieke F; Vincken, Koen L; Mol, Chris P; Stuijfzand, Bobby G; van der Gijp, Anouk

    2018-05-16

    The interpretation of medical images is a primary task for radiologists. Besides two-dimensional (2D) images, current imaging technologies allow for volumetric display of medical images. Whereas current radiology practice increasingly uses volumetric images, the majority of studies on medical image interpretation is conducted on 2D images. The current study aimed to gain deeper insight into the volumetric image interpretation process by examining this process in twenty radiology trainees who all completed four volumetric image cases. Two types of data were obtained concerning scroll behaviors and think-aloud data. Types of scroll behavior concerned oscillations, half runs, full runs, image manipulations, and interruptions. Think-aloud data were coded by a framework of knowledge and skills in radiology including three cognitive processes: perception, analysis, and synthesis. Relating scroll behavior to cognitive processes showed that oscillations and half runs coincided more often with analysis and synthesis than full runs, whereas full runs coincided more often with perception than oscillations and half runs. Interruptions were characterized by synthesis and image manipulations by perception. In addition, we investigated relations between cognitive processes and found an overall bottom-up way of reasoning with dynamic interactions between cognitive processes, especially between perception and analysis. In sum, our results highlight the dynamic interactions between these processes and the grounding of cognitive processes in scroll behavior. It suggests, that the types of scroll behavior are relevant to describe how radiologists interact with and manipulate volumetric images.

  10. Aspects of volumetric efficiency measurement for reciprocating engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Radivoje B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The volumetric efficiency significantly influences engine output. Both design and dimensions of an intake and exhaust system have large impact on volumetric efficiency. Experimental equipment for measuring of airflow through the engine, which is placed in the intake system, may affect the results of measurements and distort the real picture of the impact of individual structural factors. This paper deals with the problems of experimental determination of intake airflow using orifice plates and the influence of orifice plate diameter on the results of the measurements. The problems of airflow measurements through a multi-process Otto/Diesel engine were analyzed. An original method for determining volumetric efficiency was developed based on in-cylinder pressure measurement during motored operation, and appropriate calibration of the experimental procedure was performed. Good correlation between the results of application of the original method for determination of volumetric efficiency and the results of theoretical model used in research of influence of the intake pipe length on volumetric efficiency was determined. [Acknowledgments. The paper is the result of the research within the project TR 35041 financed by the Ministry of Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia

  11. Superelastic Graphene Aerogel/Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene/MnO2 Composite as Compression-Tolerant Electrode for Electrochemical Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lv

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-compressible electrodes with high electrochemical performance, reversible compressibility and extreme durability are in high demand in compression-tolerant energy storage devices. Herein, an ultra-compressible ternary composite was synthesized by successively electrodepositing poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT and MnO2 into the superelastic graphene aerogel (SEGA. In SEGA/PEDOT/MnO2 ternary composite, SEGA provides the compressible backbone and conductive network; MnO2 is mainly responsible for pseudo reactions; the middle PEDOT not only reduces the interface resistance between MnO2 and graphene, but also further reinforces the strength of graphene cellar walls. The synergistic effect of the three components in the ternary composite electrode leads to high electrochemical performances and good compression-tolerant ability. The gravimetric capacitance of the compressible ternary composite electrodes reaches 343 F g−1 and can retain 97% even at 95% compressive strain. And a volumetric capacitance of 147.4 F cm−3 is achieved, which is much higher than that of other graphene-based compressible electrodes. This value of volumetric capacitance can be preserved by 80% after 3500 charge/discharge cycles under various compression strains, indicating an extreme durability.

  12. Transversely Compressed- and Restrained Shear Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    2013-01-01

    Anchorage of FRP strengthening systems where the deformation perpendicular to the FRP material is restrained or a compressive force is applied on the strengthening, seems to provide ductility, increased utilization of the FRP and failure modes which can be controlled through the anchorage method....

  13. Isotropic compression of cohesive-frictional particles with rolling resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luding, Stefan; Benz, Thomas; Nordal, Steinar

    2010-01-01

    Cohesive-frictional and rough powders are the subject of this study. The behavior under isotropic compression is examined for different material properties involving Coulomb friction, rolling-resistance and contact-adhesion. Under isotropic compression, the density continuously increases according

  14. Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A.H.; Sonnergaard, Jørn; Hovgaard, L.

    2005-01-01

    Low-pressure compression of pharmaceutical powders using small amounts of sample (50 mg) was evaluated as an alternative to traditional bulk powder characterization by tapping volumetry. Material parameters were extrapolated directly from the compression data and by fitting with the Walker...

  15. Model of large volumetric capacitance in graphene supercapacitors based on ion clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Brian; Fogler, M. M.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2011-12-01

    Electric double-layer supercapacitors (SCs) are promising devices for high-power energy storage based on the reversible absorption of ions into porous conducting electrodes. Graphene is a particularly good candidate for the electrode material in SCs due to its high conductivity and large surface area. In this paper, we consider SC electrodes made from a stack of graphene sheets with randomly inserted spacer molecules. We show that the large volumetric capacitances C≳100F/cm3 observed experimentally can be understood as a result of collective intercalation of ions into the graphene stack and the accompanying nonlinear screening by graphene electrons that renormalizes the charge of the ion clusters.

  16. A model of large volumetric capacitance in graphene supercapacitors based on ion clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Brian; Fogler, Michael; Shklovskii, Boris

    2012-02-01

    Electric double layer supercapacitors are promising devices for high-power energy storage based on the reversible absorption of ions into porous, conducting electrodes. Graphene is a particularly good candidate for the electrode material in supercapacitors due to its high conductivity and large surface area. In this paper we consider supercapacitor electrodes made from a stack of graphene sheets with randomly-inserted ``spacer" molecules. We show that the large volumetric capacitances C > 100 F/cm^3 observed experimentally can be understood as a result of collective intercalation of ions into the graphene stack and the accompanying nonlinear screening by graphene electrons that renormalizes the charge of the ion clusters.

  17. Optical pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The interest in using large lasers to achieve a very short and intense pulse for generating fusion plasma has provided a strong impetus to reexamine the possibilities of optical pulse compression at high energy. Pulse compression allows one to generate pulses of long duration (minimizing damage problems) and subsequently compress optical pulses to achieve the short pulse duration required for specific applications. The ideal device for carrying out this program has not been developed. Of the two approaches considered, the Gires--Tournois approach is limited by the fact that the bandwidth and compression are intimately related, so that the group delay dispersion times the square of the bandwidth is about unity for all simple Gires--Tournois interferometers. The Treacy grating pair does not suffer from this limitation, but is inefficient because diffraction generally occurs in several orders and is limited by the problem of optical damage to the grating surfaces themselves. Nonlinear and parametric processes were explored. Some pulse compression was achieved by these techniques; however, they are generally difficult to control and are not very efficient. (U.S.)

  18. Full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion via photonic nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglei; Xuan, Yimin

    2017-10-12

    Volumetric solar thermal conversion is an emerging technique for a plethora of applications such as solar thermal power generation, desalination, and solar water splitting. However, achieving broadband solar thermal absorption via dilute nanofluids is still a daunting challenge. In this work, full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion is demonstrated over a thin layer of the proposed 'photonic nanofluids'. The underlying mechanism is found to be the photonic superposition of core resonances, shell plasmons, and core-shell resonances at different wavelengths, whose coexistence is enabled by the broken symmetry of specially designed composite nanoparticles, i.e., Janus nanoparticles. The solar thermal conversion efficiency can be improved by 10.8% compared with core-shell nanofluids. The extinction coefficient of Janus dimers with various configurations is also investigated to unveil the effects of particle couplings. This work provides the possibility to achieve full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion, and may have potential applications in efficient solar energy harvesting and utilization.

  19. Volumetric display using a roof mirror grid array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Hirano, Noboru; Maeda, Yuuki; Ohno, Keisuke; Maekawa, Satoshi

    2010-02-01

    A volumetric display system using a roof mirror grid array (RMGA) is proposed. The RMGA consists of a two-dimensional array of dihedral corner reflectors and forms a real image at a plane-symmetric position. A two-dimensional image formed with a RMGA is moved at thigh speed by a mirror scanner. Cross-sectional images of a three-dimensional object are displayed in accordance with the position of the image plane. A volumetric image can be observed as a stack of the cross-sectional images by high-speed scanning. Image formation by a RMGA is free from aberrations. Moreover, a compact optical system can be constructed because a RMGA doesn't have a focal length. An experimental volumetric display system using a galvanometer mirror and a digital micromirror device was constructed. The formation of a three-dimensional image consisting of 1024 × 768 × 400 voxels is confirmed by the experimental system.

  20. Gradients estimation from random points with volumetric tensor in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomoaki; Nagata, Koji

    2017-12-01

    We present an estimation method of fully-resolved/coarse-grained gradients from randomly distributed points in turbulence. The method is based on a linear approximation of spatial gradients expressed with the volumetric tensor, which is a 3 × 3 matrix determined by a geometric distribution of the points. The coarse grained gradient can be considered as a low pass filtered gradient, whose cutoff is estimated with the eigenvalues of the volumetric tensor. The present method, the volumetric tensor approximation, is tested for velocity and passive scalar gradients in incompressible planar jet and mixing layer. Comparison with a finite difference approximation on a Cartesian grid shows that the volumetric tensor approximation computes the coarse grained gradients fairly well at a moderate computational cost under various conditions of spatial distributions of points. We also show that imposing the solenoidal condition improves the accuracy of the present method for solenoidal vectors, such as a velocity vector in incompressible flows, especially when the number of the points is not large. The volumetric tensor approximation with 4 points poorly estimates the gradient because of anisotropic distribution of the points. Increasing the number of points from 4 significantly improves the accuracy. Although the coarse grained gradient changes with the cutoff length, the volumetric tensor approximation yields the coarse grained gradient whose magnitude is close to the one obtained by the finite difference. We also show that the velocity gradient estimated with the present method well captures the turbulence characteristics such as local flow topology, amplification of enstrophy and strain, and energy transfer across scales.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of volumetric alcohol taxation in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Joshua M; Cobiac, Linda J; Doran, Christopher M; Vos, Theo; Shakeshaft, Anthony P

    2010-04-19

    To estimate the potential health benefits and cost savings of an alcohol tax rate that applies equally to all alcoholic beverages based on their alcohol content (volumetric tax) and to compare the cost savings with the cost of implementation. Mathematical modelling of three scenarios of volumetric alcohol taxation for the population of Australia: (i) no change in deadweight loss, (ii) no change in tax revenue, and (iii) all alcoholic beverages taxed at the same rate as spirits. Estimated change in alcohol consumption, tax revenue and health benefit. The estimated cost of changing to a volumetric tax rate is $18 million. A volumetric tax that is deadweight loss-neutral would increase the cost of beer and wine and reduce the cost of spirits, resulting in an estimated annual increase in taxation revenue of $492 million and a 2.77% reduction in annual consumption of pure alcohol. The estimated net health gain would be 21 000 disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), with potential cost offsets of $110 million per annum. A tax revenue-neutral scenario would result in an 0.05% decrease in consumption, and a tax on all alcohol at a spirits rate would reduce consumption by 23.85% and increase revenue by $3094 million [corrected]. All volumetric tax scenarios would provide greater health benefits and cost savings to the health sector than the existing taxation system, based on current understandings of alcohol-related health effects. An equalized volumetric tax that would reduce beer and wine consumption while increasing the consumption of spirits would need to be approached with caution. Further research is required to examine whether alcohol-related health effects vary by type of alcoholic beverage independent of the amount of alcohol consumed to provide a strong evidence platform for alcohol taxation policies.

  2. On the characterisation of the dynamic compressive behaviour of silicon carbides subjected to isentropic compression experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinszner Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic materials are commonly used as protective materials particularly due to their very high hardness and compressive strength. However, the microstructure of a ceramic has a great influence on its compressive strength and on its ballistic efficiency. To study the influence of microstructural parameters on the dynamic compressive behaviour of silicon carbides, isentropic compression experiments have been performed on two silicon carbide grades using a high pulsed power generator called GEPI. Contrary to plate impact experiments, the use of the GEPI device and of the lagrangian analysis allows determining the whole loading path. The two SiC grades studied present different Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL due to their different microstructures. For these materials, the experimental technique allowed evaluating the evolution of the equivalent stress during the dynamic compression. It has been observed that these two grades present a work hardening more or less pronounced after the HEL. The densification of the material seems to have more influence on the HEL than the grain size.

  3. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Rodriquez, P.J.; Younger, S.M.; Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal

  4. Pulsed Compression Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roestenberg, T. [University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-06-07

    The advantages of the Pulsed Compression Reactor (PCR) over the internal combustion engine-type chemical reactors are briefly discussed. Over the last four years a project concerning the fundamentals of the PCR technology has been performed by the University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands. In order to assess the feasibility of the application of the PCR principle for the conversion methane to syngas, several fundamental questions needed to be answered. Two important questions that relate to the applicability of the PCR for any process are: how large is the heat transfer rate from a rapidly compressed and expanded volume of gas, and how does this heat transfer rate compare to energy contained in the compressed gas? And: can stable operation with a completely free piston as it is intended with the PCR be achieved?.

  5. Medullary compression syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga T, L.; Echegaray, A.; Zaharia, M.; Pinillos A, L.; Moscol, A.; Barriga T, O.; Heredia Z, A.

    1994-01-01

    The authors made a retrospective study in 105 patients treated in the Radiotherapy Department of the National Institute of Neoplasmic Diseases from 1973 to 1992. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the influence of radiotherapy in patients with medullary compression syndrome in aspects concerning pain palliation and improvement of functional impairment. Treatment sheets of patients with medullary compression were revised: 32 out of 39 of patients (82%) came to hospital by their own means and continued walking after treatment, 8 out of 66 patients (12%) who came in a wheelchair or were bedridden, could mobilize by their own after treatment, 41 patients (64%) had partial alleviation of pain after treatment. In those who came by their own means and did not change their characteristics, functional improvement was observed. It is concluded that radiotherapy offers palliative benefit in patients with medullary compression syndrome. (authors). 20 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Lung, liver and lymph node metastases in follow-up MSCT. Comprehensive volumetric assessment of lesion size changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, A.M.; Fischer, S.; Biederer, J.; Heller, M.; Fabel, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Bolte, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Freitag-Wolf, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Informatik und Statistik; Soza, G.; Tietjen, C. [Siemens AG (Germany). Imaging and IT Div. Computed Tomography

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate measurement accuracy in terms of precision and inter-rater variability in the simultaneous volumetric assessment of lung, liver and lymph node metastasis size change over time in comparison to RECIST 1.1. Materials and Methods: Three independent readers evaluated multislice CT data from clinical follow-up studies (chest/abdomen) in 50 patients with metastases. A total of 117 lung, 77 liver and 97 lymph node metastases were assessed manually (RECIST 1.1) and by volumetry with semi-automated software. The quality of segmentation and need for manual adjustments were recorded. Volumes were converted to effective diameters to allow comparison to RECIST. For statistical assessment of precision and interobserver agreement, the Wilcoxon-signed rank test and Bland-Altman plots were utilized. Results: The quality of segmentation after manual correction was acceptable to excellent in 95 % of lesions and manual corrections were applied in 21 - 36 % of all lesions, most predominantly in lymph nodes. Mean precision was 2.6 - 6.3 % (manual) with 0.2 - 1.5 % (effective) relative measurement deviation (p <.001). Inter-reader median variation coefficients ranged from 9.4 - 12.8 % (manual) and 2.9 - 8.2 % (volumetric) for different lesion types (p <.001). The limits of agreement were {+-} 9.8 to {+-} 11.2 % for volumetric assessment. Conclusion: Superior precision and inter-rater variability of volumetric over manual measurement of lesion change over time was demonstrated in a whole body setting. (orig.)

  7. Tensile and compressive failure modes of laminated composites loaded by fatigue with different mean stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Assa

    1990-01-01

    Laminated composite materials tend to fail differently under tensile or compressive load. Under tension, the material accumulates cracks and fiber fractures, while under compression, the material delaminates and buckles. Tensile-compressive fatigue may cause either of these failure modes depending on the specific damage occurring in the laminate. This damage depends on the stress ratio of the fatigue loading. Analysis of the fatigue behavior of the composite laminate under tension-tension, compression-compression, and tension-compression had led to the development of a fatigue envelope presentation of the failure behavior. This envelope indicates the specific failure mode for any stress ratio and number of loading cycles. The construction of the fatigue envelope is based on the applied stress-cycles to failure (S-N) curves of both tensile-tensile and compressive-compressive fatigue. Test results are presented to verify the theoretical analysis.

  8. Compressive failure with interacting cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guoping; Liu Xila

    1993-01-01

    The failure processes in concrete and other brittle materials are just the results of the propagation, coalescence and interaction of many preexisting microcracks or voids. To understand the real behaviour of the brittle materials, it is necessary to bridge the gap from the relatively matured one crack behaviour to the stochastically distributed imperfections, that is, to concern the crack propagation and interaction of microscopic mechanism with macroscopic parameters of brittle materials. Brittle failure in compression has been studied theoretically by Horii and Nemat-Nasser (1986), in which a closed solution was obtained for a preexisting flaw or some special regular flaws. Zaitsev and Wittmann (1981) published a paper on crack propagation in compression, which is so-called numerical concrete, but they did not take account of the interaction among the microcracks. As for the modelling of the influence of crack interaction on fracture parameters, many studies have also been reported. Up till now, some researcher are working on crack interaction considering the ratios of SIFs with and without consideration of the interaction influences, there exist amplifying or shielding effects of crack interaction which are depending on the relative positions of these microcracks. The present paper attempts to simulate the whole failure process of brittle specimen in compression, which includes the complicated coupling effects between the interaction and propagation of randomly distributed or other typical microcrack configurations step by step. The lengths, orientations and positions of microcracks are all taken as random variables. The crack interaction among many preexisting random microcracks is evaluated with the help of a simple interaction matrix (Yang and Liu, 1991). For the subcritically stable propagation of microcracks in mixed mode fracture, fairly known maximum hoop stress criterion is adopted to compute branching lengths and directions at each tip of the crack

  9. Graph Compression by BFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Apostolico

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Web Graph is a large-scale graph that does not fit in main memory, so that lossless compression methods have been proposed for it. This paper introduces a compression scheme that combines efficient storage with fast retrieval for the information in a node. The scheme exploits the properties of the Web Graph without assuming an ordering of the URLs, so that it may be applied to more general graphs. Tests on some datasets of use achieve space savings of about 10% over existing methods.

  10. Competing hydrostatic compression mechanisms in nickel cyanide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Lucas, T.C. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Cairns, A.B.; Funnell, N.P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Tucker, M.G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Kleppe, A.K. [Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Hriljac, J.A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Goodwin, A.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    We use variable-pressure neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements to determine the uniaxial and bulk compressibilities of nickel(II) cyanide, Ni(CN){sub 2}. Whereas other layered molecular framework materials are known to exhibit negative area compressibility, we find that Ni(CN){sub 2} does not. We attribute this difference to the existence of low-energy in-plane tilt modes that provide a pressure-activated mechanism for layer contraction. The experimental bulk modulus we measure is about four times lower than that reported elsewhere on the basis of density functional theory methods [Phys. Rev. B 83 (2011) 024301].

  11. Synthesis and Thermodynamic Studies of Physisorptive Energy Storage Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadie, Nicholas

    Physical adsorption of hydrogen or other chemical fuels on the surface of carbonaceous materials offers a promising avenue for energy storage applications. The addition of a well-chosen sorbent material to a compressed gas tank increases the volumetric energy density of the system while still permitting fast refueling, simplicity of design, complete reversibility, high cyclability, and low overall cost of materials. While physical adsorption is most effective at temperatures below ambient, effective storage technologies are possible at room temperature and modestly high pressure. A volumetric Sieverts apparatus was designed, constructed, and commissioned to accurately measure adsorption uptake at high pressures and an appropriate thermodynamic treatment of the experimental data is presented. In Chapter 1, the problem of energy storage is introduced in the context of hydrogen as an ideal alternative fuel for future mobile vehicle applications, and with methane in mind as a near-term solution. The theory of physical adsorption that is relevant to this work is covered in Chapter 2. In-depth studies of two classes of materials are presented in the final chapters. Chapter 3 presents a study of the dissociative "hydrogen spillover" effect in the context of its viability as a practical hydrogen storage solution at room temperature. Chapters 4-5 deal with zeolite-templated carbon, an extremely high surface-area material which shows promise for hydrogen and methane storage applications. Studies of hydrogen adsorption at high pressure (Chapter 4) and anomalous thermodynamic properties of methane adsorption (Chapter 5) on ZTCs are presented. The concluding chapter discusses the impact of and possible future directions for this work.

  12. Establishing a volumetric measurement control program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S.H.; Jenkins, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), several facilities have nearly all their special nuclear material in solution and therefore, volume measurements play a key role in the accountability of these materials. Normally, facilities rely on frequent instrument calibrations, periodic tank calibrations and proper instrument configuration to ensure measurement control. At SRS, methods have been employed that go beyond these basic steps to monitor the volume measurement systems and provide real time indication of measurement control. These methods can be used to indicate if a tank requires recalibration, if there is a sampling problem, or if there is an instrument problem. The methods include: sample density comparison, in-tank to laboratory density comparison, redundant instrument comparison and tank to tank transfer comparison. This paper describes these methods and the generation of control charts to track these comparisons in real time

  13. 3D Volumetric Analysis of Fluid Inclusions Using Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, A.; Mulukutla, G.; Sahagian, D.; Bodnar, B.

    2009-05-01

    Fluid inclusions preserve valuable information regarding hydrothermal, metamorphic, and magmatic processes. The molar quantities of liquid and gaseous components in the inclusions can be estimated from their volumetric measurements at room temperatures combined with knowledge of the PVTX properties of the fluid and homogenization temperatures. Thus, accurate measurements of inclusion volumes and their two phase components are critical. One of the greatest advantages of the Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) in application to fluid inclsion analsyis is that it is affordable for large numbers of samples, given the appropriate software analysis tools and methodology. Our present work is directed toward developing those tools and methods. For the last decade LSCM has been considered as a potential method for inclusion volume measurements. Nevertheless, the adequate and accurate measurement by LSCM has not yet been successful for fluid inclusions containing non-fluorescing fluids due to many technical challenges in image analysis despite the fact that the cost of collecting raw LSCM imagery has dramatically decreased in recent years. These problems mostly relate to image analysis methodology and software tools that are needed for pre-processing and image segmentation, which enable solid, liquid and gaseous components to be delineated. Other challenges involve image quality and contrast, which is controlled by fluorescence of the material (most aqueous fluid inclusions do not fluoresce at the appropriate laser wavelengths), material optical properties, and application of transmitted and/or reflected confocal illumination. In this work we have identified the key problems of image analysis and propose some potential solutions. For instance, we found that better contrast of pseudo-confocal transmitted light images could be overlayed with poor-contrast true-confocal reflected light images within the same stack of z-ordered slices. This approach allows one to narrow

  14. Sorption Behavior of Compressed CO2 and CH4 on Ultrathin Hybrid Poly(POSS-imide) Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Michiel J T; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Wiese, Martin; Wessling, Matthias; Nijmeijer, Arian; Benes, Nieck E

    2015-12-09

    Sorption of compressed gases into thin polymeric films is essential for applications including gas sensors and membrane based gas separation. For glassy polymers, the sorption behavior is dependent on the nonequilibrium status of the polymer. The uptake of molecules by a polymer is generally accompanied by dilation, or swelling, of the polymer material. In turn, this dilation can result in penetrant induced plasticization and physical aging that affect the nonequilibrium status of the polymer. Here, we investigate the dilation and sorption behavior of ultrathin membrane layers of a hybrid inorganic-organic network material that consists of alternating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane and imide groups, upon exposure to compressed carbon dioxide and methane. The imide precursor contains fluoroalkene groups that provide affinity toward carbon dioxide, while the octa-functionalized silsesquioxane provides a high degree of cross-linking. This combination allows for extremely high sorption capacities, while structural rearrangements of the network are hindered. We study the simultaneous uptake of gases and dilation of the thin films at high pressures using spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. Ellipsometry provides the changes in both the refractive index and the film thickness, and allows for accurate quantification of sorption and swelling. In contrast, gravimetric and volumetric measurements only provide a single parameter; this does not allow an accurate correction for, for instance, the changes in buoyancy because of the extensive geometrical changes of highly swelling films. The sorption behavior of the ultrathin hybrid layers depends on the fluoroalkene group content. At low pressure, the apparent molar volume of the gases is low compared to the liquid molar volume of carbon dioxide and methane, respectively. At high gas concentrations in the polymer film, the apparent molar volume of carbon dioxide and methane exceeds that of the liquid molar volume, and

  15. 46 CFR 188.10-21 - Compressed gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-21 Compressed gas. This term includes any... by the Reid method covered by the American Society for Testing Materials Method of Test for Vapor...

  16. Compressive Strength of Compacted Clay-Sand Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faseel Suleman Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of sand to improve the strength of natural clays provides a viable alternative for civil infrastructure construction involving earthwork. The main objective of this note was to investigate the compressive strength of compacted clay-sand mixes. A natural clay of high plasticity was mixed with 20% and 40% sand (SP and their compaction and strength properties were determined. Results indicated that the investigated materials exhibited a brittle behaviour on the dry side of optimum and a ductile behaviour on the wet side of optimum. For each material, the compressive strength increased with an increase in density following a power law function. Conversely, the compressive strength increased with decreasing water content of the material following a similar function. Finally, the compressive strength decreased with an increase in sand content because of increased material heterogeneity and loss of sand grains from the sides during shearing.

  17. Compressible generalized Newtonian fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Málek, Josef; Rajagopal, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2010), s. 1097-1110 ISSN 0044-2275 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : power law fluid * uniform temperature * compressible fluid Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.290, year: 2010

  18. Temporal compressive sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2017-12-12

    Methods and systems for temporal compressive sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.

  19. Compression of Infrared images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    best for bits-per-pixel rates below 1.4 bpp, while HEVC obtains best performance in the range 1.4 to 6.5 bpp. The compression performance is also evaluated based on maximum errors. These results also show that HEVC can achieve a precision of 1°C with an average of 1.3 bpp....

  20. Gas compression infrared generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, W.F.

    1980-01-01

    A molecular gas is compressed in a quasi-adiabatic manner to produce pulsed radiation during each compressor cycle when the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, and part of the energy is recovered during the expansion phase, as defined in U.S. Pat. No. 3,751,666; characterized by use of a cylinder with a reciprocating piston as a compressor

  1. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, A; Stubley, P G; Comley, A J; Eggert, J H; Foster, J M; Kalantar, D H; McGonegle, D; Patel, S; Peacock, L J; Rothman, S D; Smith, R F; Suggit, M J; Wark, J S

    2016-04-13

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported 'anomalous' elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. This model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature.

  2. Synthesis of chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites and their application in large volumetric capacitance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Naeyoung; Kwon, Soongeun; Lee, Dongwook; Yoon, Dong-Myung; Park, Young Min; Benayad, Anass; Choi, Jae-Young; Park, Jong Se

    2013-12-17

    Chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites as flexible supercapacitor electrode materials are synthesized by amide bonding. Carbon nanotubes attached along the edges and onto the surface of graphene act as spacers to increase the electrolyte-accessible surface area. Our lamellar structure electrodes demonstrate the largest volumetric capacitance (165 F cm(-3) ) ever shown by carbon-based electrodes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. VOLUMETRIC LEAK DETECTION IN LARGE UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS - VOLUME I

    Science.gov (United States)

    A set of experiments was conducted to determine whether volumetric leak detection system presently used to test underground storage tanks (USTs) up to 38,000 L (10,000 gal) in capacity could meet EPA's regulatory standards for tank tightness and automatic tank gauging systems whe...

  4. 100KE/KW fuel storage basin surface volumetric factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    This Supporting Document presents calculations of surface Volumetric factors for the 100KE and 100KW Fuel Storage Basins. These factors relate water level changes to basin loss or additions of water, or the equivalent water displacement volumes of objects added to or removed from the basin

  5. Designing remote web-based mechanical-volumetric flow meter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Today, in water and wastewater industry a lot of mechanical-volumetric flow meters are used for the navigation of the produced water and the data of these flow meters, due to use in a wide geographical range, is done physically and by in person presence. All this makes reading the data costly and, in some cases, due to ...

  6. Image Segmentation, Registration, Compression, and Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Wei, Hai; Yadegar, Joseph; Ray, Nilanjan; Zabuawala, Sakina

    2011-01-01

    A novel computational framework was developed of a 2D affine invariant matching exploiting a parameter space. Named as affine invariant parameter space (AIPS), the technique can be applied to many image-processing and computer-vision problems, including image registration, template matching, and object tracking from image sequence. The AIPS is formed by the parameters in an affine combination of a set of feature points in the image plane. In cases where the entire image can be assumed to have undergone a single affine transformation, the new AIPS match metric and matching framework becomes very effective (compared with the state-of-the-art methods at the time of this reporting). No knowledge about scaling or any other transformation parameters need to be known a priori to apply the AIPS framework. An automated suite of software tools has been created to provide accurate image segmentation (for data cleaning) and high-quality 2D image and 3D surface registration (for fusing multi-resolution terrain, image, and map data). These tools are capable of supporting existing GIS toolkits already in the marketplace, and will also be usable in a stand-alone fashion. The toolkit applies novel algorithmic approaches for image segmentation, feature extraction, and registration of 2D imagery and 3D surface data, which supports first-pass, batched, fully automatic feature extraction (for segmentation), and registration. A hierarchical and adaptive approach is taken for achieving automatic feature extraction, segmentation, and registration. Surface registration is the process of aligning two (or more) data sets to a common coordinate system, during which the transformation between their different coordinate systems is determined. Also developed here are a novel, volumetric surface modeling and compression technique that provide both quality-guaranteed mesh surface approximations and compaction of the model sizes by efficiently coding the geometry and connectivity

  7. EFFECTIVENESS OF ADJUVANT USE OF POSTERIOR MANUAL COMPRESSION WITH GRADED COMPRESSION IN THE SONOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilnathan V

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diagnosing appendicitis by Graded Compression Ultrasonogram is a difficult task because of limiting factors such as operator– dependent technique, retrocaecal location of the appendix and patient obesity. Posterior manual compression technique visualizes the appendix better in the Grey-scale Ultrasonogram. The Aim of this study is to determine the accuracy of ultrasound in detecting or excluding acute appendicitis and to evaluate the usefulness of the adjuvant use of posterior manual compression technique in visualization of the appendix and in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis MATERIALS AND METHODS This prospective study involved a total of 240 patients in all age groups and both sexes. All these patients underwent USG for suspected appendicitis. Ultrasonography was performed with transverse and longitudinal graded compression sonography. If the appendix is not visualized on graded compression sonography, posterior manual compression technique was used to further improve the detection of appendix. RESULTS The vermiform appendix was visualized in 185 patients (77.1% out of 240 patients with graded compression alone. 55 out of 240 patients whose appendix could not be visualized by graded compression alone were subjected to both graded followed by posterior manual compression technique among that Appendix was visualized in 43 patients on posterior manual compression technique amounting to 78.2% of cases, Appendix could not be visualized in the remaining 12 patients (21.8% out of 55. CONCLUSION Combined method of graded compression with posterior manual compression technique is better than the graded compression technique alone in diagnostic accuracy and detection rate of the vermiform appendix.

  8. Thermal characteristics of highly compressed bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueoka, Tooru; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Imamura, S.; Ogawa, Terushige; Murata, Shigemi.

    1990-01-01

    In the disposal of high level radioactive wastes in strata, it is planned to protect the canisters enclosing wastes with buffer materials such as overpacks and clay, therefore, the examination of artificial barrier materials is an important problem. The concept of the disposal in strata and the soil mechanics characteristics of highly compressed bentonite as an artificial barrier material were already reported. In this study, the basic experiment on the thermal characteristics of highly compressed bentonite was carried out, therefore, it is reported. The thermal conductivity of buffer materials is important because the possibility that it determines the temperature of solidified bodies and canisters is high, and the buffer materials may cause the thermal degeneration due to high temperature. Thermophysical properties are roughly divided into thermodynamic property, transport property and optical property. The basic principle of measured thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, the kinds of the measuring method and so on are explained. As for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of highly compressed bentonite, the experimental setup, the procedure, samples and the results are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Model of a thermal driven volumetric pump for energy harvesting in an underwater glider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcão Carneiro, J.; Gomes de Almeida, F.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater gliders are one of the most promising approaches to achieve an increase of human presence in the oceans. Among existing solutions, thermal driven gliders present long range and endurance capabilities, offering the possibility of remaining years beneath water collecting and transmitting data to shore. A key component in thermal gliders lies in the process used to collect ocean's thermal energy. In this paper a new quasi-static model of a thermal driven volumetric pump, for use in underwater gliders, is presented. The study also encompasses an analysis of the influence different hydraulic system parameters have on the thermodynamic cycle efficiency. Finally, the paper proposes a simple dynamic model of a heat exchanger that uses commercially available materials for the Phase Change Material (PCM) container. Simulation results validate the models developed. - Highlights: • A new model of a thermal driven volumetric pump for underwater gliders is proposed. • The effect hydraulic system parameters have on the cycle efficiency is analyzed. • The energy efficiency may be increased tenfold using adequate hydraulic parameters. • It's shown that the PCM PVT transition surface may not alter the cycle efficiency.

  10. Numerical analysis of radiation propagation in innovative volumetric receivers based on selective laser melting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Fabrizio; Santiago, Sergio; Roccabruna, Mattia; Luque, Salvador; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose; Crema, Luigi; Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Volumetric absorbers constitute one of the key elements in order to achieve high thermal conversion efficiencies in concentrating solar power plants. Regardless of the working fluid or thermodynamic cycle employed, design trends towards higher absorber output temperatures are widespread, which lead to the general need of components of high solar absorptance, high conduction within the receiver material, high internal convection, low radiative and convective heat losses and high mechanical durability. In this context, the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting, has allowed for the fabrication of intricate geometries that are capable of fulfilling the previous requirements. This paper presents a parametric design and analysis of the optical performance of volumetric absorbers of variable porosity conducted by means of detailed numerical ray tracing simulations. Sections of variable macroscopic porosity along the absorber depth were constructed by the fractal growth of single-cell structures. Measures of performance analyzed include optical reflection losses from the absorber front and rear faces, penetration of radiation inside the absorber volume, and radiation absorption as a function of absorber depth. The effects of engineering design parameters such as absorber length and wall thickness, material reflectance and porosity distribution on the optical performance of absorbers are discussed, and general design guidelines are given.

  11. Powder compression mechanics of spray-dried lactose nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellrup, Joel; Nordström, Josefina; Mahlin, Denny

    2017-02-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structural impact of the nanofiller incorporation on the powder compression mechanics of spray-dried lactose. The lactose was co-spray-dried with three different nanofillers, that is, cellulose nanocrystals, sodium montmorillonite and fumed silica, which led to lower micron-sized nanocomposite particles with varying structure and morphology. The powder compression mechanics of the nanocomposites and physical mixtures of the neat spray-dried components were evaluated by a rational evaluation method with compression analysis as a tool, using the Kawakita equation and the Shapiro-Konopicky-Heckel equation. Particle rearrangement dominated the initial compression profiles due to the small particle size of the materials. The strong contribution of particle rearrangement in the materials with fumed silica continued throughout the whole compression profile, which prohibited an in-depth material characterization. However, the lactose/cellulose nanocrystals and the lactose/sodium montmorillonite nanocomposites demonstrated high yield pressure compared with the physical mixtures indicating increased particle hardness upon composite formation. This increase has likely to do with a reinforcement of the nanocomposite particles by skeleton formation of the nanoparticles. In summary, the rational evaluation of mechanical properties done by applying powder compression analysis proved to be a valuable tool for mechanical evaluation for this type of spray-dried composite materials, unless they demonstrate particle rearrangement throughout the whole compression profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative Study of the Volumetric Methods Calculation Using GNSS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şmuleac, Adrian; Nemeş, Iacob; Alina Creţan, Ioana; Sorina Nemeş, Nicoleta; Şmuleac, Laura

    2017-10-01

    This paper aims to achieve volumetric calculations for different mineral aggregates using different methods of analysis and also comparison of results. To achieve these comparative studies and presentation were chosen two software licensed, namely TopoLT 11.2 and Surfer 13. TopoLT program is a program dedicated to the development of topographic and cadastral plans. 3D terrain model, level courves and calculation of cut and fill volumes, including georeferencing of images. The program Surfer 13 is produced by Golden Software, in 1983 and is active mainly used in various fields such as agriculture, construction, geophysical, geotechnical engineering, GIS, water resources and others. It is also able to achieve GRID terrain model, to achieve the density maps using the method of isolines, volumetric calculations, 3D maps. Also, it can read different file types, including SHP, DXF and XLSX. In these paper it is presented a comparison in terms of achieving volumetric calculations using TopoLT program by two methods: a method where we choose a 3D model both for surface as well as below the top surface and a 3D model in which we choose a 3D terrain model for the bottom surface and another 3D model for the top surface. The comparison of the two variants will be made with data obtained from the realization of volumetric calculations with the program Surfer 13 generating GRID terrain model. The topographical measurements were performed with equipment from Leica GPS 1200 Series. Measurements were made using Romanian position determination system - ROMPOS which ensures accurate positioning of reference and coordinates ETRS through the National Network of GNSS Permanent Stations. GPS data processing was performed with the program Leica Geo Combined Office. For the volumetric calculating the GPS used point are in 1970 stereographic projection system and for the altitude the reference is 1975 the Black Sea projection system.

  13. Visualization and computer graphics on isotropically emissive volumetric displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Benjamin; Maciejewski, Ross; Chen, Min; Ebert, David S

    2009-01-01

    The availability of commodity volumetric displays provides ordinary users with a new means of visualizing 3D data. Many of these displays are in the class of isotropically emissive light devices, which are designed to directly illuminate voxels in a 3D frame buffer, producing X-ray-like visualizations. While this technology can offer intuitive insight into a 3D object, the visualizations are perceptually different from what a computer graphics or visualization system would render on a 2D screen. This paper formalizes rendering on isotropically emissive displays and introduces a novel technique that emulates traditional rendering effects on isotropically emissive volumetric displays, delivering results that are much closer to what is traditionally rendered on regular 2D screens. Such a technique can significantly broaden the capability and usage of isotropically emissive volumetric displays. Our method takes a 3D dataset or object as the input, creates an intermediate light field, and outputs a special 3D volume dataset called a lumi-volume. This lumi-volume encodes approximated rendering effects in a form suitable for display with accumulative integrals along unobtrusive rays. When a lumi-volume is fed directly into an isotropically emissive volumetric display, it creates a 3D visualization with surface shading effects that are familiar to the users. The key to this technique is an algorithm for creating a 3D lumi-volume from a 4D light field. In this paper, we discuss a number of technical issues, including transparency effects due to the dimension reduction and sampling rates for light fields and lumi-volumes. We show the effectiveness and usability of this technique with a selection of experimental results captured from an isotropically emissive volumetric display, and we demonstrate its potential capability and scalability with computer-simulated high-resolution results.

  14. Compressible Fluid Suspension Performance Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoogterp, Francis

    2003-01-01

    ... compressible fluid suspension system that was designed and installed on the vehicle by DTI. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate the possible performance benefits of the compressible fluid suspension system...

  15. Compressive creep of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.R.M. da; Melo, F.C.L. de; Cairo, C.A.; Piorino Neto, F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon nitride samples were formed by pressureless sintering process, using neodymium oxide and a mixture of neodymium oxide and yttrio oxide as sintering aids. The short term compressive creep behaviour was evaluated over a stress range of 50-300 MPa and temperature range 1200 - 1350 0 C. Post-sintering heat treatments in nitrogen with a stepwise decremental variation of temperature were performed in some samples and microstructural analysis by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the secondary crystalline phase which form from the remnant glass are dependent upon composition and percentage of aditives. Stress exponent values near to unity were obtained for materials with low glass content suggesting grain boundary diffusion accommodation processes. Cavitation will thereby become prevalent with increase in stress, temperature and decrease in the degree of crystallization of the grain boundary phase. (author) [pt

  16. LZ-Compressed String Dictionaries

    OpenAIRE

    Arz, Julian; Fischer, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    We show how to compress string dictionaries using the Lempel-Ziv (LZ78) data compression algorithm. Our approach is validated experimentally on dictionaries of up to 1.5 GB of uncompressed text. We achieve compression ratios often outperforming the existing alternatives, especially on dictionaries containing many repeated substrings. Our query times remain competitive.

  17. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  18. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  19. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a techique to generate on-board volumetric cine-magnetic resonance imaging (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling, and on-board 2-dimensional cine MRI. Methods and Materials: One phase of a 4-dimensional MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. Three major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4-dimensional MRI based on principal-component analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2-dimensional cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both digital extended-cardiac torso (XCAT) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from 4 real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using volume-percent-difference (VPD), center-of-mass-shift (COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest (ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change, and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results: Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between normalized profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was, on average, 8.43 ± 1.52% and the COMS was, on average, 0.93 ± 0.58 mm across all time steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against

  20. Choreographing Couch and Collimator in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yingli; Zhang Pengpeng; Happersett, Laura; Xiong Jianping; Yang Jie; Chan, Maria; Beal, Kathryn; Mageras, Gig; Hunt, Margie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To design and optimize trajectory-based, noncoplanar subarcs for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) deliverable on both Varian TrueBEAM system and traditional accelerators; and to investigate their potential advantages for treating central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: To guide the computerized selection of beam trajectories consisting of simultaneous couch, gantry, and collimator motion, a score function was implemented to estimate the geometric overlap between targets and organs at risk for each couch/gantry angle combination. An initial set of beam orientations is obtained as a function of couch and gantry angle, according to a minimum search of the score function excluding zones of collision. This set is grouped into multiple continuous and extended subarcs subject to mechanical limitations using a hierarchical clustering algorithm. After determination of couch/gantry trajectories, a principal component analysis finds the collimator angle at each beam orientation that minimizes residual target-organ at risk overlaps. An in-house VMAT optimization algorithm determines the optimal multileaf collimator position and monitor units for control points within each subarc. A retrospective study of 10 CNS patients compares the proposed method of VMAT trajectory with dynamic gantry, leaves, couch, and collimator motion (Tra-VMAT); a standard noncoplanar VMAT with no couch/collimator motion within subarcs (Std-VMAT); and noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans that were clinically used. Results: Tra-VMAT provided improved target dose conformality and lowered maximum dose to brainstem, optic nerves, and chiasm by 7.7%, 1.1%, 2.3%, and 1.7%, respectively, compared with Std-VMAT. Tra-VMAT provided higher planning target volume minimum dose and reduced maximum dose to chiasm, optic nerves, and cochlea by 6.2%, 1.3%, 6.3%, and 8.4%, respectively, and reduced cochlea mean dose by 8.7%, compared with IMRT. Tra-VMAT averaged

  1. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Wendy [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ren, Lei, E-mail: lei.ren@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, You [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a techique to generate on-board volumetric cine-magnetic resonance imaging (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling, and on-board 2-dimensional cine MRI. Methods and Materials: One phase of a 4-dimensional MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. Three major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4-dimensional MRI based on principal-component analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2-dimensional cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both digital extended-cardiac torso (XCAT) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from 4 real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using volume-percent-difference (VPD), center-of-mass-shift (COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest (ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change, and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results: Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between normalized profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was, on average, 8.43 ± 1.52% and the COMS was, on average, 0.93 ± 0.58 mm across all time steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against

  2. Vessel suppressed chest Computed Tomography for semi-automated volumetric measurements of solid pulmonary nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Gianluca; Eberhard, Matthias; Martini, Katharina; Vittoria De Martini, Ilaria; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate whether vessel-suppressed computed tomography (VSCT) can be reliably used for semi-automated volumetric measurements of solid pulmonary nodules, as compared to standard CT (SCT) MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ninety-three SCT were elaborated by dedicated software (ClearRead CT, Riverain Technologies, Miamisburg, OH, USA), that allows subtracting vessels from lung parenchyma. Semi-automated volumetric measurements of 65 solid nodules were compared between SCT and VSCT. The measurements were repeated by two readers. For each solid nodule, volume measured on SCT by Reader 1 and Reader 2 was averaged and the average volume between readers acted as standard of reference value. Concordance between measurements was assessed using Lin's Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC). Limits of agreement (LoA) between readers and CT datasets were evaluated. Standard of reference nodule volume ranged from 13 to 366 mm 3 . The mean overestimation between readers was 3 mm 3 and 2.9 mm 3 on SCT and VSCT, respectively. Semi-automated volumetric measurements on VSCT showed substantial agreement with the standard of reference (Lin's CCC = 0.990 for Reader 1; 0.985 for Reader 2). The upper and lower LoA between readers' measurements were (16.3, -22.4 mm 3 ) and (15.5, -21.4 mm 3 ) for SCT and VSCT, respectively. VSCT datasets are feasible for the measurements of solid nodules, showing an almost perfect concordance between readers and with measurements on SCT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Digital cinema video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husak, Walter

    2003-05-01

    The Motion Picture Industry began a transition from film based distribution and projection to digital distribution and projection several years ago. Digital delivery and presentation offers the prospect to increase the quality of the theatrical experience for the audience, reduce distribution costs to the distributors, and create new business opportunities for the theater owners and the studios. Digital Cinema also presents an opportunity to provide increased flexibility and security of the movies for the content owners and the theater operators. Distribution of content via electronic means to theaters is unlike any of the traditional applications for video compression. The transition from film-based media to electronic media represents a paradigm shift in video compression techniques and applications that will be discussed in this paper.

  4. Fingerprints in compressed strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed into a context-free grammar of size n that supports efficient Karp–Rabin fingerprint queries to any substring of S. That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S......[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(log⁡N) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(log⁡log⁡N) query time...

  5. WSNs Microseismic Signal Subsection Compression Algorithm Based on Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouzhou Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For wireless network microseismic monitoring and the problems of low compression ratio and high energy consumption of communication, this paper proposes a segmentation compression algorithm according to the characteristics of the microseismic signals and the compression perception theory (CS used in the transmission process. The algorithm will be collected as a number of nonzero elements of data segmented basis, by reducing the number of combinations of nonzero elements within the segment to improve the accuracy of signal reconstruction, while taking advantage of the characteristics of compressive sensing theory to achieve a high compression ratio of the signal. Experimental results show that, in the quantum chaos immune clone refactoring (Q-CSDR algorithm for reconstruction algorithm, under the condition of signal sparse degree higher than 40, to be more than 0.4 of the compression ratio to compress the signal, the mean square error is less than 0.01, prolonging the network life by 2 times.

  6. Starting up a programme of atomic piles using compressed gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, J.; Yvon, J.

    1959-01-01

    1) An examination of the intellectual and material resources which have directed the French programme towards: a) the natural uranium and plutonium system, b) the use of compressed gas as heat transfer fluid (primary fluid). 2) The parts played in exploring the field by the pile EL2 and G1, EL2 a natural uranium, heavy water and compressed gas pile, G1 a natural uranium, graphite and atmospheric air pile. 3) Development of the neutronics of graphite piles: physical study of G1. 4) The examination of certain problem posed by centres equipped with natural uranium, graphite and compressed carbon dioxide piles: structure, special materials, fluid circuits, maximum efficiency. Economic aspects. 5) Aids to progress: a) piles for testing materials and for tests on canned fuel elements, b) laboratory and calculation facilities. 6) Possible new orientations of compressed gas piles: a) raising of the pressure, b) enriched fuel, c) higher temperatures, d) use of heavy water. (author) [fr

  7. Compressed sensing electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leary, Rowan; Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A.; Holland, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The recent mathematical concept of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that a small number of well-chosen measurements can suffice to reconstruct signals that are amenable to sparse or compressible representation. In addition to powerful theoretical results, the principles of CS are being exploited increasingly across a range of experiments to yield substantial performance gains relative to conventional approaches. In this work we describe the application of CS to electron tomography (ET) reconstruction and demonstrate the efficacy of CS–ET with several example studies. Artefacts present in conventional ET reconstructions such as streaking, blurring of object boundaries and elongation are markedly reduced, and robust reconstruction is shown to be possible from far fewer projections than are normally used. The CS–ET approach enables more reliable quantitative analysis of the reconstructions as well as novel 3D studies from extremely limited data. - Highlights: • Compressed sensing (CS) theory and its application to electron tomography (ET) is described. • The practical implementation of CS–ET is outlined and its efficacy demonstrated with examples. • High fidelity tomographic reconstruction is possible from a small number of images. • The CS–ET reconstructions can be more reliably segmented and analysed quantitatively. • CS–ET is applicable to different image content by choice of an appropriate sparsifying transform

  8. Volumetric breast density estimation from full-field digital mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engeland, Saskia; Snoeren, Peter R; Huisman, Henkjan; Boetes, Carla; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2006-03-01

    A method is presented for estimation of dense breast tissue volume from mammograms obtained with full-field digital mammography (FFDM). The thickness of dense tissue mapping to a pixel is determined by using a physical model of image acquisition. This model is based on the assumption that the breast is composed of two types of tissue, fat and parenchyma. Effective linear attenuation coefficients of these tissues are derived from empirical data as a function of tube voltage (kVp), anode material, filtration, and compressed breast thickness. By employing these, tissue composition at a given pixel is computed after performing breast thickness compensation, using a reference value for fatty tissue determined by the maximum pixel value in the breast tissue projection. Validation has been performed using 22 FFDM cases acquired with a GE Senographe 2000D by comparing the volume estimates with volumes obtained by semi-automatic segmentation of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The correlation between MRI and mammography volumes was 0.94 on a per image basis and 0.97 on a per patient basis. Using the dense tissue volumes from MRI data as the gold standard, the average relative error of the volume estimates was 13.6%.

  9. Volumetric plasma source development and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crain, Marlon D.; Maron, Yitzhak; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Starbird, Robert L.; Johnston, Mark D.; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Droemer, Darryl W.

    2008-01-01

    The development of plasma sources with densities and temperatures in the 10 15 -10 17 cm -3 and 1-10eV ranges which are slowly varying over several hundreds of nanoseconds within several cubic centimeter volumes is of interest for applications such as intense electron beam focusing as part of the x-ray radiography program. In particular, theoretical work (1,2) suggests that replacing neutral gas in electron beam focusing cells with highly conductive, pre-ionized plasma increases the time-averaged e-beam intensity on target, resulting in brighter x-ray sources. This LDRD project was an attempt to generate such a plasma source from fine metal wires. A high voltage (20-60kV), high current (12-45kA) capacitive discharge was sent through a 100 (micro)m diameter aluminum wire forming a plasma. The plasma's expansion was measured in time and space using spectroscopic techniques. Lineshapes and intensities from various plasma species were used to determine electron and ion densities and temperatures. Electron densities from the mid-10 15 to mid-10 16 cm -3 were generated with corresponding electron temperatures of between 1 and 10eV. These parameters were measured at distances of up to 1.85 cm from the wire surface at times in excess of 1 (micro)s from the initial wire breakdown event. In addition, a hydrocarbon plasma from surface contaminants on the wire was also measured. Control of these contaminants by judicious choice of wire material, size, and/or surface coating allows for the ability to generate plasmas with similar density and temperature to those given above, but with lower atomic masses

  10. Near-lossless multichannel EEG compression based on matrix and tensor decompositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwels, Justin; Srinivasan, K; Reddy, M Ramasubba; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2013-05-01

    A novel near-lossless compression algorithm for multichannel electroencephalogram (MC-EEG) is proposed based on matrix/tensor decomposition models. MC-EEG is represented in suitable multiway (multidimensional) forms to efficiently exploit temporal and spatial correlations simultaneously. Several matrix/tensor decomposition models are analyzed in view of efficient decorrelation of the multiway forms of MC-EEG. A compression algorithm is built based on the principle of “lossy plus residual coding,” consisting of a matrix/tensor decomposition-based coder in the lossy layer followed by arithmetic coding in the residual layer. This approach guarantees a specifiable maximum absolute error between original and reconstructed signals. The compression algorithm is applied to three different scalp EEG datasets and an intracranial EEG dataset, each with different sampling rate and resolution. The proposed algorithm achieves attractive compression ratios compared to compressing individual channels separately. For similar compression ratios, the proposed algorithm achieves nearly fivefold lower average error compared to a similar wavelet-based volumetric MC-EEG compression algorithm.

  11. Contributions in compression of 3D medical images and 2D images; Contributions en compression d'images medicales 3D et d'images naturelles 2D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudeau, Y

    2006-12-15

    The huge amounts of volumetric data generated by current medical imaging techniques in the context of an increasing demand for long term archiving solutions, as well as the rapid development of distant radiology make the use of compression inevitable. Indeed, if the medical community has sided until now with compression without losses, most of applications suffer from compression ratios which are too low with this kind of compression. In this context, compression with acceptable losses could be the most appropriate answer. So, we propose a new loss coding scheme based on 3D (3 dimensional) Wavelet Transform and Dead Zone Lattice Vector Quantization 3D (DZLVQ) for medical images. Our algorithm has been evaluated on several computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image volumes. The main contribution of this work is the design of a multidimensional dead zone which enables to take into account correlations between neighbouring elementary volumes. At high compression ratios, we show that it can out-perform visually and numerically the best existing methods. These promising results are confirmed on head CT by two medical patricians. The second contribution of this document assesses the effect with-loss image compression on CAD (Computer-Aided Decision) detection performance of solid lung nodules. This work on 120 significant lungs images shows that detection did not suffer until 48:1 compression and still was robust at 96:1. The last contribution consists in the complexity reduction of our compression scheme. The first allocation dedicated to 2D DZLVQ uses an exponential of the rate-distortion (R-D) functions. The second allocation for 2D and 3D medical images is based on block statistical model to estimate the R-D curves. These R-D models are based on the joint distribution of wavelet vectors using a multidimensional mixture of generalized Gaussian (MMGG) densities. (author)

  12. Volumetric image-guidance: Does routine usage prompt adaptive re-planning? An institutional review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanyi, James A.; Fuss, Martin H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate how the use of volumetric image-guidance using an on-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system impacts on the frequency of adaptive re-planning. Material and methods. Treatment courses of 146 patients who have undergone a course of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) using volumetric CBCT image-guidance were analyzed. Target locations included the brain, head and neck, chest, abdomen, as well as prostate and non-prostate pelvis. The majority of patients (57.5%) were treated with hypo-fractionated treatment regimens (three to 15 fraction courses). The frequency of image-guidance ranged from daily (87.7%) to weekly or twice weekly. The underlying medical necessity for adaptive re-planning as well as frequency and consequences of plan adaptation to dose-volume parameters was assessed. Results. Radiation plans of 34 patients (23.3%) were adapted at least once (up to six time) during their course of EBRT as a result of image-guidance CBCT review. Most common causes for adaptive planning were: tumor change (mostly shrinkage: 10 patients; four patients more than one re-plan), change in abdominal girth (systematic change in hollow organ filling; n=7, two patients more than one re-plan), weight loss (n=5), and systematic target setup deviation from simulation (n=5). Adaptive re-plan was required mostly for conventionally fractionated courses; only 5 patient plans undergoing hypo-fractionated treatment were adjusted. In over 91% of adapted plans, the dose-volume parameters did deviate from the prescribed plan parameters by more than 5% for at least 10% of the target volume, or organs-at-risk in close proximity to the target volume. Discussion. Routine use of volumetric image-guidance has in our practice increased the demand for adaptive re-planning. Volumetric CBCT image-guidance provides sufficient imaging information to reliably predict the need for dose adjustment. In the vast majority of cases evaluated, the initial and adapted dose

  13. Tracking Ionic Rearrangements and Interpreting Dynamic Volumetric Changes in Two-Dimensional Metal Carbide Supercapacitors: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui; Lin, Zifeng; Merlet, Céline; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Miao, Ling; Jiang, Jianjun; Simon, Patrice

    2017-12-06

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study achieved on two-dimensional (2D) Ti 3 C 2 T x MXenes in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIM] + [TFSI] - ) electrolyte. Our simulations reproduce the different patterns of volumetric change observed experimentally for both the negative and positive electrodes. The analysis of ionic fluxes and structure rearrangements in the 2D material provide an atomic scale insight into the charge and discharge processes in the layer pore and confirm the existence of two different charge-storage mechanisms at the negative and positive electrodes. The ionic number variation and the structure rearrangement contribute to the dynamic volumetric changes of both electrodes: negative electrode expansion and positive electrode contraction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. On the use of volumetric strain meters to infer additional characteristics of short-period seismic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, R.D.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Glassmoyer, G.

    1989-01-01

    Volumetric strain meters (Sacks-Evertson design) are installed at 15 sites along the San Andreas fault system, to monitor long-term strain changes for earthquake prediction. Deployment of portable broadband, high-resolution digital recorders (GEOS) at several of the sites extends the detection band for volumetric strain to periods shorter than 5 ?? 10-2 sec and permits the simultaneous observation of seismic radiation fields using conventional short-period pendulum seismometers. Recordings of local and regional earthquakes indicate that dilatometers respond to P energy but not direct shear energy and that straingrams can be used to resolve superimposed reflect P and S waves for inference of wave characteristics not permitted by either sensor alone. Simultaneous measurements of incident P- and S-wave amplitudes are used to introduce a technique for single-station estimates of wave field inhomogeneity, free-surface reflection coefficients and local material P velocity. -from Authors

  15. Simulation of volumetrically heated pebble beds in solid breeding blankets for fusion reactors. Modelling, experimental validation and sensitivity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Gonzalez, Francisco Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The Breeder Units contains pebble beds of lithium orthosilicate (Li_4SiO_4) as tritium breeder material and beryllium as neutron multiplier. In this dissertation a closed validation strategy for the thermo-mechanical validation of the Breeder Units has been developed. This strategy is based on the development of dedicated testing and modeling tools, which are needed for the qualification of the thermo-mechanical functionality of these components in an out-of-pile experimental campaign. The neutron flux in the Breeder Units induces a nonhomogeneous volumetric heating in the pebble beds that must be mimicked in an out-of-pile experiment with an external heating system minimizing the intrusion in the pebble beds. Therefore, a heater system that simulates this volumetric heating has been developed. This heater system is based on ohmic heating and linear heater elements, which approximates the point heat sources of the granular material by linear sources. These linear sources represent ''linear pebbles'' in discrete locations close enough to relatively reproduce the thermal gradients occurring in the functional materials. The heater concept has been developed for the Li_4SiO_4 and it is based on a hexagonal matrix arrangement of linear and parallel heater elements of diameter 1 mm separated by 7 mm. A set of uniformly distributed thermocouples in the transversal and longitudinal direction in the pebble bed midplane allows a 2D temperature reconstruction of that measurement plane by means of biharmonic spline interpolation. This heating system has been implemented in a relevant Breeder Unit region and its proof-of-concept has been tested in a PRE-test Mock-Up eXperiment (PREMUX) that has been designed and constructed in the frame of this dissertation. The packing factor of the pebble bed with and without the heating system does not show significant differences, giving an indirect evidence of the low intrusion of the system. Such low intrusion has been confirmed by in

  16. Simulation of volumetrically heated pebble beds in solid breeding blankets for fusion reactors. Modelling, experimental validation and sensitivity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Gonzalez, Francisco Alberto

    2016-10-14

    The Breeder Units contains pebble beds of lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) as tritium breeder material and beryllium as neutron multiplier. In this dissertation a closed validation strategy for the thermo-mechanical validation of the Breeder Units has been developed. This strategy is based on the development of dedicated testing and modeling tools, which are needed for the qualification of the thermo-mechanical functionality of these components in an out-of-pile experimental campaign. The neutron flux in the Breeder Units induces a nonhomogeneous volumetric heating in the pebble beds that must be mimicked in an out-of-pile experiment with an external heating system minimizing the intrusion in the pebble beds. Therefore, a heater system that simulates this volumetric heating has been developed. This heater system is based on ohmic heating and linear heater elements, which approximates the point heat sources of the granular material by linear sources. These linear sources represent ''linear pebbles'' in discrete locations close enough to relatively reproduce the thermal gradients occurring in the functional materials. The heater concept has been developed for the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and it is based on a hexagonal matrix arrangement of linear and parallel heater elements of diameter 1 mm separated by 7 mm. A set of uniformly distributed thermocouples in the transversal and longitudinal direction in the pebble bed midplane allows a 2D temperature reconstruction of that measurement plane by means of biharmonic spline interpolation. This heating system has been implemented in a relevant Breeder Unit region and its proof-of-concept has been tested in a PRE-test Mock-Up eXperiment (PREMUX) that has been designed and constructed in the frame of this dissertation. The packing factor of the pebble bed with and without the heating system does not show significant differences, giving an indirect evidence of the low intrusion of the system. Such

  17. Compression and rupture cycles as tools for compressibility characterization application to apatitic calcium phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontier, C. [S.P.C.T.S., Faculte des Sciences, Limoges (France); G.E.F., Faculte de Pharmacie, Limoges (France); Viana, M.; Chulia, D. [G.E.F., Faculte de Pharmacie, Limoges (France); Champion, E.; Bernache-Assollant, D. [S.P.C.T.S., Faculte des Sciences, Limoges (France)

    2002-07-01

    Measurement of the cycles of compression and rupture helps to understand the phenomena occurring during compaction. Different parameters are deduced from the cycles, such as the packing of the material and energies used during compression. The ratio between the energy of rupture and the energy of compaction defines the efficacy of compaction of the materials. This technique is applied to ceramic materials using apatitic calcium phosphates with a Ca/P molar ratio of 1.5 (apatitic tricalcium phosphate and {beta}-tricalcium phosphate) and 1.667 (stoichiometric hydroxyapatite). The methodology uses a uniaxial instrumented press to plot the cycles of compaction and rupture. The results point out the good compaction and cohesion properties of apatitic tricalcium phosphate, compared to the other apatitic materials. (orig.)

  18. Engineering three-dimensionally electrodeposited Si-on-Ni inverse opal structure for high volumetric capacity Li-ion microbattery anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Cho, Hyung-Man; Meng, Ying Shirley; Li, Quan

    2014-06-25

    Aiming at improving the volumetric capacity of nanostructured Li-ion battery anode, an electrodeposited Si-on-Ni inverse opal structure has been proposed in the present work. This type of electrode provides three-dimensional bi-continuous pathways for ion/electron transport and high surface area-to-volume ratios, and thus exhibits lower interfacial resistance, but higher effective Li ions diffusion coefficients, when compared to the Si-on-Ni nanocable array electrode of the same active material mass. As a result, improved volumetric capacities and rate capabilities have been demonstrated in the Si-on-Ni inverse opal anode. We also show that optimization of the volumetric capacities and the rate performance of the inverse opal electrode can be realized by manipulating the pore size of the Ni scaffold and the thickness of the Si deposit.

  19. High volumetric power density, non-enzymatic, glucose fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncescu, Vlad; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    The development of new implantable medical devices has been limited in the past by slow advances in lithium battery technology. Non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells are promising replacement candidates for lithium batteries because of good long-term stability and adequate power density. The devices developed to date however use an "oxygen depletion design" whereby the electrodes are stacked on top of each other leading to low volumetric power density and complicated fabrication protocols. Here we have developed a novel single-layer fuel cell with good performance (2 μW cm⁻²) and stability that can be integrated directly as a coating layer on large implantable devices, or stacked to obtain a high volumetric power density (over 16 μW cm⁻³). This represents the first demonstration of a low volume non-enzymatic fuel cell stack with high power density, greatly increasing the range of applications for non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells.

  20. A feasibility study of digital tomosynthesis for volumetric dental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M K; Kim, H K; Youn, H; Kim, S S

    2012-01-01

    We present a volumetric dental tomography method that compensates for insufficient projection views obtained from limited-angle scans. The reconstruction algorithm is based on the backprojection filtering method which employs apodizing filters that reduce out-of-plane blur artifacts and suppress high-frequency noise. In order to accompolish this volumetric imaging two volume-reconstructed datasets are synthesized. These individual datasets provide two different limited-angle scans performed at orthogonal angles. The obtained reconstructed images, using less than 15% of the number of projection views needed for a full skull phantom scan, demonstrate the potential use of the proposed method in dental imaging applications. This method enables a much smaller radiation dose for the patient compared to conventional dental tomography.

  1. COMPARISON OF VOLUMETRIC REGISTRATION ALGORITHMS FOR TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Julio; Joshi, Anand A; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear registration of brain MRI scans is often used to quantify morphological differences associated with disease or genetic factors. Recently, surface-guided fully 3D volumetric registrations have been developed that combine intensity-guided volume registrations with cortical surface constraints. In this paper, we compare one such algorithm to two popular high-dimensional volumetric registration methods: large-deformation viscous fluid registration, formulated in a Riemannian framework, and the diffeomorphic "Demons" algorithm. We performed an objective morphometric comparison, by using a large MRI dataset from 340 young adult twin subjects to examine 3D patterns of correlations in anatomical volumes. Surface-constrained volume registration gave greater effect sizes for detecting morphometric associations near the cortex, while the other two approaches gave greater effects sizes subcortically. These findings suggest novel ways to combine the advantages of multiple methods in the future.

  2. Volumetric properties of ammonium nitrate in N,N-dimethylformamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranes, Milan; Dozic, Sanja; Djeric, Vesna; Gadzuric, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We observed interactions and changes in the solution using volumetric properties. ► The greatest influence on the solvent–solvent interactions has temperature. ► The smallest influence temperature has on the ion–ion interactions. ► Temperature has no influence on concentrated systems and partially solvated melts. - Abstract: The densities of the ammonium nitrate in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) mixtures were measured at T = (308.15 to 348.15) K for different ammonium nitrate molalities in the range from (0 to 6.8404) mol·kg −1 . From the obtained density data, volumetric properties (apparent molar volumes and partial molar volumes) have been evaluated and discussed in the term of respective ionic and dipole interactions. From the apparent molar volume, determined at various temperatures, the apparent molar expansibility and the coefficients of thermal expansion were also calculated.

  3. Predicting positional error of MLC using volumetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareram, E.S.

    2008-01-01

    IMRT normally using multiple beamlets (small width of the beam) for a particular field to deliver so that it is imperative to maintain the positional accuracy of the MLC in order to deliver integrated computed dose accurately. Different manufacturers have reported high precession on MLC devices with leaf positional accuracy nearing 0.1 mm but measuring and rectifying the error in this accuracy is very difficult. Various methods are used to check MLC position and among this volumetric analysis is one of the technique. Volumetric approach was adapted in our method using primus machine and 0.6cc chamber at 5 cm depth In perspex. MLC of 1 mm error introduces an error of 20%, more sensitive to other methods

  4. Determination of uranium by a gravimetric-volumetric titration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krtil, J.

    1998-01-01

    A volumetric-gravimetric modification of a method for the determination of uranium based on the reduction of uranium to U (IV) in a phosphoric acid medium and titration with a standard potassium dichromate solution is described. More than 99% of the stoichiometric amount of the titrating solution is weighed and the remainder is added volumetrically by using the Mettler DL 40 RC Memotitrator. Computer interconnected with analytical balances collects continually the data on the analyzed samples and evaluates the results of determination. The method allows to determine uranium in samples of uranium metal, alloys, oxides, and ammonium diuranate by using aliquot portions containing 30 - 100 mg of uranium with the error of determination, expressed as the relative standard deviation, of 0.02 - 0.05%. (author)

  5. Two-dimensional random arrays for real time volumetric imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Richard E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Smith, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    real time volumetric imaging system, which employs a wide transmit beam and receive mode parallel processing to increase image frame rate. Depth-of-field comparisons were made from simulated on-axis and off-axis beamplots at ranges from 30 to 160 mm for both coaxial and offset transmit and receive......Two-dimensional arrays are necessary for a variety of ultrasonic imaging techniques, including elevation focusing, 2-D phase aberration correction, and real time volumetric imaging. In order to reduce system cost and complexity, sparse 2-D arrays have been considered with element geometries...... selected ad hoc, by algorithm, or by random process. Two random sparse array geometries and a sparse array with a Mills cross receive pattern were simulated and compared to a fully sampled aperture with the same overall dimensions. The sparse arrays were designed to the constraints of the Duke University...

  6. Volumetric determination of tumor size abdominal masses. Problems -feasabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, H.; Bautz, W.; Sendler, A.; Fink, U.; Gerhardt, P.

    1995-01-01

    The most important indication for clinically reliable volumetric determination of tumor size in the abdominal region is monitoring liver metastases during chemotherapy. Determination of volume can be effectively realized using 3D reconstruction. Therefore, the primary data set must be complete and contiguous. The mass should be depicted strongly enhanced and free of artifacts. At present, this prerequisite can only be complied with using thin-slice spiral CT. Phantom studies have proven that a semiautomatic reconstruction algorithm is recommendable. The basic difficulties involved in volumetric determination of tumor size are the problems in differentiating active malignant mass and changes in the surrounding tissue, as well as the lack of histomorphological correlation. Possible indications for volumetry of gastrointestinal masses in the assessment of neoadjuvant therapeutic concepts are under scientific evaluation. (orig./MG) [de

  7. In Vivo Real Time Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological....... This paper investigates the in vivo applicability and sensitivity of volumetric SA imaging. Utilizing the transmit events to generate a set of virtual point sources, a frame rate of 25 Hz for a 90° x 90° field-of-view was achieved. Data were obtained using a 3.5 MHz 32 x 32 elements 2-D phased array...... transducer connected to the experimental scanner (SARUS). Proper scaling is applied to the excitation signal such that intensity levels are in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations for in vivo ultrasound imaging. The measured Mechanical Index and spatial-peak- temporal...

  8. Validation of a method for measuring the volumetric breast density from digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonzo-Proulx, O; Shen, S Z; Yaffe, M J; Packard, N; Boone, J M; Al-Mayah, A; Brock, K K

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of an algorithm used to measure the volumetric breast density (VBD) from digital mammograms. The algorithm is based on the calibration of the detector signal versus the thickness and composition of breast-equivalent phantoms. The baseline error in the density from the algorithm was found to be 1.25 ± 2.3% VBD units (PVBD) when tested against a set of calibration phantoms, of thicknesses 3-8 cm, with compositions equivalent to fibroglandular content (breast density) between 0% and 100% and under x-ray beams between 26 kVp and 32 kVp with a Rh/Rh anode/filter. The algorithm was also tested against images from a dedicated breast computed tomography (CT) scanner acquired on 26 volunteers. The CT images were segmented into regions representing adipose, fibroglandular and skin tissues, and then deformed using a finite-element algorithm to simulate the effects of compression in mammography. The mean volume, VBD and thickness of the compressed breast for these deformed images were respectively 558 cm 3 , 23.6% and 62 mm. The displaced CT images were then used to generate simulated digital mammograms, considering the effects of the polychromatic x-ray spectrum, the primary and scattered energy transmitted through the breast, the anti-scatter grid and the detector efficiency. The simulated mammograms were analyzed with the VBD algorithm and compared with the deformed CT volumes. With the Rh/Rh anode filter, the root mean square difference between the VBD from CT and from the algorithm was 2.6 PVBD, and a linear regression between the two gave a slope of 0.992 with an intercept of -1.4 PVBD and a correlation with R 2 = 0.963. The results with the Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh anode/filter were similar.

  9. Validation of a method for measuring the volumetric breast density from digital mammograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo-Proulx, O; Shen, S Z; Yaffe, M J [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Packard, N; Boone, J M [UC Davis Medical Center, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Al-Mayah, A; Brock, K K, E-mail: oliviera@sri.utoronto.c [University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2010-06-07

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of an algorithm used to measure the volumetric breast density (VBD) from digital mammograms. The algorithm is based on the calibration of the detector signal versus the thickness and composition of breast-equivalent phantoms. The baseline error in the density from the algorithm was found to be 1.25 {+-} 2.3% VBD units (PVBD) when tested against a set of calibration phantoms, of thicknesses 3-8 cm, with compositions equivalent to fibroglandular content (breast density) between 0% and 100% and under x-ray beams between 26 kVp and 32 kVp with a Rh/Rh anode/filter. The algorithm was also tested against images from a dedicated breast computed tomography (CT) scanner acquired on 26 volunteers. The CT images were segmented into regions representing adipose, fibroglandular and skin tissues, and then deformed using a finite-element algorithm to simulate the effects of compression in mammography. The mean volume, VBD and thickness of the compressed breast for these deformed images were respectively 558 cm{sup 3}, 23.6% and 62 mm. The displaced CT images were then used to generate simulated digital mammograms, considering the effects of the polychromatic x-ray spectrum, the primary and scattered energy transmitted through the breast, the anti-scatter grid and the detector efficiency. The simulated mammograms were analyzed with the VBD algorithm and compared with the deformed CT volumes. With the Rh/Rh anode filter, the root mean square difference between the VBD from CT and from the algorithm was 2.6 PVBD, and a linear regression between the two gave a slope of 0.992 with an intercept of -1.4 PVBD and a correlation with R{sup 2} = 0.963. The results with the Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh anode/filter were similar.

  10. Environmental effects on the compressive properties - Thermosetting vs. thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, A.; Jeelani, S.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of moisture and temperature on the compressive properties of graphite/epoxy and APC-2 materials systems was investigated to assess the viability of using APC-2 instead of graphite/epoxy. Data obtained indicate that the moisture absorption rate of T-300/epoxy is higher than that of APC-2. Thick plate with smaller surface area absorbs less moisture than thin plate with larger surface area. The compressive strength and modulus of APC-2 are higher than those of T-300/epoxy composite, and APC-2 sustains higher compressive strength in the presence of moisture. The compressive strength and modulus decrease with the increase of temperature in the range of 23-100 C. The compression failure was in the form of delamination, interlaminar shear, and end brooming.

  11. Ideal femoral head size in total hip arthroplasty balances stability and volumetric wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Michael B; Nam, Denis; Mayman, David J

    2012-10-01

    Over the last several years, a trend towards increasing femoral head size in total hip arthroplasty to improve stability and impingement free range of motion has been observed. The specific questions we sought to answer in our review were: (1) What are the potential advantages and disadvantages of metal-on-metal, ceramic-on-ceramic, and metal-on-polyethylene bearings? (2) What is effect that femoral head size has on joint kinematics? (3) What is the effect that large femoral heads have on bearing surface wear? A PubMed search and a review of 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society abstracts was performed and articles were chosen that directly answered components of the specific aims and that reported outcomes with contemporary implant designs or materials. A review of the literature suggests that increasing femoral head size decreases the risk of postoperative dislocation and improves impingement free range of motion; however, volumetric wear increases with large femoral heads on polyethylene and increases corrosion of the stem in large metal-on-metal modular total hip arthroplasty (THA); however, the risk of potentially developing osteolysis or adverse reactions to metal debris respectively is still unknown. Further, the effect of large femoral heads with ceramic-on-ceramic THA is unclear, due to limited availability and published data. Surgeons must balance the benefits of larger head size with the increased risk of volumetric wear when determining the appropriate head size for a given patient.

  12. Role of intracanalicular volumetric and dosimetric parameters on hearing preservation after vestibular schwannoma radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massager, Nicolas; Nissim, Ouzi; Delbrouck, Carine; Devriendt, Daniel; David, Philippe; Desmedt, Francoise; Wikler, David; Hassid, Sergio; Brotchi, Jacques; Levivier, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between hearing preservation after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) and some volumetric and dosimetric parameters of the intracanalicular components of VS. Methods and Materials: This study included 82 patients with a VS treated by GKR; all patients had no NF2 disease, a Gardner-Robertson hearing class 1-4 before treatment, a marginal dose of 12 Gy, and a radiologic and audiologic follow-up ≥1 year post-GKR. The volume of both the entire tumor and the intracanalicular part of the tumor and the mean and integrated dose of these two volumes were correlated to the auditory outcomes of patients. Results: At last hearing follow-up, 52 patients had no hearing worsening, and 30 patients had an increase of ≥1 class on Gardner-Robertson classification. We found that hearing preservation after GKR is significantly correlated with the intracanalicular tumor volume, as well as with the integrated dose delivered to the intracanalicular tumor volume. Conclusions: Some volumetric and dosimetric parameters of the intracanalicular part of the tumor influence hearing preservation after GKR of VS. Consequently, we advise the direct treatment of patients with preserved functional hearing and a VS including a small intracanalicular volume

  13. Hierarchical TiN nanoparticles-assembled nanopillars for flexible supercapacitors with high volumetric capacitance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ping; Li, Xingxing; Gao, Biao; Fu, Jijiang; Xia, Lu; Zhang, Xuming; Huo, Kaifu; Shen, Wenli; Chu, Paul K

    2018-05-10

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is an attractive electrode material in fast charging/discharging supercapacitors because of its excellent conductivity. However, the low capacitance and mechanical brittleness of TiN restricts its further application in flexible supercapacitors with high energy density. Thus, it is still a challenge to rationally design TiN electrodes with both high electrochemical and mechanical properties. Herein, the hierarchical TiN nanoparticles-assembled nanopillars (H-TiN NPs) array as binder free electrodes were obtained by nitriding of hierarchical titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopillars, which was produced by a simple hydrothermal treatment of anodic TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) array in water. The porous TiN nanoparticles connected to each other to form ordered nanopillar arrays, effectively providing larger specific surface area and more active sites for charge storage. The H-TiN NPs delivered a high volumetric capacitance of 120 F cm-3 at 0.83 A cm-3, which is better than that of TiN NTs arrays (69 F cm-3 at 0.83 A cm-3). After assembling into all-solid-state devices, the H-TiN NPs based supercapacitors exhibited outstanding volumetric capacitance of 5.9 F cm-3 at 0.02 A cm-3 and a high energy density of 0.53 mW h cm-3. Our results reveal a new strategy to optimize the supercapacitive performance of metal nitrides.

  14. Analytical solution for stress, strain and plastic instability of pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Sérgio B.; Netto, Theodoro A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of internally pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws is analyzed. The two possible modes of circumferentially straining the pipe wall are identified and associated to hypothesized geometries. The radial deformation that takes place by bending the pipe wall is studied by means of axisymmetric flaws and the membrane strain developed by unequal hoop deformation is analyzed with the help of narrow axial flaws. Linear elastic shell solutions for stress and strain are developed, the plastic behavior is studied and the maximum hoop stress at the flaw is related to the undamaged pipe hoop stress by means of stress concentration factors. The stress concentration factors are employed to obtain equations predicting the pressure at which the pipe fails by plastic instability for both types of flaw. These analytical solutions are validated by comparison with burst tests on 3″ diameter pipes and finite element simulations. Forty-one burst tests were carried out and two materials with very dissimilar plastic behavior, carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel, were used in the experiments. Both the analytical and the numerical predictions showed good correlation with the experimentally observed burst pressures. - Highlights: ► An analytical model for the burst of a pipe with a volumetric flaw is developed. ► Deformation, strain and stress are modeled in the elastic and plastic domains. ► The model is comprehensively validated by experiments and numerical simulations. ► The burst pressure model’s accuracy is equivalent to finite element simulations.

  15. Recoverable Wire-Shaped Supercapacitors with Ultrahigh Volumetric Energy Density for Multifunctional Portable and Wearable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Minjie; Yang, Cheng; Song, Xuefeng; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Peng; Gao, Lian

    2017-05-24

    Wire-shaped supercapacitors (SCs) based on shape memory materials are of considerable interest for next-generation portable and wearable electronics. However, the bottleneck in this field is how to develop the devices with excellent electrochemical performance while well-maintaining recoverability and flexibility. Herein, a unique asymmetric electrode concept is put forward to fabricate smart wire-shaped SCs with ultrahigh energy density, which is realized by using porous carbon dodecahedra coated on NiTi alloy wire and flexible graphene fiber as yarn electrodes. Notably, the wire-shaped SCs not only exhibit high flexibility that can be readily woven into real clothing but also represent the available recoverable ability. When irreversible plastic deformations happen, the deformed shape of the devices can automatically resume the initial predesigned shape in a warm environment (about 35 °C). More importantly, the wire-shaped SCs act as efficient energy storage devices, which display high volumetric energy density (8.9 mWh/cm 3 ), volumetric power density (1080 mW/cm 3 ), strong durability in multiple mechanical states, and steady electrochemical behavior after repeated shape recovery processes. Considering their relative facile fabrication technology and excellent electrochemical performance, this asymmetric electrode strategy produced smart wire-shaped supercapacitors desirable for multifunctional portable and wearable electronics.

  16. Volumetric Real-Time Imaging Using a CMUT Ring Array

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Jung Woo; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Gencel, Mustafa; Stephens, Douglas N.; O’Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David J.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2012-01-01

    A ring array provides a very suitable geometry for forward-looking volumetric intracardiac and intravascular ultrasound imaging. We fabricated an annular 64-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array featuring a 10-MHz operating frequency and a 1.27-mm outer radius. A custom software suite was developed to run on a PC-based imaging system for real-time imaging using this device.

  17. 3-dimensional charge collection efficiency measurements using volumetric tomographic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobos, Daniel [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    For a better understanding of the electrical field distribution of 3D semiconductor detectors and to allow efficiency based design improvements, a method to measure the 3D spatial charge collection efficiency of planar, 3D silicon and diamond sensors using 3D volumetric reconstruction techniques is possible. Simulation results and first measurements demonstrated the feasibility of this method and show that with soon available 10 times faster beam telescopes even small structures and efficiency differences will become measurable in few hours.

  18. Thermodynamic and volumetric databases and software for magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Youn-Bae; Aliravci, Celil; Spencer, Philip J.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Fuerst, Carlton D.; Chartrand, Patrice; Pelton, Arthur D.

    2009-05-01

    Extensive databases for the thermodynamic and volumetric properties of magnesium alloys have been prepared by critical evaluation, modeling, and optimization of available data. Software has been developed to access the databases to calculate equilibrium phase diagrams, heat effects, etc., and to follow the course of equilibrium or Scheil-Gulliver cooling, calculating not only the amounts of the individual phases, but also of the microstructural constituents.

  19. Volumetric 3D display using a DLP projection engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we describe a volumetric 3D display system based on the high speed DLPTM (Digital Light Processing) projection engine. Existing two-dimensional (2D) flat screen displays often lead to ambiguity and confusion in high-dimensional data/graphics presentation due to lack of true depth cues. Even with the help of powerful 3D rendering software, three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a 2D flat screen may still fail to provide spatial relationship or depth information correctly and effectively. Essentially, 2D displays have to rely upon capability of human brain to piece together a 3D representation from 2D images. Despite the impressive mental capability of human visual system, its visual perception is not reliable if certain depth cues are missing. In contrast, volumetric 3D display technologies to be discussed in this article are capable of displaying 3D volumetric images in true 3D space. Each "voxel" on a 3D image (analogous to a pixel in 2D image) locates physically at the spatial position where it is supposed to be, and emits light from that position toward omni-directions to form a real 3D image in 3D space. Such a volumetric 3D display provides both physiological depth cues and psychological depth cues to human visual system to truthfully perceive 3D objects. It yields a realistic spatial representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them.

  20. A Hierarchical Volumetric Shadow Algorithm for Single Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Baran, Ilya; Chen, Jiawen; Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar; Durand, Fredo; Lehtinen, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    Volumetric effects such as beams of light through participating media are an important component in the appearance of the natural world. Many such effects can be faithfully modeled by a single scattering medium. In the presence of shadows, rendering these effects can be prohibitively expensive: current algorithms are based on ray marching, i.e., integrating the illumination scattered towards the camera along each view ray, modulated by visibility to the light source at each sample. Visibility...

  1. Systematic Parameterization, Storage, and Representation of Volumetric DICOM Data

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Felix; Selver, M. Alper; Gezer, Sinem; Dicle, O?uz; Hillen, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Tomographic medical imaging systems produce hundreds to thousands of slices, enabling three-dimensional (3D) analysis. Radiologists process these images through various tools and techniques in order to generate 3D renderings for various applications, such as surgical planning, medical education, and volumetric measurements. To save and store these visualizations, current systems use snapshots or video exporting, which prevents further optimizations and requires the storage of significant addi...

  2. In-Situ Spatial Variability Of Thermal Conductivity And Volumetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies of spatial variability of thermal conductivity and volumetric water content of silty topsoil were conduct-ed on a 0.6 ha site at Abeokuta, South-Western Nigeria. The thermal conductivity (k) was measured at depths of up to 0.06 m along four parallel profiles of 200 m long and at an average temperature of 25 C, using ...

  3. Computer simulation of fatigue under diametrical compression

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona, H. A.; Kun, F.; Andrade Jr., J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    We study the fatigue fracture of disordered materials by means of computer simulations of a discrete element model. We extend a two-dimensional fracture model to capture the microscopic mechanisms relevant for fatigue, and we simulate the diametric compression of a disc shape specimen under a constant external force. The model allows to follow the development of the fracture process on the macro- and micro-level varying the relative influence of the mechanisms of damage accumulation over the ...

  4. Energy density enhancement of chemical heat storage material for magnesium oxide/water chemical heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myagmarjav, Odtsetseg; Zamengo, Massimiliano; Ryu, Junichi; Kato, Yukitaka

    2015-01-01

    A novel candidate chemical heat storage material having higher reaction performance and higher thermal conductivity used for magnesium oxide/water chemical heat pump was developed in this study. The material, called EML, was obtained by mixing pure Mg(OH)_2 with expanded graphite (EG) and lithium bromide (LiBr), which offer higher thermal conductivity and reactivity, respectively. With the aim to achieve a high energy density, the EML composite was compressed into figure of the EML tablet (ϕ7.1 mm × thickness 3.5 mm). The compression force did not degrade the reaction conversion, and furthermore it enabled us to achieve best heat storage and output performances. The EML tablet could store heat of 815.4 MJ m_t_a_b"−"3 at 300 °C within 120 min, which corresponded to almost 4.4 times higher the heat output of the EML composite, and therefore, the EML tablet is the solution which releases more heat in a shorter time. A relatively larger volumetric gross heat output was also recorded for the EML tablet, which was greater than one attained for the EML composite at certain temperatures. As a consequence, it is expected that the EML tablet could respond more quickly to sudden demand of heat from users. It was concluded that the EML tablet demonstrated superior performances. - Highlights: • A new chemical heat storage material, donated as EML, was developed. • EML composite made from pure Mg(OH)_2, expanded graphite and lithium bromide. • EML tablet was demonstrated by compressing the EML composite. • Compression force did not degrade the conversion in dehydration and hydration. • EML tablet demonstrated superior heat storage and output performances.

  5. Three-dimensional volumetric display by inclined-plane scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Eto, Takuma; Nishimura, Yasuhiro; Matsushita, Kenji

    2003-05-01

    A volumetric display system based on three-dimensional (3-D) scanning that uses an inclined two-dimensional (2-D) image is described. In the volumetric display system a 2-D display unit is placed obliquely in an imaging system into which a rotating mirror is inserted. When the mirror is rotated, the inclined 2-D image is moved laterally. A locus of the moving image can be observed by persistence of vision as a result of the high-speed rotation of the mirror. Inclined cross-sectional images of an object are displayed on the display unit in accordance with the position of the image plane to observe a 3-D image of the object by persistence of vision. Three-dimensional images formed by this display system satisfy all the criteria for stereoscopic vision. We constructed the volumetric display systems using a galvanometer mirror and a vector-scan display unit. In addition, we constructed a real-time 3-D measurement system based on a light section method. Measured 3-D images can be reconstructed in the 3-D display system in real time.

  6. A volumetric three-dimensional digital light photoactivatable dye display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shreya K.; Cao, Jian; Lippert, Alexander R.

    2017-07-01

    Volumetric three-dimensional displays offer spatially accurate representations of images with a 360° view, but have been difficult to implement due to complex fabrication requirements. Herein, a chemically enabled volumetric 3D digital light photoactivatable dye display (3D Light PAD) is reported. The operating principle relies on photoactivatable dyes that become reversibly fluorescent upon illumination with ultraviolet light. Proper tuning of kinetics and emission wavelengths enables the generation of a spatial pattern of fluorescent emission at the intersection of two structured light beams. A first-generation 3D Light PAD was fabricated using the photoactivatable dye N-phenyl spirolactam rhodamine B, a commercial picoprojector, an ultraviolet projector and a custom quartz imaging chamber. The system displays a minimum voxel size of 0.68 mm3, 200 μm resolution and good stability over repeated `on-off' cycles. A range of high-resolution 3D images and animations can be projected, setting the foundation for widely accessible volumetric 3D displays.

  7. Volumetric full-range magnetomotive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Adeel; Kim, Jongsik; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MM-OCT) can be utilized to spatially localize the presence of magnetic particles within tissues or organs. These magnetic particle-containing regions are detected by using the capability of OCT to measure small-scale displacements induced by the activation of an external electromagnet coil typically driven by a harmonic excitation signal. The constraints imposed by the scanning schemes employed and tissue viscoelastic properties limit the speed at which conventional MM-OCT data can be acquired. Realizing that electromagnet coils can be designed to exert MM force on relatively large tissue volumes (comparable or larger than typical OCT imaging fields of view), we show that an order-of-magnitude improvement in three-dimensional (3-D) MM-OCT imaging speed can be achieved by rapid acquisition of a volumetric scan during the activation of the coil. Furthermore, we show volumetric (3-D) MM-OCT imaging over a large imaging depth range by combining this volumetric scan scheme with full-range OCT. Results with tissue equivalent phantoms and a biological tissue are shown to demonstrate this technique. PMID:25472770

  8. Reducing uncertainties in volumetric image based deformable organ registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2003-01-01

    Applying volumetric image feedback in radiotherapy requires image based deformable organ registration. The foundation of this registration is the ability of tracking subvolume displacement in organs of interest. Subvolume displacement can be calculated by applying biomechanics model and the finite element method to human organs manifested on the multiple volumetric images. The calculation accuracy, however, is highly dependent on the determination of the corresponding organ boundary points. Lacking sufficient information for such determination, uncertainties are inevitable--thus diminishing the registration accuracy. In this paper, a method of consuming energy minimization was developed to reduce these uncertainties. Starting from an initial selection of organ boundary point correspondence on volumetric image sets, the subvolume displacement and stress distribution of the whole organ are calculated and the consumed energy due to the subvolume displacements is computed accordingly. The corresponding positions of the initially selected boundary points are then iteratively optimized to minimize the consuming energy under geometry and stress constraints. In this study, a rectal wall delineated from patient CT image was artificially deformed using a computer simulation and utilized to test the optimization. Subvolume displacements calculated based on the optimized boundary point correspondence were compared to the true displacements, and the calculation accuracy was thereby evaluated. Results demonstrate that a significant improvement on the accuracy of the deformable organ registration can be achieved by applying the consuming energy minimization in the organ deformation calculation

  9. Compressive Transient Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Qilin

    2017-04-01

    High resolution transient/3D imaging technology is of high interest in both scientific research and commercial application. Nowadays, all of the transient imaging methods suffer from low resolution or time consuming mechanical scanning. We proposed a new method based on TCSPC and Compressive Sensing to achieve a high resolution transient imaging with a several seconds capturing process. Picosecond laser sends a serious of equal interval pulse while synchronized SPAD camera\\'s detecting gate window has a precise phase delay at each cycle. After capturing enough points, we are able to make up a whole signal. By inserting a DMD device into the system, we are able to modulate all the frames of data using binary random patterns to reconstruct a super resolution transient/3D image later. Because the low fill factor of SPAD sensor will make a compressive sensing scenario ill-conditioned, We designed and fabricated a diffractive microlens array. We proposed a new CS reconstruction algorithm which is able to denoise at the same time for the measurements suffering from Poisson noise. Instead of a single SPAD senor, we chose a SPAD array because it can drastically reduce the requirement for the number of measurements and its reconstruction time. Further more, it not easy to reconstruct a high resolution image with only one single sensor while for an array, it just needs to reconstruct small patches and a few measurements. In this thesis, we evaluated the reconstruction methods using both clean measurements and the version corrupted by Poisson noise. The results show how the integration over the layers influence the image quality and our algorithm works well while the measurements suffer from non-trival Poisson noise. It\\'s a breakthrough in the areas of both transient imaging and compressive sensing.

  10. Fast Compressive Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2014-10-01

    It is a challenging task to develop effective and efficient appearance models for robust object tracking due to factors such as pose variation, illumination change, occlusion, and motion blur. Existing online tracking algorithms often update models with samples from observations in recent frames. Despite much success has been demonstrated, numerous issues remain to be addressed. First, while these adaptive appearance models are data-dependent, there does not exist sufficient amount of data for online algorithms to learn at the outset. Second, online tracking algorithms often encounter the drift problems. As a result of self-taught learning, misaligned samples are likely to be added and degrade the appearance models. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective and efficient tracking algorithm with an appearance model based on features extracted from a multiscale image feature space with data-independent basis. The proposed appearance model employs non-adaptive random projections that preserve the structure of the image feature space of objects. A very sparse measurement matrix is constructed to efficiently extract the features for the appearance model. We compress sample images of the foreground target and the background using the same sparse measurement matrix. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via a naive Bayes classifier with online update in the compressed domain. A coarse-to-fine search strategy is adopted to further reduce the computational complexity in the detection procedure. The proposed compressive tracking algorithm runs in real-time and performs favorably against state-of-the-art methods on challenging sequences in terms of efficiency, accuracy and robustness.

  11. SeqCompress: an algorithm for biological sequence compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-10-01

    The growth of Next Generation Sequencing technologies presents significant research challenges, specifically to design bioinformatics tools that handle massive amount of data efficiently. Biological sequence data storage cost has become a noticeable proportion of total cost in the generation and analysis. Particularly increase in DNA sequencing rate is significantly outstripping the rate of increase in disk storage capacity, which may go beyond the limit of storage capacity. It is essential to develop algorithms that handle large data sets via better memory management. This article presents a DNA sequence compression algorithm SeqCompress that copes with the space complexity of biological sequences. The algorithm is based on lossless data compression and uses statistical model as well as arithmetic coding to compress DNA sequences. The proposed algorithm is compared with recent specialized compression tools for biological sequences. Experimental results show that proposed algorithm has better compression gain as compared to other existing algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative data compression techniques and multi-compression results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M R; Ibrahimy, M I; Motakabber, S M A; Ferdaus, M M; Khan, M N H

    2013-01-01

    Data compression is very necessary in business data processing, because of the cost savings that it offers and the large volume of data manipulated in many business applications. It is a method or system for transmitting a digital image (i.e., an array of pixels) from a digital data source to a digital data receiver. More the size of the data be smaller, it provides better transmission speed and saves time. In this communication, we always want to transmit data efficiently and noise freely. This paper will provide some compression techniques for lossless text type data compression and comparative result of multiple and single compression, that will help to find out better compression output and to develop compression algorithms

  13. Utility of Early Post-operative High Resolution Volumetric MR Imaging after Transsphenoidal Pituitary Tumor Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kunal S.; Kazam, Jacob; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Anand, Vijay K.; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Controversy exists over the utility of early post-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after transsphenoidal pituitary surgery for macroadenomas. We investigate whether valuable information can be derived from current higher resolution scans. Methods Volumetric MRI scans were obtained in the early (30 days) post-operative periods in a series of patients undergoing transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. The volume of the residual tumor, resection cavity, and corresponding visual field tests were recorded at each time point. Statistical analyses of changes in tumor volume and cavity size were calculated using the late MRI as the gold standard. Results 40 patients met the inclusion criteria. Pre-operative tumor volume averaged 8.8 cm3. Early postoperative assessment of average residual tumor volume (1.18 cm3) was quite accurate and did not differ statistically from late post-operative volume (1.23 cm3, p=.64), indicating the utility of early scans to measure residual tumor. Early scans were 100% sensitive and 91% specific for predicting ≥ 98% resection (psurgery and a lack of decrease should alert the surgeon to possible persistent compression of the optic apparatus that may warrant re-operation. PMID:25045791

  14. Volumetric breast density measurement: sensitivity analysis of a relative physics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the sensitivity and robustness of a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement system to errors in the imaging physics parameters including compressed breast thickness (CBT), tube voltage (kVp), filter thickness, tube current-exposure time product (mAs), detector gain, detector offset and image noise. 3317 raw digital mammograms were processed with Volpara(®) (Matakina Technology Ltd, Wellington, New Zealand) to obtain fibroglandular tissue volume (FGV), breast volume (BV) and VBD. Errors in parameters including CBT, kVp, filter thickness and mAs were simulated by varying them in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) tags of the images up to ±10% of the original values. Errors in detector gain and offset were simulated by varying them in the Volpara configuration file up to ±10% from their default values. For image noise, Gaussian noise was generated and introduced into the original images. Errors in filter thickness, mAs, detector gain and offset had limited effects on FGV, BV and VBD. Significant effects in VBD were observed when CBT, kVp, detector offset and image noise were varied (p applications such as tracking density change over time, it remains to be seen how accurate the measures need to be.

  15. Analysis by compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meredith, David

    MEL is a geometric music encoding language designed to allow for musical objects to be encoded parsimoniously as sets of points in pitch-time space, generated by performing geometric transformations on component patterns. MEL has been implemented in Java and coupled with the SIATEC pattern...... discovery algorithm to allow for compact encodings to be generated automatically from in extenso note lists. The MEL-SIATEC system is founded on the belief that music analysis and music perception can be modelled as the compression of in extenso descriptions of musical objects....

  16. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  17. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  18. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  19. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis guided Near Infrared Spectroscopy: Volumetric estimates of fibroglandular fraction and breast density from tomosynthesis reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Michaelsen, Kelly E; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Pogue, Brian W; Poplack, Steven P; Karellas, Andrew; Paulsen, Keith D

    A multimodality system combining a clinical prototype digital breast tomosynthesis with its imaging geometry modified to facilitate near-infrared spectroscopic imaging has been developed. The accuracy of parameters recovered from near-infrared spectroscopy is dependent on fibroglandular tissue content. Hence, in this study, volumetric estimates of fibroglandular tissue from tomosynthesis reconstructions were determined. A kernel-based fuzzy c-means algorithm was implemented to segment tomosynthesis reconstructed slices in order to estimate fibroglandular content and to provide anatomic priors for near-infrared spectroscopy. This algorithm was used to determine volumetric breast density (VBD), defined as the ratio of fibroglandular tissue volume to the total breast volume, expressed as percentage, from 62 tomosynthesis reconstructions of 34 study participants. For a subset of study participants who subsequently underwent mammography, VBD from mammography matched for subject, breast laterality and mammographic view was quantified using commercial software and statistically analyzed to determine if it differed from tomosynthesis. Summary statistics of the VBD from all study participants were compared with prior independent studies. The fibroglandular volume from tomosynthesis and mammography were not statistically different ( p =0.211, paired t-test). After accounting for the compressed breast thickness, which were different between tomosynthesis and mammography, the VBD from tomosynthesis was correlated with ( r =0.809, p 0.99, paired t-test), and was linearly related to, the VBD from mammography. Summary statistics of the VBD from tomosynthesis were not statistically different from prior studies using high-resolution dedicated breast computed tomography. The observation of correlation and linear association in VBD between mammography and tomosynthesis suggests that breast density associated risk measures determined for mammography are translatable to tomosynthesis

  20. Nonlinear viscoelasticity of pre-compressed layered polymeric composite under oscillatory compression

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yangguang

    2018-05-03

    Describing nonlinear viscoelastic properties of polymeric composites when subjected to dynamic loading is essential for development of practical applications of such materials. An efficient and easy method to analyze nonlinear viscoelasticity remains elusive because the dynamic moduli (storage modulus and loss modulus) are not very convenient when the material falls into nonlinear viscoelastic range. In this study, we utilize two methods, Fourier transform and geometrical nonlinear analysis, to quantitatively characterize the nonlinear viscoelasticity of a pre-compressed layered polymeric composite under oscillatory compression. We discuss the influences of pre-compression, dynamic loading, and the inner structure of polymeric composite on the nonlinear viscoelasticity. Furthermore, we reveal the nonlinear viscoelastic mechanism by combining with other experimental results from quasi-static compressive tests and microstructural analysis. From a methodology standpoint, it is proved that both Fourier transform and geometrical nonlinear analysis are efficient tools for analyzing the nonlinear viscoelasticity of a layered polymeric composite. From a material standpoint, we consequently posit that the dynamic nonlinear viscoelasticity of polymeric composites with complicated inner structures can also be well characterized using these methods.

  1. The compression dome concept: the restorative implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milicich, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    Evidence now supports the concept that the enamel on a tooth acts like a compression dome, much like the dome of a cathedral. With an overlying enamel compression dome, the underlying dentin is protected from damaging tensile forces. Disruption of a compression system leads to significant shifts in load pathways. The clinical restorative implications are significant and far-reaching. Cutting the wrong areas of a tooth exposes the underlying dentin to tensile forces that exceed natural design parameters. These forces lead to crack propagation, causing flexural pain and eventual fracture and loss of tooth structure. Improved understanding of the microanatomy of tooth structure and where it is safe to cut teeth has led to a revolution in dentistry that is known by several names, including microdentistry, minimally invasive dentistry, biomimetic dentistry, and bioemulation dentistry. These treatment concepts have developed due to a coalescence of principles of tooth microanatomy, material science, adhesive dentistry, and reinforcing techniques that, when applied together, will allow dentists to repair a compromised compression dome so that it more closely replicates the structure of the healthy tooth.

  2. Giant negative linear compression positively coupled to massive thermal expansion in a metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weizhao; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2014-07-04

    Materials with negative linear compressibility are sought for various technological applications. Such effects were reported mainly in framework materials. When heated, they typically contract in the same direction of negative linear compression. Here we show that this common inverse relationship rule does not apply to a three-dimensional metal-organic framework crystal, [Ag(ethylenediamine)]NO3. In this material, the direction of the largest intrinsic negative linear compression yet observed in metal-organic frameworks coincides with the strongest positive thermal expansion. In the perpendicular direction, the large linear negative thermal expansion and the strongest crystal compressibility are collinear. This seemingly irrational positive relationship of temperature and pressure effects is explained and the mechanism of coupling of compressibility with expansivity is presented. The positive coupling between compression and thermal expansion in this material enhances its piezo-mechanical response in adiabatic process, which may be used for designing new artificial composites and ultrasensitive measuring devices.

  3. Free compression tube. Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Ioan

    2012-11-01

    During the flight of vehicles, their propulsion energy must overcome gravity, to ensure the displacement of air masses on vehicle trajectory, to cover both energy losses from the friction between a solid surface and the air and also the kinetic energy of reflected air masses due to the impact with the flying vehicle. The flight optimization by increasing speed and reducing fuel consumption has directed research in the aerodynamics field. The flying vehicles shapes obtained through studies in the wind tunnel provide the optimization of the impact with the air masses and the airflow along the vehicle. By energy balance studies for vehicles in flight, the author Ioan Rusu directed his research in reducing the energy lost at vehicle impact with air masses. In this respect as compared to classical solutions for building flight vehicles aerodynamic surfaces which reduce the impact and friction with air masses, Ioan Rusu has invented a device which he named free compression tube for rockets, registered with the State Office for Inventions and Trademarks of Romania, OSIM, deposit f 2011 0352. Mounted in front of flight vehicles it eliminates significantly the impact and friction of air masses with the vehicle solid. The air masses come into contact with the air inside the free compression tube and the air-solid friction is eliminated and replaced by air to air friction.

  4. Photon compression in cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensley, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown theoretically that intense microwave radiation is absorbed non-classically by a newly enunciated mechanism when interacting with hydrogen plasma. Fields > 1 Mg, lambda > 1 mm are within this regime. The predicted absorption, approximately P/sub rf/v/sub theta/sup e/, has not yet been experimentally confirmed. The applications of such a coupling are many. If microwave bursts approximately > 5 x 10 14 watts, 5 ns can be generated, the net generation of power from pellet fusion as well as various military applications becomes feasible. The purpose, then, for considering gas-gun photon compression is to obtain the above experimental capability by converting the gas kinetic energy directly into microwave form. Energies of >10 5 joules cm -2 and powers of >10 13 watts cm -2 are potentially available for photon interaction experiments using presently available technology. The following topics are discussed: microwave modes in a finite cylinder, injection, compression, switchout operation, and system performance parameter scaling

  5. Fingerprints in Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2013-01-01

    The Karp-Rabin fingerprint of a string is a type of hash value that due to its strong properties has been used in many string algorithms. In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed by a context-free grammar of size n that answers fingerprint queries...... derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(loglogN) query time. Hence, our data structures has the same time and space complexity as for random access in SLPs. We utilize the fingerprint data structures to solve the longest common extension problem in query time O(logNlogℓ) and O....... That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(logN) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP...

  6. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  7. Generalized massive optimal data compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsing, Justin; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we provide a general procedure for optimally compressing N data down to n summary statistics, where n is equal to the number of parameters of interest. We show that compression to the score function - the gradient of the log-likelihood with respect to the parameters - yields n compressed statistics that are optimal in the sense that they preserve the Fisher information content of the data. Our method generalizes earlier work on linear Karhunen-Loéve compression for Gaussian data whilst recovering both lossless linear compression and quadratic estimation as special cases when they are optimal. We give a unified treatment that also includes the general non-Gaussian case as long as mild regularity conditions are satisfied, producing optimal non-linear summary statistics when appropriate. As a worked example, we derive explicitly the n optimal compressed statistics for Gaussian data in the general case where both the mean and covariance depend on the parameters.

  8. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  9. Behaviour of soil-cement specimens in unconfined dynamic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J.; Fendukly, L. M.

    1994-06-01

    The response of the cement-stabilized red marl to dynamic loading in compression has been investigated over a range of cement contents and curing times. Specimens were subjected to different stress levels below unconfined compressive strength, at a frequency of 5 Hz, and a fatigue relationship for the material was developed. The value of resilient modulus was found to be greater than the modulus of elasticity for the same cement content and curing time.

  10. Effects of compression on the sound absorption of fibrous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castagnede, Bernard; Akninen, Achour; Brouard, Achour

    2000-01-01

    During the compression of a fibrous mat, it is well known that the absorption properties are decreasing. In order to predict this change, some heuristic formulae are proposed which take into account the modifications of the physical parameters(porosity, resistivity, tortousity and shappe factors)......) which enter in the standard "equivalent fluid" model. Numerical predictions are then discussed and compared to experimental data obtained on a fibrous material(uncompressed and the compressed) used in automotive industry....

  11. Quasi-isentropic compression using compressed water flow generated by underwater electrical explosion of a wire array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurovich, V.; Virozub, A.; Rososhek, A.; Bland, S.; Spielman, R. B.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2018-05-01

    A major experimental research area in material equation-of-state today involves the use of off-Hugoniot measurements rather than shock experiments that give only Hugoniot data. There is a wide range of applications using quasi-isentropic compression of matter including the direct measurement of the complete isentrope of materials in a single experiment and minimizing the heating of flyer plates for high-velocity shock measurements. We propose a novel approach to generating quasi-isentropic compression of matter. Using analytical modeling and hydrodynamic simulations, we show that a working fluid composed of compressed water, generated by an underwater electrical explosion of a planar wire array, might be used to efficiently drive the quasi-isentropic compression of a copper target to pressures ˜2 × 1011 Pa without any complex target designs.

  12. Spatial distribution of bacterial communities on volumetric and planar anodes in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Vargas, Ignacio T.

    2013-05-29

    Pyrosequencing was used to characterize bacterial communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells across a volumetric (graphite fiber brush) and a planar (carbon cloth) anode, where different physical and chemical gradients would be expected associated with the distance between anode location and the air cathode. As expected, the stable operational voltage and the coulombic efficiency (CE) were higher for the volumetric anode than the planar anode (0.57V and CE=22% vs. 0.51V and CE=12%). The genus Geobacter was the only known exoelectrogen among the observed dominant groups, comprising 57±4% of recovered sequences for the brush and 27±5% for the carbon-cloth anode. While the bacterial communities differed between the two anode materials, results showed that Geobacter spp. and other dominant bacterial groups were homogenously distributed across both planar and volumetric anodes. This lends support to previous community analysis interpretations based on a single biofilm sampling location in these systems. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Analytical computation of thermodynamic performance parameters of actual vapour compression refrigeration system with R22, R32, R134a, R152a, R290 and R1270

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vali Shaik Sharmas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on analytical computation of thermodynamic performance of actual vapour compression refrigeration system by using six pure refrigerants. The refrigerants are namely R22, R32, R134a, R152a, R290 and R1270 respectively. A MATLAB code is developed to compute the thermodynamic performance parameters of actual vapour compression system such as refrigeration effect, compressor work, COP, power per ton of refrigeration, compressor discharge temperature and volumetric refrigeration capacity at condensing and evaporating temperatures of 54.4oC and 7.2oC respectively. Analytical results exhibited that COP of both R32 and R134a are 15.95% and 11.71% higher among the six investigated refrigerants. However R32 and R134a cannot be replaced directly into R22 system. This is due to their higher compressor discharge temperature and poor volumetric capacity respectively. The discharge temperature of both R1270 and R290 are lower than R22 by 20-26oC. Volumetric refrigeration capacity of R1270 (3197 kJ/m3 is very close to that of volumetric capacity of R22 (3251 kJ/m3. Both R1270 and R290 shows good miscibility with R22 mineral oil. Overall R1270 would be a suitable ecofriendly refrigerant to replace R22 from the stand point of ODP, GWP, volumetric capacity, discharge temperature and miscibility with mineral oil although its COP is lower.

  14. Microdamage in polycrystalline ceramics under dynamic compression and tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K.S.; Zhang, D.; Feng, R.; Wu, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    In-grain microplasticity and intergranular microdamage in polycrystalline hexagonal-structure ceramics subjected to a sequence of dynamic compression and tension are studied computationally using the Voronoi polycrystal model, by which the topological heterogeneity and material anisotropy of the crystals are simulated explicitly. The constitutive modeling considers crystal plasticity by basal slip, intergranular shear damage during compression, and intergranular mode-I cracking during tension. The model parameters are calibrated with the available shock compression and spall strength data on polycrystalline α-6H silicon carbide. The numerical results show that microplasticity is a more plausible micromechanism for the inelastic response of the material under shock compression. On the other hand, the spallation behavior of the shocked material can be well predicted by intergranular mode-I microcracking during load reversal from dynamic compression to tension. The failure process and the resulting spall strength are, however, affected strongly by the intensity of local release heterogeneity induced by heterogeneous microplasticity, and by the grain-boundary shear damage during compression

  15. On the compressive behavior of an FDM Steward Platform part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nectarios Vidakis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene (ABS is commonly used material in the fused deposition modeling (FDM process. In this work, ABS and ABS plus parts were built with different building parameters and they were tested according to the ASTM D695 standard. Compression strength results were compared to stock ABS material values. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, to determine the failure mode of the filament strands. Following this a Steward Platform part was tested under compression in a tensile testing machine. The experimental results were employed to develop a finite element model of the Steward Platform part, in order to determine the maximum force the part can withstand. The Finite Element Model results were in good agreement with the values measured in the Steward Platform part compressive tests, demonstrating that the model developed is reliable. In these experiments, it was found that ABS parts build with a larger layer thickness showed lower compressive strength, which ABS plus did not show. ABS specimens on average developed about half the compressive strength of the ABS plus specimens, while the ABS plus specimens showed lower compressive strength values than stock ABS material.

  16. Moldable cork ablation material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  17. In-situ volumetric topography of IC chips for defect detection using infrared confocal measurement with active structured light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang-Chia; Le, Manh-Trung; Phuc, Dao Cong; Lin, Shyh-Tsong

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the development of in-situ integrated circuit (IC) chip defect detection techniques for automated clipping detection by proposing infrared imaging and full-field volumetric topography. IC chip inspection, especially held during or post IC packaging, has become an extremely critical procedure in IC fabrication to assure manufacturing quality and reduce production costs. To address this, in the article, microscopic infrared imaging using an electromagnetic light spectrum that ranges from 0.9 to 1.7 µm is developed to perform volumetric inspection of IC chips, in order to identify important defects such as silicon clipping, cracking or peeling. The main difficulty of infrared (IR) volumetric imaging lies in its poor image contrast, which makes it incapable of achieving reliable inspection, as infrared imaging is sensitive to temperature difference but insensitive to geometric variance of materials, resulting in difficulty detecting and quantifying defects precisely. To overcome this, 3D volumetric topography based on 3D infrared confocal measurement with active structured light, as well as light refractive matching principles, is developed to detect defects the size, shape and position of defects in ICs. The experimental results show that the algorithm is effective and suitable for in-situ defect detection of IC semiconductor packaging. The quality of defect detection, such as measurement repeatability and accuracy, is addressed. Confirmed by the experimental results, the depth measurement resolution can reach up to 0.3 µm, and the depth measurement uncertainty with one standard deviation was verified to be less than 1.0% of the full-scale depth-measuring range. (paper)

  18. Lung, liver and lymph node metastases in follow-up MSCT. Comprehensive volumetric assessment of lesion size changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, A.M.; Fischer, S.; Biederer, J.; Heller, M.; Fabel, M.; Bolte, H.; Freitag-Wolf, S.; Soza, G.; Tietjen, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate measurement accuracy in terms of precision and inter-rater variability in the simultaneous volumetric assessment of lung, liver and lymph node metastasis size change over time in comparison to RECIST 1.1. Materials and Methods: Three independent readers evaluated multislice CT data from clinical follow-up studies (chest/abdomen) in 50 patients with metastases. A total of 117 lung, 77 liver and 97 lymph node metastases were assessed manually (RECIST 1.1) and by volumetry with semi-automated software. The quality of segmentation and need for manual adjustments were recorded. Volumes were converted to effective diameters to allow comparison to RECIST. For statistical assessment of precision and interobserver agreement, the Wilcoxon-signed rank test and Bland-Altman plots were utilized. Results: The quality of segmentation after manual correction was acceptable to excellent in 95 % of lesions and manual corrections were applied in 21 - 36 % of all lesions, most predominantly in lymph nodes. Mean precision was 2.6 - 6.3 % (manual) with 0.2 - 1.5 % (effective) relative measurement deviation (p <.001). Inter-reader median variation coefficients ranged from 9.4 - 12.8 % (manual) and 2.9 - 8.2 % (volumetric) for different lesion types (p <.001). The limits of agreement were ± 9.8 to ± 11.2 % for volumetric assessment. Conclusion: Superior precision and inter-rater variability of volumetric over manual measurement of lesion change over time was demonstrated in a whole body setting. (orig.)

  19. Adiabatic compression and radiative compression of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Flux is conserved during mechanical compression of magnetic fields for both nonrelativistic and relativistic compressors. However, the relativistic compressor generates radiation, which can carry up to twice the energy content of the magnetic field compressed adiabatically. The radiation may be either confined or allowed to escape

  20. Activated crystals of fluorite type as photochromic mediums for recording of volumetric holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangel'skaya, V.A.; Ashcheulov, Yu.V.; Perfilov, V.N.; Rejterov, V.M.; Sukhanov, V.I.; Feofilov, P.P.

    1975-01-01

    The paper is a study of the mechanism of photochromism and of the photochromic and holographic properties of fluorides of alkaline earth metals with one and two rare-earth activators. It is shown that the angular selectivity of ''thick'' (d approximately 2-5 mm) crystals is 2-3 angular minutes and that the optimum energy exposures, corresponding to the maximum diffraction efficiency values, are 0.1-1.0 J/cm 2 for singly-activated crystals and 1.0-10 J/cm 2 for crystals with two activators. The diffraction efficiencies of holograms of both types of crystals is in the range of approximately 0.1-0.2%. The experimental data are compared with calculations made for photochromic crystals with pigmentation centres. It is suggested that the materials studied can serve as a basis for measuring volumetric holograms. (author)

  1. Unfired clay bricks – moisture properties and compressive strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E.J. de Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus, methods and test results from an experimental investigation of (1) the properties for moisture performance of the materials, including water vapour sorption and water vapour transmission, (2) humidity buffering of the indoor climate by an absorbent material, and (3) the compressive...... strength are presented....

  2. Contributions in compression of 3D medical images and 2D images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudeau, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The huge amounts of volumetric data generated by current medical imaging techniques in the context of an increasing demand for long term archiving solutions, as well as the rapid development of distant radiology make the use of compression inevitable. Indeed, if the medical community has sided until now with compression without losses, most of applications suffer from compression ratios which are too low with this kind of compression. In this context, compression with acceptable losses could be the most appropriate answer. So, we propose a new loss coding scheme based on 3D (3 dimensional) Wavelet Transform and Dead Zone Lattice Vector Quantization 3D (DZLVQ) for medical images. Our algorithm has been evaluated on several computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image volumes. The main contribution of this work is the design of a multidimensional dead zone which enables to take into account correlations between neighbouring elementary volumes. At high compression ratios, we show that it can out-perform visually and numerically the best existing methods. These promising results are confirmed on head CT by two medical patricians. The second contribution of this document assesses the effect with-loss image compression on CAD (Computer-Aided Decision) detection performance of solid lung nodules. This work on 120 significant lungs images shows that detection did not suffer until 48:1 compression and still was robust at 96:1. The last contribution consists in the complexity reduction of our compression scheme. The first allocation dedicated to 2D DZLVQ uses an exponential of the rate-distortion (R-D) functions. The second allocation for 2D and 3D medical images is based on block statistical model to estimate the R-D curves. These R-D models are based on the joint distribution of wavelet vectors using a multidimensional mixture of generalized Gaussian (MMGG) densities. (author)

  3. Investigation of Pre- and Post-Swelling Behavior of Elastomeric Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Akhtar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last ten years, a new type of modern polymer, known as swelling elastomer, has been used extensively as a sealing element in the oil and gas industry. These elastomers have been instrumental in various new applications such as water shut off, zonal isolation, and sidetracking. Though swell packers can significantly reduce costs and increase productivity, their failure can lead to serious losses. The integrity and reliability of swelling elastomer seals under different field conditions is a major concern. The investigation of changes in material behavior over a specified swelling period is a necessary first step for performance evaluation of elastomer seals. The current study is based on experimental analysis of changes in geometric and mechanical behavior (hardness, tensile, compressive, bulk of an elastomeric material due to swelling. Tests were carried out before and after various stages of swelling. Specimens were placed in saline water (0.6% and 12% concentrations at a temperature of 50°C, with the total swelling period being one month. Swelling, hardness, compression, and bulk tests were conducted using disc samples, while ring samples were used for tensile experiments. A small test rig was designed and constructed for determination of bulk modulus. Stress-strain curves under tension and compression, and pressure volumetric-strain curves were obtained for specimens subjected to different swelling periods. Due to the fast-swell nature of the elastomer, there were sharp changes in mechanical properties within the first few days of swelling for both salinities. Elastic modulus derived from tensile and compressive tests showed a 90% decrease in the first few days. Bulk modulus showed fluctuation in its variation with an increasing swelling period. There was a small effect of salinity only during the first 5 or 6 days.

  4. Synoptic volumetric variations and flushing of the Tampa Bay estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M.; Meyers, S. D.; Luther, M. E.

    2014-03-01

    Two types of analyses are used to investigate the synoptic wind-driven flushing of Tampa Bay in response to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle from 1950 to 2007. Hourly sea level elevations from the St. Petersburg tide gauge, and wind speed and direction from three different sites around Tampa Bay are used for the study. The zonal (u) and meridional (v) wind components are rotated clockwise by 40° to obtain axial and co-axial components according to the layout of the bay. First, we use the subtidal observed water level as a proxy for mean tidal height to estimate the rate of volumetric bay outflow. Second, we use wavelet analysis to bandpass sea level and wind data in the time-frequency domain to isolate the synoptic sea level and surface wind variance. For both analyses the long-term monthly climatology is removed and we focus on the volumetric and wavelet variance anomalies. The overall correlation between the Oceanic Niño Index and volumetric analysis is small due to the seasonal dependence of the ENSO response. The mean monthly climatology between the synoptic wavelet variance of elevation and axial winds are in close agreement. During the winter, El Niño (La Niña) increases (decreases) the synoptic variability, but decreases (increases) it during the summer. The difference in winter El Niño/La Niña wavelet variances is about 20 % of the climatological value, meaning that ENSO can swing the synoptic flushing of the bay by 0.22 bay volumes per month. These changes in circulation associated with synoptic variability have the potential to impact mixing and transport within the bay.

  5. Agreement of mammographic measures of volumetric breast density to MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Wang

    Full Text Available Clinical scores of mammographic breast density are highly subjective. Automated technologies for mammography exist to quantify breast density objectively, but the technique that most accurately measures the quantity of breast fibroglandular tissue is not known.To compare the agreement of three automated mammographic techniques for measuring volumetric breast density with a quantitative volumetric MRI-based technique in a screening population.Women were selected from the UCSF Medical Center screening population that had received both a screening MRI and digital mammogram within one year of each other, had Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS assessments of normal or benign finding, and no history of breast cancer or surgery. Agreement was assessed of three mammographic techniques (Single-energy X-ray Absorptiometry [SXA], Quantra, and Volpara with MRI for percent fibroglandular tissue volume, absolute fibroglandular tissue volume, and total breast volume.Among 99 women, the automated mammographic density techniques were correlated with MRI measures with R(2 values ranging from 0.40 (log fibroglandular volume to 0.91 (total breast volume. Substantial agreement measured by kappa statistic was found between all percent fibroglandular tissue measures (0.72 to 0.63, but only moderate agreement for log fibroglandular volumes. The kappa statistics for all percent density measures were highest in the comparisons of the SXA and MRI results. The largest error source between MRI and the mammography techniques was found to be differences in measures of total breast volume.Automated volumetric fibroglandular tissue measures from screening digital mammograms were in substantial agreement with MRI and if associated with breast cancer could be used in clinical practice to enhance risk assessment and prevention.

  6. Agreement of mammographic measures of volumetric breast density to MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeff; Azziz, Ania; Fan, Bo; Malkov, Serghei; Klifa, Catherine; Newitt, David; Yitta, Silaja; Hylton, Nola; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A

    2013-01-01

    Clinical scores of mammographic breast density are highly subjective. Automated technologies for mammography exist to quantify breast density objectively, but the technique that most accurately measures the quantity of breast fibroglandular tissue is not known. To compare the agreement of three automated mammographic techniques for measuring volumetric breast density with a quantitative volumetric MRI-based technique in a screening population. Women were selected from the UCSF Medical Center screening population that had received both a screening MRI and digital mammogram within one year of each other, had Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessments of normal or benign finding, and no history of breast cancer or surgery. Agreement was assessed of three mammographic techniques (Single-energy X-ray Absorptiometry [SXA], Quantra, and Volpara) with MRI for percent fibroglandular tissue volume, absolute fibroglandular tissue volume, and total breast volume. Among 99 women, the automated mammographic density techniques were correlated with MRI measures with R(2) values ranging from 0.40 (log fibroglandular volume) to 0.91 (total breast volume). Substantial agreement measured by kappa statistic was found between all percent fibroglandular tissue measures (0.72 to 0.63), but only moderate agreement for log fibroglandular volumes. The kappa statistics for all percent density measures were highest in the comparisons of the SXA and MRI results. The largest error source between MRI and the mammography techniques was found to be differences in measures of total breast volume. Automated volumetric fibroglandular tissue measures from screening digital mammograms were in substantial agreement with MRI and if associated with breast cancer could be used in clinical practice to enhance risk assessment and prevention.

  7. Method for Determining Volumetric Efficiency and Its Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrozik Andrzej

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern means of transport are basically powered by piston internal combustion engines. Increasingly rigorous demands are placed on IC engines in order to minimise the detrimental impact they have on the natural environment. That stimulates the development of research on piston internal combustion engines. The research involves experimental and theoretical investigations carried out using computer technologies. While being filled, the cylinder is considered to be an open thermodynamic system, in which non-stationary processes occur. To make calculations of thermodynamic parameters of the engine operating cycle, based on the comparison of cycles, it is necessary to know the mean constant value of cylinder pressure throughout this process. Because of the character of in-cylinder pressure pattern and difficulties in pressure experimental determination, in the present paper, a novel method for the determination of this quantity was presented. In the new approach, the iteration method was used. In the method developed for determining the volumetric efficiency, the following equations were employed: the law of conservation of the amount of substance, the first law of thermodynamics for open system, dependences for changes in the cylinder volume vs. the crankshaft rotation angle, and the state equation. The results of calculations performed with this method were validated by means of experimental investigations carried out for a selected engine at the engine test bench. A satisfactory congruence of computational and experimental results as regards determining the volumetric efficiency was obtained. The method for determining the volumetric efficiency presented in the paper can be used to investigate the processes taking place in the cylinder of an IC engine.

  8. Extended Kalman filtering for continuous volumetric MR-temperature imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis de Senneville, Baudouin; Roujol, Sébastien; Hey, Silke; Moonen, Chrit; Ries, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Real time magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry has evolved into the method of choice for the guidance of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) interventions. For this role, MR-thermometry should preferably have a high temporal and spatial resolution and allow observing the temperature over the entire targeted area and its vicinity with a high accuracy. In addition, the precision of real time MR-thermometry for therapy guidance is generally limited by the available signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the influence of physiological noise. MR-guided HIFU would benefit of the large coverage volumetric temperature maps, including characterization of volumetric heating trajectories as well as near- and far-field heating. In this paper, continuous volumetric MR-temperature monitoring was obtained as follows. The targeted area was continuously scanned during the heating process by a multi-slice sequence. Measured data and a priori knowledge of 3-D data derived from a forecast based on a physical model were combined using an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The proposed reconstruction improved the temperature measurement resolution and precision while maintaining guaranteed output accuracy. The method was evaluated experimentally ex vivo on a phantom, and in vivo on a porcine kidney, using HIFU heating. On the in vivo experiment, it allowed the reconstruction from a spatio-temporally under-sampled data set (with an update rate for each voxel of 1.143 s) to a 3-D dataset covering a field of view of 142.5×285×54 mm(3) with a voxel size of 3×3×6 mm(3) and a temporal resolution of 0.127 s. The method also provided noise reduction, while having a minimal impact on accuracy and latency.

  9. Coulomb-Driven Relativistic Electron Beam Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles is a well-known phenomenon in many areas of research. In general, the Coulomb repulsion force broadens the pulse width of an electron bunch and limits the temporal resolution of many scientific facilities such as ultrafast electron diffraction and x-ray free-electron lasers. Here we demonstrate a scheme that actually makes use of the Coulomb force to compress a relativistic electron beam. Furthermore, we show that the Coulomb-driven bunch compression process does not introduce additional timing jitter, which is in sharp contrast to the conventional radio-frequency buncher technique. Our work not only leads to enhanced temporal resolution in electron-beam-based ultrafast instruments that may provide new opportunities in probing material systems far from equilibrium, but also opens a promising direction for advanced beam manipulation through self-field interactions.

  10. Coulomb-Driven Relativistic Electron Beam Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2018-01-26

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles is a well-known phenomenon in many areas of research. In general, the Coulomb repulsion force broadens the pulse width of an electron bunch and limits the temporal resolution of many scientific facilities such as ultrafast electron diffraction and x-ray free-electron lasers. Here we demonstrate a scheme that actually makes use of the Coulomb force to compress a relativistic electron beam. Furthermore, we show that the Coulomb-driven bunch compression process does not introduce additional timing jitter, which is in sharp contrast to the conventional radio-frequency buncher technique. Our work not only leads to enhanced temporal resolution in electron-beam-based ultrafast instruments that may provide new opportunities in probing material systems far from equilibrium, but also opens a promising direction for advanced beam manipulation through self-field interactions.

  11. Synthesis of Volumetric Ring Antenna Array for Terrestrial Coverage Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Reyna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction.

  12. Synthesis of Volumetric Ring Antenna Array for Terrestrial Coverage Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Alberto; Panduro, Marco A.; Del Rio Bocio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction. PMID:24701150

  13. Volumetric and calorimetric properties of aqueous ionene solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukšič, Miha; Hribar-Lee, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The volumetric (partial and apparent molar volumes) and calorimetric properties (apparent heat capacities) of aqueous cationic polyelectrolyte solutions - ionenes - were studied using the oscillating tube densitometer and differential scanning calorimeter. The polyion's charge density and the counterion properties were considered as variables. The special attention was put to evaluate the contribution of electrostatic and hydrophobic effects to the properties studied. The contribution of the CH 2 group of the polyion's backbone to molar volumes and heat capacities was estimated. Synergistic effect between polyion and counterions was found.

  14. CT volumetric measurements of the orbits in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahe, T.; Schlolaut, K.H.; Poss, T.; Trier, H.G.; Lackner, K.; Bonn Univ.; Bonn Univ.

    1989-01-01

    The volumes of the four recti muscles and the orbital fat was measured by CT in 40 normal persons and in 60 patients with clinically confirmed Graves' disease. Compared with normal persons, 42 patients (70%) showed an increase in muscle volume and 28 patients (46.7%) an increase in the amount of fat. In nine patients (15%) muscle volume was normal, but the fat was increased. By using volumetric measurements, the amount of fat in the orbits in patients with Graves' disease could be determined. (orig.) [de

  15. Hierarchical anatomical brain networks for MCI prediction: revisiting volumetric measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luping Zhou

    Full Text Available Owning to its clinical accessibility, T1-weighted MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging has been extensively studied in the past decades for prediction of Alzheimer's disease (AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI. The volumes of gray matter (GM, white matter (WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are the most commonly used measurements, resulting in many successful applications. It has been widely observed that disease-induced structural changes may not occur at isolated spots, but in several inter-related regions. Therefore, for better characterization of brain pathology, we propose in this paper a means to extract inter-regional correlation based features from local volumetric measurements. Specifically, our approach involves constructing an anatomical brain network for each subject, with each node representing a Region of Interest (ROI and each edge representing Pearson correlation of tissue volumetric measurements between ROI pairs. As second order volumetric measurements, network features are more descriptive but also more sensitive to noise. To overcome this limitation, a hierarchy of ROIs is used to suppress noise at different scales. Pairwise interactions are considered not only for ROIs with the same scale in the same layer of the hierarchy, but also for ROIs across different scales in different layers. To address the high dimensionality problem resulting from the large number of network features, a supervised dimensionality reduction method is further employed to embed a selected subset of features into a low dimensional feature space, while at the same time preserving discriminative information. We demonstrate with experimental results the efficacy of this embedding strategy in comparison with some other commonly used approaches. In addition, although the proposed method can be easily generalized to incorporate other metrics of regional similarities, the benefits of using Pearson correlation in our application are reinforced by the experimental

  16. Isentropic compressibilities of (amide + water) mixtures: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papamatthaiakis, Dimitris; Aroni, Fryni; Havredaki, Vasiliki

    2008-01-01

    The density and ultrasonic velocity of aqueous solutions of formamide (FA), N-methylformamide (NMF), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), pyrrolidin-2-one (PYR), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), and their pure phases have been measured at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. Densities and ultrasonic velocities in pure amides have been also measured at the temperature range 288.15 K to 308.15 K for the computation of their thermal expansivities. Isentropic compressibility, intermolecular free length, relative association, apparent molar compressibility, as well as the excess quantities, ultrasonic velocity, isentropic compressibility, intermolecular free length, have been evaluated and fitted to the Redlich-Kister type equation. The deviation from ideal mixing law in ultrasonic velocity is positive while the deviations in isentropic compressibility and intermolecular free length are negative for all (amide + water) mixtures. This behavior reveals the nature and the magnitude of intermolecular interactions between the amide-water molecules. The sequence of superimposed curves of various ultrasonic parameters vs. the amide mole fraction is related to the strength of interactions between the unlike molecules and the role of -CH 3 substitution in amides. The comparison of ultrasonic to volumetric properties reveals differences on the position of the extrema and their relation with the degree of substitution while the interpretation of these differences is discussed. Two different approaches on the computation of excess functions, applied in this work, brought out a difference in the magnitude of deviations and a partial reversion to the sequence of amides curves suggesting a different estimation in terms of deviations from ideal mixing law and therefore of the relative molecular interactions

  17. 78 FR 16045 - Safety Advisory: Unauthorized Marking of Compressed Gas Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2013-0019; Notice No. 13-03] Safety Advisory: Unauthorized Marking of Compressed Gas Cylinders AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Safety Advisory...

  18. Application specific compression : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.

  19. Compressed Baryonic Matter of Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Baryonic matter in the core of a massive and evolved star is compressed significantly to form a supra-nuclear object, and compressed baryonic matter (CBM) is then produced after supernova. The state of cold matter at a few nuclear density is pedagogically reviewed, with significant attention paid to a possible quark-cluster state conjectured from an astrophysical point of view.

  20. Streaming Compression of Hexahedral Meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isenburg, M; Courbet, C

    2010-02-03

    We describe a method for streaming compression of hexahedral meshes. Given an interleaved stream of vertices and hexahedral our coder incrementally compresses the mesh in the presented order. Our coder is extremely memory efficient when the input stream documents when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. when it contains topological finalization tags). Our coder then continuously releases and reuses data structures that no longer contribute to compressing the remainder of the stream. This means in practice that our coder has only a small fraction of the whole mesh in memory at any time. We can therefore compress very large meshes - even meshes that do not file in memory. Compared to traditional, non-streaming approaches that load the entire mesh and globally reorder it during compression, our algorithm trades a less compact compressed representation for significant gains in speed, memory, and I/O efficiency. For example, on the 456k hexahedra 'blade' mesh, our coder is twice as fast and uses 88 times less memory (only 3.1 MB) with the compressed file increasing about 3% in size. We also present the first scheme for predictive compression of properties associated with hexahedral cells.

  1. Data Compression with Linear Algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Etler, David

    2015-01-01

    A presentation on the applications of linear algebra to image compression. Covers entropy, the discrete cosine transform, thresholding, quantization, and examples of images compressed with DCT. Given in Spring 2015 at Ocean County College as part of the honors program.

  2. Images compression in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, M.S.; Furuie, S.S.; Moura, L.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of two methods for images compression in nuclear medicine was evaluated. The LZW precise, and Cosine Transformed, approximate, methods were analyzed. The results were obtained, showing that the utilization of approximated method produced images with an agreeable quality for visual analysis and compression rates, considerably high than precise method. (C.G.C.)

  3. Investigation of Nonlinear Site Response and Seismic Compression from Case History Analysis and Laboratory Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Eric

    In this thesis I address a series of issues related to ground failure and ground motions during earthquakes. A major component is the evaluation of cyclic volumetric strain behavior of unsaturated soils, more commonly known as seismic compression, from advanced laboratory testing. Another major component is the application of nonlinear and equivalent linear ground response analyses to large-strain problems involving highly nonlinear dynamic soil behavior. These two components are merged in the analysis of a truly unique and crucial field case history of nonlinear site response and seismic compression. My first topic concerns dynamic soil testing for relatively small strain dynamic soil properties such as threshold strains, gammatv. Such testing is often conducted using specialized devices such as dual-specimen simple-shear, as devices configured for large strain testing produce noisy signals in the small strain range. Working with a simple shear device originally developed for large-strain testing, I extend its low-strain capabilities by characterizing noisy signals and utilizing several statistical methods to extract meaningful responses in the small strain range. I utilize linear regression of a transformed variable to estimate the cyclic shear strain from a noisy signal and the confidence interval on its amplitude. I utilize Kernel regression with the Nadaraya-Watson estimator and a Gaussian kernel to evaluate vertical strain response. A practical utilization of these techniques is illustrated by evaluating threshold shear strains for volume change with a procedure that takes into account uncertainties in the measured shear and vertical strains. My second topic concerns the seismic compression characteristics of non-plastic and low-plasticity silty sands with varying fines content (10 ≤ FC ≤ 60%). Simple shear testing was performed on various sand-fines mixtures at a range of modified Proctor relative compaction levels ( RC) and degrees-of-saturation (S

  4. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  5. Compressive Sensing in Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    . The need for cheaper, smarter and more energy efficient wireless devices is greater now than ever. This thesis addresses this problem and concerns the application of the recently developed sampling theory of compressive sensing in communication systems. Compressive sensing is the merging of signal...... acquisition and compression. It allows for sampling a signal with a rate below the bound dictated by the celebrated Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem. In some communication systems this necessary minimum sample rate, dictated by the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem, is so high it is at the limit of what...... with using compressive sensing in communication systems. The main contribution of this thesis is two-fold: 1) a new compressive sensing hardware structure for spread spectrum signals, which is simpler than the current state-of-the-art, and 2) a range of algorithms for parameter estimation for the class...

  6. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li Jinsheng; Price, Robert A Jr; Wang Lu; Ma, C-M; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm 3 insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm 2 photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose–volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm 3 dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm 2 field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT patient dose

  7. Scanners and drillers: Characterizing expert visual search through volumetric images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Trafton; Vo, Melissa Le-Hoa; Olwal, Alex; Jacobson, Francine; Seltzer, Steven E.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2013-01-01

    Modern imaging methods like computed tomography (CT) generate 3-D volumes of image data. How do radiologists search through such images? Are certain strategies more efficient? Although there is a large literature devoted to understanding search in 2-D, relatively little is known about search in volumetric space. In recent years, with the ever-increasing popularity of volumetric medical imaging, this question has taken on increased importance as we try to understand, and ultimately reduce, errors in diagnostic radiology. In the current study, we asked 24 radiologists to search chest CTs for lung nodules that could indicate lung cancer. To search, radiologists scrolled up and down through a “stack” of 2-D chest CT “slices.” At each moment, we tracked eye movements in the 2-D image plane and coregistered eye position with the current slice. We used these data to create a 3-D representation of the eye movements through the image volume. Radiologists tended to follow one of two dominant search strategies: “drilling” and “scanning.” Drillers restrict eye movements to a small region of the lung while quickly scrolling through depth. Scanners move more slowly through depth and search an entire level of the lung before moving on to the next level in depth. Driller performance was superior to the scanners on a variety of metrics, including lung nodule detection rate, percentage of the lung covered, and the percentage of search errors where a nodule was never fixated. PMID:23922445

  8. Computational assessment of visual search strategies in volumetric medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Gezheng; Aizenman, Avigael; Drew, Trafton; Wolfe, Jeremy M; Haygood, Tamara Miner; Markey, Mia K

    2016-01-01

    When searching through volumetric images [e.g., computed tomography (CT)], radiologists appear to use two different search strategies: "drilling" (restrict eye movements to a small region of the image while quickly scrolling through slices), or "scanning" (search over large areas at a given depth before moving on to the next slice). To computationally identify the type of image information that is used in these two strategies, 23 naïve observers were instructed with either "drilling" or "scanning" when searching for target T's in 20 volumes of faux lung CTs. We computed saliency maps using both classical two-dimensional (2-D) saliency, and a three-dimensional (3-D) dynamic saliency that captures the characteristics of scrolling through slices. Comparing observers' gaze distributions with the saliency maps showed that search strategy alters the type of saliency that attracts fixations. Drillers' fixations aligned better with dynamic saliency and scanners with 2-D saliency. The computed saliency was greater for detected targets than for missed targets. Similar results were observed in data from 19 radiologists who searched five stacks of clinical chest CTs for lung nodules. Dynamic saliency may be superior to the 2-D saliency for detecting targets embedded in volumetric images, and thus "drilling" may be more efficient than "scanning."

  9. Analytic Intermodel Consistent Modeling of Volumetric Human Lung Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun; Seyfi, Behnaz; Neylon, John; Santhanam, Anand P

    2015-10-01

    Human lung undergoes breathing-induced deformation in the form of inhalation and exhalation. Modeling the dynamics is numerically complicated by the lack of information on lung elastic behavior and fluid-structure interactions between air and the tissue. A mathematical method is developed to integrate deformation results from a deformable image registration (DIR) and physics-based modeling approaches in order to represent consistent volumetric lung dynamics. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation assumes the lung is a poro-elastic medium with spatially distributed elastic property. Simulation is performed on a 3D lung geometry reconstructed from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset of a human subject. The heterogeneous Young's modulus (YM) is estimated from a linear elastic deformation model with the same lung geometry and 4D lung DIR. The deformation obtained from the CFD is then coupled with the displacement obtained from the 4D lung DIR by means of the Tikhonov regularization (TR) algorithm. The numerical results include 4DCT registration, CFD, and optimal displacement data which collectively provide consistent estimate of the volumetric lung dynamics. The fusion method is validated by comparing the optimal displacement with the results obtained from the 4DCT registration.

  10. [Benefits of volumetric to facial rejuvenation. Part 1: Fat grafting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, P; Lepage, C

    2017-10-01

    For a number of years, a volumetric approach using autologous fat injection has been implemented to improve cosmetic outcome in face-lift procedures and to achieve lasting rejuvenation. Autologous fat as filling tissue has been used in plastic surgery since the late 19th century, but has only recently been associated to face lift procedures. The interest of the association lies on the one hand in the pathophysiology of facial aging, involving skin sag and loss of volume, and on the other hand in the tissue induction properties of grafted fat, "rejuvenating" the injected area. The strict methodology consisting in harvesting, treating then injecting an autologous fat graft is known as LipoStructure ® or lipofilling. We here describe the technique overall, then region by region. It is now well known and seems simple, effective and reproducible, but is nevertheless delicate. For each individual, it is necessary to restore a harmonious face with well-distributed volumes. By associating volumetric to the face lift procedure, the plastic surgeon plays a new role: instead of being a tailor, cutting away excess skin, he or she becomes a sculptor, remodeling the face to restore the harmony of youth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Volumetric three-dimensional display system with rasterization hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalora, Gregg E.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Giovinco, Michael; Napoli, Joshua

    2001-06-01

    An 8-color multiplanar volumetric display is being developed by Actuality Systems, Inc. It will be capable of utilizing an image volume greater than 90 million voxels, which we believe is the greatest utilizable voxel set of any volumetric display constructed to date. The display is designed to be used for molecular visualization, mechanical CAD, e-commerce, entertainment, and medical imaging. As such, it contains a new graphics processing architecture, novel high-performance line- drawing algorithms, and an API similar to a current standard. Three-dimensional imagery is created by projecting a series of 2-D bitmaps ('image slices') onto a diffuse screen that rotates at 600 rpm. Persistence of vision fuses the slices into a volume-filling 3-D image. A modified three-panel Texas Instruments projector provides slices at approximately 4 kHz, resulting in 8-color 3-D imagery comprised of roughly 200 radially-disposed slices which are updated at 20 Hz. Each slice has a resolution of 768 by 768 pixels, subtending 10 inches. An unusual off-axis projection scheme incorporating tilted rotating optics is used to maintain good focus across the projection screen. The display electronics includes a custom rasterization architecture which converts the user's 3- D geometry data into image slices, as well as 6 Gbits of DDR SDRAM graphics memory.

  12. Three-dimensional volumetric assessment of response to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, C.G.; Stracher, M.A.; Linggood, R.M.; Leong, J.C.; Skates, S.J.; Miketic, L.M.; Kushner, D.C.; Jacobson, J.O.

    1988-01-01

    From 1981 to 1986, 12 patients with Stage I and II diffuse large cell lymphoma of the mediastinum were treated with 4 or more cycles of multiagent chemotherapy and for nine patients this was followed by mediastinal irradiation. The response to treatment was assessed by three-dimensional volumetric analysis utilizing thoracic CT scans. The initial mean tumor volume of the five patients relapsing was 540 ml in contrast to an initial mean tumor volume of 360 ml for the seven patients remaining in remission. Of the eight patients in whom mediastinal lymphoma volumes could be assessed 1-2 months after chemotherapy prior to mediastinal irradiation, the three patients who have relapsed had volumes of 292, 92 and 50 ml (mean volume 145 ml) in contrast to five patients who have remained in remission with residual volume abnormalities of 4-87 ml (mean volume 32 ml). Four patients in prolonged remission with CT scans taken one year after treatment have been noted to have mediastinal tumor volumes of 0-28 ml with a mean value of 10 ml. This volumetric technique to assess the extent of mediastinal large cell lymphoma from thoracic CT scans appears to be a useful method to quantitate the amount of disease at presentation as well as objectively monitor response to treatment. 13 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 table

  13. A spiral-based volumetric acquisition for MR temperature imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielden, Samuel W; Feng, Xue; Zhao, Li; Miller, G Wilson; Geeslin, Matthew; Dallapiazza, Robert F; Elias, W Jeffrey; Wintermark, Max; Butts Pauly, Kim; Meyer, Craig H

    2018-06-01

    To develop a rapid pulse sequence for volumetric MR thermometry. Simulations were carried out to assess temperature deviation, focal spot distortion/blurring, and focal spot shift across a range of readout durations and maximum temperatures for Cartesian, spiral-out, and retraced spiral-in/out (RIO) trajectories. The RIO trajectory was applied for stack-of-spirals 3D imaging on a real-time imaging platform and preliminary evaluation was carried out compared to a standard 2D sequence in vivo using a swine brain model, comparing maximum and mean temperatures measured between the two methods, as well as the temporal standard deviation measured by the two methods. In simulations, low-bandwidth Cartesian trajectories showed substantial shift of the focal spot, whereas both spiral trajectories showed no shift while maintaining focal spot geometry. In vivo, the 3D sequence achieved real-time 4D monitoring of thermometry, with an update time of 2.9-3.3 s. Spiral imaging, and RIO imaging in particular, is an effective way to speed up volumetric MR thermometry. Magn Reson Med 79:3122-3127, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Spatio-volumetric hazard estimation in the Auckland volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, Mark S.

    2015-05-01

    The idea of a volcanic field `boundary' is prevalent in the literature, but ill-defined at best. We use the elliptically constrained vents in the Auckland Volcanic Field to examine how spatial intensity models can be tested to assess whether they are consistent with such features. A means of modifying the anisotropic Gaussian kernel density estimate to reflect the existence of a `hard' boundary is then suggested, and the result shown to reproduce the observed elliptical distribution. A new idea, that of a spatio-volumetric model, is introduced as being more relevant to hazard in a monogenetic volcanic field than the spatiotemporal hazard model due to the low temporal rates in volcanic fields. Significant dependencies between the locations and erupted volumes of the observed centres are deduced, and expressed in the form of a spatially-varying probability density. In the future, larger volumes are to be expected in the `gaps' between existing centres, with the location of the greatest forecast volume lying in the shipping channel between Rangitoto and Castor Bay. The results argue for tectonic control over location and magmatic control over erupted volume. The spatio-volumetric model is consistent with the hypothesis of a flat elliptical area in the mantle where tensional stresses, related to the local tectonics and geology, allow decompressional melting.

  15. Performance-scalable volumetric data classification for online industrial inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Aby J.; Sadki, Mustapha; Lea, R. M.

    2002-03-01

    Non-intrusive inspection and non-destructive testing of manufactured objects with complex internal structures typically requires the enhancement, analysis and visualization of high-resolution volumetric data. Given the increasing availability of fast 3D scanning technology (e.g. cone-beam CT), enabling on-line detection and accurate discrimination of components or sub-structures, the inherent complexity of classification algorithms inevitably leads to throughput bottlenecks. Indeed, whereas typical inspection throughput requirements range from 1 to 1000 volumes per hour, depending on density and resolution, current computational capability is one to two orders-of-magnitude less. Accordingly, speeding up classification algorithms requires both reduction of algorithm complexity and acceleration of computer performance. A shape-based classification algorithm, offering algorithm complexity reduction, by using ellipses as generic descriptors of solids-of-revolution, and supporting performance-scalability, by exploiting the inherent parallelism of volumetric data, is presented. A two-stage variant of the classical Hough transform is used for ellipse detection and correlation of the detected ellipses facilitates position-, scale- and orientation-invariant component classification. Performance-scalability is achieved cost-effectively by accelerating a PC host with one or more COTS (Commercial-Off-The-Shelf) PCI multiprocessor cards. Experimental results are reported to demonstrate the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of the data-parallel classification algorithm for on-line industrial inspection applications.

  16. Effect of temperature and ionic strength on volumetric and acoustic properties of solutions of urea alkyl derivatives in aqueous NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Wawer, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Urea and its alkyl derivatives in aqueous NaCl solutions were studied. • The density and the speed of sound were measured for presented systems. • The strongest impact of NaCl on obtained quantities is noticed for apparent molar compression. • Bigger hydrophobic character of the solute results in bigger changes of calculated quantities with concentration. • The geometry of the solute is a crucial condition for hydrophobic hydration to happen. - Abstract: The present work was undertaken to study volumetric and acoustic properties for diluted solutions of tetramethylurea in pure water and for urea, n-propylurea, n-butylurea and tetramethylurea in 0.5 or 1 mol · dm −3 aqueous solutions of sodium chloride. This paper presents measured values of densities and sound velocities at T = (288.15, 298.15 and 308.15) K. From these data the apparent molar volumes, V Φ , adiabatic compressibilities, κ S , and apparent molar adiabatic compressions, K S,Φ , were obtained. The values of apparent molar volumes for infinite dilution and limited apparent adiabatic compressions were calculated from extrapolation of the concentration dependence. Further, the corresponding transfer data as well as hydration number of urea and its derivatives in the studied systems were estimated. The obtained parameters are discussed in terms of various solute-solvent and solute-cosolute interactions

  17. Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Imaging with a Piezoelectric 2-D Row-Column Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann

    2016-01-01

    The synthetic aperture (SA) technique can be used for achieving real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D row-column addressed transducers. This paper investigates SA volumetric imaging performance of an in-house prototyped 3 MHz λ/2-pitch 62+62 element piezoelectric 2-D row-column addres......The synthetic aperture (SA) technique can be used for achieving real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D row-column addressed transducers. This paper investigates SA volumetric imaging performance of an in-house prototyped 3 MHz λ/2-pitch 62+62 element piezoelectric 2-D row...

  18. Evaluation of mammogram compression efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przelaskowski, A.; Surowski, P.; Kukula, A.

    2005-01-01

    Lossy image coding significantly improves performance over lossless methods, but a reliable control of diagnostic accuracy regarding compressed images is necessary. The acceptable range of compression ratios must be safe with respect to as many objective criteria as possible. This study evaluates the compression efficiency of digital mammograms in both numerically lossless (reversible) and lossy (irreversible) manner. Effective compression methods and concepts were examined to increase archiving and telediagnosis performance. Lossless compression as a primary applicable tool for medical applications was verified on a set 131 mammograms. Moreover, nine radiologists participated in the evaluation of lossy compression of mammograms. Subjective rating of diagnostically important features brought a set of mean rates given for each test image. The lesion detection test resulted in binary decision data analyzed statistically. The radiologists rated and interpreted malignant and benign lesions, representative pathology symptoms, and other structures susceptible to compression distortions contained in 22 original and 62 reconstructed mammograms. Test mammograms were collected in two radiology centers for three years and then selected according to diagnostic content suitable for an evaluation of compression effects. Lossless compression efficiency of the tested coders varied, but CALIC, JPEG-LS, and SPIHT performed the best. The evaluation of lossy compression effects affecting detection ability was based on ROC-like analysis. Assuming a two-sided significance level of p=0.05, the null hypothesis that lower bit rate reconstructions are as useful for diagnosis as the originals was false in sensitivity tests with 0.04 bpp mammograms. However, verification of the same hypothesis with 0.1 bpp reconstructions suggested their acceptance. Moreover, the 1 bpp reconstructions were rated very similarly to the original mammograms in the diagnostic quality evaluation test, but the

  19. Experimental validation of finite element analysis of human vertebral collapse under large compressive strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hadi S; Clouthier, Allison L; Zysset, Philippe K

    2014-04-01

    Osteoporosis-related vertebral fractures represent a major health problem in elderly populations. Such fractures can often only be diagnosed after a substantial deformation history of the vertebral body. Therefore, it remains a challenge for clinicians to distinguish between stable and progressive potentially harmful fractures. Accordingly, novel criteria for selection of the appropriate conservative or surgical treatment are urgently needed. Computer tomography-based finite element analysis is an increasingly accepted method to predict the quasi-static vertebral strength and to follow up this small strain property longitudinally in time. A recent development in constitutive modeling allows us to simulate strain localization and densification in trabecular bone under large compressive strains without mesh dependence. The aim of this work was to validate this recently developed constitutive model of trabecular bone for the prediction of strain localization and densification in the human vertebral body subjected to large compressive deformation. A custom-made stepwise loading device mounted in a high resolution peripheral computer tomography system was used to describe the progressive collapse of 13 human vertebrae under axial compression. Continuum finite element analyses of the 13 compression tests were realized and the zones of high volumetric strain were compared with the experiments. A fair qualitative correspondence of the strain localization zone between the experiment and finite element analysis was achieved in 9 out of 13 tests and significant correlations of the volumetric strains were obtained throughout the range of applied axial compression. Interestingly, the stepwise propagating localization zones in trabecular bone converged to the buckling locations in the cortical shell. While the adopted continuum finite element approach still suffers from several limitations, these encouraging preliminary results towards the prediction of extended vertebral

  20. Crystal and Particle Engineering Strategies for Improving Powder Compression and Flow Properties to Enable Continuous Tablet Manufacturing by Direct Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattoraj, Sayantan; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2018-04-01

    Continuous manufacturing of tablets has many advantages, including batch size flexibility, demand-adaptive scale up or scale down, consistent product quality, small operational foot print, and increased manufacturing efficiency. Simplicity makes direct compression the most suitable process for continuous tablet manufacturing. However, deficiencies in powder flow and compression of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) limit the range of drug loading that can routinely be considered for direct compression. For the widespread adoption of continuous direct compression, effective API engineering strategies to address power flow and compression problems are needed. Appropriate implementation of these strategies would facilitate the design of high-quality robust drug products, as stipulated by the Quality-by-Design framework. Here, several crystal and particle engineering strategies for improving powder flow and compression properties are summarized. The focus is on the underlying materials science, which is the foundation for effective API engineering to enable successful continuous manufacturing by the direct compression process. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  2. Indentation of elastically soft and plastically compressible solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Needleman, A.; Tvergaard, Viggo; Van der Giessen, E.

    2015-01-01

    rapidly for small deviations from plastic incompressibility and then decreases rather slowly for values of the plastic Poisson's ratio less than 0.25. For both soft elasticity and plastic compressibility, the main reason for the lower values of indentation hardness is related to the reduction......The effect of soft elasticity, i.e., a relatively small value of the ratio of Young's modulus to yield strength and plastic compressibility on the indentation of isotropically hardening elastic-viscoplastic solids is investigated. Calculations are carried out for indentation of a perfectly sticking...... rigid sharp indenter into a cylinder modeling indentation of a half space. The material is characterized by a finite strain elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation that allows for plastic as well as elastic compressibility. Both soft elasticity and plastic compressibility significantly reduce...

  3. Compression etiology in tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almekinders, Louis C; Weinhold, Paul S; Maffulli, Nicola

    2003-10-01

    Recent studies have emphasized that the etiology of tendinopathy is not as simple as was once thought. The etiology is likely to be multifactorial. Etiologic factors may include some of the traditional factors such as overuse, inflexibility, and equipment problems; however, other factors need to be considered as well, such as age-related tendon degeneration and biomechanical considerations as outlined in this article. More research is needed to determine the significance of stress-shielding and compression in tendinopathy. If they are confirmed to play a role, this finding may significantly alter our approach in both prevention and in treatment through exercise therapy. The current biomechanical studies indicate that certain joint positions are more likely to place tensile stress on the area of the tendon commonly affected by tendinopathy. These joint positions seem to be different than the traditional positions for stretching exercises used for prevention and rehabilitation of tendinopathic conditions. Incorporation of different joint positions during stretching exercises may exert more uniform, controlled tensile stress on these affected areas of the tendon and avoid stresshielding. These exercises may be able to better maintain the mechanical strength of that region of the tendon and thereby avoid injury. Alternatively, they could more uniformly stress a healing area of the tendon in a controlled manner, and thereby stimulate healing once an injury has occurred. Additional work will have to prove if a change in rehabilitation exercises is more efficacious that current techniques.

  4. Compressible Vortex Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavarasan, Ramasamy; Arakeri, Jayawant; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of a high-speed vortex ring with a shock wave is one of the fundamental issues as it is a source of sound in supersonic jets. The complex flow field induced by the vortex alters the propagation of the shock wave greatly. In order to understand the process, a compressible vortex ring is studied in detail using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and shadowgraphic techniques. The high-speed vortex ring is generated from a shock tube and the shock wave, which precedes the vortex, is reflected back by a plate and made to interact with the vortex. The shadowgraph images indicate that the reflected shock front is influenced by the non-uniform flow induced by the vortex and is decelerated while passing through the vortex. It appears that after the interaction the shock is "split" into two. The PIV measurements provided clear picture about the evolution of the vortex at different time interval. The centerline velocity traces show the maximum velocity to be around 350 m/s. The velocity field, unlike in incompressible rings, contains contributions from both the shock and the vortex ring. The velocity distribution across the vortex core, core diameter and circulation are also calculated from the PIV data.

  5. Compressibility of the fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonská, Jana

    2014-03-01

    The presence of air in the liquid causes the dynamic system behaviour. When solve to issue of the dynamics we often meet problems of cavitation. Cavitation is an undesirable phenomenon, since it causes a disruption of the surrounding material and material destruction. Cavitation is accompanied by loud sound effects and reduces the efficiency of such pumps, etc. Therefore, it is desirable to model systems in which the cavitation might occur. A typical example is a solution of water hammer.

  6. Compressibility of the fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablonská Jana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of air in the liquid causes the dynamic system behaviour. When solve to issue of the dynamics we often meet problems of cavitation. Cavitation is an undesirable phenomenon, since it causes a disruption of the surrounding material and material destruction. Cavitation is accompanied by loud sound effects and reduces the efficiency of such pumps, etc. Therefore, it is desirable to model systems in which the cavitation might occur. A typical example is a solution of water hammer.

  7. Mammography image compression using Wavelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuhar Ripin; Md Saion Salikin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Md Isa

    2004-01-01

    Image compression plays an important role in many applications like medical imaging, televideo conferencing, remote sensing, document and facsimile transmission, which depend on the efficient manipulation, storage, and transmission of binary, gray scale, or color images. In Medical imaging application such Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACs), the image size or image stream size is too large and requires a large amount of storage space or high bandwidth for communication. Image compression techniques are divided into two categories namely lossy and lossless data compression. Wavelet method used in this project is a lossless compression method. In this method, the exact original mammography image data can be recovered. In this project, mammography images are digitized by using Vider Sierra Plus digitizer. The digitized images are compressed by using this wavelet image compression technique. Interactive Data Language (IDLs) numerical and visualization software is used to perform all of the calculations, to generate and display all of the compressed images. Results of this project are presented in this paper. (Author)

  8. Spherical composite particles of rice starch and microcrystalline cellulose: a new coprocessed excipient for direct compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limwong, Vasinee; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn; Kulvanich, Poj

    2004-03-12

    Composite particles of rice starch (RS) and microcrystalline cellulose were fabricated by spray-drying technique to be used as a directly compressible excipient. Two size fractions of microcrystalline cellulose, sieved (MCS) and jet milled (MCJ), having volumetric mean diameter (D50) of 13.61 and 40.51 microm, respectively, were used to form composite particles with RS in various mixing ratios. The composite particles produced were evaluated for their powder and compression properties. Although an increase in the microcrystalline cellulose proportion imparted greater compressibility of the composite particles, the shape of the particles was typically less spherical with rougher surface resulting in a decrease in the degree of flowability. Compressibility of composite particles made from different size fractions of microcrystalline cellulose was not different; however, using MCJ, which had a particle size range close to the size of RS (D50 = 13.57 microm), provided more spherical particles than using MCS. Spherical composite particles between RS and MCJ in the ratio of 7:3 (RS-MCJ-73) were then evaluated for powder properties and compressibility in comparison with some marketed directly compressible diluents. Compressibility of RS-MCJ-73 was greater than commercial spray-dried RS (Eratab), coprocessed lactose and microcrystalline cellulose (Cellactose), and agglomerated lactose (Tablettose), but, as expected, lower than microcrystalline cellulose (Vivapur 101). Flowability index of RS-MCJ-73 appeared to be slightly lower than Eratab but higher than Vivapur 101, Cellactose, and Tablettose. Tablets of RS-MCJ-73 exhibited low friability and good self-disintegrating property. It was concluded that these developed composite particles could be introduced as a new coprocessed direct compression excipient.

  9. Compressive Properties and Anti-Erosion Characteristics of Foam Concrete in Road Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinzhu; Huang, Hongxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Ding, Yifan

    2018-01-01

    To analyse the compression properties and anti-erosion characteristics of foam concrete, one dimensional compression tests were carried out using ring specimens of foam concrete, and unconfined compression tests were carried out using foam concrete specimens cured in different conditions. The results of one dimensional compression tests show that the compression curve of foam concrete has two critical points and three stages, which has significant difference with ordinary geotechnical materials such as soil. Based on the compression curve the compression modulus of each stage were determined. The results of erosion tests show that sea water has a slight influence on the long-term strength of foam concrete, while the sulphate solution has a significant influence on the long-term strength of foam concrete, which needs to pay more attention.

  10. On Compression of a Heavy Compressible Layer of an Elastoplastic or Elastoviscoplastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtanyuk, L. V.; Panchenko, G. L.

    2017-11-01

    The problem of deformation of a horizontal plane layer of a compressible material is solved in the framework of the theory of small strains. The upper boundary of the layer is under the action of shear and compressing loads, and the no-slip condition is satisfied on the lower boundary of the layer. The loads increase in absolute value with time, then become constant, and then decrease to zero.Various plasticity conditions are consideredwith regard to the material compressibility, namely, the Coulomb-Mohr plasticity condition, the von Mises-Schleicher plasticity condition, and the same conditions with the viscous properties of the material taken into account. To solve the system of partial differential equations for the components of irreversible strains, a finite-difference scheme is developed for a spatial domain increasing with time. The laws of motion of elastoplastic boundaries are presented, the stresses, strains, rates of strain, and displacements are calculated, and the residual stresses and strains are found.

  11. Compression and Reswelling of Microgel Particles after an Osmotic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeboom, Jelle J. F.; Voudouris, Panayiotis; Punter, Melle T. J. J. M.; Aangenendt, Frank J.; Florea, Daniel; van der Schoot, Paul; Wyss, Hans M.

    2017-09-01

    We use dedicated microfluidic devices to expose soft hydrogel particles to a rapid change in the externally applied osmotic pressure and observe a surprising, nonmonotonic response: After an initial rapid compression, the particle slowly reswells to approximately its original size. We theoretically account for this behavior, enabling us to extract important material properties from a single microfluidic experiment, including the compressive modulus, the gel permeability, and the diffusivity of the osmolyte inside the gel. We expect our approach to be relevant to applications such as controlled release, chromatography, and responsive materials.

  12. Analytical solution for stress, strain and plastic instability of pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Sergio B., E-mail: sbcunha@petrobras.com.br [PETROBRAS/TRANSPETRO, Av. Pres. Vargas 328 - 7th floor, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20091-060 (Brazil); Netto, Theodoro A., E-mail: tanetto@lts.coppe.ufrj.br [COPPE, Federal University ot Rio de Janeiro, Ocean Engineering Department, PO BOX 68508, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    The mechanical behavior of internally pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws is analyzed. The two possible modes of circumferentially straining the pipe wall are identified and associated to hypothesized geometries. The radial deformation that takes place by bending the pipe wall is studied by means of axisymmetric flaws and the membrane strain developed by unequal hoop deformation is analyzed with the help of narrow axial flaws. Linear elastic shell solutions for stress and strain are developed, the plastic behavior is studied and the maximum hoop stress at the flaw is related to the undamaged pipe hoop stress by means of stress concentration factors. The stress concentration factors are employed to obtain equations predicting the pressure at which the pipe fails by plastic instability for both types of flaw. These analytical solutions are validated by comparison with burst tests on 3 Double-Prime diameter pipes and finite element simulations. Forty-one burst tests were carried out and two materials with very dissimilar plastic behavior, carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel, were used in the experiments. Both the analytical and the numerical predictions showed good correlation with the experimentally observed burst pressures. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An analytical model for the burst of a pipe with a volumetric flaw is developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deformation, strain and stress are modeled in the elastic and plastic domains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is comprehensively validated by experiments and numerical simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The burst pressure model's accuracy is equivalent to finite element simulations.

  13. Mechanisms of anomalous compressibility of vitreous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alisha N.; Lesher, Charles E.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2014-11-01

    The anomalous compressibility of vitreous silica has been known for nearly a century, but the mechanisms responsible for it remain poorly understood. Using GHz-ultrasonic interferometry, we measured longitudinal and transverse acoustic wave travel times at pressures up to 5 GPa in vitreous silica with fictive temperatures (Tf) ranging between 985 °C and 1500 °C. The maximum in ultrasonic wave travel times-corresponding to a minimum in acoustic velocities-shifts to higher pressure with increasing Tf for both acoustic waves, with complete reversibility below 5 GPa. These relationships reflect polyamorphism in the supercooled liquid, which results in a glassy state possessing different proportions of domains of high- and low-density amorphous phases (HDA and LDA, respectively). The relative proportion of HDA and LDA is set at Tf and remains fixed on compression below the permanent densification pressure. The bulk material exhibits compression behavior systematically dependent on synthesis conditions that arise from the presence of floppy modes in a mixture of HDA and LDA domains.

  14. Context-Aware Image Compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky C K Chan

    Full Text Available We describe a physics-based data compression method inspired by the photonic time stretch wherein information-rich portions of the data are dilated in a process that emulates the effect of group velocity dispersion on temporal signals. With this coding operation, the data can be downsampled at a lower rate than without it. In contrast to previous implementation of the warped stretch compression, here the decoding can be performed without the need of phase recovery. We present rate-distortion analysis and show improvement in PSNR compared to compression via uniform downsampling.

  15. Compressive sensing for urban radar

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of compressive sensing and sparse signal reconstruction, approaches to urban radar have shifted toward relaxed constraints on signal sampling schemes in time and space, and to effectively address logistic difficulties in data acquisition. Traditionally, these challenges have hindered high resolution imaging by restricting both bandwidth and aperture, and by imposing uniformity and bounds on sampling rates.Compressive Sensing for Urban Radar is the first book to focus on a hybrid of two key areas: compressive sensing and urban sensing. It explains how reliable imaging, tracki

  16. Combined use of biochemical and volumetric biomarkers to assess the risk of conversion of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Nesteruk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of several biomarkers in predicting the conversion of mild cognitive impairment (MCI to Alzheimer’s disease (AD: β-amyloid and tau proteins in cerebrospinal fluid and the volumetric evaluation of brain structures including the hippocampus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Material and methods : MRI of the brain with the volumetric assessment of hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, superior, medial and inferior temporal gyri was performed in 40 patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment. Each patient had a lumbar puncture to evaluate β-amyloid and tau protein (total and phosphorylated levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. The observation period was 2 years. Results : Amongst 40 patients with MCI, 9 (22.5% converted to AD within 2 years of observation. Discriminant analysis was conducted and sensitivity for MCI conversion to AD on the basis of volumetric measurements was 88.9% and specificity 90.3%; on the basis of β-amyloid and total tau, sensitivity was 77.8% and specificity 83.9%. The combined use of the results of volumetric measurements with the results of proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid did not increase the sensitivity (88.9% but increased specificity to 96.8% and the percentage of correct classification to 95%.

  17. A Finite Element Method for Simulation of Compressible Cavitating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Ehsan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yu; Sahni, Onkar; Shephard, Mark; Oberai, Assad

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on a novel approach for finite element simulations of multi-phase flows which involve evolving interface with phase change. Modeling problems, such as cavitation, requires addressing multiple challenges, including compressibility of the vapor phase, interface physics caused by mass, momentum and energy fluxes. We have developed a mathematically consistent and robust computational approach to address these problems. We use stabilized finite element methods on unstructured meshes to solve for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to handle the interface motions. Our method uses a mesh adaptation strategy to preserve the quality of the volumetric mesh, while the interface mesh moves along with the interface. The interface jump conditions are accurately represented using a discontinuous Galerkin method on the conservation laws. Condensation and evaporation rates at the interface are thermodynamically modeled to determine the interface velocity. We will present initial results on bubble cavitation the behavior of an attached cavitation zone in a separated boundary layer. We acknowledge the support from Army Research Office (ARO) under ARO Grant W911NF-14-1-0301.

  18. On the undrained compressive behaviour of gassy sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haththotuwa, C.K.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Gassy soils are composed of soil, water, and air phases. The soils contain a relatively large amount of gas dissolved in pore fluids, and are typically found with a large number of small bubbles embedded in the pore water. Larger bubbles are found in the matrices of fully saturated soils. This paper discussed a study of the loading behaviour of gassy soils. Shear and compression waves were used to measure the degree of gas saturation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the transient behaviour of the gassy soils during undrained loading while using P and S wave velocities in order to characterize changes in saturation. A moist tamping method was used to prepare reconstituted samples of Ottawa sands. A modified triaxial system was used to test the samples. Cell pressure was increased rapidly and pore pressure, axial, and volumetric deformations were measured. P and S wave measurements were taken at the end of each increment at equilibrium conditions. Results of the study indicated that gas content may be responsive to confining pressures as well as pore pressures. Compressibility had a beneficial influence on stability. Results also showed that gas content is linked to total stresses. It was concluded that P wave velocity increased with decreasing gas content, while S wave velocity showed no response to decreases in gas saturation. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Optimization of compressive 4D-spatio-spectral snapshot imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xia; Feng, Weiyi; Lin, Lihua; Su, Wu; Xu, Guoqing

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a modified 3D computational reconstruction method in the compressive 4D-spectro-volumetric snapshot imaging system is proposed for better sensing spectral information of 3D objects. In the design of the imaging system, a microlens array (MLA) is used to obtain a set of multi-view elemental images (EIs) of the 3D scenes. Then, these elemental images with one dimensional spectral information and different perspectives are captured by the coded aperture snapshot spectral imager (CASSI) which can sense the spectral data cube onto a compressive 2D measurement image. Finally, the depth images of 3D objects at arbitrary depths, like a focal stack, are computed by inversely mapping the elemental images according to geometrical optics. With the spectral estimation algorithm, the spectral information of 3D objects is also reconstructed. Using a shifted translation matrix, the contrast of the reconstruction result is further enhanced. Numerical simulation results verify the performance of the proposed method. The system can obtain both 3D spatial information and spectral data on 3D objects using only one single snapshot, which is valuable in the agricultural harvesting robots and other 3D dynamic scenes.

  20. Compressive properties of silica aerogel at 295, 76, and 20K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvidson, J.M.; Scull, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    Specimens of silica aerogel were tested in compression at 295, 76, and 20 K in a helium gas environment. The properties reported include Young's modulus, the proportional limit, and yield strength. Compressive stress-versus-strain curves at these temperatures are also given. A test apparatus was developed specifically to determine the compressive properties of low strength materials. To measure specimen strain a concentric, overlapping-cylinder, capacitance extensometer was developed. This frictionless device has the capability to conduct variable temperature tests at any temperature from 1.8 to 295 K. Results from the compression tests indicate that at low temperatures the material is not only stronger, but tougher. During 295-K compression tests, the samples fractured and, in some cases, crumbled. After 76- or 20-K compression tests, the specimens remained intact

  1. Compact toroid formation, compression, and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degnan, J.H.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Baca, G.P.; Beason, J.D.; Bell, D.E.; Dearborn, M.E.; Dietz, D.; Douglas, M.R.; Englert, S.E.; Englert, T.J.; Hackett, K.E.; Holmes, J.H.; Hussey, T.W.; Kiuttu, G.F.; Lehr, F.M.; Marklin, G.J.; Mullins, B.W.; Price, D.W.; Roderick, N.F.; Ruden, E.L.; Sovinec, C.R.; Turchi, P.J.; Bird, G.; Coffey, S.K.; Seiler, S.W.; Chen, Y.G.; Gale, D.; Graham, J.D.; Scott, M.; Sommars, W.

    1993-01-01

    Research on forming, compressing, and accelerating milligram-range compact toroids using a meter diameter, two-stage, puffed gas, magnetic field embedded coaxial plasma gun is described. The compact toroids that are studied are similar to spheromaks, but they are threaded by an inner conductor. This research effort, named MARAUDER (Magnetically Accelerated Ring to Achieve Ultra-high Directed Energy and Radiation), is not a magnetic confinement fusion program like most spheromak efforts. Rather, the ultimate goal of the present program is to compress toroids to high mass density and magnetic field intensity, and to accelerate the toroids to high speed. There are a variety of applications for compressed, accelerated toroids including fast opening switches, x-radiation production, radio frequency (rf) compression, as well as charge-neutral ion beam and inertial confinement fusion studies. Experiments performed to date to form and accelerate toroids have been diagnosed with magnetic probe arrays, laser interferometry, time and space resolved optical spectroscopy, and fast photography. Parts of the experiment have been designed by, and experimental results are interpreted with, the help of two-dimensional (2-D), time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations. When not driven by a second discharge, the toroids relax to a Woltjer--Taylor equilibrium state that compares favorably to the results of 2-D equilibrium calculations and to 2-D time-dependent MHD simulations. Current, voltage, and magnetic probe data from toroids that are driven by an acceleration discharge are compared to 2-D MHD and to circuit solver/slug model predictions. Results suggest that compact toroids are formed in 7--15 μsec, and can be accelerated intact with material species the same as injected gas species and entrained mass ≥1/2 the injected mass

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Wen; Hao, Nanxin; Wang, Yibin; Zong, Genlin

    2012-01-01

    Background Although diffusion tensor imaging has been successfully applied in brain research for decades, several main difficulties have hindered its extended utilization in spinal cord imaging. Purpose To assess the feasibility and clinical value of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for evaluating chronic spinal cord compression. Material and Methods Single-shot spin-echo echo-planar DT sequences were scanned in 42 spinal cord compression patients and 49 healthy volunteers. The mean values of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy were measured in region of interest at the cervical and lower thoracic spinal cord. The patients were divided into two groups according to the high signal on T2WI (the SCC-HI group and the SCC-nHI group for with or without high signal). A one-way ANOVA was used. Diffusion tensor tractography was used to visualize the morphological features of normal and impaired white matter. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values between the different spinal cord segments of the normal subjects. All of the patients in the SCC-HI group had increased apparent diffusion coefficient values and decreased fractional anisotropy values at the lesion level compared to the normal controls. However, there were no statistically significant diffusion index differences between the SCC-nHI group and the normal controls. In the diffusion tensor imaging maps, the normal spinal cord sections were depicted as fiber tracts that were color-encoded to a cephalocaudal orientation. The diffusion tensor images were compressed to different degrees in all of the patients. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography are promising methods for visualizing spinal cord tracts and can provide additional information in clinical studies in spinal cord compression

  3. Effect of Kollidon VA®64 particle size and morphology as directly compressible excipient on tablet compression properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, R S; Patel, C; Sevak, V; Chan, M

    2018-01-01

    The study evaluates use of Kollidon VA ® 64 and a combination of Kollidon VA ® 64 with Kollidon VA ® 64 Fine as excipient in direct compression process of tablets. The combination of the two grades of material is evaluated for capping, lamination and excessive friability. Inter particulate void space is higher for such excipient due to the hollow structure of the Kollidon VA ® 64 particles. During tablet compression air remains trapped in the blend exhibiting poor compression with compromised physical properties of the tablets. Composition of Kollidon VA ® 64 and Kollidon VA ® 64 Fine is evaluated by design of experiment (DoE). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of two grades of Kollidon VA ® 64 exhibits morphological differences between coarse and fine grade. The tablet compression process is evaluated with a mix consisting of entirely Kollidon VA ® 64 and two mixes containing Kollidon VA ® 64 and Kollidon VA ® 64 Fine in ratio of 77:23 and 65:35. A statistical modeling on the results from the DoE trials resulted in the optimum composition for direct tablet compression as combination of Kollidon VA ® 64 and Kollidon VA ® 64 Fine in ratio of 77:23. This combination compressed with the predicted parameters based on the statistical modeling and applying main compression force between 5 and 15 kN, pre-compression force between 2 and 3 kN, feeder speed fixed at 25 rpm and compression range of 45-49 rpm produced tablets with hardness ranging between 19 and 21 kp, with no friability, capping, or lamination issue.

  4. Compression induced intercellular shaping for some geometric cellular lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adonai Gimenez Calbo

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The wall perimeter fraction, which contact neighboring cells, was named compression ratio (alpha. A zero compression ratio indicates maximum intercellular (air volume (vG, v/v and neglectable contact among cells, while alpha=1 indicates complete adherence between neighboring cells and no vG in the lattice. The maximum intercellular air volume (beta, v/v, when alpha=0, was 0.593 for triangular, 0.2146 for square and 0,0931 for hexagonal lattices. The equation alpha=1- (vG/beta½ was derived to relate alpha, beta and vG in the studied lattices. The relation (P S=p/alpha between cell turgor (P S and the tissue aggregating pressure (p, defined as the compression to keep in place a layer of cells, was demonstrated using the compression ratio concept. Intercellular deformations of Ipomea batatas L. roots obtained with pressure chamber were used to test alpha, vG, p and P S as a function of compression. Volumetric and transversal elastic extensibilities and the lamella media tearing forces were obtained and alpha constancy was considered as a criteria of cellular shape stability.A fração do perímetro da parede celular em contato com células vizinha foi denominada razão de compressão (alfa. Razão de compressão zero indica volume intercelular (vG, v/v máximo e contato neglível entre as células, enquanto alfa=1 ocorre quando há completa aderência com as células vizinhas (vG=0. O volume (gasoso intercelular máximo (beta, v/v, quando alfa=0, foi 0,593, 0,2146 e 0,0931 para látices triangulares, quadradas e hexagonais. A equação derivada para relacionar alfa, beta and vG nas látices estudadas foi alfa=1- (vG/beta½. A razão de compressão foi em seguida empregada para estabelecer a relação P S=p/alfa entre a pressão de turgescência (P S e a pressão de agregação (p, definida com a compressão para manter uma camada de células no seu lugar. As deformações intercelulares de batata-doce obtidas com procedimentos de c

  5. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  6. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  7. Compressed sensing for distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Coluccia, Giulio; Magli, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the state-of-the art in the exciting and timely topic of compressed sensing for distributed systems. It has to be noted that, while compressed sensing has been studied for some time now, its distributed applications are relatively new. Remarkably, such applications are ideally suited to exploit all the benefits that compressed sensing can provide. The objective of this book is to provide the reader with a comprehensive survey of this topic, from the basic concepts to different classes of centralized and distributed reconstruction algorithms, as well as a comparison of these techniques. This book collects different contributions on these aspects. It presents the underlying theory in a complete and unified way for the first time, presenting various signal models and their use cases. It contains a theoretical part collecting latest results in rate-distortion analysis of distributed compressed sensing, as well as practical implementations of algorithms obtaining performance close to...

  8. Nonlinear compression of optical solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    linear pulse propagation is the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation [1]. There are ... Optical pulse compression finds important applications in optical fibres. The pulse com ..... to thank CSIR, New Delhi for financial support in the form of SRF.

  9. Natural convection in wavy enclosures with volumetric heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oztop, H.F.; Varol, Y.; Abu-Nada, E.; Chamkha, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of volumetric heat sources on natural convection heat transfer and flow structures in a wavy-walled enclosure are studied numerically. The governing differential equations are solved by an accurate finite-volume method. The vertical walls of enclosure are assumed to be heated differentially whereas the two wavy walls (top and bottom) are kept adiabatic. The effective governing parameters for this problem are the internal and external Rayleigh numbers and the amplitude of wavy walls. It is found that both the function of wavy wall and the ratio of internal Rayleigh number (Ra I ) to external Rayleigh number (Ra E ) affect the heat transfer and fluid flow significantly. The heat transfer is predicted to be a decreasing function of waviness of the top and bottom walls in case of (IRa/ERa)>1 and (IRa/ERa)<1. (authors)

  10. Thermal expansion and volumetric changes during indium phosphide melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazov, V.M.; Davletov, K.; Nashel'skij, A.Ya.; Mamedov, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the measurements of a thermal expansion were summed up at various temperatures as a diagram in coordinates (Δ 1/1) approximately F(t). It was shown that an appreciable deviation of the relationship (Δ1/1) approximately f(t) from the linear law corresponded to a temperature of 500-550 deg C. It was noted that the said deviation was related to an appreciable thermal decomposition of indium phosphide as temperature increased. The strength of the inter-atomic bond of indium phosphide was calculated. Investigated were the volumetric changes of indium phosphide on melting. The resultant data were analyzed with the aid of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation

  11. Volumetric multimodality neural network for brain tumor segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvana Castillo, Laura; Alexandra Daza, Laura; Carlos Rivera, Luis; Arbeláez, Pablo

    2017-11-01

    Brain lesion segmentation is one of the hardest tasks to be solved in computer vision with an emphasis on the medical field. We present a convolutional neural network that produces a semantic segmentation of brain tumors, capable of processing volumetric data along with information from multiple MRI modalities at the same time. This results in the ability to learn from small training datasets and highly imbalanced data. Our method is based on DeepMedic, the state of the art in brain lesion segmentation. We develop a new architecture with more convolutional layers, organized in three parallel pathways with different input resolution, and additional fully connected layers. We tested our method over the 2015 BraTS Challenge dataset, reaching an average dice coefficient of 84%, while the standard DeepMedic implementation reached 74%.

  12. Optimization approaches to volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, Jan, E-mail: junkelbach@mgh.harvard.edu; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Alber, Markus [Department of Medical Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C DK-8000 (Denmark); Bangert, Mark [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany); Bokrantz, Rasmus [RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm SE-111 34 (Sweden); Chen, Danny [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Men, Chunhua [Department of Research, Elekta, Maryland Heights, Missouri 63043 (United States); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Papp, Dávid [Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Romeijn, Edwin [H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Salari, Ehsan [Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas 67260 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has found widespread clinical application in recent years. A large number of treatment planning studies have evaluated the potential for VMAT for different disease sites based on the currently available commercial implementations of VMAT planning. In contrast, literature on the underlying mathematical optimization methods used in treatment planning is scarce. VMAT planning represents a challenging large scale optimization problem. In contrast to fluence map optimization in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for static beams, VMAT planning represents a nonconvex optimization problem. In this paper, the authors review the state-of-the-art in VMAT planning from an algorithmic perspective. Different approaches to VMAT optimization, including arc sequencing methods, extensions of direct aperture optimization, and direct optimization of leaf trajectories are reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are outlined and recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  13. Stability and Volumetric Properties of Asphalt Mixture Containing Waste Plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Kader Siti Aminah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to determine the optimum bitumen content (OBC for every percentage added of waste plastics in asphalt mixtures and to investigate the stability properties of the asphalt mixtures containing waste plastic. Marshall stability and flow values along with density, air voids in total mix, voids in mineral aggregate, and voids filled with bitumen were determined to obtain OBC at different percentages of waste plastic, i.e., 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% by weight of bitumen as additive. Results showed that the OBC for the plastic-modified asphalt mixtures at 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% are 4.98, 5.44, 5.48, and 5.14, respectively. On the other hand, the controlled specimen’s shows better volumetric properties compared to plastic mixes. However, 4% additional of waste plastic indicated better stability than controlled specimen.

  14. Compression force and radiation dose in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waade, Gunvor G.; Sanderud, Audun [Department of Life Sciences and Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, P.O. 4 St. Olavs Plass, 0130 Oslo (Norway); Hofvind, Solveig, E-mail: solveig.hofvind@kreftregisteret.no [Department of Life Sciences and Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, P.O. 4 St. Olavs Plass, 0130 Oslo (Norway); The Cancer Registry of Norway, P.O. 5313 Majorstuen, 0304 Oslo (Norway)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Compression force and radiation dose for 17 951 screening mammograms were analyzed. • Large variations in mean applied compression force between the breast centers. • Limited associations between compression force and radiation dose. - Abstract: Purpose: Compression force is used in mammography to reduce breast thickness and by that decrease radiation dose and improve image quality. There are no evidence-based recommendations regarding the optimal compression force. We analyzed compression force and radiation dose between screening centers in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP), as a first step towards establishing evidence-based recommendations for compression force. Materials and methods: The study included information from 17 951 randomly selected screening examinations among women screened with equipment from four different venors at fourteen breast centers in the NBCSP, January-March 2014. We analyzed the applied compression force and radiation dose used on craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) view on left breast, by breast centers and vendors. Results: Mean compression force used in the screening program was 116N (CC: 108N, MLO: 125N). The maximum difference in mean compression force between the centers was 63N for CC and 57N for MLO. Mean radiation dose for each image was 1.09 mGy (CC: 1.04mGy, MLO: 1.14mGy), varying from 0.55 mGy to 1.31 mGy between the centers. Compression force alone had a negligible impact on radiation dose (r{sup 2} = 0.8%, p = < 0.001). Conclusion: We observed substantial variations in mean compression forces between the breast centers. Breast characteristics and differences in automated exposure control between vendors might explain the low association between compression force and radiation dose. Further knowledge about different automated exposure controls and the impact of compression force on dose and image quality is needed to establish individualised and evidence

  15. Rotary retort for carbonizing bituminous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meguin, A G; Muller, W

    1920-09-05

    A process of carbonizing bituminous materials, such as coal and oil shale at a low temperature in a rotary retort with simultaneous compressing the material especially of the semicoke formed that is characterized in that the material during the distillation through rapid rotation of the retort is exposed to the action of centrifugal force and thereby it is compressed.

  16. Study of mechanical compression of spin-polarized 3He gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.; Heil, W.; Krug, B.; Leduc, M.; Meyerhoff, M.; Nacher, P.J.; Otten, E.W.; Prokscha, T.; Schearer, L.D.; Surkau, R.

    1994-01-01

    We have piloted mechanical compression of spinpolarized 3He by a titanium piston compressor. Questions of materials and design are discussed, followed by a thorough investigation of relaxation sources in the course of compression. The latter are traced mainly to regions with large surface to volume ratio, through which fast passage is demanded, therefore. We conclude from this feasibility study that polarized 3He may be compressed this way up to many bars without serious polarization losses. ((orig.))

  17. Hydrostatic Compression of 2,4,6,8,10,12 hexanitrohexaaza isowurtzitane (CL20) Co Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    ARL-TR-7901 ● DEC 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Hydrostatic Compression of 2,4,6,8,10,12- hexanitrohexaaza-isowurtzitane (CL20... Hydrostatic Compression of 2,4,6,8,10,12- hexanitrohexaaza-isowurtzitane (CL20) Co-Crystals by DeCarlos Taylor Weapons and Materials...Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) October 2015–September 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hydrostatic Compression of 2,4,6,8,10,12

  18. Understanding Turbulence in Compressing Plasmas and Its Exploitation or Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, Seth

    Unprecedented densities and temperatures are now achieved in compressions of plasma, by lasers and by pulsed power, in major experimental facilities. These compressions, carried out at the largest scale at the National Ignition Facility and at the Z Pulsed Power Facility, have important applications, including fusion, X-ray production, and materials research. Several experimental and simulation results suggest that the plasma in some of these compressions is turbulent. In fact, measurements suggest that in certain laboratory plasma compressions the turbulent energy is a dominant energy component. Similarly, turbulence is dominant in some compressing astrophysical plasmas, such as in molecular clouds. Turbulence need not be dominant to be important; even small quantities could greatly influence experiments that are sensitive to mixing of non-fuel into fuel, such as compressions seeking fusion ignition. Despite its important role in major settings, bulk plasma turbulence under compression is insufficiently understood to answer or even to pose some of the most fundamental questions about it. This thesis both identifies and answers key questions in compressing turbulent motion, while providing a description of the behavior of three-dimensional, isotropic, compressions of homogeneous turbulence with a plasma viscosity. This description includes a simple, but successful, new model for the turbulent energy of plasma undergoing compression. The unique features of compressing turbulence with a plasma viscosity are shown, including the sensitivity of the turbulence to plasma ionization, and a "sudden viscous dissipation'' effect which rapidly converts plasma turbulent energy into thermal energy. This thesis then examines turbulence in both laboratory compression experiments and molecular clouds. It importantly shows: the possibility of exploiting turbulence to make fusion or X-ray production more efficient; conditions under which hot-spot turbulence can be prevented; and a

  19. Short-term mechanisms influencing volumetric brain dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki Dieleman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and brain analysis tools, it has become possible to measure brain volume changes up to around 0.5%. Besides long-term brain changes caused by atrophy in aging or neurodegenerative disease, short-term mechanisms that influence brain volume may exist. When we focus on short-term changes of the brain, changes may be either physiological or pathological. As such determining the cause of volumetric dynamics of the brain is essential. Additionally for an accurate interpretation of longitudinal brain volume measures by means of neurodegeneration, knowledge about the short-term changes is needed. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms influencing brain volumes on a short-term basis and set-out a framework of MRI techniques to be used for volumetric changes as well as the used analysis tools. 3D T1-weighted images are the images of choice when it comes to MRI of brain volume. These images are excellent to determine brain volume and can be used together with an analysis tool to determine the degree of volume change. Mechanisms that decrease global brain volume are: fluid restriction, evening MRI measurements, corticosteroids, antipsychotics and short-term effects of pathological processes like Alzheimer's disease, hypertension and Diabetes mellitus type II. Mechanisms increasing the brain volume include fluid intake, morning MRI measurements, surgical revascularization and probably medications like anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-hypertensive medication. Exercise was found to have no effect on brain volume on a short-term basis, which may imply that dehydration caused by exercise differs from dehydration by fluid restriction. In the upcoming years, attention should be directed towards studies investigating physiological short-term changes within the light of long-term pathological changes. Ultimately this may lead to a better understanding of the physiological short-term effects of

  20. 40 CFR 80.157 - Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Volumetric additive reconciliation (â... ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.157 Volumetric additive reconciliation (“VAR”), equipment calibration, and... other comparable VAR supporting documentation. (ii) For a facility which uses a gauge to measure the...