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Sample records for material testing program

  1. Material control and accounting self-test program design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggers, R.F.; Wilson, R.L.; Byers, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a controversial but potentially beneficial MCandA strategy that has not been widely attempted in the past, called Self-Test. In this strategy a processor of Strategic Special Nuclear Material (SSNM) devises a program of internally administered tests to determine if the MCandA system performs in a reliable, expedient manner in the face of a simulated loss or compromise. Self-Test procedures would include, for example, the actual removal of SSNM from process equipment in order to determine whether the MCandA system will detect the simulated theft. Self-Test programs have several potential problems. However, an approach with the potential for solving many of these problems has been devised and is discussed

  2. Radiation damage calculations for the APT materials test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corzine, R.K.; Wechsler, M.S.; Dudziak, D.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; James, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    A materials irradiation was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in the fall of 1996 and spring of 1997 in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. Testing of the irradiated materials is underway. In the proposed APT design, materials in the target and blanket are to be exposed to protons and neutrons over a wide range of energies. The irradiation and testing program was undertaken to enlarge the very limited direct knowledge presently available of the effects of medium-energy protons (∼1 GeV) on the properties of engineering materials. APT candidate materials were placed in or near the LANSCE accelerator 800-MeV, 1-mA proton beam and received roughly the same proton current density in the center of the beam as would be the case for the APT facility. As a result, the proton fluences achieved in the irradiation were expected to approach the APT prototypic full-power-year values. To predict accurately the performance of materials in APT, radiation damage parameters for the materials experiment must be determined. By modeling the experiment, calculations for atomic displacement, helium and hydrogen cross sections and for proton and neutron fluences were done for representative samples in the 17A, 18A, and 18C areas. The LAHET code system (LCS) was used to model the irradiation program, LAHET 2.82 within LCS transports protons > 1 MeV, and neutrons >20 MeV. A modified version of MCNP for use in LCS, HMCNP 4A, was employed to tally neutrons of energies <20 MeV

  3. Material testing facilities and programs for plasma-facing component testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Doerner, R. P.; Greuner, H.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.

    2017-09-01

    Component development for operation in a large-scale fusion device requires thorough testing and qualification for the intended operational conditions. In particular environments are necessary which are comparable to the real operation conditions, allowing at the same time for in situ/in vacuo diagnostics and flexible operation, even beyond design limits during the testing. Various electron and neutral particle devices provide the capabilities for high heat load tests, suited for material samples and components from lab-scale dimensions up to full-size parts, containing toxic materials like beryllium, and being activated by neutron irradiation. To simulate the conditions specific to a fusion plasma both at the first wall and in the divertor of fusion devices, linear plasma devices allow for a test of erosion and hydrogen isotope recycling behavior under well-defined and controlled conditions. Finally, the complex conditions in a fusion device (including the effects caused by magnetic fields) are exploited for component and material tests by exposing test mock-ups or material samples to a fusion plasma by manipulator systems. They allow for easy exchange of test pieces in a tokamak or stellarator device, without opening the vessel. Such a chain of test devices and qualification procedures is required for the development of plasma-facing components which then can be successfully operated in future fusion power devices. The various available as well as newly planned devices and test stands, together with their specific capabilities, are presented in this manuscript. Results from experimental programs on test facilities illustrate their significance for the qualification of plasma-facing materials and components. An extended set of references provides access to the current status of material and component testing capabilities in the international fusion programs.

  4. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertling, Gene; Randolph, Henry; Hsi, Chi-Shiung; Verbelyi, Darren

    1991-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The first dealing with work involved with Clemson University and the second with the results from Westinghouse/Savannah River. Both areas of work involved low noise, low thermal conductivity superconducting grounding links used in the NASA-sponsored Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) Project. Clemson prepared the links from YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor tape that was mounted on a printed circuit board and encapsulated with epoxy resin. The Clemson program includes temperature vs. resistance, liquid nitrogen immersion, water immersion, thermal cycling, humidity, and radiation testing. The evaluation of the links under a long term environmental test program is described. The Savannah River program includes gamma irradiation, vibration, and long-term evaluation. The progress made in these evaluations is discussed.

  5. Material Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    . Consequently we ask what the practice of programming and giving form to such materials would be like? How would we be able to familiarize ourselves with the dynamics of these materials and their different combinations of cause and effect? Which tools would we need and what would they look like? Will we program......, and color, but additionally being capable of sensing, actuating, and computing. Indeed, computers will not be things in and by themselves, but embedded into the materials that make up our surroundings. This also means that the way we interact with computers and the way we program them, will change...... these computational composites through external computers and then transfer the code them, or will the programming happen closer to the materials? In this feature we outline a new research program that floats between imagined futures and the development of a material programming practice....

  6. Bleed water testing program for controlled low strength material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Bleed water measurements for two Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) mixes were conducted to provide engineering data for the Tank 20F closure activities. CLSM Mix 1 contained 150 pounds of cement per cubic yard whereas CLSM Mix 2 contained 50 pounds per cub yard. SRS currently used CLSM Mix 2 for various applications. Bleed water percentages and generation rates were measured along with flow and compressive strength. This information will be used to select a mix design for the Tank 20F closure activities and to establish the engineering requirements, such as, lift height, time required between lifts and quantity of bleed water to be removed from the tank during the placement activities. Mix 1 is recommended for placement within Tank 20F because it has better flow characteristics, less segregation, lower percentage of bleed water and slightly higher strength. Optimization of Mix 1 was beyond the scope of this study. However, further testing of thickening additives, such as clays (bentonite), sodium silicate or fine silicas maybe useful for decreasing or eliminating bleed water

  7. A quality assurance program for nuclear power reactor materials tests at the Ford nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Michigan Nuclear Reactor Laboratory Quality Assurance Program has been established to assure that materials testing services provided to electric utilities produce accurate results in accordance with industry standards, sound engineering practice, and customer requirements. The program was prepared to comply with applicable requirements of 10CFR50, Appendix B, of the Code of Federal Regulations and a standard of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), N45.2. The paper discusses the quality assurance program applicability, organization, qualification and training of personnel, material identification and control, examination and testing, measuring and test equipment, nonconforming test equipment, records, audits, and distribution

  8. Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program. Reducing helium impurity depletion in HTGR materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, D.H.

    1984-08-01

    Moisture depletion in HTGR materials testing rigs has been empirically studied in the GE High Temperature Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (HTRMTL). Tests have shown that increased helium flow rates and reduction in reactive (oxidizable) surface area are effective means of reducing depletion. Further, a portion of the depletion has been shown to be due to the presence of free C released by the dissociation of CH 4 . This depletion component can be reduced by reducing the helium residence time (increasing the helium flow rate) or by reducing the CH 4 concentration in the test gas. Equipment modifications to reduce depletion have been developed, tested, and in most cases implemented in the HTRMTL to date. These include increasing the Helium Loop No. 1 pumping capacity, conversion of metallic retorts and radiation shields to alumina, isolation of thermocouple probes from the test gas by alumina thermowells, and substitution of non-reactive Mo-TZM for reactive metallic structural components

  9. Approved reference and testing materials for use in Nuclear Waste Management Research and Development Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, G.B.; Daniel, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    This document, addressed to members of the waste management research and development community summarizes reference and testing materials available from the Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center (MCC). These materials are furnished under the MCC's charter to distribute reference materials essential for quantitative evaluation of nuclear waste package materials under development in the US. Reference materials with known behavior in various standard waste management related tests are needed to ensure that individual testing programs are correctly performing those tests. Approved testing materials are provided to assist the projects in assembling materials data base of defensible accuracy and precision. This is the second issue of this publication. Eight new Approved Testing Materials are listed, and Spent Fuel is included as a separate section of Standard Materials because of its increasing importance as a potential repository storage form. A summary of current characterization information is provided for each material listed. Future issues will provide updates of the characterization status of the materials presented in this issue, and information about new standard materials as they are acquired. 7 references, 1 figure, 19 tables

  10. Mechanical properties test program on structural materials in a sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Chopra, O.K.; Kassner, T.F.

    1979-10-01

    This document describes in detail the ongoing and planned US Test program on the mechanical properties of sodium-exposed Type 316 austenitic stainless and Fe-2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steels. The test program is based on the Development Requirement Specifications (DRS) established by the DOE/Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) Program Office, the general need for the development of LMFBR structural-design criteria established by the Nuclear Systems Materials Handbook, and the need for a fundamental understanding of materials behavior in a sodium environment, which is generic to LMFBR systems. The planned test program is an extension of work based on current knowledge of sodium chemistry and the influence of sodium purity on the mechanical properties of structural materials

  11. PROGRAM ASTEC (ADVANCED SOLAR TURBO ELECTRIC CONCEPT). PART 1. CANDIDATE MATERIALS LABORATORY TESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A space power system of the type envisioned by the ASTEC program requires the development of a lightweight solar collector of high reflectance...capable of withstanding the space environment for an extended period. A survey of the environment of interest for ASTEC purposes revealed 4 potential...developed by the solar-collector industry for use in the ASTEC program, and to test the effects of space environment on these materials. Of 6 material

  12. An investigation of high-temperature irradiation test program of new ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori; Terai, Takayuki; Oku, Tatsuo

    1999-08-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute entrusted the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with an investigation into the trend of irradiation processing/damage research on new ceramic materials. The present report describes the result of the investigation, which was aimed at effective execution of irradiation programs using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) by examining preferential research subjects and their concrete research methods. Objects of the investigation were currently on-going preliminary tests of functional materials (high-temperature oxide superconductor and high-temperature semiconductor) and structural materials (carbon/carbon and SiC/SiC composite materials), together with newly proposed subjects of, e.g., radiation effects on ceramics-coated materials and super-plastic ceramic materials as well as microscopic computer simulation of deformation and fracture of ceramics. These works have revealed 1) the background of each research subject, 2) its objective and significance from viewpoints of science and engineering, 3) research methodology in stages from preliminary tests to real HTTR irradiation, and 4) concrete HTTR-irradiation methods which include main specifications of test specimens, irradiation facilities and post-irradiation examination facilities and apparatuses. The present efforts have constructed the important fundamentals in the new ceramic materials field for further planning and execution of the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  13. Materials and material testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergens, H.

    1978-01-01

    A review based on 105 literature quotations is given on the latest state of development in the steel sector and in the field of non-ferrous metals and plastics. The works quoted also include, preparation, working, welding including simulation methods, improvement of weldability, material mechanics (explanation of defects mechanisms by means of fracture mechanics), defect causes (corrosion, erosion, hydrogen influence), mechanical-technological and non-destructive material testing. Examples from the field of reactor building are also given within there topics. (IHOE) [de

  14. A study of production of radioactive environmental reference materials used for proficiency testing program in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, En-Chi; Wang, Jeng-Jong

    2013-01-01

    To realise radioactive environmental reference materials in Taiwan, seven environmental materials of soil, water, vegetation, meat, airborne particles (filter paper), milk and mushroom samples that are frequently encountered were used to establish the preparation of the reference materials. These seven environmental materials were collected, checked for freedom from radioactivity and prepared according to their properties. The preparation was carried out by using activity about 10–100 times that of the minimum detectable activity (MDA) in routine measurements in the radioactive standard used to spike the inactive material and this standard is traceable to national ionising radioactivity standards (TAF, 2004). To demonstrate sample traceability to the added standard, each sample was carefully measured and its uncertainty evaluated. Based on the recommendations of ISO Guide 35 for evaluation of reference materials and with the above assessment and verification procedures, the uncertainties (k=1) of the spike activity used in making reference materials were: 60 Co≤4.6%, 134 Cs≤4.7%, 137 Cs≤5.0%, total β≤0.6% and 3 H≤1.3%. - Highlights: • Seven kinds environmental materials were used to establish the production of the RMs. • Spiking the traceable standard radioactive source to the blank substance. • Each sample was carefully evaluated for its uncertainty. • The performance of the RMs was estimated with the Proficiency Testing program report. • The ability of the environment RMs in the configuration is quite good

  15. Dictionary materials engineering, materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This dictionary contains about 9,500 entries in each part of the following fields: 1) Materials using and selection; 2) Mechanical engineering materials -Metallic materials - Non-metallic inorganic materials - Plastics - Composites -Materials damage and protection; 3) Electrical and electronics materials -Conductor materials - Semiconductors - magnetic materials - Dielectric materials - non-conducting materials; 4) Materials testing - Mechanical methods - Analytical methods - Structure investigation - Complex methods - Measurement of physical properties - Non-destructive testing. (orig.) [de

  16. Technical critique on radiation test facilities for the CTR surface and materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.

    1975-02-01

    Major radiation test facilities will be necessary in the near-term (5 years) and long-term (greater than 10 years) future for the timely development and understanding of fusion confinement systems and of prototype fusion power reactors. The study includes the technical justifications and requirements for CTR Neutron and Plasma Radiation Test Facilities. The initial technical critique covers the feasibility and design problems: in upgrading the performance of the accelerator-rotating (solid TiT) target systems, and in transforming the accelerator-supersonic jet target concept into a radiation testing facility. A scoping assessment on the potential of a pulsed high-beta plasma device (dense plasma focus) is introduced to explore plasma concepts as near-term neutron and plasma radiation sources for the CTR Surface and Materials Program. (U.S.)

  17. Environmental Fatigue of Metallic Materials in Nuclear Power Plants - A Review of Korean Test Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Changheul; Jang, Hun; Hong, Jongdae [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyunchul [Doosan Heavy Industry and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Soon; Lee, Jaegon [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Environmental fatigue of the metallic components in light water reactors has been the subject of extensive research and regulatory interest in Korea and abroad. Especially, it was one of the key domestic issues for the license renewal of operating reactors and licensing of advanced reactors during the early 2000s. To deal with the environmental fatigue issue domestically, a systematic test program has been initiated and is still underway. The materials tested were SA508 Gr.1a low alloy steels, 316LN stainless steels, cast stainless steels, and an Alloy 690 and 52M weld. Through tests and subsequent analysis, the mechanisms of reduced low cycle fatigue life have been investigated for those alloys. In addition, the effects of temperature, dissolved oxygen level, and dissolved hydrogen level on low cycle fatigue behaviors have been investigated. In this paper, the test results and key analysis results are briefly summarized. Finally, an on-going test program for hot-bending of 347 stainless steel is introduced.

  18. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices. Mid-Term Report, May 1990 - Jun. 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haertling, G.; Randolph, H.; Hsi, Chi-Shiung; Verbelyi, D.

    1991-07-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The first dealing with work involved with Clemson University and the second with the results from Westinghouse/Savannah River. Both areas of work involved low noise, low thermal conductivity superconducting grounding links used in the NASA-sponsored Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) Project. Clemson prepared the links from YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor tape that was mounted on a printed circuit board and encapsulated with epoxy resin. The Clemson program includes temperature vs. resistance, liquid nitrogen immersion, water immersion, thermal cycling, humidity, and radiation testing. The evaluation of the links under a long term environmental test program is described. The Savannah River program includes gamma irradiation, vibration, and long-term evaluation. The progress made in these evaluations is discussed

  19. Baseline Assessment of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Reference Material and Proficiency Testing/External Quality Assurance Material Commutability: A Vitamin D Standardization Program Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, Karen W; Sempos, Christopher T; Tai, Susan S-C; Camara, Johanna E; Wise, Stephen A; Eckfeldt, John H; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Carter, Graham D; Jones, Julia; Myers, Gary L; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Miller, W Greg; Bachmann, Lorin M; Young, Ian S; Pettit, Juanita; Caldwell, Grahame; Liu, Andrew; Brooks, Stephen P J; Sarafin, Kurtis; Thamm, Michael; Mensink, Gert B M; Busch, Markus; Rabenberg, Martina; Cashman, Kevin D; Kiely, Mairead; Galvin, Karen; Zhang, Joy Y; Kinsella, Michael; Oh, Kyungwon; Lee, Sun-Wha; Jung, Chae L; Cox, Lorna; Goldberg, Gail; Guberg, Kate; Meadows, Sarah; Prentice, Ann; Tian, Lu; Brannon, Patsy M; Lucas, Robyn M; Crump, Peter M; Cavalier, Etienne; Merkel, Joyce; Betz, Joseph M

    2017-09-01

    The Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) coordinated a study in 2012 to assess the commutability of reference materials and proficiency testing/external quality assurance materials for total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in human serum, the primary indicator of vitamin D status. A set of 50 single-donor serum samples as well as 17 reference and proficiency testing/external quality assessment materials were analyzed by participating laboratories that used either immunoassay or LC-MS methods for total 25(OH)D. The commutability test materials included National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 972a Vitamin D Metabolites in Human Serum as well as materials from the College of American Pathologists and the Vitamin D External Quality Assessment Scheme. Study protocols and data analysis procedures were in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The majority of the test materials were found to be commutable with the methods used in this commutability study. These results provide guidance for laboratories needing to choose appropriate reference materials and select proficiency or external quality assessment programs and will serve as a foundation for additional VDSP studies.

  20. Advanced Industrial Materials Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stooksbury, F.

    1994-06-01

    The mission of the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) program is to commercialize new/improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. Program investigators in the DOE national laboratories are working with about 100 companies, including 15 partners in CRDA's. Work is being done on intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy-consuming process industries. The aim of the AIM program is to bring materials from basic research to industrial application to strengthen the competitive position of US industry and save energy.

  1. Industry to Education Technical Transfer Program & Composite Materials. Composite Materials Course. Fabrication I Course. Fabrication II Course. Composite Materials Testing Course. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massuda, Rachel

    These four reports provide details of projects to design and implement courses to be offered as requirements for the associate degree program in composites and reinforced plastics technology. The reports describe project activities that led to development of curricula for four courses: composite materials, composite materials fabrication I,…

  2. Subcritical Measurements Research Program for Fresh and Spent Materials Test Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-01-01

    'A series of subcritical noise measurements were performed on fresh and spent University of Missouri Research Reactor fuel assemblies. These experimental measurements were performed for the purposes of providing benchmark quality data for validating transport theory computer codes and nuclear cross-section data used to perform criticality safety analyses for highly enriched, uranium-aluminum Material Test Reactor fuel assemblies. A mechanical test rig was designed and built to hold up to four fuel assemblies and neutron detectors in a subcritical array. The rig provided researchers with the ability to evaluate the reactivity effects of variable fuel/detector spacing, fuel rotation, and insertion of metal reflector plates into the lattice.'

  3. Materials testing 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The following subjects were dealt with at the meeting: Testing with vibration loads; Hardness testing; Calibration of test devices and equipment; Test technique for compound materials; Vibration strength testing and expense of experiments; Solving problems in introducing forces into samples and components and process of ambulant materials testing. There are 17 separate abstracts from among 43 lectures. (orig./PW) [de

  4. The J-resistance curve Leak-before-Break test program on material for the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Darlington Leak-Before-Break (DLBB) approach has been developed for large diameter (21, 22, 24 inch) SA106B heat transport (HT) piping and SA105 fittings as a design alternative to pipewhip restraints and in recognition of the questionable benefits of providing such restraints. Ontario Hydro's DLBB approach is based on the elastic plastic fracture mechanics method. In this test program, J-resistance curves were determined from actual pipe heats that were used in the construction of the Darlington heat transport systems (Units 1 and 2). Test blocks were prepared using four different welding procedures for nuclear Class I piping. The test program was designed to take into account the effect of various factors such as test temperature, crack plane orientation, welding effects, etc., which have influence on fracture properties. A total of 91 tests were conducted. An acceptable lower bound J-resistance curve for the piping steels was obtained by machining maximum thickness specimens from the pipes and by testing side grooved compact tension specimens. Test results showed that all pipes, welds and heat-affected zone materials within the scope of the DLBB program exhibited uppershelf toughness behaviour. All specimens showed high crack initiation toughness Jsub(lc), rising J-resistance curve and stable and ductile crack extension. Toughness of product forms depended on the direction of crack extension (circumferential versus axial crack orientation). Toughness of DLBB welds and parent materials at 250 0 C was lower than that at 20 0 C. (author)

  5. Materials Sciences Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A compilation and index of the ERDA materials sciences program is presented. This compilation is intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research and as an aid in selecting new programs

  6. A review of a radioactive material shipping container including design, testing, upgrading compliance program and shipping logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celovsky, A.; Lesco, R.; Gale, B.; Sypes, J.

    2003-01-01

    Ten years ago Atomic Energy of Canada developed a Type B(U)-85 shipping container for the global transport of highly radioactive materials. This paper reviews the development of the container, including a summary of the design requirements, a review of the selected materials and key design elements, and the results of the major qualification tests (drop testing, fire test, leak tightness testing, and shielding integrity tests). As a result of the testing, improvements to the structural, thermal and containment design were made. Such improvements, and reasons thereof, are noted. Also provided is a summary of the additional analysis work required to upgrade the package from a Type B(U) to a Type B(F), i.e. essentially upgrading the container to include fissile radioisotopes to the authorized radioactive contents list. Having a certified shipping container is only one aspect governing the global shipments of radioactive material. By necessity the shipment of radioactive material is a highly regulated environment. This paper also explores the experiences with other key aspects of radioactive shipments, including the service procedures used to maintain the container certification, the associated compliance program for radioactive material shipments, and the shipping logistics involved in the transport. (author)

  7. Ferrocyanide safety program: Final report on adiabatic calorimetry and tube propagation tests with synthetic ferrocyanide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauske, H.F.; Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Based on Fauske and Associates, Inc. Reactive System Screening Tool tests, the onset or initiation temperature for a ferrocyanide-nitrate propagating reaction is about 250 degrees Celcius. This is at about 200 degrees Celcius higher than current waste temperatures in the highest temperature ferrocyanide tanks. Furthermore, for current ambient waste temperatures, the tube propagation tests show that a ferrocyanide concentration of 15.5 wt% or more is required to sustain a propagation reaction in the complete absence of free water. Ignoring the presence of free water, this finding rules out propagating reactions for all the Hanford flowsheet materials with the exception of the ferrocyanide waste produced by the original In Farm flowsheet

  8. BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

    2010-08-31

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  9. Building Materials Reclamation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weggel, David C.; Chen, Shen-En; Hilger, Helene; Besnard, Fabien; Cavalline, Tara; Tempest, Brett; Alvey, Adam; Grimmer, Madeleine; Turner, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C and D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C and D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C and D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C and D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  10. Testing of abrasion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummert, G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of abrasion testing according to ASTM C 704-76 a is presented for steel fibre concrete mortar, fusion-cast basalt and a surface coating material and results of practical interest are mentioned. Due to the high technical demands on these materials and their specific fields of application, the very first test already supplied interesting findings. From the user's point of view, the method is an interesting alternative to the common test methods, e.g. according to DIN 52 108 (wheel test according to Boehme). In English-speaking countries, testing according to ASTM is often mandatory in the refractory industry in order to assure constant quality of refractory materials after setting. The method is characterized by good comparability and high accuracy of measurement. Only the test piece is exchanged while the test conditions remain constant, so that accurate information on the material studied is obtained. (orig.) [de

  11. Materials Science Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the Department of Energy in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research. The Director of this office is appointed by the President with Senate consent. The Director advises the Secretary on the physical research program; monitors the Department's R ampersand D programs; advises the Secretary on management of the laboratories under the jurisdiction of the Department, excluding those that constitute part of the nuclear weapon complex; and advises the Secretary on basic and applied research activities of the Department. The research covers a spectrum of scientific and engineering areas of interest to the Department of Energy and is conducted generally by personnel trained in the disciplines of Solid State Physics, Metallurgy, Ceramics, Chemistry, Polymers and Materials Science. The Materials Sciences Division supports basic research on materials properties and phenomena important to all energy systems. The aim is to provide the necessary base of materials knowledge required to advance the nation's energy programs. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1989 together with a convenient index to the Division's programs

  12. Materials Test Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — When completed, the Materials Test Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will meet mission need. MTS will provide the only fast-reactor-like irradiation...

  13. Radioactive material package seal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 x 10 -7 std cm 3 /s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  14. Nondestructive testing of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUKEM has transferred know-how from reactor technology to materials testing. The high and to a large extent new quality standards in the nuclear industry necessitate reliable measuring and testing equipment of the highest precision. Many of the tasks presented to us could not be solved with the equipment available on the market, for which reason we have developed our own measuring, testing and control systems. We have therefore acquired considerable experience in dealing with specific measuring, testing and control tasks and can handle even out-of-the-way problems that are submitted to us from a wide variety of fields. Our mechanical systems for the checking of close-tolerance gaps, the automatic determination of pellet dimensions and the measurement of absolute lengths and absolute velocities are in use in many different industrial fields. We have succeeded in solving unusual testing and sorting problems with the aid of automated surface testing equipment working on optical principles. Our main activities in the field of non-destructive testing have been concentrated on ultrasonic and eddy current testing and, of late, acoustic emission analysis. NUKEM ultrasonic systems are notable for their high defect detection rate and testing accuracy, combined with high testing speed. The equipment we supply includes ultrasonic rotary systems for the production testing of quality tubes, ultrasonic immersion systems for the final testing of reactor cladding tubes, weld testing equipment, and test equipment for the bonds in multi-layer plates. (orig./RW) [de

  15. Dictionary of materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedecke, W.

    1992-01-01

    This trilingual dictionary contains about 12000 terms from the field of non-destructive and destructive materials testing; the English and French terms can be looked up in two separate, alphabetical indexes. The compilation also presents terms from related fields such as quality control, production control, environmental protection and radiological protection, and wherever appropriate in the context from the fields of physics, chemistry, mathematics and electronic data processing. (HP) [de

  16. Development and Field Test of Competency Based Instructional Material for a Career Mobility Program for Licensed Practical Nurses. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen Community Coll., Paramus, NJ.

    The Associate Degree Nursing Program at Bergen Community College developed and field tested competency-based instructional modules in a program designed to allow licensed practical nurses to qualify to take the certification examination for registered nurses after a year of study. Thirteen licensed practical nurses were enrolled in the first class…

  17. Materials and test methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kase, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide, in cooperation with ORNL and LANL, specimens required for studies to develop organic insulators having the cryogenic neutron irradiation resistance required for MFE systems utilizing superconducting magnetic confinement. To develop test methods and analytical procedures for assessing radiation damage. To stimulate and participate in international cooperation directed toward accomplishing these objectives. The system for producing uniaxially reinforced, 3-4 mm (0.125 in) diameter rod specimens has been refined and validated by production of excellent quality specimens using liquid-mix epoxy resin systems. The methodology is undergoing further modification to permit use of hot-melt epoxy and polyimide resin systems as will be required for the experimental program to be conducted in the NLTNIF reactor at ORNL. Preliminary studies indicate that short beam and torsional shear test methods will be useful in evaluating radiation degradation. Development of these and other applicable test methods are continuing. A cooperative program established with laboratories in Japan and in England has resulted in the production and testing of specimens having an identical configuration

  18. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, T.; Cruse, J.M.

    1991-02-01

    To provide uniform packaging of hazardous materials on an international level, the United Nations has developed packaging recommendations that have been implemented worldwide. The United Nations packaging recommendations are performance oriented, allowing for a wide variety of package materials and systems. As a result of this international standard, efforts in the United States are being directed toward use of performance-oriented packaging and elimination of specification (designed) packaging. This presentation will focus on trends, design evaluation, and performance testing of radioactive material packaging. The impacts of US Department of Transportation Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A on specification and low-specific activity radioactive material packaging requirements are briefly discussed. The US Department of Energy's program for evaluating radioactive material packings per US Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A requirements, is used as the basis for discussing low-activity packaging performance test requirements. High-activity package testing requirements are presented with examples of testing performed at the Hanford Site that is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Relay test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Kunkel, C.; Shteyngart, S.

    1994-02-01

    This report presents the results of a relay test program conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The program is a continuation of an earlier test program the results of which were published in NUREG/CR-4867. The current program was carried out in two phases: electrical testing and vibration testing. The objective was primarily to focus on the electrical discontinuity or continuity of relays and circuit breaker tripping mechanisms subjected to electrical pulses and vibration loads. The electrical testing was conducted by KEMA-Powertest Company and the vibration testing was performed at Wyle Laboratories, Huntsville, Alabama. This report discusses the test procedures, presents the test data, includes an analysis of the data and provides recommendations regarding reliable relay testing

  20. Fusion program research materials inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, T.K.; Wiffen, F.W.; Davis, J.W.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory maintains a central inventory of research materials to provide a common supply of materials for the Fusion Reactor Materials Program. This will minimize unintended material variations and provide for economy in procurement and for centralized record keeping. Initially this inventory is to focus on materials related to first-wall and structural applications and related research, but various special purpose materials may be added in the future. The use of materials from this inventory for research that is coordinated with or otherwise related technically to the Fusion Reactor Materials Program of DOE is encouraged

  1. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, T.

    1992-06-01

    In an effort to provide uniform packaging of hazardous material on an international level, recommendations for the transport of dangerous goods have been developed by the United Nations. These recommendations are performance oriented and contrast with a large number of packaging specifications in the US Department of Transportation's hazard materials regulations. This dual system presents problems when international shipments enter the US Department of Transportation's system. Faced with the question of continuing a dual system or aligning with the international system, the Research and Special Programs Administration of the US Department of Transportation responded with Docket HM-181. This began the transition toward the international transportation system. Following close behind is Docket HM-169A, which addressed low specific activity radioactive material packaging. This paper will discuss the differences between performance-oriented and specification packaging, the transition toward performance-oriented packaging by the US Department of Transportation, and performance-oriented testing of radioactive material packaging by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A will be discussed along with Type A (low activity) and Type B (high activity) radioactive material packaging evaluations

  2. Foreign material exclusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Moreno, J.; Folguera Mateo, M.

    2015-01-01

    Foreign material is any element that is not part of the system as it has been designed. For example dirt, loose parts, wires, chips, etc. that may affect the operation of the system or component. (Author)

  3. Materials and test methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    The industrial specification for production of the G-10CR grade of cryogenic high-pressure laminate has been revised and accepted by US manufacturers. The objective was to make the specification as generic as possible without adversely affecting performance and to add a material performance criteria to the specification. G-10CR and G-11CR products have been produced by five US industrial laminating forms. No significant differences in cryogenic mechanical properties were found among G-10CR material produced by these manufacturers. This indicates that the specifications are fulfilling their intended purpose. An efficient system for producing research materials for systematic screening of the parameters influencing cryogenic radiation resistance was devised. Laboratories in Japan and England have agreed to actively cooperate with NBS in further development of this system

  4. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  5. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing. These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale section of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environment prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase show that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  6. Manipulator comparative testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.J.; Sundstrom, E.; Herndon, J.N.; Fujita, Y.; Maeda, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Manipulator Comparative Testing Program examined differences among manipulator systems from the United States and Japan. The manipulator systems included the Meidensha BILARM 83A, the Model M-2 of Central Research Laboratories Division of Sargent Industries (CRL), and the GCA Corporation PaR Systems Model 6000. The site of testing was the Remote Operations Maintenance Demonstration (ROMD) facility, operated by the Fuel Recycle Division in the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In all stages of testing, operators using the CRL Model M-2 manipulator had consistently lower times to completion and error rates than they did using other machines. Performance was second best with the Meidensha BILARM 83A in master-slave mode. Performance with the BILARM in switchbox mode and the PaR 6000 manipulator was approximately equivalent in terms of criteria recorded in testing. These data show no impact of force reflection on task performance

  7. Materials Characterization Center program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.D.; Ross, W.A.; Hill, O.F.; Mendel, J.E.; Merz, M.D.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1980-03-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) has been established at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Materials Characterization Organization for providing an authoritative, referenceable basis for establishing nuclear waste material properties and test methods. The MCC will provide a data base that will include information on the components of the waste emplacement package - the spent fuel or processed waste form and the engineered barriers - and their interaction with each other and as affected by the environment. The MCC will plan materials testing, develop and document procedures, collect and analyze existing materials data, and conduct tests as necessary

  8. US/French joint research program regarding the behavior of polymer base materials subjected to beta radiation: Volume 2, Phase-2a screening tests: [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckalew, W.H.; Wyant, F.J.; Chenion, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Tutour, P.; Le Meur, M.

    1987-09-01

    As part of the ongoing joint NRC/CEA cooperative test program to investigate the relative effectiveness of beta and gamma irradiation to produce damage in polymer base materials, ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) specimens, in slab geometry, were exposed to Cobalt-60 gamma rays and accelerator produced electron beams. Specimens were irradiated and evaluated at research facilities in the US (Sandia National Laboratories) and France (Compagnie ORIS Industrie). These tests included several electron beam energies, sample thicknesses, exposure doses, and dose rates. Based on changes in the tensile properties, of the test specimens, results of these studies suggest that material damage resulting from electron and gamma irradiations can be correlated on the basis of absorbed radiation dose

  9. Materials Testing - Digital Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Wiley

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Access to credible building product performance information throughout the design and construction process is critical to enable project development, vet product selections, ensure as-built quality, and successfully complete construction. This is common knowledge and part of common practice for nearly all parties involved in design and construction. The sources of such information can range from vernacular to formal – from common practice to special reference. The focus of this paper is one of the more formal or specialized information sources, performance testing, as well as how such performance testing information can be better used. This paper’s goals are to familiarize the reader with performance testing and to depict a new kind of valuable informational tool (digital ecology. Reference to pertinent nomenclature, description of a real world example, and detailed description of such an informational tool’s values will be provided.The major content of this paper was developed during project-based work and firm-funded internal research at point b design, ltd. over approximately the previous 4 years. The phrase ‘digital ecology’ as herein used is a new concept proposed by the author. The analysis contained in this paper could be applied to the field of operations and maintenance as it is herein applied to design and construction; however, operations and maintenance is beyond the scope of this paper and may be addressed in future papers. It is my hope that this paper will contribute to tangible and real improvements of the built environment via continued, positive development within academic and professional practice.

  10. Testing of Replacement Bag Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, the FB-Line bagout material was changed to simplify the processing of sand, slag, and crucible.The results of the strength tests and the outgassing measurements and calculations demonstrate that the proposed replacement nylon bag materials (HRMP and orange anti-static material) are acceptable substitutes for LDPE and the original nylon with respect to mechanical properties

  11. Developing test materials for dyscalculia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenskov, Lena; Bent, Lindhardt,

    Aims, requirements and context for the development of test materials for dyscalculia are analyzed. The test materials are to be used for Grade 4 pupils in Danish primary schools. Preliminary results are presented from focus group interview with adolescents and adults, who see themselves as being...

  12. CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Dave Grimmett; Bryan McEnerney

    2007-01-31

    This report provides detailed test results consisting of test data and post-test inspections from Task 1 ''Cooled Liner Coupon Development and Test'' of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources--Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The primary objective of this development and test program is to verify that ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liner materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will successfully withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) designed and fabricated the cooled liner test assembly article that was tested in a slagging gasifier at CANMET Energy Technology Center (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The test program conducted in 2006 met the objective of operating the cooled liner test article at slagging conditions in a small scale coal gasifier at CETC-O for over the planned 100 hours. The test hardware was exposed to at least 30 high temperature excursions (including start-up and shut-down cycles) during the test program. The results of the testing has provided valuable information on gasifier startup and required cooling controls in steady state operation of future advanced gasifiers using similar liners. The test program also provided a significant amount of information in the areas of CMC materials and processing for improved capability in a gasifier environment and insight into CMC liner fabrication that will be essential for near-term advanced gasifier projects.

  13. Japanese materials program and FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    1988-01-01

    Japanese materials program has been briefly reviewed and the associated university program, which is still in a provisional stage has been described in some detail. Important elements of the university proposal will be 1) construction of a high energy high fluence neutron irradiation facility, 2) establishing or expanding local research centers including hot laboratories, and 3) promotion of fundamental studies. The FFTF/MOTA Project is a very important constituent of the whole program, the results coming out of which should be well coordinated with other fundamental research programs to extract full essence needed for the advancement of realization of fusion energy. (author)

  14. Development Of Ultrasonic Testing Based On Delphi Program As A Learning Media In The Welding Material Study Of Detection And Welding Disables In The Environment Of Vocational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwi Cahyono, Bagus; Ainur, Chandra

    2018-04-01

    The development of science and technology has a direct impact on the preparation of qualified workers, including the preparation of vocational high school graduates. Law Number 20 the Year 2003 on National Education System explains that the purpose of vocational education is to prepare learners to be ready to work in certain fields. One of the learning materials in Vocational High School is welding and detecting welding defects. Introduction of welding and detecting welding defects, one way that can be done is by ultrasonic testing will be very difficult if only capitalize the book only. Therefore this study aims to adopt ultrasonic testing in a computer system. This system is called Delphi Program-based Ultrasonic Testing Expert System. This system is used to determine the classification and type of welding defects of the welded defect indicator knew. In addition to the system, there is a brief explanation of the notion of ultrasonic testing, calibration procedures and inspection procedures ultrasonic testing. In this system, ultrasonic input data testing that shows defects entered into the computer manually. This system is built using Delphi 7 software and Into Set Up Compiler as an installer. The method used in this research is Research and Development (R & D), with the following stages: (1) preliminary research; (2) manufacture of software design; (3) materials collection; (4) early product development; (5) validation of instructional media experts; (6) product analysis and revision; (8) media trials in learning; And (9) result of end product of instructional media. The result of the research shows that: (1) the result of feasibility test according to ultrasonic material testing expert that the system is feasible to be used as instructional media in welding material subject and welding defect detection in vocational education environment, because it contains an explanation about detection method of welding defect using method Ultrasonic testing in detail; (2

  15. Simulator for materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Sugaya, Naoto; Ohtsuka, Kaoru; Hanakawa, Hiroki; Onuma, Yuichi; Hosokawa, Jinsaku; Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Tamura, Kazuo; Hotta, Kohji; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    A real-time simulator for both reactor and irradiation facilities of a materials testing reactor, “Simulator of Materials Testing Reactors”, was developed for understanding reactor behavior and operational training in order to utilize it for nuclear human resource development and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of anticipated operational transients and accident conditions caused by the reactor and irradiation facilities. The development of the simulator was sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. This report summarizes the simulation components, hardware specification and operation procedure of the simulator. (author)

  16. Underground Nuclear Testing Program, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    The Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) continues to conduct an underground nuclear testing program which includes tests for nuclear weapons development and other tests for development of nuclear explosives and methods for their application for peaceful uses. ERDA also continues to provide nuclear explosive and test site support for nuclear effects tests sponsored by the Department of Defense. This Supplement extends the Environmental Statement (WASH-1526) to cover all underground nuclear tests and preparations for tests of one megaton (1 MT) or less at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during Fiscal Year 1976. The test activities covered include numerous continuing programs, both nuclear and non-nuclear, which can best be conducted in a remote area. However, if nuclear excavation tests or tests of yields above 1 MT or tests away from NTS should be planned, these will be covered by separate environmental statements

  17. Railgun bore material test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.; Burton, R.L.; Witherspoon, F.D.; Bloomberg, H.W.; Goldstein, S.A.; Tidman, D.A.; Winsor, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    GT-Devices, Inc. has constructed a material test facility (MTF) to study the fundamental heat transfer problem of both railgun and electrothermal guns, and to test candidate gun materials under real plasma conditions. The MTF electrothermally produces gigawatt-level plasmas with pulse lengths of 10-30 microseconds. Circular bore and non-circular bore test barrels have been successfully operated under a wide range of simulated heating environments for EM launchers. Diagnostics include piezoelectric MHz pressure probes, time-of-flight probes, and current and voltage probes. Ablation measurements are accomplished by weighing and optical inspection, including borescope, optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). From these measurements the ablation threshold for both the rail and insulator materials can be determined as a function of plasma heating. The MTF diagnostics are supported by an unsteady 1-D model of MTF which uses the flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm to calculate the fluid equations in conservative form. A major advantage of the FCT algorithm is that it can model gas dynamic shock behaviour without the requirement of numerical diffusion. The principle use of the code is to predict the material surface temperature ΔT/α from the unsteady heat transfer q(t)

  18. the JHR Material Testing Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roure, C.; Cornu, B.; Berthet, B.; Simon, E.; Estre, N.; Guimbal, P.; Kinnunen, P.; Kotiluoto, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is a European experimental reactor under construction in CEA Cadarache. It will be dedicated to material and fuel irradiation tests, and to medical isotopes production. Non-Destructive nuclear Examinations systems (NDE) will be implemented in pools to analyse the irradiated fuel or tested material in their supporting experimental irradiation devices extracted from the core or its immediate periphery. The Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache is working in collaboration with VTT (Technical Research Centre in Finland) in designing and developing NDE systems implementing gamma-ray spectroscopy and high energy X-ray imaging of the sample and irradiation device. CEA is also designing a neutron radiography system for which NML is working on the detection system. Design studies are performed with Monte Carlo transport codes and specific simulation tools developed by the NML for Xray and neutron imaging. (authors)

  19. Research reactors and materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, H.

    1986-01-01

    Research reactors can be classified in three main groups according to the moderator which is used. Their technical characteristics are given and the three most recent research and materials testing reactors are described: OSIRIS, ORPHEE and the high-flux reactor of Grenoble. The utilization of research reactors is reviewed in four fields of activity: training, fundamental or applied research and production (eg. radioisotopes) [fr

  20. Nuclear material control and accountancy planning and performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Enhinger; Dennis Wilkey; Rod Martin; Ken Byers; Brian Smith

    1999-01-01

    An overview of performance testing as used at U.S. Department of Energy facilities is provided. Performance tests are performed on specific aspects of the regulations or site policy. The key issues in establishing a performance testing program are: identifying what needs to be tested; determining how to test; establishing criteria to evaluate test results. The program elements of performance testing program consist of: planning; coordination; conduct; evaluation. A performance test may be conducted of personnel or equipment. The DOE orders for nuclear material control and accountancy are divided into three functional areas: program administration, material accounting, and material control. Examples performance tests may be conducted on program administration, accounting, measurement and measurement control, inventory, and containment [ru

  1. Accelerated test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, F. E.; Harkness, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A brief discussion on the accelerated testing of batteries is given. The statistical analysis and the various aspects of the modeling that was done and the results attained from the model are also briefly discussed.

  2. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, E.L.; Trego, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is being designed to be constructed at Hanford, Washington, The system is designed to produce about 10 15 n/cm-s in a volume of approx. 10 cc and 10 14 n/cm-s in a volume of 500 cc. The lithium and target systems are being developed and designed by HEDL while the 35-MeV, 100-mA cw accelerator is being designed by LASL. The accelerator components will be fabricated by US industry. The total estimated cost of the FMIT is $105 million. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in September 1984

  3. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1975-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 .s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed. (U.S.)

  4. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R.; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1975-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 . s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed

  5. Ukrainian Program for Material Science in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Oleg

    Ukrainian Program for Material Sciences in Microgravity O.P. Fedorov, Space Research Insti-tute of NASU -NSAU, Kyiv, The aim of the report is to present previous and current approach of Ukrainian research society to the prospect of material sciences in microgravity. This approach is based on analysis of Ukrainian program of research in microgravity, preparation of Russian -Ukrainian experiments on Russian segment of ISS and development of new Ukrainian strategy of space activity for the years 2010-2030. Two parts of issues are discussed: (i) the evolution of our views on the priorities in microgravity research (ii) current experiments under preparation and important ground-based results. item1 The concept of "space industrialization" and relevant efforts in Soviet and post -Soviet Ukrainian research institutions are reviewed. The main topics are: melt supercooling, crystal growing, testing of materials, electric welding and study of near-Earth environment. The anticipated and current results are compared. item 2. The main experiments in the framework of Ukrainian-Russian Research Program for Russian Segment of ISS are reviewed. Flight installations under development and ground-based results of the experiments on directional solidification, heat pipes, tribological testing, biocorrosion study is presented. Ground-based experiments and theoretical study of directional solidification of transparent alloys are reviewed as well as preparation of MORPHOS installation for study of succinonitrile -acetone in microgravity.

  6. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  7. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford tank farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  8. Navy Shipboard Hazardous Material Minimization Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieberich, M.J. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States). Carderock Div.; Robinson, P. [Life Cycle Engineering, Inc., Charleston, SC (United States); Chastain, B.

    1994-12-31

    The use of hazardous (and potentially hazardous) materials in shipboard cleaning applications has proliferated as new systems and equipments have entered the fleet to reside alongside existing equipments. With the growing environmental awareness (and additional, more restrictive regulations) at all levels/echelon commands of the DoD, the Navy has initiated a proactive program to undertake the minimization/elimination of these hazardous materials in order to eliminate HMs at the source. This paper will focus on the current Shipboard Hazardous Materials Minimization Program initiatives including the identification of authorized HM currently used onboard, identification of potential substitute materials for HM replacement, identification of new cleaning technologies and processes/procedures, and identification of technical documents which will require revision to eliminate the procurement of HMs into the federal supply system. Also discussed will be the anticipated path required to implement the changes into the fleet and automated decision processes (substitution algorithm) currently employed. The paper will also present the most recent technologies identified for approval or additional testing and analysis including: supercritical CO{sub 2} cleaning, high pressure blasting (H{sub 2}O + baking soda), aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning materials and processes, solvent replacements and dedicated parts washing systems with internal filtering capabilities, automated software for solvent/cleaning process substitute selection. Along with these technological advances, data availability (from on-line databases and CDROM Database libraries) will be identified and discussed.

  9. Advanced neutron source materials surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavilin, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will be composed of several different materials, one of which is 6061-T6 aluminum. Among other components, the reflector vessel and the core pressure boundary tube (CPBT), are to be made of 6061-T6 aluminum. These components will be subjected to high thermal neutron fluences and will require a surveillance program to monitor the strength and fracture toughness of the 6061-T6 aluminum over their lifetimes. The purpose of this paper is to explain the steps that were taken in the summer of 1994 toward developing the surveillance program. The first goal was to decide upon standard specimens to use in the fracture toughness and tensile testing. Second, facilities had to be chosen for specimens representing the CPBT and the reflector vessel base, weld, and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) metals. Third, a timetable had to be defined to determine when to remove the specimens for testing

  10. Material control system simulator program reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollstien, R.B.

    1978-01-24

    A description is presented of a Material Control System Simulator (MCSS) program for determination of material accounting uncertainty and system response to particular adversary action sequences that constitute plausible material diversion attempts. The program is intended for use in situations where randomness, uncertainty, or interaction of adversary actions and material control system components make it difficult to assess safeguards effectiveness against particular material diversion attempts. Although MCSS may be used independently in the design or analysis of material handling and processing systems, it has been tailored toward the determination of material accountability and the response of material control systems to adversary action sequences.

  11. Material control system simulator program reference manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollstien, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of a Material Control System Simulator (MCSS) program for determination of material accounting uncertainty and system response to particular adversary action sequences that constitute plausible material diversion attempts. The program is intended for use in situations where randomness, uncertainty, or interaction of adversary actions and material control system components make it difficult to assess safeguards effectiveness against particular material diversion attempts. Although MCSS may be used independently in the design or analysis of material handling and processing systems, it has been tailored toward the determination of material accountability and the response of material control systems to adversary action sequences

  12. Test Program Set (TPS) Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC TPS Laboratory provides an organic Test Program Set (TPS) development, maintenance, and life cycle management capability for DoD LCMC materiel developers....

  13. Nevada Test Site closure program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenk, D.P.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a summary of the history, design and development, procurement, fabrication, installation and operation of the closures used as containment devices on underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. It also addresses the closure program mothball and start-up procedures. The Closure Program Document Index and equipment inventories, included as appendices, serve as location directories for future document reference and equipment use

  14. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  15. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

    2008-01-01

    Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program

  16. Materials program for magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwilsky, K.M.; Cohen, M.M.; Finfgeld, C.R.; Reuther, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Magnetic Fusion Reactor Materials Program is currently operating at a level of $7.8M. The program is divided into four technical areas which cover both short and long term problems. These are: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance, Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies, Plasma-Materials Interaction, and Special Purpose Materials. A description of the program planning process, the continuing management structure, and the resulting documents is presented

  17. Unmanned Vehicle Material Flammability Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T’ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam; Rouvreau, Sebastian; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; hide

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity combustion phenomena have been an active area of research for the past 3 decades however, there have been very few experiments directly studying spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample and environment sizes typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. All previous experiments have been limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. Terrestrial fire safety standards for all other habitable volumes on earth, e.g. mines, buildings, airplanes, ships, etc., are based upon testing conducted with full-scale fires. Given the large differences between fire behavior in normal and reduced gravity, this lack of an experimental data base at relevant length scales forces spacecraft designers to base their designs using 1-g understanding. To address this question a large scale spacecraft fire experiment has been proposed by an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status and concept of this collaborative international project to examine spacecraft material flammability at realistic scales. The concept behind this project is to utilize an unmanned spacecraft such as Orbital Cygnus vehicle after it has completed its delivery of cargo to the ISS and it has begun its return journey to earth. This experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. A computer modeling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the examination of fire behavior on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This will be

  18. Accelerated leach test development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    In FY 1989, a draft accelerated leach test for solidified waste was written. Combined test conditions that accelerate leaching were validated through experimental and modeling efforts. A computer program was developed that calculates test results and models leaching mechanisms. This program allows the user to determine if diffusion controls leaching and, if this is the case, to make projections of releases. Leaching mechanisms other than diffusion (diffusion plus source term partitioning and solubility limited leaching) are included in the program is indicators of other processes that may control leaching. Leach test data are presented and modeling results are discussed for laboratory scale waste forms composed of portland cement containing sodium sulfate salt, portland cement containing incinerator ash, and vinyl ester-styrene containing sodium sulfate. 16 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Opportunities for the LWR ATF materials development program to contribute to the LBE-cooled ADS materials qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xing, E-mail: gongxingzfl@hotmail.com [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Li, Rui, E-mail: li-rui@cgnpc.com.cn [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Sun, Maozhou; Ren, Qisen [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Liu, Tong, E-mail: liutong@cgnpc.com.cn [Department of ATF R& D, Nuclear Fuel Research and Development Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute Co., Ltd., China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), Shenzhen, 518026 (China); Short, Michael P., E-mail: hereiam@mit.edu [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Accelerator-driven systems (ADS) are a promising approach for nuclear waste disposal. Nevertheless, the principal candidate materials proposed for ADS construction, such as the ferritic/martensitic steel, T91, and austenitic stainless steels, 316L and 15-15Ti, are not fully compatible with the liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant. Under some operating conditions, liquid metal embrittlement (LME) or liquid metal corrosion (LMC) may occur in these steels when exposed to LBE. These environmentally-induced material degradation effects pose a threat to ADS reactor safety, as failure of the materials could initiate a severe accident, in which fission products are released into the coolant. Meanwhile, parallel efforts to develop accident-tolerant fuels (ATF) in light water reactors (LWRs) could provide both general materials design philosophies and specific material solutions to the ADS program. In this paper, the potential contributions of the ATF materials development program to the ADS materials qualification program are evaluated and discussed in terms of service conditions and materials performance requirements. Several specific areas where coordinated development may benefit both programs, including composite materials and selected coatings, are discussed. - Highlights: • ATF materials developed for LWRs could be candidate materials for the LBE-cooled ADS program. • Similar material design and protection philosophies are utilized in both programs. • Unique challenges of LBE-cooled ADS systems could possibly be addressed by LWR ATF materials. • More coordinated testing should be performed between the ATF and ADS programs.

  20. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Sandra Birk; Brent Matteson; Hongbo Tian

    2006-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) has been directed by DOE-RW to develop a new repository waste package design based on the transport, aging, and disposal canister (TAD) system concept. A neutron poison material for fabrication of the internal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) baskets for these canisters needs to be identified. A material that has been used for criticality control in wet and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel is borated stainless steel. These stainless products are available as an ingot metallurgy plate product with a molybdenum addition and a powder metallurgy product that meets the requirements of ASTM A887, Grade A. A new Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy has been developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with its research partners (Sandia National Laboratory and Lehigh University) with DOE-EM funding provided by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). This neutron absorbing alloy will be used to fabricate the SNF baskets in the DOE standardized canister. The INL has designed the DOE Standardized Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister for the handling, interim storage, transportation, and disposal in the national repository of DOE owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A corrosion testing program is required to compare these materials in environmental conditions representative of a breached waste canister. This report will summarize the results of crevice corrosion tests for three alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the waste package should a breech occur. The three alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb 304B4 Grade A (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled)

  1. Tamarisk coalition - native riparian plant materials program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy Kolegas

    2012-01-01

    The Tamarisk Coalition (TC), a nonprofit organization dedicated to riparian restoration in the western United States, has created a Native Plant Materials Program to address the identified need for native riparian plant species for use in revegetation efforts on the Colorado Plateau. The specific components of the Native Plant Materials Program include: 1) provide seed...

  2. Reference materials and representative test materials: the nanotechnology case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roebben, G.; Rasmussen, K.; Kestens, V.; Linsinger, T. P. J.; Rauscher, H.; Emons, H.; Stamm, H.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of chemical, physical and biological tests are performed on manufactured nanomaterials for scientific and regulatory purposes. Existing test guidelines and measurement methods are not always directly applicable to or relevant for nanomaterials. Therefore, it is necessary to verify the use of the existing methods with nanomaterials, thereby identifying where modifications are needed, and where new methods need to be developed and validated. Efforts for verification, development and validation of methods as well as quality assurance of (routine) test results significantly benefit from the availability of suitable test and reference materials. This paper provides an overview of the existing types of reference materials and introduces a new class of test materials for which the term ‘representative test material’ is proposed. The three generic concepts of certified reference material, reference material(non-certified) and representative test material constitute a comprehensive system of benchmarks that can be used by all measurement and testing communities, regardless of their specific discipline. This paper illustrates this system with examples from the field of nanomaterials, including reference materials and representative test materials developed at the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, in particular at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), and at the Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP).

  3. Construction of computational program of aging in insulating materials for searching reversed sequential test conditions to give damage equivalent to simultaneous exposure of heat and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuse, Norikazu; Homma, Hiroya; Okamoto, Tatsuki

    2013-01-01

    Two consecutive numerical calculations on degradation of polymeric insulations under thermal and radiation environment are carried out to simulate so-called reversal sequential acceleration test. The aim of the calculation is to search testing conditions which provide material damage equivalent to the case of simultaneous exposure of heat and radiation. At least following four parameters are needed to be considered in the sequential method; dose rate and exposure time in radiation, as well as temperature and aging time in heating. The present paper discusses the handling of these parameters and shows some trial calculation results. (author)

  4. Environmental testing techniques for electronics and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dummer, Geoffrey W A; Fry, D W; Higinbotham, W

    2013-01-01

    Environmental Testing Techniques for Electronics and Materials reviews environmental testing techniques for evaluating the performance of electronic equipment, components, and materials. Environmental test planning, test methods, and instrumentation are described, along with the general environmental conditions under which equipment must operate. This book is comprised of 15 chapters and begins by explaining why environmental testing is necessary and describing the environment in which electronics must operate. The next chapter considers how an environmental test plan is designed; the methods

  5. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  6. Thermophysical tests of buffer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H. [ITC, Tokyo (Japan); Taniguchi, Wataru

    1999-03-01

    Thermodynamic properties of buffer materials were measured for putting in order thermodynamic constants to be used in the near-field thermal analysis. The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were measured as functions of the water content and temperature to deduce the specific heat. The thermal conductivity and specific heat varied significantly as the water content changed. Obtained values of the specific heat agreed well the expected values calculated based on the constituents of the buffer material. Temperature dependence of the thermodynamic constants was found small below 90degC. From the findings, the thermal conductivity and specific heat of the buffer material were formulated as functions of the water content. Thermodynamic study of powdery bentonite was carried out as well with a purpose of use for filling apertures in the artificial barrier. (H. Baba)

  7. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a containment level-III laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Kym S; Burdz, Tamara V; Turenne, Christine Y; Sharma, Meenu K; Kabani, Amin M; Wolfe, Joyce N

    2005-01-24

    In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3) laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating/chemical fixation) may not consistently kill MTB organisms. An inclusive viability study (n = 226) was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7%) of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80 degrees C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18), resulting in 0% viability. This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation) or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a CL3 laboratory. This process is vital to establish in

  8. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a Containment Level-III Laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabani Amin M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3 laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating /chemical fixation may not consistently kill MTB organisms. Methods An inclusive viability study (n = 226 was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Results Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7% of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80°C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18, resulting in 0% viability. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a

  9. Single event upset test programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russen, L.C.

    1984-11-01

    It has been shown that the heavy ions in cosmic rays can give rise to single event upsets in VLSI random access memory devices (RAMs). Details are given of the programs written to test 1K, 4K, 16K and 64K memories during their irradiation with heavy charged ions, in order to simulate the effects of cosmic rays in space. The test equipment, which is used to load the memory device to be tested with a known bit pattern, and subsequently interrogate it for upsets, or ''flips'', is fully described. (author)

  10. Materials sciences programs, Fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in materials science topics important to the mission of the Department of Energy. The programmatic divisions under the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geosciences, and Energy Biosciences. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship among synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences subfields include: physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 517 research programs including 255 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 262 research grants (233 of which are at universities), and 29 Small Business Innovation Research Grants. Five cross-cutting indices located at the rear of this book identify all 517 programs according to principal investigator(s), materials, techniques, phenomena, and environment.

  11. Status of CCTF test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Y.; Iguchi, T.; Sugimoto, J.; Akimoto, H.; Okubo, T.; Okabe, K.

    1984-01-01

    The cylindrical core test facility (CCTF) is one of the facilities of the large scale reflood test program which was initiated in April, 1976. The first series of the CCTF test (CCTF CORE I Test) was completed in April, 1981 and the second series (CCTF Core II Test) has been conducted since April, 1982. In the test, the following has been intended to be examined: (1) The conservativeness of the assumption of the safety analysis with the evaluation model (EM) code. (2) The refill and reflood phenomena for analytical modeling of thermo-hydrodynamics in the core and the system. (3) The validity of the models in the EM code and the application to the best estimate code development. In this paper, presented are the quantative evaluation of the REFLA code and the discussion of some CCTF Core II Test results. The REFLA code consists of REFLA-1D core code developed with the results of small scale tests and a simple system model developed with the results of the CCTF Core I Test. The CCTF Core II Test was perfored for developing more realistic model for the alternative ECCS as well as for the cold leg injection type ECCS

  12. Automated [inservice testing] IST program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    There are two methods used to manage a Section XI program: Manual and Automated. The manual method usually consists of hand written records of test results and scheduling requirements. This method while initially lower in cost, results in problems later on in the life of a plant as data continues to accumulate. Automation allows instant access to forty years of test results. Due to the lower cost and higher performance of todays' personal computers, an automated method via a computer program provides an excellent method for managing the vast amount of data that accumulates over the forty year life of a plant. Through the use of a computer, special functions involving this data are available, which through a manual method would not be practical. This paper will describe some of the advantages in using a computer program to manage the Section XI 1ST program. The ISTBASE consists of program code and numerous databases. The source code is written and complied in CLIPPER (tm) language. Graphing routines are performed by dGE (tm) graphics library. Graphs are displayed in EGA form. Since it was estimated that the total complied code, would exceed 640K of ram, overlays through the use of modular programming were used to facilitate the DOS restrictions of 640K ram. The use of overlays still require the user to gain access to ISTBASE through the PASSWORD module. The database files are designed to be compatible with dBASE III+ (tm) data structure. This allows transfer of data between ISTBASE and other database managers/applications. A math co-processor is utilized to speed up calculations on graphs and other mathematical calculations. Program code and data files require a hard disk drive with at least 28 Meg capacity. While ISTBASE will execute on a 8088 based computer, an 80286 computer with a 12 MHz operating speed should be considered the minimum system configuration

  13. Sandia Dynamic Materials Program Strategic Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flicker, Dawn Gustine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Benage, John F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Desjarlais, Michael P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knudson, Marcus D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Leifeste, Gordon T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lemke, Raymond W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mattsson, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wise, Jack L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Materials in nuclear and conventional weapons can reach multi-megabar pressures and 1000s of degree temperatures on timescales ranging from microseconds to nanoseconds. Understanding the response of complex materials under these conditions is important for designing and assessing changes to nuclear weapons. In the next few decades, a major concern will be evaluating the behavior of aging materials and remanufactured components. The science to enable the program to underwrite decisions quickly and confidently on use, remanufacturing, and replacement of these materials will be critical to NNSA’s new Stockpile Responsiveness Program. Material response is also important for assessing the risks posed by adversaries or proliferants. Dynamic materials research, which refers to the use of high-speed experiments to produce extreme conditions in matter, is an important part of NNSA’s Stockpile Stewardship Program.

  14. HFR irradiation testing of fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; von der Hardt, P.; Loelgen, R.; Scheurer, H.; Zeisser, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present and future role of the High Flux Reactor Petten for fusion materials testing has been assessed. For practical purposes the Tokamak-based fusion reactor is chosen as a point of departure to identify material problems and materials data needs. The identification is largely based on the INTOR and NET design studies, the reported programme strategies of Japan, the U.S.A. and the European Communities for technical development of thermonuclear fusion reactors and on interviews with several experts. Existing and planned irradiation facilities, their capabilities and limitations concerning materials testing have been surveyed and discussed. It is concluded that fission reactors can supply important contributions for fusion materials testing. From the point of view of future availability of fission testing reactors and their performance it appears that the HFR is a useful tool for materials testing for a large variety of materials. Prospects and recommendations for future developments are given

  15. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of... test for the membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be submitted to the Commandant (CG...

  16. Buffer mass test - Buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.

    1982-08-01

    Commercial Na bentonite (MX-80) is the clay component of the buffer material in the heater holes as well of the tunnel backfill. Important characteristics are the clay content, liquid limit, X-ray diffraction pattern, water content, and degree of granulation. The ballast material consists of quartz-rich sand and feldspar-rich filler. The preparation of highly compacted bentonite for the near-field isolation of the canister was made by using isostatic compaction technique. The resulting dense bentonite core was cut into regularly shaped blocks which were arranged around each heater and lowered as one unit - heavily instrumented - in the respective deposition holes. For three of the six holes a narrow slot was left open between the bentonite stack and the rock; for the remaining ones a wider slot was chosen with a fill of soft bentonite powder. Both arrangements are expected to yield an ultimate bulk density which is sufficiently high to fulfil the requirement of a negligible permeability and a sufficient swelling pressure as well as heat conductivity, which are the essential parameters. The tunnel backfill, which consists of a mixture of suitably graded ballast material and MX-80 powder, has a considerably lower swelling pressure and heat conductivity, and a higher permeability, all these parameters still within the requirements of the KBS 2 concept. The various zones with different bentonite/sand ratios and the technique to apply them are described in the final part of the report. (Author)

  17. Materials program plan for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garde, A.; Hall, B.O.; Harkness, S.D.; Maiya, P.S.; Rechtin, M.D.; Li, C.Y.

    1979-08-01

    The effect of the irradiation environment on the microstructure of materials is studied. A major part of the initial activity in this area will be aimed toward evaluating the importance of pulse effects on microstructural development. The development effort that is necessary to cope with the high cycle loading of the first wall structure is studied. The loading pulses are expected to range from 1 to 20 per second (3 x 10 7 to 6 x 10 8 /year), thus creating a high cycle fatigue problem for any long-lived first wall structure. The interrelationship between specimen and component testing is a major issue in this section. Static mechanical property requirements are also considered here. Lithium compatibility is treated. The final section integrates the conclusions reached in the body of the report into a unified strategy that suggests a particular effort level to support major program milestones

  18. Materials program plan for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garde, A.; Hall, B.O.; Harkness, S.D.; Maiya, P.S.; Rechtin, M.D.; Li, C.Y.

    1979-08-01

    The effect of the irradiation environment on the microstructure of materials is studied. A major part of the initial activity in this area will be aimed toward evaluating the importance of pulse effects on microstructural development. The development effort that is necessary to cope with the high cycle loading of the first wall structure is studied. The loading pulses are expected to range from 1 to 20 per second (3 x 10/sup 7/ to 6 x 10/sup 8//year), thus creating a high cycle fatigue problem for any long-lived first wall structure. The interrelationship between specimen and component testing is a major issue in this section. Static mechanical property requirements are also considered here. Lithium compatibility is treated. The final section integrates the conclusions reached in the body of the report into a unified strategy that suggests a particular effort level to support major program milestones.

  19. FBR metallic materials test manual (English version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odaka, Susumu; Kato, Shoichi; Yoshida, Eiichi

    2003-06-01

    For the development of the fast breeder reactor, this manual describes the method of in-air and in-sodium material tests and the method of organization the data. This previous manual has revised in accordance with the revision of Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) and the conversion to the international unit. The test methods of domestic committees such as the VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) workshop were also refereed. The material test technologies accumulated in this group until now were also incorporated. This English version was prepared in order to provide more engineers with the FBR metallic materials test manual. (author)

  20. Developing the MAPLE materials test reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Lidstone, R.F.; Donnelly, J.V.

    1992-05-01

    MAPLE-MTR is a new multipurpose research facility being planned by AECL Research as a possible replacement for the 35-year-old NRU reactor. In developing the MAPLE-MTR concept, AECL is starting from the recent design and licensing experience with the MAPLE-X10 reactor. By starting from technology developed to support the MAPLE-X10 design and adapting it to produce a concept that satisfies the requirements of fuel channel materials testing and fuel irradiation programs, AECL expects to minimize the need for major advances in nuclear technology (e.g., fuel, heat transfer). Formulation of the MAPLE-MTR concept is at an early stage. This report describes the irradiation requirements of the research areas, how these needs are translated into design criteria for the project and elements of the preliminary design concept

  1. Minimum Leakage Condenser Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This report presents the results and analysis of tests performed on four critical areas of large surface condensers: the tubes, tubesheets, tube/tubesheet joints and the water chambers. Significant changes in operation, service duty and the reliability considerations require that certain existing design criteria be verified and that improved design features be developed. The four critical areas were treated analytically and experimentally. The ANSYS finite element computer program was the basic analytical method and strain gages were used for obtaining experimental data. The results of test and analytical data are compared and recommendations made regarding potential improvement in condenser design features and analytical techniques

  2. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-A19897, R.H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280degF. Table 1 lists the neutron shield materials tested. The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found. The Bisco modified NS-4 and Reactor Experiments HMPP are both acceptable materials from a thermal accident standpoint for use in the shipping cask. Tests of the Kobe PP-R01 and Envirotech HDPE were stopped for safety reasons, due to inability to deal with the heavy smoke, before completion of the 30-minute heating phase. However these materials may prove satisfactory if they could undergo the complete heating. (J.P.N.)

  3. Fossil Energy Materials Program conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R. (comp.)

    1987-08-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy has recognized the need for materials research and development to assure the adequacy of materials of construction for advanced fossil energy systems. The principal responsibility for identifying needed materials research and for establishing a program to address these needs resides within the Office of Technical Coordination. That office has established the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Fossil Energy Materials Program to fulfill that responsibility. In addition to the AR and TD Materials Program, which is designed to address in a generic way the materials needs of fossil energy systems, specific materials support activities are also sponsored by the various line organizations such as the Office of Coal Gasification. A conference was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee on May 19-21, 1987, to present and discuss the results of program activities during the past year. The conference program was organized in accordance with the research thrust areas we have established. These research thrust areas include structural ceramics (particularly fiber-reinforced ceramic composites), corrosion and erosion, and alloy development and mechanical properties. Eighty-six people attended the conference. Papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  4. Unify a hazardous materials/waste program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, H.T.

    1988-01-01

    Efficiently managing a hazardous materials/waste program in a multi-facility, multi-product corporation is a major challenge. This paper describes several methods to help unify a program and gain maximum efficiency of manpower and to minimize risk

  5. Bibliography of Ethnic Heritage Studies Program Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Greta; And Others

    The Ethnic Heritage Studies Program was designed to teach students about the nature of their heritage and to study the contributions of the cultural heritage of other ethnic groups. This is a bibliography of materials developed by projects which received Federal Ethnic Heritage Studies Program grants during fiscal year 1974-75 and 1975-76.…

  6. Materials sciences programs: Fiscal year 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects.

  7. Materials sciences programs, fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects

  8. Materials sciences programs, fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects.

  9. Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-16

    Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White Martin H. Moore Brian J. Melde Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Interfacial...ABSTRACT Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White, Martin H. Moore, Brian J. Melde Center for Bio/Molecular Science

  10. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-01-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a ''total impact energy'' approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper

  11. Measurement control program for nuclear material accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.J.; Roberts, F.P.; Merrill, J.A.; Brown, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    A measurement control program for nuclear material accounting monitors and controls the quality of the measurments of special nuclear material that are involved in material balances. The quality is monitored by collecting data from which the current precision and accuracy of measurements can be evaluated. The quality is controlled by evaluations, reviews, and other administrative measures for control of selection or design of facilities, equipment and measurement methods and the training and qualification of personnel who perform SNM measurements. This report describes the most important elements of a program by which management can monitor and control measurement quality

  12. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: experimental capabilities and test matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the experimental capabilities of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) and reference material specimen test matrices. The description of the experimental capabilities and the test matrices has been updated to match the current single test cell facility ad assessed experimenter needs. Sufficient detail has been provided so that the user can plan irradiation experiments and conceptual hardware. The types of experiments, irradiation environment and support services that will be available in FMIT are discussed

  13. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800 degree C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280 degree F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found

  14. Parts, Materials, and Processes Control Program for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    cycle cost ; and 4. Improve procurement and test of small quantities of parts and materials that meet system requirements. This document supersedes...the reliability of program PMP to reduce PMP failures at all levels of assembly and test 3. Reduce program lifecycle cost 4. Improve procurement and...part shall be procured in single lots directly from the manufacturer or its authorized franchised distributor. The contractor shall be able to

  15. Survey report on high temperature irradiation experiment programs for new ceramic materials in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor). 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    A survey research on status of research activities on new ceramic materials in Japan was carried out under contract between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The purpose of the survey is to provide information to prioritize prospective experiments and tests in the HTTR. The HTTR as a high temperature gas cooled reactor has a unique and superior capability to irradiate large-volumed specimen at high temperature up to approximately 800degC. The survey was focused on mainly the activities of functional ceramics and heat resisting ceramics as a kind of structural ceramics. As the result, the report recommends that the irradiation experiment of functional ceramics is feasible to date. (K. Itami)

  16. Test for radioactive material transport package safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoqiang; Zhao Bing; Zhang Jiangang; Wang Xuexin; Ma Anping

    2012-01-01

    Regulations on radioactive material transport in China were introduced. Test facilities and data acquiring instruments for radioactive material package in China Institute for Radiation Protection were also introduced in this paper, which were used in drop test and thermal test. Test facilities were constructed according to the requirements of IAEA's 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' (TS-R-l) and Chinese 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' (GB 11806-2004). Drop test facilities were used in free drop test, penetration test, mechanical test (free drop test Ⅰ, free drop test Ⅱ and free drop test Ⅲ) of type A and type B packages weighing less than thirteen tons. Thermal test of type B packages can be carried out in the thermal test facilities. Certification tests of type FCo70-YQ package, type 30A-HB-01 package, type SY-I package and type XAYT-I package according to regulations were done using these facilities. (authors)

  17. Computational Materials Program for Alloy Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    The research program sponsored by this grant, "Computational Materials Program for Alloy Design", covers a period of time of enormous change in the emerging field of computational materials science. The computational materials program started with the development of the BFS method for alloys, a quantum approximate method for atomistic analysis of alloys specifically tailored to effectively deal with the current challenges in the area of atomistic modeling and to support modern experimental programs. During the grant period, the program benefited from steady growth which, as detailed below, far exceeds its original set of goals and objectives. Not surprisingly, by the end of this grant, the methodology and the computational materials program became an established force in the materials communitiy, with substantial impact in several areas. Major achievements during the duration of the grant include the completion of a Level 1 Milestone for the HITEMP program at NASA Glenn, consisting of the planning, development and organization of an international conference held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in August of 2002, finalizing a period of rapid insertion of the methodology in the research community worlwide. The conference, attended by citizens of 17 countries representing various fields of the research community, resulted in a special issue of the leading journal in the area of applied surface science. Another element of the Level 1 Milestone was the presentation of the first version of the Alloy Design Workbench software package, currently known as "adwTools". This software package constitutes the first PC-based piece of software for atomistic simulations for both solid alloys and surfaces in the market.Dissemination of results and insertion in the materials community worldwide was a primary focus during this period. As a result, the P.I. was responsible for presenting 37 contributed talks, 19 invited talks, and publishing 71 articles in peer-reviewed journals, as

  18. Preparation of working calibration and test materials: uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, S.S.; Spraktes, F.W.; Baldwin, J.M.; Hand, R.L.; Lash, R.P.

    1977-05-01

    Reliable working calibration and test materials (WCTMs) are essential to a meaningful analytical measurements quality assurance program. This report describes recommended methods for the preparation of uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs for testing analytical methods, for calibrating methods, and for testing personnel. Uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs can be synthesized from characterized starting materials or prepared from typical plant materials by thorough characterization with reference to primary or secondary reference calibration and test materials (PRCTMs or SRCTMs). Recommended starting materials are described along with detailed procedures for (a) preparing several widely-used types of uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs, (b) packaging the WCTMs, (c) analyzing the WCTMs to establish the reference values or to confirm the synthesis, and (d) statistically evaluating the analytical data to assign reference values and to assess the accuracy of the WCTMs

  19. Materials sciences programs: Fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Science Division programs. This compilation is primarily intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F describes other user facilities, G as a summary of funding levels and H has indices characterizing research projects.

  20. Materials sciences programs fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is primarily intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F describes other user facilities, G as a summary of funding levels and H has indices characterizing research projects.

  1. Materials Sciences programs, fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. The report is divided into six sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Sections D and E have information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section F gives distribution of funding, and Section G has various indexes

  2. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This report provides a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. The report is divided into six sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research program, Section D has information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section E gives distributions of funding, and Section F has various indexes

  3. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The Materials Sciences Division supports basic research on materials properties and phenomena important to all energy systems. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1992 together with an index to the Division's programs. Recent publications from Division-sponsored panel meetings and workshops are listed. The body of the report is arranged under the following section headings: laboratories, grant and contract research, small business innovation research, major user facilities, other user facilities, funding levels, and index

  4. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Imaizumi, Tomomi; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishitsuka, Tatsuo; Tamura, Kazuo [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  5. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Imaizumi, Tomomi; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Suzuki, Masahide; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo; Tamura, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  6. Plutonium Immobilization Program cold pour tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovis, G.L.; Stokes, M.W.; Smith, M.E.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to carry out the disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. This program uses the can-in-canister (CIC) approach. CIC involves encapsulating plutonium in ceramic forms (or pucks), placing the pucks in sealed stainless steel cans, placing the cans in long cylindrical magazines, latching the magazines to racks inside Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and filling the DWPF canisters with high-level waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it attractive for reuse. At present, the DWPF pours glass into empty canisters. In the CIC approach, the addition of a stainless steel rack, magazines, cans, and ceramic pucks to the canisters introduces a new set of design and operational challenges: All of the hardware installed in the canisters must maintain structural integrity at elevated (molten-glass) temperatures. This suggests that a robust design is needed. However, the amount of material added to the DWPF canister must be minimized to prevent premature glass cooling and excessive voiding caused by a large internal thermal mass. High metal temperatures, minimizing thermal mass, and glass flow paths are examples of the types of technical considerations of the equipment design process. To determine the effectiveness of the design in terms of structural integrity and glass-flow characteristics, full-scale testing will be conducted. A cold (nonradioactive) pour test program is planned to assist in the development and verification of a baseline design for the immobilization canister to be used in the PIP process. The baseline design resulting from the cold pour test program and CIC equipment development program will provide input to Title 1 design for second-stage immobilization. The cold pour tests will be conducted in two

  7. Materials testing using laser energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, W.W.; Calder, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    A convenient method for determining the elastic constants of materials has been devised using the energy from a Q-switched neodymium-glass laser. Stress waves are induced in materials having circular rod or rectangular bar geometries by the absorption of energy from the laser. The wave transit times through the material are recorded with a piezoelectric transducer. Both dilatation and shear wave velocities are determined in a single test using an ultrasonic technique and these velocities are used to calculate the elastic constants of the material. A comparison of the constants determined for ten common engineering materials using this method is made with constants derived using the conventional ultrasonic pulse technique and agreement is shown to be about one percent in most cases. Effects of material geometry are discussed and surface damage to the material caused by laser energy absorption is shown

  8. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The Materials Sciences Division constitutes one portion of a wide range of research supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1983 together with a convenient index to the program

  9. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-01

    This report provides a compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs; the compilation is to assist administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into 7 sections: laboratory projects, contract research projects, small business innovation research, major user facilities, other user facilities, funding level distributions, and indexes.

  10. Physical and chemical test results of electrostatic safe flooring materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompf, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This test program was initiated because a need existed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to have this information readily available to the engineer who must make the choice of which electrostatic safe floor to use in a specific application. The information, however, should be of value throughout both the government and private industry in the selection of a floor covering material. Included are the test results of 18 floor covering materials which by test evaluation at KSC are considered electrostatically safe. Tests were done and/or the data compiled in the following areas: electrostatics, flammability, hypergolic compatibility, outgassing, floor type, material thickness, and available colors. Each section contains the test method used to gather the data and the test results.

  11. Thermoelectric materials evaluation program. Quarterly technical task report No. 46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampl, E.F. Jr.

    1976-02-01

    This forty-sixth Technical Task Report prepared under contract E(11-1)-2331 with the U.S. AEC and U.S. ERDA covers the performance period from October 1, 1975, to December 31, 1975. Highlights include the following tasks: N-type material development (material synthesis--gadolinium selenide compositions; material analyses; material processing; element contacting; ingradient compatibility and life testing; mechanical property characterization), TPM-217 P-type characterization (material preparation and analyses; element contacting; thermodynamic stability; isothermal chemical compatibility; ingradient compatibility and ingradient life testing; performance mapping of contacted and noncontacted elements; high-temperature partitioned P-legs), couple development (design and development of TPM-217/gadolinium selenide rare earth chalcogenide couple; design and development of TPM-217/3N-PbTe couples; advanced generator concepts), module development, liaison with Jet Propulsion Laboratory and material supply, liaison with GGA, and program management. 24 figures, 27 tables

  12. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Murphy

    2008-01-01

    In the past, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site has been performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation Department. Calibration and performance tests on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor were performed but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor because it had never been put into service. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no program in place to test them quarterly. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) Manager at the time decided that the program needed to be strengthened and MC and A took over performance testing of all SNM portal monitoring equipment. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with creating a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, writing procedures, troubleshooting/repairing, validating the process, control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and running the program

  13. Improved cytotoxicity testing of magnesium materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Janine [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Proefrock, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Department for Marine Bioanalytical Chemistry, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Hort, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Magnesium Processing, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2011-06-25

    Metallic magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are highly suitable for medical applications as biocompatible and biodegradable implant materials. Magnesium has mechanical properties similar to bone, stimulates bone regeneration, is an essential non-toxic element for the human body and degrades completely within the body environment. In consequence, magnesium is a promising candidate as implant material for orthopaedic applications. Protocols using the guideline of current ISO standards should be carefully evaluated when applying them for the characterization of the cytotoxic potential of degradable magnesium materials. For as-cast material we recommend using 10 times more extraction medium than recommended by the ISO standards to obtain reasonable results for reliable cytotoxicity rankings of degradable materials in vitro. In addition primary isolated human osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells should be used to test magnesium materials.

  14. Improved cytotoxicity testing of magnesium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Janine; Proefrock, Daniel; Hort, Norbert; Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Metallic magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are highly suitable for medical applications as biocompatible and biodegradable implant materials. Magnesium has mechanical properties similar to bone, stimulates bone regeneration, is an essential non-toxic element for the human body and degrades completely within the body environment. In consequence, magnesium is a promising candidate as implant material for orthopaedic applications. Protocols using the guideline of current ISO standards should be carefully evaluated when applying them for the characterization of the cytotoxic potential of degradable magnesium materials. For as-cast material we recommend using 10 times more extraction medium than recommended by the ISO standards to obtain reasonable results for reliable cytotoxicity rankings of degradable materials in vitro. In addition primary isolated human osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells should be used to test magnesium materials.

  15. Fuels and materials testing capabilities in Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.B.; Chastain, S.A.; Culley, G.E.; Ethridge, J.L.; Lovell, A.J.; Newland, D.J.; Pember, L.A.; Puigh, R.J.; Waltar, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor, which started operating in 1982, is a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor located in Hanford, Washington State, and operated by Westinghouse Hanford Co. under contract with U.S. Department of Energy. The reactor has a wide variety of functions for irradiation tests and special tests, and its major purpose is the irradiation of fuel and material for liquid metal reactor, nuclear reactor and space reactor projects. The review first describes major technical specifications and current conditions of the FFTF reactor. Then the plan for irradiation testing is outlined focusing on general features, fuel pin/assembly irradiation tests, and absorber irradiation tests. Assemblies for special tests include the material open test assembly (MOTA), fuel open test assembly (FOTA), closed loop in-reactor assembly (CLIRA), and other special fuel assemblies. An interim examination and maintenance cell (FFTF/IEM cell) and other hot cells are used for nondestructive/destructive tests and physical/mechanical properties test of material after irradiation. (N.K.)

  16. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules.

  17. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N.

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules

  18. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B G; Joo, K N [and others

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules.

  19. Erosion testing of hard materials and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-29

    Erosion is the process by which unconstrained particles, usually hard, impact a surface, creating damage that leads to material removal and component failure. These particles are usually very small and entrained in fluid of some type, typically air. The damage that occurs as a result of erosion depends on the size of the particles, their physical characteristics, the velocity of the particle/fluid stream, and their angle of impact on the surface of interest. This talk will discuss the basics of jet erosion testing of hard materials, composites and coatings. The standard test methods will be discussed as well as alternative approaches to determining the erosion rate of materials. The damage that occurs will be characterized in genera1 terms, and examples will be presented for the erosion behavior of hard materials and coatings (both thick and thin).

  20. Materials Sciences Programs. Fiscal Year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is primarily intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research. The report is divided into six sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the Small Business Innovation Research Program, Sections D and E have information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section F gives distribution of funding, and Section G has various indexes

  1. Materials Sciences programs. Fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a convenient compilation and index of the DOE Materials Sciences Division programs. This compilation is intended for use by administrators, managers, and scientists to help coordinate research and as an aid in selecting new programs. The report is divided into five sections. Section A contains all laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has information on DOE collaborative research centers, Section D shows distribution of funding, and Section E has various indices

  2. Testing of materials and scale models for impact limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maji, A.K.; Satpathi, D.; Schryer, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum Honeycomb and Polyurethane foam specimens were tested to obtain experimental data on the material's behavior under different loading conditions. This paper reports the dynamic tests conducted on the materials and on the design and testing of scale models made out of these open-quotes Impact Limiters,close quotes as they are used in the design of transportation casks. Dynamic tests were conducted on a modified Charpy Impact machine with associated instrumentation, and compared with static test results. A scale model testing setup was designed and used for preliminary tests on models being used by current designers of transportation casks. The paper presents preliminary results of the program. Additional information will be available and reported at the time of presentation of the paper

  3. Principles for supplying virus-tested material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varveri, Christina; Maliogka, Varvara I; Kapari-Isaia, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Production of virus-tested material of vegetatively propagated crops through national certification schemes has been implemented in many developed countries for more than 60 years and its importance for being the best virus control means is well acknowledged by growers worldwide. The two most important elements of certification schemes are the use of sensitive, reliable, and rapid detection techniques to check the health status of the material produced and effective and simple sanitation procedures for the elimination of viruses if present in candidate material before it enters the scheme. New technologies such as next-generation sequencing platforms are expected to further enhance the efficiency of certification and production of virus-tested material, through the clarification of the unknown etiology of several graft-transmissible diseases. The successful production of virus-tested material is a demanding procedure relying on the close collaboration of researchers, official services, and the private sector. Moreover, considerable efforts have been made by regional plant protection organizations such as the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO), the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), and the European Union and the USA to harmonize procedures, methodologies, and techniques in order to assure the quality, safety, and movement of the vegetatively propagated material produced around the world. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Simulation and material testing of jet engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA software engine simulator version U 1.7a beta has been used for simulation and material testing of jet engines. Specifications of Modem Jet Engines are stated, and then engine simulator is applied on these specifications. This simulator can simulate turbojet, afterburner, turbofan and ram jet. The material of many components of engine may be varied. Conventional and advanced materials for jet engines can be simulated and tested. These materials can be actively cooled to increase the operating temperature limit. As soon as temperature of any engine component exceeds the temperature limit of material, a warning message flashes across screen. Temperature Limits Exceeded. This flashing message remainst here until necessaryc hangesa re carried out in engine operationp rocedure. Selection Criteria of Engines is stated for piston prop, turboprop, turbofan, turbojet, and turbojet with afterburner and Ramjet. Several standard engines are modeled in Engine Simulator. These engines can. be compared by several engineering specifications. The design, modeling, simulation and testing of engines helps to better understand different types of materials used in jet engines. (author)

  5. Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.

    1986-11-01

    The Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility (PMITF), recently designed and constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma system with densities around 10 11 cm -3 and electron temperatures of 10-20 eV. The device consists of a mirror cell with high-field-side microwave injection and a heating power of up to 0.8 kW(cw) at 2.45 GHz. The facility will be used for studies of plasma-materials interactions and of particle physics in pump limiters and for development and testing of plasma edge diagnostics

  6. An innovative approach for testing bioinformatics programs using metamorphic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Huai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in experimental and computational technologies have fueled the development of many sophisticated bioinformatics programs. The correctness of such programs is crucial as incorrectly computed results may lead to wrong biological conclusion or misguide downstream experimentation. Common software testing procedures involve executing the target program with a set of test inputs and then verifying the correctness of the test outputs. However, due to the complexity of many bioinformatics programs, it is often difficult to verify the correctness of the test outputs. Therefore our ability to perform systematic software testing is greatly hindered. Results We propose to use a novel software testing technique, metamorphic testing (MT, to test a range of bioinformatics programs. Instead of requiring a mechanism to verify whether an individual test output is correct, the MT technique verifies whether a pair of test outputs conform to a set of domain specific properties, called metamorphic relations (MRs, thus greatly increases the number and variety of test cases that can be applied. To demonstrate how MT is used in practice, we applied MT to test two open-source bioinformatics programs, namely GNLab and SeqMap. In particular we show that MT is simple to implement, and is effective in detecting faults in a real-life program and some artificially fault-seeded programs. Further, we discuss how MT can be applied to test programs from various domains of bioinformatics. Conclusion This paper describes the application of a simple, effective and automated technique to systematically test a range of bioinformatics programs. We show how MT can be implemented in practice through two real-life case studies. Since many bioinformatics programs, particularly those for large scale simulation and data analysis, are hard to test systematically, their developers may benefit from using MT as part of the testing strategy. Therefore our work

  7. Fusion reactor materials program plan. Section III. Plasma material interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    A discussion of materials-related problems and an analysis of such problems is given for each major topical area. The strategy that will be used to solve the materials problems is described. As part of this program strategy, a series of major milestones is identified that extends over the next 20 years. Detailed task descriptions for the next five years leading to the achievement of the major milestones are given. Each task is described on a separate page (or task sheet) which includes the task number, task title, objective, scope, and the major milestones addressed by the task. Secondary milestones within a given task or subtask are defined, together with a priority assignment and an estimate of man-years to accomplish the work. Each Plan is organized along major topics which parallel the Subtask organization of the Task Group responsible for the Plan

  8. Testing fireproof materials in a combustion chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulhavy Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with a prototype concept, real experiment and numerical simulation of a combustion chamber, designed for testing fire resistance some new insulating composite materials. This concept of a device used for testing various materials, providing possibility of monitoring temperatures during controlled gas combustion. As a fuel for the combustion process propane butane mixture has been used and also several kinds of burners with various conditions of inlet air (forced, free and fuel flows were tested. The tested samples were layered sandwich materials based on various materials or foams, used as fillers in fire shutters. The temperature distribution was measured by using thermocouples. A simulation of whole concept of experimental chamber has been carried out as the non-premixed combustion process in the commercial final volume sw Pyrosim. The result was to design chamber with a construction suitable, according to the international standards, achieve the required values (temperature in time. Model of the combustion based on a stoichiometric defined mixture of gas and the tested layered samples showed good conformity with experimental results – i.e. thermal distribution inside and heat release rate that has gone through the sample.

  9. Development for advanced materials and testing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hishinuma, Akimichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Recent studies using a JMTR and research reactors of JRR-2 and JRR-3 are briefly summarized. Small specimen testing techniques (SSTT) required for an effective use of irradiation volume and also irradiated specimens have been developed focussing on tensile test, fatigue test, Charpy test and small punch test. By using the small specimens of 0.1 - several mm in size, similar values of tensile and fatigue properties to those by standard size specimens can be taken, although the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) depends strongly on Charpy specimen size. As for advanced material development, R and D about low activation ferritic steels have been done to investigate irradiation response. The low activation ferritic steel, so-called F82H jointly-developed by JAERI and NKK for fusion, has been confirmed to have good irradiation resistance within a limited dose and now selected as a standard material in the fusion material community. It is also found that TiAi intermetallic compounds, which never been considered for nuclear application in the past, have an excellent irradiation resistance under an irradiation condition. Such knowledge can bring about a large expectation for developing advanced nuclear materials. (author)

  10. Borehole Plugging-Materials Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulick, C.W. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    This report discusses the background and first year's results of the grouting materials development program for plugging boreholes associated with the Nuclear Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The grouts are to be pumpable, impermeable, and durable for many thousands of years. The work was done at the Concrete Laboratory of the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES), Vicksburg, Mississippi. The workability, strength, porosity, bonding, expansion, and permeability data are summarized and discussed. The work is continuing at WES

  11. Impact Testing of Orbiter Thermal Protection System Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Justin

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the impact testing of the materials used in designing the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS). Pursuant to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommendations a testing program of the TPS system was instituted. This involved using various types of impactors in different sizes shot from various sizes and strengths guns to impact the TPS tiles and the Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS). The observed damage is shown, and the resultant lessons learned are reviewed.

  12. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed

  13. Programs of the Materials and Radiation Effects Branch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.

    1976-01-01

    This report describes specific efforts devoted to resolving fusion reactor materials needs as they relate to major fusion power program objectives and construction of major fusion facilities. Summaries of ERDA-sponsored research being conducted on the following areas are given: surface program, bulk irradiation program, dosimetry program, materials selection and development program, and neutron source development program

  14. Nuclear materials control and accountability internal audit program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barham, M.A.; Abbott, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the Department of Energy Order (DOE) 5633.3, Control and Accountability for Nuclear Materials, includes several requirements for development and implementation of an internal audit program. Martin Marietta Energy System, Inc., manages five sites in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Ohio for the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge and has a Central Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability (NMC and A) Manager with matrixed responsibility for the NMC and A program at the five sites. The Energy Systems Central NMC and A Manager has developed an NMC and A Internal Audit Handbook which defines the functional responsibilities, performance criteria, and reporting and documentation requirements for the Energy Systems NMC and A Internal Audit Program. The initial work to develop and implement these standards was tested at the K-25 Site when the site hired an internal auditor to meet the DOE requirements for an NMC and A Internal Audit program

  15. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-01-01

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented

  16. Fuel rod D07/B15 from Ringhals 2 PWR: Source material for corrosion/leach tests in groundwater. Fuel rod/pellet characterization program. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, R.

    1987-03-01

    A joint SKB/STUDSVIK experimental program to determine the corrosion rates and to establish the corrosion mechanisms of spent UO 2 fuel in groundwater under both oxidizing and reducing conditions is in progress in the Hot Cell Laboratory of Studsvik Energiteknik AB. High burnup fuel of both BWR and PWR type are studied. Characterization of the spent fuel at both rod and pellet level is an important part of the experimental program. Experiments on PWR fuel have been concentrated so far on specimens from one rod, manufacturer's number 03688, which had occupied position B15 in assembly D07. This assembly had been irradiated for 5 cycles in the Ringhals 2 reactor between 1977 and 1983. The calculated assembly burnup was 41.3 MWd/kg U. The present report is a collection of separate reports describing those items in the characterization program which have been performed so far. No overall summary of the experimental results is given here, and the report should be viewed as a collection of reference data. (orig.)

  17. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  18. Segmented fuel irradiation program: investigation on advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, H.; Goto, K.; Sabate, R.; Abeta, S.; Baba, T.; Matias, E. de; Alonso, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Segmented Fuel Irradiation Program, started in 1991, is a collaboration between the Japanese organisations Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (KEPCO) representing other Japanese utilities, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI); and the Spanish Organisations Empresa Nacional de Electricidad, S.A. (ENDESA) representing A.N. Vandellos 2, and Empresa Nacional Uranio, S.A. (ENUSA); with the collaboration of Westinghouse. The objective of the Program is to make substantial contribution to the development of advanced cladding and fuel materials for better performance at high burn-up and under operational power transients. For this Program, segmented fuel rods were selected as the most appropriate vehicle to accomplish the aforementioned objective. Thus, a large number of fuel and cladding combinations are provided while minimising the total amount of new material, at the same time, facilitating an eventual irradiation extension in a test reactor. The Program consists of three major phases: phase I: design, licensing, fabrication and characterisation of the assemblies carrying the segmented rods (1991 - 1994); phase II: base irradiation of the assemblies at Vandellos 2 NPP, and on-site examination at the end of four cycles (1994-1999). Phase III: ramp testing at the Studsvik facilities and hot cell PIE (1996-2001). The main fuel design features whose effects on fuel behaviour are being analysed are: alloy composition (MDA and ZIRLO vs. Zircaloy-4); tubing texture; pellet grain size. The Program is progressing satisfactorily as planned. The base irradiation is completed in the first quarter of 1999, and so far, tests and inspections already carried out are providing useful information on the behaviour of the new materials. Also, the Program is delivering a well characterized fuel material, irradiated in a commercial reactor, which can be further used in other fuel behaviour experiments. The paper presents the main

  19. High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR), Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    After conversion to burnable poison fuel elements, the High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR) Petten (Netherlands), operated through 1974 for 280 days at 45 MW. Equipment for irradiation experiments has been replaced and extended. The average annual occupation by experiments was 55% as compared to 38% in 1973. Work continued on thirty irradiation projects and ten development activities

  20. Automation software for a materials testing laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    The software environment in use at the NASA-Lewis Research Center's High Temperature Fatigue and Structures Laboratory is reviewed. This software environment is aimed at supporting the tasks involved in performing materials behavior research. The features and capabilities of the approach to specifying a materials test include static and dynamic control mode switching, enabling multimode test control; dynamic alteration of the control waveform based upon events occurring in the response variables; precise control over the nature of both command waveform generation and data acquisition; and the nesting of waveform/data acquisition strategies so that material history dependencies may be explored. To eliminate repetitive tasks in the coventional research process, a communications network software system is established which provides file interchange and remote console capabilities.

  1. Tests on irradiated magnet-insulator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmunk, R.E.; Miller, L.G.; Becker, H.

    1983-01-01

    Fusion-reactor coils, located in areas where they will be only partially shielded, must be fabricated from materials which are as resistant to radiation as possible. They will probably incorporate resistive conductors with either water or cryogenic cooling. Inorganic insulators have been recommended for these situations, but the possibility exists that some organic insulators may be usuable as well. Results were previously reported for irradiation and testing of three glass reinforced epoxies: G-7, G-10, and G-11. Thin disks of these materials, nominally 0.5 mm thick by 11.1 mm diameter, were tested in compressive fatigue, a configuration and loading which represents reasonably well the magnet environment. In that work G-10 was shown to withstand repeated loading to moderately high stress levels without failure, and the material survived better at liquid nitrogen temperature than at room temperature

  2. 47 CFR 73.713 - Program tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... International Broadcast Stations § 73.713 Program tests. (a) Upon completion of construction of an international.... The Commission reserves the right to change the date of the beginning of such tests or to suspend or revoke the authority for program tests as and when such action may appear to be in the public interest...

  3. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilat Amos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available New techniques for dynamic characterization of materials that have been developed in the last three years (since the last DYMAT conference in 2012, and results from recent dynamic testing of Inconel 718 are presented. The first development is a dynamic punch test in which three dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to measure the deformation of the rear surface of a specimen as it being penetrated. The second experimental technique that is under development is a dynamic tension experiment in which full-field strain measurement with DIC and full-field temperature measurement are done simultaneously during the test.

  4. European Fusion Materials Research Program - Recent Results and Future Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diegele, E.; Andreani, R.; Laesser, R.; Schaaf, B. van der

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviews the objectives and the status of the current EU long-term materials program. It highlights recent results, discusses some of the key issues and major existing problems to be resolved and presents an outlook on the R and D planned for the next few years. The main objectives of the Materials Development program are the development and qualification of reduced activation structural materials for the Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) in ITER and of low activation structural materials resistant to high fluence neutron irradiation for in-vessel components such as breeding blanket, divertor and first wall in DEMO. The EU strategy assumes: (i) ITER operation starting in 2015 with DEMO relevant Test Blanket Modules to be installed from day one of operation, (ii) IFMIF operation in 2017 and (iii) DEMO final design activities in 2022 to 2025. The EU candidate structural material EUROFER for TBMs has to be fully code qualified for licensing well before 2015. In parallel, research on materials for operation at higher temperatures is conducted following a logical sequence, by supplementing EUROFER with the oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels and, thereafter, with fibre-reinforced Silicon Carbide (SiC f /SiC). Complementary, tungsten alloys are developed as structural material for high temperature applications such as gas-cooled divertors

  5. Salt repository sealing materials development program: 5-year work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.B.

    1986-06-01

    This plan covers 5 years (fiscal years 1986 through 1990) of work in the repository sealing materials program to support design decisions and licensing activities for a salt repository. The plan covers a development activity, not a research activity. There are firm deliverables as the end points of each part of the work. The major deliverables are: development plans for code development and materials testing; seal system components models; seal system performance specifications; seal materials specifications; and seal materials properties ''handbook.'' The work described in this plan is divided into three general tasks as follows: mathematical modeling; materials studies (salt, cementitious materials, and earthen materials); and large-scale testing. Each of the sections presents an overview, status, planned activities, and summary of program milestones. This plan will be the starting point for preparing the development plans described above, but is subject to change if preparation of the work plan indicates that a different approach or sequence is preferable to achieve the ultimate goal, i.e., support of design and licensing

  6. The PUMA test program and data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.; Morrison, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    The PUMA test program is sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide data that are relevant to various Boiling Water Reactor phenomena. The author briefly describes the PUMA test program and facility, presents the objective of the program, provides data analysis for a large-break loss-of-coolant accident test, and compares the data with a RELAP5/MOD 3.1.2 calculation

  7. Ablative Material Testing at Lewis Rocket Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The increasing demand for a low-cost, reliable way to launch commercial payloads to low- Earth orbit has led to the need for inexpensive, expendable propulsion systems for new launch vehicles. This, in turn, has renewed interest in less complex, uncooled rocket engines that have combustion chambers and exhaust nozzles fabricated from ablative materials. A number of aerospace propulsion system manufacturers have utilized NASA Lewis Research Center's test facilities with a high degree of success to evaluate candidate materials for application to new propulsion devices.

  8. FMIT - the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A joint effort by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has produced a preliminary design for a Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) that uses a high-power linear accelerator to fire a deuteron beam into a high-speed jet of molten lithium. The result is a continuous energy spectrum of neutrons with a 14-MeV average energy which can irradiate material samples to projected end-of-life levels in about 3 years, with a total accumulated fluence of 10 21 to 10 22 n/cm 2

  9. Accelerated bridge paint test program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    The accelerated bridge paint (AB-Paint) program evaluated a new Sherwin-Williams two-coat, : fast-curing paint system. The system is comprised of an organic zinc-rich primer (SW Corothane I : Galvapac One-Pack Zinc-Rich Primer B65 G11) and a polyurea...

  10. Materials surveillance program for C-E NSSS reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koziol, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation surveillance programs for light water NSSS reactor vessels provide the means by which the utility can assess the extent of neutron-induced changes in the reactor vessel materials. These programs are conducted to verify, by direct measurement, the conservatism in the predicted radiation-induced changes and hence the operational parameters (i.e., heat-up, cooldown, and pressurization rates). In addition, such programs provide assurance that the scheduled adjustments in the operational parameters are made with ample margin for safe operation of the plant. During the past 3 years, several documents have been promulgated establishing the criteria for determining both the initial properties of the reactor vessel materials as well as measurement of changes in these initial properties as a result of irradiation. These documents, ASTM E-185-73, ''Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels,'' and Appendix H to 10 CFR 50, ''Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements,'' are complementary to each other. They are the result of a change in the basic philosophy regarding the design and analysis of reactor vessels. In effect, the empirical ''transition temperature approach,'' which was used for design, was replaced by the ''analytical fracture mechanics approach.'' The implementation of this technique was described in Welding Research Council Bulletin 1975 and Appendix G to ASME Code Section III. Further definition of requirements appears in Appendix G to 10 CFR 50 published in July 1973. It is the intent of this paper to describe (1) a typical materials surveillance program for the reactor vessel of a Combustion Engineering NSSS, and (2) how the results of such programs, as well as experimental programs provide feed-back for improvement of materials to enhance their radiation resistance and thereby further improve the safety and reliability of future plants. (author)

  11. Overview of NASA's Microgravity Materials Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, James Patton

    2012-01-01

    The microgravity materials program was nearly eliminated in the middle of the aughts due to budget constraints. Hardware developments were eliminated. Some investigators with experiments that could be performed using ISS partner hardware received continued funding. Partnerships were established between US investigators and ESA science teams for several investigations. ESA conducted peer reviews on the proposals of various science teams as part of an ESA AO process. Assuming he or she was part of a science team that was selected by the ESA process, a US investigator would submit a proposal to NASA for grant funding to support their part of the science team effort. In a similar manner, a US materials investigator (Dr. Rohit Trivedi) is working as a part of a CNES selected science team. As funding began to increase another seven materials investigators were selected in 2010 through an NRA mechanism to perform research related to development of Materials Science Research Rack investigations. One of these has since been converted to a Glovebox investigation.

  12. Ultrasonic testing of materials at level 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    Ultrasonic inspection is a nondestructive method in which high frequency sound waves are introduced into the material being inspected. Ultrasonic testing has a superior penetrating power to radiography and can detect flaws deep in the test specimen (say up to about 6 to 7 meters of steel). It is quite sensitive to small flaws and allows the precise determination of the location and size of the flaws. Basic ultrasonic test methods such as the through transmission method and the resonance method, sensors and testing techniques are described. Pulse echo type flaw detectors and their applications for inspection of welds are surveyed. Ultrasonic standards, calibration of the equipment and evaluation methods are presented. Examples of practical applications in welding, casting and forging processes are given. Figs and tabs

  13. Test System for Thermoelectric Modules and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Švejda, V.; Horna, P.; Sikora, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a design for a complex measuring device that enables its user to assess the parameters of power-generating thermoelectric modules (TEMs) (or bulk thermoelectric materials) under a wide range of temperatures ( T cold = 25°C to 90°C, T hot TEM, the actual heat flow through the module, and its mechanical load, which can be varied during the measurement. Key components of our testing setup are (i) a measuring chamber where the TEM/material is compressed between thermally shielded heating blocks equipped with a mechanical loading system and water-cooled copper-based cooler, (ii) an electrical load system, (iii) a type K thermocouple array connected to a data acquisition computer, and (iv) a thermostatic water-based cooling system with electronically controlled flow rate and temperature of cooling water. Our testing setup represents a useful tool able to assess, e.g., the thermoelectric parameters of newly developed TEMs and materials or to evaluate the thermoelectric parameters of commercially available modules and materials for comparison with values declared by the manufacturer.

  14. Oil spill sorbents: Testing protocol and certification listing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, D.; Gausemel, I.

    1993-01-01

    Environment Canada's Emergencies Engineering Division is spearheading a program in conjunction with the Canadian General Standards Board that would see the development of a certification and listing program in addition to a national standard for the testing of sorbent materials. Funding for this program is provided by Environment Canada (EC), Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC), US Coast Guard (USCG), and US Minerals Management Service (MMS). The test methods are based upon those defined by the American Society for Testing and Materials and previous test methods developed by Environment Canada for our series of reports entitled Selection Criteria and Laboratory Evaluation of Oil Spill Sorbents. This series, which was started in 1975, encompasses a number of commercially available oil spill sorbents tested with different petroleum products and hydrocarbon solvents. The testing program will categorize the sorbents according to their operating characteristics. The main categories are oil spills on water, oil spills on land, and industrial use. The characteristics to be evaluated with the new test protocols include initial and maximum sorption capacities, water pickup, buoyancy, reuse potential, retention profile, disintegration (material integrity), and ease of application and retrieval. In the near future are plans to incorporate changes to the test that would involve increasing the list of test liquids to encompass spills in an industrial setting, in addition to testing sorbent booms and addressing the disposal problem

  15. Apparatus Tests Peeling Of Bonded Rubbery Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Russell A.; Graham, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Instrumented hydraulic constrained blister-peel apparatus obtains data on degree of bonding between specimen of rubbery material and rigid plate. Growth of blister tracked by video camera, digital clock, pressure transducer, and piston-displacement sensor. Cylinder pressure controlled by hydraulic actuator system. Linear variable-differential transformer (LVDT) and float provide second, independent measure of change in blister volume used as more precise volume feedback in low-growth-rate test.

  16. New JMTR irradiation test plan on fuels and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Sasajima, Hideo; Ogiyanagi, Jin; Nakamura, Jinichi; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In order to maintain and enhance safety of light water reactors (LWRs) in long-term and up-graded operations, proper understanding of irradiation behavior of fuels and materials is essentially important. Japanese government and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have decided to refurbish the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and to install new tests rigs, in order to play an active role for solving irradiation related issues on plant aging and high-duty uses of the current LWRs and on development of next-generation reactors. New tests on fuel integrity under simulated abnormal transients and high-duty irradiation conditions are planned in the JMTR. Power ramp tests of newdesign fuel rods will also be performed in the first stage of the program, which is expected to start in year 2011 after refurbishment of the JMTR. Combination of the JMTR tests with simulated reactivity initiated accident tests in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and loss of coolant accident tests in hot laboratories would serve as the integrated fuel safety research on the high performance fuels at extended burnups, covering from the normal to the accident conditions, including abnormal transients. For the materials irradiation, fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels and stress corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steels are being studied in addition to basic irradiation behavior of nuclear materials such as hafnium. The irradiation studies would contribute not only to solve the current problems but also to identify possible seeds of troubles and to make proactive responses. (author)

  17. Standard test methods for bend testing of material for ductility

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover bend testing for ductility of materials. Included in the procedures are four conditions of constraint on the bent portion of the specimen; a guided-bend test using a mandrel or plunger of defined dimensions to force the mid-length of the specimen between two supports separated by a defined space; a semi-guided bend test in which the specimen is bent, while in contact with a mandrel, through a specified angle or to a specified inside radius (r) of curvature, measured while under the bending force; a free-bend test in which the ends of the specimen are brought toward each other, but in which no transverse force is applied to the bend itself and there is no contact of the concave inside surface of the bend with other material; a bend and flatten test, in which a transverse force is applied to the bend such that the legs make contact with each other over the length of the specimen. 1.2 After bending, the convex surface of the bend is examined for evidence of a crack or surface irregu...

  18. The Yucca Mountain Project Prototype Testing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is conducting a Prototype Testing Program to ensure that the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) tests can be completed in the time available and to develop instruments, equipment, and procedures so the ESF tests can collect reliable and representative site characterization data. This report summarizes the prototype tests and their status and location and emphasizes prototype ESF and surface tests, which are required in the early stages of the ESF site characterization tests. 14 figs

  19. Numerical regulation of a test facility of materials for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zauq, M.H.

    1982-02-01

    The installation aims at testing materials used in nuclear power plants; tests consists in simulations of a design basis accident (failure of a primary circuit of a PWR type reactor) for a qualification of these materials. A description of the test installation, of the thermodynamic control, and of the control system is presented. The organisation of the software is then given: description of the sequence chaining monitor, operation, list and function of the programs. The analog information processing is also presented (data transmission). A real-time microcomputer and clock are used for this work. The microprocessor is the 6800 of MOTOROLA. The microcomputer used has been built around the MC 6800; its structure is described. The data acquisition include an analog data acquisition system and a numerical data acquisition system. Laboratory and on-site tests are finally presented [fr

  20. Ultrasonic tests on materials with protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    Protective coatings are applied to some nuclear components such as reactor vessels to inhibit surface corrosion. Since in-service ultrasonic inspection is required for such components, a study was performed to determine whether the use of protective coatings can affect ultrasonic tests. Two 2 in. thick steel plates were uniformly machined, sandblasted, and used as bases for two types of protective coatings. The type and thickness of the coating and the presence of contamination, such as fingerprints or mild oxidation under the paint, were the independent variables associated with the coating. Tests were run to determine the effects of the protective coatings on ultrasonic tests conducted on the steel plates. Significant variations in ultrasonic test sensitivity occurred as a function of the type and thickness of protective coating, couplant (material that conducts the ultrasound from the transducer into the test part, normally water or some type of oil), transducer wear plate, and ultrasonic test frequency. Ultrasonic tests can be strongly affected by a protective coating on the component to be inspected. As compared to the test sensitivity for an uncoated reference sample, the sensitivity may be dramatically shifted up or down on the coated surface. In certain coating thickness ranges, the sensitivity can fluctuate widely with small changes in coating thickness. If a coating is chosen properly, however, components with protective coatings can be tested ultrasonically with valid results. These results are for the case of ultrasonic input on the coated surface. It is not expected that an ultrasonic test conducted from the front surface would be appreciably affected by a coating on the rear surface

  1. Materials balance area Custodian Performance Evaluation Program at PNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, D.A.

    1991-07-01

    The material balance area (MBA) custodian has primary responsibility for control and accountability of nuclear material within an MBA. In this role, the custodian operates as an extension of the facility material control and accountability (MC ampersand A) organization. To effectively meet administrative requirements and protection needs, the custodian must be fully trained in all aspects of MC ampersand A related to the MBA, and custodian performance must be periodically evaluated. DOE Policy requires that each facility provide for a program which assures that each facility provide for a program which assures that personnel performing MC ampersand A functions are (1) trained and/or qualified to perform their duties and responsibilities and (2) knowledgeable of requirements and procedures related to their functions. The MBA Custodian Performance Evaluation Program at PNL uses a variety of assessment techniques to meet this goal, including internal and independent MBA audits, periodic custodian testing, conduct of limited scope performance tests, daily monitoring of MC ampersand A documentation, and reviewing custodian performance during physical inventories. The data collected from these sources is analyzed and incorporated into an annual custodian performance evaluation document, given to each custodian and line management. Development of this program has resulted in significantly improved custodian performance and a marked decrease in finding and observations identified during MBA audits

  2. Testing programs for the Multimission Modular Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) provides a standard spacecraft bus to a user for a variety of space missions ranging from near-earth to synchronous orbits. The present paper describes the philosophy behind the MMS module test program and discusses the implementation of the test program. It is concluded that the MMS module test program provides an effective and comprehensive customer buy-off at the subsystem contractor's plant, is an optimum approach for checkout of the subsystems prior to use for on-orbit servicing in the Shuttle Cargo Bay, and is a cost-effective technique for environmental testing.

  3. Standard test method for dynamic tear testing of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1983-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the dynamic tear (DT) test using specimens that are 3/16 in. to 5/8 in. (5 mm to 16 mm) inclusive in thickness. 1.2 This test method is applicable to materials with a minimum thickness of 3/16 in. (5 mm). 1.3 The pressed-knife procedure described for sharpening the notch tip generally limits this test method to materials with a hardness level less than 36 HRC. Note 1—The designation 36 HRC is a Rockwell hardness number of 36 on Rockwell C scale as defined in Test Methods E 18. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Implementing and testing program PLOTTAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.; McLaughlin, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Enclosed is a description of the magnetic tape or floppy diskette containing the PLOTTAB code package. In addition detailed information is provided on implementation and testing of this code. See part I for mainframe computers; part II for personal computers. These codes are documented in IAEA-NDS-82. (author)

  5. Radioactive waste material testing capabilities in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive material including wastes, generated by Romanian nuclear facilities are packaged in accordance with national and IAEA's Regulation for a safe transport to the disposal center. The evaluation and certification of packages is accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal and simulated test conditions in order to prove the package to technical performances. The standards provide to package designers the possibility to use analysis, testing or a combination of these. The paper describes the experimental and simulating qualification tests for type A packages used for transport and storage of radioactive wastes (low level). Testing are used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural response. There are also presented testing capabilities which are used to perform and simulate the required qualification tests. By direct comparison of analysis and experimental results, the degree of reliability of analytical methods and admissibility of assumptions taken in package designing and in demonstrating its safety under conditions of INR - Pitesti, within the contract between the INR - Pitesti and IAEA - Vienna, were determined. (author)

  6. A smart predictor for material property testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wilson; Kanneg, Derek

    2008-01-01

    A reliable predictor is very useful for real-world industrial applications to forecast the future behavior of dynamic systems. A smart predictor, based on a novel recurrent neural fuzzy (RNF) scheme, is developed in this paper for multi-step-ahead prediction of material properties. A systematic investigation based on two benchmark data sets is conducted in terms of performance and efficiency. Analysis results reveal that, of the data-driven forecasting schemes, predictors based on step input patterns outperform those based on sequential input patterns; the RNF predictor outperforms those based on recurrent neural networks and ANFIS schemes in multi-step-ahead prediction of nonlinear time series. An adaptive Levenberg–Marquardt training technique is adopted to improve the robustness and convergence of the RNF predictor. Furthermore, the proposed smart predictor is implemented for material property testing. Investigation results show that the developed RNF predictor is a reliable forecasting tool for material property testing; it can capture and track the system's dynamic characteristics quickly and accurately. It is also a robust predictor to accommodate different system conditions

  7. Material characterization models and test methods for historic building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tessa Kvist; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Møller, Eva B.

    2017-01-01

    Predictions of long term hygrothermal performance can be assessed by dynamic hygrothermal simulations, in which material parameters are crucial input. Material parameters for especially historic materials are often unknown; therefore, there is a need to determine important parameters, and simple...

  8. Nondestructive Testing of Materials and Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Akkaya, Yılmaz

    2013-01-01

    Condition assessment and characterization of materials and structures by means of nondestructive testing (NDT) methods is a priority need around the world to meet the challenges associated with the durability, maintenance, rehabilitation, retrofitting, renewal and health monitoring of new and existing infrastructures including historic monuments. Numerous NDT methods that make use of certain components of the electromagnetic and acoustic spectra are currently in use to this effect with various levels of success and there is an intensive worldwide research effort aimed at improving the existing methods and developing new ones. The knowledge and information compiled in this book captures the current state-of-the-art in NDT methods and their application to civil and other engineering materials and structures. Critical reviews and advanced interdisciplinary discussions by world-renowned researchers point to the capabilities and limitations of the currently used NDT methods and shed light on current and future res...

  9. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  10. Material test of concrete for PCCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Katsuya; Kamiyama, Yukio; Iwasawa, Jiro.

    1987-01-01

    The concrete used for the prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for Tsuruga No.2 plant of Japan Atomic Power Co. has the design standard strength as high as 420 kg/cm 2 , but for the purpose of preventing the cracking due to hydration heat at the time of concrete hardening, the medium heat cement mixed with flyash was adopted. The example of using the cement of this kind for high strength concrete has been few, and the data on its various properties have been scarce. First, the various mixing proportion for the high strength concrete using the medium heat cement mixed with flyash was experimented, and the basic mixing proportion for satisfying the design standard strength 420 kg/cm 2 was determined. Next, about this basic mixing proportion, the tests on the crrep characteristics and the thermal characteristics required for the design of PCCVs were carried out. In this report, the results of these tests on the concrete are described. By combining the concrete materials available in Tsuruga district, the test on unsolidified concrete and hardened concrete was carried out. The experimental method and the results are reported. Uniaxial compression creep test was carried out on the concrete having the selected mixing proportion to evaluate the propriety of the design creep factor. In the test of the thermal characteristics, the heat conductivity, heat diffusivity, linear thermal expansion and specific heat were measured. (Kako, I.)

  11. MHD diffuser model test program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idzorek, J J

    1976-07-01

    Experimental results of the aerodynamic performance of seven candidate diffusers are presented to assist in determining their suitability for joining an MHD channel to a steam generator at minimum spacing. The three dimensional diffusers varied in area ratio from 2 to 3.8 and wall half angle from 2 to 5 degrees. The program consisted of five phases: (1) tailoring a diffuser inlet nozzle to a 15 percent blockage; (2) comparison of isolated diffusers at enthalpy ratios 0.5 to 1.0 with respect to separation characteristics and pressure recovery coefficients; (3) recording the optimum diffuser exit flow distribution; (4) recording the internal flow distribution within the steam generator when attached to the diffuser; and (5) observing isolated diffuser exhaust dynamic characteristics. The 2 and 2-1/3 degree half angle rectangular diffusers showed recovery coefficients equal to 0.48 with no evidence of flow separation or instability. Diffusion at angles greater than these produced flow instabilities and with angles greater than 3 degrees random flow separation and reattachment.

  12. MHD diffuser model test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idzorek, J.J.

    1976-07-01

    Experimental results of the aerodynamic performance of seven candidate diffusers are presented to assist in determining their suitability for joining an MHD channel to a steam generator at minimum spacing. The three dimensional diffusers varied in area ratio from 2 to 3.8 and wall half angle from 2 to 5 degrees. The program consisted of five phases: (1) tailoring a diffuser inlet nozzle to a 15 percent blockage; (2) comparison of isolated diffusers at enthalpy ratios 0.5 to 1.0 with respect to separation characteristics and pressure recovery coefficients; (3) recording the optimum diffuser exit flow distribution; (4) recording the internal flow distribution within the steam generator when attached to the diffuser; and (5) observing isolated diffuser exhaust dynamic characteristics. The 2 and 2-1/3 degree half angle rectangular diffusers showed recovery coefficients equal to 0.48 with no evidence of flow separation or instability. Diffusion at angles greater than these produced flow instabilities and with angles greater than 3 degrees random flow separation and reattachment

  13. Tests on 'radio-active' material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The storage of radio-active waste from nuclear power stations is a well known problem and a subject for extensive investigation. In connection with the use of cement as storage material, tests were carried out on cement-filled 200-litre sheet-steel containers. In order to avoid contamination of the cement core by drilling sludge, any drilling operation must be carried out dry, i.e. without liquid cooling. Air-blast cooling was therefore used for the cooling of a diamond drill and also for the removal of swarf. (H.E.G.)

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R and D) Program is responsible for performing R and D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R and D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  16. In-situ thermal testing program strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    In the past year the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has implemented a new Program Approach to the licensing process. The Program Approach suggests a step-wise approach to licensing in which the early phases will require less site information than previously planned and necessitate a lesser degree of confidence in the longer-term performance of the repository. Under the Program Approach, the thermal test program is divided into two principal phases: (1) short-term in situ tests (in the 1996 to 2000 time period) and laboratory thermal tests to obtain preclosure information, parameters, and data along with bounding information for postclosure performance; and (2) longer-term in situ tests to obtain additional data regarding postclosure performance. This effort necessitates a rethinking of the testing program because the amount of information needed for the initial licensing phase is less than previously planned. This document proposes a revised and consolidated in situ thermal test program (including supporting laboratory tests) that is structured to meet the needs of the Program Approach. A customer-supplier model is used to define the Project data needs. These data needs, along with other requirements, were then used to define a set of conceptual experiments that will provide the required data within the constraints of the Program Approach schedule. The conceptual thermal tests presented in this document represent a consolidation and update of previously defined tests that should result in a more efficient use of Project resources. This document focuses on defining the requirements and tests needed to satisfy the goal of a successful license application in 2001, should the site be found suitable

  17. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  18. Material testing of reconditioned orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, S; Rewari, A; Keilig, L; Widu, F; Jäger, A; Bourauel, C

    2012-12-01

    While all manufacturers of orthodontic brackets label these products for single use, there are commercial providers offering bracket reconditioning (or "recycling"). We conducted this study to investigate the effects of different recycling techniques on material-related parameters in orthodontic brackets, aiming to derive indications for clinical use and conclusions about the biocompatibility, longevity, and application of recycled brackets. New metal brackets (equilibrium(®); Dentaurum, Ispringen, Germany) were compared to brackets recycled by different techniques, including direct flaming with a Bunsen burner, chemical reconditioning in an acid bath, a commercial unit (Big Jane; Esmadent, IL, USA), and outsourcing to a company (Ortho Clean, Dellstedt, Germany). Material-related examinations included the following: (1) corrosion behavior by static immersion testing and use of a mass spectrometer to determine nickel-ion concentrations in the corrosive medium, (2) surface features in scanning electron micrographs before and after corrosion testing, (3) Vickers hardness using a hardness testing machine, (4) shear bond strength as defined in DIN 13990-1, (5) dimensional stability of the bracket slots by light microscopy, and (6) frictional loss as assessed by an orthodontic measurement and simulation system (OMSS). Each examination was performed on ten brackets. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Compared to the new brackets, those recycled in an acid bath or by a commercial provider revealed significant dimensional changes (pbrackets varied according to the recycling techniques employed. The group of brackets recycled by one company revealed hardness values that differed from those of all the other groups. No significant differences were observed in nickel-ion release, frictional loss, and shear bond strength. Recycling was found to significantly reduce the corrosion resistance and dimensional stability of orthodontic brackets. As the savings

  19. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  20. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y H; Cho, M S [and others

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  1. Liquid Lead-Bismuth Materials Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcharnotskaia, Valentina; Ammerman, Curtt; Darling, Timothy; King, Joe; Li, Ning; Shaw, Don; Snodgrass, Leon; Woloshun, Keith

    2002-01-01

    We designed and built the Liquid Lead-Bismuth Materials Test Loop (MTL) to study the materials behavior in a flow of molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this paper we present a description of the loop with main components and their functions. Stress distribution in the piping due to sustained, occasional and expansion loads is shown. The loop is designed so that a difference of 100 deg. C can be attained between the coldest and the hottest parts at a nominal flow rate of 8.84 GPM. Liquid LBE flow can be activated by a mechanical sump pump or by natural convection. In order to maintain a self-healing protective film on the surface of the stainless steel pipe, a certain concentration of oxygen has to be maintained in the liquid metal. We developed oxygen sensors and an oxygen control system to be implemented in the loop. The loop is outfitted with a variety of instruments that are controlled from a computer based data acquisition system. Initial experiments include preconditioning the loop, filling it up with LBE, running at uniform temperature and tuning the oxygen control system. We will present some preliminary results and discuss plans for the future tests. (authors)

  2. Safeguards system testing WSRC Insider Exercise Program (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robichaux, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    One of the major concerns related to the control and accountability of nuclear material located at DOE facilities is the theft or diversion of material by an insider. Many complex safeguards and security systems have been installed to provide timely detection and prevention of the removal of nuclear materials. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company's (WSRC) Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) section has implemented an insider exercise program designed to evaluate the effectiveness of these safeguards systems. Exercises consist of limited scope performance test. This paper describes the structure and controls for the insider exercise program at the Savannah River Site, the lessons learned over the past several years, and methods being utilized to improve the program

  3. The NRU blowdown test facility commissioning program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsworth, J A; Zanatta, R J; Yamazaki, A R; Semeniuk, D D; Wong, W; Dickson, L W; Ferris, C E; Burton, D H [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1990-12-31

    A major experimental program has been established at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRL) that will provide essential data on the thermal and mechanical behaviour of nuclear fuel under abnormal reactor operating conditions and on the transient release, transport and deposition of fission product activity from severely degraded fuel. A number of severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments will be conducted within the Blowdown Test Facility (BTF) at CRL. A series of experiments are being conducted to commission this new facility prior to the SFD program. This paper describes the features and the commissioning program for the BTF. A development and testing program is described for critical components used on the reactor test section. In-reactor commissioning with a fuel assembly simulator commenced in 1989 June and preliminary results are given. The paper also outlines plans for future all-effects, in-reactor tests of CANDU-designed fuel. (author). 11 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  4. U.S. fast reactor materials and structures program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, W.O.; Purdy, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. DOE has sponsored a vigorous breeder reactor materials and structures program for 15 years. Important contributions have resulted from this effort in the areas of design (inelastic rules, verified methods, seismic criteria, mechanical properties data); resolution of licensing issues (technical witnessing, confirmatory testing); construction (fabrication/welding procedures, nondestructive testing techniques); and operation (sodium purification, instrumentation and chemical analysis, radioactivity control, and in-service inspection. The national LMFBR program currently is being restructured. The Materials and Structures Program will focus its efforts in the following areas: (1) removal of anticipated licensing impediments through confirmation of the adequacy of structural design methods and criteria for components containing welds and geometric discontinuities, the generation of mechanical properties for stainless steel castings and weldments, and the evaluation of irradiation effects; (2) qualification of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel and tribological coatings for design flexibility; (3) development of improved inelastic design guidelines and procedures; (4) reform of design codes and standards and engineering practices, leading to simpler, less conservative rules and to simplified design analysis methods; and (5) incorporation of information from foreign program

  5. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications

  6. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

  7. Programmed Death-Ligand 1 Immunohistochemistry Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büttner, Reinhard; Gosney, John R; Skov, Birgit Guldhammer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Three programmed death-1/programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors are currently approved for treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Treatment with pembrolizumab in NSCLC requires PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing. Nivolumab and atezolizumab are approved without PD-L1...

  8. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Niimi, Motoji; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  9. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Niimi, Motoji; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  10. EBR-2 [Experimental Breeder Reactor-2] test programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Lehto, W.K.; Lindsay, R.W.; Planchon, H.P.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Hill, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) is a sodium cooled power reactor supplying about 20 MWe to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) grid and, in addition, is the key component in the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). EBR-2's testing capability is extensive and has seen four major phases: (1) demonstration of LMFBR power plant feasibility, (2) irradiation testing for fuel and material development, (3) testing the off-normal performance of fuel and plant systems and (4) operation as the IFR prototype, developing and demonstrating the IFR technology associated with fuel and plant design. Specific programs being carried out in support of the IFR include advanced fuels and materials development, advanced control system development, plant diagnostics development and component testing. This paper discusses EBR-2 as the IFR prototype and the associated testing programs. 29 refs

  11. Program Helps Design Tests Of Developmental Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hops, Jonathan

    1994-01-01

    Computer program called "A Formal Test Representation Language and Tool for Functional Test Designs" (TRL) provides automatic software tool and formal language used to implement category-partition method and produce specification of test cases in testing phase of development of software. Category-partition method useful in defining input, outputs, and purpose of test-design phase of development and combines benefits of choosing normal cases having error-exposing properties. Traceability maintained quite easily by creating test design for each objective in test plan. Effort to transform test cases into procedures simplified by use of automatic software tool to create cases based on test design. Method enables rapid elimination of undesired test cases from consideration and facilitates review of test designs by peer groups. Written in C language.

  12. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - SSST Testing Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Whinnery, LeRoy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Phillips, Jason J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), Huntsville, AL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-03-25

    The Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program is conducting a proficiency study for Small- Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are the methods used for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis during the IDCA program. These methods changed throughout the Proficiency Test and the reasons for these changes are documented in this report. The most significant modifications in standard testing methods are: 1) including one specified sandpaper in impact testing among all the participants, 2) diversifying liquid test methods for selected participants, and 3) including sealed sample holders for thermal testing by at least one participant. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), is putting the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The study is adding SSST testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature. Ultimately the study will suggest new guidelines and methods and possibly establish the SSST testing accuracies needed to develop safe handling practices for HMEs. Each participating testing laboratory uses identical test materials and preparation methods wherever possible. The testing performers involved are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, (NSWC IHD), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RXQL). These tests are conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some consistency in test protocols, procedures, and experiments and to compare results when these testing variables cannot be made consistent.

  13. 7 CFR 3406.12 - Program application materials-teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program application materials-teaching. 3406.12... GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of a Teaching Proposal § 3406.12 Program application materials—teaching... program, and the forms needed to prepare and submit teaching grant applications under the program. ...

  14. Decontamination tests on tritium-contaminated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutot, P.; Schipfer, P.

    1967-01-01

    These tests are designed to try out various processes liable to be applied to the decontamination of a material contaminated with tritium. The samples are thin stainless- steel slabs contaminated in the laboratory with elements extracted from industrial installations. The measurement of the initial and residual activities is carried out using an open-window BERTHOLD counter. The best results are obtained by passing a current of pre-heated (300 deg. C) air containing water vapour. This process makes it possible to reach a decontamination factor of 99.5 per cent in 4 hours. In a vacuum, the operation has to be prolonged to 100 hours in order to obtain a decontamination factor of 99.2 per cent. Wet-chemical or electrolytic treatments are efficient but their use is limited by the inherent corrosion risks. A study of the reappearance of the contamination has made it possible to observe that this phenomenon occurs whatever the process used. (authors) [fr

  15. The advanced test reactor strategic evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    Since the Chernobly accident, the safety of test reactors and irradiation facilities has been critically evaluated from the public's point of view. A systematic evaluation of all safety, environmental, and operational issues must be made in an integrated manner to prioritize actions to maximize benefits while minimizing costs. Such a proactive program has been initiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This program, called the Strategic Evaluation Program (STEP), is being conducted for the ATR to provide integrated safety and operational reviews of the reactor against the standards applied to licensed commercial power reactors. This has taken into consideration the lessons learned by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) and the follow-on effort known as the Integrated Safety Assessment Program (ISAP). The SEP was initiated by the NRC to review the designs of older operating nuclear power plants to confirm and document their safety. The ATR STEP objectives are discussed

  16. In-plant test using process monitoring data for nuclear material accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.W.; Fager, J.E.

    1982-11-01

    A test of daily material accounting is being conducted for the NRC as part of a continuing program to estimate the effectiveness of using process monitoring data to enhance strategic special nuclear material accounting in fuel facilities. The test is being conducted at a uranium scrap recovery facility. The purpose is to develop and test procedures for resolving anomalies in material loss indicators. This report describes the results of the first test campaign, in which the emphasis was to characterize the daily material accounting system, test generic resolution procedures, and identify specific conditions that result in anomalies in material loss indicators

  17. The plane strain tests in the PROMETRA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazalis, B.; Desquines, J.; Carassou, S.; Le Jolu, T.; Bernaudat, C.

    2016-01-01

    A fuel cladding mechanical test, performed under conditions of plane strain deformation in the transverse direction of tube axis, was originally developed at Pennsylvania State University. It was decided to implement this original test within the PROMETRA program using the same experimental procedure and its optimization for a ring mechanical testing on plane strain conditions (PST tests) in hot cells laboratory. This paper presents a detailed description and an interpretation of the Plane Strain Tensile (PST) tests performed in the framework of the PROMETRA program on fresh and irradiated claddings. At first, the context of the PST tests is situated and the specificities of these tests implemented at CEA are justified. Indeed, a significant adjustment of the original experimental procedure is carried out in order to test the irradiated fuel cladding in the best possible conditions. Then, the tests results on fresh Zircaloy-4 and on irradiated Zircaloy-4, M5™ and ZIRLO ® specimens are gathered. The main analyses in support of these tests, such as metallographies, fractographic examinations and finite element simulations are detailed. Finally, a synthesis of the interpretation of the tests is proposed. The PST test seems only representative of plane strain fracture conditions when the test material is very ductile (fresh or high temperature or low hydride material like M5TM). However, it provides a relevant representation of the RIA rupture initiation which is observed in irradiated cladding resulting from hydride rim damage due to the strong irradiation of a fuel rod. - Highlights: • A plane strain mechanical test performed on fuel rod claddings is described. • The tests are performed in the framework of the French PROMETRA program. • Fresh Zircaloy-4 and irradiated Zircaloy-4, M5 and ZIRLO specimens are tested. • The main analyses in support of these tests are detailed. • A synthesis of the interpretation of the PST tests is proposed.

  18. The plane strain tests in the PROMETRA program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazalis, B., E-mail: bernard.cazalis@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN/PSN-RES, F-13115 Saint-Paul Lez Durance BP3 (France); Desquines, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN/PSN-RES, F-13115 Saint-Paul Lez Durance BP3 (France); Carassou, S.; Le Jolu, T. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/DMN, F- 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bernaudat, C. [Electricité de France, EDF/SEPTEN, F-69628 Villeurbanne (France)

    2016-04-15

    A fuel cladding mechanical test, performed under conditions of plane strain deformation in the transverse direction of tube axis, was originally developed at Pennsylvania State University. It was decided to implement this original test within the PROMETRA program using the same experimental procedure and its optimization for a ring mechanical testing on plane strain conditions (PST tests) in hot cells laboratory. This paper presents a detailed description and an interpretation of the Plane Strain Tensile (PST) tests performed in the framework of the PROMETRA program on fresh and irradiated claddings. At first, the context of the PST tests is situated and the specificities of these tests implemented at CEA are justified. Indeed, a significant adjustment of the original experimental procedure is carried out in order to test the irradiated fuel cladding in the best possible conditions. Then, the tests results on fresh Zircaloy-4 and on irradiated Zircaloy-4, M5™ and ZIRLO{sup ®} specimens are gathered. The main analyses in support of these tests, such as metallographies, fractographic examinations and finite element simulations are detailed. Finally, a synthesis of the interpretation of the tests is proposed. The PST test seems only representative of plane strain fracture conditions when the test material is very ductile (fresh or high temperature or low hydride material like M5TM). However, it provides a relevant representation of the RIA rupture initiation which is observed in irradiated cladding resulting from hydride rim damage due to the strong irradiation of a fuel rod. - Highlights: • A plane strain mechanical test performed on fuel rod claddings is described. • The tests are performed in the framework of the French PROMETRA program. • Fresh Zircaloy-4 and irradiated Zircaloy-4, M5 and ZIRLO specimens are tested. • The main analyses in support of these tests are detailed. • A synthesis of the interpretation of the PST tests is proposed.

  19. Two micro fatigue test methods for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunomura, Shigetomo; Noguchi, Shinji; Okamura, Yuichi; Kumai, Shinji

    1993-01-01

    This paper demonstrates two miniature fatigue test methods in response to the requirements of the fusion reactor wall materials development program. It is known that the fatigue strength evaluated by the axial loading test is independent of the specimen size, while that evaluated by the bend test or torsion test is dependent upon the size of specimen. The new type of gripping system for the axial, tension-tension, fatigue testing of TEM disk-size specimens that has been developed is described in this paper. An alignment tool assists in gripping the miniature specimen. The miniature tension-tension fatigue test method seems to provide reliable S-N curves for SUS304 and SUS316L stainless steels. An indentation method has also been developed to determine fatigue properties. A hard steel ball or ceramic ball was used for cyclically loading the specimen, and an S-N curve was subsequently obtained. The merit of this method is primarily simple handling. S-N curves obtained from four materials by this indentation method compared well with those obtained from the rotary bend fatigue test employing a standard-size specimen

  20. IFE chamber technology testing program in NIF and chamber development test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Issues concerning chamber technology testing program in NIF involving: criteria for evaluation/prioritization of experiments, engineering scaling requirements for test article design and material selection and R and D plan prior to NIF testing were addressed in this paper. In order to maximize the benefits of testing program in NIF, the testing in NIF should provide the experimental data relevant to DEMO design choice or to DEMO design predictive capability by utilizing engineering scaling test article designs. Test plans were developed for 2 promising chamber design concepts. Early testing in non-fusion/non-ignition prior to testing in ignition facility serves a critical role in chamber R and D test plans in order to reduce the risks and costs of the more complex experiments in NIF

  1. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  2. The UKAEA mechanical test programs in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    1977-01-01

    The design of CDFR will be based on the mechanical behaviour of materials in air, although at a later date account may need to be taken of sodium effects. The need for this Information is outlined in the introductory paper. The extent of the air programs and preliminary findings are described in this paper

  3. The UKAEA mechanical test programs in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, D S [UKAEA, RNPDL, Risley (United Kingdom)

    1977-07-01

    The design of CDFR will be based on the mechanical behaviour of materials in air, although at a later date account may need to be taken of sodium effects. The need for this Information is outlined in the introductory paper. The extent of the air programs and preliminary findings are described in this paper.

  4. Periodical test program in depth revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feltin, C.; Zermizoglou, R.

    1987-11-01

    Inspection visits made to different sites during 1980 and 1981 evidenced the need to extend and define more precisely the periodical tests performed on safety related systems; thus Electricite de France was requested by the Safety Authorities to re-examine the periodical test program for all safety related systems. This paper presents the methodology adopted by Electricite de France in order to perform an exhaustive analysis of the periodical test program for the 900 and 1300 MWe plants, and the organization set up at the IPSN at one hand and Electricite de France on the other hand for the purpose of elaborating a periodical test program which would be ratified by the Safety Authorities

  5. Testing of SRS and RFETS Nylon Bag Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    This report compares the effects of radiation and heating on nylon bagout materials used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Recently, to simplify the processing of sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C), FB-Line has replaced the low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags normally used to package cans of plutonium-bearing material with nylon bags. LDPE and PVC are not soluble in the nitric acid dissolver solution used in F-Canyon, so cans bagged using these materials had to be repackaged before they were added to the dissolver. Because nylon dissolves in nitric acid, cans bagged in nylon can be charged to the F-Canyon dissolvers without repackaging, thereby reducing handling requirements and personnel exposure. As part of a program to process RFETS SS and C at SRS, RFETS has also begun to use a nylon bagout material. The RFETS bag materials is made from a copolymer of nylon 6 and nylon 6.9, while the SRS material is made from a nylon 6 monomer. In addition, the SRS nylon has an anti-static agent added. The RFETS nylon is slightly softer than the SRS nylon, but does not appear to be as resistant to flex cracks initiated by contact with sharp corners of the inner can containing the SS and C.2 FB-Line Operations has asked for measurement of the effects of radiation and heating on these materials. Specifically, they have requested a comparison of the material properties of the plastics before and after irradiation, a measurement of the amount of outgassing when the plastics are heated, and a calculation of the amount of radiolytic gas generation. Testing was performed on samples taken from material that is currently used in FB-Line (color coded orange) and at RFETS. The requested tests are the same tests previously performed on the original and replacement nylon and LDPE bag materials.3,4,5. To evaluate the effect of irradiation on material properties, tensile stresses and elongations to break

  6. U.S. Advanced Materials Development Program for steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patriarca, P.; Harkness, S.D.; Duke, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The selection of construction materials for LMFBR steam generators is reviewed, presenting the advantages and limitations of 2 1 / 2 Cr-1 Mo steel selected for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. These limitations indicate that further development of high-strength ferritic steels containing 9 to 12 percent Cr and the high-nickel Alloy 800 could lead to superior materials, and programs to develop these materials have been started. Combustion Engineering has surveyed the experience with the high-strength ferritic steels and prepared ingots of 26 selected compositions. Charpy V-notch tests and metallography have been used to characterize these alloys, and optimum welding rod compositions for these alloys are under development. Westinghouse-Tampa is undertaking a program to gain code acceptance of Alloy 800. A program has been set up to provide the information required for design, justification, and fabrication of reliable components. Progress has been made on characterization, the role of tertiary creep in failure, and the development of welding processes. (U.S.)

  7. Recommended well drilling and testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.; Wilson, C.

    1978-07-01

    A well drilling and testing program is recommended by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to identify the hydrology of deep basalts in the Pasco Basin. The ultimate objective of this program is to assist in determining the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository on the Hanford Reservation. The recommended program has been staged for maximum effectiveness. In the first stage, six wells have been identified for drilling and testing which, when coupled with existing wells, will provide sufficient data for a preliminary overview of basin hydrology and a preliminary determination of the hydrologic suitability of the deep basalt for a repository site. The rate at which the first stage wells are drilled and tested will depend upon the date at which a preliminary determination of site suitability is required. It was assumed that a preliminary determination of suitability would be required in 1980, in which case all six first stage wells would be drilled in FY 1979. If the results of the first stage analysis are favorable for repository siting, tentative repository sites can be identified and a second stage hydrology program can be implemented to provide the necessary details of the flow system. To accomplish this stage, a number of deep wells would be required at locations both inside and outside the basin, with specific sites to be identified as the work progresses to obtain maximum utility of existing data. A program is recommended for testing in each new well and for completion of testing in each existing well. Recommended tests include borehole geophysics, pressure and permeability testing, geochemical sampling, tracer testing, hydrofracturing and borehole fracture logging. The entire data collection program is oriented toward providing the information required to establish and verify an accurate numerical model of the Pasco Basin

  8. Performance testing of elastomeric seal materials under low and high temperature conditions: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRONOWSKI,DAVID R.

    2000-06-01

    The US Department of Energy Offices of Defense Programs and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management jointly sponsored a program to evaluate elastomeric O-ring seal materials for radioactive material shipping containers. The report presents the results of low- and high-temperature tests conducted on 27 common elastomeric compounds.

  9. Material balance area custodian performance evaluation program at PNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the material balance area (MBA) custodian has primary responsibility for control and accountability of nuclear material within an MBA. In this role, the custodian operates as an extension of the facility material control and accountability (MC and A) organization. To effectively meet administrative requirements and protection needs, the custodian must be fully trained in all aspects of MC and A related to the MBA, and custodian performance must be periodically evaluated. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Policy requires that each facility provide for a program which ensures that personnel performing MC and A functions are trained and/or qualified to perform their duties and responsibilities and knowledgeable of requirements and procedures related to their functions. the MBA Custodian Performance Evaluation Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) uses a variety of assessment techniques to meet this goal, including internal and independent MBA audits, periodic custodian testing, limited scope performance tests, daily monitoring of MC and A documentation, and reviewing custodian performance during physical inventories

  10. System Studies for the ADTF: Target and Materials Test Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappiello, M.; Pitcher, E.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.

    2002-01-01

    To meet the objectives of the Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) program, the Accelerator-Driven Test Facility (ADTF) provides a world-class accelerator-driven test facility to: - Provide the capability to assess technology options for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel and waste through a proof-of-performance. - Provide a user facility that allows testing of advanced nuclear technologies and applications, material science and research, experimental physics, and conventional nuclear engineering science applications. - Provide the capability, through upgrades or additions to the ADTF accelerator, to produce tritium for defense purposes, if required. - Provide the capability, through upgrades or additions, to produce radioisotopes for medical and commercial purposes. These missions are diverse and demand a facility with significant flexibility. In order to meet them, it is envisioned that we construct two target stations: the Target and Materials Test (TMT) station and the Subcritical Multiplier (SCM) test station. The two test stations share common hot-cell facilities for post-irradiation examination. It is expected the TMT will come online first, closely followed by the SCM. The TMT will provide the capability to: - Irradiate small samples of proposed ATW (accelerator-driven transmutation of waste) fuels and materials at prototypic flux, temperature, and coolant conditions (requires intense source of neutrons). - Perform transient testing. - Test liquid (lead-bismuth) and solid spallation targets with water, sodium, or helium coolant. - Test generation-IV fuels for advance nuclear systems (requires high-intensity thermal flux). - Irradiate fission product transmutation targets. - Test advanced fuel and coolant combinations, including helium, water, sodium, and lead-bismuth. - Produce isotopes for commercial and medical applications. - Perform neutron physics experiments. The SCM will provide the capability to: - Irradiate large samples of proposed ATW

  11. Quality assurance in the nuclear test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.N.

    1979-01-01

    In February 1979 Test Program laid the ground work for a new quality assurance structure. The new approach was based on the findings and recommendations of the Ad Hoc QA Program Review panel, which are summarized in this report. The new structure places the responsibility for quality assurance in the hands of the line organizations, both in the programmatic and functional elements of the LLL matrix

  12. Heavy Section Steel Technology Program. Part II. Intermediate vessel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, G.D.

    1975-01-01

    The testing of the intermediate pressure vessels is a major activity under the Heavy Section Steel Technology Program. A primary objective of these tests is to develop or verify methods of fracture prediction, through the testing of selected structures and materials, in order that a valid basis can be established for evaluating the serviceability and safety of light-water reactor pressure vessels. These vessel tests were planned with sufficiently specific objectives that substantial quantitative weight could be given to the results. Each set of testing conditions was chosen so as to provide specific data by which analytical methods of predicting flaw growth, and in some cases crack arrest, could be evaluated. Every practical effort was made to assure that results would be relevant to some aspect of real reactor pressure vessel performance through careful control of material properties, selection of test temperatures, and design of prepared flaws. 5 references

  13. Testing Systems and Results for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Griffith, G.W.; Garnier, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development (ALFD) Pathway. Development and testing of high performance fuel cladding identified as high priority to support: enhancement of fuel performance, reliability, and reactor safety. One of the technologies being examined is an advanced fuel cladding made from ceramic matrix composites (CMC) utilizing silicon carbide (SiC) as a structural material supplementing a commercial Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) tube. A series of out-of-pile tests to fully characterize the SiC CMC hybrid design to produce baseline data. The planned tests are intended to either produce quantitative data or to demonstrate the properties required to achieve two initial performance conditions relative to standard zircaloybased cladding: decreased hydrogen uptake (corrosion) and decreased fretting of the cladding tube under normal operating and postulated accident conditions. These two failure mechanisms account for approximately 70% of all in-pile failures of LWR commercial fuel assemblies

  14. Advanced Industrial Materials Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stooksbury, F. [comp.

    1994-06-01

    Mission of the AIM program is to commercialize new/improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. Program investigators in the DOE national laboratories are working with about 100 companies, including 15 partners in CRDAs. Work is being done on intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy-consuming process industries. The aim of the AIM program is to bring materials from basic research to industrial application to strengthen the competitive position of US industry and save energy.

  15. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  16. Tritium systems test assembly quality assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstiens, F.L.; Wilhelm, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    A quality assurance program should establish the planned and systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that fusion facilities and their subsystems will perform satisfactorily in service. The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) Quality Assurance Program has been designed to assure that the designs, tests, data, and interpretive reports developed at TSTA are valid, accurate, and consistent with formally specified procedures and reviews. The quality consideration in all TSTA activities is directed toward the early detection of quality problems, coupled with timely and positive disposition and corrective action

  17. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  18. Autoclave Testing on Zirconium Alloy Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Petra-Britt; Sell, Hans-Juergen; Garzarolli, Friedrich

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion of Zirconium components like fuel rod claddings and spacer grids is limiting lifetime and duty of these components. In Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactors (PWR and BWR), different corrosion phenomena are of interest. Although in-pile experience is the final proof for a material development, significant experience was gained by autoclave tests, trying to simulate in-pile conditions but reducing time for return of experience by increased temperatures. For PWR application, the uniform corrosion is studied in water at up to 370 deg. C and in high pressure steam at 400 deg. C, and for BWR, the nodular corrosion is studied in high pressure steam at 500-520 deg. C. Particular attention has to be given to the corrosion media, because oxidative traces in the water can significantly affect the corrosion response. An extensive air removal is thus important for all corrosion tests. This links to the different water chemistry conditions that have been investigated as separate effects otherwise difficult to separate under in-pile conditions. Uniform corrosion in 350 deg. C water is usually a cyclic process with repeated rate transitions. In addition, at high exposure times an acceleration of corrosion can occur, e.g. for Zr-Sn alloys with a high Sn content. In 400 deg. C steam, corrosion rate decreases somewhat with increasing time. Uniform corrosion rate of Zr alloys depends on their Sn- and Fe+Cr contents as well as on their annealing parameters with a similar trend as in PWR and on their yield strength, however with an opposite trend compared to BWR conditions. Nodular corrosion of BWR alloys depends on the annealing parameter with a similar trend as in PWR and out-of-reactor also significantly on the Fe+Cr content. The hydrogen pickup fraction (HPUF) depends largely on details of the water chemistry and can particularly depend on autoclave degassing and probably also on autoclave contaminations. Thus any HPUF value from out-of- pile corrosion tests is only

  19. Fracture Toughness Round Robin Test International in pressure tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagarcia, M.P.; Liendo, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Part of the pressure tubes surveillance program of CANDU type reactors is to determine the fracture toughness using a special fracture specimen and test procedure. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited decided to hold a Round Robin Test International and 9 laboratories participated worldwide in which several pressure tube materials were selected: Zircaloy-2, Zr-2.5%Nb cold worked and Zr-2.5%Nb heat treated. The small specimens used held back the thickness and curvature of the tube. J-R curves at room temperature were obtained and the crack extension values were determined by electrical potential drop techniques. These values were compared with results generated from other laboratories and a bid scatter was founded. It could be due to slight variations in the test method or inhomogeneity of the materials and a statistical study must be done to see if there is any pattern. The next step for the Round Robin Test would be to make some modifications in the test method in order to reduce the scatter. (Author)

  20. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  1. The WIPP research and development test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    The WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) is a DOE RandD Facility for the purpose of developing the technology needed for the safe disposal of the United States defense-related radioactive waste. The in-situ test program is defined for the thermal-structural interactions, plugging and sealing, and waste package interactions in a salt environment. An integrated series of large-scale underground tests address the issues of both systems and long-term isolation performance of a repository

  2. Cooperative field test program for wind systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  3. U.S.-origin nuclear material removal program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messick, C.E.; Galan, J.J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). U.S.-Origin Nuclear Material Removal Program

    2014-12-15

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) U.S.-Origin Nuclear Material Removal program, also known as the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (FRR SNF AP), was established by the U.S. Department of Energy in May 1996. The program's mission provides a disposition pathway for certain U.S. origin spent nuclear fuel and other weapons-grade nuclear material. The program will continue until May 2016 with an additional three year window for fuel cooldown and transportation. This paper provides an update on recent program accomplishments, current program initiatives and future activities.

  4. U.S.-origin nuclear material removal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Galan, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) U.S.-Origin Nuclear Material Removal program, also known as the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (FRR SNF AP), was established by the U.S. Department of Energy in May 1996. The program's mission provides a disposition pathway for certain U.S. origin spent nuclear fuel and other weapons-grade nuclear material. The program will continue until May 2016 with an additional three year window for fuel cooldown and transportation. This paper provides an update on recent program accomplishments, current program initiatives and future activities.

  5. Testing of ceramic filter materials at the PCFB test facility; Keraamisten suodinmateriaalien testaus PCFB-koelaitoksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R; Eriksson, T; Lehtonen, P; Tiensuu, J [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula, Finland since 1986. In 1989, a 10 MW PCFB test facility was constructed. The test facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1994 for obtaining data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The main objective of the project Y53 was to evaluate advanced candle filter materials for the Hot Gas Clean-up Unit (HGCU) to be used in a commercial PCFB Demonstration Project. To achieve this goal, the selected candle materials were exposed to actual high temperature, high pressure coal combustion flue gases for a period of 1000-1500 h during the PCFB test runs. The test runs were carried out in three test segments in Foster Wheeler`s PCFB test facility at the Karhula R and D Center. An extensive inspection and sampling program was carried out after the second test segment. Selected sample candles were analyzed by the filter supplier and the preliminary results were encouraging. The material strength had decreased only within expected range. Slight elongation of the silicon carbide candles was observed, but at this phase the elongation can not be addressed to creep, unlike in the candles tested in 1993-94. The third and last test segment was completed successfully in October 1996. The filter system was inspected and several sample candles were selected for material characterization. The results will be available in February - March 1997. (orig.)

  6. THE NUCLEAR MATERIAL MEASUREMENT PROGRAM PLAN FOR GOSATOMNADZOR OF RUSSIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokov, Dmitry; Byers, Kenneth R.

    2003-01-01

    As the Russian State regulatory agency responsible for oversight of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A), Gosatomnadzor of Russia determines the status of the MC and A programs at Russian facilites by testing the nuclear material inventory for accounting record accuracy. Currently, Gosatomnadzor is developing and implementing an approach to planning and conducting MC and A inspections using non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments that will provide for consistent application of MC and A measurement inspection objectives throughtout Russia. This Gosatomnadzor NDA Program Plan documents current NDA measurement capability in all regions of Gosatomnadzor; provides justification for upgrades to equipment, procedures and training; and defines the inspector-facility operator interface as it relates to NDA measurement equipment use. This plan covers a three-year measurement program cycle, but will be reviewed and updated annually to ensure that adequate inspection resources are available to meet the demands of the inspection schedule. This paper presents the elements of this plan and describes the process by which Gosatomnadzor ensures that its NDA instruments are effectively utilized, procedures are developed and certified, and inspection personnel are properly trained to provide assurance that Russian nuclear facilities are in compliance with Russian MC and A regulations.

  7. 47 CFR 73.1620 - Program tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... integration of ownership and management and diversification of the media of mass communciation contained in... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program tests. 73.1620 Section 73.1620 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES...

  8. Standard leach tests for nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.; Barnes, B.O.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Five leach tests were conducted to study time-dependent leaching of waste forms (glass). The first four tests include temperature as a variable and the use of three standard leachants. Three of the tests are static and two are dynamic (flow). This paper discusses the waste-form leach tests and presents some representative data. 4 figures

  9. NRC valve performance test program - check valve testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanmougin, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Valve Performance Test Program addresses the current requirements for testing of pressure isolation valves (PIVs) in light water reactors. Leak rate monitoring is the current method used by operating commercial power plants to survey the condition of their PIVs. ETEC testing of three check valves (4-inch, 6-inch, and 12-inch nominal diameters) indicates that leak rate testing is not a reliable method for detecting impending valve failure. Acoustic emission monitoring of check valves shows promise as a method of detecting loosened internals damage. Future efforts will focus on evaluation of acoustic emission monitoring as a technique for determining check valve condition. Three gate valves also will be tested to evaluate whether the check valve results are applicable to gate type PIVs

  10. Program in change: shipment of hazardous materials at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    Positive measures such as education, control, and auditing ability should be incorporated into each hazardous material shipping program to assure compliance with regulations and the safe movement of hazardous materials. This paper discusses these and other pertinent components of a shipping program. 3 references

  11. Inpile (in PWR) testing of cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, R.; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. J.; Choi, B. K.; Kim, J. M.

    1999-04-01

    As an introduction, the reasons to perform inpile tests are depicted. An overview over general inpile test procedure is given, and test details which are necessary for the development of new alloys for high burnup claddings, like sample geometries and measuring techniques for inpile corrosion testing, are described in detail. Tests for the creep and length change behavior of cladding tubes are described briefly. Finally, conclusions are drawn and literature citations for further test details are given. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs

  12. Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY)

  13. The High Level Vibration Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmayer, C.H.; Curreri, J.R.; Park, Y.J.; Kato, W.Y.; Kawakami, S.

    1989-01-01

    As part of cooperative agreements between the United States and Japan, tests have been performed on the seismic vibration table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC) in Japan. The objective of the test program was to use the NUPEC vibration table to drive large diameter nuclear power piping to substantial plastic strain with an earthquake excitation and to compare the results with state-of-the-art analysis of the problem. The test model was designed by modifying the 1/2.5 scale model of the PWR primary coolant loop. Elastic and inelastic seismic response behavior of the test model was measured in a number of test runs with an increasing excitation input level up to the limit of the vibration table. In the maximum input condition, large dynamic plastic strains were obtained in the piping. Crack initiation was detected following the second maximum excitation run. The test model was subjected to a maximum acceleration well beyond what nuclear power plants are designed to withstand. This paper describes the overall plan, input motion development, test procedure, test results and comparisons with pre-test analysis. 4 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  14. The High Level Vibration Test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmayer, C.H.; Curreri, J.R.; Park, Y.J.; Kato, W.Y.; Kawakami, S.

    1990-01-01

    As part of cooperative agreements between the United States and Japan, tests have been performed on the seismic vibration table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC) in Japan. The objective of the test program was to use the NUPEC vibration table to drive large diameter nuclear power piping to substantial plastic strain with an earthquake excitation and to compare the results with state-of-the-art analysis of the problem. The test model was designed by modifying the 1/2.5 scale model of the pressurized water reactor primary coolant loop. Elastic and inelastic seismic response behavior of the test model was measured in a number of test runs with an increasing excitation input level up to the limit of the vibration table. In the maximum input condition, large dynamic plastic strains were obtained in the piping. Crack initiation was detected following the second maximum excitation run. The test model was subjected to a maximum acceleration well beyond what nuclear power plants are designed to withstand. This paper describes the overall plan, input motion development, test procedure, test results and comparisons with pre-test analysis

  15. 1/3-scale model testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Attaway, S.W.; Bronowski, D.R.; Uncapher, W.L.; Huerta, M.; Abbott, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the drop testing of a one-third scale model transport cask system. Two casks were supplied by Transnuclear, Inc. (TN) to demonstrate dual purpose shipping/storage casks. These casks will be used to ship spent fuel from DOEs West Valley demonstration project in New York to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for long term spent fuel dry storage demonstration. As part of the certification process, one-third scale model tests were performed to obtain experimental data. Two 9-m (30-ft) drop tests were conducted on a mass model of the cask body and scaled balsa and redwood filled impact limiters. In the first test, the cask system was tested in an end-on configuration. In the second test, the system was tested in a slap-down configuration where the axis of the cask was oriented at a 10 degree angle with the horizontal. Slap-down occurs for shallow angle drops where the primary impact at one end of the cask is followed by a secondary impact at the other end. The objectives of the testing program were to (1) obtain deceleration and displacement information for the cask and impact limiter system, (2) obtain dynamic force-displacement data for the impact limiters, (3) verify the integrity of the impact limiter retention system, and (4) examine the crush behavior of the limiters. This paper describes both test results in terms of measured deceleration, post test deformation measurements, and the general structural response of the system

  16. Design of online testing system of material radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Junsheng; He Shengping; Gao Xinjun

    2014-01-01

    The capability of radiation resistance is important for some material used in some specifically engineering fields. It is the same principal applied in all existing test system that compares the performance parameter after radiation to evaluate material radiation resistance. A kind of new technique on test system of material radiation resistance is put forward in this paper. Experimentation shows that the online test system for material radiation resistance works well and has an extending application outlook. (authors)

  17. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

    2007-08-09

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

  18. Data package for the Turkey Point material interaction test capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogness, J.C.; Davis, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    Objective of the Materials Interaction Test (MIT) is to obtain interaction information on candidate package storage materials and geologies under prototypic temperatures in gamma and low level neutron fields. Compatibility, structural properties, and chemical transformations will be studied. The multiple test samples are contained within test capsules connected end-to-end to form a test train. Only passive instrumentation has been used to monitor temperatures and record neutron fluence. The test train contains seven capsules: three to test compatibility, two for structural tests, and two for chemical transformation studies. The materials tested are potential candidates for the spent fuel package canister and repository geologies

  19. Preliminary irradiation test results from the Yankee Atomic Electric Company reactor vessel test irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemiller, E.C.; Fyfitch, S.; Campbell, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company test irradiation program was implemented to characterize the irradiation response of representative Yankee Rowe reactor vessel beltline plate materials and to remove uncertainties in the analysis of existing irradiation data on the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel steel. Plate materials each containing 0.24 w/o copper, but different nickel contents at 0.63 w/o and 0.19 w/o, were heat treated to simulate the Yankee vessel heat treatment (austenitized at 1800 deg F) and to simulate Regulatory Guide 1.99 database materials (austenitized at 1600 deg. F). These heat treatments produced different microstructures so the effect of microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity could be tested. Because the nickel content of the test plates varied and the copper level was constant, the effect of nickel on irradiation embrittlement was also tested. Correlation monitor material, HSST-02, was included in the program to benchmark the Ford Nuclear Reactor (U. of Michigan Test Reactor) which had never been used for this type of irradiation program. Materials taken from plate surface locations (vs. 1/4T) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from the rapid quench, is maintained after irradiation. If the improved properties are maintained, pressurized thermal shock calculations could utilize this margin. Finally, for one experiment, irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures (500 deg. F and 550 deg. F) to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. The preliminary results of the irradiation program show an increase in T 30 shift of 69 deg. F for a decrease in irradiation temperature of 50 deg. F. The results suggest that for nickel bearing steels, the superior toughness of plate surface material is maintained after irradiation and for the copper content tested, nickel had no apparent effect on irradiation response. No apparent microstructure

  20. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V. [The D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), 3 Doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, Saint Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  1. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented

  2. Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk

  3. The high level vibration test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmayer, C.H.; Curreri, J.R.; Park, Y.J.; Kato, W.Y.; Kawakami, S.

    1989-01-01

    As part of cooperative agreements between the US and Japan, tests have been performed on the seismic vibration table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC) in Japan. The objective of the test program was to use the NUPEC vibration table to drive large diameter nuclear power piping to substantial plastic strain with an earthquake excitation and to compare the results with state-of-the-art analysis of the problem. The test model was subjected to a maximum acceleration well beyond what nuclear power plants are designed to withstand. A modified earthquake excitation was applied and the excitation level was increased carefully to minimize the cumulative fatigue damage due to the intermediate level excitations. Since the piping was pressurized, and the high level earthquake excitation was repeated several times, it was possible to investigate the effects of ratchetting and fatigue as well. Elastic and inelastic seismic response behavior of the test model was measured in a number of test runs with an increasing excitation input level up to the limit of the vibration table. In the maximum input condition, large dynamic plastic strains were obtained in the piping. Crack initiation was detected following the second maximum excitation run. Crack growth was carefully monitored during the next two additional maximum excitation runs. The final test resulted in a maximum crack depth of approximately 94% of the wall thickness. The HLVT (high level vibration test) program has enhanced understanding of the behavior of piping systems under severe earthquake loading. As in other tests to failure of piping components, it has demonstrated significant seismic margin in nuclear power plant piping

  4. The Advanced Test Reactor Strategic Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of safety, environmental, and operational issues has been initiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This program, the Strategic Evaluation Program (STEP), provides an integrated review of safety and operational issues against the standards applied to licensed commercial facilities. In the review of safety issues, 18 deviations were identified which required prompt attention. Resolution of these items has been accelerated in the program. An integrated living schedule is being developed to address the remaining findings. A risk evaluation is being performed on the proposed corrective actions and these actions will then be formally ranked in order of priority based on considerations of safety and operational significance. Once the final ranking is completed, an integrated schedule will be developed, which will include considerations of availability of funding and operating schedule. 3 refs., 2 figs

  5. Glass solidification material confinement test device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiki, Shigekazu.

    1997-01-01

    In a device for confining glass solidification materials, a pipeline connecting a detection vessel and a detector is formed to have a double walled structure, and air blowing holes are formed on the wall of the inner pipe, and an air supply mechanism is connected to inner and outer pipes for supplying blowing air thereby preventing deposition on the inner pipe wall. The air blowing holes are formed by constituting the pipe by using a porous sintered material and porous portions thereof are defined as the air blowing holes, or holes are formed on the pipe wall made of a metal by machining. A blowing boundary layer is formed by blowing the supplied air along the pipe wall of the inner pipe, by which deposition of the sucked materials to the inner wall of the inner pipe is prevented, and all of the materials sucked from the detection vessel are collected to the detector. In addition, an air exit pipe is formed into a double walled structure so as to be supplied blowing air from the air supply mechanism thereby enabling to prevent deposition of sucked materials more reliably. (N.H.)

  6. Radiochemical analyses of several spent fuel Approved Testing Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Wildung, N.J.

    1994-09-01

    Radiochemical characterization data are described for UO 2 and UO 2 plus 3 wt% Gd 2 O 3 commercial spent nuclear fuel taken from a series of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs). These full-length nuclear fuel rods include MLA091 of ATM-103, MKP070 of ATM-104, NBD095 and NBD131 of ATM-106, and ADN0206 of ATM-108. ATMs 103, 104, and 106 were all irradiated in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Reactor No.1), a pressurized-water reactor that used fuel fabricated by Combustion Engineering. ATM-108 was part of the same fuel bundle designed as ATM-105 and came from boiling-water reactor fuel fabricated by General Electric and irradiated in the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant. Rod average burnups and expected fission gas releases ranged from 2,400 to 3,700 GJ/kgM. (25 to 40 Mwd/kgM) and from less than 1% to greater than 10%, respectively, depending on the specific ATM. The radiochemical analyses included uranium and plutonium isotopes in the fuel, selected fission products in the fuel, fuel burnup, cesium and iodine on the inner surfaces of the cladding, 14 C in the fuel and cladding, and analyses of the gases released to the rod plenum. Supporting examinations such as fuel rod design and material descriptions, power histories, and gamma scans used for sectioning diagrams are also included. These ATMs were examined as part of the Materials Characterization Center Program conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

  7. Aviation Career Awareness Program [and Related Materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Edwin T.

    The learning packet focuses on general aviation and is to be used in career awareness programs at the elementary level. It includes a document which presents a group of units on general aviation and its related careers. The units include the following: (1) aircraft manufacturing, (2) instruments and controls, (3) how airplanes fly, (4) flight…

  8. NRC Confirmatory Testing Program for SBWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.; Bessette, D.E.; Shotkin, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the NRC Confirmatory Testing Program for SBWR is to provide integral data for code assessment, which reasonably reproduce the important phenomena and processes expected in the SBWR under various loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and transient conditions. To achieve this objective, the Program consists of four coupled elements: (1) to design and construct an integral, carefully-scaled SBWR test facility at Purdue Univ., (2) to provide pre-construction RELAP5/CONTAIN predictions of the facility design, (3) to provide confirmatory data for code assessment, and (4) to assess the RELAP5/CONTAIN code with data. A description of the open-quotes preliminary designclose quotes of the Purdue test facility and test matrix is presented. The facility is scheduled to be built by December 1994. Approximately 50 tests will be performed from April 1995 through April 1996 and documented by interim data reports. A final and complete data report is scheduled to be published by July 31, 1996

  9. Refurbishing the BR2 materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugnet, J.M.; Dekeyser, J.; Gubel, P.

    1995-01-01

    SCK/CEN is refurbishing its BR2 reactor to allow its further operation during the next 15 years; in doing so, it chooses to keep BR2 available for future scientific and technological irradiation programs within an international context. (author) 2 figs

  10. Advanced Mechanical Testing of Sandwich Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayman, Brian; Berggreen, Christian; Jenstrup, Claus

    2008-01-01

    An advanced digital optical system has been used to measure surface strains on sandwich face and core specimens tested in a project concerned with improved criteria for designing sandwich X-joints. The face sheet specimens were of glass reinforced polyester and were tested in tension. The core sp...

  11. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY ON POROUS MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficacy of antimicrobial treatments to eliminate or control biological growth in the indoor environment can easily be tested on nonporous surfaces. However, the testing of antimicrobial efficacy on porous surfaces, such as those found in the indoor environment [i.e., gypsum ...

  12. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol test program :FY 2005-06 testing and aerosol data summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Nolte, O.; Loiseau, O.; Koch, W.; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Billone, M. C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Burtseva, T.; Brucher, W; Steyskal, Michele D.

    2006-01-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This document focuses on an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, primarily during FY 2005 and about the first two-thirds of FY 2006. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of May 2006. We provide details on the significant findings on aerosol results and observations from the recently completed Phase 2 surrogate material tests using cerium oxide ceramic pellets in test rodlets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants. Results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR (the ratio of respirable particles from real spent fuel/respirables from surrogate spent fuel, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber); and, measurements of enhanced volatile fission product species sorption onto respirable particles. We discuss progress and results for the first three, recently performed Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide, DUO 2 , test rodlets. We will also review the status of preparations and the final Phase 4 tests in this program, using short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. These data plus testing results and design are tailored to support and guide, follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments

  13. Historical Evolution of NASA Standard Materials Testing with Hypergolic Propellants and Ammonia (NASA Standard 6001 Test 15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Benjamin; McClure, Mark B.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has performed testing of hazardous and reactive aerospace fluids, including hypergolic propellants, with materials since the 1960s with the Apollo program. Amongst other test activities, Test 15 is a NASA standard test for evaluating the reactivity of materials with selected aerospace fluids, in particular hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, uns-dimethylhydrazine, Aerozine 50, dinitrogen tetroxide oxidizers, and ammonia. This manuscript provides an overview of the history of Test 15 over a timeline ranging from prior to its development and first implementation as a NASA standard test in 1974 to its current refinement. Precursor documents to NASA standard tests, as they are currently known, are reviewed. A related supplementary test, international standardization, and enhancements to Test 15 are also discussed. Because WSTF was instrumental in the development and implementation of Test 15, WSTF experience and practices are referred to in this manuscript.

  14. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2000-01-01

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given

  15. Aircraft Carrier Exposure Testing of Aircraft Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Eui

    2004-01-01

    .... Test and control specimens were affixed on exposure racks and installed on aircraft carriers to compare adhesive bonding primers for aluminum and to determine the static property behavior of various...

  16. Cibachrome testing. [photographic processing and printing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The use of Cibachrome products as a solution to problems encountered when contact printing Kodak film type SO-397 onto Kodak Ektrachrome color reversal paper type 1993 is investigated. A roll of aerial imagery consisting of Kodak film types SO-397 and 2443 was contact printed onto Cibachrome and Kodak materials and compared in terms of color quality, resolution, cost, and compatibility with existing equipment and techniques. Objective measurements are given in terms of resolution and sensitometric response. Comparison prints and transparencies were viewed and ranked according to overall quality and aesthetic appeal. It is recommended that Cibachrome Print material be used in place of Kodak Ektachrome paper because it is more easily processed, the cost is equivalent, and it provides improved resolution, color quality, and image fade resistance.

  17. Material test data of SUS304 welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asayama, Tai [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Kawakami, Tomohiro [Nuclear Energy System Incorporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    This report summarizes the material test data of SUS304 welded joints. Numbers of the data are as follows: Tensile tests 71 (Post-irradiation: 39, Others: 32), Creep tests 77 (Post-irradiation: 20, Others: 57), Fatigue tests 50 (Post-irradiation: 0), Creep-fatigue tests 14 (Post-irradiation: 0). This report consists of the printouts from 'the structural material data processing system'. (author)

  18. Material testing in a linear theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alani, R.; Azodi, H.; Naraghi, M.; Safaii, B.; Torabi-Fard, A.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of stainless steel 316 and Inconel 625 alloys has been investigated with a thermonuclear-like plasma, n = 10 16 cm -3 and Tsub(i) = 1 keV, generated in the Alvand I linear theta pinch. The average power flux is 10 7 W/cm 2 and the interaction time nearly one μs. A theoretical analysis based on the formation of an observed impurity layer near the material, has been used to determine the properties of the impurity layer and the extent of the damage on the material. Although arcing has been observed, the dominant damage mechanism has been assessed to be due to evaporation. Exposure to single shots has produced very heavily defective areas and even surface cracks on the SS 316 sample, but no cracks were observed on Inconel 625 after exposure to even 18 shots. On the basis of temperature rise and evaporation a comparison is made among materials exposed to plasmas of a theta pinch, shock tube, present generation tokamak and an anticipated tokamak reactor. (orig.)

  19. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Y. F. [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  20. Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1985-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed for the Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 1985 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program (LLWMP). Programmatic activities were concentrated in three areas, as listed and described in the following paragraphs. (1) A literature survey of reported leaching mechanisms, available mathematical models and factors that affect leaching of LLW forms has been compiled. Mechanisms which have been identified include diffusion, dissolution, ion exchange, corrosion and surface effects. Available mathematical models are based on diffusion as the predominant mechanism. Although numerous factors that affect leaching have been identified, they have been conveniently categorized as factors related to the entire leaching system, to the leachant or to the waste form. A report has been published on the results of this literature survey. (2) A computerized data base of LLW leaching data and mathematical models is being developed. The data are being used for model evaluation by curve fitting and statistical analysis according to standard procedures of statistical quality control. (3) Long-term tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms. Results on the effect of temperature on leachability indicate that the leach rates of cement and VES waste forms increase with increasing temperature, whereas, the leach rate of bitumen is little affected

  1. BNL NONLINEAR PRE TEST SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR THE NUPEC ULTIMATE STRENGTH PIPING TEST PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DEGRASSI, G.; HOFMAYER, C.; MURPHY, C.; SUZUKI, K.; NAMITA, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has been conducting a multi-year research program to investigate the behavior of nuclear power plant piping systems under large seismic loads. The objectives of the program are: to develop a better understanding of the elasto-plastic response and ultimate strength of nuclear piping; to ascertain the seismic safety margin of current piping design codes; and to assess new piping code allowable stress rules. Under this program, NUPEC has performed a large-scale seismic proving test of a representative nuclear power plant piping system. In support of the proving test, a series of materials tests, static and dynamic piping component tests, and seismic tests of simplified piping systems have also been performed. As part of collaborative efforts between the United States and Japan on seismic issues, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and its contractor, the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this research program by performing pre-test and post-test analyses, and by evaluating the significance of the program results with regard to safety margins. This paper describes BNL's pre-test analysis to predict the elasto-plastic response for one of NUPEC's simplified piping system seismic tests. The capability to simulate the anticipated ratcheting response of the system was of particular interest. Analyses were performed using classical bilinear and multilinear kinematic hardening models as well as a nonlinear kinematic hardening model. Comparisons of analysis results for each plasticity model against test results for a static cycling elbow component test and for a simplified piping system seismic test are presented in the paper

  2. Creep property testing of energy power plant component material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitiswati, Sri; Histori; Triyadi, Ari; Haryanto, Mudi

    1999-01-01

    Creep testing of SA213 T12 boiler piping material from fossil plant, Suralaya has been done. The aim of the testing is to know the creep behaviour of SA213 T12 boiler piping material which has been used more than 10 yeas, what is the material still followed ideal creep curve (there are primary stage, secondary stage, and tertiary stage). This possibility could happened because the material which has been used more than 10 years usually will be through ageing process because corrosion. The testing was conducted in 520 0C, with variety load between 4% until 50% maximum allowable load based on strength of the material in 520 0C

  3. Preliminary irradiation test results from the Yankee Atomic Electric Company reactor vessel test irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemiller, E.C.; Fyfitch, Stephen; Campbell, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company test irradiation program was implemented to characterize the irradiation response of representative Yankee Rowe reactor vessel beltline plate materials and to remove uncertainties in the analysis of existing irradiation data on the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel steel. Plate materials each containing 0.24 w/o copper, but different nickel contents at 0.63 w/o and 0.19 w/o, were heat treated to simulate the Yankee vessel heat treatment (austenitized at 982 o C (1800 o F)) and to simulate Regulatory Guide 1.99 database materials (austenitized at 871 o C (1600 o F)). These heat treatments produced different microstructures so the effect of microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity could be tested. Because the nickel content of the test plates varied and the copper level was constant, the effect of nickel on irradiation embrittlement was also tested. Correlation monitor material, HSST-02, was included in the program to benchmark the Ford Nuclear Reactor (University of Michigan Test Reactor) which had never been used before for this type of irradiation program. Materials taken from plate surface locations (versus 1/4 T) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from the rapid quench, are maintained after irradiation. If the improved properties are maintained, pressurized thermal shock calculations could utilize this margin. Finally, for one experiment, irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures (260 o C and 288 o C) to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. (Author)

  4. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  5. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidt J.D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Three new testing configurations that have been developed since the last DYMAT conference in 2009 are presented. The first is high strain rate testing of Kevlar cloth and Kevlar yarn in a tensile Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB apparatus. The Kevlar cloth/yarn is attached to the bars by specially designed adaptors that keep the impedance constant. In addition to determining the specimen’s stress and strain from the recorded waves in the bars the deformations are also measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC. The second testing configuration is a high strain rate shear test for sheet metal. The experiment is done by using a flat notched specimen in a tensile SHB apparatus. The shear strain is measured using DIC within the notch and on the boundary. The third development is a compression apparatus for testing at intermediate strain rates ranging from 20 s−1 to 200 s−1. The apparatus is a combination of a hydraulic actuator and a compression SHB. The stress in the specimen is determined from the stress wave in a very long transmitter bar and the strain and strain rate is determined by using DIC. The results show clean stress strain curves (no ringing.

  6. How My Program Passed the Turing Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrys, Mark

    In 1989, the author put an ELIZA-like chatbot on the Internet. The conversations this program had can be seen - depending on how one defines the rules (and how seriously one takes the idea of the test itself) - as a passing of the Turing Test. This is the first time this event has been properly written. This chatbot succeeded due to profanity, relentless aggression, prurient queries about the user, and implying that they were a liar when they responded. The element of surprise was also crucial. Most chatbots exist in an environment where people expectto find some bots among the humans. Not this one. What was also novel was the onlineelement. This was certainly one of the first AI programs online. It seems to have been the first (a) AI real-time chat program, which (b) had the element of surprise, and (c) was on the Internet. We conclude with some speculation that the future of all of AI is on the Internet, and a description of the "World- Wide-Mind" project that aims to bring this about.

  7. Electrostatic discharge attenuation test for the characterization of ESD protective materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasi, Jaakko; Viheriaekoski, Toni; Sutela, Lassi; Tamminen, Pasi K

    2008-01-01

    New experimental method has been developed to evaluate materials, tools, equipment and packaging used in the electronics production environment under Charged Device Model (CDM) type of electrostatic discharge (ESD) transients. The method is intended to characterize the ability of the material or object to attenuate ESD energy and peak discharge current when a charged device is discharged into the material under test. The test is supplementary for the standard quasi-static measurements of ESD control programs in the cases where standard measurements do not give sufficient information due to voltage non-linearity, complexity or shape of the material or object under test.

  8. Disk-bend ductility tests for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Braski, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    We modified the HEDL disk-bend test machine and are using it to qualitatively screen alloys that are susceptible to embrittlement caused by irradiation. Tests designed to understand the disk-bend test in relation to a uniaxial test are discussed. Selected results of tests of neutron-irradiated material are also presented

  9. Quality Assurance Protocol for AFCI Advanced Structural Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this letter is to inform you of recent progress on the development of advanced structural materials in support of advanced fast reactors and AFCI. As you know, the alloy development effort has been initiated in recent months with the procurement of adequate quantities of the NF616 and HT-UPS alloys. As the test alloys become available in the coming days, mechanical testing, evaluation of optimizing treatments, and screening of environmental effects will be possible at a larger scale. It is therefore important to establish proper quality assurance protocols for this testing effort in a timely manner to ensure high technical quality throughout testing. A properly implemented quality assurance effort will also enable preliminary data taken in this effort to be qualified as NQA-1 during any subsequent licensing discussions for an advanced design or actual prototype. The objective of this report is to describe the quality assurance protocols that will be used for this effort. An essential first step in evaluating quality protocols is assessing the end use of the data. Currently, the advanced structural materials effort is part of a long-range, basic research and development effort and not, as yet, involved in licensing discussions for a specific reactor design. After consultation with Mark Vance (an ORNL QA expert) and based on the recently-issued AFCI QA requirements, the application of NQA-1 quality requirements will follow the guidance provided in Part IV, Subpart 4.2 of the NQA-1 standard (Guidance on Graded Application of QA for Nuclear-Related Research and Development). This guidance mandates the application of sound scientific methodology and a robust peer review process in all phases, allowing for the data to be qualified for use even if the programmatic mission changes to include licensing discussions of a specific design or prototype. ORNL has previously implemented a QA program dedicated to GNEP activities and based on an appropriately graded

  10. Quality Assurance Protocol for AFCI Advanced Structural Materials Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this letter is to inform you of recent progress on the development of advanced structural materials in support of advanced fast reactors and AFCI. As you know, the alloy development effort has been initiated in recent months with the procurement of adequate quantities of the NF616 and HT-UPS alloys. As the test alloys become available in the coming days, mechanical testing, evaluation of optimizing treatments, and screening of environmental effects will be possible at a larger scale. It is therefore important to establish proper quality assurance protocols for this testing effort in a timely manner to ensure high technical quality throughout testing. A properly implemented quality assurance effort will also enable preliminary data taken in this effort to be qualified as NQA-1 during any subsequent licensing discussions for an advanced design or actual prototype. The objective of this report is to describe the quality assurance protocols that will be used for this effort. An essential first step in evaluating quality protocols is assessing the end use of the data. Currently, the advanced structural materials effort is part of a long-range, basic research and development effort and not, as yet, involved in licensing discussions for a specific reactor design. After consultation with Mark Vance (an ORNL QA expert) and based on the recently-issued AFCI QA requirements, the application of NQA-1 quality requirements will follow the guidance provided in Part IV, Subpart 4.2 of the NQA-1 standard (Guidance on Graded Application of QA for Nuclear-Related Research and Development). This guidance mandates the application of sound scientific methodology and a robust peer review process in all phases, allowing for the data to be qualified for use even if the programmatic mission changes to include licensing discussions of a specific design or prototype. ORNL has previously implemented a QA program dedicated to GNEP activities and based on an appropriately graded

  11. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material: ATM-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1988-10-01

    The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material (ATM)-106 spent fuel from Assembly BT03 of pressurized-water reactor Calvert Cliffs No. 1. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well- characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCWRM) program. ATM-106 consists of 20 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 3700 GJ/kgM (43 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of /approximately/10%. Characterization data include (1) as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (6) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel rod are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report. 12 refs., 110 figs., 81 tabs

  12. Materials development for ITER shielding and test blanket in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.M., E-mail: Chenjm@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wu, J.H.; Liu, X.; Wang, P.H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Z.H.; Li, Z.N. [Ningxia Orient Non-ferrous Metals Group Co. Ltd., P.O. Box 105, Shizuishan (China); Wang, X.S.; Zhang, P.C. [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, N.M.; Fu, H.Y.; Liu, D.H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2011-10-01

    China is a member of the ITER program and is developing her own materials for its shielding and test blanket modules. The materials include vacuum-hot-pressing (VHP) Be, CuCrZr alloy, 316L(N) and China low activation ferritic/martensitic (CLF-1) steels. Joining technologies including Be/Cu hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and electron beam (EB) weldability of 316L(N) were investigated. Chinese VHP-Be showed good properties, with BeO content and ductility that satisfy the ITER requirements. Be/Cu mock-ups were fabricated for Be qualification tests at simulated ITER vertical displacement event (VDE) and heat flux cycling conditions. Fine microstructure and good mechanical strength of the CuCrZr alloy were achieved by a pre-forging treatment, while the weldability of 316L(N) by EB was demonstrated for welding depths varying from 5 to 80 mm. Fine microstructure, high strength, and good ductility were achieved in CLF-1 steel by an optimized normalizing, tempering and aging procedure.

  13. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  14. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled)

  15. Verification test for radiation reduction effect and material integrity on PWR primary system by zinc injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, H.; Nagata, T.; Yamada, M. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp. (Japan); Kasahara, K.; Tsuruta, T.; Nishimura, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (Japan); Ishigure, K. [Saitama Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Zinc injection is known to be an effective method for the reduction of radiation source in the primary water system of a PWR. There is a need to verify the effect of Zn injection operation on radiation source reduction and materials integrity of PWR primary circuit. In order to confirm the effectiveness of Zn injection, verification test as a national program sponsored by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) was started in 1995 for 7-year program, and will be finished by the end of March in 2002. This program consists of irradiation test and material integrity test. Irradiation test as an In-Pile-Test managed by AEAT Plc(UK) was performed using the LVR-15 reactor of NRI Rez in Check Republic. Furthermore, Out-of-Pile-Test using film adding unit was also performed to obtain supplemental data for In-Pile-Test at Takasago Engineering Laboratory of NUPEC. Material Integrity test was planned to perform constant load test, constant strain test and corrosion test at the same time using large scale Loop and slow strain extension rate testing (SSRT) at Takasago Engineering Laboratory of NUPEC. In this paper, the results of the verification test for Zinc program at present are discussed. (authors)

  16. Test system for thermoelectric modules and materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejtmánek, Jiří; Knížek, Karel; Švejda, V.; Horna, P.; Sikora, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 10 (2014), s. 3726-3732 ISSN 0361-5235 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-17538S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : thermoelectric power module * automatic thermoelectric testing setup * heat flow measurement * power generation * heat recovery Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.798, year: 2014

  17. Active Waste Materials Corrosion and Decontamination Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, M.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Pitman, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    Stainless steel alloys, 304L and 316L, were corrosion tested in representative radioactive samples of three actual Hanford tank waste solutions (Tanks AW-101, C-104, AN-107). Both the 304L and 316L exhibited good corrosion performance when immersed in boiling waste solutions. The maximum general corrosion rate was 0.015 mm/y (0.60 mils per year). Generally, the 304L had a slightly higher rate than the 316L. No localized attack was observed after 122 days of testing in the liquid phase, liquid/vapor phase, or vapor phase. Radioactive plate-out decontamination tests indicated that a 24-hour exposure to 1 und M HNO 3 could remove about 99% of the radioactive components in the metal film when exposed to the C-104 and AN-107 solutions. The decontamination results are less certain for the AW-101 solution, since the initial contamination readings exceeded the capacity of the meter used for this test

  18. The US fusion materials program: Status and directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.

    1987-05-01

    The general long term objective of the Fusion Materials Program of the Office of Fusion Energy is the development of new or improved materials that will enhance the economic and environmental attractiveness of fusion as an energy source. The US Magnetic Fusion Program Plan, as augmented by the Technical Planning Activity (TPA), calls for information to be developed on critical issues such that a decision can be made by about 2005 on whether to pursue fusion as a viable energy source. Viability will be evaluated in at least four areas: technical, economic, environmental, and safety. The Fusion Materials Program addresses directly only the magnetic confinement option, although some of the information gained is applicable to the alternative approach of inertial confinement. The scope of this paper is limited to programs in which a primary concern is bulk neutron radiation effects, as opposed to those in which the primary concern is interaction of the materials with the plasma. 14 refs

  19. JAERI/KEK target material program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Sasa, Toshinobu

    2001-01-01

    Mercury target was designed for megawatt neutron scattering facility in JAERI/KEK spallation neutron source. The incident proton energy and current are 3 GeV and 333 μA, respectively: the total proton energy is 1 MW in short pulses at a frequency of 25 Hz. Under the guide rule the mercury target was designed: the maximum temperature of target window is 170degC and induced stresses for the type 316 stainless steel are within limits of design guide. In order to demonstrate ADS (Accelerator Driven Systems) transmutation critical and engineering facilities have been designed conceptually. In engineering facility lead-bismuth spallation target station is to be planned. Objective to build the facility is to demonstrate material irradiation. According to neutronics calculation irradiation damage of the target vessel window will be 5 dpa per year. (author)

  20. Evaluation of candidate magnetohydrodynamic materials for the U-02 Phase III test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1978-06-01

    As part of a cooperative U.S.--U.S.S.R. program, electrode and insulator materials tested at the Westinghouse Electrode Systems Test Facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, were evaluated. From this evaluation materials will be selected for use in the third phase of tests being conducted in the U-02 magnetohydrodynamics test facility in the Soviet Union. Electrode and insulator materials were examined with both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The cathodes were found to behave differently from the anodes; most notably, the cathodes showed greater potassium interaction. The lanthanum chromite-based electrodes (excluding those fabricated by plasma-spraying) are recommended for testing in the U-02 Phase III test. Hotpressed, fused-grained MgO and sintered MgAl 2 O 4 are recommended as insulator materials. The electrode attachment techniques used in the Westinghouse Tests were inadequate and need to be modified for the U-02 test

  1. Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasiguti, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors is described based on the report to the Nuclear Fusion Council, the project research program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, and other official documents. The alloy development for the first wall and its radiation damage are the main topics discussed in this paper. Materials viewpoints for the Japanese Tokamak facilities and the problems of irradiation facilities are also discussed. (orig.)

  2. Nondestructive control of materials by ultrasonic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, Noelle.

    1974-01-01

    A bibliographic study of nondestructive control methods of solids by ultrasonic tests, and of the ultrasonic emission of a transducer of finite dimension, is first presented. The principle of two of these methods is verified experimentally; they should permit the measurement of various physical parameters of solids, and the detection of local inhomogeneities. The first method calls upon the analysis of the ultrasonic signal (amplitude and phase), after it has crossed a constant thickness of a metallic specimen. This analysis reveals variations of attenuation and of ultrasonic propagation velocity within the specimen. A good spatial resolution is obtained by using 1mm-diameter probes. The second method leads, thanks to a test rig equipped with broad frequency band electrostatic transducers, to the knowledge of the attenuation law of the specimens as a function of frequency (present range: 5 to 15MHz); from this a classification of these specimens as regards their granulometry is deduced [fr

  3. New spark test device for material characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Kildemo, Morten

    2004-01-01

    An automated spark test system based on combining field emission and spark measurements, exploiting a discharging capacitor is investigated. In particular, the remaining charge on the capacitor is analytically solved assuming the field emitted current to follow the Fowler Nordheim expression. The latter allows for field emission measurements from pA to A currents, and spark detection by complete discharge of the capacitor. The measurement theory and experiments on Cu and W are discussed.

  4. High temperature tests for graphite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed within the framework of the EURISOL for facilities SPIRAL-II (GANIL, France) and SPES (LNL, Italy), and aims to investigate the anticipated strength properties of fine-grained graphite at elevated temperatures. It appears that the major parameters that affect to the lifetime of a graphite target of this IP are the temperature and heating time. High temperature tests were conducted to simulate the heating under the influence of a beam of heavy particles by passing thro...

  5. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing in anisotropic materials - Rectangular crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostroem, A.

    2001-12-01

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry when searching for defects, in particular cracks. To develop and qualify testing procedures extensive experimental work on test blocks is usually required. This can take a lot of time and therefore be quite costly. A good mathematical model of the testing situation is therefore of great value as it can reduce the experimental work to a great extent. A good model can be very useful for parametric studies and as a pedagogical tool. A further use of a model is as a tool in the qualification of personnel. In anisotropic materials, e.g. austenitic welds, the propagation of ultrasound becomes much more complicated as compared to isotropic materials. Therefore, modelling is even more useful for anisotropic materials, and it in particular has a greater pedagogical value. The present project has been concerned with a further development of the anisotropic capabilities of the computer program UTDefect, which has so far only contained a strip-like crack as the single defect type for anisotropic materials. To be more specific, the scattering by a rectangular crack in an anisotropic component has been studied and the result is adapted to include transmitting and receiving ultrasonic probes. The component under study is assumed to be anisotropic with arbitrary anisotropy. On the other hand, it is assumed to be homogeneous, and this in particular excludes most welds, where it is seldom an adequate approximation to assume homogeneity. The anisotropy may be arbitrarily oriented and the same is true of the rectangular crack. The crack may also be located near a backside of the component. To solve the scattering problem for the crack an integral equation method is used. The probe model has been developed in an earlier project and to compute the signal response in the receiving probe an electromechanical reciprocity argument is employed. As a rectangle is a truly 3D scatterer the sizes of the

  6. Proposal of world network on material testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Establishment of an international cooperation system of worldwide testing reactor network (world network) is proposed in order to achieve efficient facility utilization and provide high quality irradiation data by role sharing of irradiation tests with materials testing reactors in the world. As for the first step, mutual understanding among materials testing reactors is thought to be necessary. From this point, an international symposium on materials testing reactors (ISMTR) was held to construct the world network from 2008, and a common understanding of world network has begun to be shared. (author)

  7. Program strategy document for the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1979-07-01

    A multiyear program plan is presented which describes the program of the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center (TIC) at Sandia Laboratories. The work element plans, along with their corresponding work breakdown structures, are presented for TTC activities in the areas of Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues for the years from 1979 to 1985

  8. Nuclear fuels for material test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Durazzo, M.; Freitas, C.T. de

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results related do the development of nuclear fuels for reactors cooled and moderated by water have been presented cylindrical and plate type fuels have been described in which the core consists of U compouns dispersed in an Al matrix and is clad with aluminium. Fabrication details involving rollmilling, swaging or hot pressing have been described. Corrosion and irradiation test results are also discussed. The performance of the different types of fuels indicates that it is possible to locally fabricate fuel plates with U 3 O 8 +Al cores (20% enriched U) for use in operating Brazilian research reactors. (Author) [pt

  9. FWP executive summaries: Basic energy sciences materials sciences programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samara, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    This report provides an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

  10. Annotated Bibliography of Materials for Elementary Foreign Language Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobb, Fred

    An annotated bibliography contains about 70 citations of instructional materials and materials concerning curriculum development for elementary school foreign language programs. Citations are included for Arabic, classical languages, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish. Items on exploratory language courses and general works on…

  11. Materials testing for molten carbonate fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Mario, F.; Frangini, S.

    1995-01-01

    Unlike conventional generation systems fuel cells use an electrochemical reaction between a fossil fuel and an oxidant to produce electricity through a flame less combustion process. As a result, fuel cells offer interesting technical and operating advantages in terms of conversion efficiencies and environmental benefits due to very low pollutant emissions. Among the different kinds of fuel cells the molten carbonate fuel cells are currently being developed for building compact power generation plants to serve mainly in congested urban areas in virtue of their higher efficiency capabilities at either partial and full loads, good response to power peak loads, fuel flexibility, modularity and, potentially, cost-effectiveness. Starting from an analysis of the most important degradative aspects of the corrosion of the separator plate, the main purpose of this communication is to present the state of the technology in the field of corrosion control of the separator plate in order to extend the useful lifetime of the construction materials to the project goal of 40,000 hours

  12. State-of-the-art methods for testing materials outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Sam Williams

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, computers, sensors, microelectronics, and communication technologies have made it possible to automate the way materials are tested in the field. It is now possible to purchase monitoring equipment to measure weather and materials properties. The measurement of materials response often requires innovative approaches and added expense, but the...

  13. Qualification tests of materials for spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.; Maloy, S.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Several laboratories will take part in an extensive materials qualification program that includes irradiation in the proton beam and neutron field available at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Damage Facility (LASREF). A number of candidate materials will be exposed to prototypic spallation producing particle radiation. Studies of corrosion-related phenomena and the mitigation of these effects will also be accomplished

  14. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  16. Flammability tests for regulation of building and construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Sumathipala

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of building materials and products for flammability is critical to ensure the safety of occupants in buildings and other structures. The involvement of exposed building materials and products in fires resulting in the loss of human life often spurs an increase in regulation and new test methods to address the problem. Flammability tests range from those...

  17. The development of an enhanced strain measurement device to support testing of radioactive material packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncapkher, W.L.; Arviso, M.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive material package designers use structural testing to verify and demonstrate package performance. A major part of evaluating structural response is the collection of reliable instrumentation measurement data. Over the last four decades, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been actively involved in the development, testing, and evaluation of measurement devices for a broad range of applications, resulting in the commercialization of several measurement devices commonly used today. SNL maintains an ongoing program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and evaluate measurement devices to support testing of packages used to transport radioactive or hazardous materials. The development of the enhanced strain measurement device is part of this program

  18. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyeon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jeters, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonheyo, George T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  19. Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Ruggeri, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the difficulties with developing and verifying accurate impact models is that parameters such as high strain rate material properties, failure modes, static properties, and impact test measurements are often obtained from a variety of different sources using different materials, with little control over consistency among the different sources. In addition there is often a lack of quantitative measurements in impact tests to which the models can be compared. To alleviate some of these problems, a project is underway to develop a consistent set of material property, impact test data and failure analysis for a variety of aircraft materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. This project is jointly funded by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property data and impact test data are obtained using identical material, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. Four parallel efforts are currently underway: Measurement of material deformation and failure response over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and failure analysis of material property specimens and impact test articles conducted by The Ohio State University; development of improved numerical modeling techniques for deformation and failure conducted by The George Washington University; impact testing of flat panels and substructures conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center. This report describes impact testing which has been done on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade. Data from this testing will be used in validating material models developed under this program. The material

  20. Industry-led program recycles used oil materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The Alberta Used Oil Management Association (AUOMA) is running an industry-led program for recycling used oil filters, containers and used oil. The objective of the program is to help develop an infrastructure that will make recycling simple and convenient for consumers of oil materials. It was estimated that millions of litres of used oil are improperly discarded into the Alberta environment. The program is also aimed at increasing public awareness of the importance of recycling used oil materials, particularly to those consumers who change their own motor oil. By the end of 1997 AUOMA expects to open about 50 recycling centres called EcoCentres. An environmental handling charge (EHC) will be paid to AUOMA by wholesale suppliers on the first sale of oil materials in Alberta. The EHC will be the only funds used to support the program

  1. Material control test and evaluation system at the ICPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    The US DOE is evaluating process monitoring as part of a total nuclear material safeguards system. A monitoring system is being installed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to test and evaluate material control and surveillance concepts in an operating nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Process monitoring for nuclear material control complements conventional safeguards accountability and physical protection to assure adherence to approved safeguards procedures and verify containment of nuclear materials within the processing plant

  2. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 2000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlin, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 200 0 C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented

  3. Sensory submodalities testing in neurolinguistic programming, part of mental training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Teodor GROSU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: this study is part of a larger work, which involves increasing sporting performance by applying mental training techniques – special techniques of neurolinguistic programming. In this case we will discuss some aspects of the test application Jacobson S. (2011. Purpose of study and hypothesis: In neurolinguistic programming (NLP we have studied the relationship between sensory submodalities, in accordance with the Jacobson test (2011. We wanted to check the degree of significance of the mean difference parameters studied and if the materiality result falls within the objective parameters. If ideomotor representations of athletes are completed with multiple sensations of all sensory submodalities such as visual, auditory, kinesthetic, olfactory and gustatory, the possibility of applying the techniques of NLP (neurolinguistic programming will have more effective results. Methods and material: two records were made by using two tests, test1 and test2 on master students of the University “Babes-Bolyai” Cluj-Napoca, from FEFS from APS department (training and sports performance. The statistical indicators were calculated on elements of descriptive statistics and the data is presented using indicators of centrality, location and distribution. Statistical analysis of non-parametric Wilcoxon test was used for sample pairs (data uneven distribution/rank. Materiality tests used was α=0.05 (5%, α=0.01 (1% or α=0.001. Results and deliberations: to detect the correlation between the two variables we used the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (ρ. Statistical analysis was performed using the correlation coefficients Colton’s rule. It was found that no statistically significant differences were observed (p>0.05 in the statistical analysis of sample pairs Jacobson test values (times T1-T2. This is a result of the short timeframe – just one month – for objectives reasons. However, many of them appear in a good and a very good

  4. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program. Annual progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrell, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in the Department of Energy. The mission of the AIM Program is to conduct applied research, development, and applications engineering work, in partnership with industry, to commercialize new or improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. AIM is responsible for identifying, supporting, and coordinating multidisciplinary projects to solve identified industrial needs and transferring the technology to the industrial sector. Program investigators in the DOE National Laboratories are working closely with approximately 100 companies, including 15 partners in Cooperative Research and Development Agreements. Work is being done in a wide variety of materials technologies, including intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The Program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy consuming process industries, including forest products, glass, steel, aluminum, foundries, chemicals, and refineries. To support OITs {open_quotes}Industries of the Future{close_quotes} initiatives and to improve the relevance of materials research, assessments of materials needs and opportunities in the process industries are being made. These assessments are being used for program planning and priority setting; support of work to satisfy those needs is being provided. Many new materials that have come into the marketplace in recent years, or that will be available for commercial use within a few more years, offer substantial benefits to society. This document contains 28 reports on advanced materials research. Individual reports have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  5. Test and evaluation of pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Pil; Hong, Jun Hwa; Nho, Kye Hoe; Han, Dae June; Chi, Se Hwan

    1985-01-01

    We have prepared a method for analyzing the Charpy impact test data, which is deduced from ''the standard anelastic solid equation''. The theoretical expression for the absorbed energy is in a form of W=Wsub(U)+(Wsub(R)-Wsub(U))/ [1+(ωtau) 2 ] showing the Debye characteristics and where tau is given by the Arrhenius equation; tau=tau 0 exp(ΔH/ksub(B)T). Four measurable parameters, at the present stage, can characterize the dynamic hehavior of cracking (Charpy impact result). They are the upper shelf energy(Wsub(R), the lower shelf energy (Wsub(U)), the activation energy of crack (ΔH, and wtau(0) where w tau(0) are the resonance frequency of the specimen and the jumping pre-exponential factor of propagating crack respectively. However the states of R (relaxed) and U (un-relaxed) should be defined from reasonable physical conditions in the future and it is possible that Wsub(U) is small enough to be taken as zero. The effects of irradiation, alloying elements, and heat treatment on the impact results should be interpreted as changes in the above characteristic parameters. The present method has been applied for weld metal of SA 508-2 irradiated up to a fluence of 4x10 18 n/cm 2 , E>1.0Mev, resulting in about 29% decrease in Wsub(R), negligible change in Wsub(U), 5.6 times increase in ωtau 0 , and no change in ΔH. This seems to indicate that irradiation degrades an average value of YOUNG's modulus so that cracks propagate more easily and it does not effect on breaking the lattice bond. However much more systematic analyses should be necessary for correct judgment. It is concluded that the present method is quite adequate for analyzing the Charpy impact data even though plastic deformation in the specimen was not considered separately so that the method should be applied for various cases in order to evaluate the proper trend of effects of irradiation, alloying elements, and heat treatment on the Charpy impact results. (Author)

  6. Improving student understanding in web programming material through multimedia adventure games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitriasari, N. S.; Ashiddiqi, M. F.; Nurdin, E. A.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to make multimedia adventure games and find out the improvement of learners’ understanding after being given treatment of using multimedia adventure game in learning Web Programming. Participants of this study are students of class X (ten) in one of the Vocational Schools (SMK) in Indonesia. The material of web programming is a material that difficult enough to be understood by the participant therefore needed tools to facilitate the participants to understand the material. Solutions offered in this study is by using multimedia adventures game. Multimedia has been created using Construct2 and measured understood with method Non-equivalent Control Group Design. Pre-test and post-test has given to learners who received treatment using the multimedia adventure showed increase in understanding web programming material.

  7. Nuclear Materials Management for the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesse C. Schreiber

    2007-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) has transitioned from its historical role of weapons testing to a broader role that is focused on being a solution to multiple National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) challenges and opportunities with nuclear materials for the nation. NTS is supporting other NNSA sites challenged with safe nuclear materials storage and disposition. NNSA, with site involvement, is currently transforming the nuclear stockpile and supporting infrastructure to meet the 2030 vision. Efforts are under way to make the production complex smaller, more consolidated, and more modern. With respect to the nuclear material stockpile, the NNSA sites are currently reducing the complex nuclear material inventory through dispositioning and consolidating nuclear material. This includes moving material from other sites to NTS. State-of-the-art nuclear material management and control practices at NTS are essential for NTS to ensure that these new activities are accomplished in a safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally responsible manner. NTS is aggressively addressing this challenge

  8. Assessment of the quality of test results from selected civil engineering material testing laboratories in Tanzania

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbawala, SJ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Civil and geotechnical engineering material testing laboratories are expected to produce accurate and reliable test results. However, the ability of laboratories to produce accurate and reliable test results depends on many factors, among others...

  9. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  10. Standard test method for galling resistance of material couples

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a laboratory test that ranks the galling resistance of material couples using a quantitative measure. Bare metals, alloys, nonmetallic materials, coatings, and surface modified materials may be evaluated by this test method. 1.2 This test method is not designed for evaluating the galling resistance of material couples sliding under lubricated conditions, because galling usually will not occur under lubricated sliding conditions using this test method. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Qualification test of packages for transporting radioactive materials and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Santos, P. de; Miaw, S.T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1979 the Waste Treatment Division of Nuclear Tecnology Development Center has been developed and tested packagings for transporting radioactive materials and wastes. The Division has designed facilities for testing Type A packages in accordance with the adopted regulations. The Division has tested several packages for universities, research centers, industries, INB, FURNAS, etc. (author) [pt

  12. Nuclear-waste-package materials degradation modes and accelerated testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    This report reviews the materials degradation modes that may affect the long-term behavior of waste packages for the containment of nuclear waste. It recommends an approach to accelerated testing that can lead to the qualification of waste package materials in specific repository environments in times that are short relative to the time period over which the waste package is expected to provide containment. This report is not a testing plan but rather discusses the direction for research that might be considered in developing plans for accelerated testing of waste package materials and waste forms

  13. Spacecraft Testing Programs: Adding Value to the Systems Engineering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Keith J.; Schaible, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Testing has long been recognized as a critical component of spacecraft development activities - yet many major systems failures may have been prevented with more rigorous testing programs. The question is why is more testing not being conducted? Given unlimited resources, more testing would likely be included in a spacecraft development program. Striking the right balance between too much testing and not enough has been a long-term challenge for many industries. The objective of this paper is to discuss some of the barriers, enablers, and best practices for developing and sustaining a strong test program and testing team. This paper will also explore the testing decision factors used by managers; the varying attitudes toward testing; methods to develop strong test engineers; and the influence of behavior, culture and processes on testing programs. KEY WORDS: Risk, Integration and Test, Validation, Verification, Test Program Development

  14. Potential countersample materials for in vitro simulation wear testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Adrian C; Hu, Xiao Q; Marquis, Peter M

    2002-05-01

    Any laboratory investigation of the wear resistance of dental materials needs to consider oral conditions so that in vitro wear results can be correlated with in vivo findings. The choice of the countersample is a critical factor in establishing the pattern of tribological wear and in achieving an efficient in vitro wear testing system. This research investigated the wear behavior and surface characteristics associated with three candidate countersample materials used for in vitro wear testing in order to identify a possible suitable substitute for human dental enamel. Three candidate materials, stainless steel, steatite and dental porcelain were evaluated and compared to human enamel. A variety of factors including hardness, wear surface evolution and frictional coefficients were considered, relative to the tribology of the in vivo situation. The results suggested that the dental porcelain investigated bore the closest similarity to human enamel of the materials investigated. Assessment of potential countersample materials should be based on the essential tribological simulation supported by investigations of mechanical, chemical and structural properties. The selected dental porcelain had the best simulating ability among the three selected countersample materials and this class of material may be considered as a possible countersample material for in vitro wear test purposes. Further studies are required, employing a wider range of dental ceramics, in order to optimise the choice of countersample material for standardized in vitro wear testing.

  15. Electrofracturing test system and method of determining material characteristics of electrofractured material samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Glover, Steven F.; Pfeifle, Tom; Su, Jiann-Cherng; Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Broome, Scott Thomas; Gardner, William Payton

    2017-08-01

    A device for electrofracturing a material sample and analyzing the material sample is disclosed. The device simulates an in situ electrofracturing environment so as to obtain electrofractured material characteristics representative of field applications while allowing permeability testing of the fractured sample under in situ conditions.

  16. OCRWM Science and Technology Program Cementitious Materials Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE

    2004-01-01

    This potential project will develop and test cost effective cementitious materials for construction of Yucca Mountain (YM) inverts, drift liners, and bulkheads. These high silica cementitious materials will be designed to buffer the pH and Eh of the groundwater, to slow corrosion of waste packages (WP), and to retard radionuclide migration. While being compatible with YM repository systems, these materials are expected to be less expensive to produce, and as strong, and more durable than ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). Therefore, building out the repository with these cementitious materials may significantly reduce these costs and reduce uncertainty in short-( 10,000 yr) repository performance. Both laboratory development and natural analog studies are anticipated using a unique combination of expertise at ORNL, UT, UC Berkeley, and Minatom to develop and test high-silica hydraulic, cementitious binders for use at YM. The major tasks of this project are to (1) formulate and make candidate cementitious materials using high-silica hydraulic hinders, (2) measure the physical and chemical properties of these materials, (3) expose combinations of these materials and WP materials to static and flowing YM groundwater at temperatures consistent with the expected repository conditions, (4) examine specimens of both the cementitious materials and WP materials periodically for chemical and mineralogical changes to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and (5) predict the long-term performance of the material by thermodynamic and transport modeling and by comparisons with natural analogs

  17. Round-Robin Test of Paraffin Phase-Change Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidi, S.; Mehling, H.; Hemberger, F.; Haussmann, Th.; Laube, A.

    2015-11-01

    A round-robin test between three institutes was performed on a paraffin phase-change material (PCM) in the context of the German quality association for phase-change materials. The aim of the quality association is to define quality and test specifications for PCMs and to award certificates for successfully tested materials. To ensure the reproducibility and comparability of the measurements performed at different institutes using different measuring methods, a round-robin test was performed. The sample was unknown. The four methods used by the three participating institutes in the round-robin test were differential scanning calorimetry, Calvet calorimetry and three-layer calorimetry. Additionally, T-history measurements were made. The aim of the measurements was the determination of the enthalpy as a function of temperature. The results achieved following defined test specifications are in excellent agreement.

  18. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. The focus of this document will be the overall range of DOE's structural materials research activities being conducted to support VHTR development. By far, the largest portion of material's R&D supporting VHTR development is that being performed directly as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Supplementary VHTR materials R&D being performed in the DOE program, including university and international research programs and that being performed under direct contracts with the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, will also be described. Specific areas of high-priority materials research that will be needed to deploy the NGNP and provide a basis for subsequent VHTRs are described, including the following: (1) Graphite: (a) Extensive unirradiated materials characterization and assessment of irradiation effects on properties must be performed to qualify new grades of graphite for nuclear service, including thermo-physical and mechanical properties and their changes, statistical variations from billot-to-billot and lot-to-lot, creep, and especially, irradiation creep. (b) Predictive models, as well as codification of the requirements and design methods for graphite core supports, must be developed to provide a basis for licensing. (2) Ceramics: Both fibrous and load-bearing ceramics must be qualified for environmental and radiation service as insulating materials. (3) Ceramic Composites: Carbon-carbon and SiC-SiC composites must be qualified for specialized usage in selected high-temperature components, such as core stabilizers, control rods, and insulating covers and ducting. This will require development of component-specific designs and fabrication processes, materials characterization, assessment of environmental and irradiation effects, and establishment of codes and standards for materials testing and design

  19. Standard Test Method for Testing Nonmetallic Seal Materials by Immersion in a Simulated Geothermal Test Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for a laboratory test for performing an initial evaluation (screening) of nonmetallic seal materials by immersion in a simulated geothermal test fluid. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see Section 6 and 11.7.

  20. Materials and corrosion programs sponsored by the Gas Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals briefly with the Gas Research Institute and its research in materials and corrosion. As a not-for-profit organization, the Gas Research Institute plans, finances, and manages applied and basic research and technological development programs associated with gaseous fuels. These programs are in the general areas of production, transportation, storage, utilization and conservation of natural and manufactured gases and related products. Research results, whether experimental or analytical, are evaluated and publicly disseminated. Materials and corrosion research is concentrated in the SNG from Coal and Non-fossil Hydrogen subprograms

  1. Choose of standard materials in the method of β-testing new materials' mass thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhong

    2007-01-01

    To make sure of the standard mass thickness in beta radials testing mass thickness, this paper calculate using M. C. method and get the result of the relations between the beta radials' transmission rate of different energies and mass thickness in different materials. This result prove that in method of beta test mass thickness choosing materials whose elements are close as standard materials are viable. (authors)

  2. Nuclear Materials Stewardship Within the DOE Environmental Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilyeu, J. D.; Kiess, T. E.; Gates, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program has made significant progress in planning disposition of its excess nuclear materials and has recently completed several noteworthy studies. Since establishment in 1997, the EM Nuclear Material Stewardship Program has developed disposition plans for excess nuclear materials to support facility deactivation. All nuclear materials have been removed from the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (Mound), and disposition planning is nearing completion for the Fernald Environmental Management Project and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Only a few issues remain for materials at the Hanford and Idaho sites. Recent trade studies include the Savannah River Site Canyons Nuclear Materials Identification Study, a Cesium/Strontium Management Alternatives Trade Study, a Liquid Technical Standards Trade Study, an Irradiated Beryllium Reflectors with Tritium study, a Special Performance Assessment Required Trade Study, a Neutron Source Trade Study, and development of discard criteria for uranium. A Small Sites Workshop was also held. Potential and planned future activities include updating the Plutonium-239 storage study, developing additional packaging standards, developing a Nuclear Material Disposition Handbook, determining how to recover or dispose of Pu-244 and U-233, and working with additional sites to define disposition plans for their nuclear materials

  3. Plutonium-bearing materials feed report for the DOE Fissile Materials Disposition Program alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brough, W.G.; Boerigter, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    This report has identified all plutonium currently excess to DOE Defense Programs under current planning assumptions. A number of material categories win clearly fan within the scope of the MD (Materials Disposition) program, but the fate of the other categories are unknown at the present time. MD planning requires that estimates be made of those materials likely to be considered for disposition actions so that bounding cases for the PEIS (Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement) can be determined and so that processing which may be required can be identified in considering the various alternatives. A systematic analysis of the various alternatives in reachmg the preferred alternative requires an understanding of the possible range of values which may be taken by the various categories of feed materials. One table identifies the current total inventories excess to Defense Program planning needs and represents the bounding total of Pu which may become part of the MD disposition effort for all materials, except site return weapons. The other categories, principally irradiated fuel, rich scrap, and lean scrap, are discussed. Another table summarizes the ranges and expected quantities of Pu which could become the responsibility of the MD program. These values are to be used for assessing the impact of the various alternatives and for scaling operations to assess PEIS impact. Determination of the actual materials to be included in the disposition program will be done later

  4. An Interdisciplinary Program in Materials Science at James Madison University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Chris

    2008-03-01

    Over the past decade a core group of faculty at James Madison University has created an interdisciplinary program in materials science that provides our students with unique courses and research experiences that augment the existing, high-quality majors in physics and astronomy, chemistry and biochemistry, geology and environmental science, mathematics and statistics, and integrated science and technology. The university started this program by creating a Center for Materials Science whose budget is directly allocated by the provost. This source of funds acts as seed money for research, support for students, and a motivating factor for each of the academic units to support the participation of their faculty in the program. Courses were created at the introductory and intermediate level that are cross-listed by the departments to encourage students to enroll in them as electives toward their majors. Furthermore, the students are encouraged to participate in undergraduate research in materials since this is the most fundamental unifying theme across the disciplines. This talk will cover some of the curricular innovations that went into the design of the program to make it successful, examples of faculty and student research and how that feeds back into the classroom, and success stories of the interactions that have developed between departments because of this program. Student outcomes and future plans to improve the program will also be discussed.

  5. Data package for the Turkey Point material interaction test capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogness, J.C.; Davis, R.B.

    1980-02-01

    Objective of the test is to obtain interaction information on candidate package storage materials and geologies under prototypic temperatures in gamma and low-level neutron fields. This document provides a fabrication record of the experiment

  6. Nuclear technology in materials testing and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neider, R.

    1975-01-01

    A report of the 1974 activities of the laboratories for physical and measuring technical fundamentals, radiation effects and radiation protection, application of radionuclides and testing of radioactive materials of the Bundesanstalt fuer Materialpruefung (BAM) is given. (RW/LH) [de

  7. Dredged Material Testing and Evaluation for Ocean Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation and testing of dredged material proposed for ocean dumping is conducted to help protect human health and the marine environment. National guidance is provided by the Green Book. Regional Implementation Manuals are provided.

  8. Testing of porous materials using ion beam techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, E.; Asrama, M.; Paszti, F.; Battistig, G.; Hajnal, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Porous materials were examined by backscattering spectrometry and oxygen resonance measurements. The material was a porous silicon (PS) sample. The BS data were evaluated by simulation, using the RBX program, and a comparison was made with measured data. The PS sample was also investigated using the 16 O(α,α) 16 O reaction, and the resonance spectra were evaluated. The data yielded useful information on porosity, mean pore diameter, mean pore distance, and structure ordering. (R.P.)

  9. Progress and Strategies for Testing of Materials for Solar Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2017-04-25

    Accelerated testing is key to confident launch of a new product. However, for new products like solar panels, the best approach is not always clear. The challenge for materials manufacturers is that test times can be long. Also, small-coupon testing may not predict the behavior in the full-size module, but testing of the full-size module is too expensive. As a result, solar panel test standards like IEC 61215 are useful, but are not sufficient. Material manufacturers have needed to define their own test protocols. This presentation will review some historical data (e.g., data show that manufacturers are making great progress toward reducing encapsulant discoloration) and describe advances in material testing (for example, new techniques are being demonstrated on how to more quantitatively assess adhesion, detect tendency for delamination, and understand how encapsulant properties affect other properties like cracking of cells). The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force has been researching climate-specific weathering tests toward the goal of defining international standards that would simplify qualification and quality assurance testing for materials. The status of these tests and the strategies for how to organize these standards to best meet the needs of the industry will be discussed.

  10. Using Virtual Testing for Characterization of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph

    Composite materials are finally providing uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems applications -- airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. They have high strength-to-weight ratios, are durable and resistant to environmental effects, have high impact strength, and can be manufactured in a variety of shapes. Generalized constitutive models are being developed to accurately model composite systems so they can be used in implicit and explicit finite element analysis. These models require extensive characterization of the composite material as input. The particular constitutive model of interest for this research is a three-dimensional orthotropic elasto-plastic composite material model that requires a total of 12 experimental stress-strain curves, yield stresses, and Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio in the material directions as input. Sometimes it is not possible to carry out reliable experimental tests needed to characterize the composite material. One solution is using virtual testing to fill the gaps in available experimental data. A Virtual Testing Software System (VTSS) has been developed to address the need for a less restrictive method to characterize a three-dimensional orthotropic composite material. The system takes in the material properties of the constituents and completes all 12 of the necessary characterization tests using finite element (FE) models. Verification and validation test cases demonstrate the capabilities of the VTSS.

  11. FMIT test cell diagnostics: a unique materials challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, C.P.; Fuller, J.L.

    1981-08-01

    Basic materials problems are discussed in instrumenting the FMIT test cell, which are applicable to fusion devices in general. Recent data on ceramic-to-metal seals, mineral insulated instrument cables, thermocouples, and optical components are reviewed. The data makes it clear that it would be a mistake to assume that materials and instruments will behave in the FMIT test cell environment as they do in more familiar fission reactors and low power accelerators

  12. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  13. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-01-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material

  14. Accelerated irradiation test of gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279 degrees C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed

  15. Accelerated irradiation test of Gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279{degrees}C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed.

  16. Remote-handling demonstration tests for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, E.J.; Hussey, M.W.; Kelly, V.P.; Yount, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is to create a fusion-like environment for fusion materials development. Crucial to the success of FMIT is the development and testing of remote handling systems required to handle materials specimens and maintenance of the facility. The use of full scale mock-ups for demonstration tests provides the means for proving these systems

  17. Irradiation testing of miniature fuel plates for the RERTR program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senn, R L; Martin, M M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    1983-08-01

    An irradiation test facility, which provides a test bed for irradiating a variety of miniature fuel plates miniplates) for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, has been placed into operation. The objective of these tests is to screen various candidate fuel materials as to their suitability for replacing the highly enriched uranium fuel materials currently used by the world's test and research reactors with a lower enrichment fuel material, without significantly degrading reactor operating characteristics and power levels. The use of low uranium enrichment of about 20% {sup 235}U in place of highly enriched fuel for these reactors would reduce the potential for {sup 235}U diversion. Fuel materials currently being evaluated in this first phase of these screening tests include aluminum-base dispersion-type fuel plates with fuel cores of 1) high uranium content U{sup 3}){sup 8}-Al being developed by ORNL, 2) high uranium content UAI{sub x}-Al being developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., and 3) very high uranium content U{sub 3}Si-Al- being developed by ANL. The miniplates are 115-mm long by 50-mm wide with overall plate thicknesses of 1.27 or 1.52 mm. The fuel core dimensions vary according to overall plate thicknesses with a minimal clad thickness requirement of 0.20 mm. Sixty such miniplates (thirty of each thickness) can be irradiated in one test facility. The irradiation test facility, designated as HFED-1 is operating in core position E-7 in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR), a 30-MW water-moderated reactor. The peak neutron flux measured for this experiment is 1.96 x 10{sup 18} neutrons m{sub -2} s{sub -1}. The various types of miniplates will achieve burnups of up to approximately 2.2x10{sup 27} fissions/m{sup 3} of fuel, which will require approximately eight full power months of irradiation. During reactor shutdown periods, the experiment is removed from the reactor, moved to a special poolside station, disassembled, and inspected

  18. Pioneer Robot Testing Program and Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herndon, J.N.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) and Ukraine established a joint program in 1997 to address the need for remotely operated systems for unstructured environments in Ukraine such as the highly hazardous conditions inside the failed Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Unit 4, or Shelter Object. The environment inside Shelter Object is extremely hazardous due to ionizing radiation fields, high airborne contamination, and major industrial safety issues. Although Ukrainian workers have explored and mapped much of the internals of Unit 4 in the time since the accident during the morning hours of April 26, 1986, there remain areas where humans have not entered to this date. Based on the agreement between USDOE and Ukraine, the USDOE, in cooperation with the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), developed the Pioneer Robot and has provided it to the ChNPP within the framework of international technical assistance. Pioneer is capable of mobile platform movement and manipulation under teleoperated control, 3-dimensional mapping, and environmental data collection. The Pioneer is radiation hardened for conditions like those of Shelter Object. Pioneer has been evaluated on site in Ukraine for use in both the Shelter Object environment and the more general conditions of ChNPP decommissioning. This paper summarizes the results of these testing activities and describes the status and near-term activities in support of the Pioneer Robot integration into Ukraine

  19. The concept verification testing of materials science payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griner, C. S.; Johnston, M. H.; Whitaker, A.

    1976-01-01

    The concept Verification Testing (CVT) project at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, is a developmental activity that supports Shuttle Payload Projects such as Spacelab. It provides an operational 1-g environment for testing NASA and other agency experiment and support systems concepts that may be used in shuttle. A dedicated Materials Science Payload was tested in the General Purpose Laboratory to assess the requirements of a space processing payload on a Spacelab type facility. Physical and functional integration of the experiments into the facility was studied, and the impact of the experiments on the facility (and vice versa) was evaluated. A follow-up test designated CVT Test IVA was also held. The purpose of this test was to repeat Test IV experiments with a crew composed of selected and trained scientists. These personnel were not required to have prior knowledge of the materials science disciplines, but were required to have a basic knowledge of science and the scientific method.

  20. Proceedings of the international symposium on materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Materials Testing Reactors hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The symposium was held on July 16 to 17, 2008, at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA. This symposium was also held for the 40th anniversary ceremony of Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) from achieving its first criticality. The objective of the symposium is to exchange the information on current status, future plan and so on among each testing reactors for the purpose of mutual understanding. There were 138 participants from Argentina, Belgium, France, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Korea, the Russian Federation, Sweden, the United State, Vietnam and Japan. The symposium was divided into four technical sessions and three topical sessions. Technical sessions addressed the general topics of 'status and future plan of materials testing reactors', 'material development for research and testing reactors', irradiation technology (including PIE technology)' and 'utilization with materials testing reactors', and 21 presentations were made. Also the topical sessions addressed 'establishment of strategic partnership', 'management on re-operation work at reactor trouble' and 'basic technology for neutron irradiation tests in MTRs', and panel discussion was made. The 21 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Quality assurance program description for shipping packages of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This quality assurance plan describes the quality assurance program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), for shipping packages of radioactive material. The purpose of this report is to describe how PNL will comply with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 71, Appendix E. In compliance with the instructions from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the 18 criteria from Appendix E are covered

  2. DOE materials program supporting immobilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, G.K.; Scheib, W.S. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is presented of the DOE program for developing waste-form criteria, immobilization processes, and generation and evaluation of performance characterization data. Interrelationships are discussed among repository design, materials requirements, immobilization process definition, quality assurance, and risk analysis as part of the National Environmental Policy Act and regulatory processes

  3. Laser-accelerated particle beams for stress testing of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, M; Scisciò, M; Vallières, S; Cardelli, F; Chen, S N; Famulari, G; Gangolf, T; Revet, G; Schiavi, A; Senzacqua, M; Antici, P

    2018-01-25

    Laser-driven particle acceleration, obtained by irradiation of a solid target using an ultra-intense (I > 10 18  W/cm 2 ) short-pulse (duration testing materials and are particularly suited for identifying materials to be used in harsh conditions. We show that these laser-generated protons can produce, in a very short time scale, a strong mechanical and thermal damage, that, given the short irradiation time, does not allow for recovery of the material. We confirm this by analyzing changes in the mechanical, optical, electrical, and morphological properties of five materials of interest to be used in harsh conditions.

  4. Tests of candidate materials for particle bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Wales, D.

    1987-01-01

    Rhenium metal hot frits and zirconium carbide-coated fuel particles appear suitable for use in flowing hydrogen to at least 2000 K, based on previous tests. Recent tests on alternate candidate cooled particle and frit materials are described. Silicon carbide-coated particles began to react with rhenium frit material at 1600 K, forming a molten silicide at 2000 K. Silicon carbide was extensively attacked by hydrogen at 2066 K for 30 minutes, losing 3.25% of its weight. Vitrous carbon was also rapidly attacked by hydrogen at 2123 K, losing 10% of its weight in two minutes. Long term material tests on candidate materials for closed cycle helium cooled particle bed fuel elements are also described. Surface imperfections were found on the surface of pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles after ninety days exposure to flowing (∼500 ppM) impure helium at 1143 K. The imperfections were superficial and did not affect particle strength

  5. Organic lining materials test in flue gas ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveh, R.; Sfez, D.; Johannsson, L.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protection solutions are being widely used in electric power plants equipped with Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) systems. Organic lining materials are one of many solutions available on the market for corrosion protection. This market segment is found in a continuous development in order to fulfill the severe demands of these materials. The main goal of this test is to obtain information about the high temperature resistance of the materials as occurs when the FGD system is by-passed. Aster initial investigation of this market segment only a few lining materials were found compatible according to their manufacturer data. Seven of these materials were installed in the outlet flue gas duct of the Israeli power station M.D. B. This power station is not equipped with a FGD system, thus it gives a real simulation of the environmental conditions into which the lining material is subjected when the FGD system is by-passed. The materials installation was observed carefully and performed by representatives from the manufacturers in order to avoid material failure due to a non-adequate application. The power station was shut down and the lining materials were inspected three and a half months after the lining materials were applied. The inspection results were good and besides changes in the lining color, most materials did not show any damages. During that time the flue gas temperature at the duct was 134?C except some temperature fluctuations

  6. An Approach to the Flammability Testing of Aerospace Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation reviews: (1) Current approach to evaluation of spacecraft materials flammability (2) The need for and the approach to alternative routes (3) Examples of applications of the approach recommended a) Crew Module splash down b) Crew Module depressurization c) Applicability of NASA's flammability test data to other sample configurations d) Applicability of NASA's ground flammability test data to spacecraft environments

  7. Nondestructive testing technology for measurement coatings thickness on material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Mingtai; Wu Lunqiang; Zhang Lianping

    2008-01-01

    The principle, applicability range, advantage and disadvantage of electromagnetic, eddy current method, β backscatter method and XRF methods for nondestructive testing coating thickness of material have been reviewed. The relevant apparatus and manufacturers have been summarized. And the application and developmental direction of manufacturers for nondestructive testing coatings thickness has been foreshowed. (authors)

  8. Enhancing materials management programs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassaballa, M.M.; Malak, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Materials management programs for the nuclear utilities in the United States are continually being affected, concurrent with the gradual disappearance of qualified component and replacement parts vendors by regulatory concerns about procurement and materials management. In addition, current economic and competitive pressures are forcing utilities to seek avenues for reducing procurement costs for safety-related items. In response to these concerns, initiatives have been undertaken and engineering guidelines have been developed by the nuclear power industry-sponsored organizations, such as the Electric Power Research Institute and the Nuclear Management Resources Council. It is our experience that successful materials management programs require a multitude of engineering disciplines and experience and are composed of three major elements: strategic procurement plan, parts classification and procurement data base, and enhancement tools. This paper provides a brief description of each of the three elements

  9. Test plan for buried waste containment system materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, J.; Shaw, P.

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of the FY 1997 barrier material work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are to (1) select a waste barrier material and verify that it is compatible with the Buried Waste Containment System Process, and (2) determine if, and how, the Buried Waste Containment System emplacement process affects the material properties and performance (on proof of principle scale). This test plan describes a set of measurements and procedures used to validate a waste barrier material for the Buried Waste Containment System. A latex modified proprietary cement manufactured by CTS Cement Manufacturing Company will be tested. Emplacement properties required for the Buried Waste Containment System process are: slump between 8 and 10 in., set time between 15 and 30 minutes, compressive strength at set of 20 psi minimum, and set temperature less than 100 degrees C. Durability properties include resistance to degradation from carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates. A set of baseline barrier material properties will be determined to provide a data base for comparison with the barrier materials when tested in the field. The measurements include permeability, petrographic analysis to determine separation and/or segregation of mix components, and a set of mechanical properties. The measurements will be repeated on specimens from the field test material. The data will be used to determine if the Buried Waste Containment System equipment changes the material. The emplacement properties will be determined using standard laboratory procedures and instruments. Durability of the barrier material will be evaluated by determining the effect of carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates on the compressive strength of the barrier material. The baseline properties will be determined using standard ASTM procedures. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  10. Development, simulation and testing of structural materials for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laesser, R.; Baluc, N.; Boutard, J.-L.; Diegele, E.; Gasparotto, M.; Riccardi, B.; Dudarev, S.; Moeslang, A.; Pippan, R.; Schaaf, B. van der

    2006-01-01

    In DEMO the structural and functional materials of the in-vessel components will be exposed to a very intense flux of fusion neutrons with energies up to 14 MeV creating displacement cascades and gaseous transmutation products. Point defects and transmutations will induce new microstructures leading to changes in mechanical and physical properties such as hardening, swelling, loss of fracture toughness and creep strength. The kinetics of microstructural evolution depends on time, temperature and defect production rates. The structural materials to be used in DEMO should have very special properties: high radiation resistance up to the dose of 100 dpa, low residual activation, high creep strength and good compatibility with the cooling media in as wide a temperature operational window as possible for the achievement of high thermal efficiency. The most promising materials are: Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steels (Eurofer and F82H), Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) RAFM and RAF steels, SiC fibres reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiCf/SiC), tungsten (W) and W-alloys. Each of these materials has its advantages and drawbacks and will be best used under certain conditions. Presently the best studied group of materials are the RAFM steels. They require the smallest extrapolation for use in DEMO but also offer the lowest upper temperature limit of operation (550 o C) and thus the lowest thermal efficiency. The other materials foreseen for more advanced breeder blanket and divertor concepts require intense fundamental R(and)D and testing before their acceptance, whereas the so-called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) will be constructed using RAFM steel and tested in ITER. Validation of the DEMO structural materials will be done in IFMIF, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, which will produce neutron damage and transmutation products very similar to those characterising a fusion device and will allow accelerated testing with damage rates

  11. Investigation of contact allergy to dental materials by patch testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Rai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental products are widely used by patients and dental personnel alike and may cause problems for both. Dental materials could cause contact allergy with varying manifestations such as burning, pain, stomatitis, cheilitis, ulcers, lichenoid reactions localized to the oral mucosa in patients, and hand dermatitis in dental personnel. Patch testing with the dental series comprising commonly used materials can be used to detect contact allergies to dental materials. Aim: This study aimed to identify contact allergy among patients who have oral mucosal lesions after dental treatment and among dental personnel who came in contact with these materials. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who had undergone dental procedures with symptoms of oral lichen planus, oral stomatitis, burning mouth, and recurrent aphthosis, were included in the study. Dental personnel with history of hand dermatitis were also included in the study. Patch testing was performed using Chemotechnique Dental Series and results interpreted as recommended by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG. Results: Out of 13 patients who had undergone dental treatment/with oral symptoms, six patients with stomatitis, lichenoid lesions, and oral ulcers showed positive patch tests to a variety of dental materials, seven patients with ulcers had negative patch tests, seven dental personnel with hand dermatitis showed multiple allergies to various dental materials, and most had multiple positivities. Conclusion: The patch test is a useful, simple, noninvasive method to detect contact allergies among patients and among dental personnel dealing with these products. Long term studies are necessary to establish the relevance of these positive patch tests by eliminating the allergic substances, identifying clinical improvement, and substituting with nonallergenic materials.

  12. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test

  13. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) program. Annual progress report. FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven `Vision Industries` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. These are: aluminium; chemical; forest products; glass; metal casting; refineries; and steel. OIT is working with these industries, through appropriate organizations, to develop Visions of the desired condition of each industry some 20 or 25 years in the future and then to prepare Road Maps and Implementation Plans to enable them to reach their goals. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to `Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is necessary that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the energy database for articles from this report.

  14. Multiyear Program Plan for the High Temperature Materials Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvid E. Pasto

    2000-03-17

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) prepared a Technology Roadmap describing the challenges facing development of higher fuel efficiency, less polluting sport utility vehicles, vans, and commercial trucks. Based on this roadmap, a multiyear program plan (MYPP) was also developed, in which approaches to solving the numerous challenges are enumerated. Additional planning has been performed by DOE and national laboratory staff, on approaches to solving the numerous challenges faced by heavy vehicle system improvements. Workshops and planning documents have been developed concerning advanced aerodynamics, frictional and other parasitic losses, and thermal management. Similarly, the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program has developed its own multiyear program plan. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory, a major user facility sponsored by OHVT, has now developed its program plan, described herein. Information was gathered via participation in the development of OHVT's overall Technology Roadmap and MYPP, through personal contacts within the materials-user community, and from attendance at conferences and expositions. Major materials issues for the heavy vehicle industry currently center on trying to increase efficiency of (diesel) engines while at the same time reducing emissions (particularly NO{sub x} and particulates). These requirements dictate the use of increasingly stronger, higher-temperature capable and more corrosion-resistant materials of construction, as well as advanced catalysts, particulate traps, and other pollution-control devices. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a technique which will certainly be applied to diesel engines in the near future, and its use represents a formidable challenge, as will be described later. Energy-efficient, low cost materials processing methods and surface treatments to improve wear, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also required.

  15. Multiyear Program Plan for the High Temperature Materials Laboratory; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvid E. Pasto

    2000-01-01

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) prepared a Technology Roadmap describing the challenges facing development of higher fuel efficiency, less polluting sport utility vehicles, vans, and commercial trucks. Based on this roadmap, a multiyear program plan (MYPP) was also developed, in which approaches to solving the numerous challenges are enumerated. Additional planning has been performed by DOE and national laboratory staff, on approaches to solving the numerous challenges faced by heavy vehicle system improvements. Workshops and planning documents have been developed concerning advanced aerodynamics, frictional and other parasitic losses, and thermal management. Similarly, the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program has developed its own multiyear program plan. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory, a major user facility sponsored by OHVT, has now developed its program plan, described herein. Information was gathered via participation in the development of OHVT's overall Technology Roadmap and MYPP, through personal contacts within the materials-user community, and from attendance at conferences and expositions. Major materials issues for the heavy vehicle industry currently center on trying to increase efficiency of (diesel) engines while at the same time reducing emissions (particularly NO(sub x) and particulates). These requirements dictate the use of increasingly stronger, higher-temperature capable and more corrosion-resistant materials of construction, as well as advanced catalysts, particulate traps, and other pollution-control devices. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a technique which will certainly be applied to diesel engines in the near future, and its use represents a formidable challenge, as will be described later. Energy-efficient, low cost materials processing methods and surface treatments to improve wear, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also required

  16. MAPLIB, Thermodynamics Materials Property Generator for FORTRAN Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, U.; Zimmerer, W. and others

    1978-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: MAPLIB is a program system which is able to incorporate the values of the properties of any material in a form suitable for use in other computer programs. The data are implemented in FORTRAN functions. A utility program is provided to assist in library management. 2 - Method of solution: MAPLIB consists of the following parts: 1) Conventions for the data format. 2) Some integrated data. 3) A data access system (FORTRAN subroutine). 4) An utility program for updating and documentation of the actual library content. The central part is a set of FORTRAN functions, e.g. WL H2O v(t,p) (heat conduction of water vapor as a function of temperature and pressure), which compute the required data and which can be called by the user program. The data content of MAPLIB has been delivered by many persons. There was no systematic evaluation of the material. It is the responsibility of every user to check the data for physical accuracy. MAPLIB only serves as a library system for manipulation and storing of such data. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: a) See responsibility as explained above. b) Up to 1000 data functions could be implemented. c) If too many data functions are included in MAPLIB, the storage requirements become excessive for application in users programs

  17. Ballistic Impact Testing of Aluminum 2024 and Titanium 6Al-4V for Material Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Emmerling, William C.; Altobelli, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental program is underway to develop a consistent set of material property and impact test data, and failure analysis, for a variety of materials that can be used to develop improved impact failure and deformation models. Unique features of this set of data are that all material property information and impact test results are obtained using identical materials, the test methods and procedures are extensively documented and all of the raw data is available. This report describes ballistic impact testing which has been conducted on aluminum (Al) 2024 and titanium (Ti) 6Al-4vanadium (V) sheet and plate samples of different thicknesses and with different types of projectiles, one a regular cylinder and one with a more complex geometry incorporating features representative of a jet engine fan blade.

  18. Reprint of: Improved cytotoxicity testing of magnesium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Janine; Pröfrock, Daniel; Hort, Norbert; Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Metallic magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are highly suitable for medical applications as biocompatible and biodegradable implant materials. Magnesium has mechanical properties similar to bone, stimulates bone regeneration, is an essential non-toxic element for the human body and degrades completely within the body environment. In consequence, magnesium is a promising candidate as implant material for orthopaedic applications. Protocols using the guideline of current ISO standards should be carefully evaluated when applying them for the characterization of the cytotoxic potential of degradable magnesium materials. For as-cast material we recommend using 10 times more extraction medium than recommended by the ISO standards to obtain reasonable results for reliable cytotoxicity rankings of degradable materials in vitro. In addition primary isolated human osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells should be used to test magnesium materials.

  19. Reprint of: Improved cytotoxicity testing of magnesium materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Janine [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Proefrock, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Department for Marine Bioanalytical Chemistry, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Hort, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Magnesium Processing, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Metallic magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are highly suitable for medical applications as biocompatible and biodegradable implant materials. Magnesium has mechanical properties similar to bone, stimulates bone regeneration, is an essential non-toxic element for the human body and degrades completely within the body environment. In consequence, magnesium is a promising candidate as implant material for orthopaedic applications. Protocols using the guideline of current ISO standards should be carefully evaluated when applying them for the characterization of the cytotoxic potential of degradable magnesium materials. For as-cast material we recommend using 10 times more extraction medium than recommended by the ISO standards to obtain reasonable results for reliable cytotoxicity rankings of degradable materials in vitro. In addition primary isolated human osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells should be used to test magnesium materials.

  20. Growing and testing mycelium bricks as building insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yangang; Brewer, Matthew; El-Gharabawy, Hoda; Griffith, Gareth; Jones, Phil

    2018-02-01

    In order to improve energy performance of buildings, insulation materials (such as mineral glass and rock wools, or fossil fuel-based plastic foams) are being used in increasing quantities, which may lead to potential problem with materials depletions and landfill disposal. One sustainable solution suggested is the use of bio-based, biodegradable materials. A number of attempts have been made to develop biomaterials, such as sheep wood, hemcrete or recycled papers. In this paper, a novel type of bio insulation materials - mycelium is examined. The aim is to produce mycelium materials that could be used as insulations. The bio-based material was required to have properties that matched existing alternatives, such as expanded polystyrene, in terms of physical and mechanical characteristics but with an enhanced level of biodegradability. The testing data showed mycelium bricks exhibited good thermal performance. Future work is planned to improve growing process and thermal performance of the mycelium bricks.

  1. Preliminary geochemical and physical testing of materials for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.L.; Anttonen, G.J.; O'Rourke, J.E.; Allirot, D.

    1980-04-01

    The available data on environmental conditions (both natural and man-made) at the Hanford Site are sufficient for preconceptual plug system design. Results of the geochemical testing program indicate that preferred candidate plug materials are chemically nonreactive during laboratory tests that simulated some of the expected environmental conditions. Agitated, crushed-basalt samples and mixtures containing basalt were found to be self-cementing under the hydrothermal conditions. Materials considered most suitable for consideration in future test programs and preconceptual plug design are mixtures of natural materials (basalt, clay, glaciofluvial sand, gravel, and zeolite) and processed natural materials

  2. Preliminary geochemical and physical testing of materials for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.L.; Anttonen, G.J.; O' Rourke, J.E.; Allirot, D.

    1980-04-01

    The available data on environmental conditions (both natural and man-made) at the Hanford Site are sufficient for preconceptual plug system design. Results of the geochemical testing program indicate that preferred candidate plug materials are chemically nonreactive during laboratory tests that simulated some of the expected environmental conditions. Agitated, crushed-basalt samples and mixtures containing basalt were found to be self-cementing under the hydrothermal conditions. Materials considered most suitable for consideration in future test programs and preconceptual plug design are mixtures of natural materials (basalt, clay, glaciofluvial sand, gravel, and zeolite) and processed natural materials (portland cement Type V and grouts plus additives).

  3. Atomistic Simulations of Small-scale Materials Tests of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Chan Sun; Jin, Hyung Ha; Kwon, Jun Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of materials properties under neutron irradiation is one of the key issues affecting the lifetime of nuclear reactors. Evaluating the property changes of materials due to irradiations and understanding the role of microstructural changes on mechanical properties are required for ensuring reliable and safe operation of a nuclear reactor. However, high dose of neuron irradiation capabilities are rather limited and it is difficult to discriminate various factors affecting the property changes of materials. Ion beam irradiation can be used to investigate radiation damage to materials in a controlled way, but has the main limitation of small penetration depth in the length scale of micro meters. Over the past decade, the interest in the investigations of size-dependent mechanical properties has promoted the development of various small-scale materials tests, e.g. nanoindentation and micro/nano-pillar compression tests. Small-scale materials tests can address the issue of the limitation of small penetration depth of ion irradiation. In this paper, we present small-scale materials tests (experiments and simulation) which are applied to study the size and irradiation effects on mechanical properties. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation and nanopillar compression tests. These atomistic simulations are expected to significantly contribute to the investigation of the fundamental deformation mechanism of small scale irradiated materials

  4. Strip specimen tests for pipeline materials and girth welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, William C. [Edison Welding Institute (EWI), Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Strip specimen testing of pipeline materials has been widely applied as a method of getting data relevant to the performance of pipelines under axial direction loading. Comparisons of strip specimen against smaller standard tests (round tensile bar, fracture toughness specimens, polished round bars) and against full-scale or large-scale testing will be explored. Data from early-generation pipe welds from the 1920's to the 1940's to the most recent materials for offshore reeled pipe will be used for examples. Strip samples can provide full thickness information to take account of varying material properties or imperfection distribution through the thickness. Strip samples can also accommodate measurement of effects of the original surface finish or weld surface shape. Strip samples have more design flexibility than standard tests, but must be designed to limit stress concentrations and effects of local bending. (author)

  5. Piezoelectric materials involved in road traffic applications test system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez Rodriguez, M.; Jimenez Martinez, F.; Frutos, J. de

    2011-01-01

    The test bench system described in this paper performs experiments on piezoelectric materials used in road traffic applications, covering a range between 14 and 170 km/h, which is considered enough for testing under standard traffic conditions. A software has been developed to control the three phase induction motor driver and to acquire all the measurement data of the piezoelectric materials. The mass over each systems axis can be selected, with a limit of 60 kg over each wheel. The test bench is used to simulate the real behaviour of buried piezoelectric cables in road traffic applications for both light and heavy vehicles. This new test bed system is a powerful research tool and can be applied to determine the optimal installation and configuration of the piezoelectric cable sensors and opens a new field of research: the study of energy harvesting techniques based on piezoelectric materials. (Author) 10 refs.

  6. Development and demonstration program for dynamic nuclear materials control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustson, R.H.; Baron, N.; Ford, R.F.; Ford, W.; Hagen, J.; Li, T.K.; Marshall, R.S.; Reams, V.S.; Severe, W.R.; Shirk, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    A significant portion of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Safeguards Program is directed toward the development and demonstration of dynamic nuclear materials control. The building chosen for the demonstration system is the new Plutonium Processing Facility in Los Alamos, which houses such operations as metal-to-oxide conversion, fuel pellet fabrication, and scrap recovery. A DYnamic MAterials Control (DYMAC) system is currently being installed in the facility as an integral part of the processing operation. DYMAC is structured around interlocking unit-process accounting areas. It relies heavily on nondestructive assay measurements made in the process line to draw dynamic material balances in near real time. In conjunction with the nondestructive assay instrumentation, process operators use interactive terminals to transmit additional accounting and process information to a dedicated computer. The computer verifies and organizes the incoming data, immediately updates the inventory records, monitors material in transit using elapsed time, and alerts the Nuclear Materials Officer in the event that material balances exceed the predetermined action limits. DYMAC is part of the United States safeguards system under control of the facility operator. Because of its advanced features, the system will present a new set of inspection conditions to the IAEA, whose response is the subject of a study being sponsored by the US-IAEA Technical Assistance Program. The central issue is how the IAEA can use the increased capabilities of such a system and still maintain independent verification

  7. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  8. Thermal testing transport packages for radioactive materials: Reality vs regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.; Carlson, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    The principle objective of this paper is to provide information that will help describe the physical thermal tests performed to demonstrate compliance with the hypothetical accident conditions specified in 10 CFR 71.73. Physical testing should be applied to packages that cannot be modeled by analysis to adequately predict their response to hypothetical accident conditions. These tests should be used when chemical decomposition or material changes occur during an accident that would be difficult to analytically predict or model

  9. Using Virtual ATE Model to Migrate Test Programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓明; 杨乔林

    1995-01-01

    Bacause of high development costs of IC (Integrated Circuit)test programs,recycling existing test programs from one kind of ATE (Automatic Test Equipment) to another or generating directly from CAD simulation modules to ATE is more and more valuable.In this paper,a new approach to migrating test programs is presented.A virtual ATE model based on object-oriented paradigm is developed;it runs Test C++ (an intermediate test control language) programs and TeIF(Test Inftermediate Format-an intermediate pattern),migrates test programs among three kinds of ATE (Ando DIC8032,Schlumberger S15 and GenRad 1732) and generates test patterns from two kinds of CAD 9Daisy and Panda) automatically.

  10. Standard Test Method for Contamination Outgassing Characteristics of Spacecraft Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a technique for generating data to characterize the kinetics of the release of outgassing products from materials. This technique will determine both the total mass flux evolved by a material when exposed to a vacuum environment and the deposition of this flux on surfaces held at various specified temperatures. 1.2 This test method describes the test apparatus and related operating procedures for evaluating the total mass flux that is evolved from a material being subjected to temperatures that are between 298 and 398 K. Pressures external to the sample effusion cell are less than 7 × 10−3 Pa (5 × 10−5 torr). Deposition rates are measured during material outgassing tests. A test procedure for collecting data and a test method for processing and presenting the collected data are included. 1.3 This test method can be used to produce the data necessary to support mathematical models used for the prediction of molecular contaminant generation, migration, and deposition. 1.4 Al...

  11. Ultraviolet Testing of Space Suit Materials for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristine; Fries, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may require radical changes in the approach to extra-vehicular (EVA) suit design. A major challenge is the balance of building a suit robust enough to complete multiple EVAs under intense ultraviolet (UV) light exposure without losing mechanical strength or compromising the suit's mobility. To study how the materials degrade on Mars in-situ, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) invited the Advanced Space Suit team at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) to place space suit materials on the Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument's calibration target of the Mars 2020 rover. In order to select materials for the rover and understand the effects from Mars equivalent UV exposure, JSC conducted ground testing on both current and new space suit materials when exposed to 2500 hours of Mars mission equivalent UV. To complete this testing, JSC partnered with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to utilize their UV vacuum chambers. Materials tested were Orthofabric, polycarbonate, Teflon, Dacron, Vectran, spectra, bladder, nGimat coated Teflon, and nGimat coated Orthofabric. All samples were measured for mass, tensile strength, and chemical composition before and after radiation. Mass loss was insignificant (less than 0.5%) among the materials. Most materials loss tensile strength after radiation and became more brittle with a loss of elongation. Changes in chemical composition were seen in all radiated materials through Spectral Analysis. Results from this testing helped select the materials that will fly on the Mars 2020 rover. In addition, JSC can use this data to create a correlation to the chemical changes after radiation-which is what the rover will send back while on Mars-to the mechanical changes, such as tensile strength.

  12. Fundamental radiation effects studies in the fusion materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fundamental radiation effects studies in the US Fusion Materials Program generally fall under the aegis of the Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Program. In a narrow sense, the problem addressed by the DAFS program is the prediction of radiation effects in fusion devices using data obtained in non-representative environments. From the onset, the program has had near-term and long-term components. The premise for the latter is that there will be large economic penalties for uncertainties in predictive capability. Fusion devices are expected to be large and complex and unanticipated maintenance will be costly. It is important that predictions are based on a maximum of understanding and a minimum of empiricism. Gaining this understanding is the thrust of the long-term component. (orig.)

  13. The Hazardous Material Technician Apprenticeship Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, S.D.

    1987-07-01

    This document describes an apprenticeship training program for hazardous material technician. This entry-level category is achieved after approximately 216 hours of classroom and on-the-job training. Procedures for evaluating performance include in-class testing, use of on-the-job checks, and the assignment of an apprentice mentor for each trainee

  14. Real sequential evaluation of materials balance data with the computer program PROSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicking, U.; Golly, W.; Seifert, R.

    1991-01-01

    Material accountancy is an important tool for international nuclear safeguards. The aim is to detect a possible loss of material timely and with high probability. In this context, a computer program called PROSA (Program for Sequential Analysis of NRTA data) was developed at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. PROSA is a statistical tool to decide on the basis of statistical considerations whether or not in a given sequence of material balances a loss of material might have occurred. The evaluation of the material balance data (MUF values) is carried out with statistical test procedures. In the present PROSA version 4.0 three tests, Page's test, CUMUF test and GEMUF test are applied at a time. These three test procedures are the result of several years of research and are supposed to be the most promising ones with respect to the detection probability of possible losses of material as well as to the timeliness of such a detection. PROSA version 4.0 is a user-friendly, menudriven computer program which is suitable for routine field application. Data input - that means MUF values and measurement model - can be performed either by diskette or by key-enter. The output consists of an information whether or not an alarm is indicated. This information can be displayed either numerically or graphically. Therefore, a comfortable graphical output utility is attached to PROSA version 4.0. In this presentation the theoretical concepts implemented in PROSA will be explained. Furthermore, the functioning of the program will be presented and the performance of PROSA will be demonstrated using balance data of a real reprocessing campaign. (J.P.N.)

  15. Build green and conventional materials off-gassing tests: A final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piersol, P.

    1995-12-31

    Build Green is a certification program that will identify and label building products with a known recycled content. The introduction of these recycled materials has raised the concern that they may emit more indoor pollutants than conventional materials. This study addresses that concern by analyzing Build Green and conventional materials to assess their potential for off-gassing. The study involved emission tests of 37 materials including carpets, carpet undercushions, structural lumber, foundation material, insulation, drywall, fiberboard, counter tops, and cabinetry. The results presented in this report include comparisons of Build Green and conventional materials in terms of emissions of volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde, the material loading ratio, and discussion of the specific sources of the emissions.

  16. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

  17. Overview of the U.S. Fusion Materials Sciences Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, Steven J.

    2005-01-01

    Highlights of recent U.S. fusion materials research activities are summarized, including multiscale materials modeling and experimental results. Recent first principles atomistic calculations on vanadium and iron-helium have found that previous interatomic potentials incorrectly predict several important point defect properties. Molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades are now approaching energies equivalent to 14 MeV fusion neutrons. Considerable effort is being devoted to understanding the fundamental mechanisms of low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement. Work is also in progress to determine the allowable temperature and dose operating regimes for candidate reduced activation structural materials (including transmutant helium effects). New compositions of reduced activation steels and vanadium alloys with potential for significantly improved properties are being investigated. Due to recent improvements in SiC/SiC ceramic composites, engineering-relevant mechanical property tests are being introduced to replace historical qualitative screening tests. Materials research in support of the ITER burning plasma physics machine is briefly described

  18. Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia's facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns

  19. Alternative filtration testing program: Pre-evaluation of test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgeton, G.K.; Poirier, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    Based on results of testing eight solids removal technologies and one pretreatment option, it is recommended that a centrifugal ultrafilter and polymeric ultrafilter undergo further testing as possible alternatives to the Norton Ceramic filters. Deep bed filtration should be considered as a third alternative, if a backwashable cartridge filter is shown to be inefficient in separate testing

  20. Alternative filtration testing program: Pre-evaluation of test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgeton, G.K.; Poirier, M.R.

    1990-09-28

    Based on results of testing eight solids removal technologies and one pretreatment option, it is recommended that a centrifugal ultrafilter and polymeric ultrafilter undergo further testing as possible alternatives to the Norton Ceramic filters. Deep bed filtration should be considered as a third alternative, if a backwashable cartridge filter is shown to be inefficient in separate testing.

  1. Test or toy? Materiality and the measurement of infant intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacy L

    2015-05-01

    Adopting a material culture perspective, this article interrogates the composition of the copy of the Cattell Infant Intelligence Scale housed at the University of Toronto Scientific Instruments Collection. As a deliberately assembled collection of toys, the Cattell Scale makes clear the indefinite boundary between test and toy in 20th-century American psychology. Consideration of the current condition of some of the material constituents of this particular Cattell Scale provides valuable insight into some of the elusive practices of intelligence testers in situ and highlights the dynamic nature of the testing process. At the same time, attending to the materiality of this intelligence test reveals some of the more general assumptions about the nature of intelligence inherent in tests for young children. The scale and others like it, I argue, exposes psychologists' often-uncritical equation of childhood intelligence with appropriate play undertaken with an appropriate toy, an approach complicit in, and fostered by, midcentury efforts to cultivate particular forms of selfhood. This analysis serves as an example of the kind of work that may be done on the history of intelligence testing when the material objects that were (and are) inherently a part of the testing process are included in historical scholarship. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Program for analyzing power boost tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, C.A.

    1982-03-01

    A rapid increase of power in a reactor produces a failure in the fuel. Experiments to study the conditions in the NRU reactor after such failures have been planned and carried out. Given the concentrations of specified isotopes at a number of times over the length of an experiment as produced for example, from the program SARGS and the power history of the reactor, this program calculates the release rates, escape rate coefficients, and fractional releases for the isotopes. These values may be optionally printed and plotted. Decay schemes for a limited number of mass numbers are implemented. The program is written in FORTRAN and runs on the CDC 6600 - CYBER 170 system

  3. Results of ASTM round robin testing for mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    The results are summarized of several interlaboratory 'round robin' test programs for measuring the mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of advanced fiber reinforced composite materials. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were conducted by participants in ASTM committee D30 on High Modulus Fibers and their Composites and by representatives of the European Group on Fracture (EGF) and the Japanese Industrial Standards Group (JIS). DCB tests were performed on three AS4 carbon fiber reinforced composite materials: AS4/3501-6 with a brittle epoxy matrix; AS4/BP907 with a tough epoxy matrix; and AS4/PEEK with a tough thermoplastic matrix. Difficulties encountered in manufacturing panels, as well as conducting the tests are discussed. Critical issues that developed during the course of the testing are highlighted. Results of the round robin testing used to determine the precision of the ASTM DCB test standard are summarized.

  4. GCRA review and appraisal of fuel material development programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The Fuel material Development Program has as its principal objective and responsibility the development of a fuel that is both economical and licensable and that, at the same time, will fulfill the required performance criteria. To accomplish this, the program is broken down into the following major fuel development task areas: development of the experimental and analytical data base for selecting, qualifying, and verifying the reference fuel design; providing the data base and developing models for evaluating fuel performance under upset and accident conditions; and developing and justifying fuel fabrication specifications which are consistent with the overall fuel performance criteria and with the fuel fabrication process capabilities

  5. Health and safety information program for hazardous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.P.; Fallon, N.J.; Kuehner, A.V.

    1979-01-01

    The system is used as a management tool in several safety and health programs. It is used to: trace the use of hazardous materials and to determine monitoring needs; inform the occupational physician of the potential health problems associated with materials ordered by a given individual; inform the fire and rescue group of hazardous materials in a given building; provide waste disposal recommendations to the hazardous waste management group; assist the hazardous materials shipping coordinator in identifying materials which are regulated by the Department of Transportation; and guide management decisions in the area of recognizing and rectifying unsafe conditions. The information system has been expanded from a manual effort to provide a brief description of health hazards of chemicals used at the lab to a computerized health and safety information system which serves the needs of all personnel who may encounter the material in the course of their work. The system has been designed to provide information needed to control the potential problems associated with a hazardous material up to the time that it is consumed in a given operation or is sent to the waste disposal facility

  6. The waste minimization program at the Feed Materials Production Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasdel, J.E.; Crotzer, M.E.; Gardner, R.L.; Kato, T.R.; Spradlin, C.N.

    1987-01-01

    A waste minimization program is being implemented at the Feed Materials Production Center to reduce the generation of uranium-contaminated wastes and to comply with existing and forthcoming regulations. Procedures and plans are described which deal with process and non-process trash, contaminated wood and metals, used metal drums, and major process wastes such as contaminated magnesium fluoride and neutralized raffinate. Waste minimization techniques used include segregation, source reduction, volume reduction, material substitution and waste/product recycle. The importance of training, communication, and incentives is also covered. 5 refs., 11 figs

  7. Definition study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and associated test program and test plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Definition Study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and Associated Test Program and Test Plan, was initiated to identify the most cost effective program for a follow-on to the AST Test Bed Program. The VCEE Study defined various subscale VCE's based on different available core engine components, and a full scale VCEE utilizing current technology. The cycles were selected, preliminary design accomplished and program plans and engineering costs developed for several program options. In addition to the VCEE program plans and options, a limited effort was applied to identifying programs that could logically be accomplished on the AST Test Bed Program VCE to extend the usefulness of this test hardware. Component programs were provided that could be accomplished prior to the start of a VCEE program.

  8. Progeria Research Foundation Diagnostic Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share the DVD Meet the Kids in the Movie Bring LATS to the classroom! Close News/Events ... this could severely affect their research results and interpretation. Through the PRF Diagnostics Program, each cell line ...

  9. Erosion tests of materials by energetic particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schechter, D.E.; Tsai, C.C.; Sluss, F.; Becraft, W.R.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The internal components of magnetic fusion devices must withstand erosion from and high heat flux of energetic plasma particles. The selection of materials for the construction of these components is important to minimize contamination of the plasma. In order to study various materials' comparative resistance to erosion by energetic particles and their ability to withstand high heat flux, water-cooled copper swirl tubes coated or armored with various materials were subjected to bombardment by hydrogen and helium particle beams. Materials tested were graphite, titanium carbide (TiC), chromium, nickel, copper, silver, gold, and aluminum. Details of the experimental arrangement and methods of application or attachment of the materials to the copper swirl tubes are presented. Results including survivability and mass losses are discussed.

  10. LOCA simulation in the NRU reactor: materials test-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russcher, G.E.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Wildung, N.J.; Rausch, W.N.

    1981-10-01

    A simulated loss-of-coolant accident was performed with a full-length test bundle of pressurized water reactor fuel rods. This second experiment of the program produced peak fuel cladding temperatures of 1148K (1607 0 F) and resulted in six ruptured fuel rods. Test data and initial results from the experiment are presented here in the form of photographs and graphical summaries. These results are also compared with the preceding prototypic thermal-hydraulic test results and with computer model test predictions

  11. Towards a Theory for Testing Non-terminating Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotlieb, Arnaud; Petit, Matthieu

    2009-01-01

    Non-terminating programs are programs that legally perform unbounded computations. Though they are ubiquitous in real-world applications, testing these programs requires new theoretic developments as usual definitions of test data adequacy criteria ignore infinite paths. This paper develops...... a theory of program-based structural testing based on operational semantics. Reasoning at the program semantics level permits to cope with infinite paths (and non-feasible paths) when defining test data adequacy criteria. As a result, our criteria respect the first Weyuker’s property on finite...... applicability, even for non-terminating programs. We discuss the consequences of this re-interpretation of test data adequacy criteria w.r.t. existing test coverage criteria....

  12. Test methods for selection of materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste vitrification. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Corbett, R.A.; Morrison, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Candidate materials of construction were evaluated for a facility at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant to vitrify high-level radioactive waste. Limited operating experience was available under the corrosive conditions of the complex vitrification process. The objective of the testing program was to provide a high degree of assurance that equipment will meet or exceed design lifetimes. To meet this objective in reasonable time and minimum cost, a program was designed consisting of a combination of coupon immersion and electrochemical laboratory tests and pilot-scale tests. Stainless steels and nickel-based alloys were tested. Alloys that were most resistant to general and local attack contained nickel, molybdenum (>9%), and chromium (where Cr + Mo > 30%). Alloy C-276 was selected as the reference material for process equipment. Stellite 6 was selected for abrasive service in the presence of formic acid. Alloy 690 and ALLCORR were selected for specific applications

  13. Reference Material Kydex(registered trademark)-100 Test Data Message for Flammability Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Carl D.; Richardson, Erin; Davis, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) database contains, as an engineering resource, a large amount of material test data carefully obtained and recorded over a number of years. Flammability test data obtained using Test 1 of NASA-STD-6001 is a significant component of this database. NASA-STD-6001 recommends that Kydex 100 be used as a reference material for testing certification and for comparison between test facilities in the round-robin certification testing that occurs every 2 years. As a result of these regular activities, a large volume of test data is recorded within the MAPTIS database. The activity described in this technical report was undertaken to mine the database, recover flammability (Test 1) Kydex 100 data, and review the lessons learned from analysis of these data.

  14. NNWSI Phase II materials interaction test procedure and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. This report describes a test method (Phase II) that has been developed to measure the release of radionuclides from the waste package under simulated repository conditions, and provides information on materials interactions that may occur in the repository. The results of 13 weeks of testing using the method are presented, and an analog test is described that investigates the relationship between the test method and expected repository conditions. 9 references, 10 figures, 11 tables

  15. Compilation of radiation damage test data cable insulating materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: ethylene- propylene rubber, Hypalon, neoprene rubber, polyethylene, polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber, etc. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses from 5*10/sup 5/ to 5*10/sup 6/ Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs, to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (13 refs).

  16. Test plan: Potash Core Test. WIPP experimental program borehole plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, C.L.

    1979-09-01

    The Potash Core Test will utilize a WIPP emplaced plug to obtain samples of an in-situ cured plug of known mix constituents for bench scale testing. An earlier effort involved recovery at the salt horizon of Plug 217, a 17 year old plug in a potash exploration hole for bond testing, but the lack of particulars in the emplacement precluded significant determination of plug performance

  17. Optimal selection for shielding materials by fuzzy linear programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Y.; Miura, N.; Sugasawa, S.

    1996-01-01

    An application of fuzzy linear programming methods to optimization of a radiation shield is presented. The main purpose of the present study is the choice of materials and the search of the ratio of mixture-component as the first stage of the methodology on optimum shielding design according to individual requirements of nuclear reactor, reprocessing facility, shipping cask installing spent fuel, ect. The characteristic values for the shield optimization may be considered their cost, spatial space, weight and some shielding qualities such as activation rate and total dose rate for neutron and gamma ray (includes secondary gamma ray). This new approach can reduce huge combination calculations for conventional two-valued logic approaches to representative single shielding calculation by group-wised optimization parameters determined in advance. Using the fuzzy linear programming method, possibilities for reducing radiation effects attainable in optimal compositions hydrated, lead- and boron-contained materials are investigated

  18. Standard test methods for rockwell hardness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the Rockwell hardness and the Rockwell superficial hardness of metallic materials by the Rockwell indentation hardness principle. This standard provides the requirements for Rockwell hardness machines and the procedures for performing Rockwell hardness tests. 1.2 This standard includes additional requirements in annexes: Verification of Rockwell Hardness Testing Machines Annex A1 Rockwell Hardness Standardizing Machines Annex A2 Standardization of Rockwell Indenters Annex A3 Standardization of Rockwell Hardness Test Blocks Annex A4 Guidelines for Determining the Minimum Thickness of a Test Piece Annex A5 Hardness Value Corrections When Testing on Convex Cylindrical Surfaces Annex A6 1.3 This standard includes nonmandatory information in appendixes which relates to the Rockwell hardness test. List of ASTM Standards Giving Hardness Values Corresponding to Tensile Strength Appendix X1 Examples of Procedures for Determining Rockwell Hardness Uncertainty Appendix X...

  19. Standard test methods for rockwell hardness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the Rockwell hardness and the Rockwell superficial hardness of metallic materials by the Rockwell indentation hardness principle. This standard provides the requirements for Rockwell hardness machines and the procedures for performing Rockwell hardness tests. 1.2 This standard includes additional requirements in annexes: Verification of Rockwell Hardness Testing Machines Annex A1 Rockwell Hardness Standardizing Machines Annex A2 Standardization of Rockwell Indenters Annex A3 Standardization of Rockwell Hardness Test Blocks Annex A4 Guidelines for Determining the Minimum Thickness of a Test Piece Annex A5 Hardness Value Corrections When Testing on Convex Cylindrical Surfaces Annex A6 1.3 This standard includes nonmandatory information in appendixes which relates to the Rockwell hardness test. List of ASTM Standards Giving Hardness Values Corresponding to Tensile Strength Appendix X1 Examples of Procedures for Determining Rockwell Hardness Uncertainty Appendix X...

  20. A testing program to evaluate the effects of simulant mixed wastes on plastic transportation packaging components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-01-01

    Based on regulatory requirements for Type A and B radioactive material packaging, a Testing Program was developed to evaluate the effects of mixed wastes on plastic materials which could be used as liners and seals in transportation containers. The plastics evaluated in this program were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile rubber), cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbons, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), butyl rubber, polypropylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). These plastics were first screened in four simulant mixed wastes. The liner materials were screened using specific gravity measurements and seal materials by vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements. For the screening of liner materials, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals. The tests also indicated that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. Those materials which passed the screening tests were subjected to further comprehensive testing in each of the simulant wastes. The materials were exposed to four different radiation doses followed by exposure to a simulant mixed waste at three temperatures and four different exposure times (7, 14, 28, 180 days). Materials were tested by measuring specific gravity, dimensional, hardness, stress cracking, VTR, compression set, and tensile properties. The second phase of this Testing Program involving the comprehensive testing of plastic liner has been completed and for seal materials is currently in progress

  1. 78 FR 39271 - Applications for New Awards; Educational Technology, Media, and Materials Program for Individuals...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Educational Technology, Media, and Materials...: Educational Technology, Media, and Materials Program for Individuals with Disabilities--Center on Technology... Description Purpose of Program: The purpose of the Educational Technology, Media, and Materials for...

  2. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucher, Wenzel; Koch, Wolfgang; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Loiseau, Olivier; Mo, Tin; Billone, Michael C.; Autrusson, Bruno A.; Young, F. I.; Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana; Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver; Thompson, Nancy Slater; Hibbs, Russell S.; Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin; Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung

    2005-01-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of

  3. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Mo, Tin (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Billone, Michael C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Thompson, Nancy Slater (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Hibbs, Russell S. (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL)

    2005-07-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of

  4. Radioactive material package test standards and performance requirements - public perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.; Rawl, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses issues related to the public perception of the regulatory test standards and performance requirements for packaging and transporting radioactive material. Specifically, it addresses the adequacy of the package performance standards and testing for Type B packages, which are those packages designed for transporting the most hazardous quantities and forms of radioactive material. Type B packages are designed to withstand accident conditions in transport. To improve public perception, the public needs to better understand: (a) the regulatory standards and requirements themselves, (b) the extensive history underlying their development, and (c) the soundness of the technical foundation. The public needs to be fully informed on studies, tests, and analyses that have been carried out worldwide and form the basis of the regulatory standards and requirements. This paper provides specific information aimed at improving the public perception of packages test standards

  5. Scoping Future Policy Dynamics in Raw Materials Through Scenarios Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Vitor; Keane, Christopher; Sturm, Flavius; Schimpf, Sven; Bodo, Balazs

    2017-04-01

    The International Raw Materials Observatory (INTRAW) project is working towards a sustainable future for the European Union in access to raw materials, from an availability, economical, and environmental framework. One of the major exercises for the INTRAW project is the evaluation of potential future scenarios for 2050 to frame economic, research, and environmental policy towards a sustainable raw materials supply. The INTRAW consortium developed three possible future scenarios that encompass defined regimes of political, economic, and technological norms. The first scenario, "Unlimited Trade," reflects a world in which free trade continues to dominate the global political and economic environment, with expectations of a growing demand for raw materials from widely distributed global growth. The "National Walls" scenario reflects a world where nationalism and economic protectionism begins to dominate, leading to stagnating economic growth and uneven dynamics in raw materials supply and demand. The final scenario, "Sustainability Alliance," examines the dynamics of a global political and economic climate that is focused on environmental and economic sustainability, leading towards increasingly towards a circular raw materials economy. These scenarios were reviewed, tested, and provided simulations of impacts with members of the Consortium and a panel of global experts on international raw materials issues which led to expected end conditions for 2050. Given the current uncertainty in global politics, these scenarios are informative to identifying likely opportunities and crises. The details of these simulations and expected responses to the research demand, technology investments, and economic components of raw materials system will be discussed.

  6. The insulation irradiation test program for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McManamy, T.J.; Kanemoto, G.; Snook, P.

    1990-01-01

    The electrical insulation for the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is expected to be exposed to radiation doses on the order of 10 10 rad with ∼90% of the dose from neutrons. The coils are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature and then heated during the pulse to a peak temperature >300 K. In a program to evaluate the effects of radiation exposure on the insulators, three types of boron-free insulation were irradiated at room temperature in the Advanced Technology Reactor (ATR) and tested at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The materials were Spaulrad-S, Shikishima PG5-1, and Shikishima PG3-1. The first two use a bismaleimide resin and the third an aromatic amine hardened epoxy. Spaulrad-S is a two-dimensional (2-D) weave of S-glass, while the others are 3-D weaves of T-glass. Flexure and shear/compression samples were irradiated to approximately 5 x 10 9 rad and 3 x 10 10 rad with 35 to 40% of the total dose from neutrons. The shear/compression samples were tested in pairs by applying an average compression of 345 MPa and then a shear load. After static tests were completed, fatigue testing was done by cycling the shear load for up to 30,000 cycles with a constant compression. The static shear strength of the samples that did not fail was then determined. Generally, shear strengths on the order of 120 MPa were measured. The behavior of the flexure and shear/compression samples was significantly different; large reductions in the flexure strength were observed, while the shear strength stayed the same or increased slightly. The 3-D weave material demonstrated higher strength and significantly less radiation damage than the 2-D material in flexure but performed nearly identically when tested with combined shear and compression. The epoxy system was much more sensitive to fatigue damage than the bismaleimide materials. 9 refs., 5 figs

  7. A study of statistical tests for near-real-time materials accountancy using field test data of Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Hideo; Ikawa, Koji; Miura, Nobuyuki; Iwanaga, Masayuki; Kusano, Toshitsugu.

    1988-03-01

    An Near-Real-Time Materials Accountancy(NRTA) system had been developed as an advanced safeguards measure for PNC Tokai Reprocessing Plant; a minicomputer system for NRTA data processing was designed and constructed. A full scale field test was carried out as a JASPAS(Japan Support Program for Agency Safeguards) project with the Agency's participation and the NRTA data processing system was used. Using this field test data, investigation of the detection power of a statistical test under real circumstances was carried out for five statistical tests, i.e., a significance test of MUF, CUMUF test, average loss test, MUF residual test and Page's test on MUF residuals. The result shows that the CUMUF test, average loss test, MUF residual test and the Page's test on MUF residual test are useful to detect a significant loss or diversion. An unmeasured inventory estimation model for the PNC reprocessing plant was developed in this study. Using this model, the field test data from the C-1 to 85 - 2 campaigns were re-analyzed. (author)

  8. Irradiation experiments and materials testing capabilities in High Flux Reactor in Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzginova, N.; Blagoeva, D.; Hegeman, H.; Van der Laan, J.

    2011-01-01

    The text of publication follows: The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten is a powerful multi-purpose research and materials testing reactor operating for about 280 Full Power Days per year. In combination with hot cells facilities, HFR provides irradiation and post-irradiation examination services requested by nuclear energy research and development programs, as well as by industry and research organizations. Using a variety of the custom developed irradiation devices and a large experience in executing irradiation experiments, the HFR is suitable for fuel, materials and components testing for different reactor types. Irradiation experiments carried out at the HFR are mainly focused on the understanding of the irradiation effects on materials; and providing databases for irradiation behavior of materials to feed into safety cases. The irradiation experiments and materials testing at the HFR include the following issues. First, materials irradiation to support the nuclear plant life extensions, for instance, characterization of the reactor pressure vessel stainless steel claddings to insure structural integrity of the vessel, as well as irradiation of the weld material coupons to neutron fluence levels that are representative for Light Water Reactors (LWR) internals applications. Secondly, development and qualification of the structural materials for next generation nuclear fission reactors as well as thermo-nuclear fusion machines. The main areas of interest are in both conventional stainless steel and advanced reduced activation steels and special alloys such as Ni-base alloys. For instance safety-relevant aspects of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) such as the integrity of fuel and structural materials with increasing neutron fluence at typical HTR operating conditions has been recently assessed. Thirdly, support of the fuel safety through several fuel irradiation experiments including testing of pre-irradiated LWR fuel rods containing UO 2 or MOX fuel. Fourthly

  9. Round robin testing of thermal conductivity reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulstrom, L.C.; Tye, R.P.; Smith, S.E.

    1985-07-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations, has a need to determine the thermal properties of basalt in the region being considered for a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Experimental data on thermal conductivity and its variation with temperature are information required for the characterization of basalt. To establish thermal conductivity values for the reference materials, an interlaboratory measurements program was undertaken. The program was planned to meet the objectives of performing an experimental characterization of the new stock and providing a detailed analysis of the results such that reference values of thermal conductivity could be determined. This program of measurements of the thermal conductivity of Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 has produced recommended values that are within +- 1% of those accepted previously. These measurements together with those of density indicate that the present lots of material are similar to those previously available. Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 can continue to be used with confidence as thermal conductivity reference materials for studies on rocks and minerals and other materials of similar thermal conductivity. The uncertainty range for Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 up to 300 0 C is +- 10.3% and +- 5.6%, respectively. This range is similar to that indicated for the previously recommended values proposed some 18 years ago. It would appear that the overall state of the art in thermal conductivity measurements for materials in this range has changed little in the intervening years. The above uncertainties, which would have been greater had not three data sets been eliminated, are greater than those which are normally claimed for each individual method. Analyses of these differences through refinements in techniques and additional measurements to higher temperatures are required. 13 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  10. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  11. Foreign Material Exclusion Program at CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urjan, Daniel [S.N. ' Nuclearelectrica' SA, CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant, Medgidiei 2 Street, 905200 Cernavoda, Constanta (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    In the face of a continuing attention to operations and maintenance costs at nuclear power plants, the future of the industry depends largely upon increasing plant availability and improving operating efficiency. The success in achieving these objectives is dependent upon the success of each plant's equipment maintenance program. Preventing the introduction of foreign materials into a nuclear power plant system or component requires a careful, thoughtful, and professional approach by all site personnel. This paper describes a proactive approach to prevent the introduction of foreign material into systems and components, by providing an overview of technical considerations required to develop, implement, and manage a foreign material exclusion program at CNE Cernavoda Unit 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Station. It is also described an example of Foreign Material Intrusion which happened during the 2003 planned maintenance outage at Cernavoda Unit no.1. This paper also defines personnel responsibilities and key nomenclature and a means for evaluating prospective work tasks and activities against standardized criteria, in order to identify the appropriate level of the required FME controls. (author)

  12. Foreign Material Exclusion Program at CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urjan, Daniel [S.N. ' Nuclearelectrica' SA, CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant, Medgidiei 2 Street, 905200 Cernavoda, Constanta (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    In the face of a continuing attention to operations and maintenance costs at nuclear power plants, the future of the industry depends largely upon increasing plant availability and improving operating efficiency. The success in achieving these objectives is dependent upon the success of each plant's equipment maintenance program. Preventing the introduction of foreign materials into a nuclear power plant system or component requires a careful, thoughtful, and professional approach by all site personnel. This paper describes a proactive approach to prevent the introduction of foreign material into systems and components, by providing an overview of technical considerations required to develop, implement, and manage a foreign material exclusion program at CNE Cernavoda Unit 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Station. It is also described an example of Foreign Material Intrusion which happened during the 2003 planned maintenance outage at Cernavoda Unit no.1. This paper also defines personnel responsibilities and key nomenclature and a means for evaluating prospective work tasks and activities against standardized criteria, in order to identify the appropriate level of the required FME controls. (author)

  13. Foreign Material Exclusion Program at CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urjan, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In the face of a continuing attention to operations and maintenance costs at nuclear power plants, the future of the industry depends largely upon increasing plant availability and improving operating efficiency. The success in achieving these objectives is dependent upon the success of each plant's equipment maintenance program. Preventing the introduction of foreign materials into a nuclear power plant system or component requires a careful, thoughtful, and professional approach by all site personnel. This paper describes a proactive approach to prevent the introduction of foreign material into systems and components, by providing an overview of technical considerations required to develop, implement, and manage a foreign material exclusion program at CNE Cernavoda Unit 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Station. It is also described an example of Foreign Material Intrusion which happened during the 2003 planned maintenance outage at Cernavoda Unit no.1. This paper also defines personnel responsibilities and key nomenclature and a means for evaluating prospective work tasks and activities against standardized criteria, in order to identify the appropriate level of the required FME controls. (author)

  14. CIT photoheliograph functional verification unit test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Tests of the 2/3-meter photoheliograph functional verification unit FVU were performed with the FVU installed in its Big Bear Solar Observatory vacuum chamber. Interferometric tests were run both in Newtonian (f/3.85) and Gregorian (f/50) configurations. Tests were run in both configurations with optical axis horizontal, vertical, and at 45 deg to attempt to determine any gravity effects on the system. Gravity effects, if present, were masked by scatter in the data associated with the system wavefront error of 0.16 lambda rms ( = 6328A) apparently due to problems in the primary mirror. Tests showed that the redesigned secondary mirror assembly works well.

  15. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N.

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this project was to establish basic capsule irradiation technology using the multi-purpose research reactor [HANARO] to eventually support national R and D projects of advanced fuel and materials related to domestic nuclear power plants and next generation reactors. There are several national nuclear projects in KAERI, which require several irradiation tests to investigate in-pile behavior of nuclear reactor fuel and materials for the R and D of several types of fuels such as advanced PWR and DUPIC fuels and for the R and D of structural materials such as RPV(reactor pressure vessel) steel, Inconel, zirconium alloy, and stainless steel. At the moment, internal and external researchers in institutes, industries and universities are interested in investigating the irradiation characteristics of materials using the irradiation facilities of HANARO. For these kinds of material irradiation tests, it is important to develop various capsules using our own techniques. The development of capsules requires several leading-edge technologies and our own experiences related to design and fabrication. In the second phase from April 1,2000 to March 31, 2003, the utilization technologies were developed using various sensors for the measurements of temperature, pressure and displacement, and instrumented capsule technologies for the required fuel irradiation tests were developed. In addition, the improvement of the existing capsule technologies and the development of an in-situ measurable creep capsule for specific purposes were done to meet the various requirements of users

  16. Test Methods for Measuring Material Properties of Composite Materials in all Three Material Axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    eccentricities in the test setup. Therefore, the research team purchased a special test fixture for performing out-of-plane tension testing in which the...coated wheels as shown in Figure 6. The 15.2 cm long by 2.54 cm thick blocks were separated into five pieces, each with a length of 2.67 cm using the...composite plate. Figure 6. Blocks reduced to a thickness of 2.54 cm using surface grinder and custom electro plated diamond coated wheels Figure 7

  17. Thermophysical and Optical Properties of Materials Considered for Use on the LDSD Test Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Matthew; Mastropietro, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    In June 2014, the first of multiple flights in the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) technology development program took place and successfully demonstrated a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) in Mars-like conditions. Although the primary goal of the technology program was the development of new decelerators for landing heavier payloads on Mars, the low-cost thermal design of the test vehicle was only possible through the innovative use of a combination of both commercial off the shelf (COTS) and aerospace grade materials. As a result, numerous thermophysical and optical property measurements were undertaken to characterize material candidates before the final material selection was made. This paper presents thermophysical and optical property measurements performed over the course of the LDSD test vehicle development, including those not ultimately selected for use on the vehicle. These properties are compared and contrasted with the existing measurements available in previous literature.

  18. Standard Test Methods for Constituent Content of Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods determine the constituent content of composite materials by one of two approaches. Method I physically removes the matrix by digestion or ignition by one of seven procedures, leaving the reinforcement essentially unaffected and thus allowing calculation of reinforcement or matrix content (by weight or volume) as well as percent void volume. Method II, applicable only to laminate materials of known fiber areal weight, calculates reinforcement or matrix content (by weight or volume), and the cured ply thickness, based on the measured thickness of the laminate. Method II is not applicable to the measurement of void volume. 1.1.1 These test methods are primarily intended for two-part composite material systems. However, special provisions can be made to extend these test methods to filled material systems with more than two constituents, though not all test results can be determined in every case. 1.1.2 The procedures contained within have been designed to be particularly effective for ce...

  19. Fusion materials irradiation test facility: description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Parker, E.F.; Hagan, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility will generate a high-flux, high-energy neutron source that will provide a fusion-like radiation environment for fusion reactor materials development. The neutrons will be produced in a nuclear stripping reaction by impinging a 35 MeV beam of deuterons from an Alvarez-type linear accelerator on a flowing lithium target. The target will be located in a test cell which will provide an irradiation volume of over 750l within which 10 cm 3 will have an average neutron flux of greater than 1.4 x 10 15 n/cm 2 -s and 500 cm 3 an average flux of greater than 2.2 by 10 14 n/cm 2- s with an expected availability factor greater than 65%. The projected fluence within the 10 cm 3 high flux region of FMIT will effect damage upon the materials test specimens to 30 dpa (displacements per atom) for each 90 day irradiation period. This irradiation flux volume will be at least 500 times larger than that of any other facility with comparable neutron energy and will fully meet the fusion materials damage research objective of 100 dpa within three years for the first round of tests

  20. 44 years of testing radioactive materials packages at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shappert, L.B.; Ludwig, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews the package testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1960 and then examines the trends in the testing activities that occurred during the same period. Radioactive material shipments have been made from ORNL since the 1940s. The first fully operating reactor built at the ORNL site was patterned after the graphite pile constructed by Enrico Fermi under Stagg Field in Chicago. After serving as a test bed for future reactors, it became useful as a producer of radioactive isotopes. The Isotopes Division was established at ORNL to furnish radioactive materials used in the medical community. Often these shipments have been transported by aircraft worldwide due to the short half-lives of many of the materials. This paper touches briefly on the lighter and smaller radioisotope packages that were being shipped from ORNL in large numbers and then deals with the testing of packages designed to handle large radioactive sources, such as spent fuel, and other fissile materials.

  1. 44 years of testing radioactive materials packages at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Ludwig, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the package testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1960 and then examines the trends in the testing activities that occurred during the same period. Radioactive material shipments have been made from ORNL since the 1940s. The first fully operating reactor built at the ORNL site was patterned after the graphite pile constructed by Enrico Fermi under Stagg Field in Chicago. After serving as a test bed for future reactors, it became useful as a producer of radioactive isotopes. The Isotopes Division was established at ORNL to furnish radioactive materials used in the medical community. Often these shipments have been transported by aircraft worldwide due to the short half-lives of many of the materials. This paper touches briefly on the lighter and smaller radioisotope packages that were being shipped from ORNL in large numbers and then deals with the testing of packages designed to handle large radioactive sources, such as spent fuel, and other fissile materials

  2. Introduction to non-destructive testing of materials: part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, B.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves are mechanical vibrations that require a medium, which functions as carrier. Ultrasonics are widely used in non-destructive testing of materials in which high frequency sound waves are introduced into the material being inspected. If the frequency of sound waves in within the range 10 to 20,000 Hz, the sound is audible, i.e. the range of hearing, above 20,000 Hz, the sound waves are referred to as Ultrasound or Ultrasonics. Sound waves do not cause any permanent change in material although its transient presence is very noticeable. An energy transport through a sound wave is possible only when constituent particles are connected to each other by elastic forces. Liquids and Gases are also suitable media for the transmission of sound. In vacuum no matter exists and thus no sound transmission is possible. At the end of this article advantages and limitations of ultrasonic testing are also given. (A.B.)

  3. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; Popelar, Carl F.; Page, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA a comprehensive suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for aging multilayer pressure vessels, Southwest Research Institute (R) (SwRI) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. This report describes Phase 1 of this effort which includes a preliminary material property assessment as well as a fractographic, fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analyses of an induced flaw in the outer shell of a representative multilayer vessel that was subjected to cyclic pressure test. SwRI performed this Phase 1 effort under contract to the Digital Wave Corporation in support of their contract to Jacobs ATOM for the NASA Ames Research Center.

  4. Recent USNRC results and program plans for elevated temperature time dependent material behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, T J [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington (United States)

    1977-07-01

    The SI program thus provides NRC with a consultant capability to monitor the materials and structures efforts of applicants. Also, analytical and experimental work is actively pursued in areas with limited background or limited experimental basis. One major area, the extrapolation of test data from time limited tests to the full 40 year plant lifetime, has been chosen for a significant independent effort. This extrapolation study provides a focus for all creep-fatigue, fracture mode and analysis methods development to be done within the program. The supporting assurance which may be provided by sound in-service-inspection techniques must also be developed to the fullest possible extent. (author)

  5. Recent USNRC results and program plans for elevated temperature time dependent material behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    The SI program thus provides NRC with a consultant capability to monitor the materials and structures efforts of applicants. Also, analytical and experimental work is actively pursued in areas with limited background or limited experimental basis. One major area, the extrapolation of test data from time limited tests to the full 40 year plant lifetime, has been chosen for a significant independent effort. This extrapolation study provides a focus for all creep-fatigue, fracture mode and analysis methods development to be done within the program. The supporting assurance which may be provided by sound in-service-inspection techniques must also be developed to the fullest possible extent. (author)

  6. Test of user- and system programs coded in real time languages - requirements on program language and testing tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertlin, J.; Mackert, M.

    1979-01-01

    In the present paper the functions are presented, which should be part of a test system for user programs in a higher treat time programming language, taking into account time sequences and competitive processes. As can be shown by the problem of testing, use of higher level real time programming languages renders the task of program development essentially easier, however performance of test procedures without appropriate test systems is very difficult. After the presentation of notions and methods for the testing of programs, general requirements on testing tools are described and the test system functions for a program test, beeing uncritical with respect to time, are placed together. Thereby, for every individual function, the interface between the test system, the program under test, and the residual program-generation system (compiler, binder, operating system, delay-time system, and loader) is given too. For the time-critical test, a series of desirable functions are described, which can be implemented with acceptable expense. (orig.) [de

  7. Fusion reactor materials program plan. Section 2. Damage analysis and fundamental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The scope of this program includes: (1) Development of procedures for characterizing neutron environments of test facilities and fusion reactors, (2) Theoretical and experimental investigations of the influence of irradiation environment on damage production, damage microstructure evolution, and mechanical and physical property changes, (3) Identification and, where appropriate, development of essential nuclear and materials data, and (4) Development of a methodology, based on damage mechanisms, for correlating the mechanical behavior of materials exposed to diverse test environments and projecting this behavior to magnetic fusion reactor (MFR) environments. Some major problem areas are addressed

  8. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelar, Carl F.; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA with a suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for the vessels described above, Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. An initial characterization of the strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth properties was performed in Phase 1. Based on the results and recommendations of Phase 1, a more extensive material property characterization effort was developed in this Phase 2 effort. This Phase 2 characterization included additional strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth of the multilayer vessel and head materials. In addition, some more limited characterization of the welds and heat affected zones (HAZs) were performed. This report

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.E. Mizia; W.E. Windes; W.R. Corwin; T.D. Burchell; C.E. Duty; Y. Katoh; J.W. Klett; T.E. McGreevy; R.K. Nanstad; W. Ren; P.L. Rittenhouse; L.L. Snead; R.W. Swindeman; D.F. Wlson

    2007-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 950°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Some of the general and administrative aspects of the R&D Plan include: • Expand American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards in support of the NGNP Materials R&D Program. • Define and develop inspection needs and the procedures for those inspections. • Support selected university materials related R&D activities that would be of direct benefit to the NGNP Project. • Support international materials related collaboration activities through the DOE sponsored Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Materials and Components (M&C) Project Management Board (PMB). • Support document review activities through the Materials Review Committee (MRC) or other suitable forum.

  10. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Michael A. [Southwest Research Institute; Page, Richard A. [Southwest Research Institute

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to

  11. Installation for fatigue testing of materials at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushenkov, I.D.; Chernetskij, V.K.; Il'ichev, V.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    A new installation for mechanical fatigue tests of structural material samples is described, in which the possibility to conduct tests in the range of lower temperatures (4.2-300 K) is ensured. The installation permits to carry out fatigue tests using the method of axial loading of annular (up to 6 mm in diameter) and plane (up to 12 mm wide) samples during symmetric, asymmetric and pulsing loading cycles. It is shown that the installation suggested has quite extended operation possibilities and, coincidentally, it is characterized by design simplicity, compactness, comparatively low metal consumption and maintenance convenience

  12. Materials Compatibility Testing in RSRM ODC: Free Cleaner Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Jill M.; Sagers, Neil W.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Government regulations have mandated production phase-outs of a number of solvents, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, an ozone-depleting chemical (ODC). This solvent was used extensively in the production of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRMs) for the Space Shuttle. Many tests have been performed to identify replacement cleaners. One major area of concern in the selection of a new cleaner has been compatibility. Some specific areas considered included cleaner compatibility with non-metallic surfaces, painted surfaces, support materials such as gloves and wipers as well as corrosive properties of the cleaners on the alloys used on these motors. The intent of this paper is to summarize the test logic, methodology, and results acquired from testing the many cleaner and material combinations.

  13. Blood-alcohol proficiency test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary survey has been performed to ascertain the validity of the blood alcohol analysis performed by a number of laboratories on a voluntary basis. Values of accuracy and precision of the tests are presented. /Abstract from report summary pag...

  14. Chairside CAD/CAM materials. Part 2: Flexural strength testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Michael; Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Mevec, Daniel; Harrer, Walter; Lube, Tanja; Danzer, Robert; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Strength is one of the preferred parameters used in dentistry for determining clinical indication of dental restoratives. However, small dimensions of CAD/CAM blocks limit reliable measurements with standardized uniaxial bending tests. The objective of this study was to introduce the ball-on-three-ball (B3B) biaxial strength test for dental for small CAD/CAM block in the context of the size effect on strength predicted by the Weibull theory. Eight representative chairside CAD/CAM materials ranging from polycrystalline zirconia (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent), reinforced glasses (Vitablocs Mark II, VITA; Empress CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and glass-ceramics (e.max CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Suprinity, VITA; Celtra Duo, Dentsply) to hybrid materials (Enamic, VITA; Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) have been selected. Specimens were prepared with highly polished surfaces in rectangular plate (12×12×1.2mm 3 ) or round disc (Ø=12mm, thickness=1.2mm) geometries. Specimens were tested using the B3B assembly and the biaxial strength was determined using calculations derived from finite element analyses of the respective stress fields. Size effects on strength were determined based on results from 4-point-bending specimens. A good agreement was found between the biaxial strength results for the different geometries (plates vs. discs) using the B3B test. Strength values ranged from 110.9MPa (Vitablocs Mark II) to 1303.21MPa (e.max ZirCAD). The strength dependency on specimen size was demonstrated through the calculated effective volume/surface. The B3B test has shown to be a reliable and simple method for determining the biaxial strength restorative materials supplied as small CAD/CAM blocks. A flexible solution was made available for the B3B test in the rectangular plate geometry. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1986-09-01

    A computerized data base of LLW leaching data has been developed. Long-term tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms containing simulated wastes are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms

  16. Mechanical Testing of Carbon Based Woven Thermal Protection Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, John; Agrawal, Parul; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Three Dimensional Woven thermal protection system (TPS) materials are one of the enabling technologies for mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator systems. These materials have been shown capable of serving a dual purpose as TPS and as structural load bearing members during entry and descent operations. In order to ensure successful structural performance, it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of these materials prior to and post exposure to entry-like heating conditions. This research focuses on the changes in load bearing capacity of woven TPS materials after being subjected to arcjet simulations of entry heating. Preliminary testing of arcjet tested materials [1] has shown a mechanical degradation. However, their residual strength is significantly more than the requirements for a mission to Venus [2]. A systematic investigation at the macro and microstructural scales is reported here to explore the potential causes of this degradation. The effects of heating on the sizing (an epoxy resin coating used to reduce friction and wear during fiber handling) are discussed as one of the possible causes for the decrease in mechanical properties. This investigation also provides valuable guidelines for margin policies for future mechanically deployable entry systems.

  17. Brittle fracture tests at low temperature for transport cask materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaki, Akio; Ito, Chihiro; Arai, Taku; Saegusa, Toshiari

    1993-01-01

    The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material were revised in 1985, and brittle fracture assessment at low temperature for transport packages are now required. This report discusses the applicability of the actual method for brittle fracture assessment of type-B transport cask materials used in JAPAN. The necessity of brittle fracture assessment at low temperature was estimated for each material of type-B transport casks used in Japan and the applicability was investigated. Dynamic fracture toughness values, K Id (J Id ), and RT NDT values of Low-Mn Carbon Steels, that are SA 350 Gr.LF1 Modify and SA 516 Gr.70 material which used in type-B transport cask body, were also obtained to check whether or not an easier and conventional test method, that prescribed in ASME CODE SECTION III, can be substituted for the dynamic fracture test method. And for bolt materials, which include 1.8Ni-0.8Cr-0.3Mo Carbon Steel and type 630 H Stainless Steel, toughness data were obtained for reference. (J.P.N.)

  18. GPR Laboratory Tests For Railways Materials Dielectric Properties Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca De Chiara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In railways Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR studies, the evaluation of materials dielectric properties is critical as they are sensitive to water content, to petrographic type of aggregates and to fouling condition of the ballast. Under the load traffic, maintenance actions and climatic effects, ballast condition change due to aggregate breakdown and to subgrade soils pumping, mainly on existing lines with no sub ballast layer. The main purpose of this study was to validate, under controlled conditions, the dielectric values of materials used in Portuguese railways, in order to improve the GPR interpretation using commercial software and consequently the management maintenance planning. Different materials were tested and a broad range of in situ conditions were simulated in laboratory, in physical models. GPR tests were performed with five antennas with frequencies between 400 and 1800 MHz. The variation of the dielectric properties was measured, and the range of values that can be obtained for different material condition was defined. Additionally, in situ GPR measurements and test pits were performed for validation of the dielectric constant of clean ballast. The results obtained are analyzed and the main conclusions are presented herein.

  19. Design of a high-flux test assembly for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Material Test Facility (FMIT) will provide a high flux fusion-like neutron environment in which a variety of structural and non-structural materials irradiations can be conducted. The FMIT experiments, called test assemblies, that are subjected to the highest neutron flux magnitudes and associated heating rates will require forced convection liquid metal cooling systems to remove the neutron deposited power and maintain test specimens at uniform temperatures. A brief description of the FMIT facility and experimental areas is given with emphasis on the design, capabilities and handling of the high flux test assembly

  20. Helping Students Test Programs That Have Graphical User Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Thornton

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Within computer science education, many educators are incorporating software testing activities into regular programming assignments. Tools like JUnit and its relatives make software testing tasks much easier, bringing them into the realm of even introductory students. At the same time, many introductory programming courses are now including graphical interfaces as part of student assignments to improve student interest and engagement. Unfortunately, writing software tests for programs that have significant graphical user interfaces is beyond the skills of typical students (and many educators. This paper presents initial work at combining educationally oriented and open-source tools to create an infrastructure for writing tests for Java programs that have graphical user interfaces. Critically, these tools are intended to be appropriate for introductory (CS1/CS2 student use, and to dovetail with current teaching approaches that incorporate software testing in programming assignments. We also include in our findings our proposed approach to evaluating our techniques.

  1. Tested program for Third World economic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, R.W.

    1977-04-01

    Some of the responsibility for the inability of Western-oriented Third World Countries (1) to make democratic economic institutions work rests upon advisers to American and international financial institutions who recommend principles of economic growth distilled out of Keynesian recipes for an over-saving Western society of the 1930s, and out of aspects of American experience with no applicability elsewhere. Applicable aspects of U.S. experience suggest a program relying on capitalistic drives and using fiscal and monetary policy of the type that proved useful in the development of democratic capitalism in the U.S. in the 19th century.

  2. Design of a materials testing experiment for the INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, M.A.; Opperman, E.K.

    1981-01-01

    The United States, Japan, USSR and the European community are jointly participating in the design of an International Tokamak Reactor called INTOR. In support of the US contribution to the INTOR design, the features of an experiment for bulk neutron irradiation damage studies were developed. It is anticipated that materials testing will be an important part of the programmatic mission of INTOR and consequently the requirements for materials testing in INTOR must be identified early in the reactor design to insure compatibility. The design features of the experiment, called a Channel Test, are given in this paper. The major components of the channel test are the water cooled heat sink (channel module) and the specimen capsule. The temperature within each of the 153 specimen capsules is predetermined by engineering the thermal barrier between the specimen capsule and heat sink. Individual capsules can be independently accessed and are designed to operate at a predetermined temperature within the range of 50 to 700 0 C. The total irradiation volume within a single channel test is 45 liters. Features of the channel test that result in experimental versatility and simplified remote access and handling are discussed

  3. Small Punch Test Techniques for Irradiated Materials in Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Sik; Ahn, S. B.; Oh, W. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Choo, Y. S.

    2006-06-01

    Detailed procedures of the small punch test including the apparatus, the definition of small punch-related parameters, and the interpretation of results were presented. The testing machine should have a capability of the compressive loading and unloading at a given deflection level. The small punch specimen holder consists of an upper and lower die and clamping screws. The clamped specimen is deformed by using ball or spherical head punch. Two type of specimens with a circular and a square shape were used. The irradiated small punch specimen is made from the undamaged portion of the broken CVN bars or prepared by the irradiation of the specimen fabricated from the fresh materials. The heating and cooling devices should have the capability of the temperature control within ±2 .deg. C for the target value during the test. Based on the load-deflection data obtained from the small punch test. the empirical correlation between the small punch related parameters and a tensile properties such as 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength, fracture toughness, ductile-brittle transition temperature and creep properties determined from the standard test method is established and used to evaluate the mechanical properties of an irradiated materials. In addition, from the quantitative fractographic assessment of small punch test specimens, the relationship between the small punch energy and the quantity of ductile crack growth is obtained. Analytical formulations demonstrated good agreement with experimental load-deflection curves

  4. Biosphere 2 test module experimentation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alling, Abigail; Leigh, Linda S.; Maccallum, Taber; Alvarez-Romo, Norberto

    1990-01-01

    The Biosphere 2 Test Module is a facility which has the capability to do either short or long term closures: five month closures with plants were conducted. Also conducted were investigations of specific problems, such as trace gas purification by bioregenerative systems by in-putting a fixed concentration of a gas and observing its uptake over time. In other Test Module experiments, the concentration of one gas was changed to observe what effects this has on other gases present or on the system. The science of biospherics which encompasses the study of closed biological systems provides an opening into the future in space as well as in the Earth's biosphere.

  5. PBF/LOFT Lead Rod Test Program experiment predictions document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J.; Cox, W.R.; Niebruegge, D.A.; Seiber, S.J.; Brake, T.E.; Driskell, W.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Tolman, E.L.

    1978-12-01

    The PBF/LOFT Lead Rod (LLR) Test Program is being conducted to provide experimental information on the behavior of nuclear fuel under normal and accident conditions in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The PBF/LLR tests are designed to simulate the test conditions for the LOFT Power Ascension Tests L2-3 through L2-5. The test program has been designed to provide a parametric evaluation of the LOFT fuel (center and peripheral modules) over a wide range of power. This report presents the experiment predictions for the three four-rod LOCA tests

  6. Nuclear waste transportation package testing: A review of selected programs in the United States and abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snedeker, D.F.

    1990-12-01

    This report provides an overview of some recent nuclear waste transportation package development programs. This information is intended to aid the State of Nevada in its review of US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear waste transportation programs. This report addresses cask testing programs in the United Kingdom and selected 1/4 and full scale testing in the US. Facilities that can provide cask testing services, both in the US and to a limited extent abroad, are identified. The costs for different type test programs are identified as a means to estimate costs for future test programs. Not addressed is the public impact such testing might have in providing an increased sense of safety or confidence. The British test program was apparently quite successful in demonstrating safety to the public at the time. There is no US test effort that is similar in scope for direct comparison. Also addressed are lessons learned from testing programs and areas that may merit possible future integrated examination. Areas that may require further examination are both technical and institutional. This report provides information which, when combined with other sources of information will enable the State of Nevada to assess the following areas: feasibility of full scale testing; costs of full scale tests; potential benefits of testing; limits that full scale testing impose; and disadvantages of emphasis on testing vs analytical solutions. This assessment will then allow the state to comment on DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) plans for the development and licensing of new shipping cask designs. These plans currently expect contractors to perform engineering testing for materials development, quarter scale model testing to validate analytical assessments and full scale prototype testing of operational features. DOE currently plans no full scale or extra-regulatory destructive testing to aid in cask licensing. 1 tab

  7. Coordination Between the HEU Transparency Program and the Material Protection, Control and Accountability Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaser, J.; Hernandez, J.; Dougherty, D.; Bieniawski, A.; Cahalane, P.; Mastal, E.

    2000-01-01

    DOE sponsored programs such as Material Protection Control and Accountability (MPC and A) and implementation of the Highly-Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program send US personnel into Russian nuclear facilities and receive Russian representatives from these programs. While there is overlap in the Russian nuclear facilities visited by these two programs, there had not been any formal mechanism to share information between them. Recently, an MPC and A/HEU Working Group was developed to facilitate the sharing of appropriate information and to address concerns expressed by Minatom and Russian facility personnel such as US visit scheduling conflicts. This paper discusses the goals of the Working Group and ways it has helped to allow the programs to work more efficiently with the Russian facilities

  8. TESTING OF GAS REACTOR MATERIALS AND FUEL IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations

  9. Testing of Gas Reactor Materials and Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations

  10. Exposure testing and evaluation of solar utilization materials. Semiannual report, May 1, 1975--October 31, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilligan, J.E.; Brzuskiewicz, J.

    1975-01-01

    The initial efforts of a program of research and experimental testing is described in which the optical performance of materials for use in solar energy utilization devices will be determined before and after exposure to outdoor weathering tests. Materials which are currently in use and others which are being considered or developed for these applications will be characterized and exposed to natural solar radiation. Outdoor testing will be accomplished in Phoenix (Ariz.), Miami (Fla.), and Chicago (Ill.). The results of these tests, primarily the effects of outdoor exposure on optical and physical properties, will be compiled in a handbook, along with cost, availability and other pertinent information. These data are vital to the intelligent selection of solar utilization materials, since a knowledge of the cost performance and lifetime characteristics of candidate materials will greatly assist the design of efficient and reliable solar energy utilization devices. Primary accomplishments include the definition of sample requirements, specification of test samples and test configurations, formulation of acceptance/rejection criteria and contacts with numerous potential materials suppliers.

  11. Next Generation Drivetrain Development and Test Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan; Erdman, Bill; Blodgett, Doug; Halse, Chris; Grider, Dave

    2015-11-03

    This presentation was given at the Wind Energy IQ conference in Bremen, Germany, November 30 through December 2, 2105. It focused on the next-generation drivetrain architecture and drivetrain technology development and testing (including gearbox and inverter software and medium-voltage inverter modules.

  12. Technical bases for the DWPF testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be the first production facility in the United States for the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste. Production of DWPF canistered wasteforms will begin prior to repository licensing, so decisions on facility startup will have to be made before the final decisions on repository design are made. The Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) has addressed this discrepancy by defining a Waste Acceptance Process. This process provides assurance that the borosilicate-glass wasteform, in a stainless-steel canister, produced by the DWPF will be acceptable for permanent storage in a federal repository. As part of this process, detailed technical specifications have been developed for the DWPF product. SRS has developed detailed strategies for demonstrating compliance with each of the Waste Acceptance Process specifications. An important part of the compliance is the testing which will be carried out in the DWPF. In this paper, the bases for each of the tests to be performed in the DWPF to establish compliance with the specifications are described, and the tests are detailed. The results of initial tests relating to characterization of sealed canisters are reported

  13. Validating High-Stakes Testing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Makes the point that the interpretations and use of high-stakes test scores rely on policy assumptions about what should be taught and the content standards and performance standards that should be applied. The assumptions built into an assessment need to be subjected to scrutiny and criticism if a strong case is to be made for the validity of the…

  14. Bibliography of published material related to the Soviet PNE Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, G.P.; Nordyke, M.D.

    1977-01-01

    Scientists in the Soviet Union have published many papers that provide details about the Soviet program for the peaceful use of nuclear explosions. Over the years much of this material has been gathered at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory into what has become a sizeable collection. The bibliography of 334 references provides a useful record of the material available in that collection. The bibliography is divided into three main parts. Part I lists articles alphabetically. In Part II, the same articles are arranged by subject; many of them are included under more than one subject category. Part III is a list of important collections of papers. These collections provide many of the articles listed in Parts I and II

  15. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: a facility for fusion-materials qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Hagan, J.W.; Opperman, E.K.; Burke, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility will provide a unique testing environment for irradiation of structural and special purpose materials in support of fusion power systems. The neutron source will be produced by a deuteron-lithium stripping reaction to generate high energy neutrons to ensure damage similar to that of a deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum. The facility design is now ready for the start of construction and much of the supporting lithium system research has been completed. Major testing of key low energy end components of the accelerator is about to commence. The facility, its testing role, and the status and major aspects of its design and supporting system development are described

  16. Full scale tests of moisture buffer capacity of wall materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2005-01-01

    that are harmful such as growth of house dust mites, surface condensation and mould growth. Therefore a series of experiments has been carried out in a full scale test facility to determine the moisture buffer effect of interior walls of cellular concrete and plaster board constructions. For the cellular concrete......Moisture buffer capacity of hygroscopic materials can be used to moderate peaks in the relative humidity (RH) of indoor air as well as moisture content variations in building materials and furnishing. This can help to ensure healthier indoor environments by preventing many processes...... of the changes of moisture content in specimens of the wall composites exposed to the same environment. It was found that the finishes had a big impact on the buffer performance of the underlying materials. Even though the untreated cellular concrete had a very high buffer capacity, the effect was strongly...

  17. Database on gas migration tests through bentonite buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanai, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    Carbon steel is a candidate material for an overpack for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Japan. The corrosion of the carbon steel overpack in aqueous solution under anoxic conditions will cause the generation of hydrogen gas, which may affect hydrological and mechanical properties of the bentonite buffer. To evaluate such an effect of gas generation, it is necessary to develop a model of gas migration through bentonite buffer material taking account of data obtained from experiments. The gas migration experiments under both unsaturated and saturated conditions have been carried out to clarify the fundamental characteristics of bentonite for gas migration. This report compiles the experimental data obtained from gas migration tests for buffer material which has been conducted by JAEA until December, 2007. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (author)

  18. Tests with ceramic waste form materials made by pressureless consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Hash, M. C.; Hebden, A. S.; Ebert, W. L.

    2002-01-01

    A multiphase waste form referred to as the ceramic waste form (CWF) will be used to immobilize radioactively contaminated salt wastes recovered after the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel. The CWF is made by first occluding salt in zeolite and then encapsulating the zeolite in a borosilicate binder glass. A variety of surrogate CWF materials were made using pressureless consolidation (PC) methods for comparison with CWF consolidated using a hot isostatic press (HIP) method and to study the effects of glass/zeolite batching ratio and processing conditions on the physical and chemical properties of the resulting materials. The data summarized in this report will also be used to support qualification of the PC CWF for disposal in the proposed federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The phase composition and microstructure of HIP CWF and PC CWF are essentially identical: both are composed of about 70% sodalite, 25% binder glass, and a 5% total of inclusion phases (halite, nepheline, and various oxides and silicates). The primary difference is that PC CWF materials have higher porosities than HIP CWFs. The product consistency test (PCT) that was initially developed to monitor homogeneous glass waste forms was used to measure the chemical durabilities of the CWF materials. Series of replicate tests with several PC CWF materials indicate that the PCT can be conducted with the same precision with CWF materials as with borosilicate glasses. Short-term (7-day) PCTs were used to evaluate the repeatability of making the PC CWF and the effects of the glass/zeolite mass ratio, process temperature, and processing time on the chemical durability. Long-term (up to 1 year) PCTs were used to compare the durabilities of HIP and PC CWFs and to estimate the apparent solubility limit for the PC CWF that is needed for modeling. The PC and HIP CWF materials had similar disabilities, based on the release of silicon in long

  19. Damage functions generation for polyatomic materials irradiated in test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberman, A.; Lesueur, D.

    1987-06-01

    Neutron exposure parameters in polyatomic materials is of great importance for fusion technology programs. The COMPOSI code computes the number of displaced atoms of sub-lattice ''j'' induced by one atom of sub-lattice ''i'' either by direct collision or through intermediate knocked atom. The code uses Lindhard equations; it is solved by iterative process. The atomic displacements cross-sections, as a function of neutron energy are derived by folding previous results with ''i'' type PKA. Moreover the COMPOSI code may include recoils from charged particles e.g.: Alpha + Triton from Li 6 capture in Li Al 0 2 . These responses in various spectra are discussed [fr

  20. Material control system design: Test Bed Nitrate Storage Area (TBNSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.A.; Da Roza, R.A.; Dunn, D.R.; Sacks, I.J.; Harrison, W.; Huebel, J.G.; Ross, W.N.; Salisbury, J.D.; Sanborn, R.H.; Weissenberger, S.

    1978-05-01

    This report provides an example of a hypothetical Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Safeguard Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) System which will be used as a subject for the demonstration of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory MC and A System Evaluation Methodology in January 1978. This methodology is to become a tool in the NRC evaluation of license applicant submittals for Nuclear Fuel Cycle facilities. The starting point for this test bed design was the Allied-General Nuclear Services--Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant Reprocessing plant as described in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), of August 1975. The test bed design effort was limited to providing an SNM safeguard system for the plutonium nitrate storage area of this facility

  1. Fuel and Fuel System Materials Compatibility Test Program for A JP-8+100 Fuel Additive. Volume 1: Thermal Stability Additive Package BetzDearborn Spec Aid(Registered) 8Q462

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    SAE Rings, Sealing, Butadiene-Acrylonitrile ( NBR ), Rubber Fuel and Low Temperature Resistant 60 - 70 MIL-R-83248C Rubber , Fluorocarbon...KAPTON/TEFLON (COMPOSITE) WIRE I.I.10 34 VI. REFERENCE DOCUMENTS Non-Metallics MIL-HDBK-149B Military Standardization Hand Book Rubber ...ASTM D-1414 Standard Test Methods for Rubber O-Rings ASTM D-412 Type II Standard Test Methods for Vulcanized Rubber and Thermoplastic

  2. Test results of Nb3Sn ribbons for the Princeton D coil test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaugerts, J.; File, J.; Willard, J.W.

    1974-10-01

    A previously described D coil test program was modified. Details of a smaller Nb 3 Sn D coil test program are described. Cusp coil tests were made with several Nb 3 Sn composite ribbons. Measurements of both the quench and recovery currents as a function of magnetic field component perpendicular to the wide edge of the ribbon are presented. (auth)

  3. EMERIS: an advanced information system for a materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adorjan, F.; Buerger, L.; Lux, I.; Mesko, L.; Szabo, K.; Vegh, J.; Ivanov, V.V.; Mozhaev, A.A.; Yakovlev, V.V.

    1990-06-01

    The basic features of the Materials Testing Reactor of IAE, Moscow (MR) Information System (EMERIS) are outlined. The purpose of the system is to support reactor and experimental test loop operators by a flexible, fully computerized and user-friendly tool for the aquisition, analysis, archivation and presentation of data obtained during operation of the experimental facility. High availability of EMERIS services is ensured by redundant hardware and software components, and by automatic configuration procedure. A novel software feature of the system is the automatic Disturbance Analysis package, which is aimed to discover primary causes of irregularities occurred in the technology. (author) 2 refs.; 2 figs

  4. Testing of irradiated and annealed 15H2MFA materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillemot, F.; Uri, G.

    1994-01-01

    A set of surveillance samples made from 15H2MFA material has been studied in the laboratory of AEKI. Miniature notched tensile specimens were cut from some remnants of irradiated and broke surveillance charpy remnants. The Absorbed Specific Fracture Energy (ASFE) was measured on the specimens. A cutting machine and testing technique were elaborated for the measurements. The second part of the Charpy remnants was annealed at 460 deg. C and 490 deg. C for 6-8 hours. The specimens were tested similarity and the results were compared. (author). 5 refs, 9 figs

  5. Radioactive wear tests of four cylinder liner materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylte, G.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation on the wear properties of various liner materials, financed by a research grant from NTNF (Royal Norwegian Council for Scientific and Industrial Research), is reported. The investigation was carried out by the Division of Internal Combustion Engines, Trondheim, Univ.,Norway, on a two-stroke, turbocharged, medium speed diesel engine (Wichmann 2ACAT, 280 by 420 mm). Thin pearlitic cast iron inserts of various compositions were pressed into the upper part of a specially machined cylinder liner. These inserts were activated in a nuclear reactor, and tracer techniques employed to measure the wear rate. Gas oil was used as a fuel throughout all tests. The insert technique employed, and the handling methods devised, were satisfactory. This part of the project must be characterised as being very successful. Originally, six different liner materials were specified, but due to misunderstandings duplications resulted in only four different materials finally being received at the laboratory. The engine tests disclosed that the wear rates of all four materials were low under laboratory conditions, and therefore difficult to measure accurately. Nevertheless, the wear properties of the inserts clearly fell into two distinct classes, which may be termed good and excellent. The relative values inside each group are, however, more uncertain due to the cumulative effects of errors, instrument drift, measurement statistics, etc. (Auth.)

  6. Experimental Verification of an Instrument to Test Flooring Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Rony; Löfgren, Hans, Dr

    2018-02-01

    The focus of this work is to validate the fluid model with different flooring materials and the measurements of an instrument to test flooring materials and its force attenuating capabilities using mathematical models to describe the signature and coefficients of the floor. The main contribution of the present work focus on the development of a mathematical fluid model for floors. The aim of the thesis was to analyze, compare different floor materials and to study the linear dynamics of falling impacts on floors. The impact of the hammer during a fall is captured by an accelerometer and response is collected using a picoscope. The collected data was analyzed using matlab least square method which is coded as per the fluid model. The finding from this thesis showed that the fluid model works with more elastic model but it doesn’t work for rigid materials like wood. The importance of parameters like velocity, mass, energy loss and other coefficients of floor which influences the model during the impact of falling on floors were identified and a standardized testing method was set.

  7. Collider Dipole Magnet test program from development through production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Verification of CDM performance, reliability, and magnet production processes will be accomplished during the development phase of the program. Key features of this program include thorough in process testing of magnet subassemblies, verification of the magnetic field quality, and demonstration of the CDM performance during the formal qualification program. Reliability demonstration of the CDM design includes component tests and an accelerated life test program. Prototype magnet phase will address achievement of magnet performance goals through a program of fabrications, test, analysis, redesign as required and procurement of modified parts for a second fabrication run. This process would be repeated again if necessary, and would conclude with a final design for the production magnets. Production process validation will address the effects that key production processes have upon magnet performance, using the magnets produced during the Preproduction phase

  8. Composite Material Testing Data Reduction to Adjust for the Systematic 6-DOF Testing Machine Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasios lliopoulos; John G. Michopoulos; John G. C. Hermanson

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a data reduction methodology for eliminating the systematic aberrations introduced by the unwanted behavior of a multiaxial testing machine, into the massive amounts of experimental data collected from testing of composite material coupons. The machine in reference is a custom made 6-DoF system called NRL66.3 and developed at the NAval...

  9. Tritium Systems Test Assembly operator training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstiens, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Proper operator training is needed to help ensure the safe operation of fusion facilities by personnel who are qualified to carry out their assigned responsibilities. Operators control and monitor the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) during normal, emergency, and maintenance phases. Their performance is critical both to operational safety, assuring no release of tritium to the atmosphere, and to the successful simulation of the fusion reaction progress. Through proper training we are helping assure that TSTA facility operators perform their assignments in a safe and efficient manner and that the operators maintain high levels of operational proficiency through continuing training, retraining, requalification, and recertification

  10. History of ground motion programs at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banister, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Some measurements were made in the atmospheric testing era, but the study of ground motion from nuclear tests became of wider interest after the instigation of underground testing. The ground motion generated by underground nuclear test has been investigated for a number of reasons including understanding basic phenomena, operational and safety concerns, yield determination, stimulation of earthquake concerns, and developing methods to aid in treaty verifications. This history of ground motion programs will include discussing early studies, high yield programs, Peaceful Nuclear Explosions tests, and some more recent developments. 6 references, 10 figures

  11. Reactor materials program process water component failure probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W. L.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum rate loss of coolant accident for the Savannah River Production Reactors is presently specified as the abrupt double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a large process water pipe. This accident is not considered credible in light of the low applied stresses and the inherent ductility of the piping materials. The Reactor Materials Program was initiated to provide the technical basis for an alternate, credible maximum rate LOCA. The major thrust of this program is to develop an alternate worst case accident scenario by deterministic means. In addition, the probability of a DEGB is also being determined; to show that in addition to being mechanistically incredible, it is also highly improbable. The probability of a DEGB of the process water piping is evaluated in two parts: failure by direct means, and indirectly-induced failure. These two areas have been discussed in other reports. In addition, the frequency of a large bread (equivalent to a DEGB) in other process water system components is assessed. This report reviews the large break frequency for each component as well as the overall large break frequency for the reactor system

  12. Efficient separations and processing crosscutting program: Develop and test sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed during FY 1995 under the task open-quotes Develop and Test Sorbents,close quotes the purpose of which is to develop high-capacity, selective solid extractants to recover cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. This work is being done for the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP), operated by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's Office of Technology Development. The task is under the direction of staff at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with key participation from industrial and university staff at 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota; IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Forks, Utah; AlliedSignal, Inc., Des Plaines, Illinois, and Texas A ampersand M University, College Station, Texas. 3M and IBC are responsible for ligand and membrane technology development; AlliedSignal and Texas A ampersand M are developing sodium titanate powders; and PNL is testing the materials developed by the industry/university team members. Major accomplishments for FY 1995 are summarized in this report

  13. Tests and studies of USSR materials at the US coal burning MHD facility UTSI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegin, G P; Romanov, A I; Rekov, A I; Spiridonov, E G; Barodina, T I; Vysotsky, D A

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the overall program of the US--USSR cooperation in the field of MHD power generation tests of Soviet electrode materials were conducted at the coal burning MHD facility UTSI-2 of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. The main purposes of the tests are evaluation of electrode materials behavior in the channel of the MHD generator operating with combustion products of coal containing ionizing alkali seed, study of thermal and physical stability of materials in the presence of corrosive slag, study of electrophysical characteristics of electrode materials when they are subjected to the passage of current through the plasma-slag-electrode system. Tests were conducted on electrodes made of silicon carbide doped with titanium and LaCrO/sub 3/--Cr cermet. Results are reported on the phase and chemical composition and structure of these two materials, their thermophysical and electrophysical properties, and the electrode fabrication methods. The MHD facility UTSI-2, where the tests were conducted is one of few utilizing actual coal as the fuel. A description of this facility is given, and its main operating parameters and the methods used to conduct electrode tests with and without an applied current are described.

  14. Advanced In-pile Instrumentation for Material and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Daw, J.E.; Unruh, T.C.; Chase, B.M.; Davis, K.L.; Palmer, A.J.; Schley, R.S.

    2013-06-01

    The US Department of Energy sponsors the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program to promote U.S. research in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, advancing U.S. energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to design, develop, and deploy new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for identifying instrumentation needed for ATR irradiation tests and the program initiated to obtain these sensors. New sensors developed from this effort are identified; and the progress of other development efforts is summarized. As reported in this paper, INL staff is currently involved in several tasks to deploy real-time length and flux detection sensors, and efforts have been initiated to develop a crack growth test rig. Tasks evaluating 'advanced' technologies, such as fiber-optics based length detection and ultrasonic thermometers are also underway. In addition, specialized sensors for real-time detection of temperature and thermal conductivity are not only being provided to NSUF reactors, but are also being provided to several international test reactors. (authors)

  15. Advanced In-Pile Instrumentation for Materials Testing Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, J. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Daw, J. E.; Unruh, T. C.; Chase, B. M.; Davis, K. L.; Palmer, A. J.; Schley, R. S.

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy sponsors the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program to promote U.S. research in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, advancing U.S. energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to design, develop, and deploy new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for identifying instrumentation needed for ATR irradiation tests and the program initiated to obtain these sensors. New sensors developed from this effort are identified, and the progress of other development efforts is summarized. As reported in this paper, INL researchers are currently involved in several tasks to deploy real-time length and flux detection sensors, and efforts have been initiated to develop a crack growth test rig. Tasks evaluating `advanced' technologies, such as fiber-optics based length detection and ultrasonic thermometers, are also underway. In addition, specialized sensors for real-time detection of temperature and thermal conductivity are not only being provided to NSUF reactors, but are also being provided to several international test reactors.

  16. Testing program for concrete at temperatures to 8940K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Robinson, G.C.

    1981-01-01

    A test program was conducted to define the variations in mechanical properties of a limestone aggregate concrete and a lightweight insulating concrete exposed to elevated temperatures. Four test series were conducted: (1) unconfined compression; (2) shear; (3) rebar bond; and (4) sustained loading (creep). Tests results are presented

  17. Justice downwind: America's atomic testing program in the 1950s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, H.

    1986-01-01

    Drawing on personal interviews, case histories, and the archives of the Atomic Energy Commission, Professor Ball discusses the American nuclear-testing program from 1951 to 1963, the impact of the testing on people living downwind from the Nevada Test Site, long-term effects of radiation exposure, and the clash between the ''downwinders'' and the government

  18. The Department of Energy's radon testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, H.L.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; Gammage, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy recently completed an initial survey of indoor radon in its buildings in response to Public Law 100--551, the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988. Other federal agencies have also conducted radon surveys. This paper presents an overview of the results from radon testing of several thousand buildings ranging from 100 m 2 to over 10,000 M 2 in size. In addition, we have examined results from groups of buildings, classified according to ventilation and usage characteristics. So far, there is no apparent difference among building classes. The paper also discusses our proposal for phased radon surveys. We suggest that first-phase results can be used to identify facilities with radon problems. In the second phase, we suggest measurements be made at a much higher sampling density at facilities with radon problems. The results of the second phase are expected to identify all buildings in need of mitigation

  19. Manipulator Comparative Testing Program: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.J.; Sundstrom, E.; Herndon, J.N; Fujita, Y.; Maeda, M.

    1987-02-01

    The manipulator systems tested included the Meidensha BILARM 83A, the Central Research Laboratories Model M-2, and the GCA PaR Systems Model 6000. Six manipulator and control mode combinations were evaluated: (1) the BILARM in master/slave mode without force reflection, (2) the BILARM in master/slave mode with force reflection, (3) the Model M-2 in master/slave mode without force reflection, (4) the Model M-2 in master/slave mode with force reflection, (5) the BILARM with switchbox controls, and (6) the PaR 6000 with switchbox controls. The experiments examined differences between master/slave systems with and without force reflection and differences between master/slave systems and switchbox-controlled systems. A fourth experiment examined the relative contributions of the remote viewing system and the manipulator system to the performance of remote handling tasks. Results of the experiments showed that operators using the Model M-2 in master/slave mode had significantly faster times to completion than operators using the BILARM in master/slave mode, with about the same error rate per trial. Operators were slower using the BILARM with force reflection than without it, and they committed more errors. There was no statistically significant difference between force-reflection and nonforce-reflection conditions for the M-2 manipulator for any of the performance criteria. Tasks and procedures used in this testing were not sensitive to differences within any single system. No inferences about the effect of force reflection on remote task performance should be made from these data. The two manipulator systems in switchbox mode had significantly slower times to completion than any system in master/slave mode, with approximately the same error rate per trial. There were no significant differences between the BILARM in switchbox mode and the PaR arm

  20. Needs of in-situ materials testing under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, K.; Hishinuma, A.; Kiuchi, K.

    1989-01-01

    Under neutron irradiation, the component atoms of materials are displaced as primary knock-on atoms, and the energy of the primary knock-on atoms is consumed by electron excitation and nuclear collision. Elementary irradiation defects accumulate to form damage structure including voids and bubbles. In situ test under neutron irradiation is necessary for investigating into the effect of irradiation on creep behavior, the electric properties of ceramics, transport phenomena and so on. The in situ test is also important to investigate into the phenomena related to the chemical reaction with environment during irradiation. Accelerator type high energy neutron sources are preferable to fission reactors. In this paper, the needs and the research items of in situ test under neutron irradiation using a D-Li stripping type high energy neutron source on metallic and ceramic materials are described. Creep behavior is one of the most important mechanical properties, and depends strongly on irradiation environment, also it is closely related to microstructure. Irradiation affects the electric conductibity of ceramics and also their creep behavior. In this way, in situ test is necessary. (K.I.)