WorldWideScience

Sample records for material characterization hydration

  1. THz characterization of hydrated and anhydrous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2011-06-01

    The characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of materials is of great importance to science and industry. Water content poses difficulties for successful identification of the material structure by THz radiation. However, biological tissues and hydrated forms of nonorganic substances still may be investigated by THz radiation. This paper outlines the range of possibilities of the above characterization, as well as provides analysis of the physical mechanism that allows or prevents penetration of THz waves through the substance. THz-TDS is used to measure the parameters of the characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of organic and nonorganic samples. Mathematical methods (such as prediction models of time-series analysis) are used to help identifying the absorption coefficient and other parameters of interest. The discovered dependencies allow designing techniques for material identification/characterization (e.g. of drugs, explosives, etc. that may have water content). The results are provided.

  2. Characterization of Limestone as Raw Material to Hydrated Lime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem Hwidi, Rajeb; Nuraiti Tengku Izhar, Tengku; Saad, Farah Naemah Mohd

    2018-03-01

    In Malaysia, limestone is essentially important for the economic growth as raw materials in the industry sector. Nevertheless, a little attention was paid to the physical, chemical, mineralogical, and morphological properties of the limestone using X-ray fluorescence (X-RF), X-ray diffraction (X-RD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Scanning electron microscopy / energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) respectively. Raw materials (limestone rocks) were collected from Bukit Keteri area, Chuping, Kangar, Perlis, Malaysia. Lab crusher and lab sieved were utilized to prepare five different size of ground limestone at (75 µm, 150 µm, 225 µm, 300, and 425 µm) respectively. It is found that the main chemical composition of bulk limestone was Calcium oxide (CaO) at 97.58 wt.% and trace amount of MnO, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 at 0.02%, 0.35%, and 0.396% respectively. XRD diffractograms showed characteristic peaks of calcite and quartz. Furthermore, main FTIR absorption bands at 1,419, 874.08 and 712.20 cm-1 indicated the presence of calcite. The micrographs showed clearly the difference of samples particle size. Furthermore, EDS peaks of Ca, O, and C elements confirmed the presence of CaCO3 in the samples.

  3. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoming [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Na [Green Construction Materials and Circulation Economy Center, Architectural Design and Research Institute of Tsinghua University Co., Ltd., Beijing 100084 (China); Yao, Yuan, E-mail: yuanyaocas@163.com [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States); Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Al{sup IV} and Al{sup VI} both exist in the hydration products. • Increase of Ca/Si ratio promotes the conversion from [AlO{sub 4}] to [AlO{sub 6}]. • Polymerization degree of [SiO{sub 4}] in the hydration products declines. -- Abstract: In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si + Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al{sup IV} and Al{sup VI}, but mainly in the form of Al{sup VI}. Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO{sub 4}] to [AlO{sub 6}] and inhibits the combination between [AlO{sub 4}] and [SiO{sub 4}] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO{sub 4}] in the hydration products declines.

  4. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Na; Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Al IV and Al VI both exist in the hydration products. • Increase of Ca/Si ratio promotes the conversion from [AlO 4 ] to [AlO 6 ]. • Polymerization degree of [SiO 4 ] in the hydration products declines. -- Abstract: In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, 27 Al MAS NMR and 29 Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si + Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al IV and Al VI , but mainly in the form of Al VI . Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO 4 ] to [AlO 6 ] and inhibits the combination between [AlO 4 ] and [SiO 4 ] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO 4 ] in the hydration products declines

  5. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Na; Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan

    2013-11-15

    In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, (27)Al MAS NMR and (29)Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si+Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al(IV) and Al(VI), but mainly in the form of Al(VI). Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO4] to [AlO6] and inhibits the combination between [AlO4] and [SiO4] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO4] in the hydration products declines. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Simulation and Characterization of Methane Hydrate Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, S.; Gupta, I.

    2017-12-01

    The ever rising global energy demand dictates human endeavor to explore and exploit new and innovative energy sources. As conventional oil and gas reserves deplete, we are constantly looking for newer sources for sustainable energy. Gas hydrates have long been discussed as the next big energy resource to the earth. Its global occurrence and vast quantity of natural gas stored is one of the main reasons for such interest in its study and exploration. Gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances with trapped molecules of gas inside cage-like crystals of water molecules. Gases such as methane, ethane, propane and carbon dioxide can form hydrates but in natural state, methane hydrates are the most common. Subsurface geological conditions with high pressure and low temperature favor the formation and stability of gas hydrates. While the occurrence and potential of gas hydrates as energy source has long been studied, there are still gaps in knowledge, especially in the quantitative research of gas hydrate formation and reservoir characterization. This study is focused on exploring and understanding the geological setting in which gas hydrates are formed and the subsequent changes in rock characteristics as they are deposited. It involves the numerical simulation of methane gas flow through fault to form hydrates. The models are representative of the subsurface geologic setting of Gulf of Mexico with a fault through layers of shale and sandstone. Hydrate formation simulated is of thermogenic origin. The simulations are conducted using TOUGH+HYDRATE, a numerical code developed at the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory for modeling multiphase flow through porous medium. Simulation results predict that as the gas hydrates form in the pores of the model, the porosity, permeability and other rock properties are altered. Preliminary simulation results have shown that hydrates begin to form in the fault zone and gradually in the sandstone layers. The increase in hydrate

  7. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  8. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of the microencapsulation of a hydrated salt as phase change energy storage materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jin; Wang, Tingyu; Zhu, Panpan; Xiao, Junbin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phase change point and fusion heat of samples are about 51 °Cand 150 J/g respectively. ► DSC results indicated the core material is not Na 2 HPO 4 ·12H 2 O but Na 2 HPO 4 ·7H 2 O. ► Encapsulation takes a significant role in reducing subcooling degree. - Abstract: Microcapsules loaded by disodium hydrogen phosphate heptahydrate (Na 2 HPO 4 ·7H 2 O) were prepared by means of the suspension copolymerization-solvent volatile method, with modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as coating polymer under the conditions of various organic solvents. The formation of the microencapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs)-PMMA/Na 2 HPO 4 ·7H 2 O was investigated and analyzed. The morphology of the resultant materials was characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase contrast microscope. Its final composition was confirmed by the Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR). Thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were adopted to reveal its thermal stability and thermal properties. Results indicated that the materials owned improved subcooling degree and good thermal properties, enabling the materials to be one promising phase change materials for thermal energy storage

  9. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of the microencapsulation of a hydrated salt as phase change energy storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jin, E-mail: huangjiner@126.com [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Wang, Tingyu; Zhu, Panpan; Xiao, Junbin [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China)

    2013-04-10

    Highlights: ► Phase change point and fusion heat of samples are about 51 °Cand 150 J/g respectively. ► DSC results indicated the core material is not Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·12H{sub 2}O but Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O. ► Encapsulation takes a significant role in reducing subcooling degree. - Abstract: Microcapsules loaded by disodium hydrogen phosphate heptahydrate (Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O) were prepared by means of the suspension copolymerization-solvent volatile method, with modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as coating polymer under the conditions of various organic solvents. The formation of the microencapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs)-PMMA/Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O was investigated and analyzed. The morphology of the resultant materials was characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase contrast microscope. Its final composition was confirmed by the Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR). Thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were adopted to reveal its thermal stability and thermal properties. Results indicated that the materials owned improved subcooling degree and good thermal properties, enabling the materials to be one promising phase change materials for thermal energy storage.

  10. Preparation and characterization of hydrated salts/silica composite as shape-stabilized phase change material via sol–gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yuping; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A mixture of hydrated salts were adopted as phase change materials. • Phase segregation of the hydrated salts was inhibited. • Subcooling was slightly mitigated. • Thermal cycling performance was greatly improved after PVP coating. - Abstract: A novel shape-stabilized phase change material composite was prepared by impregnating the mixture of hydrated salts (Na 2 SO 4 ·10H 2 O–Na 2 HPO 4 ·12H 2 O) into porous silica matrix obtained by sol–gel process and further coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to improve the thermal cycling performance. The chemical compatibility, morphology and phase change properties were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), hot-stage polarizing optical microscope (HS-POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Confined in the silica matrix, phase segregation of the hydrated salts was inhibited and subcooling was slightly mitigated. No leakage was observed during the solid–liquid phase transition even when the mass ratio of hydrated salts to silica was as high as 70:30. Results showed that the melting enthalpy of the composite can reach 106.2 kJ/kg with the melting temperature at 30.13 °C and there was no significant enthalpy loss after 30 thermal cycles

  11. Experimental Setup to Characterize Bentonite Hydration Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.; Pastor, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental setup to follow-up the hydration process of a bentonite. Clay samples, of 2 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, were made and introduced in a Hele-Shaw cell with two PMM windows and two steel frames. In hydration experiments, a fluid enters by an orifice in the frame, located both at the top and the bottom of the cell, to perform hydration in both senses. To get a uniform hydration we place a diffuser near the orifice. Volume influxes in hydration cells are registered in time. The evolution of the developed interface was recorded on a videotape. The video cameras was fixed to a holder so that the vertical direction in the monitor was the same as the direction of the larger extension of the cell. (Author) 6 refs

  12. Well log characterization of natural gas-hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 25 years there have been significant advancements in the use of well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrates in nature: whereas wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs were formerly used to identify gas-hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments, more advanced wireline and logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools are now routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas-hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Resistivity- and acoustic-logging tools are the most widely used for estimating the gas-hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical-resistivity and acoustic-velocity data can yield accurate gas-hydrate saturations in sediment grain-supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log-analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. New well-logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation-resistivity log measurements provide the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly interbedded and fracture-dominated gas-hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing (WFT) also allow for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids(i.e., free water along with clay- and capillary-bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms

  13. Characterizing heterogeneous dynamics at hydrated electrode surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Adam P.; Limmer, David T.; Madden, Paul A.; Chandler, David

    2013-05-01

    In models of Pt 111 and Pt 100 surfaces in water, motions of molecules in the first hydration layer are spatially and temporally correlated. To interpret these collective motions, we apply quantitative measures of dynamic heterogeneity that are standard tools for considering glassy systems. Specifically, we carry out an analysis in terms of mobility fields and distributions of persistence times and exchange times. In so doing, we show that dynamics in these systems is facilitated by transient disorder in frustrated two-dimensional hydrogen bonding networks. The frustration is the result of unfavorable geometry imposed by strong metal-water bonding. The geometry depends upon the structure of the underlying metal surface. Dynamic heterogeneity of water on the Pt 111 surface is therefore qualitatively different than that for water on the Pt 100 surface. In both cases, statistics of this ad-layer dynamic heterogeneity responds asymmetrically to applied voltage.

  14. Characterizing heterogeneous dynamics at hydrated electrode surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Adam P; Limmer, David T; Madden, Paul A; Chandler, David

    2013-05-14

    In models of Pt 111 and Pt 100 surfaces in water, motions of molecules in the first hydration layer are spatially and temporally correlated. To interpret these collective motions, we apply quantitative measures of dynamic heterogeneity that are standard tools for considering glassy systems. Specifically, we carry out an analysis in terms of mobility fields and distributions of persistence times and exchange times. In so doing, we show that dynamics in these systems is facilitated by transient disorder in frustrated two-dimensional hydrogen bonding networks. The frustration is the result of unfavorable geometry imposed by strong metal-water bonding. The geometry depends upon the structure of the underlying metal surface. Dynamic heterogeneity of water on the Pt 111 surface is therefore qualitatively different than that for water on the Pt 100 surface. In both cases, statistics of this ad-layer dynamic heterogeneity responds asymmetrically to applied voltage.

  15. Predictive Mechanical Characterization of Macro-Molecular Material Chemistry Structures of Cement Paste at Nano Scale - Two-phase Macro-Molecular Structures of Calcium Silicate Hydrate, Tri-Calcium Silicate, Di-Calcium Silicate and Calcium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla Espinosa, Ingrid Marcela

    Concrete is a hierarchical composite material with a random structure over a wide range of length scales. At submicron length scale the main component of concrete is cement paste, formed by the reaction of Portland cement clinkers and water. Cement paste acts as a binding matrix for the other components and is responsible for the strength of concrete. Cement paste microstructure contains voids, hydrated and unhydrated cement phases. The main crystalline phases of unhydrated cement are tri-calcium silicate (C3S) and di-calcium silicate (C2S), and of hydrated cement are calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide (CH). Although efforts have been made to comprehend the chemical and physical nature of cement paste, studies at molecular level have primarily been focused on individual components. Present research focuses on the development of a method to model, at molecular level, and analysis of the two-phase combination of hydrated and unhydrated phases of cement paste as macromolecular systems. Computational molecular modeling could help in understanding the influence of the phase interactions on the material properties, and mechanical performance of cement paste. Present work also strives to create a framework for molecular level models suitable for potential better comparisons with low length scale experimental methods, in which the sizes of the samples involve the mixture of different hydrated and unhydrated crystalline phases of cement paste. Two approaches based on two-phase cement paste macromolecular structures, one involving admixed molecular phases, and the second involving cluster of two molecular phases are investigated. The mechanical properties of two-phase macromolecular systems of cement paste consisting of key hydrated phase CSH and unhydrated phases C3S or C2S, as well as CSH with the second hydrated phase CH were calculated. It was found that these cement paste two-phase macromolecular systems predicted an isotropic material behavior. Also

  16. Materials characterization techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Sam; Li, L; Kumar, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    "With an emphasis on practical applications and real-world case studies, Materials Characterization Techniques presents the principles of widely used advanced surface and structural characterization...

  17. A new aluminium-hydrate species in hydrated Portland cements characterized by 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jorgen

    2006-01-01

    Recent 27 Al MAS NMR studies of hydrated Portland cements and calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phases have shown a resonance from Al in octahedral coordination, which cannot be assigned to the well-known aluminate species in hydrated Portland cements. This resonance, which exhibits the isotropic chemical shift δ iso = 5.0 ppm and the quadrupole product parameter P Q = 1.2 MHz, has been characterized in detail by 27 Al MAS and 27 Al{ 1 H} CP/MAS NMR for different hydrated white Portland cements and C-S-H phases. These experiments demonstrate that the resonance originates from an amorphous or disordered aluminate hydrate which contains Al(OH) 6 3- or O x Al(OH) 6-x (3+x)- units. The formation of the new aluminate hydrate is related to the formation of C-S-H at ambient temperatures, however, it decomposes by thermal treatment at temperatures of 70-90 o C. From the experiments in this work it is proposed that the new aluminate hydrate is either an amorphous/disordered aluminate hydroxide or a calcium aluminate hydrate, produced as a separate phase or as a nanostructured surface precipitate on the C-S-H phase. Finally, the possibilities of Al 3+ for Ca 2+ substitution in the principal layers and interlayers of the C-S-H structure are discussed

  18. Practical materials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Presents cross-comparison between materials characterization techniquesIncludes clear specifications of strengths and limitations of each technique for specific materials characterization problemFocuses on applications and clear data interpretation without extensive mathematics

  19. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of Acid-Sulfate Alteration of Basaltic Material on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii: Jarosite and Hydrated Halloysite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Trevor G.; Morris, R. V.; Archilles C. N.; Agresti, D. G.; Ming, D. W.; Hamilton, J. C.; Mertzman, S. A.; Smith, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfates have been identified on the martian surface during robotic surface exploration and by orbital remote sensing. Measurements at Meridiani Planum (MP) by the Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and Mossbauer (MB) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity document the presence of a ubiquitous sulfate-rich outcrop (20-40% SO3) that has jarosite as an anhydrous Fe3+-sulfate [1- 3]. The presence of jarosite implies a highly acidic (pH <3) formation environment [4]. Jarosite and other sulfate minerals, including kieserite, gypsum, and alunite have also been identified in several locations in orbital remote sensing data from the MEx OMEGA and MRO CRISM instruments [e.g. 5-8]. Acid sulfate weathering of basaltic materials is an obvious pathway for formation of sulfate-bearing phases on Mars [e.g. 4, 9, 10]. In order to constrain acid-sulfate pathways on Mars, we are studying the mineralogical and chemical manifestations of acid-sulfate alteration of basaltic compositions in terrestrial environments. We have previously shown that acidsulfate alteration of tephra under hydrothermal conditions on the Puu Poliahu cone (summit region of Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii) resulted in jarosite and alunite as sulfate-bearing alteration products [11-14]. Other, more soluble, sulfates may have formed, but were leached away by rain and melting snow. Acidsulfate processes on Puu Poliahu also formed hematite spherules similar (except in size) to the hematite spherules observed at MP as an alteration product [14]. Phyllosilicates, usually smectite }minor kaolinite are also present as alteration products [13]. We discuss here an occurrence of acid-sulfate alteration on Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii). We report VNIR spectra (0.35-2.5 microns ASD spectrometer), Mossbauer spectra (MER-like ESPI backscatter spectrometer), powder XRD (PANalytical), and major element chemical compositions (XRF with LOI and Fe redox) for comparison to similar data acquired or to be acquired by MRO

  20. Very early age concrete hydration characterization monitoring using piezoceramic based smart aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Qingzhao; Song, Gangbing; Hou, Shuang; Ji, Qing; Mo, Y L

    2013-01-01

    Very early age (0–20 h) concrete hydration is a complicated chemical reaction. During the very early age period, the concrete condition dramatically changes from liquid state to solid state. This paper presents the authors’ recent research on monitoring very early age concrete hydration characterization by using piezoceramic based smart aggregates. The smart aggregate (SA) transducer is designed as a sandwich structure using two marble blocks and a pre-soldered lead zirconate titanate (PZT) patch. Based on the electromechanical property of piezo materials, the PZT patches function as both actuators and sensors. In addition, the marble blocks provide reliable protection to the fragile PZT patch and develop the SA into a robust embedded actuator or sensor in the structure. The active-sensing approach, which involved a pair of smart aggregates with one as an actuator and the other one as a sensor, was applied in this paper’s experimental investigation of concrete hydration characterization monitoring. In order to completely understand the hydration condition of the inhomogeneous, over-cluttering, high-scattering characteristics of concrete (specifically of very early concrete), a swept sine wave and several constant frequency sine waves were chosen and produced by a function generator to excite the embedded actuating smart aggregate. The PZT vibration induced ultrasonic wave propagated through the concrete and was sent to the other smart aggregate sensor. The electrical signal transferred from the smart aggregate sensor was recorded during the test. As the concrete hydration reaction was occurring, the characteristic of the electrical signal continuously changed. This paper describes the successful investigation of the three states (the fluid state, the transition state, and the hardened state) of very early age concrete hydration based on classification of the received electrical signal. Specifically, the amplitude and frequency response of the electrical

  1. Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Materials Characterization Facility enables detailed measurements of the properties of ceramics, polymers, glasses, and composites. It features instrumentation...

  2. Surface modification and characterization of magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate nanowhiskers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Chuanhui [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Li Xianguo, E-mail: chuanhuigao@foxmail.com [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Feng Lijuan; Lu Shaoyan; Liu Jinyan [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2010-03-01

    In order to enhance the compatibility with plastic polymers, magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate (MHSH) nanowhiskers were modified through grafting methyl methacrylate (MMA) on the surface of the nanowhiskers by emulsion polymerization. The influences of the reaction time, MMA monomer content, adding speed of monomer and the reaction temperature on the grafting ratio were investigated. Thermogravimetry (TG), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and surface contact angle measurement were used to characterize the effect of surface modification. The results showed that the MHSH nanowhiskers were uniformly coated by polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and a well-defined core-shell hybrid structure of MHSH/PMMA was obtained. The surface contact angle of the hybrid whiskers increased to 87.32 deg. from 12.71 deg. and the whiskers surface was changed from hydrophilic to lipophilic.

  3. Development and characterization of morin hydrate loaded microemulsion for the management of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dheeraj; Singh, Manpreet; Kumar, Punnet; Vikram, Vir; Mishra, Neeraj

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare and characterize intranasal delivery of morin hydrate loaded microemulsion for the management of Alzheimer's diseases. After intranasal delivery, brain and blood drug concentrations were found to be higher for optimized morin hydrate loaded microemulsion as compared to plain morin hydrate. Significant (P microemulsion as compared to sham control group. Daily chronic treatment with morin loaded microemulsion till the 21st day significantly increased the memory in wistar rats with STZ-induced dementia.

  4. Application of the electrical characterization to the study of the hydrated phases of the cement with coal bottom ash; Aplicacion de la caracterizacion electrica al estudio de las fases hidratadas de cemento con adicion de escorias de centrales termicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez, E.; Frutos, J. de; Alvaro, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    The present paper investigates the influence of using Bottom and Fly Ash as partial replacement of cement in the hydration process. Through measurements of electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X -ray diffraction (XRD), we analyze from the early stages to the hydration process to the end. Values of EIS, XRD and its relation, are used to determine transformation of hydrated phases, and for each of the substitutions, is indicated as modified the hydrated phase as a function of time and compared it with the reference material. It also proves the relevance of using EIS measures in real time, and as non destructive testing to characterize the hydration process of these materials. (Author)

  5. Implication of seismic attenuation for gas hydrate resource characterization, Mallik, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellefleur, G.; Riedel, M.; Brent, T.; Wright, F.; Dallimore, S. R.

    2007-10-01

    Wave attenuation is an important physical property of hydrate-bearing sediments that is rarely taken into account in site characterization with seismic data. We present a field example showing improved images of hydrate-bearing sediments on seismic data after compensation of attenuation effects. Compressional quality factors estimated from zero-offset Vertical Seismic Profiling data acquired at Mallik, Northwest Territories, Canada, demonstrate significant wave attenuation for hydrate-bearing sediments. These results are in agreement with previous attenuation estimates obtained from sonic logs and crosshole data at different frequency intervals. The application of an inverse Q-filter to compensate attenuation effects of permafrost and hydrate-bearing sediments improved the resolution of surface 3D seismic data and its correlation with log data, particularly for the shallowest gas hydrate interval. Compensation of the attenuation effects of the permafrost likely explains most of the improvements for the shallow gas hydrate zone. Our results show that characterization of the Mallik gas hydrates with seismic data not corrected for attenuation would tend to overestimate thicknesses and lateral extent of hydrate-bearing strata and hence, the volume of hydrates in place.

  6. Characterization of Nanophase Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2000-01-01

    Engineering of nanophase materials and devices is of vital interest in electronics, semiconductors and optics, catalysis, ceramics and magnetism. Research associated with nanoparticles has widely spread and diffused into every field of scientific research, forming a trend of nanocrystal engineered materials. The unique properties of nanophase materials are entirely determined by their atomic scale structures, particularly the structures of interfaces and surfaces. Development of nanotechnology involves several steps, of which characterization of nanoparticles is indespensable to understand the behavior and properties of nanoparticles, aiming at implementing nanotechnolgy, controlling their behavior and designing new nanomaterials systems with super performance. The book will focus on structural and property characterization of nanocrystals and their assemblies, with an emphasis on basic physical approach, detailed techniques, data interpretation and applications. Intended readers of this comprehensive reference work are advanced graduate students and researchers in the field, who are specialized in materials chemistry, materials physics and materials science.

  7. Gas Hydrate Characterization from a 3D Seismic Dataset in the Eastern Deepwater Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Dan

    2017-10-26

    The presence of a gas hydrate petroleum system and seismic attributes derived from 3D seismic data are used for the identification and characterization of gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater eastern Gulf of Mexico. In the central deepwater Gulf of Mexico (GoM), logging while drilling (LWD) data provided insight to the amplitude response of gas hydrate saturation in sands, which could be used to characterize complex gas hydrate deposits in other sandy deposits. In this study, a large 3D seismic data set from equivalent and distal Plio-Pleistocene sandy channel deposits in the deepwater eastern Gulf of Mexico is screened for direct hydrocarbon indicators for gas hydrate saturated sands.

  8. Characterization of dielectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Danny J.; Babinec, Susan; Hagans, Patrick L.; Maxey, Lonnie C.; Payzant, Edward A.; Daniel, Claus; Sabau, Adrian S.; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Howe, Jane Y.; Wood, III, David L.; Nembhard, Nicole S.

    2017-06-27

    A system and a method for characterizing a dielectric material are provided. The system and method generally include applying an excitation signal to electrodes on opposing sides of the dielectric material to evaluate a property of the dielectric material. The method can further include measuring the capacitive impedance across the dielectric material, and determining a variation in the capacitive impedance with respect to either or both of a time domain and a frequency domain. The measured property can include pore size and surface imperfections. The method can still further include modifying a processing parameter as the dielectric material is formed in response to the detected variations in the capacitive impedance, which can correspond to a non-uniformity in the dielectric material.

  9. Material Response Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    models fit to vertical UX and TX data and a mean stress tension cutoff criterion. Because tests on the Kayenta sands one materials had revealed a definite...parameters. 9 This data characterizing the anisotropic response of the upper 30 feet of Kayenta material should not just be filed away; it should be used...9. Johnson, J. N., et al, "Anisotropic Mechanical Properties of Kayenta Sandstone (MIXED COMPANY Site) for Ground Motion Calculations," Terra Tek TR

  10. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Yongkoo, E-mail: Yongkoo.Seol@netl.doe.gov; Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field.

  11. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field

  12. Delineation, Characterization and Assessment of Gas-hydrates: Examples from Indian Offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sain, K.

    2017-12-01

    Successful test productions in McKenzie delta, Alaska, Nankai Trough and more recently in South China Sea have provided great hopes for production of gas-hydrates in near future, and boosted national programs of many countries including India. It has been imperative to map the prospective zones of gas-hydrates and evaluate their resource potential. Hence, we have adopted a systematic strategy for the delineation, characterization and quantification of gas-hydrates based on seismic traveltime tomography, full-waveform inversion, impedance inversion, attributes computation and rock-physical modeling. The bathymetry, seafloor temperature, total organic carbon content, sediment-thickness, rate of sedimentation, geothermal gradient imply that shallow sediments of Indian deep water are good hosts for occurrences of gas-hydrates. From the analysis of multi-channel seismic (MCS) data, we have identified the Krishna-Godavari (KG), Mahanadi and Andaman basins as prospective for gas-hydrates, and their presence has been validated by drilling and coring of Indian Expeditions-01 and -02. The MCS data also shows BSR-like features in the Cauvery, Kerala-Konkan and Saurashtra basins indicating that gas-hydrates cannot be ruled out from these basins also. We shall present several approaches that have been applied to field seismic and well-log data for the detection, characterization and quantification of gas-hydrates along the Indian margin.

  13. Salt hydrates and other phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, S.

    1978-01-01

    The objectives of the project are: to ascertain thermal performance of Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ . 10H/sub 2/O and other incongruently melting salt hydrates by calorimetric investigation of melting and freezing; and select compounds and mixtures suitable for isothermal heat storage within the range, 90 to 250/sup 0/C. Selection is to be used on laboratory evaluation as well as on economic and technical screening criteria.

  14. Borehole Tool for the Comprehensive Characterization of Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng; Santamarina, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Reservoir characterization and simulation require reliable parameters to anticipate hydrate deposits responses and production rates. The acquisition of the required fundamental properties currently relies on wireline logging, pressure core testing, and/or laboratory ob-servations of synthesized specimens, which are challenged by testing capabilities and in-nate sampling disturbances. The project reviews hydrate-bearing sediments, properties, and inherent sampling effects, albeit lessen with the developments in pressure core technology, in order to develop robust correlations with index parameters. The resulting information is incorporated into a tool for optimal field characterization and parameter selection with un-certainty analyses. Ultimately, the project develops a borehole tool for the comprehensive characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments at in situ, with the design recognizing past developments and characterization experience and benefited from the inspiration of nature and sensor miniaturization.

  15. Borehole Tool for the Comprehensive Characterization of Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2018-02-01

    Reservoir characterization and simulation require reliable parameters to anticipate hydrate deposits responses and production rates. The acquisition of the required fundamental properties currently relies on wireline logging, pressure core testing, and/or laboratory ob-servations of synthesized specimens, which are challenged by testing capabilities and in-nate sampling disturbances. The project reviews hydrate-bearing sediments, properties, and inherent sampling effects, albeit lessen with the developments in pressure core technology, in order to develop robust correlations with index parameters. The resulting information is incorporated into a tool for optimal field characterization and parameter selection with un-certainty analyses. Ultimately, the project develops a borehole tool for the comprehensive characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments at in situ, with the design recognizing past developments and characterization experience and benefited from the inspiration of nature and sensor miniaturization.

  16. Borehole Tool for the Comprehensive Characterization of Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Santamarina, J. Carlos [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-12-30

    Reservoir characterization and simulation require reliable parameters to anticipate hydrate deposits responses and production rates. The acquisition of the required fundamental properties currently relies on wireline logging, pressure core testing, and/or laboratory observations of synthesized specimens, which are challenged by testing capabilities and innate sampling disturbances. The project reviews hydrate-bearing sediments, properties, and inherent sampling effects, albeit lessen with the developments in pressure core technology, in order to develop robust correlations with index parameters. The resulting information is incorporated into a tool for optimal field characterization and parameter selection with uncertainty analyses. Ultimately, the project develops a borehole tool for the comprehensive characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments at in situ, with the design recognizing past developments and characterization experience and benefited from the inspiration of nature and sensor miniaturization.

  17. Sustainable Nanopozzolan Modified Cement: Characterizations and Morphology of Calcium Silicate Hydrate during Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mohamed Sutan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are environmental and sustainable benefits of partially replacing cement with industrial by-products or synthetic materials in cement based products. Since microstructural behaviours of cement based products are the crucial parameters that govern their sustainability and durability, this study investigates the microstructural comparison between two different types of cement replacements as nanopozzolan modified cement (NPMC in cement based product by focusing on the evidence of pozzolanic reactivity in corroboration with physical and mechanical properties. Characterization and morphology techniques using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were carried out to assess the pozzolanic reactivity of cement paste modified with the combination of nano- and micro silica as NPMC in comparison to unmodified cement paste (UCP of 0.5 water to cement ratio (w/c. Results were then substantiated with compressive strength (CS results as mechanical property. Results of this study showed clear evidence of pozzolanicity for all samples with varying reactivity with NPMC being the most reactive.

  18. Hydration mechanism and leaching behavior of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xiaoming, E-mail: liuxm@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline regions in size of ∼5 nm were found in the amorphous C-A-S-H gel. • A hydration model was proposed to clarify the hydration mechanism. • The developed cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable. - Abstract: A deep investigation on the hydration mechanism of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials was conducted from viewpoints of hydration products and hydration heat analysis. As a main hydration product, the microstructure of C-A-S-H gel was observed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the C-A-S-H gel is composed of amorphous regions and nanocrystalline regions. Most of regions in the C-A-S-H gel are amorphous with continuous distribution, and the nanocrystalline regions on scale of ∼5 nm are dispersed irregularly within the amorphous regions. The hydration heat of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials is much lower than that of the ordinary Portland cement. A hydration model was proposed for this kind of cementitious materials, and the hydration process mainly consists of four stages which are dissolution of materials, formation of C-A-S-H gels and ettringite, cementation of hydration products, and polycondensation of C-A-S-H gels. There are no strict boundaries among these four basic stages, and they proceed crossing each other. Moreover, the leaching toxicity tests were also performed to prove that the developed red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable.

  19. Hydration mechanism and leaching behavior of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline regions in size of ∼5 nm were found in the amorphous C-A-S-H gel. • A hydration model was proposed to clarify the hydration mechanism. • The developed cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable. - Abstract: A deep investigation on the hydration mechanism of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials was conducted from viewpoints of hydration products and hydration heat analysis. As a main hydration product, the microstructure of C-A-S-H gel was observed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the C-A-S-H gel is composed of amorphous regions and nanocrystalline regions. Most of regions in the C-A-S-H gel are amorphous with continuous distribution, and the nanocrystalline regions on scale of ∼5 nm are dispersed irregularly within the amorphous regions. The hydration heat of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials is much lower than that of the ordinary Portland cement. A hydration model was proposed for this kind of cementitious materials, and the hydration process mainly consists of four stages which are dissolution of materials, formation of C-A-S-H gels and ettringite, cementation of hydration products, and polycondensation of C-A-S-H gels. There are no strict boundaries among these four basic stages, and they proceed crossing each other. Moreover, the leaching toxicity tests were also performed to prove that the developed red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable.

  20. Feasibility of using phase change materials to control the heat of hydration in massive concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Chang; Khil, Bae-Soo; Chae, Young-Seok; Liang, Qi-Bo; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM), such as a latent heat material (LHM), to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests) were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH)2 · 8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  1. Feasibility of Using Phase Change Materials to Control the Heat of Hydration in Massive Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM, such as a latent heat material (LHM, to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH2·8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  2. Material Research on Salt Hydrates for Seasonal Heat Storage Application in a Residential Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferchaud, C.J.; Zondag, H.A.; De Boer, R. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Water vapor sorption in salt hydrates is a promising method to realize seasonal solar heat storage in the residential sector. Several materials already showed promising performance for this application. However, the stability of these materials needs to be improved for long-term (30 year) application in seasonal solar heat storages. The purpose of this article is to identify the influence of the material properties of the salt hydrates on the performance and the reaction kinetics of the sorption process. The experimental investigation presented in this article shows that the two salt hydrates Li2SO4.H2O and CuSO4.5H2O can store and release heat under the operating conditions of a seasonal solar heat storage in a fully reversible way. However, these two materials show differences in terms of energy density and reaction kinetics. Li2SO4.H2O can release heat with an energy density of around 0.80 GJ/m{sup 3} within 4 hours of rehydration at 25C, while CuSO4.5H2O needs around 130 hours at the same temperature to be fully rehydrated and reaches an energy density of 1.85 GJ/m{sup 3}. Since the two salts are dehydrated and hydrated under the same conditions, this difference in behavior is directly related to the intrinsic properties of the materials.

  3. Properties of calcium depleted hydrated cement paste: mineralogical characterization and cesium adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaahmadi, A.; Tang, L.; Zareen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the changes in adsorption properties of cementitious barriers and the effect on the release of radio-nuclides to the environment during the service life of the repository is of high importance. A major degradation scenario within safety assessment analysis of nuclear waste repositories is decalcification of cementitious materials due to long-term contact with groundwater. In order to decrease the uncertainty in the simulation of this process due to extrapolating short term data sets based on short term experimental analysis, acceleration methods enhancing the decalcification process can be used. However it is not yet completely proved that how different the properties of the aged samples through accelerated leaching is compared to the samples aged in natural ageing process. In this study the changes in cesium adsorption of the hydrated cement paste due to calcium depletion is taken in to consideration. The aged samples are prepared with application of an accelerating electro-chemical migration method. The mineralogical properties of decalcified specimens are characterized to demonstrate their comparability with naturally leached samples. The gradual effect of migration function on cementitious materials indicates a relatively homogenous leaching in cementitious specimens and a considerable increase in specific surface area due to the leaching of calcium. It is concluded that the aged samples having a larger surface area and less calcium and alkalis ions compared to pristine materials, exhibit a higher binding potential for Cs ions

  4. Characterization of cement-based ancient building materials in support of repository seal materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1983-12-01

    Ancient mortars and plasters collected from Greek and Cypriot structures dating to about 5500 BC have been investigated because of their remarkable durability. The characteristics and performance of these and other ancient cementitious materials have been considered in the light of providing information on longevity of concrete materials for sealing nuclear waste geological repositories. The matrices of these composite materials have been characterized and classified into four categories: (1) gypsum cements; (2) hydraulic hydrated lime and hydrated-lime cements; (3) hydraulic aluminous and ferruginous hydrated-lime cements (+- siliceous components); and (4) pozzolana/hydrated-lime cements. Most of the materials investigated, including linings of ore-washing basins and cisterns used to hold water, are in categories (2) and (3). The aggregates used included carbonates, sandstones, shales, schists, volcanic and pyroclastic rocks, and ore minerals, many of which represent host rock types of stratigraphic components of a salt repository. Numerous methods were used to characterize the materials chemically, mineralogically, and microstructurally and to elucidate aspects of both the technology that produced them and their response to the environmental exposure throughout their centuries of existence. Their remarkable properties are the result of a combination of chemical (mineralogical) and microstructural factors. Durability was found to be affected by matrix mineralogy, particle size and porosity, and aggregate type, grading, and proportioning, as well as method of placement and exposure conditions. Similar factors govern the potential for durability of modern portland cement-containing materials, which are candidates for repository sealing. 29 references, 29 figures, 6 tables

  5. Design, characterization, and clinical evaluation of argan oil nanostructured lipid carriers to improve skin hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichota, Deise Michele; Silva, Ana Catarina; Sousa Lobo, José Manuel; Amaral, Maria Helena

    2014-01-01

    Given its advantages in skin application (eg, hydration, antiaging, and protection), argan oil could be used in both dermatological and cosmetic formulations. Therefore, the preparation of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) using argan oil as a liquid lipid is a promising technique, since the former constitute well-established systems for dermal delivery. The aim of this work was to develop a topical formulation of argan oil NLCs to improve skin hydration. Firstly an NLC dispersion was developed and characterized, and afterward an NLC-based hydrogel was prepared. The in vivo evaluation of the suitability of the prepared formulation for the proposed application was assessed in volunteers, by measuring different skin-surface parameters for 1 month. An argan oil NLC-based hydrogel formulation was successfully prepared and characterized. Moreover, the entrapment of the NLCs in the hydrogel net did not affect their colloidal sizes. Additionally, it was observed that this formulation precipitated an increase in skin hydration of healthy volunteers. Therefore, we concluded that the preparation of NLC systems using argan oil as the liquid lipid is a promising strategy, since a synergistic effect on the skin hydration was obtained (ie, NLC occlusion plus argan oil hydration).

  6. Heavy ion beam measurement of the hydration of cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, R.A.; Schweitzer, J.S.; Spillane, T.; Zickefoose, J.; Rolfs, C.; Becker, H.-W.; Kubsky, S.; Castellote, M.; Viedma, P.G. de; Cheung, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The setting and development of strength of Portland cement concrete depends upon the reaction of water with various phases in the Portland cement including dicalcium silicate (C 2 S), tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) and tricalcium aluminate (C 3 A). The early age hydration reaction and setting time are determined by surface layers on the cement grains that form a region that is only a few 100 nm thick. This has been difficult to observe with conventional methods. Ion beam techniques have been used to investigate these layers in detail at the Tandem Accelerator facility of the University of the Ruhr in Bochum, Germany. The primary method has been Nuclear Resonance Reaction Analysis (NRRA) involving the 1 H( 15 N,αγ) 12 C reaction to measure the hydrogen depth profile. This technique has an H detection sensitivity of about 10 ppm and an H-depth resolution of a few nm at the surface.. Freshly cleaved mica is used as a calibration standard for conversion of gamma-ray counts to H concentration. The beam energy to depth conversion factor is obtained by numerical simulation using the Monte Carlo code TRIM. NRRA with the 1 H( 19 F, αγ) 16 O reaction has also been used to measure the hydrogen depth profile. Some samples were implanted with a 131 Xe layer in order to measure the depth profile of other significant elements such as calcium with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), and also to measure the erosion of the surface layers

  7. Ultrasonic assessment of early age property development in hydrating cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun

    The internal structure (microstructure) of cementitious materials, such as cement paste, mortar and concrete, evolves over time because of cement hydration. The microstructure of the cementitious phase plays a very important role in determining the strength, the mechanical properties and the long-term durability of cementitious materials. Therefore any understanding of the strength gain and the long-term durability of cementitious materials requires a proper assessment of the microstructure of its cementitious phase. Current methods for evaluating the microstructure of the cement are invasive and primarily laboratory-based. These methods are not conducive for studying the pore structure changes in the first few hours after casting since the changes in microstructure occur on a time scale that is an order of magnitude faster than the time required for sample preparation. The primary objective of the research presented in this thesis is to contribute towards advancing the current state-of-the-art in assessing the microstructure of cementitious systems. An ultrasonic wave reflection technique which allows for real-time assessment of the porosity and the elastic modulus of cementitious materials is developed. The test procedure for monitoring changes in the amplitude of horizontally polarized ultrasonic shear waves from the surface of hydrating cement paste is presented. A theoretical framework based on a poro-elastic idealization of the hydrating cementitious material is developed for interpreting the ultrasonic reflection data. The poro-elastic representation of hydrating cementitious material is shown to provide simultaneous, realistic estimates of porosity and shear modulus for hydrating cement paste and mortar through setting and early strength gain. The porosity predicted by the poro-elastic representation is identical to the capillary water content within the cement paste predicted by Powers' model. The shear modulus of the poro-elastic skeleton was compares

  8. Grain-scale imaging and compositional characterization of cryo-preserved India NGHP 01 gas-hydrate-bearing cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Laura A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on grain-scale characteristics and gas analyses of gas-hydrate-bearing samples retrieved by NGHP Expedition 01 as part of a large-scale effort to study gas hydrate occurrences off the eastern-Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and gas chromatography, we investigated gas hydrate grain morphology and distribution within sediments, gas hydrate composition, and methane isotopic composition of samples from Krishna–Godavari (KG) basin and Andaman back-arc basin borehole sites from depths ranging 26 to 525 mbsf. Gas hydrate in KG-basin samples commonly occurs as nodules or coarse veins with typical hydrate grain size of 30–80 μm, as small pods or thin veins 50 to several hundred microns in width, or disseminated in sediment. Nodules contain abundant and commonly isolated macropores, in some places suggesting the original presence of a free gas phase. Gas hydrate also occurs as faceted crystals lining the interiors of cavities. While these vug-like structures constitute a relatively minor mode of gas hydrate occurrence, they were observed in near-seafloor KG-basin samples as well as in those of deeper origin (>100 mbsf) and may be original formation features. Other samples exhibit gas hydrate grains rimmed by NaCl-bearing material, presumably produced by salt exclusion during original hydrate formation. Well-preserved microfossil and other biogenic detritus are also found within several samples, most abundantly in Andaman core material where gas hydrate fills microfossil crevices. The range of gas hydrate modes of occurrence observed in the full suite of samples suggests a range of formation processes were involved, as influenced by local in situconditions. The hydrate-forming gas is predominantly methane with trace quantities of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons of primarily microbial origin. The composition indicates the gas hydrate is Structure I.

  9. Hydration rate and strength development of low-heat type portland cement mortar mixed with pozzolanic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Jun

    1998-01-01

    Recently, low-heat type Portland cement was specified in Japan Industrial Standards (JIS). Its hydration proceeds slowly. The results of the research so far obtained indicate that slow hydration of cement and mixing of pozzolanic materials with cement make micro-structure of harded cement paste dense and durable. In this study, a blended cement using low-heat type Portland cement and some of pozzolanic materials has been newly developed and its strength property and hydration ratio were checked. The followings are conclusion. (1) Hydration rate of cement paste varies with the replacement ratio of pozzolanic materials. (2) A good liner relationship between strength and total hydration rate of cement paste was observed. (3) A proper replacement ratio of both base-cement and pozzolanic material for manufacturing a blended cement is 50%. (author)

  10. Composite materials processing, applications, characterizations

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials are used as substitutions of metals/traditional materials in aerospace, automotive, civil, mechanical and other industries. The present book collects the current knowledge and recent developments in the characterization and application of composite materials. To this purpose the volume describes the outstanding properties of this class of advanced material which recommend it for various industrial applications.

  11. Ultrasonic nondestructive materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of ultrasonic wave propagation in solid materials is presented with consideration of the altered behavior in anisotropic and nonlinear elastic materials in comparison with isotropic and linear elastic materials. Some experimental results are described in which ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements give insight into materials microstructure and associated mechanical properties. Recent developments with laser beam non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound are presented. The results of several years of experimental measurements using high-power ultrasound are discussed, which provide substantial evidence of the inability of presently accepted theories to fully explain the interaction of ultrasound with solid materials. Finally, a special synchrotron X-ray topographic system is described which affords the possibility of observing direct interaction of ultrasonic waves with the microstructural features of real crystalline solid materials for the first time.

  12. Offshore Antarctic Peninsula Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization by Geophysical Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Giustiniani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A gas hydrate reservoir, identified by the presence of the bottom simulating reflector, is located offshore of the Antarctic Peninsula. The analysis of geophysical dataset acquired during three geophysical cruises allowed us to characterize this reservoir. 2D velocity fields were obtained by using the output of the pre-stack depth migration iteratively. Gas hydrate amount was estimated by seismic velocity, using the modified Biot-Geerstma-Smit theory. The total volume of gas hydrate estimated, in an area of about 600 km2, is in a range of 16 × 109–20 × 109 m3. Assuming that 1 m3 of gas hydrate corresponds to 140 m3 of free gas in standard conditions, the reservoir could contain a total volume that ranges from 1.68 to 2.8 × 1012 m3 of free gas. The interpretation of the pre-stack depth migrated sections and the high resolution morpho-bathymetry image allowed us to define a structural model of the area. Two main fault systems, characterized by left transtensive and compressive movement, are recognized, which interact with a minor transtensive fault system. The regional geothermal gradient (about 37.5 °C/km, increasing close to a mud volcano likely due to fluid-upwelling, was estimated through the depth of the bottom simulating reflector by seismic data.

  13. Characterization of methane-hydrate formation inferred from insitu Vp-density relationship for hydrate-bearing sediment cores obtained off the eastern coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, M.; Hamada, Y.; Hirose, T.; Yamada, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In 2015, the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Drilling Expedition 02 was carried out off the eastern margin of the Indian Peninsula in order to investigate distribution and occurrence of gas hydrates. From 25 drill sites, downhole logging data, cored samples, and drilling performance data were collected. One of the target areas (area B) is located on the axial and flank of an anticline, where the BSR is identified 100 m beneath the summit of anticline. 3 sites were drilled in the crest. The lower potential hydrate zone II was suggested by downhole logging (LWD) at 270-290 m below seafloor across the top of anticline. Core samples from this interval is characterized by a higher natural gamma radiation, gamma-ray-based higher bulk density and lower porosity, and higher electrical resistivity. All these features are in good agreement with LWD results. During this expedition, numerous special core sampling operations (PCAT) were carried out, keeping its insitu pressure in a pressure-tight vessel. They enabled acquiring insitu P-wave velocity and gamma-ray attenuation density measurements. In-situ X-CT images exhibit very clear hydrate distribution as lower density patches. Hydrate-bearing sediments exhibit a Vp-density trend that is clearly different from the ordinary formation. Vp values are significantly higher than 2 km/s whereas the density remains constant at 2-2.2 g/cm3 in hydrate zones. At some hydrate-bearing sediments, we noticed that Vp is negatively correlated to the density in the deeper portion (235-285 mbsf). On the other hand, in the shallower portion they are positively correlated. From lithostratigraphy the shallower portion consists of sand, whereas deeper portion are silty-clay dominant. We infer that the sand-dominant, shallower hydrate is a pore-filling type, and Vp is correlated positively to density. On the other hand, the clay-dominant, deeper hydrate is filled in vertical veins, and Vp is negatively correlated to density. Negative

  14. Dehydration and hydration behavior of metal-salt-modified materials for chemical heat pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitobi, Hirokazu; Uruma, Keirei; Takeuchi, Masato; Ryu, Junichi; Kato, Yukitaka

    2013-01-01

    Lithium chloride (LiCl) modified magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH) 2 ) is a potential new material for chemical heat pumps. However, there is insufficient information concerning its dehydration and hydration behavior. In this study, the dehydration and hydration reactions, corresponding to the heat storage and the heat output operations, respectively, of authentic Mg(OH) 2 and LiCl-modified Mg(OH) 2 were investigated by thermogravimetric methods and near infrared spectroscopy. The dehydration of authentic Mg(OH) 2 proceeded as a one-step reaction. In contrast, the dehydration of LiCl-modified Mg(OH) 2 occurred in two steps. The dehydration reaction rates were increased by LiCl modification of the Mg(OH) 2 surface, while the activation energy for the first-order dehydration reaction was lowered. The mechanism for the hydration reaction of magnesium oxide (MgO) was different to that for the hydration of LiCl-modified MgO. This difference was explained by the effect of the LiCl on the MgO particle surface. - Highlights: ► LiCl-modified Mg(OH) 2 is a candidate material for chemical heat pumps. ► The dehydration reaction of LiCl-modified Mg(OH) 2 is a two-step reaction. ► The dehydration reaction of Mg(OH) 2 was enhanced by LiCl modification. ► The hydration mechanisms of authentic MgO and LiCl-modified MgO were different.

  15. Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone intended for efficient paving materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, A.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the growth of load on automotive roads, modern transportation engineering is in need of efficient paving materials. Runways and most advanced highways require Portland cement concretes. This makes important the studies directed to improvement of binders for such concretes. In the present work some peculiarities of the process of Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone with barium hydrosilicate sol were examined. It was found that the admixture of said sol leads to a shift in the induction period to later times without significant change in its duration. The admixture of a modifier with nanoscale barium hydrosilicates increases the degree of hydration of the cement clinker minerals and changes the phase composition of the hydration products; in particular, the content of portlandite and tricalcium silicate decreases, while the amount of ettringite increases. Changes in the hydration processes of Portland cement and early setting of cement stone that are caused by the nanoscale barium hydrosilicates, allow to forecast positive technological effects both at the stage of manufacturing and at the stage of operation. In particular, the formwork age can be reduced, turnover of molds can be increased, formation of secondary ettringite and corrosion of the first type can be eliminated.

  16. Materials Characterization Center program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.D.; Ross, W.A.; Hill, O.F.; Mendel, J.E.; Merz, M.D.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1980-03-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) has been established at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Materials Characterization Organization for providing an authoritative, referenceable basis for establishing nuclear waste material properties and test methods. The MCC will provide a data base that will include information on the components of the waste emplacement package - the spent fuel or processed waste form and the engineered barriers - and their interaction with each other and as affected by the environment. The MCC will plan materials testing, develop and document procedures, collect and analyze existing materials data, and conduct tests as necessary

  17. High temperature materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  18. Material properties characterization - concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, G.L.; MacLeod, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of the six contributions in the SMiRT 4 conference to Session H5 on structural analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels. These relate to short term stress-strain aspects of concrete loaded beyond the linear range in uniaxial and biaxial stress fields, to some time and temperature dependent properties of concrete at working stress levels, and to a programme of strain-gauge testing for the assessment of concrete properties. From the information discussed, it is clear that there are difficulties in determining material properties for concrete, and these are summarised. (UK)

  19. Hydration induced material transfer in membranes of osmotic pump tablets measured by synchrotron radiation based FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Yin, Xianzhen; Guo, Zhen; Tong, Yajun; Feng, Jing; York, Peter; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Gu, Jingkai; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-03-10

    Osmotic pump tablets are reliable oral controlled drug delivery systems based on their semipermeable membrane coating. This research used synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy and imaging to investigate the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets. SR-FTIR was applied to record and map the chemical information of a micro-region of the membranes, composed of cellulose acetate (CA, as the water insoluble matrix) and polyethylene glycol (PEG, as the soluble pore forming agent and plasticizing agent). The microstructure and chemical change of membranes hydrated for 0, 5, 10 and 30min were measured using SR-FTIR, combined with scanning electronic microscopy and atom force microscopy. The SR-FTIR microspectroscopy results indicated that there was a major change at the absorption range of 2700-3100cm(-1) in the membranes after different periods of hydration time. The absorption bands at 2870-2880cm(-1) and 2950-2960cm(-1) were assigned to represent CA and PEG, respectively. The chemical group signal distribution illustrated by the ratio of PEG to CA demonstrated that the trigger of drug release in the preliminary stage was due to the rapid transfer of PEG into liquid medium with a sharp decrease of PEG in the membranes. The SR-FTIR mapping results have demonstrated the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets and enabled reassessment of the drug release mechanism of membrane controlled osmotic pump systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Material stabilization characterization management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GIBSON, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority

  1. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, Yazhao [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xiaoming, E-mail: liuxm@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Cementitious material was designed according to [SiO{sub 4}] polymerization degree of raw materials. • The cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag yields excellent physical and mechanical properties. • Amorphous C–A–S–H gel and rod-like ettringite are predominantly responsible for the strength development. • Leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests show the cementitious material is environmentally acceptable. - Abstract: Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C–A–S–H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH){sub 2} with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}·4H{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}·H{sub 2}O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C–A–S–H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of alanine boron hydrate for its use in thermal neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanez S, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Alanine boron hydrate was synthesized for its possible use as intercomparison dosimeter for thermal neutron irradiation. The irradiations were performed in the Nuclear Reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. The salt was prepared by reacting alanine and boric acid in a (1:1) stoichiometric ratio in neutral pH 7.5 aqueous solution and also in a basic pH 13 solution. The latter reaction was prepared with the addition of ammonia hydroxide (25%). Solutions were stirred and afterwards were let to evaporate. The obtained product in each reaction is a white solid. Dosimeters were prepared with the obtained reaction products and irradiated under thermal neutron flux of 5 x 10 7 n/cm 2 s. For 30 hours. The analysis of irradiated samples was made in a Variant E-15 Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectrometer. The observed response of the samples prepared with the reaction product at the basic pH is approximately 50% higher than the neutral pH samples. In order to investigate the optimum signal enhancement samples were prepared in a basic pH medium in the following stoichiometric ratios: (1:0.5); (1:0.75); (1:1.25); (1:1.5) and (1:1.75). It was observed that the samples of the reaction (1:0.75) produced the higher response. The response was 2728% higher than the alanine only dosimeters. The reaction product was chemically characterized by X-ray diffraction, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Chromatography, Refractometry and Solubility tests. Results indicate that alanine boron hydrate is formed in basic media and in a stoichiometric ratio (1:0.75). The dosimetric characterization of alanine boron hydrate was performed, results are reported. It is concluded that alanine boron hydrate may be a good intercomparison dosimeter for thermal neutron irradiation. (Author)

  3. Characterizing the hydration state of L-threonine in solution using terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huachuan; Liu, Qiao; Zhu, Liguo; Li, Zeren

    2018-01-01

    The hydration of biomolecules is closely related to the dynamic process of their functional expression, therefore, characterizing hydration phenomena is a subject of keen interest. However, direct measurements on the global hydration state of biomolecules couldn't have been acquired using traditional techniques such as thermodynamics, ultrasound, microwave spectroscopy or viscosity, etc. In order to realize global hydration characterization of amino acid such as L-threonine, terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (THz-TDS-ATR) was adopted in this paper. By measuring the complex permittivity of L-threonine solutions with various concentrations in the THz region, the hydration state and its concentration dependence were obtained, indicating that the number of hydrous water decreased with the increase of concentration. The hydration number was evaluated to be 17.8 when the molar concentration of L-threonine was 0.34 mol/L, and dropped to 13.2 when the molar concentration increased to 0.84 mol/L, when global hydration was taken into account. According to the proposed direct measurements, it is believed that the THz-TDS-ATR technique is a powerful tool for studying the picosecond molecular dynamics of amino acid solutions.

  4. Sedimentological Characterization of a Deepwater Methane Hydrate Reservoir in Green Canyon 955, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meazell, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    Grain size is a controlling factor of hydrate saturation within a Pleistocene channel-levee system investigated by the UT-GOM2-1 expedition within the deepwater northern Gulf of Mexico. Laser diffraction and settling experiments conducted on sediments from 413-440 meters below the seafloor reveal the presence of two interbedded lithologic units, identified as a silty sand and a clayey silt, according Shepard's classification system. The sand-rich lithofacies has low density and high p-wave velocity, suggesting a high degree of hydrate saturation. Conversely, the clay and silt dominated lithofacies is characterized by a higher density and low p-wave velocity, suggesting low hydrate saturation. The sand-rich lithofacies is well-sorted and displays abundant ripple lamination, indicative of deposition within a high-energy environment. The clayey-silt is poorly-sorted and lacks sedimentary structures. The two lithofacies are interbedded throughout the reservoir unit; however, the relative abundance of the sand-rich lithofacies increases with depth, suggesting a potential decrease in flow energy or sediment flux over time, resulting in the most favorable reservoir properties near the base of the unit.

  5. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  6. Impact-limiting materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.; Duffey, T.A.; McConnell, P.

    1993-01-01

    Three types of impact-limiting materials have been characterized which have applications in packages for the transport of radioactive materials. These materials are aluminum honeycombs, polyurethane foams, and aluminum foams. The results of the materials characterization have indicated strengths and weaknesses for each type of material. The polyurethane foams provide good impact limiting ability and excellent thermal insulation. However, they burn when subjected to the regulatory thermal event in the presence of air. The aluminum honeycombs provide excellent impact resistance in specific impact orientations. However, they provide relatively poor resistance to thermal assault. Finally, the aluminum foams exhibit relatively poor impact energy absorption capacities, significant variability in energy absorption, and limited thermal insulation. The development of the figures of merit examined the response of the materials to the impact event with the intent of maximizing the energy absorption of the materials with respect to either the volume or mass of the materials. Three figures of merit will be presented for the structural response. The figure of merit for the thermal event is based on minimizing the heat flux to the containment boundary. The paper presents a discussion of the test methods, a summary of the data and the figures of merit for each material. (J.P.N.)

  7. Characterization of gas hydrate distribution using conventional 3D seismic data in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujuan; Qiang, Jin; Collett, Timothy S.; Shi, Hesheng; Yang, Shengxiong; Yan, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanping; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Duanxin

    2016-01-01

    A new 3D seismic reflection data volume acquired in 2012 has allowed for the detailed mapping and characterization of gas hydrate distribution in the Pearl River Mouth Basin in the South China Sea. Previous studies of core and logging data showed that gas hydrate occurrence at high concentrations is controlled by the presence of relatively coarse-grained sediment and the upward migration of thermogenic gas from the deeper sediment section into the overlying gas hydrate stability zone (BGHSZ); however, the spatial distribution of the gas hydrate remains poorly defined. We used a constrained sparse spike inversion technique to generate acoustic-impedance images of the hydrate-bearing sedimentary section from the newly acquired 3D seismic data volume. High-amplitude reflections just above the bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) were interpreted to be associated with the accumulation of gas hydrate with elevated saturations. Enhanced seismic reflections below the BSRs were interpreted to indicate the presence of free gas. The base of the BGHSZ was established using the occurrence of BSRs. In areas absent of well-developed BSRs, the BGHSZ was calculated from a model using the inverted P-wave velocity and subsurface temperature data. Seismic attributes were also extracted along the BGHSZ that indicate variations reservoir properties and inferred hydrocarbon accumulations at each site. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the inversion of acoustic impedance of conventional 3D seismic data, along with well-log-derived rock-physics models were also used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Our analysis determined that the gas hydrate petroleum system varies significantly across the Pearl River Mouth Basin and that variability in sedimentary properties as a product of depositional processes and the upward migration of gas from deeper thermogenic sources control the distribution of gas hydrates in this basin.

  8. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Eutectic Hydrate Salt Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Material

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Lin; Chen, Xi

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a new cold storage phase change material eutectic hydrate salt (K2HPO4·3H2O–NaH2PO4·2H2O–Na2S2O3·5H2O) was prepared, modified, and tested. The modification was performed by adding a nucleating agent and thickener. The physical properties such as viscosity, surface tension, cold storage characteristics, supercooling, and the stability during freeze-thaw cycles were studied. Results show that the use of nucleating agents, such as sodium tetraborate, sodium fluoride, and nanoparti...

  9. Imaging systems and materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murr, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a broad background for the historical development and modern applications of light optical metallography, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, field-ion microscopy and several forms of scanning probe microscopes. Numerous case examples illustrating especially synergistic applications of these imaging systems are provided to demonstrate materials characterization especially in the context of structure-property-performance issues which define materials science and engineering

  10. Seismic Characterization and Continuity Analysis of Gas Hydrate Horizons Near the Mallik Research Wells, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellefleur, G.; Riedel, M.; Brent, T.

    2005-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits in arctic environment generally lack the BSR signature diagnostic of their presence in marine seismic data. The absence of the BSR signature complicates the estimation of the resources within or below the permafrost and the determination of their potential impact on future energy supplies, geohazard and climate change. We present results from a detailed seismic characterization of three gas hydrate horizons (A, B and C) intersected below the permafrost in five wells of the Mallik gas hydrate field located in the Mackenzie delta (Northwest Territories, Canada). The detailed seismic characterization included attribute analyses, synthetic modeling and acoustic impedance inversion and allowed estimation of the lateral continuity of the three horizons in the vicinity of the wells. Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) data, 3D and 2D industry seismic data and the 5L/2L-38 geophysical logs (density, P-wave sonic velocity) were used for this study. Synthetic modeling using the sonic and density logs reveals that the base of the lower gas hydrate horizons B and C can be identified on the industry 3D and 2D seismic sections as prominent isolated reflections. The uppermost gas hydrate occurrence (horizon A) and potentially other additional smaller-scale layers are identified only on the higher-resolution VSP data. The 3D industry seismic data set processed to preserve the relative true-amplitudes was used for attribute calculations and acoustic impedance inversion. The attribute maps defined areas of continuous reflectivity for horizons B and C and structural features disrupting them. Results from impedance inversion indicate that such continuous reflectivity around the wells is most likely attributable to gas hydrates. The middle gas hydrate occurrence (horizon B) covers an area of approximately 25 000m2. Horizon C, which marks the base of gas hydrate occurrence zone, extends over a larger area of approximately 120 000m2.

  11. Hydration characteristics of zirconium oxide replaced Portland cement for use as a root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Cutajar, A; Mallia, B

    2011-08-01

    Zirconium oxide can be added to dental materials rendering them sufficiently radiopaque. It can thus be used to replace the bismuth oxide in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Replacement of Portland cement with 30% zirconium oxide mixed at a water/cement ratio of 0.3 resulted in a material with adequate physical properties. This study aimed at investigating the microstructure, pH and leaching in physiological solution of Portland cement replaced zirconium oxide at either water-powder or water-cement ratios of 0.3 for use as a root-end filling material. The hydration characteristics of the materials which exhibited optimal behavior were evaluated. Portland cement replaced by zirconium oxide in varying amounts ranging from 0 to 50% in increments of 10 was prepared and divided into two sets. One set was prepared at a constant water/cement ratio while the other set at a constant water/powder ratio of 0.3. Portland cement and MTA were used as controls. The materials were analyzed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the hydration products were determined. X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX) was used to analyze the elemental composition of the hydration products. The pH and the amount of leachate in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) were evaluated. A material that had optimal properties that satisfied set criteria and could replace MTA was selected. The microstructure of the prototype material and Portland cement used as a control was assessed after 30 days using SEM and atomic ratio diagrams of Al/Ca versus Si/Ca and S/Ca versus Al/Ca were plotted. The hydration products of Portland cement replaced with 30% zirconium oxide mixed at water/cement ratio of 0.3 were calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide and minimal amounts of ettringite and monosulphate. The calcium hydroxide leached in HBSS solution resulted in an increase in the pH value. The zirconium oxide acted as inert filler and exhibited no reaction with the hydration by-products of Portland

  12. Geological modeling for methane hydrate reservoir characterization in the eastern Nankai Trough, offshore Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Takayama, T.; Fujii, T.

    2012-12-01

    The eastern Nankai trough, which is located offshore of central Japan, is considered as an attractive potential resource field of methane hydrates. Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation is planning to conduct a production test in early 2013 at the AT1 site in the north slope of Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough. The depositional environment of methane hydrate-bearing sediments around the production test site is a deep submarine-fan turbidite system, and it is considered that the reservoir properties should show lateral as well as vertical heterogeneity. Since the variations in the reservoir heterogeneity have an impact on the methane hydrate dissociation and gas production performance, precise geological models describing reservoir heterogeneity would be required for the evaluation of reservoir potentials. In preparation for the production test, 3 wells; two monitoring boreholes (AT1-MC and AT1-MT1) and a coring well (AT1-C), were newly acquired in 2012. In addition to a geotechnical hole drilling survey in 2011 (AT1-GT), totally log data from 2 wells and core data from 2 wells were obtained around the production test site. In this study, we conducted well correlations between AT1 and A1 wells drilled in 2003 and then, 3D geological models were updated including AT1 well data in order to refine hydrate reservoir characterization around the production test site. The results of the well correlations show that turbidite sand layers are characterized by good lateral continuity, and give significant information for the distribution morphology of sand-rich channel fills. We also reviewed previously conducted 3D geological models which consist of facies distributions and petrophysical properties distributions constructed from integration of 3D seismic data and a well data (A1 site) adopting a geostatistical approach. In order to test the practical validity of the previously generated models, cross-validation was conducted using AT1 well data. The

  13. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  14. Magnetic Characterization of Organic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-12

    full doughnut. • 3D organization of these doughnuts are currently under study. • A nano doughnut formation requires 2D bending of the lamella...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0005 Magnetic Characterization of Organic Materials Dongho Kim YONSEI UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY- INDUSTRY FOUNDATION Final Report 12...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) YONSEI UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY- INDUSTRY FOUNDATION 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-g SEOUL, 120-749 KR

  15. Multicomponent seismic methods for characterizing gas hydrate occurrences and systems in deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.; Hardage, Bob A.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ characterization and quantification of natural gas hydrate occurrences remain critical research directions, whether for energy resource, drilling hazard, or climate-related studies. Marine multicomponent seismic data provide the full seismic wavefield including partial redundancy, and provide a promising set of approaches for gas hydrate characterization. Numerous authors have demonstrated the possibilities of multicomponent data at study sites around the world. We expand on this work by investigating the utility of very densely spaced (10’s of meters) multicomponent receivers (ocean-bottom cables, OBC, or ocean-bottom seismometers, OBS) for gas hydrate studies in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. Advanced processing techniques provide high-resolution compressional-wave (PP) and converted shearwave (PS) reflection images of shallow stratigraphy, as well as P-wave and S-wave velocity estimates at each receiver position. Reflection impedance estimates can help constrain velocity and density, and thus gas hydrate saturation. Further constraint on velocity can be determined through identification of the critical angle and associated phase reversal in both PP and PS wideangle data. We demonstrate these concepts with examples from OBC data from the northeast Green Canyon area and numerically simulated OBS data that are based on properties of known gas hydrate occurrences in the southeast (deeper water) Green Canyon area. These multicomponent data capabilities can provide a wealth of characterization and quantification information that is difficult to obtain with other geophysical methods.

  16. Correlations between skin hydration parameters and corneocyte-derived parameters to characterize skin conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Kyotani, Daiki; Honda, Tatsuya; Takano, Kenichi; Tamura, Toshiyasu; Mizutani, Taeko; Okano, Yuri

    2018-03-30

    Skin hydration is generally assessed using the parameters of skin surface water content (SWC) and trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL). To date, few studies have characterized skin conditions using correlations between skin hydration parameters and corneocyte parameters. The parameters SWC and TEWL allow the classification of skin conditions into four distinct Groups. The purpose of this study was to assess the characteristics of skin conditions classified by SWC and TEWL for correlations with parameters from corneocytes. A human volunteer test was conducted that measured SWC and TEWL. As corneocyte-derived parameters, the size and thick abrasion ratios, the ratio of sulfhydryl groups and disulfide bonds (SH/SS) and CP levels were analyzed. Volunteers were classified by their median SWC and TEWL values into 4 Groups: Group I (high SWC/low TEWL), Group II (high SWC/high TEWL), Group III (low SWC/low TEWL), and Group IV (low SWC/high TEWL). Group IV showed a significantly smaller size of corneocytes. Groups III and IV had significantly higher thick abrasion ratios and CP levels. Group I had a significantly lower SH/SS value. The SWC/TEWL value showed a decline in order from Group I to Group IV. Groups classified by their SWC and TEWL values showed characteristic skin conditions. We propose that the SWC and TEWL ratio is a comprehensive parameter to assess skin conditions. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Surface characterization of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Salmeron, M.

    1976-01-01

    In recent years several techniques have become available to characterize the structure and chemical composition of surfaces of ceramic materials. These techniques utilize electron scattering and scattering of ions from surfaces. Low-energy electron diffraction is used to determine the surface structure, Auger electron spectroscopy and other techniques of electron spectroscopy (ultraviolet and photoelectron spectroscopies) are employed to determine the composition of the surface. In addition the oxidation state of surface atoms may be determined using these techniques. Ion scattering mass spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry are also useful in characterizing surfaces and their reactions. These techniques, their applications and the results of recent studies are discussed. 12 figures, 52 references, 2 tables

  18. Influence of agglomeration of a recycled cement additive on the hydration and microstructure development of cement based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, R.; Shui, Z.H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study, including experimental and mechanism analysis, on investigating the effect of agglomeration of a recycled cement additive on the hydration and microstructure development of cement based materials. The recycled additive is firstly produced form waste hardened cement paste

  19. The influence of raw material, added emulsifying salt and spray drying on cheese powder structure and hydration properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felix da Silva, Denise; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Hougaard, Anni Bygvrå

    2017-01-01

    The present work has evaluated how raw material, addition of emulsifying salts (ES) and drying technology affect particle characteristics, structure, and hydration of cheese powders. In this context the spray drying technology induced the strongest effect on morphology and swelling of cheese powder...

  20. Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Methane Gas Production from Gulf of Mexico Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore Mohanty; Bill Cook; Mustafa Hakimuddin; Ramanan Pitchumani; Damiola Ogunlana; Jon Burger; John Shillinglaw

    2006-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Estimates of the amounts of methane sequestered in gas hydrates worldwide are speculative and range from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet (modified from Kvenvolden, 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In this project novel techniques were developed to form and dissociate methane hydrates in porous media, to measure acoustic properties and CT properties during hydrate dissociation in the presence of a porous medium. Hydrate depressurization experiments in cores were simulated with the use of TOUGHFx/HYDRATE simulator. Input/output software was developed to simulate variable pressure boundary condition and improve the ease of use of the simulator. A series of simulations needed to be run to mimic the variable pressure condition at the production well. The experiments can be matched qualitatively by the hydrate simulator. The temperature of the core falls during hydrate dissociation; the temperature drop is higher if the fluid withdrawal rate is higher. The pressure and temperature gradients are small within the core. The sodium iodide concentration affects the dissociation pressure and rate. This procedure and data will be useful in designing future hydrate studies.

  1. Use of X-ray diffraction to quantify amorphous supplementary cementitious materials in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellings, R.; Salze, A.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-01-01

    The content of individual amorphous supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements was quantified by the PONKCS [1] X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The analytical precision and accuracy of the method were assessed through comparison to a series of mixes of known phase composition and of increasing complexity. A 2σ precision smaller than 2–3 wt.% and an accuracy better than 2 wt.% were achieved for SCMs in mixes with quartz, anhydrous Portland cement, and hydrated Portland cement. The extent of reaction of SCMs in hydrating binders measured by XRD was 1) internally consistent as confirmed through the standard addition method and 2) showed a linear correlation to the cumulative heat release as measured independently by isothermal conduction calorimetry. The advantages, limitations and applicability of the method are discussed with reference to existing methods that measure the degree of reaction of SCMs in blended cements

  2. Microstructural characterization of catalysis product of nanocement based materials: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutan, Norsuzailina Mohamed; Izaitul Akma Ideris, Nur; Taib, Siti Noor Linda; Lee, Delsye Teo Ching; Hassan, Alsidqi; Kudnie Sahari, Siti; Mohamad Said, Khairul Anwar; Rahman Sobuz, Habibur

    2018-03-01

    Cement as an essential element for cement-based products contributed to negative environmental issues due to its high energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission during its production. These issues create the need to find alternative materials as partial cement replacement where studies on the potential of utilizing silica based materials as partial cement replacement come into picture. This review highlights the effectiveness of microstructural characterization techniques that have been used in the studies that focus on characterization of calcium hydroxide (CH) and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) formation during hydration process of cement-based product incorporating nano reactive silica based materials as partial cement replacement. Understanding the effect of these materials as cement replacement in cement based product focusing on the microstructural development will lead to a higher confidence in the use of industrial waste as a new non-conventional material in construction industry that can catalyse rapid and innovative advances in green technology.

  3. Microstructural characterization of catalysis product of nanocement based materials: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sutan Norsuzailina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement as an essential element for cement-based products contributed to negative environmental issues due to its high energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission during its production. These issues create the need to find alternative materials as partial cement replacement where studies on the potential of utilizing silica based materials as partial cement replacement come into picture. This review highlights the effectiveness of microstructural characterization techniques that have been used in the studies that focus on characterization of calcium hydroxide (CH and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H formation during hydration process of cement-based product incorporating nano reactive silica based materials as partial cement replacement. Understanding the effect of these materials as cement replacement in cement based product focusing on the microstructural development will lead to a higher confidence in the use of industrial waste as a new non-conventional material in construction industry that can catalyse rapid and innovative advances in green technology.

  4. Positron spectroscopy for materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, P.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    One of the more active areas of research on materials involves the observation and characterization of defects. The discovery of positron localization in vacancy-type defects in solids in the 1960's initiated a vast number of experimental and theoretical investigations which continue to this day. Traditional positron annihilation spectroscopic techniques, including lifetime studies, angular correlation, and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are still being applied to new problems in the bulk properties of simple metals and their alloys. In addition new techniques based on tunable sources of monoenergetic positron beams have, in the last 5 years, expanded the horizons to studies of surfaces, thin films, and interfaces. In the present paper we briefly review these experimental techniques, illustrating with some of the important accomplishments of the field. 40 refs., 19 figs

  5. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Eutectic Hydrate Salt Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Liang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new cold storage phase change material eutectic hydrate salt (K2HPO4·3H2O–NaH2PO4·2H2O–Na2S2O3·5H2O was prepared, modified, and tested. The modification was performed by adding a nucleating agent and thickener. The physical properties such as viscosity, surface tension, cold storage characteristics, supercooling, and the stability during freeze-thaw cycles were studied. Results show that the use of nucleating agents, such as sodium tetraborate, sodium fluoride, and nanoparticles, are effective. The solidification temperature and latent heat of these materials which was added with 0, 3, and 5 wt% thickeners were −11.9, −10.6, and −14.8°C and 127.2, 118.6, 82.56 J/g, respectively. Adding a nucleating agent can effectively improve the nucleation rate and nucleation stability. Furthermore, increasing viscosity has a positive impact on the solidification rate, supercooling, and the stability during freeze-thaw cycles.

  6. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon; Santamarina, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  7. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  8. Preparation and characterization of hybrid materials from natural chrysotile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraldelli, M.G.; Silva, M.L.C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Special attention has been given to the development of new materials from natural chrysotile. This fiber has about 40% silicon oxide in its structure with an outer layer of brucite (MgOH 2 ). With the aim of obtaining a material with a more uniform structure, acid leaching was performed to remove the outer layer of brucite, resulting in a silicon oxide hydrate. This material was used as support for the deposition of Nb 2 O 5 .nH 2 O. The Nb 2 O 5 .nH 2 O was prepared by conventional precipitation using as starting material niobium metallic. In this study, we performed the synthesis and characterization of the material SiO 2 .nH 2 O / Nb 2 O 5 .nH 2 O 1:1. Both chrysotile as niobium are widely available national resources, which confirms the economic viability of resource use. The materials studied were characterized by XRD, SEM and TG/DTG. (author)

  9. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank R. Rack

    2006-09-20

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41329 between Joint Oceanographic Institutions and DOE-NETL was divided into two phases based on successive proposals and negotiated statements of work pertaining to activities to sample and characterize methane hydrates on ODP Leg 204 (Phase 1) and on IODP Expedition 311 (Phase 2). The Phase 1 Final Report was submitted to DOE-NETL in April 2004. This report is the Phase 2 Final Report to DOE-NETL. The primary objectives of Phase 2 were to sample and characterize methane hydrates using the systems and capabilities of the D/V JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 311, to enable scientists the opportunity to establish the mass and distribution of naturally occurring gas and gas hydrate at all relevant spatial and temporal scales, and to contribute to the DOE methane hydrate research and development effort. The goal of the work was to provide expanded measurement capabilities on the JOIDES Resolution for a dedicated hydrate cruise to the Cascadia continental margin off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (IODP Expedition 311) so that hydrate deposits in this region would be well characterized and technology development continued for hydrate research. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. The statement of work for this project included three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd.; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). Additional small tasks that arose during the course of the research were included under these three primary tasks in consultation with the DOE

  10. Characterization of minerals, metals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Bai, Chengguang; Carpenter, John; Cai, Mingdong; Firrao, Donato; Kim, Byoung-Gon

    2012-01-01

    This state-of-the-art reference contains chapters on all aspects of the characterization of minerals, metals, and materials. The title presents papers from one of the largest yearly gatherings of materials scientists in the world and thoroughly discusses the characterization of minerals, metals, and materials The scope includes current industrial applications and research and developments in the following areas:  Characterization of Ferrous Metals Characterization of Non-Ferrous Materials Characterization of Minerals and Ceramics Character

  11. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si NMR characterization of hydrates formed in calcium aluminate-silica fume mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Rivas Mercury, J.M.; Aza, A.H. de; Turrillas, X.; Sobrados, I.; Sanz, J.

    2008-01-01

    Partially deuterated Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) y (OH) 12-4y -Al(OH) 3 mixtures, prepared by hydration of Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 (C 3 A), Ca 12 Al 14 O 33 (C 12 A 7 ) and CaAl 2 O 4 (CA) phases in the presence of silica fume, have been characterized by 29 Si and 27 Al magic-angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopies. NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize anhydrous and fully hydrated samples. In hydrated compounds, Ca 3 Al 2 (OH) 12 and Al(OH) 3 phases were detected. From the quantitative analysis of 27 Al NMR signals, the Al(OH) 3 /Ca 3 Al 2 (OH) 12 ratio was deduced. The incorporation of Si into the katoite structure, Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) 3-x (OH) 4x , was followed by 27 Al and 29 Si NMR spectroscopies. Si/OH ratios were determined from the quantitative analysis of 27 Al MAS-NMR components associated with Al(OH) 6 and Al(OSi)(OH) 5 environments. The 29 Si NMR spectroscopy was also used to quantify the unreacted silica and amorphous calcium aluminosilicate hydrates formed, C-S-H and C-A-S-H for short. From 29 Si NMR spectra, the amount of Si incorporated into different phases was estimated. Si and Al concentrations, deduced by NMR, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and Rietveld analysis of both X-ray and neutron data, indicate that only a part of available Si is incorporated in katoite structures. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron micrograph of CaAl 2 O 4 -microsilica mixture hydrated at 90 deg. C for 31 days showing a cubic Ca 3 Al 2.0±0.2 (SiO 4 ) 0.9±0.2 (OH) 1.8 crystal surrounded by unreacted amorphous silica spheres

  12. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM

    KAUST Repository

    Rahbani, Janane; Behzad, Ali Reza; Khashab, Niveen M.; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2012-01-01

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM

    KAUST Repository

    Rahbani, Janane

    2012-12-26

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbani, Janane; Behzad, Ali R; Khashab, Niveen M; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2013-02-01

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Instrumented Pressure Testing Chamber (IPTC) Characterization of Methane Gas Hydrate-Bearing Pressure Cores Collected from the Methane Production Test Site in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Offshore Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W. F.; Santamarina, J. C.; Dai, S.; Winters, W. J.; Yoneda, J.; Konno, Y.; Nagao, J.; Suzuki, K.; Fujii, T.; Mason, D. H.; Bergeron, E.

    2014-12-01

    Pressure cores obtained at the Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough, the site of the methane hydrate production test completed by the Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21) project in March 2013, were recovered from ~300 meters beneath the sea floor at close to in situ pressure. Cores were subsequently stored at ~20 MPa and ~5°C, which maintained hydrate in the cores within stability conditions. Pressure core physical properties were measured at 10 MPa and ~6°C, also within the methane hydrate stability field, using the IPTC and other Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs). Discrete IPTC measurements were carried out in strata ranging from silty sands to clayey silts within the turbidite sequences recovered in the cores. As expected, hydrate saturations were greatest in more permeable coarser-grained layers. Key results include: 1) Where hydrate saturation exceeded 40% in sandy sediments, the gas hydrate binds sediment grains within the matrix. The pressure core analyses yielded nearly in situ mechanical properties despite the absence of effective stress in the IPTC. 2) In adjacent fine-grained sediment (hydrate saturation < 15%), hydrate did not significantly bind the sediment. IPTC results in these locations were consistent with the zero effective-stress limit of comparable measurements made in PCCT devices that are designed to restore the specimen's in situ effective stress. In sand-rich intervals with high gas hydrate saturations, the measured compressional and shear wave velocities suggest that hydrate acts as a homogeneously-distributed, load-bearing member of the bulk sediment. The sands with high gas hydrate saturations were prone to fracturing (brittle failure) during insertion of the cone penetrometer and electrical conductivity probes. Authors would like to express their sincere appreciation to MH21 and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry for permitting this work to be disclosed at the 2014 Fall AGU meeting.

  16. Evaluation of blends bauxite-calcination-method red mud with other industrial wastes as a cementitious material: Properties and hydration characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Na; Liu Xiaoming; Sun Henghu; Li Longtu

    2011-01-01

    Red mud is generated from alumina production, and its disposal is currently a worldwide problem. In China, large quantities of red mud derived from bauxite calcination method are being discharged annually, and its utilization has been an urgent topic. This experimental research was to evaluate the feasibility of blends red mud derived from bauxite calcination method with other industrial wastes for use as a cementitious material. The developed cementitious material containing 30% of the bauxite-calcination-method red mud possessed compressive strength properties at a level similar to normal Portland cement, in the range of 45.3-49.5 MPa. Best compressive strength values were demonstrated by the specimen RSFC2 containing 30% bauxite-calcination-method red mud, 21% blast-furnace slag, 10% fly ash, 30% clinker, 8% gypsum and 1% compound agent. The mechanical and physical properties confirm the usefulness of RSFC2. The hydration characteristics of RSFC2 were characterized by XRD, FTIR, 27 Al MAS-NMR and SEM. As predominant hydration products, ettringite and amorphous C-S-H gel are principally responsible for the strength development of RSFC2. Comparing with the traditional production for ordinary Portland cement, this green technology is easier to be implemented and energy saving. This paper provides a key solution to effectively utilize bauxite-calcination-method red mud.

  17. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-01-01

    angle x-ray scattering (WAXD) that characterize how additives affect both the hydrated microstructure development and the original grain size. In particular, SPs alter the morphology of the hydrated phases, which no longer grow with the classic fibrillar structure on the grain surface, but nucleate in solution as globular structures. All this information converges in a quantitative, and at molecular level, description of the mechanisms involved in the setting process of one of the materials most widely used by human beings

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, K.; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Bito, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility

  19. Influence of aggregate and supplementary cementitious materials on the properties of hydrated lime (CL90s mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pavía

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrated lime is a historic material currently used in conservation. It hardens slowly by carbonation slowing construction however, supplementary cementitious materials accelerate hardening enhancing strength. Hydrated-lime mortars with rice husk ash–RHA-; ground granulated blastfurnace slag–GGBS- and increasing amounts of two aggregates were studied. Increasing aggregate lowered strength as interfacial zones proliferate; it lowered hygric properties and raised water demand. Aggregate content/composition didn’t affect the high water retention. For the higher aggregate contents (90 days, limestone mortars are c.20% stronger than silica mortars while the (1:1 silica sand mortars are 56% stronger in flexion. Additions increased strength with little impact on hygric properties. GGBS increased strength c.six times. RHA increased strength with little impact on hygric properties due to its great specific surface and high water-demand increasing porosity. GGBS and RHA properties ruling hydrate production and the kinetics of the pozzolanic reaction are considered partially responsible for the mortar property variation.

  20. Defect Characterization of Pyroelectric Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keeble, David

    2002-01-01

    Two methods for identify point defects applicable to the study of technologically relevant pyroelectric oxide materials have been investigated, namely Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS...

  1. A Study on the quantification of hydration and the strength development mechanism of cementitious materials including amorphous phases by using XRD/Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazuo; Hoshino, Seiichi; Hirao, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hiroki

    2008-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD)/Rietveld method was applied to measure the phase composition of cement. The quantative analysis concerning the progress of hydration was accomplished in an error of about the maximum 2-3% in spite of including amorphous materials such as blast furnace slag, fly ash, silica fume and C-S-H. The influence of the compressive strength on the lime stone fine powder mixture material was studied from the hydration analysis by Rietveld method. The two stages were observed in the strength development mechanism of cement; the hydration promotion of C 3 S in the early stage and the filling of cavities by carbonate hydrate for the longer term. It is useful to use various mixture materials for the formation of the resource recycling society and the durability improvement of concrete. (author)

  2. Anisotropic characterization of magnetorheological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohmen, E., E-mail: eike.dohmen@tu-dresden.de; Modler, N.; Gude, M.

    2017-06-01

    For the development of energy efficient lightweight parts novel function integrating materials are needed. Concerning this field of application magnetorheological (MR) fluids, MR elastomers and MR composites are promising materials allowing the adjustment of mechanical properties by an external magnetic field. A key issue for operating such structures in praxis is the magneto-mechanical description. Most rheological properties are gathered at laboratory conditions for high magnetic flux densities and a single field direction, which does not correspond to real praxis conditions. Although anisotropic formation of superstructures can be observed in MR suspensions (Fig. 1) or experimenters intentionally polymerize MR elastomers with anisotropic superstructures these MR materials are usually described in an external magnetic field as uniform, isotropic materials. This is due to missing possibilities for experimentally measuring field angle dependent properties and ways of distinguishing between material properties and frictional effects. Just a few scientific works experimentally investigated the influence of different field angles (Ambacher et al., 1992; Grants et al., 1990; Kuzhir et al., 2003) or the influence of surface roughness on the shear behaviour of magnetic fluids (Tang and Conrad, 1996) . The aim of this work is the introduction of a novel field angle cell allowing the determination of anisotropic mechanical properties for various MR materials depending on the applied magnetic field angle. - Highlights: • Novel magnetic field angle testing device (MFATD) presented. • Determination of magnetic field dependent anisotropic mechanical properties. • Experimental data for different field directions shown for a commercial MR fluid. • Material description of MR fluids as transversal-isotropic solids. • Magnetic field angle dependent variations in shear stresses experimentally measured. • Determination of frictional coefficients between the MR fluid and

  3. Dynamic fracture characterization of material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, A.S.; Emery, A.F.; Liaw, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    The influences of a wide range of material properties, i.e. of A533B steel, a silicon nitride ceramic and a Homalite-100 photoelastic polymer, as well as the influences of the specimen sizes on the dynamic fracture response of fracture specimens are presented in this paper. The results of a numerical study show that the dynamic fracture responses of these fracture specimens of proportional dimensions were indistinguishable provided the normalized dynamic fracture toughness versus normalized crack velocity relations of the three materials coincide. The limited results suggest that should the normalized dynamic fracture toughness versus normalized crack velocity relations between prototype and model materials coincide, then dynamic fracture experiments on scaled models can be used to infer the dynamic fracture response of the prototype. (orig./HP)

  4. X-ray Characterization of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshin, Eric

    1999-09-01

    Linking of materials properties with microstructures is a fundamental theme in materials science, for which a detailed knowledge of the modern characterization techniques is essential. Since modern materials such as high-temperature alloys, engineering thermoplastics and multilayer semiconductor films have many elemental constituents distributed in more than one phase, characterization is essential to the systematic development of such new materials and understanding how they behave in practical applications. X-ray techniques play a major role in providing information on the elemental composition and crystal and grain structures of all types of materials. The challenge to the materials characterization expert is to understand how specific instruments and analytical techniques can provide detailed information about what makes each material unique. The challenge to the materials scientist, chemist, or engineer is to know what information is needed to fully characterize each material and how to use this information to explain its behavior, develop new and improved properties, reduce costs, or ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. This comprehensive handbook presents all the necessary background to understand the applications of X-ray analysis to materials characterization with particular attention to the modern approach to these methods.

  5. Properties and characterization of modern materials

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on robust characterization and prediction methods for materials in technical applications as well as the materials’ safety features during operation. In particular, it presents methods for reliably predicting material properties, an aspect that is becoming increasingly important as engineering materials are pushed closer and closer to their limits to boost the performance of machines and structures. To increase their engineering value, components are now designed under the consideration of their multiphysical properties and functions, which requires much more intensive investigation and characterization of these materials. The materials covered in this monograph range from metal-based groups such as lightweight alloys, to advanced high-strength steels and modern titanium alloys. Furthermore, a wide range of polymers and composite materials (e.g. with micro- and nanoparticles or fibres) is covered. The book explores methods for property prediction from classical mechanical characterization-...

  6. Nondestructive characterization of materials damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobmann, G.

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses two examples of application of NDT for early detection of materials damage, or ageing effects. The first case shows the potential of micromagnetic testing techniques for early detection of hydrogen-induced stress corrosion cracking in pipework. Pipe specimens made of steel X20Cr13, which differed in materials state induced by various heat treatments, were exposed to corrosive attack induced in a closed cycle by simultaneous rinsing with NACE solution and stress application through stamp impact. Various micromagnetic testing parameters were measured at the specimens' outside surface during the annealing period. Further, fatigue experiments were made with specimen sets made of steel 1.4541, under various mechanical and temperature stresses (room temperature and 300 C), for measuring the remanent magnetization of the cylindrical fatigue test blocks (equal geometry) cut out of the specimens, in order to conclude information on the martensite content and the fatigue effects. (Orig./CB) [de

  7. Characterization of skin friction coefficient, and relationship to stratum corneum hydration in a normal Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y H; Song, S P; Luo, W; Elias, P M; Man, M Q

    2011-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that some cutaneous biophysical properties vary with age, gender and body sites. However, the characteristics of the skin friction coefficient in different genders and age groups have not yet been well established. In the present study, we assess the skin friction coefficient in a larger Chinese population. A total of 633 subjects (300 males and 333 females) aged 0.15-79 years were enrolled. A Frictiometer FR 770 and Corneometer CM 825 (C&K MPA 5) were used to measure the skin friction coefficient and stratum corneum hydration, respectively, on the dorsal surface of the hand, the forehead and the canthus. In the females, the maximum skin friction coefficients on both the canthus and the dorsal hand skin were observed around the age of 40 years. In the males, the skin friction coefficient on the dorsal hand skin gradually increased from 0 to 40 years of age, and changed little afterward. Skin friction coefficients on some body sites were higher in females than in age-matched males in some age groups. On the canthus and the dorsal hand skin of females, a positive correlation was found between skin friction coefficient and stratum corneum hydration (p skin friction coefficient was positively correlated with stratum corneum hydration on the forehead and the dorsal hand skin (p skin friction coefficient varies with age, gender and body site, and positively correlates with stratum corneum hydration on some body sites. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Seismic Characterization of the Terrebonne Mini-basin, a Hydrate Rich Depositional System in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafov, L. N.; Eze, P. C.; Haines, S. S.; Graham, S. A.; McHargue, T.; Hosford Scheirer, A.

    2017-12-01

    Natural gas bearing hydrates are a focus of research as a potential source of energy and carbon storage because they occur globally in permafrost regions and marine sediment along every continent. This study focuses on the structural and stratigraphic architecture of the Terrebonne mini-basin, northwest Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, to characterize the depositional architecture and to describe possible migration pathways for petroleum. Questions addressed include: a) continuity of sand layers b) effects of faulting and c) ponding versus fill and spill. To address these questions, seven of forty-two high resolution USGS 2D seismic lines were interpreted and then verified with WesternGeco 3D seismic data, yielding three qualitative models for the depositional environment of hydrate-bearing sand intervals. Deeper hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs were deposited as sheet-like turbidite lobes. Two shallower hydrate-bearing intervals display two possible depositional systems which form reservoirs- 1) sandy to muddy channel sealed laterally by muddy levees with associated sandy crevasse splays, and 2) ponded sandy lobes cut by channels filled with sand lags and mud. Additional observations in the 2D seismic include mass transport deposits and possible contourites. Salt movement facilitated mini-basin formation which was then ponded by sediment and followed by episodes of fill-and-spill and erosion. These seismic interpretations indicate periodic salt uplift. Overturn of salt along the northwestern edge of the basin resulted in thrust faults. The faults and erosional surfaces act as seals to reservoirs. The greatest volume of sandy reservoir potential occurs in sheet-like turbidite lobes with high lateral continuity, which facilitates updip migration of deep-sourced thermogenic gas along bedding surfaces. Channel levees serve as lateral seals to gas hydrate reservoirs, whereas faults, erosional surfaces, and shales provide vertical seals. Characterization of the Terrebonne

  9. Analytical nondestructive evaluation for materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev

    1993-01-01

    Science and technology of nondestructive testing and evaluation has contributed immensely to the safety and productivity of industrial plants. In recent years, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) has emerged as a frontline research area of equal if not greater technological relevance, for materials characterization as well. A comprehensive range of techniques from qualitative nondestructive testing for quality control of engineering products and materials to quantitative NDE for materials characterization is being used by the engineering industry and materials researchers, for better understanding of the manufacturing practices and materials behaviour. Quantitative NDE is considered essential for ensuring fitness for purpose at the start of the life in case the component has been designed using fracture mechanics parameters. Quantitative NDE is also vital for assessing degradation of material during service. Moreover, quantitative NDE enables characterization of dynamics of certain phenomenon (not achievable by destructive test methodologies) leading to better understanding of the performance of materials in relation to unavoidable defects in the materials. As the next logical step, the need for an analytical approach to NDE is felt. The need and motivation for such an approach is addressed and the means to achieve this objective are identified. It is argued that analytical NDE is essential to meet the challenges of characterization, intelligent processing of materials and life prediction of components and plants. These requirements are of significant importance in the context of recent developments in materials engineering, and for enhancing the competitive advantage of Indian engineering industry in the international market. (author). 9 refs., 3 figs

  10. Relative merits and limiting factors for x-ray and electron microscopy of thick, hydrated organic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ming; Jacobsen, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Electron and x-ray microscopes allow one to image the entire, unlabeled structure of hydrated materials at a resolution well beyond what visible light microscopes can achieve. However, both approaches involve ionizing radiation, so that radiation damage must be considered as one of the limits to imaging. Drawing upon earlier work, we describe here a unified approach to estimating the image contrast (and thus the required exposure and corresponding radiation dose) in both x-ray and electron microscopy. This approach accounts for factors such as plural and inelastic scattering, and (in electron microscopy) the use of energy filters to obtain so-called "zero loss" images. As expected, it shows that electron microscopy offers lower dose for specimens thinner than about 1 µm (such as for studies of macromolecules, viruses, bacteria and archaebacteria, and thin sectioned material), while x-ray microscopy offers superior characteristics for imaging thicker specimen such as whole eukaryotic cells, thick-sectioned tissues, and organs. The required radiation dose scales strongly as a function of the desired spatial resolution, allowing one to understand the limits of live and frozen hydrated specimen imaging. Finally, we consider the factors limiting x-ray microscopy of thicker materials, suggesting that specimens as thick as a whole mouse brain can be imaged with x-ray microscopes without significant image degradation should appropriate image reconstruction methods be identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of mass concentration of composite phase change material CA-DE on HCFC-141b hydrate induction time and system stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Sun, Zhigao; Liu, Chenggang; Zhu, Minggui

    2018-03-01

    HCFC-141b hydrate is a new type of environment-friendly cold storage medium which may be adopted to balance energy supply and demand, achieve peak load shifting and energy saving, wherein the hydrate induction time and system stability are key factors to promote and realize its application in industrial practice. Based on step cooling curve measurement, two kinds of aliphatic hydrocarbon organics, n-capric acid (CA) and lauryl alcohol (DE), were selected to form composite phase change material and to promote the generation of HCFC-141b hydrate. Five kinds of CA-DE mass concentration were chosen to compare the induction time and hydration system stability. In order to accelerate temperature reduction rate, the metal Cu with high heat conductivity performance was adopted to conduct out the heat generated during phase change. Instability index was introduced to appraise system stability. Experimental results show that phase change temperature and sub-cooling degree of CA-DE is 11.1°C and 3.0°C respectively, which means it is a preferable medium for HCFC-141b hydrate formation. For the experimental hydration systems, segmented emulsification is achieved by special titration manner to avoid rapid layering under static condition. Induction time can achieve up to 23.3min with the densest HCFC-141b hydrate and the lowest instability index, wherein CA-DE mass concentration is 3%.

  12. Characterization of nanoparticles as candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins Ferreira, E.H.; Robertis, E. de; Landi, S.M.; Gouvea, C.P.; Archanjo, B.S.; Almeida, C.A.; Araujo, J.R. de; Kuznetsov, O.; Achete, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the characterization of three different nanoparticles (silica, silver and multi-walled carbon nanotubes) as candidate reference material. We focus our analysis on the size distribution of those particles as measured by different microscopy techniques. (author)

  13. Devices for SRF material characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudket, Philippe; Xiao, B.; Junginger, T.; Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    2016-01-01

    The surface resistance Rs of superconducting materials can be obtained by measuring the quality factor of an elliptical cavity excited in a transverse magnetic mode (TM010). The value obtained has however to be taken as averaged over the whole surface. A more convenient way to obtain Rs, especially of materials which are not yet technologically ready for cavity production, is to measure small samples instead. These can be easily man ufactured at low cost, duplicated and placed in film deposition and surface analytical tools. A commonly used design for a device to measure Rs consists of a cylindrical cavity excited in a transverse electric (TE110) mode with the sample under test serving as one replaceable endplate. Such a cavity has two drawbacks. For reasonably small samples the resonant frequency will be larger than frequencies of interest concerning SRF application and it requires a reference sample of known Rs. In this article we review several devices which have been designed to overcome these limitations, reaching sub - nΩ resolution in some cases. Some of these devices also comprise a parameter space in frequency and temperature which is inaccessible to standard cavity tests, making them ideal tools to test theoretical surface resistance models.

  14. Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds. Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutken, Carol [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Macelloni, Leonardo [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); D' Emidio, Marco [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Dunbar, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Higley, Paul [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This study was designed to investigate temporal variations in hydrate system dynamics by measuring changes in volumes of hydrate beneath hydrate-bearing mounds on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the landward extreme of hydrate occurrence in this region. Direct Current Resistivity (DCR) measurements were made contemporaneously with measurements of oceanographic parameters at Woolsey Mound, a carbonate-hydrate complex on the mid-continental slope, where formation and dissociation of hydrates are most vulnerable to variations in oceanographic parameters affected by climate change, and where changes in hydrate stability can readily translate to loss of seafloor stability, impacts to benthic ecosystems, and venting of greenhouse gases to the water-column, and eventually, the atmosphere. We focused our study on hydrate within seafloor mounds because the structurally-focused methane flux at these sites likely causes hydrate formation and dissociation processes to occur at higher rates than at sites where the methane flux is less concentrated and we wanted to maximize our chances of witnessing association/dissociation of hydrates. We selected a particularly well-studied hydrate-bearing seafloor mound near the landward extent of the hydrate stability zone, Woolsey Mound (MC118). This mid-slope site has been studied extensively and the project was able to leverage considerable resources from the team’s research experience at MC118. The site exhibits seafloor features associated with gas expulsion, hydrates have been documented at the seafloor, and changes in the outcropping hydrates have been documented, photographically, to have occurred over a period of months. We conducted observatory-based, in situ measurements to 1) characterize, geophysically, the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability, and 2) contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents) to

  15. Measurement and characterization techniques for thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tritt, T M

    1997-07-01

    Characterization of thermoelectric materials can pose many problems. A temperature difference can be established across these materials as an electrical current is passed due to the Peltier effect. The thermopower of these materials is quite large and thus large thermal voltages can contribute to many of the measurements necessary to investigate these materials. This paper will discuss the chracterization techniques necessary to investigate these materials and provide an overview of some of the potential systematic errors which can arise. It will also discuss some of the corrections one needs to consider. This should provide an introduction to the characterization and measurement of thermoelectric materials and provide references for a more in depth discussion of the concepts. It should also serve as an indication of the care that must be taken while working with thermoelectric materials.

  16. Purpose of the Materials Characterization Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1984-09-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is the experimental arm of the Materials Characterization Organization (MCO), which was established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in FY 1980 to ensure high quality characterization and qualification of waste package materials essential to the reliable performance of DOE nuclear waste management programs. MCC is responsible for publishing key test methods and data in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook (DOE/TIC-11400). It sponsors a continuing series of workshops that address materials characterization test method issues. It supplies well-characterized reference and testing materials for use by the DOE nuclear waste management programs. It develops generic test methods and supports the repository waste package projects in developing selected site-specific test methods and performing confirmatory testing of these methods. When these test methods are approved by the MRB they constitute the formal tests to be used by laboratories to test and qualify materials, evaluate waste package components, and assure compliance with standards and/or specifications for the final product

  17. Microstructural pavement material characterization: some examples

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mgangira, Martin B

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available in the way materials respond to loading at the macro-level. The objective of the paper is to demonstrate how Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) as an example of advanced measurement techniques was used for material characterization. A range of samples...

  18. Characterization of Unbound Granular Materials for Pavements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    This research is focused on the characterization of the mechanical behavior of unbound granular road base materials (UGMs). An extensive laboratory investigation is described, in which various methods for determination of the mechanical properties of granular materials are examined for their

  19. Microstructure, characterizations, functionality and compressive strength of cement-based materials using zinc oxide nanoparticles as an additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nochaiya, Thanongsak [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Sekine, Yoshika [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Choopun, Supab [Applied Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Chaipanich, Arnon, E-mail: arnon.chaipanich@cmu.ac.th [Advanced Cement-Based Materials Research Unit, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-05-05

    Highlights: • Nano zinc oxide was used as an additive material. • Microstructure and phase characterization of pastes were characterized using SEM and XRD. • TGA and FTIR were also used to determine the hydration reaction. • Compressive strength of ZnO mixes was found to increase at 28 days. - Abstract: Zinc oxide nanoparticles as a nanophotocatalyst has great potential for self-cleaning applications in concrete structures, its effects on the cement hydration, setting time and compressive strength are also important when using it in practice. This paper reports the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles, as an additive material, on properties of cement-based materials. Setting time, compressive strength and porosity of mortars were investigated. Microstructure and morphology of pastes were characterized using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Moreover, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) were also used to determine the hydration reaction. The results show that Portland cement paste with additional ZnO was found to slightly increase the water requirement while the setting time presented prolongation period than the control mix. However, compressive strength of ZnO mixes was found to be higher than that of PC mix up to 15% (at 28 days) via filler effect. Microstructure, XRD and TGA results of ZnO pastes show less hydration products before 28 days but similar at 28 days. In addition, FTIR results confirmed the retardation when ZnO was partially added in Portland cement pastes.

  20. Microstructure, characterizations, functionality and compressive strength of cement-based materials using zinc oxide nanoparticles as an additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nochaiya, Thanongsak; Sekine, Yoshika; Choopun, Supab; Chaipanich, Arnon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nano zinc oxide was used as an additive material. • Microstructure and phase characterization of pastes were characterized using SEM and XRD. • TGA and FTIR were also used to determine the hydration reaction. • Compressive strength of ZnO mixes was found to increase at 28 days. - Abstract: Zinc oxide nanoparticles as a nanophotocatalyst has great potential for self-cleaning applications in concrete structures, its effects on the cement hydration, setting time and compressive strength are also important when using it in practice. This paper reports the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles, as an additive material, on properties of cement-based materials. Setting time, compressive strength and porosity of mortars were investigated. Microstructure and morphology of pastes were characterized using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Moreover, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) were also used to determine the hydration reaction. The results show that Portland cement paste with additional ZnO was found to slightly increase the water requirement while the setting time presented prolongation period than the control mix. However, compressive strength of ZnO mixes was found to be higher than that of PC mix up to 15% (at 28 days) via filler effect. Microstructure, XRD and TGA results of ZnO pastes show less hydration products before 28 days but similar at 28 days. In addition, FTIR results confirmed the retardation when ZnO was partially added in Portland cement pastes

  1. Nondestructive materials characterization with applications to aerospace materials

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Peter; Rokhlin, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    With an emphasis on aircraft materials, this book describes techniques for the material characterization to detect and quantify degradation processes such as corrosion and fatigue. It introduces readers to these techniques based on x-ray, ultrasonic, optical and thermal principles and demonstrates the potential of the techniques for a wide variety of applications concerning aircraft materials, especially aluminum and titanium alloys. The advantages and disadvantages of various techniques are evaluated. An introductory chapter describes the typical degradation mechanisms that must be considered and the microstructure features that have to be detected by NDE methods. Finally, some approaches for making lifetime predictions are discussed. It is suitable as a textbook in special training courses in advanced NDE and aircraft materials characterization.

  2. Influence of supplementary cementitious materials on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime and cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ince, C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is an investigation of the possible role of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime (CL90 and Portland cement (PC mortars. The properties of hydrated lime are significantly different from those of cement and therefore modifying fresh and hardened properties of these mortars are vital for mortar/substrate optimisation in masonry construction. The parameters investigated in this paper often are the main barriers to the use of hydrated lime in construction practice. The results show that transfer sorptivity and time to dewater freshly-mixed hydrated lime mortars can be modified when binder is partially replaced with SCMs. Compressive strength of CL90 mortars is increased systematically with the increased replacement levels of SCMs and the results are supported with the microstructural images. The ability to modify the water transport kinetics and mechanical properties allows compatibility between the mortar and the substrate unit in masonry construction.El objetivo de este artículo es investigar el papel de los materiales cementantes suplementarios (SCMs en la cinética de transporte del agua y en las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros de cal hidratada (CL90 y cemento Portland. Las propiedades de la cal hidratada son significativamente diferentes a las del cemento y por lo tanto el control de las propiedades de los morteros frescos y endurecidos es fundamental en la optimización mortero/substrato en albañilería. Los parámetros estudiados en este trabajo son a menudo las principales barreras para el uso de la cal hidratada en la práctica de la construcción. Los resultados indican que la absortividad y el tiempo necesario para deshidratar morteros de cal hidratada recién mezclados pueden ser controlados cuando el conglomerante es parcialmente remplazado por SCMs. La resistencia a compresión de los morteros CL90 aumenta sistem

  3. Analysis of unsaturated clayey materials hydration incorporating the effect of thermo-osmotic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, M.; Arson, C.

    2012-01-01

    past, for example Soler (2001) studied the impact of coupled phenomena on the long-term behavior of radioactive waste repositories in saturated argillaceous rock. Bing (2006) proposed an analytical solution in the half-space for the thermal consolidation of layered saturated soils, including the influences of thermo-osmosis and thermal filtration. Chen et al. (2009) recently proposed a coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) formulation which accounts for the flow of water and air driven by temperature gradients. The aim of this work is to explore the impact of thermo-osmosis on the hydration of clayey soils and rocks generally used in the design of nuclear waste disposals. Both small scale experiments and large scale problems are analyzed. A coupled THM formulation has been extended to deal with thermal osmosis in porous media. Special emphasis is put on the study of thermo-osmotic flow in unsaturated low permeability clays. A simple model was implemented in Theta-Stock program to study thermo-osmotic effects in the performance of a nuclear waste repository. The thermo-osmotic conductivity K fT is assumed to be a scalar (k T ). The permeability of the liquid phase in the initial state is around 5*10-13 m.s -1 . The thermo-osmotic coefficient k T is taken 100 times higher than the typical permeability of the massif: k T = 5*10 -11 m.s -1 . Containers are assumed to be stored in a 100- meter depth horizontal gallery. The ground water is located at 500 meters depth. The initial saturation degree of the ground mass was 0.15. The response of the unsaturated tuff is studied over 1000 years. The material parameters, related to fluid and temperature effects, are taken from the data given by Pollock (1986). Up to 200 years of heating, the trends of the saturation degree are the same in both models. But the magnitudes are different around the heating source, between 80 meters and 140 meters deep. With the model accounting for thermo-osmotic effects, the saturation degree is

  4. Zinc acetylacetonate hydrate adducted with nitrogen donor ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Sanjaya; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We report synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analysis of zinc acetylacetonate complex adducted by nitrogen donor ligands, such as pyridine, bipyridine, and phenanthroline. The pyridine adducted complex crystallizes to monoclinic crystal structure, whereas other two adducted complexes have orthorhombic structure. Addition of nitrogen donor ligands enhances the thermal property of these complexes as that with parent metal-organic complex. Zinc acetylacetonate adducted with pyridine shows much higher volatility (106 °C), decomposition temperature (202 °C) as that with zinc acetylacetonate (136 °C, 220 °C), and other adducted complexes. All the adducted complexes are thermally stable, highly volatile and are considered to be suitable precursors for metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The formation of these complexes is confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The complexes are widely used as starting precursor materials for the synthesis of ZnO nanostructures by microwave irradiation assisted coating process.

  5. Characterization of sialon-type materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Paul Newman [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1977-06-01

    Four sialon-type materials using volcanic ash as a raw material were characterized and some of their properties were determined. The M3 and M4 materials were identified as β1--Si3N4 sialons; their principal constituent is silicon. The M2 material was identified as a 15R-A1N polytype sialon whose principal constituent is aluminum. The M1 material is a mixture of the two types. An overview of results showing the general structural formulae and the relative order of the materials with respect to various properties as determined by the investigation is presented. It is concluded that of the materials tested, the M2 material shows the most promise as a candidate for meeting some of the current needs for high-temperature materials. It is also concluded that more research is needed in order to explain the low resistance of these materials to thermal shock since their coefficients of thermal expansion are relatively low.

  6. Preliminary Validation of Composite Material Constitutive Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Michopoulos; Athanasios lliopoulos; John C. Hermanson; Adrian C. Orifici; Rodney S. Thomson

    2012-01-01

    This paper is describing the preliminary results of an effort to validate a methodology developed for composite material constitutive characterization. This methodology involves using massive amounts of data produced from multiaxially tested coupons via a 6-DoF robotic system called NRL66.3 developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The testing is followed by...

  7. Characterization of Materials by Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, M.

    2007-03-01

    The paper reports on the use of phonon spectra obtained with the Raman spectroscopy for characterization of different materials. The Raman scattering spectra obtained for zinc selenide crystals, mixed crystals zinc selenide admixtured with magnesium or beryllium, oxide crystals including strontium lanthanum gallate, molecular crystals of triammonium hydrogen diseleniate and a homologous series of polyoxyethylene glycols are analysed.

  8. In Vivo skin hydration and anti-erythema effects of Aloe vera, Aloe ferox and Aloe marlothii gel materials after single and multiple applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lizelle T.; du Plessis, Jeanetta; Gerber, Minja; van Zyl, Sterna; Boneschans, Banie; Hamman, Josias H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the skin hydrating and anti-erythema activity of gel materials from Aloe marlothii A. Berger and A. ferox Mill. in comparison to that of Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) in healthy human volunteers. Materials and Methods: Aqueous solutions of the polisaccharidic fractions of the selected aloe leaf gel materials were applied to the volar forearm skin of female subjects. The hydration effect of the aloe gel materials were measured with a Corneometer® CM 825, Visioscan® VC 98 and Cutometer® dual MPA 580 after single and multiple applications. The Mexameter® MX 18 was used to determine the anti-erythema effects of the aloe material solutions on irritated skin areas. Results: The A. vera and A. marlothii gel materials hydrated the skin after a single application, whereas the A. ferox gel material showed dehydration effects compared to the placebo. After multiple applications all the aloe materials exhibited dehydration effects on the skin. Mexameter® readings showed that A. vera and A. ferox have anti-erythema activity similar to that of the positive control group (i.e. hydrocortisone gel) after 6 days of treatment. Conclusion: The polysaccharide component of the gel materials from selected aloe species has a dehydrating effect on the skin after multiple applications. Both A. vera and A. ferox gel materials showed potential to reduce erythema on the skin similar to that of hydrocortisone gel. PMID:24991119

  9. In Vivo skin hydration and anti-erythema effects of Aloe vera, Aloe ferox and Aloe marlothii gel materials after single and multiple applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lizelle T; du Plessis, Jeanetta; Gerber, Minja; van Zyl, Sterna; Boneschans, Banie; Hamman, Josias H

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the skin hydrating and anti-erythema activity of gel materials from Aloe marlothii A. Berger and A. ferox Mill. in comparison to that of Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) in healthy human volunteers. Aqueous solutions of the polisaccharidic fractions of the selected aloe leaf gel materials were applied to the volar forearm skin of female subjects. The hydration effect of the aloe gel materials were measured with a Corneometer(®) CM 825, Visioscan(®) VC 98 and Cutometer(®) dual MPA 580 after single and multiple applications. The Mexameter(®) MX 18 was used to determine the anti-erythema effects of the aloe material solutions on irritated skin areas. The A. vera and A. marlothii gel materials hydrated the skin after a single application, whereas the A. ferox gel material showed dehydration effects compared to the placebo. After multiple applications all the aloe materials exhibited dehydration effects on the skin. Mexameter(®) readings showed that A. vera and A. ferox have anti-erythema activity similar to that of the positive control group (i.e. hydrocortisone gel) after 6 days of treatment. The polysaccharide component of the gel materials from selected aloe species has a dehydrating effect on the skin after multiple applications. Both A. vera and A. ferox gel materials showed potential to reduce erythema on the skin similar to that of hydrocortisone gel.

  10. Ultrasonic sound speed of hydrating calcium sulphate hemihydrate; part 1, the calculation of sound speed of slurries and hardened porous material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, Jos

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the computation of the sound velocity through slurries and hardened products. The purpose is to use the sound velocity to quantify the composition of the fresh slurry as well as the hardening and hardened - porous - material. Therefore the volumetric models for hydration of

  11. Synthesis and characterization of innovative insulation materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaropoulou Aggeliki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulation elements are distinguished in inorganic fibrous and organic foamed materials. Foamed insulation materials are of great acceptance and use, but their major disadvantage is their flammability. In case of fire, they tend to transmit the flame producing toxic gases. In this paper, the synthesis and characterization of innovative inorganic insulation materials with properties competitive to commercial is presented. Their synthesis involves the mixing of inorganic raw material and water with reinforcing agent or/and foaming agent leading to the formation of a gel. Depending on raw materials nature, the insulation material is produced by freeze drying or ambient drying techniques of the gel. The raw material used are chemically benign and abundantly available materials, or industrial by-products and the final products are non-toxic and, in some cases, non-flammable. Their density and thermal conductivity was measured and found 0.02-0.06 g/cm3 and 0.03-0.04 W/mK, respectively.

  12. Characterization of material composite marble-polyester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corpas, F. A.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we characterize a new material composite, formed with a polyester and crushed white marble mixture. The final purpose is double: to obtain a material for applications sufficiently competitive after an economic viability study, increasing the yield of the main commodity, using waste marble and improving the jobs in the quarries area. From the results obtained, we deduce then that this material could be used to inside and outside adornment.

    En este trabajo, caracterizamos un nuevo material compuesto, formado con una mezcla de poliéster y de mármol blanco triturado. El propósito final es doble: por un lado obtener un material para aplicaciones lo suficientemente competitivas como para que se pueda iniciar un estudio económico de viabilidad, aumentando el rendimiento de la materia prima y mejorando las salidas laborales de las comarcas extractoras. Para la caracterización del material se ha determinado el porcentaje adecuado de poliéster. Así como las propiedades mecánicas (flexión, compresión y dureza, químicas, fatiga térmica y su influencia a la exposición solar In order to characterized of material, we have determined the suitable porcentage of polyester Also we have carried out a study of the mechanical (stretching, resistance to traction, hardeness and thermal fatigue chemicals properties and solar radiation influence. De los resultados obtenidos, este material podría ser utilizado para ornamentación tanto de interior como de exterior.

  13. Characterization of nano structured metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.; Cruz C, R.; Angeles C, C.

    1997-01-01

    Nowadays the search of new materials with specific optical properties has carried out to realize a series of experiments through the polymer synthesis [(C 3 N 3 ) 2 (NH) 3 ] n doped with gold metallic nanoparticles. The thermal stability of a polymer is due to the presence of tyazine rings contained in the structure. The samples were characterized by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction by the Powder method, Ft-infrared and its thermal properties by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetry (TGA). One of the purposes of this work is to obtain nano structured materials over a polymeric matrix. (Author)

  14. Development & Characterization of Multifunctional Microfluidic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Ahmet Burak

    The field of microfluidics has been mostly investigated for miniaturized lab on a chip devices for analytical and clinical applications. However, there is an emerging class of "smart" microfluidic materials, combining microfluidics with soft polymers to yield new functionalities. The best inspiration for such materials found in nature is skin, whose functions are maintained and controlled by a vascular "microfluidic" network. We report here the development and characterization of a few new classes of microfluidic materials. First, we introduced microfluidic materials that can change their stiffness on demand. These materials were based on an engineered microchannel network embedded into a matrix of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), whose channels were filled with a liquid photoresist (SU- 8). The elastomer filled with the photoresist was initially soft. The materials were shaped into a desired geometry and then exposed to UV-light. Once photocured, the material preserved the defined shape and it could be bent, twisted or stretched with a very high recoverable strain. As soon as the external force was removed the material returned back to its predefined shape. Thus, the polymerized SU-8 acted as the 'endoskeleton' of the microfluidic network, which drastically increased the composite's elastic and bending moduli. Second, we demonstrated a class of simple and versatile soft microfluidic materials that can be turned optically transparent or colored on demand. These materials were made in the form of flexible sheets containing a microchannel network embedded in PDMS, similar to the photocurable materials. However, this time the channels were filled with a glycerolwater mixture, whose refractive index was matched with that of the PDMS matrix. By pumping such dye solutions into the channel network and consecutively replacing the medium, we showed that we can control the material's color and light transmittance in the visible and near-infrared regions, which can be used for

  15. Solid electrolytes general principles, characterization, materials, applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hagenmuller, Paul

    1978-01-01

    Solid Electrolytes: General Principles, Characterization, Materials, Applications presents specific theories and experimental methods in the field of superionic conductors. It discusses that high ionic conductivity in solids requires specific structural and energetic conditions. It addresses the problems involved in the study and use of solid electrolytes. Some of the topics covered in the book are the introduction to the theory of solid electrolytes; macroscopic evidence for liquid nature; structural models; kinetic models; crystal structures and fast ionic conduction; interstitial motion in

  16. Characterization and damage evaluation of advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Milan

    Mechanical characterization of advanced materials, namely magnetostrictive and graphite/epoxy composite materials, is studied in this dissertation, with an emphasis on damage evaluation of composite materials. Consequently, the work in this dissertation is divided into two parts, with the first part focusing on characterization of the magneto-elastic response of magnetostrictlve materials, while the second part of this dissertation describes methods for evaluating the fatigue damage in composite materials. The objective of the first part of this dissertation is to evaluate a nonlinear constitutive relation which more closely depict the magneto-elastic response of magnetostrictive materials. Correlation between experimental and theoretical values indicate that the model adequately predicts the nonlinear strain/field relations in specific regimes, and that the currently employed linear approaches are inappropriate for modeling the response of this material in a structure. The objective of the second part of this dissertation is to unravel the complexities associated with damage events associated with polymeric composite materials. The intent is to characterize and understand the influence of impact and fatigue induced damage on the residual thermo-mechanical properties and compressive strength of composite systems. The influence of fatigue generated matrix cracking and micro-delaminations on thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) and compressive strength is investigated for woven graphite/epoxy composite system. Experimental results indicate that a strong correlation exists between TEC and compressive strength measurements, indicating that TEC measurements can be used as a damage metric for this material systems. The influence of delaminations on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a composite laminate is also investigated. Based on the changes of these parameters as a function of damage, a methodology for determining the size and location of damage is suggested

  17. Textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels from hydration of synthetic T1-C3S, β-C2S and their blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goni, S.; Guerrero, A.; Puertas, F.; Hernandez, M. S.; Palacios, M.; Dolado, J. S.; Zhu, W.; Howind, T.

    2011-01-01

    The textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of pure T1-C 3 S, β-C 2 S and their blends are studied by Nitrogen sorption and nano indentation experiments. The surface area and nano porosity of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of β-C 2 S and the 30-70 (T1-C 3 S and β-C 2 S mixture) are higher than those from hydration of T1-C 3 S, and 70-30, with the difference decreasing with hydration age. Such changes are well supported by findings of nano indentation study, which shows the greater relative volume of C-S-H phases with lower densities in the β-C 2 S and the 30-70 pastes. With the increase in hydration age, the relative volume of C-S-H phases with higher densities increased at the expenses of those with lower density. Important quantitative correlations were found among these textural characteristics and the mean chain length, determined from 2 9Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR, of the C-S-H gels. (Author) 36 refs.

  18. Computational characterization of 13C NMR lineshapes of carbon dioxide in structure 1 clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornan, P.; Woo, T.K. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Nonspherical large cages in structure one clathrates impose non-uniform motion of nonspherical guest molecules and anisotropic lineshapes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the guest. This paper presented a general method for calculating the chemical shift lineshape anisotropy of guest molecules in clathrate hydrate compounds from molecular dynamics simulations for the case of weak host, guest dipolar coupling. In order to calculate the cage chemical shielding tensors and the NMR lineshape produced by each guest molecule, the study involved the use of orientational distributions from molecular dynamics simulation along with time and powder angle averaging. The total predicted lineshape anisotropy was calculated from the superposition of the lineshapes of all guests. The approach was applied to calculate the temperature dependent 13C NMR lineshape anisotropy of carbon dioxide in structure 1 clathrates. The paper presented the computational methodology and results and discussion. It was concluded that the resulting lineshapes were in good agreement with the experimental 13C NMR spectrum at each temperature. The method provided a uniform procedure to calculate the lineshapes at different temperatures and no prior assumptions about the nature of the motion of the guest in cages was required. 37 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  19. High temperature material characterization and advanced materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. H. and others

    2005-03-01

    The study is to characterize the structural materials under the high temperature, one of the most significant environmental factors in nuclear systems. And advanced materials are developed for high temperature and/or low activation in neutron irradiation. Tensile, fatigue and creep properties have been carried out at high temperature to evaluate the mechanical degradation. Irradiation tests were performed using the HANARO. The optimum chemical composition and heat treatment condition were determined for nuclear grade 316NG stainless steel. Nitrogen, aluminum, and tungsten were added for increasing the creep rupture strength of FMS steel. The new heat treatment method was developed to form more stable precipitates. By applying the novel whiskering process, high density SiC/SiC composites with relative density above 90% could be obtained even in a shorter processing time than the conventional CVI process. Material integrated databases are established using data sheets. The databases of 6 kinds of material properties are accessible through the home page of KAERI material division

  20. Production, handling and characterization of particulate materials

    CERN Document Server

    Meesters, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    This edited volume presents most techniques and methods that have been developed by material scientists, chemists, chemical engineers and physicists for the commercial production of particulate materials, ranging from the millimeter to the nanometer scale.  The scope includes the physical and chemical background, experimental optimization of equipment and procedures, as well as an outlook on future methods. The books addresses  issues of industrial importance such as specifications, control parameter(s), control strategy, process models, energy consumption and discusses the various techniques in relation to potential applications. In addition to the production processes, all major unit operations and characterization methods are described in this book. It differs from other books which are devoted to a single technique or a single material. Contributors to this book are acknowledged experts in their field. The aim of the book is to facilitate comparison of the different unit operations leading to optimum...

  1. Characterization of novel nanostructured materials for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klauser, F.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a characterization of bulk- and surface properties of various (nanoscale) materials with respect to their possible use in applications. The main part of this work is dedicated to nanocrystalline Diamond films (NCD). Other materials include silicon nanoparticle films, gallium-, tungsten-, niobium- and hafnium-oxides as well as commercially available piercing materials. Diamond films of different surface terminations and morphologies were prepared and characterized, in order to realize surfaces with optimized properties for biological and medical applications. It was shown that properly terminated NCD Materials can be used as defined substrates for cell culture and cell-adhesion studies. In view of the use of NCD as coating for medical implants also in-vivo studies on the tissue attachment to differently terminated NCD surfaces were performed. NCD from chemical vapour deposition is a composite material which - in addition to diamond - also contains carbon species in grain boundaries. Thus - besides characterization of bulk properties (as hydrogen- and sp2 content or diamond grain size) - investigation of grain-boundary properties is important for the NCD-based applications presented within this thesis, including an electrochemical sensor, a thin-film acoustic resonator and a surface-plasmon- resonance based sensor. Thin films of silicon nanoparticles were studied by means of XPS-sputter depth profiling with respect to their behaviour under various oxidation conditions, such as exposure to ambient air or to oxygen plasma as well as upon electron irradiation under high-vacuum conditions. The investigation of gallium and tungsten oxides aims at their potential use as model catalysts. Besides a structural characterization, their oxidation and reduction behaviour was studied. Furthermore, a dendritic mixed-oxide system with an enhanced interface area could be prepared. Niobium and hafnium oxides are often used as dielectrics. It was the aim of the

  2. Methane Hydrate in Confined Spaces: An Alternative Storage System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Lars; Casco, Mirian Elizabeth; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquin

    2018-03-14

    Methane hydrate inheres the great potential to be a nature-inspired alternative for chemical energy storage, as it allows to store large amounts of methane in a dense solid phase. The embedment of methane hydrate in the confined environment of porous materials can be capitalized for potential applications as its physicochemical properties, such as the formation kinetics or pressure and temperature stability, are significantly changed compared to the bulk system. We review this topic from a materials scientific perspective by considering porous carbons, silica, clays, zeolites, and polymers as host structures for methane hydrate formation. We discuss the contribution of advanced characterization techniques and theoretical simulations towards the elucidation of the methane hydrate formation and dissociation process within the confined space. We outline the scientific challenges this system is currently facing and look on possible future applications for this technology. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Characterization of a lime-pozzolan plaster containing phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Trník, Anton; Pokorný, Jaroslav; Černý, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A PCM (Phase Change Material) modified lime-pozzolan plaster for improvement of thermal energy storage of building envelopes is studied in the paper. The investigated plaster is composed of lime hydrate, pozzolan admixture based on metakaolin and mudstone, silica sand, water and paraffin wax encapsulated in polymer capsule. The reference plaster without PCM application is studied as well. The analyzed materials are characterized by bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive strength and pore size distribution. The temperature of phase change, heat of fusion and crystallization are studied using DSC (Difference Scanning Calorimetry) analysis performed in air atmosphere. In order to get information on materials hygrothermal performance, determination of thermal and hygric properties is done in laboratory conditions. Experimental data reveal a substantial improvement of heat storage capacity of PCM-modified plaster as compared to the reference material without PCM

  4. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    , not all of them are white like snow. Some hydrates from the deep Gulf of Mexico are richly colored in shades of yellow, orange, or even red. The ice-like masses are beautiful, and contrast with the dull gray of deep sea muds. Hydrates from the Blake... volcanoes and associated gas hydrates: Marine Geology, v. 167, p. 29-42. Milkov, A.V. and R. Sassen, 2001a, Estimate of gas hydrate resource, northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope: Marine Geology, v. 179, pp. 71-83. Milkov, A.V., Sassen, R...

  5. Opto-nanomechanical spectroscopic material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetard, L.; Passian, A.; Farahi, R. H.; Thundat, T.; Davison, B. H.

    2015-10-01

    The non-destructive, simultaneous chemical and physical characterization of materials at the nanoscale is an essential and highly sought-after capability. However, a combination of limitations imposed by Abbe diffraction, diffuse scattering, unknown subsurface, electromagnetic fluctuations and Brownian noise, for example, have made achieving this goal challenging. Here, we report a hybrid approach for nanoscale material characterization based on generalized nanomechanical force microscopy in conjunction with infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. As an application, we tackle the outstanding problem of spatially and spectrally resolving plant cell walls. Nanoscale characterization of plant cell walls and the effect of complex phenotype treatments on biomass are challenging but necessary in the search for sustainable and renewable bioenergy. We present results that reveal both the morphological and compositional substructures of the cell walls. The measured biomolecular traits are in agreement with the lower-resolution chemical maps obtained with infrared and confocal Raman micro-spectroscopies of the same samples. These results should prove relevant in other fields such as cancer research, nanotoxicity, and energy storage and production, where morphological, chemical and subsurface studies of nanocomposites, nanoparticle uptake by cells and nanoscale quality control are in demand.

  6. Quality control and characterization of bentonite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiviranta, L.; Kumpulainen, S.

    2011-12-01

    Before bentonite material is taken into use in performance testing, the quality of the material needs to be checked. Three high grade bentonite materials: two natural Nabentonites from Wyoming, and one natural Ca-bentonite from Milos, were characterized. Each material was characterized using duplicate or triplicate samples in order to study variability in material quality in batches. The procedure consisted of basic acceptance testing (water ratio, CEC, swelling index, liquid limit, and granule size distribution), advanced acceptance testing (exchangeable cations, chemical and mineralogical composition, density, swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity) and complementary testing (herein surface area, water absorption capacity, montmorillonite composition, grain size distribution and plastic limit). All three materials qualified the requirements set for buffer bentonite for CEC, smectite content, swelling pressure, and hydraulic conductivity. Wyoming bentonites contained approximately 88 wt.% of smectite, and Milos bentonite 79 wt.% of smectite and 3 wt.% of illite. Precision of smectite analyses was ±2 %, and variances in composition of parallel samples within analytical errors, at least for Wyoming bentonites. Accuracy of quantitative analyses for trace minerals such as gypsum, pyrite or carbonates, was however low. As the concentrations of these trace minerals are important for Eh or pH buffering reactions or development of bentonite pore water composition, normative concentrations are recommended to be used instead of mineralogically determined concentrations. The swelling pressures and hydraulic conductivities of different materials were compared using EMDD. Swelling pressure was relatively higher for studied Cabentonite than for the studied Na-bentonites and the difference could not be explained with different smectite contents. Hydraulic conductivities seemed to be similar for all materials. The results of index tests correlated with the smectite content

  7. Characterization of liquid metal reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, I. H.; Ryu, W. S.; Kim, H. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The objectives of this report were to assess the material requirements for LMR environment, to select the optimum candidates for KALIMER components, to characterize the performance for establishing a database of the structural materials for KALIMER, and to develop the basic material technologies for the localization of the advanced materials. Stainless steel ingots were melted by VIM and hot-rolled to plate with the thickness of 15mm. The plate was solution-treated for 1 hr at 1100 deg C and then water-quenched. Specimens were taken parallel to the rolling direction of the plate. The effects of nitrogen and phosphorus were analyzed on the high temperature mechanical properties of 316MRP (Liquid Metal Reactor, Primary candidate material) stainless steels with the different nitrogen content from 0.04 to 0.15% and with the different phosphorus content from 0.002 to 0.02%. Heat treatment was performed to investigate the changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of Cr-Mo steels for LMR heat transfer tube materials and core materials. The Cr-Mo steels were normalized at the temperatures between 900 deg C and 1200 deg C for 1hrs and tempered at the temperatures between 500 deg C and 800 deg C for 2hrs. Conventional optical and electron micrographic studies were carried out to investigate the martensite lath structure, carbide indentification and carbide shape. Vickers microhardness was measured at room temperature using 10g load. Tensile properties were tested at high temperature. Charpy V-notch impact tests were also carried out at temperature between -120 deg C and +180 deg C. (author). 72 refs., 28 tabs., 244 figs

  8. Experimental Setup to Characterize Bentonite Hydration Processes; Diseno experimental para la caracterizacion de los procesos de hidratacion de la bentonita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.; Pastor, J.M.

    2001-07-01

    We present an experimental setup to follow-up the hydration process of a bentonite. Clay samples, of 2 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, were made and introduced in a Hele-Shaw cell with two PMM windows and two steel frames. In hydration experiments, a fluid enters by an orifice in the frame, located both at the top and the bottom of the cell, to perform hydration in both senses. To get a uniform hydration we place a diffuser near the orifice. Volume influxes in hydration cells are registered in time. The evolution of the developed interface was recorded on a videotape. The video cameras was fixed to a holder so that the vertical direction in the monitor was the same as the direction of the larger extension of the cell. (Author) 6 refs.

  9. Epidemiology of contrast material-induced nephropathy in the era of hydration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balemans, C.E.A.; Reichert, L.J.M.; Schelven, B.I. van; Brand, A. van den; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the incidence of contrast material-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) who received intravenous contrast media and underwent treatment in accordance with current guidelines and to determine

  10. Viscoelastic stress modeling in cementitious materials using constant viscoelastic hydration modulus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, W.; Liu, Z.; Koenders, E.A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Viscoelastic stress modeling in ageing cementitious materials is of major importance in high performance concrete of low water cement ratio (e.g. w/c ~0.35) where crack resistance due to deformation restraint needs to be determined. Total stress analysis is complicated by the occurrence of internal

  11. Towards an integrated materials characterization toolbox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Schuh, Christopher A.; Vetrano, John S.

    2011-01-01

    to reaction dynamics in four-dimensions, spanning multiple orders of magnitude in both temporal and spatial space. This study presents the authors' viewpoint on the material characterization field, reviewing its recent past, evaluating its present capabilities, and proposing directions for its future...... and, therefore, are not included [D.A. Bonnell et al.: Rev. Modern Phys. in Review]. In this study particular attention is paid to studies that have pioneered the synergetic use of multiple techniques to provide complementary views of a single structure or process; several of these studies represent...

  12. Preparation of ceramic materials for surface characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipperian, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how microstructural preparation permits a microscopic analysis of a material's internal structure, which is related to the physical properties of the material. Today, numerous microstructural quantitative and qualitative measurements are commonly utilized. Several of these include phase determination, phase hardness, phase distribution, grain size and shape, and porosity and size distribution. The most widely used surface characterization techniques are optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and x-ray microscopy. Optical microscopy includes both transmitted-and reflected-light techniques and requires a surface preparation prior to analysis. Transmitted-light microscopy samples require thinning and polishing of both sides of the sample, whereas reflected light techniques require polishing of only one side of the sample

  13. Viscoelastic characterization of soft biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Vinod Timothy

    Progressive and irreversible retinal diseases are among the primary causes of blindness in the United States, attacking the cells in the eye that transform environmental light into neural signals for the optic pathway. Medical implants designed to restore visual function to afflicted patients can cause mechanical stress and ultimately damage to the host tissues. Research shows that an accurate understanding of the mechanical properties of the biological tissues can reduce damage and lead to designs with improved safety and efficacy. Prior studies on the mechanical properties of biological tissues show characterization of these materials can be affected by environmental, length-scale, time, mounting, stiffness, size, viscoelastic, and methodological conditions. Using porcine sclera tissue, the effects of environmental, time, and mounting conditions are evaluated when using nanoindentation. Quasi-static tests are used to measure reduced modulus during extended exposure to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), as well as the chemical and mechanical analysis of mounting the sample to a solid substrate using cyanoacrylate. The less destructive nature of nanoindentation tests allows for variance of tests within a single sample to be compared to the variance between samples. The results indicate that the environmental, time, and mounting conditions can be controlled for using modified nanoindentation procedures for biological samples and are in line with averages modulus values from previous studies but with increased precision. By using the quasi-static and dynamic characterization capabilities of the nanoindentation setup, the additional stiffness and viscoelastic variables are measured. Different quasi-static control methods were evaluated along with maximum load parameters and produced no significant difference in reported reduced modulus values. Dynamic characterization tests varied frequency and quasi-static load, showing that the agar could be modeled as a linearly

  14. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Characterizing the Response of the Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrate Reservoir to Bottom Water Warming Along the Upper Continental Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, Evan A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Johnson, H. Paul [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Salmi, Marie [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Whorley, Theresa [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-11-10

    The objective of this project is to understand the response of the WA margin gas hydrate system to contemporary warming of bottom water along the upper continental slope. Through pre-cruise analysis and modeling of archive and recent geophysical and oceanographic data, we (1) inventoried bottom simulating reflectors along the WA margin and defined the upper limit of gas hydrate stability, (2) refined margin-wide estimates of heat flow and geothermal gradients, (3) characterized decadal scale temporal variations of bottom water temperatures at the upper continental slope of the Washington margin, and (4) used numerical simulations to provide quantitative estimates of how the shallow boundary of methane hydrate stability responds to modern environmental change. These pre-cruise results provided the context for a systematic geophysical and geochemical survey of methane seepage along the upper continental slope from 48° to 46°N during a 10-day field program on the R/V Thompson from October 10-19, 2014. This systematic inventory of methane emissions along this climate-sensitive margin corridor and comprehensive sediment and water column sampling program provided data and samples for Phase 3 of this project that focused on determining fluid and methane sources (deep-source vs. shallow; microbial, thermogenic, gas hydrate dissociation) within the sediment, and how they relate to contemporary intermediate water warming. During the 2014 research expedition, we sampled nine seep sites between ~470 and 520 m water depth, within the zone of predicted methane hydrate retreat over the past 40 years. We imaged 22 bubble plumes with heights commonly rising to ~300 meters below sea level with one reaching near the sea surface. We collected 22 gravity cores and 20 CTD/hydrocasts from the 9 seeps and at background locations (no acoustic evidence of seepage) within the depth interval of predicted downslope retreat of the methane hydrate stability zone. Approximately 300 pore water

  15. Characterization of the materials for functional application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duh, J.-G.

    1997-01-01

    The development of material products with extended performances has been equally pushed by the advancement of analysis techniques. Characterization of materials for functional application will be a challenge for further analytical methodology development. In this lecture, several characterization techniques will be outlined and emphasized with respect to special function applications as follows. 1. Phase analysis, crystallite size and microstrain of chemically synthesized ceramic powders in relation to phase transformation. 2. Microstructural evolution and reliability test in the solder joint of microelectronic package. The growth morphology of the intermetallic compound and its effects on the solder joint reliability will be highlighted and discussed. 3. Mechanical properties of thin films and metallized substrates, including adhesion strength, microhardness, scratch behavior, wear resistance. Special interest will be focused on the indentation-scratch deformation associated with the coating/substrate assembly. Employment of atomic force microscope in the evaluation of nano-tribology will also be probed. 4. Diffusion-related kinetics at interface by means of theoretical modelling and electron microanalysis. (author)

  16. Characterization of early-age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders using isothermal calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerman, Miloš; Tydlitát, Vratislav; Keppert, Martin; Čáchová, Monika; Černý, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Early age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders are analyzed within a wide range of component ratios. • The applied waste ceramic dust exhibits partial hydraulic properties, ettringite and calcite are formed. • Transition from tobermorite- to jennite-like structures is identified by SEM within the first 48 h. • The highest specific hydration heat after 300 h, 63 J/g, is measured for the binder containing 70% ceramic. • Substantial effect of the heat of wetting is observed, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. - Abstract: Early-age hydration processes in a lime-ceramic-water system are analyzed within the whole range of possible lime/ceramic ratios. The isothermal calorimetry shows a substantial effect of the heat of wetting on the total heat evolved, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. The highest specific hydration heat of 63 J/g during the analyzed 300-h hydration period exhibits the blended binder containing 70% ceramic and 30% lime which correlates well with the highest compressive and bending strengths of the paste prepared using this blend. Portlandite, ettringite and calcite are the main phases identified by the X-ray diffraction analysis after the hydration of ceramic-rich blends. According to the results of scanning electron microscopy, the initial course of pozzolanic reaction is for this type of binders characterized by the transition from tobermorite-like calcium-silicate-hydrate structures into jennite-like structures within the first 48 h. Blends with the ceramic content lower than 70% show a high portion of portlandite, calcite is present in low amount, and the jennite-like structures are observed after 48 h, following the initial formation of components with a very high Ca content. The favorable properties of the ceramic-rich blended binders can be explained by the partial hydraulic character of the ceramic. With the specific hydration heat of 29 J/g after 300 h and compressive strength

  17. Characterization of early-age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders using isothermal calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerman, Miloš; Tydlitát, Vratislav; Keppert, Martin; Čáchová, Monika; Černý, Robert, E-mail: cernyr@fsv.cvut.cz

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • Early age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders are analyzed within a wide range of component ratios. • The applied waste ceramic dust exhibits partial hydraulic properties, ettringite and calcite are formed. • Transition from tobermorite- to jennite-like structures is identified by SEM within the first 48 h. • The highest specific hydration heat after 300 h, 63 J/g, is measured for the binder containing 70% ceramic. • Substantial effect of the heat of wetting is observed, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. - Abstract: Early-age hydration processes in a lime-ceramic-water system are analyzed within the whole range of possible lime/ceramic ratios. The isothermal calorimetry shows a substantial effect of the heat of wetting on the total heat evolved, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. The highest specific hydration heat of 63 J/g during the analyzed 300-h hydration period exhibits the blended binder containing 70% ceramic and 30% lime which correlates well with the highest compressive and bending strengths of the paste prepared using this blend. Portlandite, ettringite and calcite are the main phases identified by the X-ray diffraction analysis after the hydration of ceramic-rich blends. According to the results of scanning electron microscopy, the initial course of pozzolanic reaction is for this type of binders characterized by the transition from tobermorite-like calcium-silicate-hydrate structures into jennite-like structures within the first 48 h. Blends with the ceramic content lower than 70% show a high portion of portlandite, calcite is present in low amount, and the jennite-like structures are observed after 48 h, following the initial formation of components with a very high Ca content. The favorable properties of the ceramic-rich blended binders can be explained by the partial hydraulic character of the ceramic. With the specific hydration heat of 29 J/g after 300 h and compressive strength

  18. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  19. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarek, M.; Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A.; Malolepszy, A.; Stobinski, L.; Jablonski, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two kind of samples: commercial graphene on Cu substrate and rGO flakes. • EPES applied to measure the IMFPs in graphene based materials. • Characterization by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS. • EPES IMFPs for rGO deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data. - Abstract: In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5–2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  20. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarek, M., E-mail: mpisarek@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Malolepszy, A. [Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, 00-065 Warsaw (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, 00-065 Warsaw (Poland); Jablonski, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Two kind of samples: commercial graphene on Cu substrate and rGO flakes. • EPES applied to measure the IMFPs in graphene based materials. • Characterization by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS. • EPES IMFPs for rGO deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data. - Abstract: In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5–2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  1. Morphological characterization of shocked porous material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai; Pan, X F; Zhang Ping; Zhu Jianshi

    2009-01-01

    Morphological measures are introduced to probe the complex procedure of shock wave reaction on porous material. They characterize the geometry and the topology of the pixelized map of a state variable like temperature. The relevance to thermodynamical properties of a material is revealed and various experimental conditions are simulated. Numerical results indicate that the shock wave reaction results in a complicated sequence of compressions and rarefactions in porous material. The increasing rate of the total fractional white area A roughly gives the velocity D of a compressive-wave series. When a velocity D is mentioned, the corresponding threshold contour level of the state variable, such as temperature, should also be stated. When the threshold contour level increases, D becomes smaller. The area A increases parabolically with time t during the initial period. The A(t) curve goes back to being linear in the following three cases: (i) when the porosity δ approaches 1, (ii) when the initial shock becomes stronger and (iii) when the contour level approaches the minimum value of the state variable. The area with high temperature may continue to increase even after the early compressive waves have arrived at the downstream free surface and some rarefactive waves have come back into the target body. In the case of energetic material needing a higher temperature for initiation, a higher porosity is preferred and the material may be initiated after the precursory compressive waves have scanned the entire target body. In some cases we need scattered hot spots, but in others we need connected ones. One may desire the fabrication of a porous body and choose the appropriate shock strength according to what is needed. With the Minkowski measures, the dependence on experimental conditions is reflected simply by a few coefficients. They may be used as order parameters to classify the maps of physical variables in a similar way to thermodynamic phase transitions.

  2. Estimation of Membrane Hydration Status for Standby Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems by Impedance Measurement: First Results on Stack Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    Fuel cells have started replacing traditional lead-acid battery banks in backup systems. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of standby, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. In the case of low temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems......, a precise estimation of hydration status of the fuel cell during standby is important for a fast and safe startup. In this article, the measurement of the complex impedance of the fuel cell is suggested as a method to estimate the membrane hydration status. A 56-cell fuel cell stack has been symmetrically...... fed with air whose temperature and relative humidity were controlled, and its complex impedance was measured at different frequencies and for different values of relative humidity. After showing that the experiment was repeatable, the fuel cell stack was characterized, a power regression model...

  3. Advanced Nanoscale Characterization of Cement Based Materials Using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation: A Review

    KAUST Repository

    Chae, Sejung R.

    2013-05-22

    We report various synchrotron radiation laboratory based techniques used to characterize cement based materials in nanometer scale. High resolution X-ray transmission imaging combined with a rotational axis allows for rendering of samples in three dimensions revealing volumetric details. Scanning transmission X-ray microscope combines high spatial resolution imaging with high spectral resolution of the incident beam to reveal X-ray absorption near edge structure variations in the material nanostructure. Microdiffraction scans the surface of a sample to map its high order reflection or crystallographic variations with a micron-sized incident beam. High pressure X-ray diffraction measures compressibility of pure phase materials. Unique results of studies using the above tools are discussed-a study of pores, connectivity, and morphology of a 2,000 year old concrete using nanotomography; detection of localized and varying silicate chain depolymerization in Al-substituted tobermorite, and quantification of monosulfate distribution in tricalcium aluminate hydration using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy; detection and mapping of hydration products in high volume fly ash paste using microdiffraction; and determination of mechanical properties of various AFm phases using high pressure X-ray diffraction. © 2013 The Author(s).

  4. Geochemical Characterization of Concentrated Gas Hydrate Deposits on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand: Preliminary Geochemical Cruise Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-29

    by staining with ethidium bromide and viewed under UV. The intensity of bands represents the strength of the produce in each sample. Positive and...hydrates with seafloor instability, submarine landslides , and possibly Tsunamis by a freeze-thaw mechanism similar to frost heave [Pecher et al...seeps and mud volcanoes associated with methane seeps and hydrates. The heatflow instrument used was a 3.5-meter-long “violin bow” or “Lister-type

  5. Surface characterization of graphene based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarek, M.; Holdynski, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Nowakowski, R.; Roguska, A.; Malolepszy, A.; Stobinski, L.; Jablonski, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, two kind of samples were used: (i) a monolayer graphene film with a thickness of 0.345 nm deposited by the CVD method on Cu foil, (ii) graphene flakes obtained by modified Hummers method and followed by reduction of graphene oxide. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport in graphene/Cu sample and reduced graphene oxide material, which determines the sampling depth of XPS and AES were evaluated from relative Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (EPES) measurements with the Au standard in the energy range 0.5-2 keV. The measured IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from experimental optical data published in the literature for the graphite sample. The EPES IMFP values at 0.5 and 1.5 keV was practically identical to that calculated from optical data for graphite (less than 4% deviation). For energies 1 and 2 keV, the EPES IMFPs for rGO were deviated up to 14% from IMFPs calculated using the optical data by Tanuma et al. [1]. Before EPES measurements all samples were characterized by various techniques like: FE-SEM, AFM, XPS, AES and REELS to visualize the surface morphology/topography and identify the chemical composition.

  6. Nondestructive characterization of UHMWPE armor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Hsu, David K.; Jensen, Terrence; Eisenmann, David

    2012-05-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a material increasingly used for fabricating helmet and body armor. In this work, plate specimens consolidated from thin fiber sheets in series 3124 and 3130 were examined with ultrasound, X-ray and terahertz radiation. Ultrasonic through-transmission scans using both air-coupled and immersion modes revealed that the 3130 series material generally had much lower attenuation than the 3124 series, and that certain 3124 plates had extremely high attenuation. Due to the relatively low inspection frequencies used, pulse-echo immersion ultrasonic testing could not detect distinct flaw echoes from the interior. To characterize the nature of the defective condition that was responsible for the high ultrasonic attenuation, terahertz radiation in the time-domain spectroscopy mode were used to image the flaws. Terahertz scan images obtained on the high attenuation samples clearly showed a distribution of a large number of defects, possibly small planar delaminations, throughout the volume of the interior. Their precise nature and morphology are to be verified by optical microscopy of the sectioned surface.

  7. Nanoscale Topographical Characterization of Orbital Implant Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salerno

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for an ideal orbital implant is still ongoing in the field of ocular biomaterials. Major limitations of currently-available porous implants include the high cost along with a non-negligible risk of exposure and postoperative infection due to conjunctival abrasion. In the effort to develop better alternatives to the existing devices, two types of new glass-ceramic porous implants were fabricated by sponge replication, which is a relatively inexpensive method. Then, they were characterized by direct three-dimensional (3D contact probe mapping in real space by means of atomic force microscopy in order to assess their surface micro- and nano-features, which were quantitatively compared to those of the most commonly-used orbital implants. These silicate glass-ceramic materials exhibit a surface roughness in the range of a few hundred nanometers (Sq within 500–700 nm and topographical features comparable to those of clinically-used “gold-standard” alumina and polyethylene porous orbital implants. However, it was noted that both experimental and commercial non-porous implants were significantly smoother than all the porous ones. The results achieved in this work reveal that these porous glass-ceramic materials show promise for the intended application and encourage further investigation of their clinical suitability.

  8. Nondestructive characterization of UHMWPE armor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Hsu, David K.; Jensen, Terrence; Eisenmann, David

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a material increasingly used for fabricating helmet and body armor. In this work, plate specimens consolidated from thin fiber sheets in series 3124 and 3130 were examined with ultrasound, X-ray and terahertz radiation. Ultrasonic through-transmission scans using both air-coupled and immersion modes revealed that the 3130 series material generally had much lower attenuation than the 3124 series, and that certain 3124 plates had extremely high attenuation. Due to the relatively low inspection frequencies used, pulse-echo immersion ultrasonic testing could not detect distinct flaw echoes from the interior. To characterize the nature of the defective condition that was responsible for the high ultrasonic attenuation, terahertz radiation in the time-domain spectroscopy mode were used to image the flaws. Terahertz scan images obtained on the high attenuation samples clearly showed a distribution of a large number of defects, possibly small planar delaminations, throughout the volume of the interior. Their precise nature and morphology are to be verified by optical microscopy of the sectioned surface.

  9. Precision Characterization of Gyrotron Window Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Charles R. [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-12-31

    The response of dielectric material to electromagnetic waves in the millimeter wavelength range (30 to 300 GHz) has received relatively little study and the processes that give rise to absorption in this region are often poorly understood. Understanding the origin of absorption at these wavelengths has basic significance for solid state physics as well as importance for development of technology in this region of the RF spectrum. This project has provided high-quality data on the temperature dependence of the dielectric loss in high-purity, semi-insulating silicon carbide (HPSI SiC), a material that holds much promise for application, especially in devices that must operate in the high power and high frequency regime. Comparison of this experimental data with theoretical predictions for various loss processes provides convincing evidence that the loss in HPSI SiC arises almost entirely from intrinsic lattice loss (ILL) as described by Garin. Fitting the data to this model yields an accurate value for the Debye temperature that characterizes crystalline SiC. In addition, our results refute a previous study(2) which reported much higher loss, attributed to the presence of free charge. The quality of the data acquired in this project is clear evidence for the value of the experimental technique that was employed here. This technique combines the excitation of a high-quality open resonator by a phase-locked backward wave oscillator (BWO) with use of a spectrum analyzer to measure the change in the resonator response curve when the sample is inserted. This system has demonstrated consistent results for very challenging measurements and does not suffer from the artifacts that often arise when using other techniques that rely on thermal sources. The low absorption loss found in HPSI SiC, when combined with its other outstanding material properties, e.g. high thermal conductivity, high tensile strength, and high carrier mobility, should provide incentive for designers to

  10. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3

  11. Chemical characterization of nuclear materials: recent trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Amrit; Nandi, C.; Patil, A.B.; Khan, K.B.

    2013-01-01

    Analytical chemistry plays a very important role for nuclear fuel activities be it fuel fabrication, waste management or reprocessing. Nuclear fuels are selected based on the type of reactor. The nuclear fuel has to conform to stringent chemical specifications like boron, cadmium, rare earths, hydrogen, oxygen to metal ratio, total gas, heavy metal content, chlorine and fluorine etc. Selection of technique is very important to evaluate the true specification. This is important particularly when the analyses have to perform inside leak tight enclosure. The present paper describes the details of advanced analytical techniques being developed and used in chemical characterization of nuclear materials specially fuels during their fabrication. Nuclear fuels comprise of fuels based on UO 2 , PUO 2 , ThO 2 and combination of (U+Pu)O 2 , (Th+U)O 2 , (Th+Pu)O 2 , (U+Pu)C, (U+Pu)N etc depending on the type of reactors chosen Viz. Pressurized Heavy water Reactor (PHWR), Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), Fast Breeder Test Reactor and Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). Chemical characterization of these fuels is very important for performance of fuel in the reactor. It provides means to ascertain that the quality of the fabricated fuel conforms to the chemical specifications for the fuel laid down by the designer. The batches of sintered/degassed pellets are subjected to comprehensive chemical quality control for trace constituents, stoichiometry and isotopic composition. Chemical Quality Control of fuel is carried out at different stages of manufacture namely feed materials, sintering, vacuum degassing and fuel element welding. Advanced analytical technique based on titrimetry, spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, XRF and XRD have largely been used for this purpose. Since they have to be handled inside special enclosures, extreme care are being taken during handling. Instruments are being developed/modified for ease of handling and maintenance. The method should be fast to reduce

  12. Chloral Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you are allergic to chloral hydrate, aspirin, tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature, away from excess ...

  13. Material characterization models and test methods for historic building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tessa Kvist; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Møller, Eva B.

    2017-01-01

    Predictions of long term hygrothermal performance can be assessed by dynamic hygrothermal simulations, in which material parameters are crucial input. Material parameters for especially historic materials are often unknown; therefore, there is a need to determine important parameters, and simple...

  14. Computational Material Modeling of Hydrated Cement Paste Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Chemistry Structure - Influence of Magnesium Exchange on Mechanical Stiffness: C-S-H Jennite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    MODELING OF C-S-H Material chemistry level modeling following the principles and techniques commonly grouped under Computational Material Science is...Henmi, C. and Kusachi, I. Monoclinic tobermorite from fuka, bitchu-cho, Okoyama Perfecture. Japan J. Min. Petr. Econ . Geol. (1989)84:374-379. [22...31] Liu, Y. et al. First principles study of the stability and mechanical properties of MC (M=Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Hf and Ta) compounds. Journal of Alloys and Compounds. (2014) 582:500-504. 10

  15. High Temperature Materials Characterization and Advanced Materials Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. H.

    2007-06-01

    The project has been carried out for 2 years in stage III in order to achieve the final goals of performance verification of the developed materials, after successful development of the advanced high temperature material technologies for 3 years in Stage II. The mechanical and thermal properties of the advanced materials, which were developed during Stage II, were evaluated at high temperatures, and the modification of the advanced materials were performed. Moreover, a database management system was established using user-friendly knowledge-base scheme to complete the integrated-information material database in KAERI material division

  16. Preparation and Supercooling Modification of Salt Hydrate Phase Change Materials Based on CaCl₂·2H₂O/CaCl₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoxiao; Dong, Zhijun; Memon, Shazim Ali; Bao, Xiaohua; Cui, Hongzhi

    2017-06-23

    Salt hydrates have issues of supercooling when they are utilized as phase change materials (PCMs). In this research, a new method was adopted to prepare a salt hydrate PCM (based on a mixture of calcium chloride dihydrate and calcium chloride anhydrous) as a novel PCM system to reduce the supercooling phenomenon existing in CaCl₂·6H₂O. Six samples with different compositions of CaCl₂ were prepared. The relationship between the performance and the proportion of calcium chloride dihydrate (CaCl₂·2H₂O) and calcium chloride anhydrous (CaCl₂) was also investigated. The supercooling degree of the final PCM reduced with the increase in volume of CaCl₂·2H₂O during its preparation. The PCM obtained with 66.21 wt % CaCl₂·2H₂O reduced the supercooling degree by about 96.8%. All six samples, whose ratio of CaCl₂·2H₂O to (CaCl₂ plus CaCl₂·2H₂O) was 0%, 34.03%, 53.82%, 76.56%, 90.74%, and 100% respectively, showed relatively higher enthalpy (greater than 155.29 J/g), and have the possibility to be applied in buildings for thermal energy storage purposes. Hence, CaCl₂·2H₂O plays an important role in reducing supercooling and it can be helpful in adjusting the solidification enthalpy. Thereafter, the influence of adding different percentages of Nano-SiO₂ (0.1 wt %, 0.3 wt %, 0.5 wt %) in reducing the supercooling degree of some PCM samples was investigated. The test results showed that the supercooling of the salt hydrate PCM in Samples 6 and 5 reduced to 0.2 °C and 0.4 °C respectively. Finally, the effect of the different cooling conditions, including frozen storage (-20 °C) and cold storage (5 °C), that were used to prepare the salt hydrate PCM was considered. It was found that both cooling conditions are effective in reducing the supercooling degree of the salt hydrate PCM. With the synergistic action of the two materials, the performance and properties of the newly developed PCM systems were better especially in terms of reducing

  17. Seismic characterization of hydrates in faulted, fine-grained sediments of Krishna-Godavari Basin: Full waveform inversion

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaiswal, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Zelt, C.A.

    (P)) and attenuation (Q sub(P) sup(-1)) character of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). In this paper, we apply frequency domain full-waveform inversion (FWI) to surface-towed 2D multichannel seismic data from the Krishna-Godavari (KG) Basin, India, to image...

  18. Seismic characterization of hydrates in faulted, fine-grained sediments of Krishna-Godavari basin: Full waveform inversion.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaiswal, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Zelt, C.A.

    (QP−1) character of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). In this paper, we apply frequency domain full-waveform inversion (FWI) to surface-towed 2D multichannel seismic data from the Krishna-Godavari (KG) Basin, India, to image the fine-scale (100...

  19. Crystallization and Characterization of a New Magnesium Sulfate Hydrate MgSO4.11H2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genceli, F.E.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; Witkamp, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    The MgSO4 crystal hydrate formed below approximately 0 °C was proven to be the undecahydrate, MgSO4 • 11H2O (meridianiite) instead of the reported dodecahydrate MgSO4 • 12H2O. The crystals were grown from solution by eutectic freeze and by cooling crystallization. The crystal structure analysis and

  20. Investigating the influence of lithologic heterogeneity on gas hydrate formation and methane recycling at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone in channelized systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daigle, Hugh; Nole, Michael; Cook, Ann; Malinverno, Alberto

    2017-12-14

    In marine environments, gas hydrate preferentially accumulates in coarse-grained sediments. At the meso- to micro-scale, however, hydrate distribution in these coarse-grained units is often heterogeneous. We employ a methane hydrate reservoir simulator coupling heat and mass transfer as well as capillary effects to investigate how capillary controls on methane solubility affect gas and hydrate accumulations in reservoirs characterized by graded bedding and alternating sequences of coarse-grained sands and fine-grained silt and clay. Simulations bury a channelized reservoir unit encased in homogeneous, fine-grained material characterized by small pores (150 nm) and low permeability (~1 md in the absence of hydrate). Pore sizes within each reservoir bed between vary between coarse sand and fine silt. Sands have a median pore size of 35 microns and a lognormal pore size distribution. We also investigate how the amount of labile organic carbon (LOC) affects hydrate growth due to microbial methanogenesis within the sediments. In a diffusion-dominated system, methane movies into reservoir layers along spatial gradients in dissolved methane concentration. Hydrate grows in such a way as to minimize these concentration gradients by accumulating slower in finer-grained reservoir layers and faster in coarser-grained layers. Channelized, fining-upwards sediment bodies accumulate hydrate first along their outer surfaces and thence inward from top to bottom. If LOC is present in thin beds within the channel, higher saturations of hydrate will be distributed more homogeneously throughout the unit. When buried beneath the GHSZ, gas recycling can occur only if enough hydrate is present to form a connected gas phase upon dissociation. Simulations indicate that this is difficult to achieve for diffusion-dominated systems, especially those with thick GHSZs and/or small amounts of LOC. However, capillary-driven fracturing behavior may be more prevalent in settings with thick GHSZs.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of MCC [Materials Characterization Center] approved testing material: ATM-10 glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-10 glass represents a reference commercial high-level waste form similar to that which will be produced by the West Valley Nuclear Service Co. Inc., West Valley, New York. The target composition and acceptable range of composition were defined by the sponsor, West Valley Nuclear Service. The ATM-10 glass was produced in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of the work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-10 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. All of the ATM-10 glass was produced in the form of bars 1.9 /times/ 1.9 /times/ 10 cm nominal size, and 93 g nominal mass. A total of 15 bars of ATM-10 glass weighing 1394 g was produced. The production bars were characterized to determine the mean composition, oxidation state, and microstructure of the ATM-10 product. Table A summarizes the characterization results. The ATM-10 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the specifications of the client. Visually, the ATM-10 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination revealed low (less than 2 wt %) concentractions of 3-μm iron-chrome (suspected spinel) crystals and /approximately/0.5-μm ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 5 to 250 μm, was observed in all samples. 4 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs

  2. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  3. Characterization methods of nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustillos, O.W.R.; Teixeira, S.R.; Lordello, A.R.; Imakuma, K.; Rodrigues, C.

    1980-01-01

    In order to organize quality control and quality assurance activities for PWR fuel production, the laboratory of IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares) has developed various chemical and physical methods to be employed for fuel characterization of UO 2 pellets. The techniques developed are the determination of total residual gases by vacuum fusion method, determination of impurity elements by optical spectrography and characterization methods by X-ray diffraction. The development and the implementation of these techniques under the implementation of these techniques under the general scheme of characterization and quality control is the major theme discussed. (E.G.) [pt

  4. Final Scientific/Technical Report of Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbach, Matthew J [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Colwell, Frederick S [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Harris, Robert [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2017-07-06

    Methane Hydrates, a solid form of methane and water, exist at high pressures and low temperatures, occurs on every continental margin on Earth, represents one of the largest reservoirs of carbon on the planet, and, if destabilized, may play an important role in both slope stability and climate change. For decades, researchers have studied methane hydrates with the hope of determining if methane hydrates are destabilizing, and if so, how this destabilization might impact slope stability and ocean/atmosphere carbon budgets. In the past ~5 years, it has become well established that the upper “feather-edge” of methane hydrate stability (intermediate water depths of ~200-500 meters below sea level) represents an important frontier for methane hydrates stability research, as this zone is most susceptible to destabilization due to minor fluctuations in ocean temperature in space and time. The Arctic Ocean—one of the fastest warming regions on Earth—is perhaps the best place to study possible changes to methane hydrate stability due to ocean warming. To address the stability of methane hydrates at intermediate ocean depths, Southern Methodist University in partnership with Oregon State University and The United State Geological Survey at Woods Hole began investigating methane hydrate stability in intermediate water depths below both the US Beaufort Sea and the Atlantic Margin, from 2012-2017. The work was funded by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The key goal of the SMU component of this study was to collect the first ever heat flow data in the Beaufort Sea and compare measured shallow (probe-based1) heat flow values with deeper (BSR-derived2) heat flow values, and from this, determine whether hydrates were in thermal equilibrium. In September 2016, SMU/OSU collected the first ever heat flow measurements in the US Beaufort Sea. Despite poor weather and rough seas, the cruise was a success, with 116 heat flow

  5. Characterization of Crushed Base Materials in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    To improve the pavement design and construction in Wyoming, the Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) is adopting the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG). A full implementation of MEPDG requires the characterization of local cr...

  6. Characterization of asphalt treated base course material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Asphalt-treated bases are often used in new pavements; the materials are available and low-cost, but there is little data on how these materials perform in cold regions. : This study investigated four ATB types (hot asphalt, emulsion, foamed asphalt,...

  7. Characterization study of industrial waste glass as starting material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In present study, an industrial waste glass was characterized and the potential to assess as starting material in development of bioactive materials was investigated. A waste glass collected from the two different glass industry was grounded to fine powder. The samples were characterized using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), ...

  8. Textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels from hydration of synthetic T1-C3S, β-C2S and their blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolado, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of pure T1-C3S, β-C2S and their blends are studied by Nitrogen sorption and nanoindentation experiments. The surface area and nanoporosity of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of β-C2S and the 30-70 (T1-C3S and β-C2S mixture are higher than those from hydration of T1-C3S, and 70-30, with the difference decreasing with hydration age. Such changes are well supported by findings of nanoindentation study, which shows the greater relative volume of C-S-H phases with lower densities in the β-C2S and the 30-70 pastes. With the increase in hydration age, the relative volume of C-S-H phases with higher densities increased at the expenses of those with lower density. Important quantitative correlations were found among these textural characteristics and the mean chain length, determined from 29Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS NMR, of the C-S-H gels.La caracterización textural y mecánica de geles C-S-H formados a partir de la hidratación de muestras puras de T1-C3S, ß-C2S y sus mezclas ha sido estudiada por medio de adsorción de nitrógeno y nanoindentación. El área superficial y la nano-porosidad de los geles formados durante la hidratación del ß-C2S y la mezcla 30-70 (T1-C3S- ß-C2S son mayores que los correspondientes a los geles del T1-C3S, y la mezcla 70-30; esta diferencia disminuye con el tiempo de hidratación. Estos cambios coinciden con los resultados de nanoindentación que indican un aumento de volumen relativo de las fases C-S-H con una densidad menor en el caso del ß-C2S y la mezcla 30-70. Al aumentar el tiempo de hidratación, el volumen relativo de fases C-S-H de mayor densidad aumenta a expensas de aquellas de menor densidad. Importantes correlaciones cuantitativas se establecen entre las características texturales y la longitud de cadena media del gel C-S-H, determinada mediante RMN-MAS de 29Si.

  9. Seismic characterization of hydrates in faulted, fine-grained sediments of Krishna-Godavari basin: Unified imaging

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaiswal, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Zelt, C.A.

    (Clennell et al., 1999). However, in basins affected by structural deformation, local fluid and heat flow, and spatially variable sedimentation, e.g., Gulf of Mexico (Ding et al., 2008) and Krishna-Godavari (Dewangan et al., 2011), the BSR profile may..., northern Gulf of Mexico: Part I. A seismic approach based on geologic model, inversion, and rock physics principles. Marine and Petroleum Geology 25, 830-844. Daigle, H., Dugan, B., 2011. Capillary controls on methane hydrate distribution and fracturing...

  10. Atomic and nano-scale characterization of a 50-year-old hydrated C3S paste

    KAUST Repository

    Geng, Guoqing

    2015-07-15

    This paper investigates the atomic and nano-scale structures of a 50-year-old hydrated alite paste. Imaged by TEM, the outer product C-S-H fibers are composed of particles that are 1.5-2 nm thick and several tens of nanometers long. 29Si NMR shows 47.9% Q1 and 52.1% Q2, with a mean SiO4 tetrahedron chain length (MCL) of 4.18, indicating a limited degree of polymerization after 50 years\\' hydration. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) study was conducted on this late-age paste and a 1.5 year old hydrated C3S solution. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) at Ca L3,2-edge indicates that Ca2 + in C-S-H is in an irregular symmetric coordination, which agrees more with the atomic structure of tobermorite than that of jennite. At Si K-edge, multi-scattering phenomenon is sensitive to the degree of polymerization, which has the potential to unveil the structure of the SiO44 - tetrahedron chain. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Atomic and nano-scale characterization of a 50-year-old hydrated C3S paste

    KAUST Repository

    Geng, Guoqing; Taylor, Rae; Bae, Sungchul; Herná ndez-Cruz, Daniel; Kilcoyne, David A.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Monteiro, Paulo J M

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the atomic and nano-scale structures of a 50-year-old hydrated alite paste. Imaged by TEM, the outer product C-S-H fibers are composed of particles that are 1.5-2 nm thick and several tens of nanometers long. 29Si NMR shows 47.9% Q1 and 52.1% Q2, with a mean SiO4 tetrahedron chain length (MCL) of 4.18, indicating a limited degree of polymerization after 50 years' hydration. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) study was conducted on this late-age paste and a 1.5 year old hydrated C3S solution. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) at Ca L3,2-edge indicates that Ca2 + in C-S-H is in an irregular symmetric coordination, which agrees more with the atomic structure of tobermorite than that of jennite. At Si K-edge, multi-scattering phenomenon is sensitive to the degree of polymerization, which has the potential to unveil the structure of the SiO44 - tetrahedron chain. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Atomic and nano-scale characterization of a 50-year-old hydrated C3S paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Guoqing; Taylor, Rae; Bae, Sungchul; Hernández-Cruz, Daniel; Kilcoyne, David A.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the atomic and nano-scale structures of a 50-year-old hydrated alite paste. Imaged by TEM, the outer product C–S–H fibers are composed of particles that are 1.5–2 nm thick and several tens of nanometers long. 29 Si NMR shows 47.9% Q 1 and 52.1% Q 2 , with a mean SiO 4 tetrahedron chain length (MCL) of 4.18, indicating a limited degree of polymerization after 50 years' hydration. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) study was conducted on this late-age paste and a 1.5 year old hydrated C 3 S solution. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) at Ca L 3,2 -edge indicates that Ca 2+ in C–S–H is in an irregular symmetric coordination, which agrees more with the atomic structure of tobermorite than that of jennite. At Si K-edge, multi-scattering phenomenon is sensitive to the degree of polymerization, which has the potential to unveil the structure of the SiO 4 4− tetrahedron chain.

  13. Materials characterization by resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, H.K.; Joo, Y.S.; Sim, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    A high temperature resonant ultrasound spectroscopy(RUS) was developed. The dynamic elastic constant of RPV weld, which has various different microstructure was determined by RUS. It was confirmed the RUS method is very sensitive to the microstructures of the material. RUS can be used to monitor the degradation of nuclear materials including neutron irradiation embrittlement through the measurement of dynamic elastic constants, elastic anisotropy, high temperature elastic constant and Q-factor

  14. Nanometer scale materials - characterization and fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murday, J.S.; Colton, R.J.; Rath, B.B.

    1993-01-01

    Materials and solid state scientists have made excellent progress in understanding material behavior in length scales from microns to meters. Below a micron, the lack of analytical prowess has been a deterrent. At the atomic scale, chemistry and atomic/molecular physics have also contributed significant understanding of matter. The maturity of these three communities, materials, solid state physics, atomic/molecular physics/chemistry, coupled with the development of analytical capability for nanometer-sized structures, promises to broaden our grasp of materials behavior into the last realm of unexplored size scales-nanometer. The motivation for this effort is driven both by the expectation of novel properties as well as by the potential solution to long standing technological issues. Critical scale lengths for many material properties fall in the nanometer range, examples include superconductor coherence lengths, electron inelastic mean free paths, electron wavelengths in solids, critical lengths for dislocation generation. Structures of nanometer size will undoubtedly show behavior unexpected from experience at the larger and smaller scales. Many technological problems such as adhesion, friction, corrosion, elasticity and fracture are believed to depend critically on nanometer scale phenomena. The millennia-old efforts to improve materials behavior have undoubtedly been slowed by our inability to 'observe' in this size range. (orig.)

  15. Accelerated hydration of high silica cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Colin; Yui, Mikazu

    2012-01-01

    Current Japanese designs for high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories anticipate the use of both bentonite (buffer and backfill material) and cement based materials. Using hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as a grouting material is undesirable because the associated high pH buffer will have an undisputed detrimental effect on the performance of the bentonite buffer and backfill and of the host rock by changing its porosity. Instead, hydrated low pH cement (LopHC) grouting materials are being developed to provide a pH inferior or equal to 11 to reduce these detrimental effects. LopHC grouting materials use mixtures of superfine OPC (SOPC) clinker and silica fume (SF), and are referred as high silica cements (HSC). The focus of the present study was to identify the development of the unhydrated and hydrated mineral assemblage and the solution chemistry during the hydration of HSC. Since hydration experiments of cementitious materials are notably slow, a ball mill was used to accelerate hydration. This was done for two reasons. Firstly, to develop a method to rapidly hydrate cement based materials without the need for higher temperatures (which can alter the mineral assemblage), and secondly, to ensure that the end point of hydration was reached in a reasonable time frame and so to realize the final mineralogy and solution chemistry of hydrated HSC

  16. Characterization of plutonium-containing materials and storage canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Throughout the weapons complex, plutonium materials are stored in various containers. Some plutonium has been stored for 20 yr or more. The physical and chemical properties of the plutonium material and the containers that hold it are often not well characterized. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 3013 standard sets criteria to which stored material must conform. The 3013 standard regulates materials that hold 50% or greater plutonium, and the other 50% is not specified and is usually unknown. The Materials Identification and Surveillance project is tasked to characterize representative materials and begin to characterize the other 50% and to show that materials can be brought into 3013 criteria conformance through thermal treatments

  17. Coupled numerical modeling of gas hydrates bearing sediments from laboratory to field-scale conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, M. J.; Santamarina, C.; Gai, X., Sr.; Teymouri, M., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    Stability and behavior of Hydrate Bearing Sediments (HBS) are characterized by the metastable character of the gas hydrate structure which strongly depends on thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical (THCM) actions. Hydrate formation, dissociation and methane production from hydrate bearing sediments are coupled THCM processes that involve, amongst other, exothermic formation and endothermic dissociation of hydrate and ice phases, mixed fluid flow and large changes in fluid pressure. The analysis of available data from past field and laboratory experiments, and the optimization of future field production studies require a formal and robust numerical framework able to capture the very complex behavior of this type of soil. A comprehensive fully coupled THCM formulation has been developed and implemented into a finite element code to tackle problems involving gas hydrates sediments. Special attention is paid to the geomechanical behavior of HBS, and particularly to their response upon hydrate dissociation under loading. The numerical framework has been validated against recent experiments conducted under controlled conditions in the laboratory that challenge the proposed approach and highlight the complex interaction among THCM processes in HBS. The performance of the models in these case studies is highly satisfactory. Finally, the numerical code is applied to analyze the behavior of gas hydrate soils under field-scale conditions exploring different features of material behavior under possible reservoir conditions.

  18. Modeling the influence of limestone addition on cement hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ragab Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the influence of using Portland limestone cement “PLC” on cement hydration by characterization of its microstructure development. The European Standard EN 197-1:2011 and Egyptian specification ESS 4756-1/2009 permit the cement to contain up to 20% ground limestone. The computational tools assist in better understanding the influence of limestone additions on cement hydration and microstructure development to facilitate the acceptance of these more economical and ecological materials. μic model has been developed to enable the modeling of microstructural evolution of cementitious materials. In this research μic model is used to simulate both the influence of limestone as fine filler, providing additional surfaces for the nucleation and growth of hydration products. Limestone powder also reacts relatively slow with hydrating cement to form monocarboaluminate (AFmc phase, similar to the mono-sulfoaluminate (AFm phase formed in ordinary Portland cement. The model results reveal that limestone cement has accelerated cement hydration rate, previous experimental results and computer model “cemhyd3d” are used to validate this model.

  19. Characterization of terahertz waves on foreign materials of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Sun-Kyu; Chiou, Chien-Ping; Jung, Jong-An

    2018-04-01

    Carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are widely utilized due to their comparatively high performance in engineering structures. It is well understood that a nondestructive technique would be very beneficial. A new terahertz radiation has been recognized for its importance in technological applications. Recently, T-ray (terahertz ray) advances in technology and instrumentation have provided a probing field on the electromagnetic spectrum. In carbon composites, the penetration characterization of T-ray waves was fundamentally investigated in order to measure the painting thickness. Also, another study dealt with THz scan images of honeycomb sandwich composite panels using a refractive index (n), an absorption coefficient (α), the electrical conductivity of glass fiber embedded epoxy matrix composites, and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) skin. For experiments, a method of detecting FRP composites with impact damage is presented, which utilizes aluminum wires intertwined with woven carbon fibers as they are inserted into the surface of the CFRP honeycomb sandwich panels. Intensive characterization of T-ray for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of carbon composite reinforced plastics (CFRP) composites is discussed in relation to the E-field influence with CFRP composite laminates.

  20. Characterization of integrated circuit packaging materials

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    Chapters in this volume address important characteristics of IC packages. Analytical techniques appropriate for IC package characterization are demonstrated through examples of the measurement of critical performance parameters and the analysis of key technological problems of IC packages. Issues are discussed which affect a variety of package types, including plastic surface-mount packages, hermetic packages, and advanced designs such as flip-chip, chip-on-board and multi-chip models.

  1. Material characterization of ancient Indian copper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    features of this culture are a variety of ceramics, beads of semi-precious stones ... iron technology and possessed a different material cul- ture. The reoccupation of the ... was of square cross-section at one end, tapering down to a smaller flatter ...

  2. Neutron source characterization for materials experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented from HFIR-CTR32, EBRII-X287, and the Omega West Reactor. An important new source of damage in nickel arises from the 340 keV 56 Fe recoil from the 59 Ni(n,α) reaction used to produce high helium levels in materials irradiations in a thermal spectrum. The status of all other experiments is summarized

  3. Production and Characterization of Novel Photovoltaic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Marvin [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-07

    This project has three major objectives: exploring the potential nanostructured materials in photovoltaic applications; providing photovoltaic research experiences to NCCU students, who are largely members of underrepresented minority groups; and enhancing the photovoltaic research infrastructure at NCCU to increase faculty and student competitiveness. Significant progress was achieved in each of these areas during the project period, as summarized in this report.

  4. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seungmin; Mondal, Paramita

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage

  5. Characterization of Redox properties of humic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of humic materials is the presence of stable free radicals as shown by the width of 1 H-NMR lines of humic acid in solution as well as ESR spectra of solid samples. Presumably, these are due to quinohdrone functional groups in the humic structure. These free radicals are assumed to be a source of the redox effects of humics in metal cations. Phenolic groups have also been proposed as a source of reduction potential in these substances. The reduction potential of humic material is 0.5-0.7 V (vs. the normal hydrogen electrode). In addition to this inherent redox property, humics undergo photolysis by sunlight in surface waters which results in the production of hydrogen peroxide. The latter can also result in redox reactions with metal cations. Such direct and indirect redox capability can have significant effects on the migration of reducible cations. Studies of the reduction of hexavalent actinide cations by humic acid showed the reactions Np O 2 2+ -> Np O 2 + (E 1/2 0 = 1.47 V) and Pu O 2 2+ -> Pu +4 (E 1/2 0 = 1.04 V) while U O 2 2+ was not reduced. The reduction of plutonium in sea water by humics is discussed. Evidence of the effects of redox by humic material on metal cations in natural waters and sediments are also reviewed. (authors). 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Characterization of materials for waste-canister compatibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, H.E.; Mack, J.E.

    1981-10-01

    Sample materials of 7 waste forms and 15 potential canister materials were procured for compatibility tests. These materials were characterized before being placed in test, and the results are the main topic of this report. A test capsule was designed for the tests in which disks of a single waste form were contacted with duplicate samples of canister materials. The capsules are undergoing short-term tests at 800 0 C and long-term tests at 100 and 300 0 C

  7. [Skin hydration and hydrating products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplan, H; Nocera, T

    2018-05-01

    One of the skin's principal functions is to protect the body against its environment by maintaining an effective epidermal barrier, not only against external factors, but also to prevent water loss from the body. Indeed, water homeostasis is vital for the normal physiological functioning of skin. Hydration levels affect not only visible microscopic parameters such as the suppleness and softness of skin, but also molecular parameters, enzyme activities and cellular signalling within the epidermis. The body is continually losing some of its water, but this phenomenon is limited and the optimal hydration gradient in skin is ensured via a set of sophisticated regulatory processes that rely on the functional and dynamic properties of the uppermost level of the skin consisting of the stratum corneum. The present article brings together data recently acquired in the fields of skin hydration and the characterisation of dehydrated or dry skin, whether through study of the regulatory processes involved or as a result of changes in the techniques used for in situ measurement, and thus in optimisation of management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  9. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D., E-mail: alejandro.rey@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal H3A 0C5 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  10. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  11. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  12. Mechanical characterization of materials for dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, A.; Miranda, P.; Guiberteau, F.; Cumbrera, F. I.

    2001-01-01

    An study of the damage induced in dental materials and model multilayer systems by masticatory contact stresses, simulated by hertz ian indentation test, have been performed. In particular, the nature of induced damage has been identified, and quantified from stress-strain curves and critical loads for yielding or crack initiation. For multilayer systems, test have been numerically simulated using finite element techniques (FEM). FEM simulations complement indentation test, allowing to justify the observed fracture modes from calculated stress fields. Practical implications can be derived from our results, relevant to the design of multilayer structures tolerant to contact damage. (Author) 34 refs

  13. Processing and Characterization of Lightweight Syntactic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    calculated dynamic mechanical properties are presented in Table 2. The modulus data should be treated with caution in SHPB testing. Figure 39 shows 0 50 100...material. Figure 62 (right) shows the steel bullet- shaped target of 7.62-mm diameter and 31.78-mm length held in the center of the gun axis by a 6-mm...Proving Ground , MD 21005-5069 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ARL-TR-7857 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10

  14. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  15. Neutron reflectometry for interfacial materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Eric K.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Kolb, Rainer; Wu Wenli; Satija, Sushil K.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry provides a powerful non-destructive analytic technique to measure physical properties of interfacial materials. The sample reflectivity provides information about composition, thickness, and roughness of films with 0.1 nm resolution. The use of neutrons has the additional advantage of being able to label selected atomic species by using different isotopes. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the use of neutron reflectometry in measuring the thermal expansion of a buried thin polymer film and measuring the change in polymer mobility near a solid substrate

  16. Characterization of the Bonds Developed between Calcium Silicate Hydrate and Polycarboxylate-Based Superplasticizers with Silyl Functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Carlos A; Chun, Byong W; Geng, Guoqing; Emwas, Abdul H; Monteiro, Paulo J M

    2017-04-11

    Major developments in concrete technology have been achieved with the use of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers (PCEs) to improve the concrete rheology without increasing the mix water content. Currently, it is possible to control the fluidity of the fresh concrete and obtain stronger and more durable structures. Therefore, there is a strong incentive to understand the interactions between PCEs and cement hydrates at the atomic scale to design new customized functional PCEs according to the ever-increasing requirements of the concrete industry. Here, the bonding types generated between a PCE with silyl functionalities (PCE-Sil) and a synthetic calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) are analyzed using XRD, 29 Si NMR spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based techniques, such as NEXAFS and EXAFS. The results indicated that the carboxylic groups present in PCE-Sil interact by a ligand-type bond with calcium, which modified not only the symmetry and coordination number of the calcium located at the surface of C-S-H but also the neighboring silicon atoms of the C-S-H. In addition, the silyl functionalities of the PCE-Sil generated covalent bonds through siloxane bridges between the silanol groups of PCE-Sil and the nonbonding oxygen located at the dimeric sites in C-S-H, forming new bridging silicon sites and subsequently increasing the silicate polymerization.

  17. Characterization of the Bonds Developed between Calcium Silicate Hydrate and Polycarboxylate-Based Superplasticizers with Silyl Functionalities

    KAUST Repository

    Orozco, Carlos A.; Chun, Byong W.; Geng, Guoqing; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Major developments in concrete technology have been achieved with the use of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers (PCEs) to improve the concrete rheology without increasing the mix water content. Currently, it is possible to control the fluidity of the fresh concrete and obtain stronger and more durable structures. Therefore, there is a strong incentive to understand the interactions between PCEs and cement hydrates at the atomic scale to design new customized functional PCEs according to the ever-increasing requirements of the concrete industry. Here, the bonding types generated between a PCE with silyl functionalities (PCE-Sil) and a synthetic calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) are analyzed using XRD, 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based techniques, such as NEXAFS and EXAFS. The results indicated that the carboxylic groups present in PCE-Sil interact by a ligand-type bond with calcium, which modified not only the symmetry and coordination number of the calcium located at the surface of C-S-H but also the neighboring silicon atoms of the C-S-H. In addition, the silyl functionalities of the PCE-Sil generated covalent bonds through siloxane bridges between the silanol groups of PCE-Sil and the nonbonding oxygen located at the dimeric sites in C-S-H, forming new bridging silicon sites and subsequently increasing the silicate polymerization.

  18. Characterization of the Bonds Developed between Calcium Silicate Hydrate and Polycarboxylate-Based Superplasticizers with Silyl Functionalities

    KAUST Repository

    Orozco, Carlos A.

    2017-03-24

    Major developments in concrete technology have been achieved with the use of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers (PCEs) to improve the concrete rheology without increasing the mix water content. Currently, it is possible to control the fluidity of the fresh concrete and obtain stronger and more durable structures. Therefore, there is a strong incentive to understand the interactions between PCEs and cement hydrates at the atomic scale to design new customized functional PCEs according to the ever-increasing requirements of the concrete industry. Here, the bonding types generated between a PCE with silyl functionalities (PCE-Sil) and a synthetic calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) are analyzed using XRD, 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based techniques, such as NEXAFS and EXAFS. The results indicated that the carboxylic groups present in PCE-Sil interact by a ligand-type bond with calcium, which modified not only the symmetry and coordination number of the calcium located at the surface of C-S-H but also the neighboring silicon atoms of the C-S-H. In addition, the silyl functionalities of the PCE-Sil generated covalent bonds through siloxane bridges between the silanol groups of PCE-Sil and the nonbonding oxygen located at the dimeric sites in C-S-H, forming new bridging silicon sites and subsequently increasing the silicate polymerization.

  19. A green-LED driven source of hydrated electrons characterized from microseconds to hours and applied to cross couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Robert; Goez, Martin

    2018-03-12

    We present a novel photoredox catalytic system that delivers synthetically useable concentrations of hydrated electrons when illuminated with a green light-emitting diode (LED). The catalyst is a ruthenium complex protected by an anionic micelle, and the urate dianion serves as sacrificial donor confined to the aqueous bulk. Through its chemical properties, that donor not only suppresses charge recombination that would limit the electron yield but also enables this system to perform cross couplings via hydrated electrons, for which we report the first examples. We have investigated the kinetics of all the steps involving the electron and its direct precursor in a comparative study by using laser flash photolysis and by monitoring product formation during LED photolysis. Despite the differences in timescales, each approach on its own already gives a complete picture of the reaction over a temporal range ten orders of magnitude wide. Noticeable discrepancies between the kinetic parameters obtained with the two complementary techniques can be rationalized with the slow secondary chemistry of the system; they reveal that the product-based method provides a more accurate description because it responds also to the changes of the system composition during a synthesis; hence, they demonstrate that in complex systems the timescale of the experimental observation should be matched to that of the actual application. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Characterization of elasticity and hydration of composite hydrogel based on collagen-iota carrageenan as a corneal tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinawati, M.; Triastuti, J.; Pursetyo, K. T.

    2018-04-01

    The cornea is a refractive element of the eye that serves to continue the stimulation of light into the eye it has a clear, transparent, elastic and relatively thick tissue. Factors caused corneal blindness, are dystrophy, keratoconus, corneal scaring. Hydrogels can be made from polysaccharide derivatives that have gelation properties such as iota carrageenan. Therefore, it is a need to develop composite hydrogel based collagen-iota carragenan as an engineeried corneal tissue with high elasticity and hydration properties. Collagen hydrogel has a maximum water content an has equlibrium up to 40 %, less than the human cornea, 81 % and under normal hydration conditions, the human cornea can transmit 87 % of visible light. In addition, the refractive index on the surface of the cornea with air is 1.375-1.380. Based on this study, it is necessary to conduct research on the development and composition of hydrogel composite collagen-iota carrageen hydrogen based on. The best result was K5 (5:5) treatment, which has the equilibrium water content of 87.07 % and viscosity of 10.7346 Pa.s.

  1. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Rack

    2005-06-30

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were to refine budgets and operational plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the scheduling of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution. The proposed statement of work for Phase 2 will include three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd., who will work with Fugro and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to accomplish some of the subtasks; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). More details about these tasks are provided in the following sections of this report. The appendices to this report contain a copy of the scientific prospectus for the upcoming IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Hydrates), which provides details of operational and scientific planning for this expedition.

  2. Crystallographic characterization of cement pastes hydrated with NaCl; Caracterizacao cristalografica de pastas de cimento hidratadas com NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Carina Gabriela de Melo e; Martinelli, Antonio Eduardo; Melo, Dulce Maria Araujo; Melo, Marcus Antonio de Freitas; Melo, Vitor Rodrigo de Melo e [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    One of the major current challenges faced by oil companies is the exploration of pre salt basins. Salt layers deposited upon the evaporation of ocean water and continental separation are mainly formed by NaCl and isolate immense oil reservoirs. The mechanical stability and zonal isolation of oil wells that run through salt layers must be fulfilled by cement sheaths saturated with NaCl to assure chemical compatibility between cement and salt layer. The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of NaCl addition on the hydration of oil well cement slurries as well as identifying the nature of crystalline phases present in the hardened cement. To that end, cement slurries containing NaCl were mixed, hardened and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The results revealed that the presence of NaCl affects the formation of hydration products by the presence of Friedel's salt. The intensity of the corresponding peaks increase as the contents of NaCl in the slurry increase. High concentrations of NaCl in Portland slurries increase the setting time of cement and the presence of Friedel's salt decreases the strength of the hardened cement. (author)

  3. Prednisone raw material characterization and formulation development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Henrique Toehwé

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Solid dosage forms for oral use, particularly tablets, are the most highly used dosage forms in therapy because they are easily administered, have high productivity and relatively low cost and provide a more stable drug to form a semi-solid net. Numerous parameters influence the quality of the final dosage form. In this study, the dissolution profile of 20-mg prednisone tablets bioequivalent to the reference product and three test formulations were evaluated using stability testing. During the study, prednisone tablets and the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API prednisone from two different manufacturers were characterized with respect to their physical and physicochemical properties. The results showed that the dissolution profiles of the test batches and the reference product did not retain pharmaceutical equivalence throughout all the stability study. Notably, both samples of API prednisone were of the same crystal form, and any phase transition that occurred during the study could not be attributed to dissolution variation during stability.

  4. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  5. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  6. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  7. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  8. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  9. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  10. Ultrasonic Characterization of Superhard Material: Osmium Diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadawa, P K

    2012-01-01

    Higher order elastic constants have been calculated in hexagonal structured superhard material OsB 2 at room temperature following the interaction potential model. The temperature variation of the ultrasonic velocities is evaluated along different angles with unique axis of the crystal using the second order elastic constants. The ultrasonic velocity decreases with the temperature along particular orientation with the unique axis. Temperature variation of the thermal relaxation time and Debye average velocities are also calculated along the same orientation. The temperature dependency of the ultrasonic properties is discussed in correlation with elastic, thermal and electrical properties. It has been found that the thermal conductivity is the main contributor to the behaviour of ultrasonic attenuation as a function of temperature and the responsible cause of attenuation is phonon-phonon interaction. The mechanical properties of OsB 2 at low temperature are better than at high temperature, because at low temperature it has low ultrasonic velocity and ultrasonic attenuation. Superhard material OsB 2 has many industrial applications, such as abrasives, cutting tools and hard coatings.

  11. Advanced Research Projects Agency on Materials Preparation and Characterization Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briefly summarized is research concerned with such topics as: Preparation of silica glass from amorphous silica; Glass structure by Raman ...ferroelectrics; Silver iodide crystals; Vapor phase growth; Refractory optical host materials; Hydroxyapatite ; Calcite; Characterization of single crystals with a double crystal spectrometer; Characterization of residual strain.

  12. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monica Sorescu

    2004-09-22

    The work described in this grant report was focused mainly on the properties of novel magnetic intermetallics. In the first project, we synthesized several 2:17 intermetallic compounds, namely Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Si{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Al{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiAl and Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiMn, as well as several 1:12 intermetallic compounds, such as NdFe{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}Al{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}SiAl and NdFe{sub 10}MnAl. In the second project, seven compositions of Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 100-x-y}B{sub y} ribbons were prepared by a melt spinning method with Nd and B content increasing from 7.3 and 3.6 to 11 and 6, respectively. The alloys were annealed under optimized conditions to obtain a composite material consisting of the hard magnetic Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and soft magnetic {alpha}-Fe phases, typical of a spring magnet structure. In the third project, intermetallic compounds of the type Zr{sub 1}Cr{sub 1}Fe{sub 1}T{sub 0.8} with T = Al, Co and Fe were subjected to hydrogenation. In the fourth project, we performed three crucial experiments. In the first experiment, we subjected a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation by high-energy ball milling, for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 14 hours. In the second experiment, we ball-milled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}:Co{sup 2+} (x = 0.1) for time intervals between 2.5 and 17.5 hours. Finally, we exposed a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Co (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 10 hours. In all cases, the structural and magnetic properties of the systems involved were elucidated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy and hysteresis loop measurements. The four projects resulted in four papers, which were published in Intermetallics, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Journal of Materials Science Letters and Materials Chemistry and Physics. The contributions reveal for the first time in literature the effect of

  13. Chemical characterization of nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    India is fabricating nuclear fuels for various types of reactors, for example, (U-Pu) MOX fuel of varying Pu content for boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), prototype fast breeder reactors (PFBRs), (U-Pu) carbide fuel fast breeder test reactor (FBTR), and U-based fuels for research reactors. Nuclear fuel being the heart of the reactor, its chemical and physical characterisation is an important component of this design. Both the fuel materials and finished fuel products are to be characterised for this purpose. Quality control (both chemical and physical) provides a means to ensure that the quality of the fabricated fuel conforms to the specifications for the fuel laid down by the fuel designer. Chemical specifications are worked out for the major and minor constituents which affect the fuel properties and hence its performance under conditions prevailing in an operating reactor. Each fuel batch has to be subjected to comprehensive chemical quality control for trace constituents, stoichiometry and isotopic composition. A number of advanced process and quality control steps are required to ensure the quality of the fuels. Further more, in the case of Pu-based fuels, it is necessary to extract maximum quality data by employing different evaluation techniques which would result in minimum scrap/waste generation of valuable plutonium. The task of quality control during fabrication of nuclear fuels of various types is both challenging and difficult. The underlying philosophy is total quality control of the fuel by proper mix of process and quality control steps at various stages of fuel manufacture starting from the feed materials. It is also desirable to adapt more than one analytical technique to increase the confidence and reliability of the quality data generated. This is all the most required when certified reference materials are not available. In addition, the adaptation of non-destructive techniques in the chemical quality

  14. Growth and characterization of bulk superconductor material

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Dapeng; Maljuk, Andrey; Zhou, Fang

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on recently developed crystal growth techniques to grow large and high quality superconducting single crystals. The techniques applied are traveling solvent floating zone (TSFZ) with infrared image furnace, Bridgeman, solution/flux and top seeded solution growth (TSSG) methods. The materials range from cuprates, cobaltates to pnictides including La2CuO4-based (LCO), YBa2Cu3O7-d (YBCO), Bi2Sr2Can−1CunO2n+4+δ (n=1,2,3) (BSCCO) to NaxCoO2. The modified Bridgman “cold finger” method is devoted to the pnictide system with the best quality (transition width DTc~0.5 K) with highest Tc~38.5 K of Ba0.68K0.32Fe2A2. The book presents various iron-based superconductors with different structures, such as 1111, 122, 111, 11 and 42622,10-3-8. Detailed single crystal growth methods (fluxes, Bridgman, floating zone), the associated procedures and their impact to crystal size and quality are presented. The book also describes the influence of doping on the structure and the electric, magnetic, and supe...

  15. Application of empirical hydration distribution functions around polar atoms for assessing hydration structures of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Daisuke; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Empirical distribution functions of water molecules in protein hydration are made. ► The functions measure how hydrogen-bond geometry in hydration deviate from ideal. ► The functions assess experimentally identified hydration structures of protein. - Abstract: To quantitatively characterize hydrogen-bond geometry in local hydration structures of proteins, we constructed a set of empirical hydration distribution functions (EHDFs) around polar protein atoms in the main and side chains of 11 types of hydrophilic amino acids (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 113 (2009) 11274). The functions are the ensemble average of possible hydration patterns around the polar atoms, and describe the anisotropic deviations from ideal hydrogen bond geometry. In addition, we defined probability distribution function of hydration water molecules (PDFH) over the hydrophilic surface of a protein as the sum of EHDFs of solvent accessible polar protein atoms. The functions envelop most of hydration sites identified in crystal structures of proteins (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 114 (2010) 4652). Here we propose the application of EHDFs and PDFHs for assessing crystallographically identified hydration structures of proteins. First, hydration water molecules are classified with respect to the geometry in hydrogen bonds in referring EHDFs. Difference Fourier electron density map weighted by PDFH of protein is proposed to identify easily density peaks as candidates of hydration water molecules. A computer program implementing those ideas was developed and used for assessing hydration structures of proteins

  16. X-ray characterization of solid small molecule organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinge, Simon; Shankland, Kenneth; Shankland, Norman; Florence, Alastair

    2014-06-10

    The present invention provides, inter alia, methods of characterizing a small molecule organic material, e.g., a drug or a drug product. This method includes subjecting the solid small molecule organic material to x-ray total scattering analysis at a short wavelength, collecting data generated thereby, and mathematically transforming the data to provide a refined set of data.

  17. Determining the mechanism and parameters of hydrate formation and loss in glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Sarah K; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2014-11-01

    Water-solid interactions are known to play a major role in the chemical and physical stability of food materials. Despite its extensive use throughout the food industry, the mechanism and parameters of hydrate formation and loss in glucose are not well characterized. Hydrate formation in alpha-anhydrous glucose (α-AG) and hydrate loss in glucose monohydrate (GM) were studied under equilibrium conditions at various relative humidity (RH) values using saturated salt slurries for 1 y. The mechanism of hydrate formation and hydrate loss were determined through mathematical modeling of Dynamic Vapor Sorption data and Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the mechanisms. The critical temperature for hydrate loss in GM was determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The moisture sorption profiles of α-AG and GM were also studied under dynamic conditions using an AquaSorp Isotherm Generator. Hydrate formation was observed at and above 68% RH at 25 °C and the conversion of α-AG to GM can best be described as following a nucleation mechanism, however, diffusion and/or geometric contraction mechanisms were also observed by Raman spectroscopy subsequent to the coalescence of initial nucleation sites. Hydrate loss was observed to occur at and below 11% RH at 25 °C during RH storage and at 70 °C during TGA. The conversion of GM to α-AG follows nucleation and diffusion mechanisms. Hydrate formation was evident under dynamic conditions in α-AG and GM prior to deliquescence. This research is the first to report hydrate formation and loss parameters for crystalline α-AG and GM during extended storage at 25 ˚C. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Characterization of Structure and Damage in Materials in Four Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, I. M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Schuh, C. A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Vetrano, J. S. [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Browning, N. D. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Field, D. P. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Jensen, D. J. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Miller, M. K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baker, I. [Darmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Dunand, D. C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dunin-Borkowski, R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Kabius, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kelly, T. [Cameca Instruments Corp., Madison, WI (United States); Lozano-Perez, S. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Misra, A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rohrer, G. S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rollett, A. D. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Taheri, M. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Thompson, G. B. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Uchic, M. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Wang, X. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Was, G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-09-30

    The materials characterization toolbox has recently experienced a number of parallel revolutionary advances, foreshadowing a time in the near future when materials scientists can quantify material structure across orders of magnitude in length and time scales (i.e., in four dimensions) completely. This paper presents a viewpoint on the materials characterization field, reviewing its recent past, evaluating its present capabilities, and proposing directions for its future development. Electron microscopy; atom-probe tomography; X-ray, neutron and electron tomography; serial sectioning tomography; and diffraction-based analysis methods are reviewed, and opportunities for their future development are highlighted. Particular attention is paid to studies that have pioneered the synergetic use of multiple techniques to provide complementary views of a single structure or process; several of these studies represent the state-of-the-art in characterization, and suggest a trajectory for the continued development of the field. Based on this review, a set of grand challenges for characterization science is identified, including suggestions for instrumentation advances, scientific problems in microstructure analysis, and complex structure evolution problems involving materials damage. The future of microstructural characterization is proposed to be one not only where individual techniques are pushed to their limits, but where the community devises strategies of technique synergy to address complex multiscale problems in materials science and engineering.

  19. Using Virtual Testing for Characterization of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph

    Composite materials are finally providing uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems applications -- airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. They have high strength-to-weight ratios, are durable and resistant to environmental effects, have high impact strength, and can be manufactured in a variety of shapes. Generalized constitutive models are being developed to accurately model composite systems so they can be used in implicit and explicit finite element analysis. These models require extensive characterization of the composite material as input. The particular constitutive model of interest for this research is a three-dimensional orthotropic elasto-plastic composite material model that requires a total of 12 experimental stress-strain curves, yield stresses, and Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio in the material directions as input. Sometimes it is not possible to carry out reliable experimental tests needed to characterize the composite material. One solution is using virtual testing to fill the gaps in available experimental data. A Virtual Testing Software System (VTSS) has been developed to address the need for a less restrictive method to characterize a three-dimensional orthotropic composite material. The system takes in the material properties of the constituents and completes all 12 of the necessary characterization tests using finite element (FE) models. Verification and validation test cases demonstrate the capabilities of the VTSS.

  20. Hydration dependent dynamics in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Greg L.; Bardaro, Michael F.; Echodu, Dorothy C.; Drobny, Gary P.; Varani, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    The essential role played by local and collective motions in RNA function has led to a growing interest in the characterization of RNA dynamics. Recent investigations have revealed that even relatively simple RNAs experience complex motions over multiple time scales covering the entire ms-ps motional range. In this work, we use deuterium solid-state NMR to systematically investigate motions in HIV-1 TAR RNA as a function of hydration. We probe dynamics at three uridine residues in different structural environments ranging from helical to completely unrestrained. We observe distinct and substantial changes in 2 H solid-state relaxation times and lineshapes at each site as hydration levels increase. By comparing solid-state and solution state 13 C relaxation measurements, we establish that ns-μs motions that may be indicative of collective dynamics suddenly arise in the RNA as hydration reaches a critical point coincident with the onset of bulk hydration. Beyond that point, we observe smaller changes in relaxation rates and lineshapes in these highly hydrated solid samples, compared to the dramatic activation of motion occurring at moderate hydration

  1. Characterization of phase change materials for thermal control of photovoltaics using Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Temperature History Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, A.; McCormack, S.J.; Huang, M.J.; Norton, B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Five PCM are characterized using tow techniques for PV temperature regulation. • Thermophysical properties of interest are determined and compared with literature. • Determined PCM properties are discussed as criteria for PV temperature regulation. • One PCM identified as potential candidate for PV temperature regulation. - Abstract: Five solid–liquid phase change materials comprising three basic classes, paraffin waxes, salt hydrates and mixtures of fatty acids were thermophysically characterized for thermal regulation applications in photovoltaics. The PCM were investigated using Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Temperature History Method to find their thermophysical properties of interest. The relationship between thermophysical properties of the PCM and their choice as temperature regulators in photovoltaics is discussed in relation to the ambient conditions under which PV systems operate

  2. Proceedings of national workshop on advanced methods for materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    During the past two decades there had been tremendous growth in the field of material science and a variety of new materials with user specific properties have been developed such as smart shape memory alloys, hybrid materials like glass-ceramics, cermets, met-glasses, inorganic- organic composite layered structures, mixed oxides with negative thermal expansion, functional polymer materials etc. Study of nano-particles and the materials assembled from such particles is another area of active research being pursued all over the world. Preparation and characterization of nano-sized materials is a challenge because of their dimensions and size dependent properties. This has led to the emergence of a variety of advanced techniques, which need to be brought to the attention of the researchers working in the field of material science which requires the expertise of physics, chemistry and process engineering. This volume deals with above aspects and papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Dehydration behaviour of hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dette, S.S.; Stelzer, T.; Jones, M.J.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaften, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Immersing a crystalline solvate in a suitable anti-solvent can induce phase transformation to solvent-free solid phase. In certain cases the solvent-mediated phase transition results in the generation of hollow, tubular structures. Both the tube dimensions of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate anhydrate (skga) and the dehydration kinetics of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate monohydrate (skgm) can be modified by the antisolvent employed. An explanation for the variable dehydration behaviour of skgm in the antisolvents is presented here. Furthermore, other crystalline hydrates were dehydrated in dry methanol. Providing an operational window can be found, any hydrate material could possibly find use in the production of tubes (micro- or nanotubes for different applications). The experimental conditions selected (dry methanol as antisolvent, dehydration temperature at 25 C) for the dehydration did not lead to the anhydrate tube growth for all hydrates investigated. Based upon the results presented here a first hypothesis is presented to explain this effect. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Survey of Swedish buffer material candidates and methods for characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlstroem, M.; Pusch, R.

    1987-12-01

    The study has given a good overview of potential clay buffer candidates in the part of Sweden that offers the best possibilities to find large accessible quantities of smectitic materials. The most promising Scanian materials are those in the Kaageroed and Vallaakra (Margreteberg) areas since they represent the most smectitic ones, which may serve as raw material for the production of canister embedment. The moraine clays in the Lund-Landskrona region seem to be useful for backfilling purposes. A refined version of Reynolds technique is suggested as an SKB standard for prospecting and characterization of buffer materials. (orig./DG)

  5. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  6. Non-invasive characterization of real-time bladder sensation using accelerated hydration and a novel sensation meter: An initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Anna S; Speich, John E; De Wachter, Stefan G; Ghamarian, Peter P; Le, David M; Colhoun, Andrew F; Ratz, Paul H; Barbee, Robert W; Klausner, Adam P

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop a non-invasive, objective, and unprompted method to characterize real-time bladder sensation. Volunteers with and without overactive bladder (OAB) were prospectively enrolled in a preliminary accelerated hydration study. Participants drank 2L Gatorade-G2® and recorded real-time sensation (0-100% scale) and standardized verbal sensory thresholds using a novel, touch-screen "sensation meter." 3D bladder ultrasound images were recorded throughout fillings for a subset of participants. Sensation data were recorded for two consecutive complete fill-void cycles. Data from 14 normal and 12 OAB participants were obtained (ICIq-OAB-5a = 0 vs. ≥3). Filling duration decreased in fill2 compared to fill1, but volume did not significantly change. In normals, adjacent verbal sensory thresholds (within fill) showed no overlap, and identical thresholds (between fill) were similar, demonstrating effective differentiation between degrees of %bladder capacity. In OAB, within-fill overlaps and between-fill differences were identified. Real-time %capacity-sensation curves left shifted from fill1 to fill2 in normals, consistent with expected viscoelastic behavior, but unexpectedly right shifted in OAB. 3D ultrasound volume data showed that fill rates started slowly and ramped up with variable end points. This study establishes a non-invasive means to evaluate real-time bladder sensation using a two-fill accelerated hydration protocol and a sensation meter. Verbal thresholds were inconsistent in OAB, and the right shift in OAB %capacity-sensation curve suggests potential biomechanical and/or sensitization changes. This methodology could be used to gain valuable information on different forms of OAB in a completely non-invasive way. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  8. Preparation and characterization of hybrid materials from natural chrysotile; Preparacao e caracterizacao de materiais hibridos a partir da crisotila natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldelli, M.G.; Silva, M.L.C.P., E-mail: marciogiraldelli@hotmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2010-07-01

    Special attention has been given to the development of new materials from natural chrysotile. This fiber has about 40% silicon oxide in its structure with an outer layer of brucite (MgOH{sub 2}). With the aim of obtaining a material with a more uniform structure, acid leaching was performed to remove the outer layer of brucite, resulting in a silicon oxide hydrate. This material was used as support for the deposition of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}.nH{sub 2}O. The Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}.nH{sub 2}O was prepared by conventional precipitation using as starting material niobium metallic. In this study, we performed the synthesis and characterization of the material SiO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O / Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}.nH{sub 2}O 1:1. Both chrysotile as niobium are widely available national resources, which confirms the economic viability of resource use. The materials studied were characterized by XRD, SEM and TG/DTG. (author)

  9. Technically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials; identification, characterization and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, H.F.

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive materials (TENORM) is produced in a relatively large amount with relatively small radioactivity, however in many instances the radioactivity levels exceeds that permissible. In this presentation, the different industries where enhanced levels of natural radioactivity is identified and characterized will be given. The different approaches for treatment of this enhanced radioactivity will be addressed. Finally, our research and development activities in characterization and treatment of TENORM produced from the oil fields in Egypt will be presented. (authors)

  10. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    . For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems......The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually...

  11. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  12. Materials Characterization and Microelectronic Implementation of Metal-insulator Transition Materials and Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    materials like crystalline semiconductors, graphene , and composites, the materials discussed here could have a significant impact. This thesis investigates...diagnosis [124], crystallinity of pharmaceutical materials [125], materials diagnosis for restoration of paintings [126], and materials research [127...temperature dots and paint were placed on samples on the substrate. Temperature dots are typically used in the transportation of goods such as food in order

  13. Microstructural characterization of radiation effects in nuclear materials

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Microstructural Characterization of Radiation Effects in Nuclear Materials provides an overview into experimental techniques that can be used to examine those effects (both neutron and charged particle) and can be used by researchers, technicians or students as a tool to introduce them to the various techniques. The need to examine the effect of radiation on materials is becoming increasingly important as nuclear energy is emerging as a growing source of renewable energy. The book opens with a discussion of why it is important to study the effects of radiation on materials and looks at current and future reactor designs and the various constraints faced by materials as a result of those designs. The book also includes an overview of the radiation damage mechanisms. The next section explores the various methods for characterizing damage including transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, atom probe tomography,...

  14. Thermal characterization of radiation processed contact lens material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, L.; Choughule, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermomechanical analysis (TMA) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) were used to characterize radiation processed contact lens gel material of 2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate(HEMA). DSC revealed two types of water in the gels. DSC and TGA in combination were used to quantitate the percentage of different types of the water in the gel material. Temperature expansion coefficients values indicate more dimensions stability in the radiation processed lenses of similar water contents. (author)

  15. Materials and corrosion characterization using the confocal resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tigges, C.P.; Sorensen, N.R.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A. [and others

    1997-05-01

    Improved characterization and process control is important to many Sandia and DOE programs related to manufacturing. Many processes/structures are currently under-characterized including thin film growth, corrosion and semiconductor structures, such as implant profiles. A sensitive tool is required that is able to provide lateral and vertical imaging of the electromagnetic properties of a sample. The confocal resonator is able to characterize the surface and near-surface impedance of materials. This device may be applied to a broad range of applications including in situ evaluation of thin film processes, physical defect detection/characterization, the characterization of semiconductor devices and corrosion studies. In all of these cases, the technology should work as a real-time process diagnostic or as a feedback mechanism regarding the quality of a manufacturing process. This report summarizes the development and exploration of several diagnostic applications.

  16. High strain-rate soft material characterization via inertial cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Jonathan B.; Barajas, Carlos; Henann, David L.; Johnsen, Eric; Franck, Christian

    2018-03-01

    Mechanical characterization of soft materials at high strain-rates is challenging due to their high compliance, slow wave speeds, and non-linear viscoelasticity. Yet, knowledge of their material behavior is paramount across a spectrum of biological and engineering applications from minimizing tissue damage in ultrasound and laser surgeries to diagnosing and mitigating impact injuries. To address this significant experimental hurdle and the need to accurately measure the viscoelastic properties of soft materials at high strain-rates (103-108 s-1), we present a minimally invasive, local 3D microrheology technique based on inertial microcavitation. By combining high-speed time-lapse imaging with an appropriate theoretical cavitation framework, we demonstrate that this technique has the capability to accurately determine the general viscoelastic material properties of soft matter as compliant as a few kilopascals. Similar to commercial characterization algorithms, we provide the user with significant flexibility in evaluating several constitutive laws to determine the most appropriate physical model for the material under investigation. Given its straightforward implementation into most current microscopy setups, we anticipate that this technique can be easily adopted by anyone interested in characterizing soft material properties at high loading rates including hydrogels, tissues and various polymeric specimens.

  17. Clearance of iron oxide particles in rat liver: effect of hydrated particle size and coating material on liver metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C; Johansson, Lars O; Hustvedt, Svein Olaf; Haldorsen, Anita G; Bjørnerud, Atle; Fayad, Zahi A; Ahlstrom, Haakan K

    2006-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect of the particle size and coating material of various iron oxide preparations on the rate of rat liver clearance. The following iron oxide formulations were used in this study: dextran-coated ferumoxide (size = 97 nm) and ferumoxtran-10 (size = 21 nm), carboxydextran-coated SHU555A (size = 69 nm) and fractionated SHU555A (size = 12 nm), and oxidized-starch coated materials either unformulated NC100150 (size = 15 nm) or formulated NC100150 injection (size = 12 nm). All formulations were administered to 165 rats at 2 dose levels. Quantitative liver R2* values were obtained during a 63-day time period. The concentration of iron oxide particles in the liver was determined by relaxometry, and these values were used to calculate the particle half-lives in the liver. After the administration of a high dose of iron oxide, the half-life of iron oxide particles in rat liver was 8 days for dextran-coated materials, 10 days for carboxydextran materials, 14 days for unformulated oxidized-starch, and 29 days for formulated oxidized-starch. The results of the study indicate that materials with similar coating but different sizes exhibited similar rates of liver clearance. It was, therefore, concluded that the coating material significantly influences the rate of iron oxide clearance in rat liver.

  18. Sampling and Characterization of 618-2 Anomalous Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharias, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    This as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) Level II review documents radiological engineering and administrative controls necessary for the sampling and characterization of anomalous materials discovered during the remediation of the 618-2 solid waste burial ground. The goals of these engineering and administrative controls are to keep personnel exposure ALARA, control contamination levels, and minimize potential for airborne contamination. Excavation of the 618-2 Burial Ground has produced many items of anomalous waste. Prior to temporary packaging and/or storage, these items have been characterized in the field to identify radiological and industrial safety conditions. Further sampling and characterization of these items, as well as those remaining from an excavated combination safe, is the subject of this ALARA Level II review. An ALARA in-progress review will also be performed prior to sampling and characterization of 618-2 anomalous materials offering risks of differing natures. General categories of anomalies requiring further characterization include the following: (1) Containers of unknown liquids and/or solids and powders (excluding transuranics); (2) Drums containing unknown liquids and/or solids; (3) Metal containers with unknown contents; and (4) Known or suspected transuranic material.

  19. Electric characterization of construction materials through radar data inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patriarca, C.

    2013-01-01

    The non-destructive evaluation with the aim of characterizing objects before or after treatment has taken place, and the monitoring of long-term performance is analyzed in this thesis. Generally, these test methods measure material properties or changes in these properties that decision makers are

  20. Optical techniques for solid-state materials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Prasankumar, Rohit P

    2016-01-01

    This book has comprehensively covered the essential optical approaches needed for solid-state materials characterization. Written by experts in the field, this will be a great reference for students, engineers, and scientists.-Professor Yoke Khin Yap, Michigan Technical University.

  1. Microelectronics materials characterization studies at the Cornell TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, Stephen C.

    1992-01-01

    The Cornell program of microelectronics materials characterization by neutron activation analysis (NAA) is described. Experimental details and results from the successful application of NAA to silicon germanium circuit structures and nickel silicide layers are presented. In doing so, the potential for using X rays from isotopes that decay by electron capture is demonstrated. (author)

  2. Data-driven design optimization for composite material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Michopoulos; John C. Hermanson; Athanasios Iliopoulos; Samuel G. Lambrakos; Tomonari Furukawa

    2011-06-01

    The main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the value of design optimization beyond its use for structural shape determination in the realm of the constitutive characterization of anisotropic material systems such as polymer matrix composites with or without damage. The approaches discussed are based on the availability of massive experimental data...

  3. Thermal interface material characterization for cryogenic electronic packaging solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, A.; McCusker, K.; Van Dyke, J.; Isler, B.; Christiansen, M.

    2017-12-01

    As applications of superconducting logic technologies continue to grow, the need for efficient and reliable cryogenic packaging becomes crucial to development and testing. A trade study of materials was done to develop a practical understanding of the properties of interface materials around 4 K. While literature exists for varying interface tests, discrepancies are found in the reported performance of different materials and in the ranges of applied force in which they are optimal. In considering applications extending from top cooling a silicon chip to clamping a heat sink, a range of forces from approximately 44 N to approximately 445 N was chosen for testing different interface materials. For each range of forces a single material was identified to optimize the thermal conductance of the joint. Of the tested interfaces, indium foil clamped at approximately 445 N showed the highest thermal conductance. Results are presented from these characterizations and useful methodologies for efficient testing are defined.

  4. Advanced characterization of lithium battery materials with positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbiellini, Bernardo; Kuriplach, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Cathode materials are crucial to improved battery performance, in part because there are not yet materials that can maintain high power and stable cycling with a capacity comparable to that of anode materials. Our parameter-free, gradient-corrected model for electron-positron correlations predicts that spectroscopies based on positron annihilation can be deployed to study the effect of lithium intercalation in the oxide matrix of the cathode. The positron characteristics in oxides can be reliably computed using methods based on first-principles. Thus, we can enable a fundamental characterization of lithium battery materials involving positron annihilation spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. The detailed information one can extract from positron experiments could be useful for understanding and optimizing both battery materials and bi-functional catalysts for oxygen reduction and evolution. (paper)

  5. Characterization of semiconductor and frontier materials by nuclear microprobe technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jieqing; Li Xiaolin; Yang Changyi; Lu Rongrong; Wang Jiqing; Guo Panlin

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear microprobe technology is used to characterize the properties of semiconductor and other frontier materials at the stages of their synthesis, modification, integration and application. On the basis of the beam current being used, the analytical nuclear microprobe techniques being used in this project can be divided into two categories: high beam current (PIXE, RBS, PEB) or low beam current (IBIC, STIM) techniques. The material properties measured are the thickness and composition of a composite surface on a SiC ceramic, the sputtering-induced surface segregation and depth profile change in a Ag-Cu binary alloy, the irradiation effects on the CCE of CVD diamond, the CCE profile at a polycrystalline CVD diamond film and a GaAs diode at different voltage biases and finally, the characterization of individual sample on an integrated material chip. (author)

  6. Raman characterization of high temperature materials using an imaging detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, G.M.; Veirs, D.K.

    1989-03-01

    The characterization of materials by Raman spectroscopy has been advanced by recent technological developments in light detectors. Imaging photomultiplier-tube detectors are now available that impart position information in two dimensions while retaining photon-counting sensitivity, effectively greatly reducing noise. The combination of sensitivity and reduced noise allows smaller amounts of material to be analyzed. The ability to observe small amount of material when coupled with position information makes possible Raman characterization in which many spatial elements are analyzed simultaneously. Raman spectroscopy making use of these capabilities has been used, for instance, to analyze the phases present in carbon films and fibers and to map phase-transformed zones accompanying crack propagation in toughened zirconia ceramics. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Preparation and characterization of the fish reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, Joao Cristiano

    2011-01-01

    The certified reference materials (CRMs) play an important role in obtaining measurement results traceable to the International System of Units, through an unbroken chain of comparisons. Thus, the demand for new certified reference materials (CRMs) increases every day in all areas of knowledge. The availability of reference materials, mainly in Brazil is still incipient, given that the demand far exceeds the available variety of these materials. The amount of certified reference materials available in the country is insufficient to meet the need of the scientific community and demands for development of new methodologies. Among the many areas in need of reference materials, we highlight the importance for the food trade balance for these products within the country. The certification of food products, intended both for export and for domestic consumption, requires analysis methods that provide precise and accurate results to ensure product quality. This paper describes the preparation and certification of a reference material in the fish matrix in mercury and methylmercury. The study brings together since the stage of material selection, preparation, development of homogeneity and stability studies and characterization. The certification was performed by means of measurements using two analytical techniques, flow injection analysis - cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FIA-CV-AAS) and isotope dilution applied to mass spectrometry (IDMS), which is a primary method. In this work the standards of the ISO 30 (ABNT 30-34) and ISO Guide 35 was used as the basis for the preparation and characterization of the material. For the calculation of uncertainties was used the GUM and Eurachem guide. As a result, was produced and certified a lot of material in relation to the concentration of mercury (Hg = 0.271 ± 0.057 mg g -1 ) and methylmercury (MeHg = 0.245 ± 0.038 mg g -1 ), and informational values of lead and arsenic. (author)

  8. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  9. In situ Low-temperature Pair Distribution Function (PDF) Analysis of CH4 and CO2 Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladek, B.; Everett, M.; McDonnell, M.; Tucker, M.; Keffer, D.; Rawn, C.

    2017-12-01

    Gas hydrates occur in ocean floor and sub-surface permafrost deposits and are stable at moderate to high pressures and low temperatures. They are a clathrate structure composed of hydrogen bonded water cages that accommodate a wide variety of guest molecules. CO2 and CH4 hydrates both crystallize as the cubic sI hydrate and can form a solid solution. Natural gas hydrates are interesting as a potential methane source and for CO2 sequestration. Long-range diffraction studies on gas hydrates give valuable structural information but do not provide a detailed understanding of the disordered gas molecule interactions with the host lattice. In-situ low temperature total scattering experiments combined with pair distribution function (PDF) analysis are used to investigate the gas molecule motions and guest-cage interactions. CO2 and methane hydrates exhibit different decomposition behavior, and CO2 hydrate has a smaller lattice parameter despite it being a relatively larger molecule. Total scattering studies characterizing both the short- and long-range order simultaneously help to elucidate the structural source of these phenomena. Low temperature neutron total scattering data were collected using the Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer (NOMAD) beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) on CO2 and CH4 hydrates synthesized with D2O. Guest molecule motion within cages and interactions between gases and cages are investigated through the hydrate stability and decomposition regions. Data were collected from 2-80 K at a pressure of 55 mbar on CO2 and CH4 hydrates, and from 80-270 K at 25 bar on CH4 hydrate. The hydrate systems were modeled with classical molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to provide an analysis of the total energy into guest-guest, guest-host and host-host contributions. Combined Reitveld and Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) structure refinement were used to fit models of the data. This combined modeling and simulation characterizes the effects of CO2 and

  10. 5th National Conference on Processing and Characterization of Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains selected full length technical papers from the oral presentations made during the 5 th National Conference on Processing and Characterization of Materials (NCPCM) 2015 organized by Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, NIT Rourkela, India on 12 th - 13 th December, 2015. The first conference of the NCPCM series was held in December 2011. NCPCM 2015 has successfully carried the tradition of previous conferences. About 100 participants from various organizations across India have participated in the conference. The conference has attracted researchers, scientists and engineers from various R and D organizations, academic institutions and industries at a single forum. The interdisciplinary approach of the conference allowed the participants to look beyond their areas of activities. Besides oral presentations the conference also had poster and metallography sessions. The conference had four technical sessions. The themes of the sessions were: Materials Processing, Characterization, Materials Deformation and Materials Modelling and Simulation. In all, during the two day conference about fifty contributory talks along with four keynote lectures were presented. Out of these, forty peer-reviewed papers have been selected for publication in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. We would like to thank all the contributors, members of the organizing committee, session chairs as well as colleagues and students who helped us with the preparation of the conference and particularly, with the preparation of this volume. We would also like to convey our heartiest gratitude to all the sponsors of NCPCM 2015. (paper)

  11. Characterization of the electromechanical properties of EAP materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrita, Stewart; Bhattachary, Kaushik; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh

    2001-01-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAP) are an emerging class of actuation materials. Their large electrically induced strains (longitudinal or bending), low density, mechanical flexibility, and ease of processing offer advantages over traditional electroactive materials. However, before the capability of these materials can be exploited, their electrical and mechanical behavior must be properly quantified. Two general types of EAP can be identified. The first type is ionic EAP, which requires relatively low voltages (EAP and it involves electrostrictive and/or Maxwell stresses. This type of materials requires large electric fields (>100MV/m) to achieve longitudinal deformations at the range from 4 - 360%. Some of the difficulties in characterizing EAP include: nonlinear properties, large compliance (large mismatch with metal electrodes), nonhomogeneity resulting from processing, etc. To support the need for reliable data, the authors are developing characterization techniques to quantify the electroactive responses and material properties of EAP materials. The emphasis of the current study is on addressing electromechanical issues related to the ion-exchange type EAP also known as IPMC. The analysis, experiments and test results are discussed in this paper.

  12. Potential Use Of Carbide Lime Waste As An Alternative Material To Conventional Hydrated Lime Of Cement-Lime Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khaja, Waheeb A.

    1992-01-01

    The present study aimed at the possibility of using the carbide lime waste as an alternative material to the conventional lime used for cement-lime mortar. The waste is a by-product obtained in the generation of acetylene from calcium carbide. Physical and chemical properties of the wastes were studied. Two cement-lime-sand mix proportions containing carbide lime waste were compared with the same mix proportions containing conventional lime along with a control mix without lime. Specimens wer...

  13. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydration are investigated. Isothermal calorimetry results show that at early ages (initial 72 hours the effects of nanosilica depend on the phenomenon by which the hydration is governed: when the hydration is chemically controlled, that is, during initial reaction, dormant period, and acceleratory period, the hydration rate is accelerated by adding nanosilica; when the hydration is governed by diffusion process, that is, during postacceleratory period, the hydration rate is decelerated by adding nanosilica. The Thermal Gravimetric Analysis on the samples at the hardened state (after 28 days of curing reveals that, after adding nanosilica, the hydration degree slightly increased compared to the plain paste.

  14. Characterization of Concrete Mixes Containing Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksoy, H.; Kardas, G.; Konuklu, Y.; Cellat, K.; Tezcan, F.

    2017-10-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) can be used in passive building applications to achieve near zero energy building goals. For this purpose PCM can be added in building structures and materials in different forms. Direct incorporation, form stabilization and microencapsulation are different forms used for PCM integration in building materials. In addition to thermal properties of PCM itself, there are several other criteria that need to be fulfilled for the PCM enhanced building materials. Mechanical properties, corrosive effects, morphology and thermal buffering have to be determined for reliable and long-term applications in buildings. This paper aims to give an overview of characterization methods used to determine these properties in PCM added fresh concrete mixes. Thermal, compressive strength, corrosion, and microscopic test results for concrete mixes with PCM are discussed.

  15. In-situ materials characterization across spatial and temporal scales

    CERN Document Server

    Graafsma, Heinz; Zhang, Xiao; Frenken, Joost

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of nanoscale materials can change rapidly with time either because the environment changes rapidly, or because the influence of the environment propagates quickly across the intrinsically small dimensions of nanoscale materials. Extremely fast time resolution studies using X-rays, electrons and neutrons are of very high interest to many researchers and is a fast-evolving and interesting field for the study of dynamic processes. Therefore, in situ structural characterization and measurements of structure-property relationships covering several decades of length and time scales (from atoms to millimeters and femtoseconds to hours) with high spatial and temporal resolutions are crucially important to understand the synthesis and behavior of multidimensional materials. The techniques described in this book will permit access to the real-time dynamics of materials, surface processes, and chemical and biological reactions at various time scales. This book provides an interdisciplinary reference for res...

  16. Characterization of selected LDEF polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composite materials which received 5 years and 10 months of exposure to the LEO environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. Resin loss and a decrease in mechanical performance as well as dramatic visual effects were observed. However, chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymeric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure. The potential effect of a silicon-containing molecular contamination of these specimens is addressed.

  17. Acoustical characterization and parameter optimization of polymeric noise control materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, Emile N.

    2003-10-01

    The sound transmission loss (STL) characteristics of polymer-based materials are considered. Analytical models that predict, characterize and optimize the STL of polymeric materials, with respect to physical parameters that affect performance, are developed for single layer panel configuration and adapted for layered panel construction with homogenous core. An optimum set of material parameters is selected and translated into practical applications for validation. Sound attenuating thermoplastic materials designed to be used as barrier systems in the automotive and consumer industries have certain acoustical characteristics that vary in function of the stiffness and density of the selected material. The validity and applicability of existing theory is explored, and since STL is influenced by factors such as the surface mass density of the panel's material, a method is modified to improve STL performance and optimize load-bearing attributes. An experimentally derived function is applied to the model for better correlation. In-phase and out-of-phase motion of top and bottom layers are considered. It was found that the layered construction of the co-injection type would exhibit fused planes at the interface and move in-phase. The model for the single layer case is adapted to the layered case where it would behave as a single panel. Primary physical parameters that affect STL are identified and manipulated. Theoretical analysis is linked to the resin's matrix attribute. High STL material with representative characteristics is evaluated versus standard resins. It was found that high STL could be achieved by altering materials' matrix and by integrating design solution in the low frequency range. A suggested numerical approach is described for STL evaluation of simple and complex geometries. In practice, validation on actual vehicle systems proved the adequacy of the acoustical characterization process.

  18. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization, Hirshfeld surface analysis, and DFT calculations of 1,4-dimethyl-2-oxo-pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakri, Youness; Anouar, El Hassane; Ramli, Youssef; Essassi, El Mokhtar; Mague, Joel T.

    2018-01-01

    Imidazopyrimidine derivatives are organic synthesized compounds with a pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole as basic skeleton. They are known for their various biological properties and as an important class of compounds in medicinal chemistry. A new 1,4-dimethyl-2-oxo-pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole hydrate derivative of the tilted group has been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic techniques NMR and FT-IR; and by a single crystal X-ray diffraction. The X-ray results showed that the tricyclic core of the title compound, C12H11N3O·H2O, is almost planar. The molecules stack along the a-axis direction in head-to- tail fashion through π-stacking interactions involving all three rings. The stacks are tied together by direct Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds and by Osbnd H⋯O, Osbnd N⋯N and Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds with the lattice water. DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) in gas phase an polarizable continuum model have been carried out to predict the spectral and geometrical data of the tilted compound. The obtained results showed relatively good correlations between the predicted and experimental data with correlation coefficients higher than 98%.

  19. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  20. Fabrication and characterization of modified-hydroxyapatite/polyetheretherketone coating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Rui [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Fang, Lin, E-mail: fanglinhit@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luo, Zhongkuan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Zheng, Ruisheng [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Song, Shenhua; Weng, Luqian; Lei, JinPing [Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • 45 wt%-Hydroxyaptite/polyetheretherketone (HA/PEEK) coating materials modified by silane coupling agent (KH560) on PEEK substrate is successfully fabricated by solution casting method. • Strong bonding between the composite coating and the PEEK substrate is achieved. • HA/PEEK coating materials exhibit better bioactivity. - Abstract: 45 wt%-Hydroxyaptite/polyetheretherketone (HA/PEEK) coating materials modified by silane coupling agent (KH560) on PEEK substrate were successfully fabricated by solution casting method and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and tensile testing. The modified HA fillers were obtained to be uniformly distributed in the HA/PEEK coating, which has better properties of tensile strength and fracture toughness than those of the unmodified specimen. A good bonding between the composite coating and the PEEK substrate was achieved by solution casting method, resulting in integral-fracture without falling apart or delaminating during tensile loading. The modified specimens dipped into simulated body fluid (SBF) were characterized by SEM, XRD and FTIR, indicating that the bioactivity of the dipped materials was demonstrated more apparent with extending the dipping time. Therefore, the coating materials may become the substitutes for the hard tissues of the human body in the future, which could realize the balance between the mechanical properties and the bioactivity by modifying the structural design of the coating.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of modified-hydroxyapatite/polyetheretherketone coating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Rui; Fang, Lin; Luo, Zhongkuan; Zheng, Ruisheng; Song, Shenhua; Weng, Luqian; Lei, JinPing

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 45 wt%-Hydroxyaptite/polyetheretherketone (HA/PEEK) coating materials modified by silane coupling agent (KH560) on PEEK substrate is successfully fabricated by solution casting method. • Strong bonding between the composite coating and the PEEK substrate is achieved. • HA/PEEK coating materials exhibit better bioactivity. - Abstract: 45 wt%-Hydroxyaptite/polyetheretherketone (HA/PEEK) coating materials modified by silane coupling agent (KH560) on PEEK substrate were successfully fabricated by solution casting method and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and tensile testing. The modified HA fillers were obtained to be uniformly distributed in the HA/PEEK coating, which has better properties of tensile strength and fracture toughness than those of the unmodified specimen. A good bonding between the composite coating and the PEEK substrate was achieved by solution casting method, resulting in integral-fracture without falling apart or delaminating during tensile loading. The modified specimens dipped into simulated body fluid (SBF) were characterized by SEM, XRD and FTIR, indicating that the bioactivity of the dipped materials was demonstrated more apparent with extending the dipping time. Therefore, the coating materials may become the substitutes for the hard tissues of the human body in the future, which could realize the balance between the mechanical properties and the bioactivity by modifying the structural design of the coating

  2. Cement-based materials' characterization using ultrasonic attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punurai, Wonsiri

    The quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of cement-based materials is a critical area of research that is leading to advances in the health monitoring and condition assessment of the civil infrastructure. Ultrasonic NDE has been implemented with varying levels of success to characterize cement-based materials with complex microstructure and damage. A major issue with the application of ultrasonic techniques to characterize cement-based materials is their inherent inhomogeneity at multiple length scales. Ultrasonic waves propagating in these materials exhibit a high degree of attenuation losses, making quantitative interpretations difficult. Physically, these attenuation losses are a combination of internal friction in a viscoelastic material (ultrasonic absorption), and the scattering losses due to the material heterogeneity. The objective of this research is to use ultrasonic attenuation to characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous cement-based materials. The study considers a real, but simplified cement-based material, cement paste---a common bonding matrix of all cement-based composites. Cement paste consists of Portland cement and water but does not include aggregates. First, this research presents the findings of a theoretical study that uses a set of existing acoustics models to quantify the scattered ultrasonic wavefield from a known distribution of entrained air voids. These attenuation results are then coupled with experimental measurements to develop an inversion procedure that directly predicts the size and volume fraction of entrained air voids in a cement paste specimen. Optical studies verify the accuracy of the proposed inversion scheme. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of using attenuation to measure the average size, volume fraction of entrained air voids and the existence of additional larger entrapped air voids in hardened cement paste. Finally, coherent and diffuse ultrasonic waves are used to develop a direct

  3. Using Hydrated Salt Phase Change Materials for Residential Air Conditioning Peak Demand Reduction and Energy Conservation in Coastal and Transitional Climates in the State of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Ok

    The recent rapid economic and population growth in the State of California have led to a significant increase in air conditioning use, especially in areas of the State with coastal and transitional climates. This fact makes that the electric peak demand be dominated by air conditioning use of residential buildings in the summer time. This extra peak demand caused by the use of air conditioning equipment lasts only a few days out of the year. As a result, unavoidable power outages have occurred when electric supply could not keep up with such electric demand. This thesis proposed a possible solution to this problem by using building thermal mass via phase change materials to reduce peak air conditioning demand loads. This proposed solution was tested via a new wall called Phase Change Frame Wall (PCFW). The PCFW is a typical residential frame wall in which Phase Change Materials (PCMs) were integrated to add thermal mass. The thermal performance of the PCFWs was first evaluated, experimentally, in two test houses, built for this purpose, located in Lawrence, KS and then via computer simulations of residential buildings located in coastal and transitional climates in California. In this thesis, a hydrated salt PCM was used, which was added in concentrations of 10% and 20% by weight of the interior sheathing of the walls. Based on the experimental results, under Lawrence, KS weather, the PCFWs at 10% and 20% of PCM concentrations reduced the peak heat transfer rates by 27.0% and 27.3%, on average, of all four walls, respectively. Simulated results using California climate data indicated that PCFWs would reduce peak heat transfer rates by 8% and 19% at 10% PCM concentration and 12.2% and 27% at 20% PCM concentration for the coastal and transitional climates, respectively. Furthermore, the PCFWs, at 10% PCM concentration, would reduce the space cooling load and the annual energy consumption by 10.4% and 7.2%, on average in both climates, respectively.

  4. Energy materials. Advances in characterization, modelling and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Eldrup, M.; Hansen, N.; Juul Jensen, D.; Nielsen, E.M.; Nielsen, S.F.; Soerensen, B.F.; Pedersen, A.S.; Vegge, T.; West, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Energy-related topics in the modern world and energy research programmes cover the range from basic research to applications and structural length scales from micro to macro. Materials research and development is a central part of the energy area as break-throughs in many technologies depend on a successful development and validation of new or advanced materials. The Symposium is organized by the Materials Research Department at Risoe DTU - National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy. The Department concentrates on energy problems combining basic and applied materials research with special focus on the key topics: wind, fusion, superconductors and hydrogen. The symposium is based on these key topics and focus on characterization of materials for energy applying neutron, X-ray and electron diffraction. Of special interest is research carried out at large facilities such as reactors and synchrotrons, supplemented by other experimental techniques and modelling on different length scales that underpins experiments. The Proceedings contain 15 key note presentations and 30 contributed presentations, covering the abovementioned key topics relevant for the energy materials. The contributions clearly show the importance of materials research when developing sustainable energy technologies and also that many challenges remain to be approached. (BA)

  5. Mechanical Resonators for Material Characterization: Sensor Development and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casci Ceccacci, Andrea; Bosco, Filippo Giacomo

    The goals of this PhD project were to provide new approaches and developing new systems for material characterization, based on micro and nanomechanical sensors. Common issues that have shown to hinder large-scale integration of sensing techniques based on a micromechanical sensor are the readout......-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA), which is of high relevance in the biomedical research field. A second version of the system is currently under development, and it aims to increase the throughput of the system allowing to read out multiple microbridge arrays. For material characterization, spectroscopy analysis is often...... considered a benchmark technology. Conventional infrared spectroscopy approaches commonly require milligram amount of sample. Considering the frame of reference given by the overall aim of the project, mechanical sensors can be exploited to provide a unique tool for performing spectroscopy on a limited...

  6. Synthesis and characterization of a new organic semiconductor material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffour, Imane [Laboratoire de Génie Physique, Département de Physique, Université de Tiaret, Tiaret 14000 (Algeria); Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, Université Mustapha Stambouli, Mascara 29000 (Algeria); Dehbi, Abdelkader [Laboratoire de Génie Physique, Département de Physique, Université de Tiaret, Tiaret 14000 (Algeria); Mourad, Abdel-Hamid I., E-mail: ahmourad@uaeu.ac.ae [Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, P.O. Box 15551 (United Arab Emirates); Belfedal, Abdelkader [Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, Université Mustapha Stambouli, Mascara 29000 (Algeria); LPCMME, Département de Physique, Université d' Oran Es-sénia, 3100 Oran (Algeria)

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to create an ideal mixture of Acetaminophen/Curcumin leading to a new and improved semiconductor material, by a study of the electrical, thermal and optical properties. This new material will be compared with existing semiconductor technology to discuss its viability within the industry. The electrical properties were investigated using complex impedance spectroscopy and optical properties were studied by means of UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The electric conductivity σ, the dielectric constant ε{sub r}, the activation energy E{sub a}, the optical transmittance T and the gap energy E{sub g} have been investigated in order to characterize our organic material. The electrical conductivity of the material is approximately 10{sup −5} S/m at room temperature, increasing the temperature causes σ to increase exponentially to approximately 10{sup −4} S/m. The activation energy obtained for the material is equal to 0.49 ± 0.02 ev. The optical absorption spectra show that the investigating material has absorbance in the visible range with a maximum wavelength (λ{sub max}) 424 nm. From analysis, the absorption spectra it was found the optical band gap equal to 2.6 ± 0.02 eV and 2.46 ± 0.02 eV for the direct and indirect transition, respectively. In general, the study shows that the developed material has characteristics of organic semiconductor material that has a promising future in the field of organic electronics and their potential applications, e.g., photovoltaic cells. - Highlights: • Development of a new organic acetaminophen/Curcumin semiconductor material. • The developed material has characteristics of an organic semiconductor. • It has electrical conductivity comparable to available organic semiconductors. • It has high optical transmittance and low permittivity/dielectric constant.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a new organic semiconductor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiffour, Imane; Dehbi, Abdelkader; Mourad, Abdel-Hamid I.; Belfedal, Abdelkader

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to create an ideal mixture of Acetaminophen/Curcumin leading to a new and improved semiconductor material, by a study of the electrical, thermal and optical properties. This new material will be compared with existing semiconductor technology to discuss its viability within the industry. The electrical properties were investigated using complex impedance spectroscopy and optical properties were studied by means of UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The electric conductivity σ, the dielectric constant ε_r, the activation energy E_a, the optical transmittance T and the gap energy E_g have been investigated in order to characterize our organic material. The electrical conductivity of the material is approximately 10"−"5 S/m at room temperature, increasing the temperature causes σ to increase exponentially to approximately 10"−"4 S/m. The activation energy obtained for the material is equal to 0.49 ± 0.02 ev. The optical absorption spectra show that the investigating material has absorbance in the visible range with a maximum wavelength (λ_m_a_x) 424 nm. From analysis, the absorption spectra it was found the optical band gap equal to 2.6 ± 0.02 eV and 2.46 ± 0.02 eV for the direct and indirect transition, respectively. In general, the study shows that the developed material has characteristics of organic semiconductor material that has a promising future in the field of organic electronics and their potential applications, e.g., photovoltaic cells. - Highlights: • Development of a new organic acetaminophen/Curcumin semiconductor material. • The developed material has characteristics of an organic semiconductor. • It has electrical conductivity comparable to available organic semiconductors. • It has high optical transmittance and low permittivity/dielectric constant.

  8. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Materials Samples: Material Certification, Fluence, and Temperature (Nonproprietary Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, M.; Shogan, R.; Fero, A.; Snyder, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores, operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs require detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel. This report contains basic material characterization information of the as-installed samples of reactor internals material which were harvested from a decommissioned PWR

  9. Raman Spectrometer for the Characterization of Advanced Materials and Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The grant focused on the purchase of a Renishaw InVia Raman microscope to support and enhance the research in...laser. The system includes an accessory for polarization (for 785 nm) and an optical cable that allows external Raman measurements. The manufacturer...UU 18-04-2016 1-Feb-2015 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Raman Spectrometer for the Characterization of Advanced Materials and Nanomaterials The views

  10. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  11. Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Multiscale Porous Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussami, Linda

    2010-07-01

    This thesis work brings fresh insights and improved understanding of nano scale materials through introducing new hybrid composites, 2D hexagonal in MCM-41 and 3D random interconnected structures of different materials, and application relevance for developing fields of science, such as fuel cells and solar cells. New types of porous materials and organometallic crystals have been prepared and characterized in detail. The porous materials have been used in several studies: as hosts to encapsulate metal-organic complexes; as catalyst supports and electrode materials in devices for alternative energy production. The utility of the new porous materials arises from their unique structural and surface chemical characteristics as demonstrated here using various experimental and theoretical approaches. New single crystal structures and arene-ligand exchange properties of f-block elements coordinated to ligand arene and halogallates are described in Paper I. These compounds have been incorporated into ordered 2D-hexagonal MCM-41 and polyhedral silica nano foam (PNF-SiO{sub 2}) matrices without significant change to the original porous architectures as described in Paper II and III. The resulting inorganic/organic hybrids exhibited enhanced luminescence activity relative to the pure crystalline complexes. A series of novel polyhedral carbon nano foams (PNF-C's) and inverse foams were prepared by nano casting from PNF-SiO{sub 2}'s. These are discussed in Paper IV. The synthesis conditions of PNF-C's were systematically varied as a function of the filling ratio of carbon precursor and their structures compared using various characterization methods. The carbonaceous porous materials were further tested in Paper V and VI as possible catalysts and catalyst supports in counter- and working electrodes for solar- and fuel cell applications

  12. Characterization of the damage produced on different materials surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellavale Clara, Hector Damian

    2004-01-01

    In the present work the characterization techniques of surfaces ULOI and RIMAPS have been applied on laboratory samples made from aluminium, stainless steel and material based on fiberglass.The resultant surfaces of, chemical etching with corrosive agents Keller and Tucker, mechanic damage from the wear and tear of abrasive paper and sandrubbing with alumina particles, are analyzed to different level of damage.The systematic application of the above mentioned techniques is carried out with the objective of finding information, which allows to characterize the superficial damage, both in its incipient state as in the extreme situation revealed by the presence of etch pits. Important results have been obtained, in the characterization of the incipient stage of the chemical etching, using the curves of the normalized area.In addition, it was possible to verify the capacity of the techniques in the early detection of the preferential directions generated by the etch pits

  13. Hydration study of limestone blended cement in the presence of hazardous wastes containing Cr(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trezza, M.A.; Ferraiuelo, M.F.

    2003-01-01

    Considering the increasing use of limestone cement manufacture, the present paper tends to characterize limestone behavior in the presence of Cr(VI). The research reported herein provides information regarding the effect of Cr(VI) from industrial wastes in the limestone cement hydration. The cementitious materials were ordinary Portland cement, as reference, and limestone blended cement. The hydration and physicomechanical properties of cementitious materials and the influence of chromium at an early age were studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), conductimetric and mechanical tests. Portland cement pastes with the addition of Cr(VI) were examined and leaching behavior with respect to water and acid solution were investigated. This study indicates that Cr(VI) modifies the rate and the components obtained during the cement hydration

  14. Nasogastric Hydration in Infants with Bronchiolitis Less Than 2 Months of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Ed; Bata, Sonny; Rengasamy, Sharmila; Krieser, David; Cheek, John; Jachno, Kim; Babl, Franz E

    2016-11-01

    To determine whether nasogastric hydration can be used in infants less than 2 months of age with bronchiolitis, and characterize the adverse events profile of these infants compared with infants given intravenous (IV) fluid hydration. A descriptive retrospective cohort study of children with bronchiolitis under 2 months of age admitted for hydration at 3 centers over 3 bronchiolitis seasons was done. We determined type of hydration (nasogastric vs IV fluid hydration) and adverse events, intensive care unit admission, and respiratory support. Of 491 infants under 2 months of age admitted with bronchiolitis, 211 (43%) received nonoral hydration: 146 (69%) via nasogastric hydration and 65 (31%) via IV fluid hydration. Adverse events occurred in 27.4% (nasogastric hydration) and 23.1% (IV fluid hydration), difference of 4.3%; 95%CI (-8.2 to 16.9), P = .51. The majority of adverse events were desaturations (21.9% nasogastric hydration vs 21.5% IV fluid hydration, difference 0.4%; [-11.7 to 12.4], P = .95). There were no pulmonary aspirations in either group. Apneas and bradycardias were similar in each group. IV fluid hydration use was positively associated with intensive care unit admission (38.5% IV fluid hydration vs 19.9% nasogastric hydration; difference 18.6%, [5.1-32.1], P = .004); and use of ventilation support (27.7% IV fluid hydration vs 15.1% nasogastric hydration; difference 12.6 [0.3-23], P = .03). Fewer infants changed from nasogastric hydration to IV fluid hydration than from IV fluid hydration to nasogastric hydration (12.3% vs 47.7%; difference -35.4% [-49 to -22], P hydration can be used in the majority of young infants admitted with bronchiolitis. Nasogastric hydration and IV fluid hydration had similar rates of complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material: ATM-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1988-10-01

    The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material (ATM)-106 spent fuel from Assembly BT03 of pressurized-water reactor Calvert Cliffs No. 1. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well- characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCWRM) program. ATM-106 consists of 20 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 3700 GJ/kgM (43 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of /approximately/10%. Characterization data include (1) as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (6) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel rod are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report. 12 refs., 110 figs., 81 tabs

  16. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  17. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  18. Scanning microwave microscopy technique for nanoscale characterization of magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, C.H., E-mail: hadlee.joseph@artov.imm.cnr.it [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Electronics Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Sardi, G.M. [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Tuca, S.S.; Gramse, G. [Johannes Kepler University, Institute for Biophysics, Gruberstrasse 40, A-4020 Linz (Austria); Lucibello, A.; Proietti, E. [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Kienberger, F. [Keysight Technologies Austria GmbH, Keysight Laboratories, Gruberstrasse 40, A-4020 Linz (Austria); Marcelli, R. [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, microwave characterization of magnetic materials using the scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) technique is presented. The capabilities of the SMM are employed for analyzing and imaging local magnetic properties of the materials under test at the nanoscale. The analyses are performed by acquiring both amplitude and phase of the reflected microwave signal. The changes in the reflection coefficient S{sub 11} are related to the local properties of the material under investigation, and the changes in its magnetic properties have been studied as a function of an external DC magnetic bias. Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films deposited by RF sputtering and grown by liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates and permalloy samples have been characterized. An equivalent electromagnetic transmission line model is discussed for the quantitative analysis of the local magnetic properties. We also observed the hysteretic behavior of the reflection coefficient S{sub 11} with an external bias field. The imaging and spectroscopy analysis on the experimental results are evidently indicating the possibilities of measuring local changes in the intrinsic magnetic properties on the surface of the material.

  19. Preparation, characterization and certification of uranium isotope reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Junior, Olivio Pereira de

    2006-01-01

    This work describes the preparation, characterization and certification of a set of uranium isotope reference materials ranging from 0.5 to 20.0 % of 235 U in mass. The most important concepts of metrology in chemical measurements were applied so that the certified quantities in these materials could be directly traceable to the International System of Units (SI). As a consequence of this approach, these materials can be used in the instruments calibration, estimation of measurement uncertainty, method validation, assessment of performance of analysts, quality control routines and interlaboratory comparison programmes. The most advanced methods and techniques in mass spectrometry, that is, gas source mass spectrometry (GSMS), thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) were investigated to identify which are the dominant components in the uncertainty and to quantify its contribution to the final value of the measurement uncertainty of the isotopic ratio. The results obtained were then compared to verify which are the methods and techniques associated to the lowest measurement uncertainty values. The isotope amount ratio n( 235 U)/n( 238 U) was certified in the materials produced to expanded uncertainties ranging from 0.02 to 0.10 % and the ratios n( 234 U)/n( 238 U) and n( 236 U)/n( 238 U), to uncertainties ranging from 0.03 to 2.20 %. These values fully comply to the requirements of the isotopic characterization of nuclear fuel as well as the analysis of environmental samples for nuclear safeguards. (author)

  20. Surface, interface and bulk materials characterization using Indus synchrotron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase, Deodatta M.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources, providing intense, polarized and stable beams of ultra violet, soft and hard x-ray photons, are having great impact on physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and other areas research. In particular synchrotron radiation has revolutionized materials characterization techniques by enhancing its capabilities for investigating the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of solids. The availability of synchrotron sources and necessary instrumentation has led to considerable improvements in spectral resolution and intensities. As a result, application scope of different materials characterization techniques has tremendously increased particularly in the analysis of solid surfaces, interfaces and bulk materials. The Indian synchrotron storage ring, Indus-1 and Indus-2 are in operation at RRCAT, Indore. The UGC-DAE CSR with the help of university scientist had designed and developed an angle integrated photoelectron spectroscopy (AlPES) beam line on Indus-1 storage ring of 450 MeV and polarized light beam line for soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (SXAS) on Indus-2 storage ring of 2.5 GeV. (author)

  1. Magnetic characterization of soft and hard magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groessinger, R.; Mehmood, N.; Sato Turtelli, R.; Keplinger, F.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: For industrial applications many materials are used which are magnetic such as various kind of steels, but also soft respectively hard magnetic materials are applied in order to solve a certain technical problem. For this purpose the magnetic properties of these materials have to be known or even optimized. In solid state physics the magnetic characterization is often performed at low temperatures, which means from 4.2 K up to room temperature. Contrary, for industrial application the range of environmental temperatures (-20 o C - 120 o C) where such systems are used is of interest. Additionally ranges the shape and size between few mm up to several cm. It is the purpose of this paper to summarize measuring systems which are mainly suited for an industrial characterizations. The most important hysteresis measurement methods which are applicable for industrial purpose are summarized. Special emphasis is laid on the difference between soft or hard magnetic materials. Practical examples for each method are given. Additionally a strain gauge method which is useful for magnetostriction measurement is shown. (author)

  2. Laminated helmet materials characterization by terahertz kinetics spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anis; Rahman, Aunik K.

    2015-05-01

    High speed acquisition of reflected terahertz energy constitutes a kinetics spectrum that is an effective tool for layered materials' deformation characterization under ballistic impact. Here we describe utilizing the kinetics spectrum for quantifying a deformation event due to impact in material used for Soldier's helmet. The same technique may be utilized for real-time assessment of trauma by measuring the helmet wore by athletes. The deformation of a laminated material (e.g., a helmet) is dependent on the nature of impact and projectile; thus can uniquely characterize the impact condition leading to a diagnostic procedure based on the energy received by an athlete during an impact. We outline the calibration process for a given material under ballistic impact and then utilize the calibration for extracting physical parameters from the measured kinetics spectrum. Measured kinetics spectra are used to outline the method and rationale for extending the concept to a diagnosis tool. In particular, captured kinetics spectra from multilayered plates subjected to ballistic hit under experimental conditions by high speed digital acquisition system. An algorithm was devised to extract deformation and deformation velocity from which the energy received on the skull was estimated via laws of nonrelativistic motion. This energy is assumed to be related to actual injury conditions, thus forming a basis for determining whether the hit would cause concussion, trauma, or stigma. Such quantification may be used for diagnosing a Soldier's trauma condition in the field or that of an athlete's.

  3. Dielectric characterization of materials at microwave frequency range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. de los Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a coaxial line was used to connect a microwave-frequency Network Analyzer and a base moving sample holder for dielectric characterization of ferroelectric materials in the microwave range. The main innovation of the technique is the introduction of a special sample holder that eliminates the air gap effect by pressing sample using a fine pressure system control. The device was preliminary tested with alumina (Al2O3 ceramics and validated up to 2 GHz. Dielectric measurements of lanthanum and manganese modified lead titanate (PLTM ceramics were carried out in order to evaluate the technique for a high permittivity material in the microwave range. Results showed that such method is very useful for materials with high dielectric permittivities, which is generally a limiting factor of other techniques in the frequency range from 50 MHz to 2 GHz.

  4. Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development.

  5. TCT characterization of different semiconductor materials for particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.; Lodomez, P.; Krueger, H.; Pernegger, H.; Weilhammer, P.; Wermes, N.

    2006-01-01

    The development of digital semiconductor based X-ray detectors necessitates a detailed understanding of the applied sensor material. Under this premise a broad-band transient current technique (TCT) setup has been developed and used to characterize different semiconductors. The measurements are based on the generation of electrical charges within the sensor material and the subsequent time-resolved analysis of the charge carrier movement. From the recorded current pulses the charge collection efficiency, the charge carrier mobility and the electric field profile have been extracted. The examined materials are silicon p in n diodes, ohmic and Schottky contacted CdTe detectors, CdZnTe (CZT) crystals with Schottky contacts as well as two single-crystal CVD-diamonds

  6. Mechanical characterization of composite materials by optical techniques: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Luigi

    2018-05-01

    The present review provides an overview of work published in recent years dealing with the mechanical characterization of composite materials performed by optical techniques. The paper emphasizes the strengths derived from the employment of full-field methods when the strain field of an anisotropic material must be evaluated. This is framed in contrast to the use of conventional measurement techniques, which provide single values of the measured quantities unable to offer thorough descriptions of deformation distribution. The review outlines the intensity and articulation of work in this research field to date and its ongoing importance not only in the academy, but also in industrial sectors where composite materials represent a strategic resource for development.

  7. Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development

  8. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties; Hydratation des argiles gonflantes: sequence d'hydratation multi-echelle determination des energies macroscopiques a partir des proprietes microscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles, F

    2006-10-15

    Smectites have interesting properties which make them potential candidates for engineered barriers in deep geological nuclear waste repository: low permeability, swelling and cations retention. The subject of this thesis consists in the determination of the relationship between hydration properties, swelling properties and cations mobility in relation with confinement properties of clayey materials. The aim is to understand and to predict the behaviour of water in smectites, following two research orientations: the mechanistic aspects and the energetic aspects of the hydration of smectites. We worked on the Na-Ca montmorillonite contained in the MX80 bentonite, with the exchanged homo ionic structure (saturated with alkaline cations and calcium cations). The approach crosses the various scales (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic) and implied the study of the various components of the system (layer-cation-water), by using original experimental methods (thermo-poro-metry and electric conductivity for various relative humidities (RH) and electrostatic calculations. Initially, the dry state is defined by SCTA (scanning calorimetry thermal analysis). Then a classical characterization of the smectite porosity for the dry state is carried out using mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption. We evidenced the existence of a meso-porosity which radius varies from 2 to 10 nm depending on the compensating cation. The thermo-poro-metry and conductivity experiments performed at various hydration states made it possible to follow the increase in the pore sizes and the cations mobility as a function of the hydration state. We highlight in particular the existence of an osmotic mesoscopic swelling for low RH (approximately 50-60%RH for Li and Na). By combining the results of thermo-poro-metry, X-ray diffraction and electric conductivity, we are able to propose a complete hydration sequence for each cation, showing the crucial role of the compensating cation in the hydration of

  9. Characterization of solar cell materials by Proton Back Scattering Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joynal Abedin, M.; Fazlul Hoque, A.K.M.; Firoz Hasan, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    The need for accurate chemical characterization of samples specially related to electronic and solar cell materials has assumed increasing importance in recent years. The importance of the study of the surfaces of materials of different origin also increased in recent years to a great extent. This need has created a worldwide spurt to develop rapid, accurate and sensitive tools for the characterization of materials. In recent years the proton backscattering spectrometry (PBS) method has been recognized as one of the useful analytical tool in several applications of material analysis and technology. The lack of information of the relevant scattering cross sections as a function of proton energy and the problems arising in conventional data analysis have so far rendered proton backscattering analysis of multielemental samples difficult at low energies. On the other hand advances in the computer evaluation of experimental data have, however, made it possible to utilize low-MeV protons as a sensitive probe for light elements in the μm range. The benefits of the method in comparison to alpha particle backscattering include the relatively higher non-Rutherford scattering cross sections of the light elements and to the lower proton stopping in the target material. These lead to higher sensitivity in detecting and profiling light elements in heavy targets and to significantly larger accessible depths and smaller straggling than with alpha particles. Research works on the development of methodologies of Proton Backscattering Spectrometry (PBS) for the analysis of thin films and surfaces has been in progress in the 3 MeV Van de Graaff Accelerator facilities of Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka for some years. The PBS system comprises a target chamber with appropriate sample holders and a Surface Barrier Detector (SBD) with the associated electronics for data acquisition and reduction. For the evaluation of the PBS data RBS Universal Master Package, RUMP has been installed in the

  10. Material characterization of a novel new armour steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, J. N.; Stumpf, W. E.

    2012-08-01

    The material characterization of a novel new armour steel with comparison to a leading commercial benchmark alloy is presented. Direct ballistic and experimental comparison is drawn. The 5.56 × 45 mm [M193] and 7.62 × 51 mm [NATO Ball] projectiles were used in a cartridge type high pressure barrel configuration to evaluate the superior plugging resistance of the new steel over a range of plate thicknesses. To characterize the dynamic plasticity of the materials, quasi-static, notched and high temperature tensile tests as well as Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests in tension and compression were performed. The open source explicit solver, IMPACT (sourceforge.net) is used in an ongoing numerical and sensitivity analysis of ballistic impact. A simultaneous multi variable fitting algorithm is planned to evaluate several selected numerical material models and show their relative correlation to experimental data. This study as well as micro-metallurgical investigation of adiabatic shear bands and localized deformation zones should result in new insights in to the underlying metallurgical and physical behavior of armour plate steels during ballistic perforation.

  11. Material characterization of a novel new armour steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stumpf W.E.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The material characterization of a novel new armour steel with comparison to a leading commercial benchmark alloy is presented. Direct ballistic and experimental comparison is drawn. The 5.56 × 45 mm [M193] and 7.62 × 51 mm [NATO Ball] projectiles were used in a cartridge type high pressure barrel configuration to evaluate the superior plugging resistance of the new steel over a range of plate thicknesses. To characterize the dynamic plasticity of the materials, quasi-static, notched and high temperature tensile tests as well as Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests in tension and compression were performed. The open source explicit solver, IMPACT (sourceforge.net is used in an ongoing numerical and sensitivity analysis of ballistic impact. A simultaneous multi variable fitting algorithm is planned to evaluate several selected numerical material models and show their relative correlation to experimental data. This study as well as micro-metallurgical investigation of adiabatic shear bands and localized deformation zones should result in new insights in to the underlying metallurgical and physical behavior of armour plate steels during ballistic perforation.

  12. Tuned apatitic materials: Synthesis, characterization and potential antimicrobial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierascu, Irina; Fierascu, Radu Claudiu; Somoghi, Raluca; Ion, Rodica Mariana; Moanta, Adriana; Avramescu, Sorin Marius; Damian, Celina Maria; Ditu, Lia Mara

    2018-04-01

    Inorganic antimicrobial materials can be viable for multiple applications (related to its use for new buildings with special requirements related to microbiological loading, such as hospital buildings and for consolidation of cultural heritage constructions); also the use of substituted hydroxyapatites for protection of stone artefacts against environmental factors (acidic rain) and biodeterioration it's an option to no longer use of toxic substances. This paper presents methods of synthesis and characterization of the material from the point of view of the obtained structures and final applications. The materials were characterized in terms of composition and morphology (using X-ray Diffraction, X-ray Fluorescence, Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Surface area and pore size determination). Antimicrobial activity was tested against filamentous fungi strains and pathogenic bacteria strains, using both spot on lawn qualitative method (on agar medium) and serial microdilution quantitative method (in broth medium). Further, it was evaluated the anti-biofilm activity of the tested samples toward the most important microbial strains implicated in biofilm development, using crystal violet stained biofilms microtiter assay, followed by spectrophotometric quantitative evaluation.

  13. Exogenous origin of hydration on asteroid (16) Psyche: the role of hydrated asteroid families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdellidou, C.; Delbo', M.; Fienga, A.

    2018-04-01

    Asteroid (16) Psyche, which for a long time was the largest M-type with no detection of hydration features in its spectrum, was recently discovered to have a weak 3-μm band and thus it was eventually added to the group of hydrated asteroids. Its relatively high density, in combination with the high radar albedo, led researchers to classify the asteroid as a metallic object. It is believed that it is possibly a core of a differentiated body, a remnant of `hit-and-run' collisions. The detection of hydration is, in principle, inconsistent with a pure metallic origin for this body. Here, we consider the scenario in which the hydration on its surface is exogenous and was delivered by hydrated impactors. We show that impacting asteroids that belong to families whose members have the 3-μm band can deliver hydrated material to Psyche. We developed a collisional model with which we test all dark carbonaceous asteroid families, which contain hydrated members. We find that the major source of hydrated impactors is the family of Themis, with a total implanted mass on Psyche of the order of ˜1014 kg. However, the hydrated fraction could be only a few per cent of the implanted mass, as the water content in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, the best analogue for the Themis asteroid family, is typically a few per cent of their mass.

  14. Structural and energetical studies of the adsorption of para and meta-isomers of xylene on pre-hydrated zeolite BaX. Characterization by neutron diffraction and temperature programmed desorption; Etude structurale et energetique de l'adsorption des isomeres para- et meta- du xylene dans la zeolithe BaX prehydratee. Caracterisation par diffraction des neutrons et thermodesorption programmee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, Ch.

    1999-10-19

    The separation of p-xylene from C{sub 8} aromatics is performed industrially by selective adsorption on zeolitic materials. FAU-type zeolites are currently used for this separation and especially the partially hydrated BaX. The aim of this work is to characterize from a structural (by low temperature neutron powder diffraction) and an energetical (by temperature programmed desorption) point of view, the adsorption of para- and meta- isomers of xylene, for different fillings, as pure substances as well as mixtures, on pre-hydrated zeolite BaX. The influence of the water pre-adsorption on xylene adsorption selectivity is carefully discussed. The crystalline structure of the zeolite BaX (framework and compensation of charge cations) and of the adsorbed phase (water, p- and m-xylene molecules) are completely characterized by neutron diffraction. The location and the distribution of water and xylene molecules on their adsorption sites is especially followed as a function of the filling of the zeolite and of the composition of the adsorbed phase. Microscopic measurements were correlated to the energetical analysis (at a macroscopic level) in order to obtain a consistent description of adsorption phenomenon and to propose a possible origin for adsorption selectivity.

  15. Characterization techniques for graphene-based materials in catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maocong Hu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based materials have been studied in a wide range of applications including catalysis due to the outstanding electronic, thermal, and mechanical properties. The unprecedented features of graphene-based catalysts, which are believed to be responsible for their superior performance, have been characterized by many techniques. In this article, we comprehensively summarized the characterization methods covering bulk and surface structure analysis, chemisorption ability determination, and reaction mechanism investigation. We reviewed the advantages/disadvantages of different techniques including Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS, X-Ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS, atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM. The application of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR, CO chemisorption, and NH3/CO2-temperature-programmed desorption (TPD was also briefly introduced. Finally, we discussed the challenges and provided possible suggestions on choosing characterization techniques. This review provides key information to catalysis community to adopt suitable characterization techniques for their research.

  16. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Zueqian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  17. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, F.

    2006-10-01

    Smectites have interesting properties which make them potential candidates for engineered barriers in deep geological nuclear waste repository: low permeability, swelling and cations retention. The subject of this thesis consists in the determination of the relationship between hydration properties, swelling properties and cations mobility in relation with confinement properties of clayey materials. The aim is to understand and to predict the behaviour of water in smectites, following two research orientations: the mechanistic aspects and the energetic aspects of the hydration of smectites. We worked on the Na-Ca montmorillonite contained in the MX80 bentonite, with the exchanged homo ionic structure (saturated with alkaline cations and calcium cations). The approach crosses the various scales (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic) and implied the study of the various components of the system (layer-cation-water), by using original experimental methods (thermo-poro-metry and electric conductivity for various relative humidities (RH) and electrostatic calculations. Initially, the dry state is defined by SCTA (scanning calorimetry thermal analysis). Then a classical characterization of the smectite porosity for the dry state is carried out using mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption. We evidenced the existence of a meso-porosity which radius varies from 2 to 10 nm depending on the compensating cation. The thermo-poro-metry and conductivity experiments performed at various hydration states made it possible to follow the increase in the pore sizes and the cations mobility as a function of the hydration state. We highlight in particular the existence of an osmotic mesoscopic swelling for low RH (approximately 50-60%RH for Li and Na). By combining the results of thermo-poro-metry, X-ray diffraction and electric conductivity, we are able to propose a complete hydration sequence for each cation, showing the crucial role of the compensating cation in the hydration of

  18. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium-decorated nanoporous platinum materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xinsheng; Koczkur, Kallum; Chen, Aicheng

    2007-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of novel three-dimensional nanoporous Pt-Ru bimetallic networks by decorating nanoporous Pt networks with Ru using a hydrothermally assisted precipitating process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to characterize the morphology and the composition of the nanoporous Pt-Ru networks formed. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that, after protected annealing treatment, Pt-Ru bimetallic material was formed. The electrocatalytic activity of the synthesized nanoporous Pt-Ru networks was characterized using electrochemical oxidation of methanol as a probe. The electrocatalytic activity of the nanoporous Pt networks significantly increases with the increments of decorated Ru and reaches the highest value with 41% of Ru. The peak current of methanol oxidation on the nanoporous Pt-Ru(41%) bimetallic networks is over 180% higher than that on the nanoporous Pt networks without Ru decoration. This is very desirable for fuel cell development and electrochemical sensor design

  19. Microstructural and chemical characterization of cladding material zirconia scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadalbert, R.; Boulanger, L.; Lansiart, S.; Silvestre, G.; Juliet, P.

    1991-01-01

    Uniform corrosion of Zircaloy-4 in PWR conditions depends both on the microstructure of the material and on its precise chemical composition. For a good understanding of the influence of the different parameters which are involved in the oxidation mechanisms, a detailed characterization of the oxide scale and the underlying metal is needed. The results on the alloying elements distribution in the oxide and the metal obtained by electron probe Microanalysis and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry as well as the TEM observations on the oxide crystal structure and the metal oxide interface are reported

  20. Quality manual for Laboratories of the Nuclear Materials Characterization Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.

    1991-05-01

    This publication presents the first Quality Manual for the Laboratories at the Nuclear Materials Characterization Division. The Manual describes the laboratories, its organization structure, fields of activities, personnel records, equipments, maintenance and calibration. The main aspects concerning quality assurance in the analysis were discussed. The whole system of receiving, identifying and processing analysis of the samples is shown. Since there are many information to be contained in several subjects of the Quality Manual, there were produced separate documents that are cross referenced in the manual. (author)

  1. Fatigue Characterization of Fire Resistant Syntactic Foam Core Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Mynul

    Eco-Core is a fire resistant material for sandwich structural application; it was developed at NC A&T State University. The Eco-Core is made of very small amount of phenolic resin and large volume of flyash by a syntactic process. The process development, static mechanical and fracture, fire and toxicity safety and water absorption properties and the design of sandwich structural panels with Eco-Core material was established and published in the literature. One of the important properties that is needed for application in transportation vehicles is the fatigue performance under different stress states. Fatigue data are not available even for general syntactic foams. The objective of this research is to investigate the fatigue performance of Eco-Core under three types of stress states, namely, cyclic compression, shear and flexure, then document failure modes, and develop empherical equations for predicting fatigue life of Eco-Core under three stress states. Compression-Compression fatigue was performed directly on Eco-Core cylindrical specimen, whereas shear and flexure fatigue tests were performed using sandwich beam made of E glass-Vinyl Ester face sheet and Eco-Core material. Compression-compression fatigue test study was conducted at two values of stress ratios (R=10 and 5), for the maximum compression stress (sigmamin) range of 60% to 90% of compression strength (sigmac = 19.6 +/- 0.25 MPa) for R=10 and 95% to 80% of compression strength for R=5. The failure modes were characterized by the material compliance change: On-set (2% compliance change), propagation (5%) and ultimate failure (7%). The number of load cycles correspond to each of these three damages were characterized as on-set, propagation and total lives. A similar approach was used in shear and flexure fatigue tests with stress ratio of R=0.1. The fatigue stress-number of load cycles data followed the standard power law equation for all three stress states. The constant of the equation were

  2. Characterization of low concentration uranium glass working materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppich, G. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wimpenny, J. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leever, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Knight, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hutcheon, I. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ryerson, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-22

    A series of uranium-doped silicate glasses were created at (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) LLNL, to be used as working reference material analogs for low uranium concentration research. Specifically, the aim of this effort was the generation of well-characterized glasses spanning a range of concentrations and compositions, and of sufficient homogeneity in uranium concentration and isotopic composition, for instrumentation research and development purposes. While the glasses produced here are not intended to replace or become standard materials for uranium concentration or uranium isotopic composition, it is hoped that they will help fill a current gap, providing low-level uranium glasses sufficient for methods development and method comparisons within the limitations of the produced glass suite. Glasses are available for research use by request.

  3. Characterization of Glass Fiber Separator Material for Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, S.; Frank, H.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization studies were carried out on a glass fiber paper that is currently employed as a separator material for some LiSOCl2 primary cells. The material is of the non-woven type made from microfilaments of E-type glass and contains an ethyl acrylate binder. Results from extraction studies and tensile testing revealed that the binder content and tensile strength of the paper were significantly less than values specified by the manufacturer. Scanning electron micrographs revealed the presence of clusters of impurities many of which were high in iron content. Results of emission spectroscopy revealed high overall levels of iron and leaching, followed by atomic absorption measurements, revealed that essentially all of this iron is soluble in SOCl2.

  4. Characterization of ureasil-polyethylene oxide/chitosan hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes Zaldivar, M.; Pulcinelli, S.H.; Peniche Covas, C.; Santilli, C.V. [Universidad de la Habana, Havana (Cuba); Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Siloxane-polyether hybrids are an interesting and versatile family of multifunctional organic-inorganic hybrid materials, also named ureasils. Ureasils have been the object of intensive studies in the last years due to their versatility and wide range of applications. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) and chitosan are biocompatible and low toxicity polymers that were used as organic phase while the inorganic phase was siloxane. Therefore, the aim of this work was the characterization of these hybrids that were prepared by the sol–gel route. Hydrochloric and acetic acids were used as catalysts. Due to the insolubility of chitosan in ethanol and organic solvents, water was used in the hydrolysis solution as the main component or alone. The obtained materials were transparent, rubbery, flexible and water-insoluble. They were characterized by different physicochemical techniques such as FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy), DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), TG (Thermogravimetric Analysis), XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering) and NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy). Results showed that chitosan addition did not provoke appreciable changes in the thermal properties but modifies the polycondensation degree and the nanoscopic structure of the materials. Significant changes were not found neither by the hydrolysis solution nor by the type of acid, except in the thermal stability. It depended on the type of acid catalyst, being higher in hybrids prepared with HCl. We can conclude that these materials can be synthesized just with water as the hydrolysis solution and that any of the two acids can be used as catalyst without significantly affect its final properties. (author)

  5. Synthesis and characterization of alanine boron hydrate for its use in thermal neutron dosimetry.; Sintesis y caracterizacion del borohidrato de alanina para su uso en dosimetria de neutrones termicos.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanez S, J C

    1994-07-01

    Alanine boron hydrate was synthesized for its possible use as intercomparison dosimeter for thermal neutron irradiation. The irradiations were performed in the Nuclear Reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. The salt was prepared by reacting alanine and boric acid in a (1:1) stoichiometric ratio in neutral pH 7.5 aqueous solution and also in a basic pH 13 solution. The latter reaction was prepared with the addition of ammonia hydroxide (25%). Solutions were stirred and afterwards were let to evaporate. The obtained product in each reaction is a white solid. Dosimeters were prepared with the obtained reaction products and irradiated under thermal neutron flux of 5 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} s. For 30 hours. The analysis of irradiated samples was made in a Variant E-15 Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectrometer. The observed response of the samples prepared with the reaction product at the basic pH is approximately 50% higher than the neutral pH samples. In order to investigate the optimum signal enhancement samples were prepared in a basic pH medium in the following stoichiometric ratios: (1:0.5); (1:0.75); (1:1.25); (1:1.5) and (1:1.75). It was observed that the samples of the reaction (1:0.75) produced the higher response. The response was 2728% higher than the alanine only dosimeters. The reaction product was chemically characterized by X-ray diffraction, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Chromatography, Refractometry and Solubility tests. Results indicate that alanine boron hydrate is formed in basic media and in a stoichiometric ratio (1:0.75). The dosimetric characterization of alanine boron hydrate was performed, results are reported. It is concluded that alanine boron hydrate may be a good intercomparison dosimeter for thermal neutron irradiation. (Author).

  6. Experimental and computing strategies in advanced material characterization problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzon, G. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy gabriella.bolzon@polimi.it (Italy)

    2015-10-28

    The mechanical characterization of materials relies more and more often on sophisticated experimental methods that permit to acquire a large amount of data and, contemporarily, to reduce the invasiveness of the tests. This evolution accompanies the growing demand of non-destructive diagnostic tools that assess the safety level of components in use in structures and infrastructures, for instance in the strategic energy sector. Advanced material systems and properties that are not amenable to traditional techniques, for instance thin layered structures and their adhesion on the relevant substrates, can be also characterized by means of combined experimental-numerical tools elaborating data acquired by full-field measurement techniques. In this context, parameter identification procedures involve the repeated simulation of the laboratory or in situ tests by sophisticated and usually expensive non-linear analyses while, in some situation, reliable and accurate results would be required in real time. The effectiveness and the filtering capabilities of reduced models based on decomposition and interpolation techniques can be profitably used to meet these conflicting requirements. This communication intends to summarize some results recently achieved in this field by the author and her co-workers. The aim is to foster further interaction between engineering and mathematical communities.

  7. Experimental and computing strategies in advanced material characterization problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzon, G.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical characterization of materials relies more and more often on sophisticated experimental methods that permit to acquire a large amount of data and, contemporarily, to reduce the invasiveness of the tests. This evolution accompanies the growing demand of non-destructive diagnostic tools that assess the safety level of components in use in structures and infrastructures, for instance in the strategic energy sector. Advanced material systems and properties that are not amenable to traditional techniques, for instance thin layered structures and their adhesion on the relevant substrates, can be also characterized by means of combined experimental-numerical tools elaborating data acquired by full-field measurement techniques. In this context, parameter identification procedures involve the repeated simulation of the laboratory or in situ tests by sophisticated and usually expensive non-linear analyses while, in some situation, reliable and accurate results would be required in real time. The effectiveness and the filtering capabilities of reduced models based on decomposition and interpolation techniques can be profitably used to meet these conflicting requirements. This communication intends to summarize some results recently achieved in this field by the author and her co-workers. The aim is to foster further interaction between engineering and mathematical communities

  8. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  9. Novel Techniques to Characterize Pore Size of Porous Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulghani, Ali J.

    2016-01-01

    Porous materials are implemented in several industrial applications such as water desalination, gas separation and pharmaceutical care which they are mainly governed by the pore size and the PSD. Analyzing shale reservoirs are not excluded from these applications and numerous advantages can be gained by evaluating the PSD of a given shale reservoir. Because of the limitations of the conventional characterization techniques, novel methods for characterizing the PSD have to be proposed in order to obtain better characterization results for the porous materials, in general, and shale rocks in particular. Thus, permporosimetry and evapoporometry (EP) technologies were introduced, designed and utilized for evaluating the two key parameters, pore size and pore size distribution. The pore size and PSD profiles of different shale samples from Norway and Argentina were analyzed using these technologies and then confirmed by mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP). Norway samples showed an average pore diameter of 12.94 nm and 19.22 nm with an average diameter of 13.77 nm and 23.23 nm for Argentina samples using permporosimetry and EP respectively. Both techniques are therefore indicative of the heterogeneity of the shales. The results from permporosimetry are in good agreement with those obtained from MIP technique, but EP for most part over-estimates the average pore size. The divergence of EP results compared to permporosimetry results is referred to the fact that the latter technique measures only the active pores which is not the case with the former technique. Overall, both techniques are complementary to each other which the results from both techniques seem reasonable and reliable and provide two simple techniques to estimate the pore size and pore size distributions for shale rocks.

  10. Novel Techniques to Characterize Pore Size of Porous Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulghani, Ali J.

    2016-04-24

    Porous materials are implemented in several industrial applications such as water desalination, gas separation and pharmaceutical care which they are mainly governed by the pore size and the PSD. Analyzing shale reservoirs are not excluded from these applications and numerous advantages can be gained by evaluating the PSD of a given shale reservoir. Because of the limitations of the conventional characterization techniques, novel methods for characterizing the PSD have to be proposed in order to obtain better characterization results for the porous materials, in general, and shale rocks in particular. Thus, permporosimetry and evapoporometry (EP) technologies were introduced, designed and utilized for evaluating the two key parameters, pore size and pore size distribution. The pore size and PSD profiles of different shale samples from Norway and Argentina were analyzed using these technologies and then confirmed by mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP). Norway samples showed an average pore diameter of 12.94 nm and 19.22 nm with an average diameter of 13.77 nm and 23.23 nm for Argentina samples using permporosimetry and EP respectively. Both techniques are therefore indicative of the heterogeneity of the shales. The results from permporosimetry are in good agreement with those obtained from MIP technique, but EP for most part over-estimates the average pore size. The divergence of EP results compared to permporosimetry results is referred to the fact that the latter technique measures only the active pores which is not the case with the former technique. Overall, both techniques are complementary to each other which the results from both techniques seem reasonable and reliable and provide two simple techniques to estimate the pore size and pore size distributions for shale rocks.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of MCC [Materials Characterization Center] approved testing material---ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, J.W.

    1988-03-01

    Materials Characterization Center glasses ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 are designed to simulate high-level waste glasses that are likely to result from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuels. The three Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) are borosilicate glasses based upon the MCC-76-68 glass composition. One radioisotope was added to form each ATM. The radioisotopes added to form ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 were 241 Am, 237 Np, and 239 Pu, respectively. Each of the ATM lots was produced in a nominal lot size of 450 g from feed stock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1200/degree/C in a platinum crucible. Each ATM was then cast into bars. Analyzed compositions of these glasses are listed. The nonradioactive elements were analyzed by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP), and the radioisotope analyses were done by alpha energy analysis. Results are discussed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Characterization of shock-absorbing material for packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio Pimenta

    2007-01-01

    Since 2001 Brazil has been participating in a regional effort with other Latin American countries which operate research reactors to improve its capability in the management of spent fuel elements from these reactors. One of the options considered is the long-term dry storage of the spent fuel in a dual purpose cask, i.e., a package for the transport and storage of radioactive material. In the scope of an IAEA-sponsored project, a cask was designed and a half-scale model for test was built. The cask consists of a sturdy cylindrical body provided with internal cavity to accommodate a basket holding the spent fuel elements, a double lid system, and external impact limiters. The cask is provided with top and bottom impact limiters, which are structures made of an external stainless steel skin and an energy-absorbing filling material. The filling material chosen was the wood composite denominated Oriented Strand Board (OSB), which is an engineered, mat-formed panel product made of strands, flakes or wafers sliced from small diameter, round wood logs and bonded with a binder under heat and pressure. The characterization of this material was carried in the scope of the cask project at the CDTN's laboratories. The tests conducted were the quasi-static compression, impact, shear-bending and edgewise shear tests. The compression, shear-bending and edgewise shear tests were carried out in a standard compression test machine and the impact test at a drop test tower equipped with a sturdy base and a drop weight. The main parameters of the material, like the Young and shear moduli, as well as the static and dynamic stress-strain curves and the specific energy absorbed, were determined during the test campaign. (author)

  13. Characterization of shock-absorbing material for packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourao, Rogerio Pimenta [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: mouraor@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Since 2001 Brazil has been participating in a regional effort with other Latin American countries which operate research reactors to improve its capability in the management of spent fuel elements from these reactors. One of the options considered is the long-term dry storage of the spent fuel in a dual purpose cask, i.e., a package for the transport and storage of radioactive material. In the scope of an IAEA-sponsored project, a cask was designed and a half-scale model for test was built. The cask consists of a sturdy cylindrical body provided with internal cavity to accommodate a basket holding the spent fuel elements, a double lid system, and external impact limiters. The cask is provided with top and bottom impact limiters, which are structures made of an external stainless steel skin and an energy-absorbing filling material. The filling material chosen was the wood composite denominated Oriented Strand Board (OSB), which is an engineered, mat-formed panel product made of strands, flakes or wafers sliced from small diameter, round wood logs and bonded with a binder under heat and pressure. The characterization of this material was carried in the scope of the cask project at the CDTN's laboratories. The tests conducted were the quasi-static compression, impact, shear-bending and edgewise shear tests. The compression, shear-bending and edgewise shear tests were carried out in a standard compression test machine and the impact test at a drop test tower equipped with a sturdy base and a drop weight. The main parameters of the material, like the Young and shear moduli, as well as the static and dynamic stress-strain curves and the specific energy absorbed, were determined during the test campaign. (author)

  14. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  15. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  16. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  17. Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering/Geological Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Santamarina, J. Carlos [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-12-30

    Fine-grained sediments host more than 90 percent of global gas hydrate accumulation. However, hydrate formation in clay-dominated sediments is less understood and characterized than other types of hydrate occurrence. There is an inadequate understanding of hydrate formation mechanisms, segregation structures, hydrate lens topology, system connectivity, and physical macro-scale properties of clay-dominated hydrate-bearing sediments. This situation hinders further analyses of the global carbon budget as well as engineering challenges/solutions related to hydrate instability and production. This project studies hydrate-bearing clay-dominated sediments with emphasis on the enhanced fundamental understanding of hydrate formation and resulting morphology, the development laboratory techniques to emulate natural hydrate formations, the assessment of analytical tools to predict physical properties, the evaluation of engineering and geological implications, and the advanced understanding of gas production potential from finegrained sediments.

  18. The structure of hydrate bearing fine grained marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, J.; Kingston, E.; Clayton, C. [Southampton Univ., Highfield (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering and the Environment; Schultheiss, P.; Druce, M. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed the structure of naturally occurring methane gas hydrates in fine-grained sediments from core samples recovered using in situ pressures from the eastern margin of the Indian Ocean. High resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) images were taken of gas hydrate cores. The hydrate structure was examined and comparisons were made between low resolution X-ray images obtained on the cores prior to sub-sectioning and depressurization procedures. The X-ray images showed the presence of high-angle, sub-parallel veins within the recovered sediments. The scans indicated that the hydrates occurred as fracture filing veins throughout the core. Fracture orientation was predominantly sub-vertical. Thick millimetric hydrate veins were composed of sub-millimetric veins with variations in fracture angle. The analysis indicated that hydrate formation was episodic in nature and subject to changes in the stress regime. Results of the study showed that depressurization and subsequent freezing alter the structure of the sediment even when the gas hydrate has not been altered. A large proportion of the hydrate survived when outside of its stability region. The self-preserving behaviour of the hydrate was attributed to the endothermic nature of gas hydrate dissociation. It was concluded that the accurate physical characterization of gas hydrates can only be conducted when the core section remains under in situ stress conditions. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Characterization of Ricin and R. communis Agglutinin Reference Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worbs, Sylvia; Skiba, Martin; Söderström, Martin; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Zeleny, Reinhard; Russmann, Heiko; Schimmel, Heinz; Vanninen, Paula; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Dorner, Brigitte G.

    2015-01-01

    Ricinus communis intoxications have been known for centuries and were attributed to the toxic protein ricin. Due to its toxicity, availability, ease of preparation, and the lack of medical countermeasures, ricin attracted interest as a potential biological warfare agent. While different technologies for ricin analysis have been established, hardly any universally agreed-upon “gold standards” are available. Expert laboratories currently use differently purified in-house materials, making any comparison of accuracy and sensitivity of different methods nearly impossible. Technically challenging is the discrimination of ricin from R. communis agglutinin (RCA120), a less toxic but highly homologous protein also contained in R. communis. Here, we established both highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials which were extensively characterized by gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight approaches as well as immunological and functional techniques. Purity reached >97% for ricin and >99% for RCA120. Different isoforms of ricin and RCA120 were identified unambiguously and distinguished by LC-ESI MS/MS. In terms of function, a real-time cytotoxicity assay showed that ricin is approximately 300-fold more toxic than RCA120. The highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials were used to conduct an international proficiency test. PMID:26703723

  20. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Ringe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR, the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask `how are nanoshapes created?', `how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', `how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  1. Characterization of Ricin and R. communis Agglutinin Reference Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Worbs

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ricinus communis intoxications have been known for centuries and were attributed to the toxic protein ricin. Due to its toxicity, availability, ease of preparation, and the lack of medical countermeasures, ricin attracted interest as a potential biological warfare agent. While different technologies for ricin analysis have been established, hardly any universally agreed-upon “gold standards” are available. Expert laboratories currently use differently purified in-house materials, making any comparison of accuracy and sensitivity of different methods nearly impossible. Technically challenging is the discrimination of ricin from R. communis agglutinin (RCA120, a less toxic but highly homologous protein also contained in R. communis. Here, we established both highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials which were extensively characterized by gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight approaches as well as immunological and functional techniques. Purity reached >97% for ricin and >99% for RCA120. Different isoforms of ricin and RCA120 were identified unambiguously and distinguished by LC-ESI MS/MS. In terms of function, a real-time cytotoxicity assay showed that ricin is approximately 300-fold more toxic than RCA120. The highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials were used to conduct an international proficiency test.

  2. Materials characterization center workshop on compositional and microstructural analysis of nuclear waste materials. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, J.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Shade, J.W.; Thomas, M.T.

    1981-06-01

    The purpose of the Workshop on Compositional and Microstructural Analysis of Nuclear Waste Materials, conducted November 11 and 12, 1980, was to critically examine and evaluate the various methods currently used to study non-radioactive, simulated, nuclear waste-form performance. Workshop participants recognized that most of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) test data for inclusion in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook will result from application of appropriate analytical procedures to waste-package materials or to the products of performance tests. Therefore, the analytical methods must be reliable and of known accuracy and precision, and results must be directly comparable with those from other laboratories and from other nuclear waste materials. The 41 participants representing 18 laboratories in the United States and Canada were organized into three working groups: Analysis of Liquids and Solutions, Quantitative Analysis of Solids, and Phase and Microstructure Analysis. Each group identified the analytical methods favored by their respective laboratories, discussed areas needing attention, listed standards and reference materials currently used, and recommended means of verifying interlaboratory comparability of data. The major conclusions from this workshop are presented

  3. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Doris E.; Griesser, Ulrich J.

    2018-01-01

    The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS) 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis), gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations). Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (de)hydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules) and (form III) differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products. PMID:29520359

  4. Experimental solid state NMR of gas hydrates : problems and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudrakovski, I.; Lu, H.; Ripmeester, J. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences; Kumar, R.; Susilo, R. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Luzi, M. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Solid State NMR is a suitable spectroscopic technique for hydrate research for several reasons, including its capability to distinguish between different structural types of hydrates, its quantitative nature and potential for both in-situ and time resolved experiments. This study illustrated the applications of solid state NMR for compositional and structural studies of clathrate hydrates, with particular emphasis on experimental techniques and potential ways to overcome technical difficulties. In order to use the method to its full capacity, some instrumental developments are needed to adapt it to the specific experimental requirements of hydrate studies, such as very low temperatures and high pressures. This presentation discussed the quantification of the Carbon-13 spectra with examples from natural and synthetic hydrates prepared from multi-component mixtures of hydrocarbons. The main approach used for the first two examples was Carbon-13 NMR with Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) at -100 degrees C. The detailed characterization of mixed hydrogen hydrates required low temperature hydrogen MAS. The quantification problems encountered during these experiments were also discussed. The purpose of these recent experimental developments was to prompt wider application of Solid State NMR in hydrate research. NMR proved to be a viable method for analyzing the composition and structure of multi-component mixed gas hydrates; characterizing natural gas hydrates; and, evaluating the formation conditions and properties of mixed hydrogen hydrates. The limitations of the method were highlighted and sensible choices of experimental conditions and techniques that ensure accurate results were discussed. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Applications of the Raman spectroscopy in the materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez S, S.; Escobar A, L.; Camacho L, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The study field of the science and technology of surfaces and materials have been of primordial importance in the last years due to the impact that they have the knowledge that it generates in diverse areas. For this reason, the Mexican Society of Science and Technology of Surfaces and Materials has focused a good part of their investigation activities toward the materials science and technology development. Inside the investigation fields carried out by members of this Society, are the following: semiconductors, thin films, hard coatings, deposit techniques, plasmas, biomaterials, Ab-initio calculations, characterization techniques, photo-thermal properties, solar cells, nano science, magnetism, superconductivity and related topics. Among the techniques used for this purpose is the Raman Spectroscopy (Rs), which has demonstrated to be a powerful and versatile tool in the materials study. In the last three congresses that the Society has organized, an average of 42 works related with this topic have been presented, what gave the rule to prepare this book whose objective is on one hand diffusing part of the works that carry out different groups integrated with members of the Society that use the Rs like an important tool in its investigation work. A second objective is that it can serve like support to the students that begin to be involved, or that they are already involved, in topics where the Rs can have a decisive paper in the development of its projects. It is also expected that some of the topics included in the book are of utility for professors and researches that already uses the Rs, or that it can be of help for those who are beginning in this technique as alternative or like complementary analysis tool. (Author)

  6. Physicochemical properties and thermal stability of quercetin hydrates in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghetti, G.S., E-mail: greicefarm@yahoo.com.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Carini, J.P. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Honorato, S.B.; Ayala, A.P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, CEP 60.455-970, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moreira, J.C.F. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto de Ciencias Basicas da Saude, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600, CEP 90035-003, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Bassani, V.L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin raw materials may present different degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal stability of quercetin in the solid state depends on its degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin dehydrate is thermodynamically more stable than the other crystal forms. - Abstract: In the present work three samples of quercetin raw materials (QCTa, QCTb and QCTc), purchased from different Brazilian suppliers, were characterized employing scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, simultaneous thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and variable temperature-powder X-ray diffraction, in order to know their physicochemical properties, specially the thermal stability in solid state. The results demonstrated that the raw materials of quercetin analyzed present distinct crystalline structures, ascribed to the different degree of hydration of their crystal lattice. The thermal stability of these quercetin raw materials in the solid state was highly dependent on their degree of hydration, where QCTa (quercetin dihydrate) was thermodynamically more stable than the other two samples.

  7. Characterization and Prediction of the Gas Hydrate Reservoir at the Second Offshore Gas Production Test Site in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machiko Tamaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the world’s first offshore production test that was conducted from a gas hydrate reservoir by a depressurization technique in 2013, the second offshore production test has been planned in the eastern Nankai Trough. In 2016, the drilling survey was performed ahead of the production test, and logging data that covers the reservoir interval were newly obtained from three wells around the test site: one well for geological survey, and two wells for monitoring surveys, during the production test. The formation evaluation using the well log data suggested that our target reservoir has a more significant heterogeneity in the gas hydrate saturation distribution than we expected, although lateral continuity of sand layers is relatively good. To evaluate the spatial distribution of gas hydrate, the integration analysis using well and seismic data was performed. The seismic amplitude analysis supports the lateral reservoir heterogeneity that has a significant positive correlation with the resistivity log data at the well locations. The spatial distribution of the apparent low-resistivity interval within the reservoir observed from log data was investigated by the P-velocity volume derived from seismic inversion. The integrated results were utilized for the pre-drill prediction of the reservoir quality at the producing wells. These approaches will reduce the risk of future commercial production from the gas hydrate reservoir.

  8. Analyses and characterization of fossil carbonaceous materials for silicon production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrvaagnes, Viktor

    2008-01-15

    Production of high silicon alloys is carried out in submerged arc furnaces by reduction of silicon bearing oxides (typically quartz) with carbon materials. Carbonaceous materials like coal, coke, charcoal and woodchips are commonly used as reduction materials in the process. Primarily based on historical prices of charcoal compared to fossil reduction materials, the Norwegian Ferroalloy Industry has mostly been using coal and coke (char) as the source of carbon. From a process point of view, the most important role of the carbonaceous material is to react with SiO gas to produce SiC. The ability of the reduction materials to react with SiO gas can be measured and the value is recognized as the reactivity of the carbon source. Reactivity is one of the most important parameters in the smelting process and is commonly acknowledged to strongly affect both productivity and specific energy consumption. The main objectives of this work has been to establish methods to characterize the material properties of fossil carbonaceous reduction materials used in the silicon process and to evaluated how these properties affect the reactivity towards SiO gas. In order to accomplish these objectives, three run of mine (ROM) single seam coals which are particularly well suited for ferroalloy production were selected. Two Carboniferous coals from USA (Blue Gem) and Poland (Staszic) with similar rank, but significantly different composition as well as a Permian coal from Australia (Peak Downs) have been characterized by chemical- and petrographical methods. Blue Gem is a homogeneous coal, low in mineral inclusions and macerals of the inertinite group and determined to have a random vitrinite reflectance of 0.71 %. Staszic has a similar reflectance of vitrinite (0.72 %), but is determined to be a very inhomogeneous coal with both inertinite macerals and minerals embedded in the vitrinite matrix. Peak Downs has a random reflectance of vitrinite of 1.32 % and is hence the coal sample of

  9. Development and characterization of acoustically efficient cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neithalath, Narayanan

    Tire-pavement interaction noise is one of the significant environmental issues in highly populated urban areas situated near busy highways. The understanding that methodologies to reduce the sound at the source itself is necessary, has led to the development of porous paving materials. This thesis outlines the systematic research effort conducted in order to develop and characterize two different types of sound absorbing cementitious materials---Enhanced Porosity Concrete (EPC), that incorporates porosity in the non-aggregate component of the mixture, and Cellulose-Cement Composites, where cellulose fibers are used as porous inclusions. The basic tenet of this research is that carefully introduced porosity of about 15%--25% in the material structure of concrete will allow sound waves to pass through and dissipate its energy. The physical, mechanical, and acoustic properties of EPC mixtures are discussed in detail. Methods are developed to determine the porosity of EPC. The total pore volume, pore size, and pore connectivity are the significant features that influence the behavior of EPC. Using a shape-specific model, and incorporating the principle of acoustic wave propagation through semi-open cells, the acoustic absorption in EPC has been modeled. The pore structure and performance of EPC is characterized using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy. Using a multi-phase conducting model, a pore connectivity factor has been developed, that correlates well with the acoustic absorption coefficient. A falling head permeameter has been designed to ascertain the water permeability of EPC mixtures. A hydraulic connectivity factor is proposed, which could be used to classify EPC mixtures based on their permeability. Electrical conductivity is shown to be a single measurable parameter that defines the performance of EPC. Preliminary studies conducted on the freezing and thawing response of EPC are also reported. From several porous, compliant materials, morphologically altered

  10. Characterization of water in hydrated Bombyx mori silk fibroin fiber and films by 2H NMR relaxation and 13C solid state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Isobe, Kotaro; Kametani, Shunsuke; Ukpebor, Obehi T; Silverstein, Moshe C; Boutis, Gregory S

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF), such as elasticity and tensile strength, change remarkably upon hydration. However, the microscopic interaction with water is not currently well understood on a molecular level. In this work, the dynamics of water molecules interacting with SF was studied by 2 H solution NMR relaxation and exchange measurements. Additionally, the conformations of hydrated [3- 13 C]Ala-, [3- 13 C]Ser-, and [3- 13 C]Tyr-SF fibers and films were investigated by 13 C DD/MAS NMR. Using an inverse Laplace transform algorithm, we were able to identify four distinct components in the relaxation times for water in SF fiber. Namely, A: bulk water outside the fiber, B: water molecules trapped weakly on the surface of the fiber, C: bound water molecules located in the inner surface of the fiber, and D: bound water molecules located in the inner part of the fiber were distinguishable. In addition, four components were also observed for water in the SF film immersed in methanol for 30s, while only two components for the film immersed in methanol for 24h. The effects of hydration on the conformation of Ser and Tyr residues in the site-specific crystalline and non-crystalline domains of 13 C selectively labeled SF, respectively, could be determined independently. Our measurements provide new insight relating the characteristics of water and the hydration structure of silk, which are relevant in light of current interest in the design of novel silk-based biomaterials. The mechanical properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF) change remarkably upon hydration. However, the microscopic interaction between SF and water is not currently well understood on a molecular level. We were able to identify four distinct components in the relaxation times for water in SF fiber by 2 H solution NMR relaxation and exchange measurements. In addition, the effects of hydration on the conformation of Ser and Tyr residues in the site-specific crystalline and

  11. TXRF applications for semiconductor materials and process characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitz, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    In the past 30 years, the semiconductor industry has undergone a dramatic evolution in technology which now has become part of our daily lives. The density of transistors on a chip has grown exponentially, approximately doubling every 18 months or increasing 3200 times. Early chips from the 1970's had about 2300 components on them compared to 7.5 million on today's sophisticated microprocessors. It is an exhausting pace with no let up in sight. Traditional materials are no longer keeping pace. Smaller and smaller circuits require alternative materials and processes. New materials such as high k and low k dielectric are being evaluated to replace silicon dioxide both as a gate material and as an insulator. Copper wiring which has less resistance thereby increasing signal speed is well into manufacturing. Other technologies such as SOI (silicon on insulator) are good candidates to win the battle of speed and performance. To keep this pace of phenomenal creativity going, material characterization and process development needs novel and innovative techniques. The versatility of total reflection x-ray florescence (TXRF) makes it an ideal analytical instrument for research and development studies for ultra trace metal analysis. TXRF can easily measure the surfaces of thin metallic films, but also both low and high K dielectric materials for ultra trace contamination levels. The multiple element capability provides accurate quantitative data over a wide range of elements. Nontraditional elements such as argon which is easily trapped in films during the sputter deposition process are easily detected by TXRF. Advances in light element; Al, Na, Mg, are providing information that was very difficult and time consuming to obtain by other analytical techniques. TXRF analysis on wafers show aluminum contamination patterns from a brush clean study and an ion implanted, shallow doped study. The silicon wafer is the perfect carrier for a TXRF analysis- smooth and highly polished for

  12. Synthesis and characterization of new polyamino-cyclodextrin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Meo, Paolo; D'Anna, Francesca; Gruttadauria, Michelangelo; Riela, Serena; Noto, Renato

    2012-01-10

    With the aim of the synthesis of chemically modified cyclodextrins bearing polyamine pendant groups, potentially useful as capping agents for the preparation of nanosized metal systems or as auxiliaries for gene transfection, the reaction between the heptakis-(6-iodo)-(6-deoxy)-β-cyclodextrin and various polyamines has been explored. This synthetic approach allows obtaining materials constituted by mixtures of cyclodextrins, having different degrees of substitution, which were satisfactorily characterized by means of various complementary techniques (ESI-MS, NMR, potentiometric titration). The products obtained were successfully subjected to preliminary tests for their binding abilities towards suitable organic guests and as capping agents for the preparation of stable silver nanoparticles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of materials characterization techniques and their future aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Shun-ichi; Kimura, Masao; Tanaka, Koki; Ikematsu, Yoichi; Mizukami, Kazumi

    2010-01-01

    Steel industry uniformly makes various qualities controlling both the internal textures and the surfaces of the steel productions, which are manufactured several 10 tons at a time, with the nano-scale. Recently, processing technology with nano-level has been approaching with atomic level because of manufacturing higher grade steel plate. So it is important that atomic level characterization increases along with it. On the other hand, shortage of raw materials and its sudden rise of the price make management situation worse. Analytical technology is expected to propose the next generation of steel plate with competitive edge and its operation provision. In this article, we will introduce several examples of our researches and give the future aspects of analytical technologies for steel industry. (author)

  14. Materials characterization studies on LANA75/85 materials for replacement beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, Kirk L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-30

    During FY15 and FY16, a purchase order (PO) was placed with Japan Metals and Chemicals, USA after an open bidding procurement process for 282 kg of LaNi4.25Al0.75 and 226 kg. of LaNi4.15Al0.85. These materials were to be used in Tritium Facility replacement beds for existing beds that have reached the end of their useful life. As part of the PO, a 100 g. sample of each material was delivered to the SRNL Hydrogen Processing Group for characterization studies as is typically done for all newly acquired hydride materials. The PO actually employed a “trust but verify” approach where JMCUSA was allowed to ship materials it felt met specifications without SRS confirmation, as long as the data used to do so was delivered to SRS as part of the PO documentation package. Subsequent SRNL analysis revealed that the material met all specifications and was of very high quality. This report documents those findings.

  15. Workplace characterizations in case of rail transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donadille, L.; Itie, C.; Lahaye, T.; Muller, H.; Bottolier-Depois, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radioactive fuel and wastes are frequently transported for storage and/or reprocessing purposes. The main part of this transport is generally done by train. Before, during and after the journey, operators and drivers, who work directly in contact with and in the vicinity of the wagons, are exposed to external irradiations due to the radioactive materials that are confined inside the containers. In order to evaluate the dose that its personnel is liable to receive during such transports, the French National Railway Company (SNCF) has requested to the Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) a series of workplaces characterizations for convoys of different types, that are considered to be representative of all types of possible transports. Each one is associated to a given radioactive material (low and medium activity wastes, new and used fuel, MOX, uranium fluoride, etc... ), involving photon or mixed neutron-photon fields. This measurement campaign has started in May 2004 and by the end of 2004 at least four types of radioactive convoys will have been investigated (three have already been measured). By using survey meters and spectrometers, the study consists in measuring the external exposure for different stages of the work that is done beside the wagons (for example coupling / decoupling two wagons, or checking the brakes) and inside the locomotive (driving). For each one of these workplaces, the exposure is estimated in terms of the ambient dose equivalent H*(10) by summing the dose all along the different phases carried out by the operator. In addition, a dosimetric characterization of each convoy is made by performing measurements along the wagons and spectrometric information about the photon and/or neutron fields are collected. This study provides helpful data to predict the dose that the operators are liable to integrate over long periods, typically one year. (author)

  16. Biomechanical testing and material characterization for the rat large intestine: regional dependence of material parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolis, Dimitrios P; Orfanidis, Ioannis K; Peroulis, Michalis

    2011-12-01

    The function of the large bowel is to absorb water from the remaining indigestible food matter and subsequently pass useless waste material from the body, but there has been only a small amount of data in the literature on its biomechanical characteristics that would facilitate our understanding of its transport function. Our study aims to fill this gap by affording comprehensive inflation/extension data of intestinal segments from distinct areas, spanning a physiologically relevant deformation range (100-130% axial stretches and 0-15 mmHg lumen pressures). These data were characterized by the Fung-type exponential model in the thick-walled setting, showing reasonable agreement, i.e. root-mean-square error ~30%. Based on optimized material parameters, i.e. a(1)testing and material characterization results for the large intestine of healthy young animals are expected to aid in comprehending the adaptation/remodeling that occurs with ageing, pathological conditions and surgical procedures, as well as for the development of suitable biomaterials for replacement.

  17. Individualized Pixel Synthesis and Characterization of Combinatorial Materials Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Xiang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, an experimentally determined phase diagram requires studies of phase formation at a range of temperatures for each composition, which takes years of effort from multiple research groups. Combinatorial materials chip technology, featuring high-throughput synthesis and characterization, is able to determine the phase diagram of an entire composition spread of a binary or ternary system at a single temperature on one materials library, which, though significantly increasing efficiency, still requires many libraries processed at a series of temperatures in order to complete a phase diagram. In this paper, we propose a “one-chip method” to construct a complete phase diagram by individually synthesizing each pixel step by step with a progressive pulse of energy to heat at different temperatures while monitoring the phase evolution on the pixel in situ in real time. Repeating this process pixel by pixel throughout the whole chip allows the entire binary or ternary phase diagram to be mapped on one chip in a single experiment. The feasibility of this methodology is demonstrated in a study of a Ge-Sb-Te ternary alloy system, on which the amorphous-crystalline phase boundary is determined.

  18. High-throughput characterization for solar fuels materials discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Slobodan; Becerra, Natalie; Cornell, Earl; Guevarra, Dan; Haber, Joel; Jin, Jian; Jones, Ryan; Kan, Kevin; Marcin, Martin; Newhouse, Paul; Soedarmadji, Edwin; Suram, Santosh; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John; High-Throughput Experimentation Team

    2014-03-01

    In this talk I will present the status of the High-Throughput Experimentation (HTE) project of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP). JCAP is an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mandate to deliver a solar fuel generator based on an integrated photoelectrochemical cell (PEC). However, efficient and commercially viable catalysts or light absorbers for the PEC do not exist. The mission of HTE is to provide the accelerated discovery through combinatorial synthesis and rapid screening of material properties. The HTE pipeline also features high-throughput material characterization using x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). In this talk I present the currently operating pipeline and focus on our combinatorial XPS efforts to build the largest free database of spectra from mixed-metal oxides, nitrides, sulfides and alloys. This work was performed at Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, supported through the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DE-SC0004993.

  19. Weld characterization of RAFM steel. EBP structural materials milestone 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, A. [Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees, CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay (France); Fontes, A. [Service de Techniques Avancees, CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay (France); Schaefer, L. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Gauthier, A.; Tavassoli, A.A. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay (France); Van Osch, E.V.; Van der Schaaf [ed.] [ECN Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    In the long term part of the European Fusion technology programme welding of reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM)steels takes a prominent place. The blanket structures are complex and welding is an important element in manufacturing procedures. In the 95-98 program several Structural Materials tasks of the European Blanket Project are devoted to welding of RAFM steels. In the milestone 3 defined for the program a review of the weld characterization was foreseen in 1998. The present report gives the status of tasks and the major conclusions and recommendations of the welding milestone meeting. The major conclusion is that defect free GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), EBW (Electron Beam Welding) and diffusion welds can be accomplished, but further work is needed to assure quantitatively the service boundary conditions. Also for irradiated steel additional work is recommended for the 99-02 period. Development of filler wire material for the European reference RAFM: EUROFER97 is necessary. Establishment of weldability tests must be settled in the next period also. 14 refs.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF GEOLOGICAL MATERIALS USING ION AND PHOTON BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOROK, SZ.B.; JONES, K.W.; TUNIZ, C.

    1998-01-01

    Geological specimens are often complex materials that require different analytical methods for their characterization. The parameters of interest may include the chemical composition of major, minor and trace elements. The chemical compounds incorporated in the minerals, the crystal structure and isotopic composition need to be considered. Specimens may be highly heterogeneous thus necessitating analytical methods capable of measurements on small sample volumes with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. Much essential information on geological materials can be obtained by using ion or photon beams. In this chapter we describe the principal analytical techniques based on particle accelerators, showing some applications that are hardly possible with conventional methods. In particular, the following techniques will be discussed: (1) Synchrotron radiation (SR) induced X-ray emission (SRIXE) and particle-induced X-ray emission (PEE) and other ion beam techniques for trace element analysis. (2) Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for ultra sensitive analysis of stable nuclides and long-lived radionuclides. In most of the cases also the possibilities of elemental and isotopic analysis with high resolution will be discussed

  1. Neutron resonance spectroscopy for the characterization of materials and objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillebeeckx, P; Borella, A; Emiliani, F; Kopecky, S; Lampoudis, C; Gorini, G; Cippo, E Perelli; Kockelmann, W; Rhodes, N J; Schooneveld, E M; Moxon, M; Postma, H; Van Beveren, C

    2012-01-01

    The resonance structure in neutron induced reaction cross sections can be used to determine the elemental compositions of materials or objects. The occurrence of resonances is the basis of neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) and neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA). NRCA and NRTA are fully non-destructive methods to determine the bulk elemental composition without the need of any sample preparation and resulting in a negligible residual activity. They have been applied to determine the elemental composition of archaeological objects and to characterize reference materials used for cross section measurements. For imaging applications a position sensitive neutron detector has been developed within the ANCIENT CHARM project. The detector is based on a 10 × 10 array of 6 Li-glass scintillators mounted on a pitch of 2.5 mm, resulting in a 25 × 25 mm 2 active area. The detector has been tested at the time-of-flight facility GELINA and used at the ISIS spallation source to study cultural heritage objects.

  2. Neutron resonance spectroscopy for the characterization of materials and objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Borella, A.; Emiliani, F.; Gorini, G.; Kockelmann, W.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Moxon, M.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Postma, H.; Rhodes, N. J.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Van Beveren, C.

    2012-03-01

    The resonance structure in neutron induced reaction cross sections can be used to determine the elemental compositions of materials or objects. The occurrence of resonances is the basis of neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) and neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA). NRCA and NRTA are fully non-destructive methods to determine the bulk elemental composition without the need of any sample preparation and resulting in a negligible residual activity. They have been applied to determine the elemental composition of archaeological objects and to characterize reference materials used for cross section measurements. For imaging applications a position sensitive neutron detector has been developed within the ANCIENT CHARM project. The detector is based on a 10 × 10 array of 6Li-glass scintillators mounted on a pitch of 2.5 mm, resulting in a 25 × 25 mm2 active area. The detector has been tested at the time-of-flight facility GELINA and used at the ISIS spallation source to study cultural heritage objects.

  3. Microstructural Characterization of Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Ceramics. Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    Microstructural characterization of two reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics has been carried out by interference layering, plasma etching, and microscopy. These specimens contained free silicon and niobium disilicide as minor phases with silicon carbide as the major phase. In conventionally prepared samples, the niobium disilicide cannot be distinguished from silicon in optical micrographs. After interference layering, all phases are clearly distinguishable. Back scattered electron (BSE) imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) confirmed the results obtained by interference layering. Plasma etching with CF4 plus 4% O2 selectively attacks silicon in these specimens. It is demonstrated that interference layering and plasma etching are very useful techniques in the phase identification and microstructural characterization of multiphase ceramic materials.

  4. Engineered materials characterization report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 2, Design data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.; Roy, A.K.; Jones, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Engineered Materials Characterization Report which presents the design data for candidate materials needed in fabricating different components for both large and medium multi-purpose canister (MPC) disposal containers, waste packages for containing uncanistered spent fuel (UCF), and defense high-level waste (HLW) glass disposal containers. The UCF waste package consists of a disposal container with a basket therein. It is assumed that the waste packages will incorporate all-metallic multibarrier disposal containers to accommodate medium and large MPCs, ULCF, and HLW glass canisters. Unless otherwise specified, the disposal container designs incorporate an outer corrosion-allowance metal barrier over an inner corrosion-resistant metal barrier. The corrosion-allowance barrier, which will be thicker than the inner corrosion-resistant barrier, is designed to undergo corrosion-induced degradation at a very low rate, thus providing the inner barrier protection from the near-field environment for a prolonged service period

  5. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris E. Braun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations. Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (dehydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules and (form III differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products.

  6. Evaluation of Nutritional Status and Hydration in Patients on Chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nutrition and hydration of the dialysis patients have major influences on the outcomes of chronic hemodialysis. Purpose: To characterize the states of nutrition and hydration in patients on chronic hemodialysis at Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) and to evaluate the usefulness of measurements by ...

  7. Characterization of NORM material produced in a water treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suursoo, S.; Kiisk, M.; Jantsikene, A.; Koch, R.; Isakar, K.; Realo, E. [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Lumiste, L. [Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia)

    2014-07-01

    In February 2012 a water treatment plant was opened in Viimsi, Estonia. The plant is designed for removal of iron, manganese, and radium from groundwater. The first 2 years of operation have shown that the purification process generates significant amounts of materials with elevated radium levels. The treatment plant is fed by nine wells, which open to radium-rich aquifers. Purification is achieved by aeration and filtration processes. Aerated water is led through two successive filter columns, first of them is filled with MnO{sub 2} coated material FMH and filtration sand, the second one with zeolite. The plant has five parallel treatment lines with a total of 95 tons of FMH + filtration sand, and 45 tons of zeolite. The average capacity of the facility has been 2400 m{sup 3}/day. Yearly input of radium to the plant is estimated to be 325 MBq for Ra-226, and 420 MBq for Ra-228. Most of the radium (about 90%) accumulates in the filter columns. Some 8-9% of it is removed by backwash water during regular filter backwash cycles. To characterize radium accumulation and its removal by backwash in detail, treatment line no. 5 is sampled monthly for filter materials and backwash water. A steady growth of radium activity concentrations is apparent in both filter materials. In the top layer of the first stage filter (FMH+sand), Ra-226 and Ra-228 activity concentrations (per unit dry weight) reached (1540 ± 60) Bq/kg and (2510 ± 50) Bq/kg (k=2), respectively, by April 2013. At the same time, radium content in the top layer of the second stage filter (zeolite) was an order of magnitude higher: (19 600 ± 130) Bq/kg for Ra-226, and (22 260 ± 170) Bq/kg for Ra-228 (k=2). Radium is not evenly distributed throughout the filter columns. A rough estimate can be given that after 1.25 years of operation (by April 2013) the accumulated activities in treatment line no. 5 reached 1000 MBq for Ra-226 and 1200 MBq for Ra-228. Although filters are the most important type of NORM

  8. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  9. Gelatin as a new humidity sensing material: Characterization and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapardanis, Steven [School of Engineering and Technology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States); Hudpeth, Mathew [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States); Kaya, Tolga, E-mail: kaya2t@cmich.edu [School of Engineering and Technology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States); Science of Advanced Materials Program, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The goal of this work is to assert the utility of collagen and its denatured counterpart gelatin as cost-effective alternatives to existing sensing layers comprised of polymers. Rather than producing a material that will need to be discarded or recycled, collagen, as a by-product of the meat and leather industry, could be repurposed. This work examines the feasibility of using collagen as a sensing layer. Planar electrodes were patterned with lift-off process to work with the natural characteristics of gelatin by utilizing metal vapor deposition, spin coating, and photolithography. Characterization methods have also been optimized through the creation of specialized humidity chambers that isolate specific characteristics such as response time, accuracy, and hysteresis. Collagen-based sensors are found to have a sensitivity to moisture in the range of 0.065 pF/%RH. Diffusion characteristics were also analyzed with the diffusion coefficient found to be 2.5 × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s. Absorption and desorption times were found to be 20 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. Hysteresis present in the data is attributed to temperature cross-sensitivity. Ultimately, the utility of collagen as a dielectric sensing material is, in part, due to its fibrous macrostructures as well its hydrophilic sites along the peptide chains. Gelatin was patterned between and below interdigitated copper electrodes and tested as a relative humidity sensor. This work shows that gelatin, which is inexpensive, widely available, and easy to process, can be an effective dielectric sensing polymer for capacitive-type relative humidity sensors.

  10. Gelatin as a new humidity sensing material: Characterization and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Shapardanis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work is to assert the utility of collagen and its denatured counterpart gelatin as cost-effective alternatives to existing sensing layers comprised of polymers. Rather than producing a material that will need to be discarded or recycled, collagen, as a by-product of the meat and leather industry, could be repurposed. This work examines the feasibility of using collagen as a sensing layer. Planar electrodes were patterned with lift-off process to work with the natural characteristics of gelatin by utilizing metal vapor deposition, spin coating, and photolithography. Characterization methods have also been optimized through the creation of specialized humidity chambers that isolate specific characteristics such as response time, accuracy, and hysteresis. Collagen-based sensors are found to have a sensitivity to moisture in the range of 0.065 pF/%RH. Diffusion characteristics were also analyzed with the diffusion coefficient found to be 2.5 × 10−5 cm2/s. Absorption and desorption times were found to be 20 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. Hysteresis present in the data is attributed to temperature cross-sensitivity. Ultimately, the utility of collagen as a dielectric sensing material is, in part, due to its fibrous macrostructures as well its hydrophilic sites along the peptide chains. Gelatin was patterned between and below interdigitated copper electrodes and tested as a relative humidity sensor. This work shows that gelatin, which is inexpensive, widely available, and easy to process, can be an effective dielectric sensing polymer for capacitive-type relative humidity sensors.

  11. Materials growth and characterization of thermoelectric and resistive switching devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Kate J.

    In the 74 years since diode rectifier based radar technology helped the allied forces win WWII, semiconductors have transformed the world we live in. From our smart phones to semiconductor-based energy conversion, semiconductors touch every aspect of our lives. With this thesis I hope to expand human knowledge of semiconductor thermoelectric devices and resistive switching devices through experimentation with materials growth and subsequent materials characterization. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was the primary method of materials growth utilized in these studies. Additionally, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), atomic layer deposition (ALD),ion beam sputter deposition, reactive sputter deposition and electron-beam (e-beam) evaporation were also used in this research for device fabrication. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were the primary characterization methods utilized for this research. Additional device and materials characterization techniques employed include: current-voltage measurements, thermoelectric measurements, x-ray diffraction (XRD), reflection absorption infra-red spectroscopy (RAIRS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), photoluminescence (PL), and raman spectroscopy. As society has become more aware of its impact on the planet and its limited resources, there has been a push toward developing technologies to sustainably produce the energy we need. Thermoelectric devices convert heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectric devices have the potential to save huge amounts of energy that we currently waste as heat, if we can make them cost-effective. Semiconducting thin films and nanowires appear to be promising avenues of research to attain this goal. Specifically, in this work we will explore the use of ErSb thin films as well as Si and InP nanowire networks for thermoelectric applications. First we will discuss the growth of

  12. Rapid hydrogen hydrate growth from non-stoichiometric tuning mixtures during liquid nitrogen quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, R Gary; Kerkar, Prasad B; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A; Sum, Amadeu K

    2012-06-21

    In this study the rapid growth of sII H(2) hydrate within 20 min of post formation quenching towards liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) temperature is presented. Initially at 72 MPa and 258 K, hydrate samples would cool to the conditions of ~60 MPa and ~90 K after quenching. Although within the stability region for H(2) hydrate, new hydrate growth only occurred under LN(2) quenching of the samples when preformed hydrate "seeds" of THF + H(2) were in the presence of unconverted ice. The characterization of hydrate seeds and the post-quenched samples was performed with confocal Raman spectroscopy. These results suggest that quenching to LN(2) temperature, a common preservation technique for ex situ hydrate analysis, can lead to rapid unintended hydrate growth. Specifically, guest such as H(2) that may otherwise need sufficiently long induction periods to nucleate, may still experience rapid growth through an increased kinetic effect from a preformed hydrate template.

  13. A pressure core ultrasonic test system for on-board analysis of gas hydrate-bearing sediments under in situ pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhou, Weihua; Xue, Kaihua; Wei, Rupeng; Ling, Zheng

    2018-05-01

    The enormous potential as an alternative energy resource has made natural gas hydrates a material of intense research interest. Their exploration and sample characterization require a quick and effective analysis of the hydrate-bearing cores recovered under in situ pressures. Here a novel Pressure Core Ultrasonic Test System (PCUTS) for on-board analysis of sediment cores containing gas hydrates at in situ pressures is presented. The PCUTS is designed to be compatible with an on-board pressure core transfer device and a long gravity-piston pressure-retained corer. It provides several advantages over laboratory core analysis including quick and non-destructive detection, in situ and successive acoustic property acquisition, and remission of sample storage and transportation. The design of the unique assembly units to ensure the in situ detection is demonstrated, involving the U-type protecting jackets, transducer precession device, and pressure stabilization system. The in situ P-wave velocity measurements make the detection of gas hydrate existence in the sediments possible on-board. Performance tests have verified the feasibility and sensitivity of the ultrasonic test unit, showing the dependence of P-wave velocity on gas hydrate saturation. The PCUTS has been successfully applied for analysis of natural samples containing gas hydrates recovered from the South China Sea. It is indicated that on-board P-wave measurements could provide a quick and effective understanding of the hydrate occurrence in natural samples, which can assist further resource exploration, assessment, and subsequent detailed core analysis.

  14. A pressure core ultrasonic test system for on-board analysis of gas hydrate-bearing sediments under in situ pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhou, Weihua; Xue, Kaihua; Wei, Rupeng; Ling, Zheng

    2018-05-01

    The enormous potential as an alternative energy resource has made natural gas hydrates a material of intense research interest. Their exploration and sample characterization require a quick and effective analysis of the hydrate-bearing cores recovered under in situ pressures. Here a novel Pressure Core Ultrasonic Test System (PCUTS) for on-board analysis of sediment cores containing gas hydrates at in situ pressures is presented. The PCUTS is designed to be compatible with an on-board pressure core transfer device and a long gravity-piston pressure-retained corer. It provides several advantages over laboratory core analysis including quick and non-destructive detection, in situ and successive acoustic property acquisition, and remission of sample storage and transportation. The design of the unique assembly units to ensure the in situ detection is demonstrated, involving the U-type protecting jackets, transducer precession device, and pressure stabilization system. The in situ P-wave velocity measurements make the detection of gas hydrate existence in the sediments possible on-board. Performance tests have verified the feasibility and sensitivity of the ultrasonic test unit, showing the dependence of P-wave velocity on gas hydrate saturation. The PCUTS has been successfully applied for analysis of natural samples containing gas hydrates recovered from the South China Sea. It is indicated that on-board P-wave measurements could provide a quick and effective understanding of the hydrate occurrence in natural samples, which can assist further resource exploration, assessment, and subsequent detailed core analysis.

  15. Resilient Modulus Characterization of Alaskan Granular Base Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Resilient modulus (MR) of base course material is an important material input for : pavement design. In Alaska, due to distinctiveness of local climate, material source, : fines content and groundwater level, resilient properties of D-1 granular base...

  16. Eutectics as improved pharmaceutical materials: design, properties and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukuvada, Suryanarayan; Nangia, Ashwini

    2014-01-28

    Eutectics are a long known class of multi-component solids with important and useful applications in daily life. In comparison to other multi-component crystalline solids, such as salts, solid solutions, molecular complexes and cocrystals, eutectics are less studied in terms of molecular structure organization and bonding interactions. Classically, a eutectic is defined based on its low melting point compared to the individual components. In this article, we attempt to define eutectics not just based on thermal methods but from a structural organization view point, and discuss their microstructures and properties as organic materials vis-a-vis solid solutions and cocrystals. The X-ray crystal structure of a cocrystal is different from that of the individual components whereas the unit cell of a solid solution is similar to that of one of the components. Eutectics are closer to the latter species in that their crystalline arrangement is similar to the parent components but they are different with respect to the structural integrity. A solid solution possesses structural homogeneity throughout the structure (single phase) but a eutectic is a heterogeneous ensemble of individual components whose crystal structures are like discontinuous solid solutions (phase separated). Thus, a eutectic may be better defined as a conglomerate of solid solutions. A structural analysis of cocrystals, solid solutions and eutectics has led to an understanding that materials with strong adhesive (hetero) interactions between the unlike components will lead to cocrystals whereas those having stronger cohesive (homo/self) interactions will more often give rise to solid solutions (for similar structures of components) and eutectics (for different structures of components). We demonstrate that the same crystal engineering principles which have been profitably utilized for cocrystal design in the past decade can now be applied to make eutectics as novel composite materials, illustrated by

  17. Advanced characterization of materials using swift ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabacniks, Manfredo H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Swift ion beams are powerful non destructive tools for material analysis especially thin films. In spite of their high energy, usually several MeV/u, little energy is deposited by the ion on the sample. Energetic ions also use to stop far away (or outside) the inspected volume, hence producing negligible damage to the sample. Ion beam methods provide quantitative trace element analysis of any atomic element (and some isotopes) in a sample and are able to yield elemental depth profiles with spatial resolution of the order of 10mm. Relying on nuclear properties of the atoms, these methods are insensitive to the chemical environment of the element, consequently not limited by matrix effects. Ion beam methods are multielemental, can handle insulating materials, are quick (an analysis usually takes less than 15 minutes), and need little (if any) sample preparation. Ion beams are also sensitive to surface roughness and sample porosity and can be used to quickly inspect these properties in a sample. The Laboratory for Ion Beam Analysis of the University of Sao Paulo, LAMFI, is a multi-user facility dedicated to provide Ion Beam Methods like PIXE, RBS, FRS and NRA techniques for the analysis of materials and thin films. Operating since 1994, LAMFI is being used mostly by many researchers from within and outside USP, most of them non specialists in ion beam methods, but in need of ion beam analysis to carry out their research. At LAMFI, during the last 9 years, more than 50% of the accelerator time was dedicated to analysis, usually PIXE or RBS. 21% was down time and about 14% of the time was used for the development of ion beam methods which includes the use of RBS for roughness characterization exploring the shading of the beam by structures on the surface and by modeling the RBS spectrum as the product of a normalized RBS spectrum and a height density distribution function of the surface. Single element thick target PIXE analysis is being developed to obtain the thin

  18. Advanced characterization of materials using swift ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabacniks, Manfredo H.

    2011-01-01

    Swift ion beams are powerful non destructive tools for material analysis especially thin films. In spite of their high energy, usually several MeV/u, little energy is deposited by the ion on the sample. Energetic ions also use to stop far away (or outside) the inspected volume, hence producing negligible damage to the sample. Ion beam methods provide quantitative trace element analysis of any atomic element (and some isotopes) in a sample and are able to yield elemental depth profiles with spatial resolution of the order of 10mm. Relying on nuclear properties of the atoms, these methods are insensitive to the chemical environment of the element, consequently not limited by matrix effects. Ion beam methods are multielemental, can handle insulating materials, are quick (an analysis usually takes less than 15 minutes), and need little (if any) sample preparation. Ion beams are also sensitive to surface roughness and sample porosity and can be used to quickly inspect these properties in a sample. The Laboratory for Ion Beam Analysis of the University of Sao Paulo, LAMFI, is a multi-user facility dedicated to provide Ion Beam Methods like PIXE, RBS, FRS and NRA techniques for the analysis of materials and thin films. Operating since 1994, LAMFI is being used mostly by many researchers from within and outside USP, most of them non specialists in ion beam methods, but in need of ion beam analysis to carry out their research. At LAMFI, during the last 9 years, more than 50% of the accelerator time was dedicated to analysis, usually PIXE or RBS. 21% was down time and about 14% of the time was used for the development of ion beam methods which includes the use of RBS for roughness characterization exploring the shading of the beam by structures on the surface and by modeling the RBS spectrum as the product of a normalized RBS spectrum and a height density distribution function of the surface. Single element thick target PIXE analysis is being developed to obtain the thin

  19. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  20. Characterization of serpentine. A potential nuclear shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, A.; Rajeswari, B.; Kadam, R.M.; Kshirsagar, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of serpentine as a potential nuclear shielding material necessitates a chemical quality control of the samples before its use in reactors. With this in view, characterization of these mineral samples was carried out using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) methods. The analytical results obtained by both ICP-AES and NAA techniques were found to be comparable. Na, Cr, Co, Zn, and Cu were found to be present in all samples of Indian origin while Ga, Ag, Ni, and Cd were found to below the limits of detection. A comparison on the detection limits of elements of interest was also carried out by both the analytical techniques and found to be in good agreement. An infrared spectroscopic investigation was also carried out on all the mineral samples. Bands at 3,689 and 3,648 cm -1 were attributed to inner and outer hydroxyl stretching of Mg-OH, respectively. The weak and broad band centered around 3,416 cm -1 was assigned due to the stretching vibrations of the adsorbed water molecules while three bands at 1076, 1022 and 968 cm -1 were prescribed to the vibrations of the SiO 4 tetrahedra. (author)

  1. Non-contact tensile viscoelastic characterization of microscale biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhui; Hong, Yuan; Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Shaobao; Shi, Qiang; Tang, Deding; Yang, Hui; Genin, Guy M.; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2018-06-01

    Many structures and materials in nature and physiology have important "meso-scale" structures at the micron length-scale whose tensile responses have proven difficult to characterize mechanically. Although techniques such as atomic force microscopy and micro- and nano-identation are mature for compression and indentation testing at the nano-scale, and standard uniaxial and shear rheometry techniques exist for the macroscale, few techniques are applicable for tensile-testing at the micrometre-scale, leaving a gap in our understanding of hierarchical biomaterials. Here, we present a novel magnetic mechanical testing (MMT) system that enables viscoelastic tensile testing at this critical length scale. The MMT system applies non-contact loading, avoiding gripping and surface interaction effects. We demonstrate application of the MMT system to the first analyses of the pure tensile responses of several native and engineered tissue systems at the mesoscale, showing the broad potential of the system for exploring micro- and meso-scale analysis of structured and hierarchical biological systems.

  2. Characterization of Catalyst Materials for Production of Aerospace Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Lauren M.; De La Ree, Ana B.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Due to environmental, economic, and security issues, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to non-petroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. Additionally, efforts are concentrated on reducing costs coupled with fuel production from non-conventional sources. One solution to this issue is Fischer-Tropsch gas-to-liquid technology. Fischer-Tropsch processing of synthesis gas (CO/H2) produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fisher-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur or aromatic compounds. This process is most commonly catalyzed by heterogeneous (in this case, silver and platinum) catalysts composed of cobalt supported on alumina or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Physisorption, chemisorptions, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are described to better understand the potential performance of Fischer-Tropsch cobalt on alumina catalysts promoted with silver and platinum. The overall goal is to preferentially produce C8 to C18 paraffin compounds for use as aerospace fuels. Progress towards this goal will eventually be updated and achieved by a more thorough understanding of the characterization of catalyst materials. This work was supported by NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing and In-situ Resource Utilization projects.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous Mn-MCM-41 materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saladino, Maria Luisa; Kraleva, Elka; Todorova, Silvia; Spinella, Alberto; Nasillo, Giorgio; Caponetti, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · Manganese MCM-41 as catalyst. · Influence of pH on the structure of MCM-41. · Influence of manganese on the structure and activity of Mn-MCM-41. - Abstract: MCM-41 has been synthesized at two different pH using cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant as template and adding the silica precursor to aqueous solutions containing CTAB. The obtained solids were calcined at 600 deg. C for 4 h. Mn-MCM-41 powders with different Mn/Si molar ratios were prepared using the incipient wetness method, followed by calcination at 550 deg. C for 5 h. At the end of the impregnation process the powders colour changed from white to brown whose intensity depends on manganese quantity. The materials characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction, N 2 adsorption, 29 Si Cross Polarization-Magic Angle Spinning NMR, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The effects of the manganese quantity and of the structural characteristic of the MCM-41 support were studied. The catalytic activity of the prepared systems was evaluated in a complete n-hexane oxidation.

  4. Chemical characterization of materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, S.B.; Nagar, B.K.; Saxena, M.K.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2009-11-01

    An Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer was procured for trace elemental determination in diverse samples. Since its installation a number of analytical measurements have been carried out on different sample matrices. These include chemical quality control measurements of nuclear fuel and other materials such as uranium metal. Uranium peroxide, ADU, ThO 2 , UO 2 ; isotopic composition of B, Li; chemical characterization of simulated ThO 2 + 2%UO 2 fuel; sodium zirconium phosphate and trace metallic elements in zirconium; Antarctica rock samples and wet phosphoric acid. Necessary separation methodologies required for effective removal of matrix were indigenously developed. In addition, a rigorous analytical protocol, which includes various calibration methodologies such as mass calibration, response calibration, detector cross calibration and linearity check over the entire dynamic range of 109 required for quantitative determination of elements at trace and ultra trace level,, has been standardized. This report summarizes efforts of RACD that have been put in this direction for the application of ICP-MS for analytical measurements. (author)

  5. Designing Neat and Composite Carbon Nanotube Materials by Porosimetric Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Kazufumi; Yoon, Howon; Ata, Seisuke; Yamada, Takeo; Futaba, Don N; Hata, Kenji

    2017-12-06

    We propose a porosimetry-based method to characterize pores formed by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the CNT agglomerates for designing neat CNT-based materials and composites. CNT agglomerates contain pores between individual CNTs and/or CNT bundles (micropore  50 nm). We investigated these pores structured by CNTs with different diameters and number of walls, clarifying the broader size distribution and the larger volume with increased diameters and number of walls. Further, we demonstrated that CNT agglomerate structures with different bulk density were distinguished depending on the pore sizes. Our method also revealed that CNT dispersibility in solvent correlated with the pore sizes of CNT agglomerates. By making use of these knowledge on tailorable pores for CNT agglomerates, we successfully found the correlation between electrical conductivity for CNT rubber composites and pore sizes of CNT agglomerates. Therefore, our method can distinguish diverse CNT agglomerate structures and guide pore sizes of CNT agglomerates to give high electrical conductivity of CNT rubber composites.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Lignin-based Membrane Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin-based membrane material was prepared from lignosulfonate extracted from sulfite pulping. The effects of formaldehyde, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA, urea, borax, glutaraldehyde (GD, and dimethyl phthalate (DMP on tensile strength and water absorption were investigated. The experimental results showed that the optimum conditions were as follows: a reaction temperature of 85 °C, 22.22 wt.% lignosulfonate, 1.59 wt.% borax, 22.22 wt.% urea, 31.75 wt.% formaldehyde, 22.22 wt.% PVA, 32.32 wt.% GD (to PVA glue, and 32.32 wt.% DMP (to PVA glue. Under these conditions, the tensile strength reached 2.2 ×104 Pa and the water absorption was 35.2%. The products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that the product components were compatible in this system, and the introduction of cross-linking agents may have resulted in a decrease in pore size.

  7. Manufacture and Characterization of Silver-free Braze Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffie, T.; Calapez, J.; Chabrol, C. [DRT/LITEN/DTH, CEA/GRENOBLE, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); De Vito, E. [UTEN/DTH/LCPEM, CEA/GRENOBLE, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Portra, T. [DRT/LITEN/DTH, CEA/GRENOBLE, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Peacock, A. [EFDA-Close Support Unit, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse, 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rigal, E. [CEA Grenoble, DRT/LITEN, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Induction brazing is one of the most successful techniques for joining Beryllium (Be) armour tiles to CuCrZr heat sink material, used as High Heat Flux Components for ITER. In the early days of the development for Fusion, silver based brazes were used because of their appropriate liquidus and solidus temperatures and their wide application in different industrial fields. However, it is known that the use of silver containing brazes could have a negative impact on the vacuum systems in ITER because of the transmutation of silver into cadmium. Copper (Cu) based brazes were produced in ribbons form using melt spinning technique. Several compositions in the Cu-Sn-In-Ni-Mn system were elaborated and characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). All the ribbons obtained are micro crystallized. Foils are 8 mm wide and their thickness is between 60 and 90 {mu}m. Among the compositions studied, two were selected for Be/CuCrZr mock-ups brazing tests; their ribbons can be easily manipulated and their last transformations are close to 740 deg. C. The results of the braze trials on the mock-ups are also reported here. (authors)

  8. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate.

  9. Impact of Compound Hydrate Dynamics on Phase Boundary Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osegovic, J. P.; Max, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Compound hydrate reactions are affected by the local concentration of hydrate forming materials (HFM). The relationship between HFM composition and the phase boundary is as significant as temperature and pressure. Selective uptake and sequestration of preferred hydrate formers (PF) has wide ranging implications for the state and potential use of natural hydrate formation, including impact on climate. Rising mineralizing fluids of hydrate formers (such as those that occur on Earth and are postulated to exist elsewhere in the solar system) will sequester PF before methane, resulting in a positive relationship between depth and BTU content as ethane and propane are removed before methane. In industrial settings the role of preferred formers can separate gases. When depressurizing gas hydrate to release the stored gas, the hydrate initial composition will set the decomposition phase boundary because the supporting solution takes on the composition of the hydrate phase. In other settings where hydrate is formed, transported, and then dissociated, similar effects can control the process. The behavior of compound hydrate systems can primarily fit into three categories: 1) In classically closed systems, all the material that can form hydrate is isolated, such as in a sealed laboratory vessel. In such systems, formation and decomposition are reversible processes with observed hysteresis related to mass or heat transfer limitations, or the order and magnitude in which individual hydrate forming gases are taken up from the mixture and subsequently released. 2) Kinetically closed systems are exposed to a solution mass flow across a hydrate mass. These systems can have multiple P-T phase boundaries based on the local conditions at each face of the hydrate mass. A portion of hydrate that is exposed to fresh mineralizing solution will contain more preferred hydrate formers than another portion that is exposed to a partially depleted solution. Examples of kinetically closed

  10. Characterization of the heat transfer properties of thermal interface materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullem, Travis Z.

    Physicists have studied the thermal conductivity of solids for decades. As a result of these efforts, thermal conduction in crystalline solids is well understood; there are detailed theories describing thermal conduction due to electrons and phonons. Phonon scattering and transmission at solid/solid interfaces, particularly above cryogenic temperatures, is not well understood and more work is needed in this area. The desire to solve engineering problems which require good thermal contact between mating surfaces has provided enhanced motivation for furthering the state of the art on this topic. Effective thermal management is an important design consideration in microelectronic systems. A common technique for removing excess heat from an electronic device is to attach a heatsink to the device; it is desirable to minimize the thermal resistance between the device and the heatsink. This can be accomplished by placing a thermal interface material (TIM) between the two surfaces. Due to the ever-increasing power densities found in electronic components, there is a desire to design better TIMs, which necessitates the ability to characterize TIM bondlines and to better understand the physics of heat conduction through TIM bondlines. A micro Fourier apparatus which employs Pt thin film thermometers of our design has been built and is capable of precisely quantifying the thermal resistance of thermal interface materials. In the present work several types of commercially available TIMs have been studied using this apparatus, including: greases, filled epoxies, and thermally conductive pads. In the case of filled epoxies, bondlines of various thicknesses, ranging from thirty microns to several hundred microns, have been measured. The microstructure of these bondlines has been investigated using optical microscopy and acoustic microscopy. Measured values of thermal conductivity are considered in terms of microstructural features such as percolation networks and filler particle

  11. Chemical alteration of cement hydrates by dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari; Nakanishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious material is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material for the radioactive waste disposal, and is expected to provide both physical and chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cementitious material and the ability to provide a high pH condition are very important parameters when considering the release of radionuclides from radioactive wastes. For the long term, in the geological disposal environment, cement hydrates will be altered by, for example, dissolution, chemical reaction with ions in the groundwater, and hydrothermal reaction. Once the composition or crystallinity of the constituent minerals of a cement hydrate is changed by these processes, the pH of the repository buffered by cementitious material and its sorption ability might be affected. However, the mechanism of cement alteration is not yet fully understood. In this study, leaching experiments of some candidate cements for radioactive waste disposal were carried out. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Blast Furnace Slag blended cement (OPC/BFS) and Highly containing Flyash and Silicafume Cement (HFSC) samples were contacted with distilled water at liquid:solid ratios of 10:1, 100:1 and 1000:1 at room temperature for 200 days. In the case of OPC, Ca(OH) 2 dissolved at high liquid:solid ratios. The specific surface area of all cement samples increased by leaching process. This might be caused by further hydration and change of composition of constituent minerals. A model is presented which predicts the leaching of cement hydrates and the mineral composition in the hydrated cement solid phase, including the incongruent dissolution of CSH gel phases and congruent dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 , Ettringite and Hydrotalcite. Experimental results of dissolution of Ca-O-H and Ca-Si-O-H phases were well predicted by this model. (author)

  12. Nuclear Materials Characterization in the Materials and Fuels Complex Analytical Hot Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriquez, Michael

    2009-01-01

    As energy prices skyrocket and interest in alternative, clean energy sources builds, interest in nuclear energy has increased. This increased interest in nuclear energy has been termed the 'Nuclear Renaissance'. The performance of nuclear fuels, fuels and reactor materials and waste products are becoming a more important issue as the potential for designing new nuclear reactors is more immediate. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Analytical Laboratory Hot Cells (ALHC) are rising to the challenge of characterizing new reactor materials, byproducts and performance. The ALHC is a facility located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the INL Site. It was built in 1958 as part of the former Argonne National Laboratory West Complex to support the operation of the second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). It is part of a larger analytical laboratory structure that includes wet chemistry, instrumentation and radiochemistry laboratories. The purpose of the ALHC is to perform analytical chemistry work on highly radioactive materials. The primary work in the ALHC has traditionally been dissolution of nuclear materials so that less radioactive subsamples (aliquots) could be transferred to other sections of the laboratory for analysis. Over the last 50 years though, the capabilities within the ALHC have also become independent of other laboratory sections in a number of ways. While dissolution, digestion and subdividing samples are still a vitally important role, the ALHC has stand alone capabilities in the area of immersion density, gamma scanning and combustion gas analysis. Recent use of the ALHC for immersion density shows that extremely fine and delicate operations can be performed with the master-slave manipulators by qualified operators. Twenty milligram samples were tested for immersion density to determine the expansion of uranium dioxide after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. The data collected confirmed modeling analysis with very tight

  13. The anomalous halogen bonding interactions between chlorine and bromine with water in clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dureckova, Hana; Woo, Tom K; Udachin, Konstantin A; Ripmeester, John A; Alavi, Saman

    2017-10-13

    Clathrate hydrate phases of Cl 2 and Br 2 guest molecules have been known for about 200 years. The crystal structure of these phases was recently re-determined with high accuracy by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In these structures, the water oxygen-halogen atom distances are determined to be shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii, which indicates the action of some type of non-covalent interaction between the dihalogens and water molecules. Given that in the hydrate phases both lone pairs of each water oxygen atom are engaged in hydrogen bonding with other water molecules of the lattice, the nature of the oxygen-halogen interactions may not be the standard halogen bonds characterized recently in the solid state materials and enzyme-substrate compounds. The nature of the halogen-water interactions for the Cl 2 and Br 2 molecules in two isolated clathrate hydrate cages has recently been studied with ab initio calculations and Natural Bond Order analysis (Ochoa-Resendiz et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 145, 161104). Here we present the results of ab initio calculations and natural localized molecular orbital analysis for Cl 2 and Br 2 guests in all cage types observed in the cubic structure I and tetragonal structure I clathrate hydrates to characterize the orbital interactions between the dihalogen guests and water. Calculations with isolated cages and cages with one shell of coordinating molecules are considered. The computational analysis is used to understand the nature of the halogen bonding in these materials and to interpret the guest positions in the hydrate cages obtained from the X-ray crystal structures.

  14. Advanced three dimensional characterization of silica-based ultraporous materials

    OpenAIRE

    Foray , Genevieve; Roiban , L.; Rong , Q.; Perret , A.; Ihiawakrim , D.; Masenelli-Varlot , K.; Maire , E.; Yrieix , B.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Whatever the field of application (building, transportation, packaging, etc.) energy losses must be reduced to meet the government target of a 40% cut in CO 2 emissions. This leads to a challenge for materials scientists: designing materials with thermal conductivities lower than 0.015 W m À1 K À1 under ambient conditions. Such a low value requires reducing air molecule mobility in highly porous materials, and silica-based superinsulation materials (SIM) made of packed...

  15. Microstructure characterization of multi-phase composites and utilization of phase change materials and recycled rubbers in cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshgin, Pania

    2011-12-01

    This research focuses on two important subjects: (1) Characterization of heterogeneous microstructure of multi-phase composites and the effect of microstructural features on effective properties of the material. (2) Utilizations of phase change materials and recycled rubber particles from waste tires to improve thermal properties of insulation materials used in building envelopes. Spatial pattern of multi-phase and multidimensional internal structures of most composite materials are highly random. Quantitative description of the spatial distribution should be developed based on proper statistical models, which characterize the morphological features. For a composite material with multi-phases, the volume fraction of the phases as well as the morphological parameters of the phases have very strong influences on the effective property of the composite. These morphological parameters depend on the microstructure of each phase. This study intends to include the effect of higher order morphological details of the microstructure in the composite models. The higher order statistics, called two-point correlation functions characterize various behaviors of the composite at any two points in a stochastic field. Specifically, correlation functions of mosaic patterns are used in the study for characterizing transport properties of composite materials. One of the most effective methods to improve energy efficiency of buildings is to enhance thermal properties of insulation materials. The idea of using phase change materials and recycled rubber particles such as scrap tires in insulation materials for building envelopes has been studied.

  16. Characterization of the structure and chemistry of defects in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.; Ruehle, M.; Seidman, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    Research programs, presented at the materials research symposium, on defects in materials are presented. Major areas include: point defects, defect aggregates, and ordering; defects in non-metals and semiconductors; atomic resolution imaging of defects; and gain boundaries, interfaces, and layered materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  17. Analytical techniques for characterization of raw materials in cell culture media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Chandana

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Raw materials are a critical part of any cell culture medium; therefore, it is of utmost importance to understand and characterize them for high-quality product. The raw material characterization (RMC program at SAFC focuses on individual screening of raw materials both analytically and biologically. The goal of the program is to develop the best-in-class knowledge base of the raw materials used in SAFC’s media formulations and their impact on performance of products.

  18. Engineered materials characterization report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 3: Corrosion and data modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.; Roy, A.K.; Jones, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    This three-volume report serves several purposes. The first volume provides an introduction to the engineered materials effort for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. It defines terms and outlines the history of selection and characterization of these materials. A summary of the recent engineered barrier materials characterization workshop is presented, and the current candidate materials are listed. The second volume tabulates design data for engineered materials, and the third volume is devoted to corrosion data, radiation effects on corrosion, and corrosion modeling. The second and third volumes are intended to be evolving documents, to which new data will be added as they become available from additional studies. The initial version of Volume 3 is devoted to information currently available for environments most similar to those expected in the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This is volume three

  19. Effect of overpressure on gas hydrate distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, G.; Chapman, W.G.; Hirasaki, G.J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Dickens, G.R.; Dugan, B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrate systems can be characterized by high sedimentation rates and/or low permeability sediments, which can lead to pore pressure higher than hydrostatic. This paper discussed a study that examined this effect of overpressure on gas hydrate and free gas distribution in marine sediments. A one-dimensional numerical model that coupled sedimentation, fluid flow, and gas hydrate formation was utilized. In order to quantify the relative importance of sedimentation rates and low permeability sediments, a dimensionless sedimentation-compaction group (scN) was defined, that compared the absolute permeability of the sediments to the sedimentation rate. Higher values of scN mean higher permeability or low sedimentation rate which generally yield hydrostatic pore pressure while lower values of scN normally create pore pressure greater than hydrostatic. The paper discussed non-hydrostatic consolidation in gas hydrate systems, including mass balances; constitutive relationships; normalized variables; and dimensionless groups. A numerical solution to the problem was presented. It was concluded that simulation results demonstrated that decreasing scN not only increased pore pressure above hydrostatic values, but also lowered the lithostatic stress gradient and gas hydrate saturation. This occurred because overpressure resulted in lower effective stress, causing higher porosity and lower bulk density of the sediment. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 appendix.

  20. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  1. Nuclear Well Log Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchwell, A.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing gas hydrate in a reservoir typically involves a full suite of geophysical well logs. The most common method involves using resistivity measurements to quantify the decrease in electrically conductive water when replaced with gas hydrate. Compressional velocity measurements are also used because the gas hydrate significantly strengthens the moduli of the sediment. At many gas hydrate sites, nuclear well logs, which include the photoelectric effect, formation sigma, carbon/oxygen ratio and neutron porosity, are also collected but often not used. In fact, the nuclear response of a gas hydrate reservoir is not known. In this research we will focus on the nuclear log response in gas hydrate reservoirs at the Mallik Field at the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nuclear logs may add increased robustness to the investigation into the properties of gas hydrates and some types of logs may offer an opportunity to distinguish between gas hydrate and permafrost. For example, a true formation sigma log measures the thermal neutron capture cross section of a formation and pore constituents; it is especially sensitive to hydrogen and chlorine in the pore space. Chlorine has a high absorption potential, and is used to determine the amount of saline water within pore spaces. Gas hydrate offers a difference in elemental composition compared to water-saturated intervals. Thus, in permafrost areas, the carbon/oxygen ratio may vary between gas hydrate and permafrost, due to the increase of carbon in gas hydrate accumulations. At the Mallik site, we observe a hydrate-bearing sand (1085-1107 m) above a water-bearing sand (1107-1140 m), which was confirmed through core samples and mud gas analysis. We observe a decrease in the photoelectric absorption of ~0.5 barnes/e-, as well as an increase in the formation sigma readings of ~5 capture units in the water-bearing sand as

  2. Molecular analysis of petroleum derived compounds that adsorb onto gas hydrate surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgund, Anna E.; Hoiland, Sylvi; Barth, Tanja; Fotland, Per; Askvik, Kjell M.

    2009-01-01

    Field observations have shown that some streams of water, gas and crude oil do not form gas hydrate plugs during petroleum production even when operating within thermodynamic conditions for hydrate formation. Also, when studied under controlled laboratory conditions, some oils are found to form hydrate dispersed systems whereas others form plugs. Oils with low tendency to form hydrate plugs are believed to contain natural hydrate plug inhibiting components (NICs) that adsorb onto the hydrate surface, making them less water-wet and preventing the particles from agglomerating into large hydrate clusters. The molecular structure of the NICs is currently unknown. In this work, hydrate adsorbing components were extracted from crude oils using freon hydrates as an extraction phase. The fractions were found to be enriched in polar material, and more polar material is associated with hydrates generated in biodegraded crude oils than in non-biodegraded oils. Various fractionation schemes and analytical techniques have been applied in the search for molecular characterisation. The average molecular weights were found to be approximately 500 g/mole. GC-MS chromatograms show a large UCM (Unresolved Complex Mixture). Thus, GC-MS has a limited potential for identification of compounds. A commercial biosurfactant was used as a model compound in the search for similar structures in the extracts. The results from analysis of the hydrate adsorbing components suggest that the type and structure are more important for hydrate morphology than the amount of material adsorbed.

  3. Streaming Potential and Electroosmosis Measurements to Characterize Porous Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luong, D.T.; Sprik, R.

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing the streaming potential and electroosmosis properties of porous media is essential in applying seismoelectric and electroseismic phenomena for oil exploration. Some parameters such as porosity, permeability, formation factor, pore size, the number of pores, and the zeta potential of

  4. Characterization of materials used for neutron spectra modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solieman, A.H.M.; Comsan, M.N.H.; Fahmey, M.A.; Morsy, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo Simulation is used to study the thickness-dependent neutron-spectral-modification after transport in different materials. A collection of significant materials is studied, for choosing of potential candidates in the construction and design of accelerator-based neutron irradiation system suitable for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

  5. Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    activities is expected to lead to new devices/ systems /composite materials useful for the USAMRMC. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Functional materials, integrated...fabrication, nanobiotechnology, multifunctional, dimensional integration, nanocomposites, sensor technology, thermoelectrics, solar cells, photovoltaics ...loop measured in the presence of an AC field, and can be increased by tuning several parameters, such as the nanoparticles’ size , saturation

  6. Preparation and characterization of multifunctional magnetic mesoporous calcium silicate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Tao, Cuilian; Zhu, Yufang; Zhu, Min; Li, Jie; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    We have prepared multifunctional magnetic mesoporous Fe–CaSiO 3 materials using triblock copolymer (P123) as a structure-directing agent. The effects of Fe substitution on the mesoporous structure, in vitro bioactivity, magnetic heating ability and drug delivery property of mesoporous CaSiO 3 materials were investigated. Mesoporous Fe–CaSiO 3 materials had similar mesoporous channels (5–6 nm) with different Fe substitution. When 5 and 10% Fe were substituted for Ca in mesoporous CaSiO 3 materials, mesoporous Fe–CaSiO 3 materials still showed good apatite-formation ability and had no cytotoxic effect on osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells evaluated by the elution cell culture assay. On the other hand, mesoporous Fe–CaSiO 3 materials could generate heat to raise the temperature of the surrounding environment in an alternating magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic property. When we use gentamicin (GS) as a model drug, mesoporous Fe–CaSiO 3 materials release GS in a sustained manner. Therefore, magnetic mesoporous Fe–CaSiO 3 materials would be a promising multifunctional platform with bone regeneration, local drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. (paper)

  7. Work function characterization of electroactive materials using an E MOSFET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.V.A.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    2004-01-01

    Materials with redox properties have been widely used in sensing applications. Understanding the redox properties of these materials is an important issue. In order to investigate the redox properties, there are several methods, such as using the Kelvin probe and a conductivity sensor, or using

  8. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  9. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.; Yoon, S.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  10. Coating and Characterization of Mock and Explosive Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M. Hunt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This project develops a method of manufacturing plastic-bonded explosives by using use precision control of agglomeration and coating of energetic powders. The energetic material coating process entails suspending either wet or dry energetic powders in a stream of inert gas and contacting the energetic powder with atomized droplets of a lacquer composed of binder and organic solvent. By using a high-velocity air stream to pneumatically convey the energetic powders and droplets of lacquer, the energetic powders are efficiently wetted while agglomerate drying begins almost immediately. The result is an energetic powder uniformly coated with binder, that is, a PBX, with a high bulk density suitable for pressing. Experiments have been conducted using mock explosive materials to examine coating effectiveness and density. Energetic materials are now being coated and will be tested both mechanically and thermally. This allows for a comprehensive comparison of the morphology and reactivity of the newly coated materials to previously manufactured materials.

  11. Energetic materials: crystallization, characterization and insensitive plastic bonded explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijden, Antoine E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Yves L.M.; Marino, Emanuela; Bouma, Richard H.B.; Scholtes, Gert J.H.G.; Duvalois, Willem [TNO Defence, Security and Safety, P. O. Box 45, 2280 AA Rijswijk (Netherlands); Roelands, Marc C.P.M. [TNO Science and Industry, P. O. Box 342, 7300 AH Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    The product quality of energetic materials is predominantly determined by the crystallization process applied to produce these materials. It has been demonstrated in the past that the higher the product quality of the solid energetic ingredients, the less sensitive a plastic bonded explosive containing these energetic materials becomes. The application of submicron or nanometric energetic materials is generally considered to further decrease the sensitiveness of explosives. In order to assess the product quality of energetic materials, a range of analytical techniques is available. Recent attempts within the Reduced-sensitivity RDX Round Robin (R4) have provided the EM community a better insight into these analytical techniques and in some cases a correlation between product quality and shock initiation of plastic bonded explosives containing (RS-)RDX was identified, which would provide a possibility to discriminate between conventional and reduced sensitivity grades. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  13. Investigating the Metastability of Clathrate Hydrates for Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Carolyn Ann [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Important breakthrough discoveries have been achieved from the DOE award on the key processes controlling the synthesis and structure-property relations of clathrate hydrates, which are critical to the development of clathrate hydrates as energy storage materials. Key achievements include: (i) the discovery of key clathrate hydrate building blocks (stable and metastable) leading to clathrate hydrate nucleation and growth; (ii) development of a rapid clathrate hydrate synthesis route via a seeding mechanism; (iii) synthesis-structure relations of H2 + CH4/CO2 binary hydrates to control thermodynamic requirements for energy storage and sequestration applications; (iv) discovery of a new metastable phase present during clathrate hydrate structural transitions. The success of our research to-date is demonstrated by the significant papers we have published in high impact journals, including Science, Angewandte Chemie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. Intellectual Merits of Project Accomplishments: The intellectual merits of the project accomplishments are significant and transformative, in which the fundamental coupled computational and experimental program has provided new and critical understanding on the key processes controlling the nucleation, growth, and thermodynamics of clathrate hydrates containing hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and other guest molecules for energy storage. Key examples of the intellectual merits of the accomplishments include: the first discovery of the nucleation pathways and dominant stable and metastable structures leading to clathrate hydrate formation; the discovery and experimental confirmation of new metastable clathrate hydrate structures; the development of new synthesis methods for controlling clathrate hydrate formation and enclathration of molecular hydrogen. Broader Impacts of Project Accomplishments: The molecular investigations performed in this project on the synthesis (nucleation & growth)-structure-stability relations of clathrate

  14. Safeguards: Modelling of the Detection and Characterization of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear safeguards is a collective term for the tools and methods needed to ensure nonproliferation and safety in connection to utilization of nuclear materials. It encompasses a variety of concepts from legislation to measurement equipment. The objective of this thesis is to present a number of research results related to nuclear materials control and accountability, especially the area of nondestructive assay. Physical aspects of nuclear materials are often the same as for materials encountered in everyday life. One special aspect though is that nuclear materials also emit radiation allowing them to be qualitatively and quantitatively measured without direct interaction with the material. For the successful assay of the material, the particle generation and detection needs to be well understood, and verified with measurements, simulations and models. Four topics of research are included in the thesis. First the generation and multiplication of neutrons and gamma rays in a fissile multiplying sample is treated. The formalism used enables investigation of the number of generated, absorbed and detected particles, offering understanding of the different processes involved. Secondly, the issue of relating the coincident detector signals, generated by both neutrons and gamma rays, to sample parameters is dealt with. Fission rate depends directly on the sample mass, while parameters such as neutron generation by alpha decay and neutron leakage multiplication are parameters that depend on the size, composition and geometry of the sample. Artificial neural networks are utilized to solve the inverse problem of finding sample characteristics from the measured rates of particle multiples. In the third part the interactions between neutrons and organic scintillation detectors are treated. The detector material consists of hydrogen and carbon, on which the neutrons scatter and transfer energy. The problem shares many characteristics with the area of neutron moderation found in

  15. Characterization of advanced semiconductor materials by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uedono, Akira; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Ishibashi, Shoji

    2005-01-01

    Positron annihilation is an established technique for investigating vacancy-type defects near surfaces or interfaces. Using this technique, one can identify defect species in a nondestructive manner. Because there is no restriction of sample conductivity or temperature, this technique can be applied to a various materials, such as semiconductors, metals, metal oxides, and polymers. The positron annihilation has been applied to the studies of Si-technology related materials, which show that it can provide useful information for the development of semiconductor devices. In this article, we report the results obtained for electroplated Cu, strained Si and high-k materials. (author)

  16. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  17. Elastic Characterization of Transversely Isotropic Soft Materials by Dynamic Shear and Asymmetric Indentation

    OpenAIRE

    Namani, R.; Feng, Y.; Okamoto, R. J.; Jesuraj, N.; Sakiyama-Elbert, S. E.; Genin, G. M.; Bayly, P. V.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical characterization of soft anisotropic materials is a fundamental challenge because of difficulties in applying mechanical loads to soft matter and the need to combine information from multiple tests. A method to characterize the linear elastic properties of transversely isotropic soft materials is proposed, based on the combination of dynamic shear testing (DST) and asymmetric indentation. The procedure was demonstrated by characterizing a nearly incompressible transversely isot...

  18. Real-Time Characterization of Special Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walston, Sean [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, Jim [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chambers, Dave [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandrasekaran, Hema [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Snyderman, Neal [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-04

    When confronting an item that may contain nuclear material, it is urgently necessary to determine its characteristics. Our goal is to provide accurate information with high-con dence as rapidly as possible.

  19. Characterizing volumetric deformation behavior of naturally occuring bituminous sand materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available newly proposed hydrostatic compression test procedure. The test procedure applies field loading conditions of off-road construction and mining equipment to closely simulate the volumetric deformation and stiffness behaviour of oil sand materials. Based...

  20. Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Vivek Kumar

    Continuous downscaling of Si complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology and progress in high-power electronics demand more efficient heat removal techniques to handle the increasing power density and rising temperature of hot spots. For this reason, it is important to investigate thermal properties of materials at nanometer scale and identify materials with the extremely large or extremely low thermal conductivity for applications as heat spreaders or heat insulators in the next generation of integrated circuits. The thin films used in microelectronic and photonic devices need to have high thermal conductivity in order to transfer the dissipated power to heat sinks more effectively. On the other hand, thermoelectric devices call for materials or structures with low thermal conductivity because the performance of thermoelectric devices is determined by the figure of merit Z=S2sigma/K, where S is the Seebeck coefficient, K and sigma are the thermal and electrical conductivity, respectively. Nanostructured superlattices can have drastically reduced thermal conductivity as compared to their bulk counterparts making them promising candidates for high-efficiency thermoelectric materials. Other applications calling for thin films with low thermal conductivity value are high-temperature coatings for engines. Thus, materials with both high thermal conductivity and low thermal conductivity are technologically important. The increasing temperature of the hot spots in state-of-the-art chips stimulates the search for innovative methods for heat removal. One promising approach is to incorporate materials, which have high thermal conductivity into the chip design. Two suitable candidates for such applications are diamond and graphene. Another approach is to integrate the high-efficiency thermoelectric elements for on-spot cooling. In addition, there is strong motivation for improved thermal interface materials (TIMs) for heat transfer from the heat-generating chip

  1. Production and Mechanical Characterization of Ballistic Thermoplastic Composite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    D. Korsacilar; C. Atas

    2014-01-01

    In this study, first thermoplastic composite materials /plates that have high ballistic impact resistance were produced. For this purpose, the thermoplastic prepreg and the vacuum bagging technique were used to produce a composite material. Thermoplastic prepregs (resin-impregnated fiber) that are supplied ready to be used, namely high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was chosen as matrix and unidirectional glass fiber was used as reinforcement. In order to compare the fiber c...

  2. Characterization of a Material Based on Short Natural Fique Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Navacerrada Saturio, Maria Angeles; Diaz Sanchidrian, Cesar; Fernández, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Fique is a biodegradable natural fiber derived from the Colombian Agavaceae family, originating in tropical America and traditionally used for the manufacture of packaging and cordages. Today, however, new uses are being developed. To meet the need for new good-quality, sustainable, low-cost construction materials for social housing, construction materials have been produced that combine different kinds of natural fibers, including fique, to improve their strength and physical properties. To ...

  3. Radioactive material inventory control at a waste characterization facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, L.K.; Chapman, J.A.; Schultz, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to the recent introduction of more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and requirements pertaining to nuclear and criticality safety, the control of radioactive material inventory has emerged as an important facet of operations at DOE nuclear facilities. In order to comply with nuclear safety regulations and nuclear criticality requirements, radioactive material inventories at each nuclear facility have to be maintained below limits specified for the facility in its safety authorization basis documentation. Exceeding these radioactive material limits constitutes a breach of the facility's nuclear and criticality safety envelope and could potentially result in an accident, cause a shut-down of the facility, and bring about imminent regulatory repercussions. The practice of maintaining control of radioactive material, especially sealed and unsealed sources, is commonplace and widely implemented; however, the requirement to track the entire radioactivity inventory at each nuclear facility for the purpose of ensuring nuclear safety is a new development. To meet the new requirements, the Applied Radiation Measurements Department at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an information system, called the open-quotes Radioactive Material Inventory Systemclose quotes (RMIS), to track the radioactive material inventory at an ORNL facility, the Waste Examination and Assay Facility (WEAF). The operations at WEAF, which revolve around the nondestructive assay and nondestructive examination of waste and related research and development activities, results in an ever-changing radioactive material inventory. Waste packages and radioactive sources are constantly being brought in or taken out of the facility; hence, use of the RMIS is necessary to ensure that the radioactive material inventory limits are not exceeded

  4. Relationship between diffusivity of water molecules inside hydrating tablets and their drug release behavior elucidated by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shingo; Onuki, Yoshinori; Kuribayashi, Hideto; Takayama, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that sustained release matrix tablets showed zero-order drug release without being affected by pH change. To understand drug release mechanisms more fully, we monitored the swelling and erosion of hydrating tablets using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three different types of tablets comprised of polyion complex-forming materials and a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used. Proton density- and diffusion-weighted images of the hydrating tablets were acquired at intervals. Furthermore, apparent self-diffusion coefficient maps were generated from diffusion-weighted imaging to evaluate the state of hydrating tablets. Our findings indicated that water penetration into polyion complex tablets was faster than that into HPMC matrix tablets. In polyion complex tablets, water molecules were dispersed homogeneously and their diffusivity was relatively high, whereas in HPMC matrix tablets, water molecule movement was tightly restricted within the gel. An optimal tablet formulation determined in a previous study had water molecule penetration and diffusivity properties that appeared intermediate to those of polyion complex and HPMC matrix tablets; water molecules were capable of penetrating throughout the tablets and relatively high diffusivity was similar to that in the polyion complex tablet, whereas like the HPMC matrix tablet, it was well swollen. This study succeeded in characterizing the tablet hydration process. MRI provides profound insight into the state of water molecules in hydrating tablets; thus, it is a useful tool for understanding drug release mechanisms at a molecular level.

  5. Dielectric characterization of high-performance spaceflight materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleppe, Nathan; Nurge, Mark A.; Bowler, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    As commercial space travel increases, the need for reliable structural health monitoring to predict possible weaknesses or failures of structural materials also increases. Monitoring of these materials can be done through the use of dielectric spectroscopy by comparing permittivity or conductivity measurements performed on a sample in use to that of a pristine sample from 100 μHz to 3 GHz. Fluctuations in these measured values or of the relaxation frequencies, if present, can indicate chemical or physical changes occurring within the material and the possible need for maintenance/replacement. In this work, we establish indicative trends that occur due to changes in dielectric spectra during accelerated aging of various high-performance polymeric materials: ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH), Poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK), polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Uses for these materials range from electrical insulation and protective coatings to windows and air- or space-craft parts that may be subject to environmental damage over long-term operation. Samples were prepared by thermal exposure and, separately, by ultraviolet/water-spray cyclic aging. The aged samples showed statistically-significant trends of either increasing or decreasing real or imaginary permittivity values, relaxation frequencies, conduction or the appearance of new relaxation modes. These results suggest that dielectric testing offers the possibility of nondestructive evaluation of the extent of age-related degradation in these materials.

  6. Advanced 3D Characterization and Reconstruction of Reactor Materials FY16 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fromm, Bradley [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hauch, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    A coordinated effort to link advanced materials characterization methods and computational modeling approaches is critical to future success for understanding and predicting the behavior of reactor materials that operate at extreme conditions. The difficulty and expense of working with nuclear materials have inhibited the use of modern characterization techniques on this class of materials. Likewise, mesoscale simulation efforts have been impeded due to insufficient experimental data necessary for initialization and validation of the computer models. The objective of this research is to develop methods to integrate advanced materials characterization techniques developed for reactor materials with state-of-the-art mesoscale modeling and simulation tools. Research to develop broad-ion beam sample preparation, high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction, and digital microstructure reconstruction techniques; and methods for integration of these techniques into mesoscale modeling tools are detailed. Results for both irradiated and un-irradiated reactor materials are presented for FY14 - FY16 and final remarks are provided.

  7. Advanced 3D Characterization and Reconstruction of Reactor Materials FY16 Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromm, Bradley; Hauch, Benjamin; Sridharan, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    A coordinated effort to link advanced materials characterization methods and computational modeling approaches is critical to future success for understanding and predicting the behavior of reactor materials that operate at extreme conditions. The difficulty and expense of working with nuclear materials have inhibited the use of modern characterization techniques on this class of materials. Likewise, mesoscale simulation efforts have been impeded due to insufficient experimental data necessary for initialization and validation of the computer models. The objective of this research is to develop methods to integrate advanced materials characterization techniques developed for reactor materials with state-of-the-art mesoscale modeling and simulation tools. Research to develop broad-ion beam sample preparation, high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction, and digital microstructure reconstruction techniques; and methods for integration of these techniques into mesoscale modeling tools are detailed. Results for both irradiated and un-irradiated reactor materials are presented for FY14 - FY16 and final remarks are provided.

  8. Overview and perspective of materials characterization by using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitsubo, Hiromichi

    2009-01-01

    A peculiarity of techniques and the methods of synchrotron radiation are explained. It consists of five sections such as introduction, synchrotron radiation, interaction between X-ray and materials, analytical methods of materials using synchrotron radiation and perspective and problems. The second section described the principles of synchrotron orbit radiation, synchrotron light source, the main formulae and schematic drawing of undulator, and the synchrotron radiation facilities in Japan. The third section explained behavior of X-ray in materials, absorption, reflection, refraction and scattering of X-ray. The fourth section stated many analytical methods of materials; the surface diffractometer, powder diffractometer, high-energy X-ray diffraction, core-electron absorption spectroscopy, micro-beam diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and photoemission spectroscopy (PES). A characteristic feature of synchrotron radiation contains the large wave length ranges from infrared to X-ray, high directivity and brightness, linear (circular) polarization, pulsed light, good control and stability. The brightness spectra of Spring-8 and SAGA-LS, concept of synchrotron light source, undulator and wiggler, nine synchrotron radiation facilities in Japan, mass absorption coefficients of Cu and Au, and analysis of materials using synchrotron radiation are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  9. Characterization of silica quartz as raw material in photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussaa, S. Anas, E-mail: sabiha.anas@gmail.com; Kheloufi, A.; Kefaifi, A.; Kerkar, F. [Division croissance cristalline et procédés métallurgiques CCPM Centre de recherche en technologie des semi-conducteurs pour l’énergétique (C.R.T.S.E) 02 Bd Frantz Fanon BP. 140 Alger 7 merveilles, Alger 16200 (Algeria); Zaourar, N. Boutarek [Laboratoire des technologies des matériaux, USTHB, B.P. 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Alger, Algérie 16111 (Algeria)

    2016-07-25

    Raw materials are essential for the functioning of modern societies, and access to these raw materials is vital to the world economy. Sustainable development, both globally level, raises important new challenges associated with access and efficient use of raw materials. High purity quartz, is consider as a critical raw material and it is a rare commodity that only forms under geological conditions where a narrow set of chemical and physical parameters is fulfilled. When identified and following special beneficiation techniques, high purity quartz obtains very attractive prices and is applied in high technology sectors that currently are under rapid expansion such as photovoltaic solar cells, silicon metal - oxide wafers in the semiconductor industry and long distance optical fibers that are used in communication networks. Crystalline silicon remains the principal material for photovoltaic technology. Metallurgical silicon is produced industrially by the reduction of silica with carbon in an electric arc furnace at temperatures higher than 2000 °C in the hottest parts, by a reaction that can be written ideally as: SiO{sub 2} + 2C = Si + 2CO. The aim of this study has been to test experimental methods for investigating the various physical and chemical proprieties of Hoggar quartz with different techniques: X Ray Fluorescence, infra-red spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optic Microscopy, Carbon Analyzer and Vickers Hardness. The results show finally that the quartz has got good result in purity but need enrichment for the photovoltaic application.

  10. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of laser deposited advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistla, Harihar Rakshit

    Additive manufacturing in the form of laser deposition is a unique way to manufacture near net shape metallic components from advanced materials. Rapid solidification facilitates the extension of solid solubility, compositional flexibility and decrease in micro-segregation in the melt among other advantages. The current work investigates the employment of laser deposition to fabricate the following: 1. Functionally gradient materials: This allows grading dissimilar materials compositionally to tailor specific properties of both these materials into a single component. Specific compositions of the candidate materials (SS 316, Inconel 625 and Ti64) were blended and deposited to study the brittle intermetallics reported in these systems. 2. High entropy alloys: These are multi- component alloys with equiatomic compositions of 5 or more elements. The ratio of Al to Ni was decreased to observe the transition of solid solution from a BCC to an FCC crystal structure in the AlFeCoCrNi system. 3. Structurally amorphous alloys: Zr-based metallic glasses have been reported to have high glass forming ability. These alloys have been laser deposited so as to rapidly cool them from the melt into an amorphous state. Microstructural analysis and X-ray diffraction were used to study the phase formation, and hardness was measured to estimate the mechanical properties.

  11. Mechanical Characterization of Cotton Fiber/Polyester Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Hussain Rajper

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of composite from natural fiber for lower structural application is growing for long-term sustainable perspective. Cotton fiber composite material has the added advantages of high specific strength, corrosion resistance, low cost and low weight compared to glass fiber on the expense of internal components of IC engines. The primary aim of the research study is to examine the effect of the cotton fiber on mechanical properties of lower structural applications when added with the polyester resin. In this paper composite material sample has been prepared by hand Lay-Up process. A mould is locally developed in the laboratory for test sample preparation. Initially samples of polyester resin with appropriate ratio of the hardener were developed and tested. At the second stage yarns of cotton fiber were mixed with the polyester resin and sample specimens were developed and tested. Relative effect of the cotton as reinforcing agent was examined and observed that developed composite specimen possess significant improvement in mechanical properties such as tensile strength was improved as 19.78 % and modulus of elasticity was increased up to 24.81%. Through this research it was also observed that developed composite material was of ductile nature and its density decreases up to 2.6%. Results from this study were compared with relevant available advanced composite materials and found improved mechanical properties of developed composite material

  12. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2014-01-01

    as the rhabdophane structure is preserved. The bound hydrate water is accommodated in the rhabdophane structure and is stable at temperatures of up to 650 oC. The thermal stability of the hydrate water and the phosphate structure are of significance for the proton conductivity. The LaPO4·0.6H2O and NdPO4•0.5H2O......Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure...... to the monazite structure upon dehydration. The thermal stability of the hydrate is studied and found to contain water of two types, physically adsorbed and structurally bound hydrate water. The adsorbed water is correlated to the specific surface area and can be reversibly recovered when dehydrated as long...

  13. Characterizing the tribological behaviour of fast breeder reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depierre, J.; Raffailhac, J.

    1984-04-01

    The object of these tests is to define the behaviour of material couples working in conditions as representative as possible of reactor operation. For this purpose a certain number of test installations have been developed to simulate the most typical cases of friction encountered: plane to plane geometry, rotational bearings, guiding bearings. Endurance tests have also been carried out on ball bearings and ballscrews samples. As said before, the test conditions attempt to reproduce as faithfully as possible the environment of the materials used in fast breeder reactors, particularly in: - using purified liquid sodium, and maintaining it isotherm, respectively at three temperature levels: 180, 400 and 550 0 C; - or using argon containing sodium aerosol particles. Some typical values of friction coefficients and rates of wear obtained during the tests with certain couples of materials are given here as examples. The aims which are currently guiding the direction of the tests are also briefly described

  14. Electromagnetic characterization of fine-scale particulate composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, P.; Konn, A.M.; Brosseau, C.

    2002-01-01

    We report the results of the composition and frequency-dependent complex permittivity and permeability of ZnO and γ-Fe 2 O 3 composites prepared by powder pressing. The electromagnetic properties of these materials exhibit a strong dependence on the powder size of the starting materials. In the microwave frequency range, the permittivity and permeability show nonlinear variations with volume fraction of Fe 2 O 3 . As the particle size decreases from a few micrometers to a few tens of nanometers, the data indicate that local mesostructural factors such as shape anisotropy, porosity and possible effect of the binder are likely to be intertwined in the understanding of electromagnetic properties of fine-scale particulate composite materials

  15. Mechanical characterization of hydroxyapatite, thermoelectric materials and doped ceria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaofeng

    For a variety of applications of brittle ceramic materials, porosity plays a critical role structurally and/or functionally, such as in engineered bone scaffolds, thermoelectric materials and in solid oxide fuel cells. The presence of porosity will affect the mechanical properties, which are essential to the design and application of porous brittle materials. In this study, the mechanical property versus microstructure relations for bioceramics, thermoelectric (TE) materials and solid oxide fuel cells were investigated. For the bioceramic material hydroxyapatite (HA), the Young's modulus was measured using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) as a function of (i) porosity and (ii) microcracking damage state. The fracture strength was measured as a function of porosity using biaxial flexure testing, and the distribution of the fracture strength was studied by Weibull analysis. For the natural mineral tetrahedrite based solid solution thermoelectric material (Cu10Zn2As4S13 - Cu 12Sb4S13), the elastic moduli, hardness and fracture toughness were studied as a function of (i) composition and (ii) ball milling time. For ZiNiSn, a thermoelectric half-Heusler compound, the elastic modulus---porosity and hardness---porosity relations were examined. For the solid oxide fuel cell material, gadolina doped ceria (GDC), the elastic moduli including Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio were measured by RUS as a function of porosity. The hardness was evaluated by Vickers indentation technique as a function of porosity. The results of the mechanical property versus microstructure relations obtained in this study are of great importance for the design and fabrication of reliable components with service life and a safety factor. The Weibull modulus, which is a measure of the scatter in fracture strength, is the gauge of the mechanical reliability. The elastic moduli and Poisson's ratio are needed in analytical or numerical models of the thermal and

  16. Results at Mallik highlight progress in gas hydrate energy resource research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T.S.

    2005-01-01

    The recent studies that project the role of gas hydrates in the future energy resource management are reviewed. Researchers have long speculated that gas hydrates could eventually be a commercial resource for the future. A Joint Industry Project led by ChevronTexaco and the US Department of Energy is designed to characterize gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico. Countries including Japan, canada, and India have established large gas hydrate research and development projects, while China, Korea and Mexico are investigating the viability of forming government-sponsored gas hydrate research projects.

  17. Production and characterization of activated carbon using indigenous waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Ibrahim, F.

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon was produced from shisham wood and coconut shell through chemical activation, using phosphoric acid and low temperature carbonization. Proximate analysis and characterization of the product were carried out and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface area, total ash content, moisture content, pH value and iodine number were determined. The product characteristics were well comparable with those of the commercially available activated carbon. (author)

  18. Material Fracture Characterization and Toughness Improving Technology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bong Sang; Yoon, J. H.; Lee, H. J.

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this study are the assurance of integrity assessment technique for RPV and primary piping, the accumulation of radiation embrittlement data for RPV steels and development of high toughness/strength radiation-resistant reactor structural materials. The present work is categorized into 4 parts. The contents are as follows. 1. Development of technical guideline for application of fracture master curve to domestic nuclear power plant, 2. Development of radiation embrittlement DB and assessment model for domestic RPV steels, 3. characterzation of crack growth properties for piping and their welds, 4. Improvement of material specification for RPV and piping Since the demand of the citizens for safety insurance of operating NPP is increasing, the results of quantitative evaluation of safety margin related to radiation embrittlement by using advanced techniques can be effectively used for public acceptance. It can provide a technical basis of safety inspection for the regulatory body. Furthermore, it is expected that the techniques and the results would be used for effectiveness of the aging management and periodic safety review programs for domestic NPPs. The results of the study for enhancement of material properties of type 347 for surge line is planed to be involved in special specification for the next KSNP construction. The results for improving strength of RPV material will be an important technical basis of an R and D program for the design and construction of a next generation NPP, such as SCWR

  19. Improved Suction Technique for the Characterization of Construction Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2007-01-01

    The suction technique is a method from soil science that is used for the study of moisture storage capacity in porous construction materials at high relative humidity levels (above approximately 93%). The samples to be studied are placed in a pressurized container (an extractor) on a water...

  20. Characterization of porous materials by small-angle scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the availability of ultra small-angle scattering instruments, one can investigate porous materials in the sub-micron length scale. Because of the increased accessible length scale vis-a-vis the multiple scattering effect, conventional data analysis procedures based on single scattering approximation quite often fail.

  1. Industrial characterization and validation of clay materials like engineering barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas, P.; Villar, M.V.; Martin, P.L.; Perez del Villar, L.; Cruz, B. de la; Cozar, J.S.; Dardaine, M.; Lajudie, A.

    1993-01-01

    This report analyzes the bentonites in Madrid and Almeria in order to select the material to built the barrier between the containers and granitic LOCK. The main objective was focussed to test radioactive waste storage in granitic LOCK. The institutions involved in this project are, CIEMAT (Spain), CEA (France), UAM (Spain) and CSIC (Spain)

  2. Strain characterization of embedded aerospace smart materials using shearography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anisimov, A.; Muller, B.; Sinke, J.; Groves, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of smart materials for embedding in aerospace composites provides enhanced functionality for future aircraft structures. Critical flight conditions like icing of the leading edges can affect the aircraft functionality and controllability. Hence, anti-icing and de-icing capabilities

  3. Mineralogy And Raw Material Characterization Of Esie Stone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electronprobe mineral data of samples of Esie statues is presented as a possible tool for provenance studies. Most of the samples contain talc, chlorite, cummingtonite and rarely tremolite. Other talc-bearing schists are prevalent in the Esie area. However talc-cummingtonite rocks, similar to the raw materials used for the ...

  4. Characterization of porous materials by small-angle scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    radiation is used in some cases to access large length scale and also to minimize the effect ... For numerous industrial and technological applications, it is often necessary to ... catalytic systems and gas burners require materials to be permeable and to provide ... We have estimated the scattering mean free path L, the.

  5. Ultrasonic and advanced methods for nondestructive testing and material characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, C. H

    2007-01-01

    ... and physics among others. There are at least two dozen NDT methods in use. In fact any sensor that can examine the inside of material nondestructively is useful for NDT. However the ultrasonic methods are still most popular because of its capability, flexibility, and relative cost effectiveness. For this reason this book places a heavy emphasis...

  6. Methodology for characterizing potential adversaries of Nuclear Material Safeguards Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, C.W.; Pollock, S.M.

    1978-11-01

    The results are described of a study by Woodward--Clyde Consultants to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in the development of methods to analyze and evaluate Nuclear Material Safeguards (NMS) Systems. The study concentrated on developing a methodology to assist experts in describing, in quantitative form, their judgments about the characteristics of potential adversaries of NMS Systems

  7. Methodology for characterizing potential adversaries of Nuclear Material Safeguards Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkwood, C.W.; Pollock, S.M.

    1978-11-01

    The results are described of a study by Woodward--Clyde Consultants to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in the development of methods to analyze and evaluate Nuclear Material Safeguards (NMS) Systems. The study concentrated on developing a methodology to assist experts in describing, in quantitative form, their judgments about the characteristics of potential adversaries of NMS Systems.

  8. Characterization of viscoelastic materials for low-magnitude blast mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartyczak, S.; Mock, W.

    2014-05-01

    Recent research indicates that exposure to low amplitude blast waves, such as IED detonation or multiple firings of a weapon, causes damage to brain tissue resulting in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Current combat helmets are not sufficiently protecting warfighters from this danger and the effects are debilitating, costly, and long-lasting. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the blast mitigating behavior of current helmet materials and new materials designed for blast mitigation using a test fixture recently developed at the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division for use with an existing gas gun. The 40-mm-bore gas gun was used as a shock tube to generate blast waves (ranging from 0.5 to 2 bar) in the test fixture mounted on the gun muzzle. A fast opening valve was used to release helium gas from the breech which formed into a blast wave and impacted instrumented targets in the test fixture. Blast attenuation of selected materials was determined through the measurement of stress data in front of and behind the target. Materials evaluated in this research include polyurethane foam from currently fielded US Army and Marine Corps helmets, polyurea 1000, and three hardnesses of Sorbothane (48, 58, and 70 durometer, Shore 00). Polyurea 1000 and 6061-T6 aluminum were used to calibrate the stress gauges.

  9. Nonlinear dynamic characterization of two-dimensional materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidovikj, D.; Alijani, F.; Cartamil Bueno, S.J.; van der Zant, H.S.J.; Amabili, M.; Steeneken, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to their atomic-scale thickness, the resonances of two-dimensional (2D) material membranes show signatures of nonlinearities at forces of only a few picoNewtons. Although the linear dynamics of membranes is well understood, the exact relation between the nonlinear response and the resonator's

  10. Initiative to manufacture and characterize Baculovirus Reference Material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamen, A.; Aucoin, M.; Merten, O.W.; Alves, P.C.M.; Hashimoto, Y.; Airenne, K.; Hu, Y.C.; Mezzina, M.; Oers, van M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This letter to the editor brings to the attention of researchers an initiative to develop a baculovirus reference material repository. To be successful this initiative needs the support of a broad panel of researchers working with baculovirus vectors for recombinant protein production and gene

  11. Dissolution of Hydrocarbon Gas Hydrates in Seawater at 1030-m; Effects of Porosity, Structure, and Compositional Variation as Determined by High-Definition Video and SEM Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L. A.; Peltzer, E. T.; Durham, W. B.; Kirby, S. H.; Brewer, P. G.; Circone, S.; Rehder, G.

    2002-12-01

    We compare dissolution rates of pure, porous, compacted, and oil-contaminated sI methane hydrate and sII methane-ethane hydrate to rates measured previously on pure, compacted, sI methane hydrate and sI carbon dioxide hydrate (Rehder et al., Fall AGU 2001). Laboratory-synthesized test specimens were used in both studies, allowing characterization of test materials prior to their transport and exposure to seawater at 1030-meter depth on the Monterey Canyon seafloor, off coastal Moss Landing, CA. Although pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions at this site are within the nominal P-T equilibrium fields of all gas hydrates tested here, the seawater is undersaturated with respect to the hydrate-forming gas species. Hence, samples dissolve with time, at a rate dependent on water current flow. Four samples were deployed in this second experiment: (1) pure, 30% porous methane hydrate; (2) pure, compacted methane hydrate; (3) pure methane hydrate compacted and then contaminated with a low-T mineral oil; and (4) pure, compacted sII methane-ethane hydrate with methane:ethane molar ratio 0.72. Samples were transferred by pressure vessel at 0 ° C and 15 MPa to the seafloor observatory via the MBARI remotely operated vehicle Ventana. Samples were then exposed to the deep ocean environment and monitored by HDTV camera for several hours at the beginning and end of a 25-hour period. Local current speed and direction were also measured throughout the experiment. Those samples that did not undergo complete dissolution after 25 h were successfully recovered to the laboratory for subsequent analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Previously, video analysis showed dissolution rates corresponding to 4.0 +/- 0.5 mmole CO2/m2 s for compacted CO2 hydrate samples, and 0.37 +/- 0.03 mmole CH4/m2s for compacted methane hydrate samples (Rehder et al, AGU 2001). The ratio of dissolution rates fits a simple diffusive boundary layer model that incorporates relative gas solubilities

  12. Gas hydrate inhibition by perturbation of liquid water structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Natural gas hydrates are icy crystalline materials that contain hydrocarbons, which are the primary energy source for this civilization. The abundance of naturally occurring gas hydrates leads to a growing interest in exploitation. Despite their potential as energy resources and in industrial applications, there is insufficient understanding of hydrate kinetics, which hinders the utilization of these invaluable resources. Perturbation of liquid water structure by solutes has been proposed to be a key process in hydrate inhibition, but this hypothesis remains unproven. Here, we report the direct observation of the perturbation of the liquid water structure induced by amino acids using polarized Raman spectroscopy, and its influence on gas hydrate nucleation and growth kinetics. Amino acids with hydrophilic and/or electrically charged side chains disrupted the water structure and thus provided effective hydrate inhibition. The strong correlation between the extent of perturbation by amino acids and their inhibition performance constitutes convincing evidence for the perturbation inhibition mechanism. The present findings bring the practical applications of gas hydrates significantly closer, and provide a new perspective on the freezing and melting phenomena of naturally occurring gas hydrates.

  13. Research opportunities in salt hydrates for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, J.

    1983-11-01

    The state of the art of salt hydrates as phase change materials for low temperature thermal energy storage is reviewed. Phase equilibria, nucleation behavior and melting kinetics of the commonly used hydrate are summarized. The development of efficient, reliable inexpensive systems based on phase change materials, especially salt hydrates for the storage (and retrieval) of thermal energy for residential heating is outlined. The use of phase change material thermal energy storage systems is not yet widespread. Additional basic research is needed in the areas of crystallization and melting kinetics, prediction of phase behavior in ternary systems, thermal diffusion in salt hydrate systems, and in the physical properties pertinent to nonequilibrium and equilibrium transformations in these systems.

  14. Textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels from hydration of synthetic T1-C{sub 3}S, {beta}-C{sub 2}S and their blends; Caracterizacion textural y mecanica de geles C-S-H formados en la hidratacion de muestras sinteticas T1-C{sub 3}S, {beta}-C{sub 2}S y sus mezclas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goni, S.; Guerrero, A.; Puertas, F.; Hernandez, M. S.; Palacios, M.; Dolado, J. S.; Zhu, W.; Howind, T.

    2011-07-01

    The textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of pure T1-C{sub 3}S, {beta}-C{sub 2}S and their blends are studied by Nitrogen sorption and nano indentation experiments. The surface area and nano porosity of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of {beta}-C{sub 2}S and the 30-70 (T1-C{sub 3}S and {beta}-C{sub 2}S mixture) are higher than those from hydration of T1-C{sub 3}S, and 70-30, with the difference decreasing with hydration age. Such changes are well supported by findings of nano indentation study, which shows the greater relative volume of C-S-H phases with lower densities in the {beta}-C{sub 2}S and the 30-70 pastes. With the increase in hydration age, the relative volume of C-S-H phases with higher densities increased at the expenses of those with lower density. Important quantitative correlations were found among these textural characteristics and the mean chain length, determined from {sup 2}9Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR, of the C-S-H gels. (Author) 36 refs.

  15. Thermodynamic Characterization of Hydration Sites from Integral Equation-Derived Free Energy Densities: Application to Protein Binding Sites and Ligand Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güssregen, Stefan; Matter, Hans; Hessler, Gerhard; Lionta, Evanthia; Heil, Jochen; Kast, Stefan M

    2017-07-24

    Water molecules play an essential role for mediating interactions between ligands and protein binding sites. Displacement of specific water molecules can favorably modulate the free energy of binding of protein-ligand complexes. Here, the nature of water interactions in protein binding sites is investigated by 3D RISM (three-dimensional reference interaction site model) integral equation theory to understand and exploit local thermodynamic features of water molecules by ranking their possible displacement in structure-based design. Unlike molecular dynamics-based approaches, 3D RISM theory allows for fast and noise-free calculations using the same detailed level of solute-solvent interaction description. Here we correlate molecular water entities instead of mere site density maxima with local contributions to the solvation free energy using novel algorithms. Distinct water molecules and hydration sites are investigated in multiple protein-ligand X-ray structures, namely streptavidin, factor Xa, and factor VIIa, based on 3D RISM-derived free energy density fields. Our approach allows the semiquantitative assessment of whether a given structural water molecule can potentially be targeted for replacement in structure-based design. Finally, PLS-based regression models from free energy density fields used within a 3D-QSAR approach (CARMa - comparative analysis of 3D RISM Maps) are shown to be able to extract relevant information for the interpretation of structure-activity relationship (SAR) trends, as demonstrated for a series of serine protease inhibitors.

  16. A prediction method of natural gas hydrate formation in deepwater gas well and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Guo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To prevent the deposition of natural gas hydrate in deepwater gas well, the hydrate formation area in wellbore must be predicted. Herein, by comparing four prediction methods of temperature in pipe with field data and comparing five prediction methods of hydrate formation with experiment data, a method based on OLGA & PVTsim for predicting the hydrate formation area in wellbore was proposed. Meanwhile, The hydrate formation under the conditions of steady production, throttling and shut-in was predicted by using this method based on a well data in the South China Sea. The results indicate that the hydrate formation area decreases with the increase of gas production, inhibitor concentrations and the thickness of insulation materials and increases with the increase of thermal conductivity of insulation materials and shutdown time. Throttling effect causes a plunge in temperature and pressure in wellbore, thus leading to an increase of hydrate formation area.

  17. Nano materials for Renewable Energy Storage: Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rather, S.U.; Zacharia, R.; Stephan, A.M.; Petrov, L.A.; Nair, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Nano technology and nano scale materials have been part of human history and in use since centuries. Staining of glass windows hundreds of years ago is one of the examples where people created beautiful works without knowing that they are using nano processing. The beginning of modern era of nano technology dates back to the talk of the Nobel laureate Professor Richard Feynman in There plenty of room at the bottom. Professor Feynman hypothesized that in near future scientists would be able to control and modulate individual molecules and atoms. After a decade, Professor Norio Taniguchi introduced the magical word nano technology. However, in 1981, the introduction of scanning tunnelling microscope enabled the scientists to see the materials in nano scale that propagated the new age of nano technology.

  18. Characterization of baking behaviour of carbonaceous materials by dilatation investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, M.; Seichter, A.; Starke, S.

    1990-01-01

    An increase in volume can be observed in carbonaceous materials during baking which is assumed to be the reason for strains and crack formation. It occurs most pronouncedly within a temperature range from 100 to 200{degree}C. The causes of such phenomena in products pressed at different temperatures are analyzed by means of a gas pressure model and a relaxation model. The factors influencing dilatation are subject to thermal analysis. 15 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Characterization of Contamination Generation Characteristics of Satellite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-22

    of IIIAglif.’le i 1 tiet .I%la It’d p’fb lri,ore -Aoili. kdVCIy well, 1-4-.e nit pw’ri’H i.i soul nt) hank-i are rt’. ovwclll tlat. 7.1.4 letal Atiti...free surface arma rather than mass. reporing of percent mass loss would not be rcl-van for these materials. Later in the program it was decided that

  20. Characterization of cryogenic materials by x-ray absorption methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heald, S.M.; Tranquada, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray absorption techniques have in recent years been developed into powerful probes of the electronic and structural properties of materials difficult to study by other techniques. In particular, the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique can be applied to a variety of cryogenic materials. Three examples are used to demonstrate the power of the technique. The first is the determination of the lattice location of dilute alloying additions such as Ta and Zr in Nb 3 Sn. The Ta additions are shown to reside predominately in Nb lattice sites, while Zr is not uniquely located at either Nb or Sn sites. In addition to structural information, temperature dependent EXAFS studies can be used to determine the rms deviations of atomic bond lengths, providing information about the temperature dependence of interatomic force constants. For Nb 3 Sn deviations are found from simple harmonic behavior at low temperatures which indicate a softening of the Nb-Sn bond strength. The final example is the study of interfacial properties in thin film systems. This is accomplished by making x-ray absorption measurements under conditions of total external reflection of the incident x-rays. As some examples show, this technique has great potential for studying interfacial reactions, a process used in the fabrication of many superconducting materials

  1. Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composite Material Properties for Impact Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Biniendak, Wieslaw K.; Arnold, William A.; Littell, Justin D.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2009-01-01

    The reliability of impact simulations for aircraft components made with triaxial braided carbon fiber composites is currently limited by inadequate material property data and lack of validated material models for analysis. Improvements to standard quasi-static test methods are needed to account for the large unit cell size and localized damage within the unit cell. The deformation and damage of a triaxial braided composite material was examined using standard quasi-static in-plane tension, compression, and shear tests. Some modifications to standard test specimen geometries are suggested, and methods for measuring the local strain at the onset of failure within the braid unit cell are presented. Deformation and damage at higher strain rates is examined using ballistic impact tests on 61- by 61- by 3.2-mm (24- by 24- by 0.125-in.) composite panels. Digital image correlation techniques were used to examine full-field deformation and damage during both quasi-static and impact tests. An impact analysis method is presented that utilizes both local and global deformation and failure information from the quasi-static tests as input for impact simulations. Improvements that are needed in test and analysis methods for better predictive capability are examined.

  2. Material Fracture Characterization and Toughness Improving Technology Developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bong Sang; Kim, M. C.; Lee, H. J. and others

    2005-04-01

    Reactor pressure boundary components including pressure vessel and piping are facing a severe aging condition that can degrade the physical-mechanical properties under neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure, and corrosive environments. In order to increase the safety of nuclear power plants, it is inevitable to improve the credibility and capability of evaluation technology based on the quantitative fracture mechanics for aging assessment of reactor components. Irradiation embrittlement is the primary aging mechanism of reactor pressure vessel and various techniques have been developed to predict the aging characteristics by using only small volume of irradiated materials. Material database of the domestic structural steels for KSNP's under reactor environments must be very important to play a role in developing an advanced material, in improving the safety of nuclear components, and also in expanding the nuclear industry abroad. This research project has been focused on developing an advanced technology of testing and analysis in the fracture mechanical point of view as well as acquiring test data and improving the performance of nuclear structural steels

  3. Novel Materials for Molecular Electronics and their Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Weis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Defect-free diacetylene (DA Langmuir-Blodgett films polymerized on a air/water interface have various¨applications in biosensors, membrane physics or low-dimensional physics. Polymerization of DA monolayers is in general way characterized by optical spectroscopy. In this study for evaluation of photopolymerization process for the first time the Maxwell displacement current (MDC measuring technique was used. In experiment MDC flows through the metalelectrode/air gap/Langmuir monolayer/water surface structure. The effect of polymerization as well as the phase transition of polymerized DA was observed. Moreover PDA domain creation and homogenization was registered.

  4. Optimization and characterization of woven kevlar reinforced epoxy matrix composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, A.; Aslam, S.

    2007-01-01

    Composite materials are actually well established materials that have demonstrated their promising advantages among the light weight structural materials used for aerospace and advanced applications. An effort is now being made to develop and characterize the Kevlar Epoxy Composite Materials by changing the vol. fraction of Kevlar in epoxy matrix. The optimum characteristics were observed with 37% fiber with resin by applying hand-lay-up process. The composites produced were subjected to mechanical testing to evaluate the mechanical characteristics. (author)

  5. Synthesis and characterization of titanium oxide supported silica materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijnemakers, Koen

    2002-01-01

    Titania-silica materials are interesting materials for use in catalysis, both as a catalyst support as well as a catalyst itself. Titania-silica materials combine the excellent support and photocatalytic properties of titania with the high thermal and mechanical stability of silica. Moreover, the interaction of titania with silica leads to new active sites, such as acid and redox sites, that are not found on the single oxides. In this Ph.D. two recently developed deposition methods were studied and evaluated for their use to create titanium oxide supported silica materials, the Chemical Surface Coating (CSC) and the Molecular Designed Dispersion (MDD). These methods were applied to two structurally different silica supports, an amorphous silica gel and the highly ordered MCM-48. Both methods are based on the specific interaction between a titanium source and the functional groups on the silica surface. With the CSC method high amounts of titanium can be obtained. However, clustering of the titania phase is observed in most cases. The MDD method allows much lower titanium amounts to be deposited without the formation of crystallites. Only at the highest Ti loading very small crystallites are formed after calcination. MCM-48 and silica gel are both pure SiO2 materials and therefore chemically similar to each other. However, they possess a different morphology and are synthesized in a different way. As such, some authors have reported that the MCM-48 surface would be more reactive than the surface of silica gel. In our experiments however no differences could be observed that confirmed this hypothesis. In the CSC method, the same reactions were observed and similar amounts of Ti and Cl were deposited. In the case of the MDD method, no difference in the reaction mechanism was observed. However, due to the lower thermal and hydrothermal stability of the MCM-48 structure compared to silica gel, partial incorporation of Ti atoms in the pore walls of MCM-48 took place

  6. Experimental investigation of smectite hydration from the simulation of 001 X-ray diffraction lines. Implications for the characterization of mineralogical modifications of the 'argilite' from the Meuse - Haute Marne site as a result of a thermal perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrage, E.

    2004-10-01

    The structural modifications affecting the reactive mineral constituents of the clay barriers (smectite) and possibly resulting from the thermal pulse related to nuclear waste storage are essentially limited to the amount and location of the layer charge deficit. These modifications likely impact the hydration properties of these minerals, and a specific methodology has thus been developed to describe, using simulation of X-ray diffraction profiles (001 reflections), these hydration properties and specifically the heterogeneity resulting from the inter-stratification of different layer types, each exhibiting a specific hydration state. The detailed study of the hydration properties of a low-charge montmorillonite (octahedral charge) has shown that the affinity of the interlayer cation for water rules the hydration state and the thickness of hydrated smectite layers. If the layer charge is increased, the transition between the different hydration states is shifted, following a water desorption isotherm, towards lower relative humidities. In addition, the hydration of studied beidellites (tetrahedral charge) was shown to be more heterogeneous than that of montmorillonites. The developed methodology also allowed describing the structural modifications resulting from a chemical perturbation (chlorinated anionic background, pH). Finally, the link between the thickness of elementary layers and the amount of interlayer water molecules has been evidenced. A new structure model has also been determined for these interlayer species allowing an improved description of their positional distribution in bi-hydrated interlayers. (author)

  7. Hydrate-bearing Submarine Landslides in the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, D.; Mason, A.; Cook, A.; Portnov, A.; Hillman, J.

    2017-12-01

    The co-occurrence of submarine landslides and hydrate-bearing sediment suggests that hydrates may play a role in landslide triggering and/or the mobility and dynamic characteristics of the submarine landslide. In turn, the removal of large sections of seafloor perturbs the hydrate stability field by removing overburden pressure and disturbing the temperature field. These potential hydrate-landslide feedbacks are not well understood. Here we combine three-dimensional seismic and petrophysical logs to characterize the deposits of submarine landslides that failed from hydrate-bearing sediments in the Orca Basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The Orca Basin contains a regionally mappable bottom simulating reflector, hydrate saturations within sands and muds, as well as numerous landslides. In addition, the Orca Basin features a well-known 123 km2 anoxic hypersaline brine pool that is actively being fed by outcropping salt. Lying at the bottom of the brine pool are deposits of submarine landslides. Slope instability in the Orca Basin is likely associated with near-seafloor salt tectonics. The most prominent landslide scar observable on the seafloor has a correlative deposit that now lies at the bottom of the brine pool 11.6 km away. The headwall is amphitheater-shaped with an average height of 80 meters and with only a minor amount of rubble remaining near the headwall. A total of 8.7 km3 of material was removed and deposited between the lower slopes of the basin and the base of the brine pool. Around the perimeter of the landslide headwall, two industry wells were drilled and well logs show elevated resistivity that are likely caused by gas hydrate. The slide deposits have a chaotic seismic facies with large entrained blocks and the headwall area does not retain much original material, which together suggests a relatively mobile style of landslide and therefore may have generated a wave upon impacting the brine pool. Such a slide-induced wave may have sloshed

  8. Surface Assisted Formation of methane Hydrates on Ice and Na Montmorillonite Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cygan, Randall Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meserole, Stephen P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Mark A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Methane hydrates are extremely important naturally-occurring crystalline materials that impact climate change, energy resources, geological hazards, and other major environmental issues. Whereas significant experimental effort has been completed to understanding the bulk thermodynamics of methane hydrate assemblies, little is understood on heterogeneous nucleation and growth of methane hydrates in clay-rich environments. Controlled synthesis experiments were completed at 265-285 K and 6.89 MPa to examine the impact of montmorillonite surfaces in clay-ice mixtures to nucleate and form methane hydrate. The results suggest that the hydrophilic and methane adsorbing properties of Namontmorillonite reduce the nucleation period of methane hydrate formation in pure ice systems.

  9. Longevity of borehole and shaft sealing materials: characterization of cement-based ancient building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    Durability and long-term stability of cements, mortars, and/or concretes utilized as borehole plugging and shaft sealing materials are of present concern in the national effort to isolate and contain nuclear waste within deep geological repositories. The present study consists of a preliminary examination of selected ancient, old, and modern building materials (14 specimens) and was intended to document and explain the remarkable durability of these portland cement-related materials. This study has provided insights into reasons for the durability of certain structures and also into the long-term stability of calcium silicate binders (cements) used in archaeologic materials. These data were combined with knowledge obtained from the behavior of modern portland cements and natural materials to evaluate the potential for longevity of such materials in a borehole environment. A multimethod analysis was used and included: macroscopic and microscopic (petrographic and SEM) analyses, chemical analyses, and x-ray diffraction analyses. 61 figures, 11 tables

  10. Characterization of Materials for Use as Optical Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rascon, E. Ortiz; Bruce, N. C.; Flores Flores, J. O.; Berru, R. Sato

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of optical characterization of silicon dioxide nanoparticle solutions. These are spherical particles with a controlled diameter between 100 nm and 600 nm. The importance of this work lies in using these solutions to develop a phantom with optical properties that closely match those of human breast tissue at near-IR wavelengths. Characterization involves illuminating the solution with a laser beam transmitted through a recipient of known width containing the solution. Resulting intensity profiles from the light spot are measured as function of the detector position. The experiments were realized using light with wavelengths 633 nm and 820 nm. Measured intensity profiles were fitted to the calculated profiles obtained from diffusion theory, using the method of images. Fitting results give us the absorption and transport scatter coefficients. These coefficients can be modified by changing the particle concentration of the solution. We found that these coefficients are the same order of magnitude as those of human tissue reported in published studies.

  11. Three types of gas hydrate reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico identified in LWD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Woong; Collett, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    High quality logging-while-drilling (LWD) well logs were acquired in seven wells drilled during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II in the spring of 2009. These data help to identify three distinct types of gas hydrate reservoirs: isotropic reservoirs in sands, vertical fractured reservoirs in shale, and horizontally layered reservoirs in silty shale. In general, most gas hydratebearing sand reservoirs exhibit isotropic elastic velocities and formation resistivities, and gas hydrate saturations estimated from the P-wave velocity agree well with those from the resistivity. However, in highly gas hydrate-saturated sands, resistivity-derived gas hydrate-saturation estimates appear to be systematically higher by about 5% over those estimated by P-wave velocity, possibly because of the uncertainty associated with the consolidation state of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Small quantities of gas hydrate were observed in vertical fractures in shale. These occurrences are characterized by high formation resistivities with P-wave velocities close to those of water-saturated sediment. Because the formation factor varies significantly with respect to the gas hydrate saturation for vertical fractures at low saturations, an isotropic analysis of formation factor highly overestimates the gas hydrate saturation. Small quantities of gas hydrate in horizontal layers in shale are characterized by moderate increase in P-wave velocities and formation resistivities and either measurement can be used to estimate gas hydrate saturations.

  12. Longevity of borehole and shaft sealing materials: characterization of ancient cement based building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.; Roy, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    Durability and long-term stability of cements in plasters, mortars, and/or concretes utilized as borehole plugging and shaft sealing materials are of present concern in the national effort to isolate nuclear waste within deep geological repositories. The present study consists of an examination of selected ancient building materials and provides insights into the durability of certain ancient structures. These data were combined with knowledge obtained from the behavior of modern portland cements and natural materials to evaluate the potential for longevity of such materials in a borehold environment. Analyses were conducted by petrographic, SEM, chemical, and x-ray diffraction techniques. 7 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  13. Development, characterization and evaluation of materials for open cycle MHD. Quarterly report, June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.L.; Marchant, D.D.

    1979-10-01

    The objectives of this program are to develop, test, characterize, and evaluate materials for open-cycle, coal-fired MHD power generators. The specific immediate goals emphasize electrode and insulator materials, including: (1) testing and evaluation of the enhanced effects of alkali seed on materials in a dc electric field; (2) development and testing of improved electrodes and insulators with controlled microstructures, compositions and properties; and (3) characterization and evaluation of materials relating to both the US MHD Program and the US-USSR Cooperative Program for MHD power generators. Progress is reported

  14. Advanced Gas Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Daniel

    2017-12-30

    Prospecting for high saturation gas hydrate deposits can be greatly aided with improved approaches to seismic interpretation and especially if sets of seismic attributes can be shown as diagnostic or direct hydrocarbon indicators for high saturation gas hydrates in sands that would be of most interest for gas hydrate production.

    A large 3D seismic data set in the deep water Eastern Gulf of Mexico was screened for gas hydrates using a set of techniques and seismic signatures that were developed and proven in the Central deepwater Gulf of Mexico in the DOE Gulf of Mexico Joint Industry Project JIP Leg II in 2009 and recently confirmed with coring in 2017.

    A large gas hydrate deposit is interpreted in the data where gas has migrated from one of the few deep seated faults plumbing the Jurassic hydrocarbon source into the gas hydrate stability zone. The gas hydrate deposit lies within a flat-lying within Pliocene Mississippi Fan channel that was deposited outboard in a deep abyssal environment. The uniform architecture of the channel aided the evaluation of a set of seismic attributes that relate to attenuation and thin-bed energy that could be diagnostic of gas hydrates. Frequency attributes derived from spectral decomposition also proved to be direct hydrocarbon indicators by pseudo-thickness that could be only be reconciled by substituting gas hydrate in the pore space. The study emphasizes that gas hydrate exploration and reservoir characterization benefits from a seismic thin bed approach.

  15. Hydration behaviors of calcium silicate-based biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuan-Ling; Wang, Wen-Hsi; Lin, Feng-Huie; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2017-06-01

    Calcium silicate (CS)-based biomaterials, such as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), have become the most popular and convincing material used in restorative endodontic treatments. However, the commercially available CS-based biomaterials all contain different minor additives, which may affect their hydration behaviors and material properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hydration behavior of CS-based biomaterials with/without minor additives. A novel CS-based biomaterial with a simplified composition, without mineral oxides as minor additives, was produced. The characteristics of this biomaterial during hydration were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. The hydration behaviors of commercially available gray and white MTAs with mineral oxide as minor additives were also evaluated for reference. For all three test materials, the XRD analysis revealed similar diffraction patterns after hydration, but MTAs presented a significant decrease in the intensities of Bi 2 O 3 -related peaks. SEM results demonstrated similar porous microstructures with some hexagonal and facetted crystals on the outer surfaces. In addition, compared to CS with a simplified composition, the FTIR plot indicated that hydrated MTAs with mineral oxides were better for the polymerization of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH), presenting Si-O band shifting to higher wave numbers, and contained more water crystals within CSH, presenting sharper bands for O-H bending. Mineral oxides might not result in significant changes in the crystal phases or microstructures during the hydration of CS-based biomaterials, but these compounds affected the hydration behavior at the molecular level. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Characterization and Modeling of Materials for Kr-Xe Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, Paul [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Naduvalath, Balakrishnan [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Czerwinski, Ken [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-11-16

    We sought to identify practical adsorbents for the separation of Kr from Xe through pressure swing adsorption. We spent appreciable efforts on two categories of materials: metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. MOFs represent a new and exciting sorbent with numerous new framework topologies and surface chemistries. Zeolites are widely used and available commercial adsorbents. We have employed a combination of gas sorption analysis to analyze gas – surface interactions, computational modelling to both aid in interpreting experimental results and to predict practical adsorbents, and in-situ crystallographic studies to confirm specific experimental results.

  17. Characterization of the NIST shellfish Standard Reference Material 4358

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nour, S.; Inn, K.G.W.; Filliben, J.; Gaast van der, H.; Men, L.C.; Calmet, D.; Altzitzoglou, T.; Povinec, P.; Takata, Y.; Wisdom, M.

    2013-01-01

    A new shellfish Standard Reference Material 4358 was developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology through an international interlaboratory comparison that involved twelve laboratories-participants from nine countries. The results from the participants were statistically evaluated, and the most robust certified values were based on the median of laboratories’ reported means and the uncertainties derived using the bootstrap method. Massic activity certified values were established for fourteen radionuclides, five activity ratios, and informational massic activity values for eight more radionuclides and two activity ratios. (author)

  18. Characterization and Modeling of Materials for Kr-Xe Separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, Paul; Naduvalath, Balakrishnan; Czerwinski, Ken

    2015-01-01

    We sought to identify practical adsorbents for the separation of Kr from Xe through pressure swing adsorption. We spent appreciable efforts on two categories of materials: metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. MOFs represent a new and exciting sorbent with numerous new framework topologies and surface chemistries. Zeolites are widely used and available commercial adsorbents. We have employed a combination of gas sorption analysis to analyze gas - surface interactions, computational modelling to both aid in interpreting experimental results and to predict practical adsorbents, and in-situ crystallographic studies to confirm specific experimental results.

  19. Materials characterization for advanced pressurized water reactors: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.A.; Gage, G.

    1994-01-01

    A compilation and overview is presented of the experimental techniques available for characterization of the microstructural changes induced by neutron irradiation of PWR pressure vessel steels, and directed towards monitoring of embrittlement processes by examination of surveillance samples from advanced reactor systems. The microstructural features of significance include copper precipitation, dislocation loop and/or microvoid matrix damage and grain boundary solute segregation. The techniques of transmission electron microscopy, field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy, small angle neutron scattering, positron annihilation and field-ion microscopy have all developed to a degree of sophistication such that they are capable of providing detailed microstructural information in these areas, and afford considerable insight into embrittlement processes when used in combination. (author)

  20. Rapid characterizing of ferromagnetic materials using spin rectification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Xiaolong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yutian; Zhou, Hengan; Rao, Jinwei; Zhao, Xiaobing; Gao, Cunxu; Xue, Desheng; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2014-01-01

    Spin rectification is a powerful tool for dc electric detections of spin dynamics and electromagnetic waves. Technically, elaborately designed on-chip microwave devices are needed in order to realize that effect. In this letter, we propose a rapid characterizing approach based on spin rectification. By directly sending dynamic current into ferromagnetic films with stripe shape, resonant dc voltages can be detected along the longitudinal or transversal directions. As an example, Fe (010) films with precise crystalline structure and magnetic parameters were used to testify the reliability of such method. We investigated not only the dynamic parameters and the precise anisotropy constants of the Fe crystals but also the principle of spin rectification in this method

  1. EPR and Optical Characterization of Photorefractive Materials Used in Agile Laser Protection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Halliburton, Larry

    2003-01-01

    .... The specific materials investigated were LiNbO3 and LiTaO3. The experimental techniques used to characterize these crystals were optical absorption, thermoluminescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR...

  2. Advanced Nanoscale Characterization of Cement Based Materials Using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation: A Review

    KAUST Repository

    Chae, Sejung R.; Moon, Juhyuk; Yoon, Seyoon; Bae, Sungchul; Levitz, Pierre; Winarski, Robert; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report various synchrotron radiation laboratory based techniques used to characterize cement based materials in nanometer scale. High resolution X-ray transmission imaging combined with a rotational axis allows for rendering of samples in three

  3. Characterization of sapphire: For its material properties at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Harman Singh

    There are numerous needs for sensing, one of which is in pressure sensing for high temperature application such as combustion related process and embedded in aircraft wings for reusable space vehicles. Currently, silicon based MEMS technology is used for pressure sensing. However, due to material properties the sensors have a limited range of approximately 600 °C which is capable of being pushed towards 1000 °C with active cooling. This can introduce reliability issues when you add more parts and high flow rates to remove large amounts of heat. To overcome this challenge, sapphire is investigated for optical based pressure transducers at temperatures approaching 1400 °C. Due to its hardness and chemical inertness, traditional cutting and etching methods used in MEMS technology are not applicable. A method that is being investigated as a possible alternative is laser machining using a picosecond laser. In this research, we study the material property changes that occur from laser machining and quantify the changes with the experimental results obtained by testing sapphire at high-temperature with a standard 4-point bending set-up.

  4. Characterization of impact behaviour of armour plate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassim, M. N.; Bolduc, M.; Nazimuddin, G.; Delorme, J.; Polyzois, I.

    2012-08-01

    Three armour plate materials, including two steels, namely HHA and Mars 300, and an aluminium alloy 5083, were studied under impact loading to determine their behaviour and the mechanisms of deformation that lead to failure. The experimental testing was carried out using either a direct impact compression Split Hopkinson Bar or a torsion Hopkinson Bar. The impact properties and stress-strain cures were obtained as a function of the impact momentum in compression and the angle of twist in torsion. It was found that at the high strain rates developed in the specimen during the tests, the deformation occurs by the formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) which may lead to the formation of cracks within the bands and the ultimate failure of the specimens. It was also found that below a certain impact momentum, the deformation is more uniform and no ASBs are formed. Also, ASBs are more likely to form in the BCC metals such as the two steels while diffuse ASBs associated with plastic flow are exhibited in the 5083 aluminum alloy. Microstructural techniques ranging from optical microscopy to atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to study the topography of the ASBs. Also, modelling of the formation was performed. The results provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ASBs in the failure of these materials.

  5. Characterization of advanced piezoelectric materials in the wide temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burianova, L.; Kopal, A.; Nosek, J

    2003-05-25

    We report about methods and results of our measurements of piezoelectric, dielectric and elastic properties of piezoelectric materials like crystals, ceramics, composites, polymers and thin layer composites. Among the methods, used in our laboratories are: the resonance method working in the temperature range 208-358 K, hydrostatic methods, both static and dynamic in the range 273-333 K, laser interferometric methods, using single and double-beam interferometer, working at room temperature, single and double-beam micro-interferometers, working inside of optical cryostat in the range 150-330 K, and pulse echo method for measurements of elastic coefficients, using ultrasonic set, working at room temperature. In our earlier papers we reported about some of our results of piezoelectric measurements of PZT ceramics using resonance method and laser interferometric method. The results of both methods were in good agreement. Now, the measurements are realized on 0-3 ceramic-polymer composites and thin layer composites. It is well known, that both intrinsic (material) and extrinsic (domain structure) contributions to properties of ferroelectric samples have characteristic, sometimes rather strong, temperature dependence. Therefore, any extension of temperature range of the above mentioned methods is welcomed.

  6. Characterization of impact behaviour of armour plate materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazimuddin G.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Three armour plate materials, including two steels, namely HHA and Mars 300, and an aluminium alloy 5083, were studied under impact loading to determine their behaviour and the mechanisms of deformation that lead to failure. The experimental testing was carried out using either a direct impact compression Split Hopkinson Bar or a torsion Hopkinson Bar. The impact properties and stress-strain cures were obtained as a function of the impact momentum in compression and the angle of twist in torsion. It was found that at the high strain rates developed in the specimen during the tests, the deformation occurs by the formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs which may lead to the formation of cracks within the bands and the ultimate failure of the specimens. It was also found that below a certain impact momentum, the deformation is more uniform and no ASBs are formed. Also, ASBs are more likely to form in the BCC metals such as the two steels while diffuse ASBs associated with plastic flow are exhibited in the 5083 aluminum alloy. Microstructural techniques ranging from optical microscopy to atomic force microscopy (AFM were used to study the topography of the ASBs. Also, modelling of the formation was performed. The results provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ASBs in the failure of these materials.

  7. Porous Materials from Thermally Activated Kaolinite: Preparation, Characterization and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Luo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, porous alumina/silica materials were prepared by selective leaching of silicon/aluminum constituents from thermal-activated kaolinite in inorganic acid or alkali liquor. The correlations between the characteristics of the prepared porous materials and the dissolution properties of activated kaolinite were also investigated. The results show that the specific surface area (SSA of porous alumina/silica increases with silica/alumina dissolution, but without marked change of the BJH pore size. Furthermore, change in pore volume is more dependent on activation temperature. The porous alumina and silica obtained from alkali leaching of kaolinite activated at 1150 °C for 15 min and acid leaching of kaolinite activated at 850 °C for 15 min are mesoporous, with SSAs, BJH pore sizes and pore volumes of 55.8 m2/g and 280.3 m2/g, 6.06 nm and 3.06 nm, 0.1455 mL/g and 0.1945 mL/g, respectively. According to the adsorption tests, porous alumina has superior adsorption capacities for Cu2+, Pb2+ and Cd2+ compared with porous silica and activated carbon. The maximum capacities of porous alumina for Cu2+, Pb2+ and Cd2+ are 134 mg/g, 183 mg/g and 195 mg/g, respectively, at 30 °C.

  8. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk,