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Sample records for massive sulfide host

  1. Volcanic-hosted massive sulfide deposits in the Murchison greenstone belt, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz-Schampera, Ulrich; Terblanche, Hennie; Oberthür, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    The Archean Murchison greenstone belt, Limpopo Province, South Africa, represents a rifted epicontinental arc sequence containing the largest volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VMS) district in Southern Africa. The so-called Cu-Zn line is host to 12 deposits of massive sulfide mineralization including: Maranda J, LCZ, Romotshidi, Mon Desir, Solomons, and Mashawa with a total tonnage of three million metric tons of very high grade Zn, subordinate Cu, and variable Pb and Au ore. The deposits developed during initial phases of highly evolved felsic volcanism between 2,974.8 ± 3.6 and 2,963.2 ± 6.4 Ma and are closely associated with quartz porphyritic rhyolite domes. Elevated heat supply ensured regional hydrothermal convection along the entire rift. Recurrent volcanism resulted in frequent disruption of hydrothermal discharge and relative short-lived episodes of hydrothermal activity, probably responsible for the small size of the deposits. Stable thermal conditions led to the development of mature hydrothermal vent fields from focused fluid discharge and sulfide precipitation within thin layers of felsic volcaniclastic rocks. Two main ore suites occur in the massive sulfide deposits of the “Cu-Zn line”: (1) a low-temperature venting, polymetallic assemblage of Zn, Pb, Sb, As, Cd, Te, Bi, Sn, ±In, ±Au, ±Mo occurring in the pyrite- and sphalerite-dominated ore types and (2) a higher temperature suite of Cu, Ag, Au, Se, In, Co, Ni is associated with chalcopyrite-bearing ores. Sphalerite ore, mineralogy, and geochemical composition attest to hydrothermal activity at relatively low temperatures of ≤250 °C for the entire rift, with short-lived pulses of higher temperature upflow, reflected by proportions of Zn-rich versus Cu-rich deposits. Major- and trace-metal composition of the deposits and Pb isotope signatures reflect the highly evolved felsic source rock composition. Geological setting, host rock composition, and metallogenesis share many similarities not

  2. Silver sulfotellurides from volcanic-hosted massive sulfide deposits in the Southern Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselov, K. A.; Belogub, E. V.; Zaykov, V. V.; Yakovleva, V. A.

    2006-07-01

    This paper addresses Ag-sulfotellurides occurring in volcanic-hosted massive sulfide deposits of the Southern Urals. Cervelleite-like minerals were identified in ores from the Gayskoe, Yaman-Kasy, Severo-Uvaryazhskoe, Tash-Tau, and Babaryk deposits, where they occur in ores containing chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite, tennantite ± bornite. Other Ag- and Te-bearing minerals (electrum, hessite, stromeyerite and Ag-bearing chalcocite) are present in the association. A benleonardite-like mineral associated with sylvanite and native tellurium was found as a metastable phase in paleohydrothermal tubes relics from the Yaman-Kasy deposit. Formation of the sulfotellurides indicates relative low fTe2 in the hydrothermal systems, insufficient for formation of most S-free tellurides. The significant Cu enrichment in cervelleite relates to the association with bornite. Broad variations in composition and physical properties of cervelleite-like sulfotellurides allow the supposition of the presence of several, as yet unnamed mineral species, which can be distinguished by Cu contents, Te/S ratios, and presumably by crystal structure.

  3. Peralkaline- and calc-alkaline-hosted volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits of the Bonnifield District, East-Central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Foley, Nora K.; Slack, John E.; Koenig, Alan E.; Oscarson, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) Zn-Pb-Cu-Ag-Au deposits of the Bonnifield mining district formed during Late Devonian-Early Mississippian magmatism along the western edge of Laurentia. The largest deposits, Dry Creek and WTF, have a combined resource of 5.7 million tonnes at 10% Zn, 4% Pb, 0.3% Cu, 300 grams per tonne (g/t) Ag, and 1.6 g/t Au. These polymetallic deposits are hosted in high field strength element (HFSE)- and rare-earth element (REE)-rich peralkaline (pantelleritic) metarhyolite, and interlayered pyritic argillite and mudstone of the Mystic Creek Member of the Totatlanika Schist Formation. Mystic Creek metarhyolite and alkali basalt (Chute Creek Member) constitute a bimodal pair that formed in an extensional environment. A synvolcanic peralkaline quartz porphyry containing veins of fluorite, sphalerite, pyrite, and quartz intrudes the central footwall at Dry Creek. The Anderson Mountain deposit, located ~32 km to the southwest, occurs within calc-alkaline felsic to intermediate-composition metavolcanic rocks and associated graphitic argillite of the Wood River assemblage. Felsic metavolcanic rocks there have only slightly elevated HFSEs and REEs. The association of abundant graphitic and siliceous argillite with the felsic volcanic rocks together with low Cu contents in the Bonnifield deposits suggests classification as a siliciclastic-felsic type of VMS deposit. Bonnifield massive sulfides and host rocks were metamorphosed and deformed under greenschist-facies conditions in the Mesozoic. Primary depositional textures, generally uncommon, consist of framboids, framboidal aggregates, and spongy masses of pyrite. Sphalerite, the predominant base metal sulfide, encloses early pyrite framboids. Galena and chalcopyrite accompanied early pyrite formation but primarily formed late in the paragenetic sequence. Silver-rich tetrahedrite is a minor late phase at the Dry Creek deposit. Gold and Ag are present in low to moderate amounts in pyrite from all of

  4. Volcanogenic massive sulfide occurrence model: Chapter C in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Koski, Randolph A.; Mosier, Dan L.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Slack, John F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Seal, Robert R., II; Piatak, Nadine M.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Thurston, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, also known as volcanic-hosted massive sulfide, volcanic-associated massive sulfide, or seafloor massive sulfide deposits, are important sources of copper, zinc, lead, gold, and silver (Cu, Zn, Pb, Au, and Ag). These deposits form at or near the seafloor where circulating hydrothermal fluids driven by magmatic heat are quenched through mixing with bottom waters or porewaters in near-seafloor lithologies. Massive sulfide lenses vary widely in shape and size and may be podlike or sheetlike. They are generally stratiform and may occur as multiple lenses.

  5. Environmental geochemistry of shale-hosted Ag-Pb-Zn massive sulfide deposits in northwest Alaska: Natural background concentrations of metals in water from mineralized areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, K.D.; Taylor, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    Red Dog, Lik and Drenchwater are shale-hosted stratiform Ag-Pb-Zn massive sulfide deposits in the northwestern Brooks Range. Natural background concentrations of metals in waters from the undisturbed (unmined) Drenchwater prospect and Lik deposit were compared to pre-mining baseline studies conducted at Red Dog. The primary factors affecting water chemistry are the extent of exposure of the deposits, the grade of mineralization, the presence of carbonate reeks in the section, and the proportion of Fe-sulfide in the ore. Surface water samples from the Drenchwater prospect, which has pyrite-dominant mineralization exposed in outcrop, have pH values as low as 2.8 and high dissolved concentrations of metals including as much as 95 mg 1-1 Al, 270 mg 1-1 Fe, 8 ??1-1 Cd, 10 ??1-1 Pb, and 2600 ??1-1 Zn, with As up to 26 ??g1-1. Surface waters from the Red Dog deposit prior to mining were also acidic and metal-rich, however, dissolved metal concentrations in Red Dog waters were many times greater. The higher metal concentrations in Red Dog waters reflect the high Zn grades and the abundant sphalerite, pyrite, and galena that were present in outcrop prior to mining. In contrast, despite significant mineralization at the Lik deposit, carbonate rocks in the section buffer the system, resulting in less acidic, mostly near-neutral pH values with low concentrations of most metals except Zn.

  6. Electrical properties of seafloor massive sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Hannington, Mark; Bairlein, Katharina; Hördt, Andreas; Jegen, Marion; Petersen, Sven; Laurila, Tea

    2016-06-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits are increasingly seen as important marine metal resources for the future. A growing number of industrialized nations are involved in the surveying and sampling of such deposits by drilling. Drill ships are expensive and their availability can be limited; seabed drill rigs are a cost-effective alternative and more suitable for obtaining cores for resource evaluation. In order to achieve the objectives of resource evaluations, details are required of the geological, mineralogical, and physical properties of the polymetallic deposits and their host rocks. Electrical properties of the deposits and their ore minerals are distinct from their unmineralized host rocks. Therefore, the use of electrical methods to detect SMS while drilling and recovering drill cores could decrease the costs and accelerate offshore operations by limiting the amount of drilling in unmineralized material. This paper presents new data regarding the electrical properties of SMS cores that can be used in that assessment. Frequency-dependent complex electrical resistivity in the frequency range between 0.002 and 100 Hz was examined in order to potentially discriminate between different types of fresh rocks, alteration and mineralization. Forty mini-cores of SMS and unmineralized host rocks were tested in the laboratory, originating from different tectonic settings such as the intermediate-spreading ridges of the Galapagos and Axial Seamount, and the Pacmanus back-arc basin. The results indicate that there is a clear potential to distinguish between mineralized and non-mineralized samples, with some evidence that even different types of mineralization can be discriminated. This could be achieved using resistivity magnitude alone with appropriate rig-mounted electrical sensors. Exploiting the frequency-dependent behavior of resistivity might amplify the differences and further improve the rock characterization.

  7. PGE geochemistry and Re Os dating of massive sulfide ores from the Baimazhai Cu Ni deposit, Yunnan province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoming; Wang, Shengwei; Sun, Weidong; Shi, Guiyong; Sun, Yali; Xiong, Dexin; Qu, Wenjun; Du, Andao

    2008-09-01

    The Baimazhai deposit in Yunnan Province is one of the largest Cu-Ni sulfide deposits hosted in mafic-ultramafic intrusions in China. Concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGE) in massive sulfide ores and host rocks from Baimazhai were determined by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) following nickel sulfide fire assay pre-concentration. The results show that the total PGE (ΣPGE) are quite low, decreasing gradually from central massive ores (78.2-556 ppb) to olivine pyroxenite (0.472-67.0 ppb), gabbro (0.847 ppb) and, websterite (0.76-0.809). The intruded lamprophyre dykes also show low ΣPGE (2.98-4.07 ppb). The ΣPGE exhibit obvious positive correlations with Au, Ni and Cu contents. Primitive mantle normalized PGE patterns of the massive Cu-Ni ores are of the Pt-Pd type with relatively steep and trough-like patterns, which are similar to those of the host rocks. In addition, the Pt/Pd and Cu/Pd ratios of the massive sulfide ores are similar to those of olivine pyroxenite, gabbro and websterite. These characteristics suggest that sulfides in the massive ores are of magmatic origin, co-genetic with their host rocks. The relatively high Pt/Pd ratios of the Baimazhai massive sulfide ores (averaging 0.83) and their host rocks imply that the Baimazhai sulfides formed in a single sulfide saturation event, but not through multiple sulfide injections. High Ir contents (0.77-5.52 ppb, averaging 2.35 ppb) and dramatically variable Pd/Ir ratios (4.76-296, averaging 138) of the massive sulfide ores suggest that the Baimazhai sulfide ores might have suffered significant late stage hydrothermal alteration. The Baimazhai massive sulfide ores yield a Re-Os isochron age of 259 ± 20 Ma (MSWD = 0.025), which is the same as the major eruption stage of the Emeishan large igneous province and the Baimazhai intrusion, further supporting their magmatic origin. The initial 187Os/ 188Os value of 0.456 ± 0.026 indicates that crustal contamination has played

  8. Cerro de Pasco and other massive sulfide deposits of central Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheney, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The famous Cerro de Pasco Pb-Zn-Ag deposit historically has been considered to be hydrothermally derived from an adjacent Tertiary volcanic vent. However, texturally massive pyrite-chert and pyrite-sphalerite-galena in the deposit have the same strike and cross folds as the adjacent pre-Tertiary strata. Both the deposit and the strata are cut by one of the large Longitudinal Faults. Both dikes and pyrite-enargite veins associated with the vent cut the massive sulfides; fragments of massive pyrite occur in the vent. A few examples of laminated pyrite and chert, banded pyrite and chert, banded pyrite and sphalerite, and banded pyrite, sphalerite, and galena are preserved in the massive sulfide portion of the deposit. The deposit has the composition and zoning patterns typical of shale-hosted massive sulfides. Cerro de Pasco probably in part of the pelitic Devonian Excelsior formation. The Colquijirca deposit 8 km to the south and the San Cristobal district 110 km to the south likewise have been considered to be Tertiary volcanic hydrothermal deposits. Colquijirca consists of stratigraphically controlled mantos of layered pyrite, chert and tuff in the Tertiary Calera formation. The mantos of the San Cristobal district are along the upper contact of the pyritic, Permian, Catalina felsic volcanic rocks; some ore consists of laminated pyrite and sphalerite. Tertiary plutons are conspicuously absent at San Cristobal, and the ores are brecciated by Tertiary folding.

  9. Stratigraphic setting and mineralogy of the Arctic volcanogenic massive sulfide prospect, Ambler district, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Arctic prospect, south central Brooks Range, is among the 30 largest of 508 volcanic-hosted massive sulphide deposits in the world. The massive sulphide lenses are interlayered with graphitic schist between metamorphosed rhyolite porphyries in Middle Devonian to early Mississippian metamorphosed volcanic, volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks. Hydrothermal alteration is of three types: chloritic, phyllic s.l., and pyrite-phengite, each type strata-distinctively and respectively below, in, and above the sulphides. Maximum alteration conforms with metal zoning in the sulfides to suggest predominantly northwestward dispersal from a linear vent area in the elongate basin containing the deposit.-G.J.N.

  10. Trace elements in tourmalines from massive sulfide deposits and tourmalinites: Geochemical controls and exploration applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, W.L.; Slack, J.F.; Ramsden, A.R.; Win, T.T.; Ryan, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    tourmalines and the metallogeny of the host massive sulfide deposits indicates that the analyzed tourmalines retain a strong chemical signature of their original hydrothermal formation, in spite of variable metamorphic recrystallization. Such trace element patterns in massive sulfide tourmalines may be useful in mineral exploration, specifically for the evaluation of tourmaline concentrations in rocks, soils, and stream sediments.

  11. Finding Massive Sulfides at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barckhausen, Udo; Dressel, Ingo; Ehrhardt, Axel; Heyde, Ingo; Schwarz-Schampera, Ulrich; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Schwalenberg, Katrin

    2017-04-01

    The formation of Polymetallic Massive Sulfides is connected to hydrothermal activity concentrated in small areas close to mid-ocean ridges. Other geological settings of hydrothermal activity exist of course (like backarcs), but these are typically not located in The Area and therefore not under the regime of the International Seabed Authority (ISA). The ISA grants license areas for mineral exploration of up to 100 blocks of 10 km x 10 km size. The areas in which Polymetallic Massive Sulfides are exposed on the seafloor are tiny compared to the size of the license areas (typically in the order of 100-200m in diameter), and until recently were in most cases detected only be chance. For localizing and investigating Polymetallic Massive Sulfide deposits, geophysical methods are used at a wide range of scales. Ship-mounted overview surveys include multibeam bathymetry, magnetic and gravity measurements and are supplemented with high density sea surface investigations, and deep tow surveys close to the seafloor. Once a Massive Sulfide deposit has been surmised, ROV based video observations and measurements directly at the seafloor are used to confirm the deposit. It turns out that hydrothermal vent sites ("Black Smokers") near mid-ocean ridges are far more common than previously thought, however, due to their small size and location in rugged terrain in the deep sea they are not easy to find. Even though we have no full understanding yet of the geologic and tectonic settings in which long lasting hydrothermal systems can develop, the hydrothermal vent fields known so far seem to have some characteristics in common which can be used to define promising areas on the basis of the bathymetric overview maps. At a dense line spacing of 2.5 km, distinct magnetic anomalies can be observed in surface towed data which are connected to known hydrothermal vent fields. This means that similar magnetic anomalies observed in other places are potential sites of recent or former

  12. Cherts from the Yangla copper deposit, western Yunnan Province: geochemical characteristics and relationship with massive sulfide mineralization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Four layers of cherts were found for the first time in the Yanglacopper deposit, western Yunnan Province. The cherts possessed the following geochemical characteristics: ① Low TiO2 and Al2O3 contents, but high ore-forming element (e.g. Cu, Au, Ag) contents; ② low total REE contents and clear negative Eu anomalies when normalized to chondrite similar to the REE contents and distribution patterns of associated massive sulfide ores; ③ silicon isotopic compositions of cherts in the Yangla deposit being the same as cherts and geyserite of hot-water sedimentary origin; ④ lead and sulfur isotopic compositions of cherts in the Yangla deposit being similar to those of the massive sulfide ores in the Yangla deposit; ⑤ Rb-Sr isochron age of cherts from the Yangla deposit being identical with that of host strata. Hence, we conclude that the cherts in the Yangla deposit are of hot-water sedimentary origin, which have a close relationship with the massive sulfide ores. The discovery of hydrothermal cherts from the Yangla copper deposit provides further evidence for the hydrothermal exhalative origin of the massive sulfide deposits.

  13. Tellurium-bearing minerals in zoned sulfide chimneys from Cu-Zn massive sulfide deposits of the Urals, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Large, R. R.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Herrington, R. J.; Stanley, C. J.

    2013-02-01

    Tellurium-bearing minerals are generally rare in chimney material from mafic and bimodal felsic volcanic hosted massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, but are abundant in chimneys of the Urals VMS deposits located within Silurian and Devonian bimodal mafic sequences. High physicochemical gradients during chimney growth result in a wide range of telluride and sulfoarsenide assemblages including a variety of Cu-Ag-Te-S and Ag-Pb-Bi-Te solid solution series and tellurium sulfosalts. A change in chimney types from Fe-Cu to Cu-Zn-Fe to Zn-Cu is accompanied by gradual replacement of abundant Fe-, Co, Bi-, and Pb- tellurides by Hg, Ag, Au-Ag telluride and galena-fahlore with native gold assemblages. Decreasing amounts of pyrite, both colloform and pseudomorphic after pyrrhotite, isocubanite ISS and chalcopyrite in the chimneys is coupled with increasing amounts of sphalerite, quatz, barite or talc contents. This trend represents a transition from low- to high sulphidation conditions, and it is observed across a range of the Urals deposits from bimodal mafic- to bimodal felsic-hosted types: Yaman-Kasy → Molodezhnoye → Uzelga → Valentorskoye → Oktyabrskoye → Alexandrinskoye → Tash-Tau → Jusa.

  14. Geology and Metal Contents of the Ruttan volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, northern Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, C. Tucker.; Taylor, Craig; Ames, Doreen E.

    2005-03-01

    The Paleoproterozoic Ruttan Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive-sulfide (VMS) deposit is a large, relatively low grade, bimodal-siliciclastic type deposit in the Rusty Lake volcanic belt of northern Manitoba. The deposit contained over 82.8 million tonnes of massive sulfide, of which 55.7 million tonnes were mined from 1973 to 2002. The deposit consists of a series of moderately to steeply dipping, south-facing lenses that extend along strike at the surface for 1.1 km and to a depth of 1.0 km. These lenses occur within a steeply dipping, bimodal volcanic, volcaniclastic and siliciclastic sequence. In the immediate mine area, transitional calc-alkalic to high-silica (tholeiitic), felsic, and intermediate volcanic/volcaniclastic rocks of the Mine Sequence are host to, and intercalated with, the massive-sulfide lenses. Transitional tholeiitic to calc-alkalic basalt and andesite are present in the footwall sequence, approximately 500 m down-section from the ore horizon. The overlying rocks are predominantly fine-grained volcaniclastics and siliciclastics, but include polyfragmental agglomerate that contains mafic bombs and scoriaceous felsic fragments. Syn-depositional felsic and mafic dikes, sills, and apophyses are ubiquitous throughout the Mine Sequence, including the ore lenses, indicating continued, near-vent magmatism, and volcanism during ore formation. Fabrics in altered hostrocks have consistent, down-plunge stretching lineations to the SSE that suggest the deposit has been elongated by a factor of ~1.2-1.5; otherwise, the deposit is remarkably undeformed. Syn- and post-depositional faults in the mine area have relatively minor displacements up to tens of meters. Proximal (within 200 m) footwall rocks exhibit moderate to strong chloritization, characterized by the upper greenschist to lower amphibolite facies assemblages that include cordierite-almandine-andalusite-sillimanite-biotite ± staurolite ± anthophyllite ± talc, and local silicification. The proximal

  15. A not so massive cluster hosting a very massive star

    CERN Document Server

    Alegría, S Ramírez; Borissova, J; Kurtev, R; Navarro, C; Kuhn, M; Carballo-Bello, J A

    2015-01-01

    We present the first physical characterization of the young open cluster VVV CL041. We spectroscopically observed the cluster main-sequence stellar population and a very-massive star candidate: WR62-2. CMFGEN modeling to our near-infrared spectra indicates that WR62-2 is a very luminous (10$^{6.4\\pm0.2} L_{\\odot}$) and massive ($\\sim80 M_{\\odot}$) star.

  16. A New Occurrence Model for National Assessment of Undiscovered Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Koski, Randolph; Morgan, Lisa A.; Mosier, Dan; Piatak, Nadine M.; Ridley, Ian; Seal, Robert R., II; Schulz, Klaus J.; Slack, John F.; Thurston, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits are very significant current and historical resources of Cu-Pb-Zn-Au-Ag, are active exploration targets in several areas of the United States and potentially have significant environmental effects. This new USGS VMS deposit model provides a comprehensive review of deposit occurrence and ore genesis, and fully integrates recent advances in the understanding of active seafloor VMS-forming environments, and integrates consideration of geoenvironmental consequences of mining VMS deposits. Because VMS deposits exhibit a broad range of geological and geochemical characteristics, a suitable classification system is required to incorporate these variations into the mineral deposit model. We classify VMS deposits based on compositional variations in volcanic and sedimentary host rocks. The advantage of the classification method is that it provides a closer linkage between tectonic setting and lithostratigraphic assemblages, and an increased predictive capability during field-based studies.

  17. Geology, alteration, and lithogeochemistry of the Hood volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, Nunavut, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Hannah K.; Piercey, Stephen J.; Toole, Trish

    2016-04-01

    The Hood volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits are hosted by the ~2.68 Ga Amooga Booga volcanic belt (ABVB) in the northwestern Archaen Slave Craton and consist of three deposits (Hood 10, 41, and 41A) and three occurrences (46, 461, and 462). The mineralized zones consist of massive to semi-massive pyrrhotite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and galena hosted predominantly by felsic volcanic flows within the predominantly mafic ABVB. The mineralized lenses occur at different stratigraphic levels and have textural, alteration, and stratigraphic features consistent with formation via subseafloor replacement. The felsic volcanic rocks in the Hood deposits can be subdivided into groups based on immobile trace element geochemistry. The main felsic types (A and B) are petrographically indistinguishable. Type A has higher high field strength element (HSFE) and rare earth element (REE) contents than type B, suggesting a higher temperature of formation. Type A rocks also have higher Nb/Ta values indicative of a greater mantle input in their genesis compared to type B rocks. Mineralization is more closely associated with type A than type B rocks. The two mafic volcanic rock types previously identified in the ABVB, type I and type II, both occur within the Hood deposits. The type II mafic group is interpreted to be the result of variable crustal contamination of type I magma. The volcanic rocks of the ABVB are interpreted to have formed in a continental margin arc/back-arc setting. The genesis of these magmatic suites involved magmatic underplating and emplacement through pre-existing sialic basement that resulted in crustal melting, mantle-crust mixing, and contamination leading to the aforementioned geochemical features in both mafic and felsic suites. This type of extensional tectonic environment was likely associated with high heat flow and is similar to global VMS environments proximal to extending continental margins (e.g., Sturgeon Lake, Bathurst, and

  18. Challenges for rescuing drill core from volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits in northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, V.; Schoephoester, P.; Lodge, R. W. D.

    2016-12-01

    Providing adequate physical care for unique lithologies can be a challenge for rock core repositories. The purpose of a repository is to preserve its collections such that they will be available and useful for current and future research. Preservation requires both documentation and physical care, including the state of the facility housing the collections, as specimens can be endangered by environmental factors. Digital documentation is a crucial first step in rescuing at-risk samples as it allows the collection to be monitored through time. Exploratory drill core from the Flambeau copper-gold mine in Ladysmith, WI was donated to the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS). The collection includes over 4.7 km of irreplaceable core from 50 sites. The ore body is situated in the Ladysmith-Rhinelander Volcanic Complex, an Early Proterozoic greenstone belt that hosts at least 13 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits (DeMatties, 1996), including Flambeau. Mineral assemblages include up to 50% sulfide minerals, mainly pyrite and marcasite (May and Dinkowitz, 1996). These lithologies present a unique preservation challenge - storage conditions must be temperature and humidity controlled to prevent pyrite oxidation (Newman 1998), which chemically and physically degrades the samples as well as labels, containers, and shelving. Once initiated, pyrite oxidation cannot be stopped or reversed, but may be stabilized (Howie, 1992). Although protecting these materials is a vital part of the WGNHS mission, climate-control modifications to the facility are cost-prohibitive. In order to rescue the samples, we documented the collection's present state. We developed and implemented a new database schema including IGSNs to improve metadata records, track samples, and link data. Although preservation of the physical samples remains a challenge, digital workflows and data management improvements will allow WGNHS to monitor the condition of these samples while also

  19. Active hydrothermal and non-active massive sulfide mound investigation using a new multiparameter chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, C.; Wu, G.; Qin, H.; Wang, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Investigation of active hydrothermal mound as well as non-active massive sulfide mound are studied recently. However, there is still lack of in-situ detection method for the non-active massive sulfide mound. Even though Transient ElectroMagnetic (TEM) and Electric Self-potential (SP) methods are good, they both are labour, time and money cost work. We proposed a new multiparameter chemical sensor method to study the seafloor active hydrothermal mound as well as non-active massive sulfide mound. This sensor integrates Eh, S2- ions concentration and pH electrochemical electrodes together, and could found chemical change caused by the active hydrothermal vent, even weak chemical abnormalities by non-active massive sulfide hydrothermal mound which MARP and CTD sometimes cannot detect. In 2012, the 1st Leg of the Chinese 26th cruise, the multiparameter chemical sensor was carried out with the deepsea camera system over the Carlsberg Ridge in Indian Ocean by R/V DAYANGYIHAO. It was shown small Eh and S2- ions concentration abnormal around a site at Northwest Indian ridge. This site was also evidenced by the TV grab. In the 2nd Leg of the same cruise in June, this chemical sensor was carried out with TEM and SP survey system. The chemical abnormalities are matched very well with both TEM and SP survey results. The results show that the multiparameter chemical sensor method not only can detect active hydrothermal mound, but also can find the non-active massive sulfide hydrothermal mound.

  20. Geology of the Brick Flat massive sulfide body, Iron Mountain cluster, West Shasta district, California ( USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Brick Flat massive sulfide body is one of a group of 8 individual bodies that constitute the Iron Mountain cluster in the S part of the West Shasta district. Before they were separated by postmineral faulting, 5 of the 8 sulfide bodies formed a single large deposit about 1375 m long with a mass of some 23 million metric tons. The pyritic Brick Flat sulfide body is one of the 5 faulted segements of this deposit. The Brick Flat massive sulfide lies within medium phenocryst rhyolite that is characteristic of the ore-bearing middle unit of the Balaklala Rhyolite. It is interpreted to be downfaulted a vertical distance of 75 to 85 m from the Old Mine sulfide-gossan orebody along the N-dipping Camden South fault. It is bounded in turn on its N side by another parallel fault, the Camden North, which drops the orebody down another 75 m to the level of the Richmond orebody. -from Author

  1. Mineralogy and geochemistry of trace metals and REE in volcanic massive sulfide host rocks, stream sediments, stream waters and acid mine drainage from the Lousal mine area (Iberian Pyrite Belt, Portugal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira da Silva, E. [GeoBioTec - GeoBiosciences, Technologies and Engineering Research Center, Departamento de Geociencias, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)], E-mail: eafsilva@ua.pt; Bobos, I. [Departamento de Geologia, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua Campo Alegre 687 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Xavier Matos, J. [Centro de Estudos Geologicos e Mineiros de Beja, Rua Frei Amador Arrais No. 39 r/c, Apartado 104, 7801-902 Beja (Portugal); Patinha, C.; Reis, A.P.; Cardoso Fonseca, E. [GeoBioTec - GeoBiosciences, Technologies and Engineering Research Center, Departamento de Geociencias, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2009-03-15

    Acid mine drainage represents a major source of water pollution in the Lousal area. The concentrations of trace metals and the rare earth elements (REE) in the host rocks, stream sediment, surface waters and acid mine drainage (AMD) associated with abandoned mine adits and tailings impoundments were determined, in order to fingerprint their sources and to understand their mobility and water-rock interaction. The results show that the Fe-SO{sub 4}-rich acid waters vary substantially in composition both spatially and seasonally. These waters include very low pH (mostly in the range 1.9-3.0), extreme SO{sub 4} concentrations (4635-20,070 mg L{sup -1}SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), high metal contents (Fe, Al, Cu, Zn and Mn) and very high REE contents. The trace metal concentrations decrease downstream from the discharge points either due to precipitation of neoformed phases or to dilution. The North-American shale composite (NASC)-normalized patterns corresponding to sediment from one stream (Corona stream) show a flat tendency or are slightly enriched in light-REE (LREE). The NASC-normalized patterns corresponding to acidic mine waters show enrichment in the middle REE (MREE) with respect to the LREE and heavy REE (HREE). Moreover, the REE concentrations in acidic mine waters are 2 or 3 orders of magnitude higher than those of the surface waters. Changes of REE concentrations and variation of Eu anomaly show two spatially distinct patterns: (a) pond and spring waters with higher REE concentrations (ranging from 375 to 2870 {mu}g L{sup -1}), that records conspicuous negative Eu anomaly, and (b) seeps from tailings impoundments corresponding to lower REE concentrations than the first pattern (ranging from 350 to 1139 {mu}g L{sup -1}) with typically negative Eu anomaly. The stream water samples collected from the impacted stream during the spring show a low pH (2.8-3.1) and contain high concentrations of Fe and trace elements (up to 61 mg L{sup -1}). Also, temporal variations of

  2. Environmental geochemistry of a Kuroko-type massive sulfide deposit at the abandoned Valzinco mine, Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, R.R.; Hammarstrom, J.M.; Johnson, A.N.; Piatak, N.M.; Wandless, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    The abandoned Valzinco mine, which worked a steeply dipping Kuroko-type massive sulfide deposit in the Virginia Au-pyrite belt, contributed significant metal-laden acid-mine drainage to the Knight's Branch watershed. The host rocks were dominated by metamorphosed felsic volcanic rocks, which offered limited acid-neutralizing potential. The ores were dominated by pyrite, sphalerite, galena, and chalcopyrite, which represented significant acid-generating potential. Acid-base accounting and leaching studies of flotation tailings - the dominant mine waste at the site - indicated that they were acid generating and therefore, should have liberated significant quantities of metals to solution. Field studies of mine drainage from the site confirmed that mine drainage and the impacted stream waters had pH values from 1.1 to 6.4 and exceeded aquatic ecosystem toxicity limits for Fe, Al, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. Stable isotope studies of water, dissolved SO42 -, and primary and secondary sulfate and sulfide minerals indicated that two distinct sulfide oxidation pathways were operative at the site: one dominated by Fe(III) as the oxidant, and another by molecular O2 as the oxidant. Reaction-path modeling suggested that geochemical interactions between tailings and waters approached a steady state within about a year. Both leaching studies and geochemical reaction-path modeling provided reasonable predictions of the mine-drainage chemistry.

  3. A geochemical perspective of Red Mountain: an unmined volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in the Alaska Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Stuart A.; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has investigated the environmental geochemistry of a group of unmined volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits in the Bonnifield mining district, Alaska Range, east-central Alaska. The spectacularly colored Red Mountain deposit is the best exposed of these and provides excellent baseline geochemical data for natural environmental impacts of acidic rock drainage, metal dissolution and transport, and acidic salt and metal precipitation from an exposed and undisturbed VMS deposit.

  4. Re-Os sulfide geochronology of the Red Dog sediment-hosted Zn-Pb-Ag deposit, Brooks Range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, R.M.; Creaser, R.A.; Selby, D.; Kelley, K.D.; Leach, D.L.; King, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    The Red Dog sediment-hosted deposit in the De Long Mountains of northern Alaska is the largest Zn producer in the world. Main stage mineralization is characterized by massive sulfide ore and crosscutting subvertical veins. Although the vein mineralization is clearly younger than the massive ore, the exact temporal relationship between the two is unclear. Re-Os geochronology of pyrite is used to determine the absolute age of main stage ore at Red Dog. A 10-point isochron on both massive and vein pyrite yields an age of 338.3 ?? 5.8 Ma and is interpreted to represent the age of main stage ore. The Re-Os data indicate that both massive and vein ore types are coeval within the resolution of the technique. Formation of the Red Dog deposit was associated with extension along a passive continental margin, and therefore the Re-Os age of main stage ore constrains the timing of rifting as well as the age of the host sedimentary rocks. Sphalerite from both massive and vein ore yields imprecise ages and shows a high degree of scatter compared to pyrite. We suggest that the Re-Os systematics of sphalerite can be disturbed and that this mineral is not reliable for Re-Os geochronology. ?? 2004 by Economic Geology.

  5. Geology, geochemistry, and genesis of the Greens Creek massive sulfide deposit, Admiralty Island, southeastern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Johnson, Craig A.

    2010-01-01

    In 1996, a memorandum of understanding was signed by representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey and Kennecott Greens Creek Mining Company to initiate a cooperative applied research project focused on the Greens Creek massive sulfide deposit in southeastern Alaska. The goals of the project were consistent with the mandate of the U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program to maintain a leading role in national mineral deposits research and with the need of Kennecott Greens Creek Mining Company to further development of the Greens Creek deposit and similar deposits in Alaska and elsewhere. The memorandum enumerated four main research priorities: (1) characterization of protoliths for the wall rocks, and elucidation of their alteration histories, (2) determination of the ore mineralogy and paragenesis, including metal residences and metal zonation within the deposit, (3) determination of the ages of events important to ore formation using both geochronology and paleontology, and (4) development of computer models that would allow the deposit and its host rocks to be examined in detail in three dimensions. The work was carried out by numerous scientists of diverse expertise over a period of several years. The written results, which are contained in this Professional Paper, are presented by 21 authors: 13 from the U.S. Geological Survey, 4 from Kennecott Greens Creek Mining Company, 2 from academia, and 2 from consultants. The Greens Creek deposit (global resource of 24.2 million tons at an average grade of 13.9 percent zinc, 5.1 percent lead, 0.15 troy ounce per ton gold, and 19.2 troy ounces per ton silver at zero cutoff) formed in latest Triassic time during a brief period of rifting of the Alexander terrane. The deposit exhibits a range of syngenetic, diagenetic, and epigenetic features that are typical of volcanogenic (VMS), sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX), and Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) genetic models. In the earliest stages of rifting, formation of

  6. Geology, ore facies and sulfur isotopes geochemistry of the Nudeh Besshi-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, southwest Sabzevar basin, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghfouri, Sajjad; Rastad, Ebrahim; Mousivand, Fardin; Lin, Ye; Zaw, Khin

    2016-08-01

    The southwest Sabzevar basin is placed in the southwestern part of a crustal domain known as the Sabzevar zone, at the north of Central Iranian microcontinent. This basin hosts abundant mineral deposits; particularly of the Mn exhalative and Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) types. The evolution of this basin is governed by the Neo-tethys oceanic crust subduction beneath the Central Iranian microcontinent and by the resulting continental arc (Sanandaj-Sirjan) and back-arc (Sabzevar-Naien). This evolution followed two major sequences: (I) Lower Late Cretaceous Volcano-Sedimentary Sequence (LLCVSS), which is indicated by fine-grained siliciclastic sediments, gray basic coarse-grained different pyroclastic rocks and bimodal volcanism. During this stage, tuff-hosted stratiform, exhalative Mn deposits (Nudeh, Benesbourd, Ferizy and Goft), oxide Cu deposits (Garab and Ferizy) and Cu-Zn VMS (Nudeh, Chun and Lala) deposits formed. (II) Upper Late Cretaceous Sedimentary Dominated Sequence (ULCSS), including pelagic limestone, marly tuff, silty limestone and marl with minor andesitic tuff rocks. The economically most important Mn (Zakeri and Cheshmeh-sefid) deposits of Sabzevar zone occur within the marly tuff of this sequence. The Nudeh Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit is situated in the LLCVSS. The host-rock of deposits consists of alkali olivine basalt flow and tuffaceous silty sandstone. Mineralization occurs as stratiform blanket-like and tabular orebodies. Based on ore body structure, mineralogy, and ore fabric, we recognize three different ore facies in the Nudeh deposit: (1) a stringer zone, consisting of a discordant mineralization of sulfides forming a stockwork of sulfide-bearing quartz veins cutting the footwall volcano-sedimentary rocks; (2) a massive ore, consisting of massive replacement pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and Friedrichite with magnetite; (3) bedded ore, with laminated to disseminated pyrite, and chalcopyrite

  7. Gold upgrading in metamorphosed massive sulfide ore deposits: Direct evidence from laser-ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis of invisible gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Thomas; Klemd, Reiner; Wenzel, Thomas; Mattsson, Benny

    2007-09-01

    The metamorphosed Boliden volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) ore deposit, northern Sweden, is characterized by an abundance of massive arsenopyrite ore and unusually high gold enrichments (up to 300-600 g/t) in crosscutting veins and fracture zones. The ore textures observed record progressive recrystallization and porphyroblast growth during meta morphism. We conducted a systematic laser-ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrom etry (LA-ICP-MS) study on the gold distribution in fine-grained massive arseno-pyrite and pyrite ore, partially recrystallized arsenopyrite ore, and both arsenopyrite and pyrite porphyroblasts found in gold-rich veins. The gold concentrations in massive arseno-pyrite are highest (30-50 ppm on average) and systematically decrease to 0-2.7 ppm with increasing degree of recrystallization. By contrast, gold concentrations in pyrite ore are much lower and do not exceed 0.2 ppm. The LA-ICP-MS data, coupled with textural data, provide the first direct conclusive evidence that gold is progressively liberated from massive sulfide ores during metamorphism and reprecipitated in veins and other low-strain sites. We suggest that such upgrading is the principal mechanism responsible for significant gold enrichment observed in many metamorphosed VHMS deposits worldwide.

  8. Physicochemical parameters of magmatic and hydrothermal processes at the Yaman-Kasy massive sulfide deposit, the southern Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonov, V. A.; Kovyazin, S. V.; Terenya, E. O.; Maslennikov, V. V.; Zaykov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.

    2006-10-01

    Melt and fluid inclusions in minerals have been studied and physicochemical parameters of magmatic processes and hydrothermal systems estimated at the Yaman-Kasy copper massive sulfide deposit in the southern Urals. It was established that relatively low-temperature (910-945°C) rhyodacitic melts belonging to the tholeiitic series and containing 2.7-5.2 wt % water participated in the formation of the igneous complexes that host the Yaman-Kasy deposit. As follows from ion microprobe results, these silicic magmas had a primitive character. In the distribution of trace elements, including REE, the rhyodacites are closer to basaltic rather than silicic volcanic rocks, and they are distinguished in this respect from the igneous rocks from other massive sulfide deposits of the Urals and the Rudny Altai. Two types of solutions actively took part in the formation of hydrothermal systems: (1) solutions with a moderate salinity (5-10 wt % dissolved salts) and (2) solutions with a low salinity (a value close to that of seawater or even lower). Concentrated fluids with more than 11.5 wt % dissolved salts were much less abundant. Hydrothermal solutions heated to 130-160, 160-270, or occasionally 280-310°C predominated in ore formation. The sequence of mineral-forming processes at the Yaman-Kasy deposit is demonstrated. Mineral assemblages were formed with an inversion of the parameters characterizing ore-forming solutions. An increase in the temperature and salinity of solutions at the early stages was followed by a decrease at the final stages. The evolution of the hydrothermal system at the Yaman-Kasy deposit has much in common with the parameters of black smokers in the present-day Pacific backarc basins.

  9. What processes at mid-ocean ridges tell us about volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathles, Lawrence M.

    2011-07-01

    Episodic seafloor spreading, ridge topography, and fault movement at ridges find (more extreme) analogs in the arc and back-arc setting where the volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits that we mine today were formed. The factors affecting sulfide accumulation efficiency and the extent to which sulfides are concentrated spatially are the same in both settings, however. The processes occurring at mid-ocean ridges therefore provide a useful insight into those producing VMS deposits in arcs and back-arcs. The critical observation investigated here is that all the heat introduced by seafloor spreading at mid-ocean ridges is carried out of the crust within a few hundred meters of the ridge axis by ˜350°C hydrothermal fluids. The high-temperature ridge hydrothermal systems are tied to the presence of magma at the ridge axis and greatly reduce the size and control the shape of axial magma intrusions. The amount of heat introduced to each square kilometer of ocean crust during its formation can be calculated, and its removal by high-temperature convection allows calculation of the total base metal endowment of the ocean basins. Using reasonable metal deposition efficiencies, we conclude that the ocean floor is a giant VMS district with metal resources >600 times the total known VMS reserves on land and a copper resource which would last >6,000 years at current production rates.

  10. Stable isotopes of carbon dioxide in soil gas over massive sulfide mineralization at Crandon, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, C.N.; Dettman, D.L.; Lohmann, K.C.; Brabec, D.

    1990-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of oxygen and carbon were determined for CO2 in soil gas in the vicinity of the massive sulfide deposit at Crandon, Wisconsin with the objective of determining the source of anomalously high CO2 concentrations detected previously by McCarthy et al. (1986). Values of ??13C in soil gas CO2 from depths between 0.5 and 1.0 m were found to range from -12.68??? to -20.03??? (PDB). Organic carbon from the uppermost meter of soil has ??13C between -24.1 and -25.8??? (PDB), indicating derivation from plant species with the C3 (Calvin) type of photosynthetic pathway. Microbial decomposition of the organic carbon and root respiration from C3 and C4 (Hatch-Slack) plants, together with atmospheric CO2 are the likely sources of carbon in soil gas CO2. Values of ??18O in soil-gas CO2 range from 32 to 38??? (SMOW). These ??18O values are intermediate between that calculated for CO2 gas in isotopic equilibrium with local groundwaters and that for atmospheric CO2. The ??18O data indicate that atmospheric CO2 has been incorporated by mixing or diffusion. Any CO2 generated by microbial oxidation of organic matter has equilibrated its oxygen isotopes with the local groundwaters. The isotopic composition of soil-gas CO2 taken from directly above the massive sulfide deposit was not distinguishable from that of background samples taken 1 to 2 km away. No enrichment of the ??13C value of soil-gas CO2 was observed, contrary to what would be expected if the anomalous CO2 were derived from the dissolution of Proterozoic marine limestone country rock or of Paleozoic limestone clasts in glacial till. Therefore, it is inferred that root respiration and decay of C3 plant material were responsible for most CO2 generation both in the vicinity of the massive sulfide and in the "background" area, on the occasion of our sampling. Interpretation of our data is complicated by the effects of rainfall, which significantly reduced the magnitude of the CO2 anomaly. Therefore, we cannot

  11. Gold in the Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, Bathurst Mining Camp, Canada: Evidence from bulk ore analysis and laser ablation ICP-MS data on sulfide phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenaghan, Sean H.; Lentz, David R.; Martin, Jillian; Diegor, Wilfredo G.

    2009-07-01

    The 329-Mt Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit (total resource of 163 Mt at 10.4% Zn, 4.2% Pb, 0.34% Cu, and 115 g/t Ag) is hosted within a Middle Ordovician bimodal volcanic and sedimentary sequence. Massive sulfides are for the most part syngenetic, and the bulk of the sulfide ore occurs as a Zn-Pb-rich banded sulfide facies that forms an intimate relationship with a laterally extensive Algoma-type iron formation and defines the Brunswick Horizon. Zone refining of stratiform sulfides is considered to have resulted in the development of a large replacement-style Cu-rich basal sulfide facies, which is generally confined between the banded sulfide facies and an underlying stringer sulfide zone. Complex polyphase deformation and associated lower- to upper-greenschist facies regional metamorphism is responsible for the present geometry of the deposit. Textural modification has resulted in a general increase in grain size through the development of pyrite and arsenopyrite porphyroblasts, which tend to overprint primary mineral assemblages. Despite the heterogeneous ductile deformation, primary features have locally been preserved, such as fine-grained colloform pyrite and base and precious metal zonation within the Main Zone. Base metal and trace element abundances in massive sulfides from the Brunswick No. 12 deposit indicate two distinct geochemical associations. The basal sulfide facies, characterized by a proximal high-temperature hydrothermal signature (Cu-Co-Bi-Se), contains generally low Au contents averaging 0.39 ppm ( n = 34). Conversely, Au is enriched in the banded sulfide facies, averaging 1.1 ppm Au ( n = 21), and is associated with an exhalative suite of elements (Zn-Pb-As-Sb-Ag-Sn). Finely laminated sulfide lenses hosted by iron formation at the north end of the Main Zone are further enriched in Au, averaging 1.7 ppm ( n = 41) and ranging up to 8.2 ppm. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analyses of

  12. Development of mining technology and equipment for seafloor massive sulfide deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaojun; Hu, Jianhua; Zhang, Ruiqiang; Dai, Yu; Yang, Hengling

    2016-09-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide(SMS) deposits which consist of Au, Ag, Cu, and other metal elements, have been a target of commercial mining in recent decades. The demand for established and reliable commercial mining system for SMS deposits is increasing within the marine mining industry. The current status and progress of mining technology and equipment for SMS deposits are introduced. First, the mining technology and other recent developments of SMS deposits are comprehensively explained and analyzed. The seafloor production tools manufactured by Nautilus Minerals and similar mining tools from Japan for SMS deposits are compared and discussed in turn. Second, SMS deposit mining technology research being conducted in China is described, and a new SMS deposits mining tool is designed according to the environmental requirement. Finally, some new trends of mining technology of SMS deposits are summarized and analyzed. All of these conclusions and results have reference value and guiding significance for the research of SMS deposit mining in China.

  13. Understanding Cu release into environment from Kure massive sulfide ore deposits, Kastamonu, NW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Cansu; Sonmez, Seref; Balci, Nurgul

    2014-05-01

    Covering a wide range on the earth's crust, oxidation of metal sulfide minerals have vital environmental impacts on the aquatic environment, causing one of the major environmental problems known as acid mine drainage (AMD). Located in the Kastamonu province of the Western Black Sea region, Kure district is one of the major copper mining sites in Turkey. Mining activities in the area heads back to ancient times, such that operation is thought to be started with the Roman Empire. Currently, only the underground mining tunnels of Bakibaba and Asikoy are being operated. Thus, mining heaps and ores of those pyritic deposits have been exposed to the oxidative conditions for so long. As a result of weathering processes of past and recent heaps of the Kure volcanic massive sulfide deposits in addition to the main ore mineral (chalcopyrite), significant amount of metals, especially Cu, are being released into the environment creating undesirable environmental conditions. In order to elucidate Cu release mechanisms from Kure pyritic ore deposits and mining wastes, field and laboratory approaches were used. Surface water and sediment samples from the streams around the mining and waste sites were collected. Groundwater samples from the active underground mining site were also collected. Physical parameters (pH, Eh, T°C, and EC) of water samples were determined in situ and in the laboratory using probes (WTW pH 3110, WTW Multi 9310 and CRISON CM 35). Metal and ion concentrations of the water samples were analysed using ICP-MS and DR 2800 spectrophotometer, respectively. High Cu, Co, Zn and Fe concentrations were determined in the water samples with pH values ranging from 2.9- 4. Cu concentrions ranges from 345 ppm to 36 ppm in the water samples. Consistent with the water samples, high Cu, Fe, Zn and Co were also determined in the sediment samples. Laboratory chalcopyrite oxidation experiments under the conditions representing the field site were set up as biological and

  14. Seismic properties and effects of hydrothermal alteration on Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide (VMS) deposits at the Lalor Lake in Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Khalid H.; Bellefleur, Gilles; Schetselaar, Ernst; Potter, David K.

    2015-12-01

    Borehole sonic and density logs are essential for mineral exploration at depth, but its limited availability to link rock properties of different ore forming geologic structure is a hindrance to seismic data interpretations. In situ density and velocity logs provide first order control on the reflectivity of various lithologic units. We analyzed borehole logs from 12 drill holes over and around the Lalor VMS deposits geographically located in the northern Manitoba, Canada, in an attempt to characterize lithologic units based on its seismic properties. The Lalor Lake deposit is part of the Paleoproterozoic Flin Flon Belt, and associated with an extensive hydrothermal alteration system. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide (VMS) zones are distributed in several ore lenses with relatively shallower facies comprise solid to solid sulfides, tend to be disseminated or Stringer sulfides, while deeper lenses are gold and silver enriched and occurred in the highly altered footwall region. Our analysis suggests that massive sulfide and diorite have higher acoustic impedance than other rock units, and can produce useful reflection signatures in seismic data. Bivariate distributions of P-wave velocity, density, acoustic impedance and Poisson's ratio in end-member mineral cones were used for qualitative assessment of the extent of alteration of various lithologic units. It can be inferred that hydrothermal alteration has considerably increased P-wave velocity and density of altered argillite and felsic volcanic rocks in comparison to their corresponding unaltered facies. Amphibole, garnet, kyanite, pyrite, sphalerite and staurolite are the dominant end-member alteration minerals affecting seismic rock properties at the VMS site.

  15. Research and Development for Multi-stage and Integrated Approach for Seafloor Massive Sulfides (SMSs) Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Asakawa, E.; Sumi, T.; Kadoshima, K.; Kose, M.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Koizumi, A.; Koizumi, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Higashi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The seafloor hydrothermal systems and related mineral deposits had been discovered at more than 550 sites so for, and near the one-third of these sites were confirmed as the massive sulfide deposits (Hannington et al., 2011). However, we are now faced with the some task like the preservation of hydrothermal vent community and the secure of amount of mineral reserves for the commercialization. In Japan, the exploration and investigation researches in Japan's EEZ has been conducted from 1980s, and about 20 seafloor hydrothermal fields including several confirmed SMSs has been discovered so far. The Cabinet Office of Government Japan (2013) have been promoting "assessment of the amount of reserves of known mineral deposits, discovery of new mineral deposits and comprehension of the approximate amount of reserves, development of equipment technologies and environmental impact assessment methods related to mining and lifting, including actual offshore tests", expecting projects to be initiated aiming at commercialization with the participation of private companies in or after FY2023-FY2027. As part of the promotion, the "Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP)" was started at FY2014 by the Cabinet Office of Government Japan, and the research project of "Next-generation technology for ocean resources exploration" is also ongoing (FY2014-FY2018). J-MARES(Research and Development Partnership for Next Generation Technology of Marine Resources Survey) is one of the private union participated the SIP organized four Inc.(JAPAX, JGI, NSENGI, and MMTEC) aimed at construction of "Multi-stage and integrated approach for SMSs exploration" through the development of upgradable and effectual geophysical exploration methods on seismic and electric-magnetic methods, and combination of the known exploration tools and systems. In this presentation, we introduce some results obtained from two research cruise (JM14-01 and JM14-02) on the known seafloor hydrothermal

  16. Autonomous Marine Seismic Survey Systems for Seafloor Massive Sulfide (SMS) Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Lee, S.; Saito, S.; Tara, K.; Sumi, T.; Kadoshima, K.; Kose, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Cabinet Office, Government Japan started the Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP) in 2014. "Next-generation Ocean Resource Exploration Techniques" is scheduled under SIP from 2014 to 2018. J-MARES participates this program and aims "Multi-stage and integrated approach for Seafloor Massive Sulfide(SMS) exploration" through the development of highly efficient and cost-effective geophysical exploration methods mainly on seismic and EM methods. J-MARES proposed Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) technique as seismic survey. It is one of reflection seismic methods that uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor. It is useful to delineate detailed structures in a spatially-limited area efficiently. JGI, a member of J-MARES, has developed autonomous VCS systems and carried out several VCS surveys in hydrothermal fields and the detailed subsurface structure is revealed up to 100m. VCS surveys have provides high resolution results but it covers a small survey area with a limited number of vertical cables. To expand the survey area, we operate ROV for re-deployments of the VCS. Another approach is to develop a deep-towed seismic system based on the VCS technology. We re-deployed the vertical cables using ROV. The ROV moved to the location of vertical cable using SSBL navigation and the video information. After arriving the location of vertical cable, the ROV grabbed the anchor and moved it to next target point. We carried out 3 time re-deployment VCS survey with four vertical cables in Iheya North Knoll, Okinawa Trough. The combined seismic sections of the 3 patches are consistent without any gap of each section. Following this, we modified the VCS system to use as a more efficient deep-tow seismic survey system. Although there are other deep-tow seismic systems, signal cables present challenges in deep waters. We use VCS technology in order to avoid these problems. The basic idea is autonomous recording system and we call it ACS

  17. Mineralogic sources of metals in leachates from the weathering of sedex, massive sulfide, and vein deposit mining wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, S.F.; Hageman, P.L.; Seal, R.R.; Piatak, N.M.; Lowers, H.

    2011-01-01

    Weathered mine waste consists of oxidized primary minerals and chemically unstable secondary phases that can be sources of readily soluble metals and acid rock drainage. Elevated concentrations of metals such as Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn are observed in deionized water-based leachate solutions derived from complex sedex and Cu-Pb-Zn mine wastes. Leachate (USGS FLT) from the Elizabeth mine, a massive sulfide deposit, has a pH of 3.4 and high concentrations of Al (16700 ug/L), Cu (440 ug/L), and Zn (8620 ug/L). Leachate from the sedex Faro mine has a pH of 3.5 and high concentrations of Al (2040 ug/L), Cu (1930 ug/L), Pb (2080 ug/L), and Zn (52900 ug/L). In contrast, higher-pH leachates produced from tailings of polymetallic vein deposits have order of magnitude lower metal concentrations. These data indicate that highly soluble secondary mineral phases exist at the surface of waste material where the samples were collected. Sulfide minerals from all sites exhibit differential degrees of weathering, from dissolution etched grain rims, to rinds of secondary minerals, to skeletal remnants. These microscale mineral-dissolution textures enhance weathering and metal teachability of waste material. Besides the formation of secondary minerals, sulfide grains from dried tailings samples may be coated by amorphous Fe-Al-Si minerals that also adsorb metals such as Cu, Ni, and Zn.

  18. Re-Os (ICP-MS) dating of the massive sulfide ores from the Jinchuan Ni-Cu-PGE deposit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Gang; DU Andao; LU Jiren; QU Wenjun; CHEN Jiangfeng

    2005-01-01

    Massive sulfide ore from the Jinchuan Ni-Cu-PGE deposit was dated by Re-Os technique using Carius Tube digestion, Os distillation, Re extraction by acetone and ICP-MS measurement. An isochron giving an age of 833 ± 35 Ma, initial 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.279 ± 0.018 (MSWD = 1.7) and γOs = 130 ± 15 is obtained. The Re-Os age obtained agrees, within analytical uncertainties, with previous SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age of 827 ± 8 Ma (n=5, MSWD = 4.3). The result suggests that the deposit was formed at Neoproterozoic and that the formation of the Jinchuan Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposit may be closely related to the plume activity, which were attributed to the breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent. The high γOs of the massive ores suggests that crustal material was involved in the formation of the Jinchuan deposit, however, the quantity of the added crustal material is less than 10%.

  19. Trace element composition of olivine - implications for the evolution of the olivine gabbro-troctolite-hosted Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co sulfide deposit, Labrador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulle, F.; Layne, G. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Voisey's Bay intrusion is part of the Nain Plutonic Suite, which transects the 1.85 Ga collisional boundary between the Proterozoic Churchill Province and the Archean Nain Province in Eastern Labrador. The intrusion comprises a group of troctolitic to olivine gabbroic bodies linked by olivine gabbro dikes; together these rocks host the world-class Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co sulfide deposit. Zones of massive and disseminated sulfide mineralization (Reid Brook, Discovery Hill, Mini-Ovoid and Ovoid) occur within a dike and at the entry line of this dike into a larger intrusion termed the Eastern Deeps [1, 2, 3]. At least two pulses of magma have generated the intrusion and the associated sulfide mineralization; an initial surge that achieved sulfide saturation by interacting with upper crustal rocks, and a later pulse of fresh, undepleted magma that forced the initial magma upwards and both remobilized the immiscible sulfide liquid and upgraded it in metal content [1, 2, 3]. Previous research [1, 2] has shown that the Ni content of olivine from the distinct sulfide-bearing host rocks is highly variable, and also indicative of both magma mixing and interaction of silicate magmas with sulfide. To further validate the significance of the olivine chemistry as a tracer for ore-forming petrological processes, we have determined the abundances of Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn in olivines from the various mafic lithologies of the Eastern Deeps intrusion using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. We present systematic variations in Mn, Co, Ni and Zn with Fo-content in olivines for both sulfide-free and sulfide-bearing zones. Olivines from mineralized and brecciated troctolitic/gabbroic zones display significantly higher Mn (up to 11,000 ppm) and Zn (up to 550 ppm) concentrations than those from nominally barren counterparts. The barren troctolite, broadly termed normal troctolite (NT), is a petrographically homogenous plagioclase and olivine cumulate. However, olivine

  20. Microporosity of BIF hosted massive hematite ore, Iron Quadrangle, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÉSAR A.C. VARAJÃO

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Massive hematite ore (MHO is a special high-grade iron ore, used as lump ore in the process of obtaining direct reduction iron (DRI. The influence of porosity on the reducibility of MHO from the Capitão do Mato Mine (Iron Quadrangle, Brazil was investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopes on drill core and open pit samples. Hematite is the main component of the samples and occurs as granular crystals (10 mum, microplates (1 mum and euhedral martite (10 to 30 mum. Quartz, maghemite, kenomagnetite and goethite are minor components. Primary micropores (Å to 1 mum are associated with microplaty crystals that fill cavities between granular hematite. Secondary micropores (Å to 5 mum related to euhedral martite crystals, are the most important. The total porosity of weathered samples, measured using nitrogen adsorption and mercury injection, attains values up to 11%, whereas unweathered samples have a porosity less than 2.5%. Reducibility is strongly enhanced by porosity, but inhibited by structure (bedding.O minério de hematita compacta (MHC é um tipo de minério de ferro de alto grau usado como minério granulado na obtenção do ferro via redução direta (DRI. A influência da porosidade sobre a redutibilidade do MHC da Mina de Capitão do Mato (Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brasil, foi investigada em amostras de furos de sonda e de afloramentos da mina, usando-se microscópio óptico e eletrônico de varredura. Hematita é o principal componente mineralógico e ocorre sob diferentes formas: granular (10 mim, microtabular (1 mim e euédrico (10 a 30 mim. Quartzo maghemita, kenomagnetita e goethita são componetes menores. Microporos primários (Å to 1 mim associam-se a cristais de hematita microtabular, que preenchem espaços entre cristais de hematita granular. Microporos secundários (Å to 5 mim, relacionados com os cristais de martita euédrica, são os mais importantes. A porosidade total das amostras do MHC, medida atrav

  1. Massive sulfide exploration models of the Iberian Pyrite Belt Neves Corvo mine region, based in a 3D geological, geophysical and geochemical ProMine study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverno, Carlos; Matos, João Xavier; Rosa, Carlos; Mário Castelo-Branco, José; Granado, Isabel; Carvalho, João; João Baptista, Maria; Represas, Patrícia; Pereira, Zélia; Oliveira, Tomás; Araujo, Vitor

    2013-04-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) hosts one of the largest concentrations of massive sulfides in the Earth's crust. This highly productive VMS belt contains more than 85 massive sulfide deposits, totalling an estimate of 1600 Mt of massive ore and about 250 Mt of stockwork ore (Leistel et al., 1998; Oliveira et al., 2005; Tornos, 2006). Included in the South Portuguese Zone the IPB is represented by the Phyllite-Quartzite Group (PQG) composed of shales and quartzites of late Devonian age followed by the Volcanic-Sedimentary Complex (VSC) a submarine succession of sediments and felsic and basic volcanic rocks (late Famennian-late Viséan age). Above the IPB a turbidite sedimentary unit occurs being represented by the Baixo Alentejo Flysch Group (BAFG). The ore deposits are hosted by felsic volcanic rocks and sediments that are dominant in the lower part of the VSC succession. The Neves Corvo (ProMine, EU FP7) project area is focused on the Neves Corvo deposit, an active copper mine. The project area is located between the Messejana Fault and the Portuguese/Spanish border which has been selected for the 3D geological and geophysical modelling study, based on high exploration potential of the Neves Corvo area (Oliveira et al. 2006, Relvas et al. 2006, Pereira et al. 2008, Rosa et al. 2008, Matos et al. 2011, Oliveira et al. 2013). In this study existing LNEG and AGC geological, geophysical and geochemistry databases were considered. New surveys were done: i) - A physical volcanology and palynostratigraphic age data study and log of the Cotovio drill-hole core (1,888 m, drilled by AGC). ii) - Interpretation of 280 km of Squid TEM performed by AGC. Based on the TEM data, significant conductors have been identified related with: shallow conductive cover, graphitic shale, black shale and sulphide mineralizations. The most important TEM conductors are related with the Neves Corvo massive sulphides lenses (1-10 Ωm). iii) - Ground and residual gravimetry studies including

  2. Massive relic galaxies challenge the co-evolution of SMBHs and their host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Trujillo, Ignacio; Balcells, Marc; Bosch, Remco C E van den

    2015-01-01

    We study a sample of eight massive galaxies that are extreme outliers (3-5$\\sigma$) in the M$_{\\bullet}$-M$_\\mathrm{bulge}$ local scaling relation. Two of these galaxies are confirmed to host extremely large super massive black holes (SMBHs), whereas the virial mass estimates for the other six are also consistent with having abnormally large SMBHs. From the analysis of their star formation histories and their structural properties we find that all these extreme outliers can be considered as relic galaxies from the early (z$\\sim$2) Universe: i.e. they are compact (R$_{\\mathrm{e}}$$<$2 kpc) and have purely old stellar populations (t$\\gtrsim$10 Gyr). In order to explain the nature of such deviations from the local relations, we propose a scenario in which the hosts of these \\"uber-massive SMBHs are galaxies that have followed a different evolutionary path than the two-phase growth channel assumed for massive galaxies. Once the SMBH and the core of the galaxy are formed at z$\\sim$2, the galaxy skips the second...

  3. On the Fueling of Massive Black Holes and the Properties of their Host Spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Escala, A

    2006-01-01

    We study the relation between nuclear massive black holes and their host spheroid gravitational potential. Using simple models, we analyze how gas is expected to be transported in the nuclear regions of galaxies. When we couple it with the expected gas lifetime given by the Kennicutt-Schmidt Law, this naturally leads to the `M_BH - M_virial' and `M_BH - sigma' relations. We also numerically test, using AMR simulations, our simple models for the mass transport with satisfactory results.

  4. "Retired" Planet Hosts: Not So Massive, Maybe Just Portly After Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, James P.

    2011-10-01

    Studies of the planet abundance as a function of stellar mass have suggested a strong increase in the frequency of planet occurrence around stars more massive than 1.5 M sun, and that such stars are deficit in short-period planets. These planet searches have relied on giant stars for a sample of high mass stars, which are hostile to precision Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity while on the main sequence. This Letter considers the observed vsin i and observationally inferred mass for exoplanet hosting giants with the vsin i of distribution of field stars, which show discrepancies that can be explained by erroneous mass determinations of some exoplanet host stars. By comparison with an expected mass distribution constructed from integrating isochrones, it is shown that the exoplanet hosts are inconsistent with a population of massive stars. These stars are more likely to have originated from a main-sequence population of late F/early G dwarfs with mass 1.0-1.2 M sun, only slightly more massive than the typical FGK dwarfs with Doppler detected planets. The deficit of short-period planets is most likely explained by tidal capture. The planet abundance difference requires either a steeper increase in planet frequency with mass than previously thought or a high rate of false positives due to signals of stellar origin. The measurement of photospheric carbon isotope ratios is suggested as a method to discriminate whether this sample of giant stars is significantly more massive than the population of FGK dwarfs with Doppler detected planets.

  5. Determination of acid forming potential of massive sulfide minerals and the tailings situated in lead/zinc mining district of Balya (NW Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, E. Ender; Öncel, M. Salim

    2016-12-01

    Weathering of sulfide minerals is a major source of acid production in nature and especially in mining territories. Pyrite is not the only principal mineral that generates acid drainage: other sulfide minerals (sphalerite, galena, chalcopyrite, etc.) may also be responsible for acid production. In addition to massive sulfide minerals, sulfide-bearing mine tailings may also produce acid drainage due to oxidation and hydrolysis reactions in waste dumps. The lead/zinc (Pb/Zn) mining region in Balya and Balıkesir, in Turkey, has operated mines intensively since the 1860s; so that characterization of the sulfide minerals and tailings situated and formed around the mining site is of great importance to secure a sustainable environment. For this purpose, acid production and neutralization potentials of massive sulfide ores of the region, and in the Pb/Zn process facility mine tailings from ten different points of tailings dam, have been determined by applied conventional Acid-Base Accounting (ABA) and Net Acid Generation (NAG) static tests after chemical and mineralogical analysis. The NAG pH and net acid production potential (NAPP) values were compared on a chart in order to classify the samples as either acid generating or non-acid generating. According to the comparisons, the sulfide minerals were classified as potentially acid forming (PAF). Massive pyrite had the highest NAPP and NAG pH value of 1966.6 kg H2SO4/ton and 1.91, respectively and the galena had the lowest NAPP value of 558.9 kg H2SO4/ton. However, the sphalerite NAG leachate pH value of 4.30 was the highest in sulfide minerals so that the sphalerite plotted near the uncertainty reference border in the PAF zone. In the mine tailings, NAPP values of 105.9 kg H2SO4/ton on average and the NAG pH values of over 7.5 were determined. In addition to these tests, water leaching (agitation test) was carried out on tailings in order to generate more information. The tailings did not generate acidic leachates as

  6. 火山成因块状硫化物矿床研究进展%RESEARCH PROGRESS ON VOLCANOGENIC MASSIVE SULFIDE DEPOSIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁世先; 崔俊强

    2013-01-01

    The VMS (Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide) deposits can be classified into four types,i.e.Kuroko-type,Cyprustype,Besshi-type and Sullivan-type,in respect to their tectonic settings and host lithology.There are commonly two major styles of footwall alteration associated with VMS deposits:footwall alteration pipes which occur immediately below the massive sulfides; and semiconformable or strata-bound footwall alteration which can be regionally extensive.As with footwall alteration,hanging-wall zone alterations vary from pipe shapes to semiconformable zones.There are two alternative sources which have been suggested for the metals in VMS deposits:leaching from the ore-bearing volcanic rocks and related basement rocks by heated seawater above a magmatic intrusion or a volcanic magma chamber; and direct input of a magmatic volatile phase from the magma chamber.The fluids involved are derived dominantly from seawater penetrating downward through the basement rocks.Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies suggest that abundant magmatic fluid component may have been incorporated into the circulating fluid system.VMS deposits are characterized by well developed metal zonation patterns defined by a typical sequence from Fe to Fe-Cu to Cu-Pb-Zn to Pb-Zn-Ba in an upward and lateral sense and this zonation reflects the evolution of fluids and the growth mechanism of the massive sulfide mound with time.The four-stage model with the change of the fluid temperature through time can interpret the classic massive sulfide mound-type deposit well.%火山成因块状硫化物(VMS)矿床可形成于太古宙至现代各个地质时期.现代海底热液成矿作用是赋存于海相火山岩系中的古代VMS矿床成矿作用的再现.VMS矿床可形成于多种构造环境,但均与拉张背景有关.按照构造环境和容矿岩系将VMS矿床分为黑矿型、塞浦路斯型、别子型和沙利文型.VMS矿床的热液蚀变由下盘蚀变带和上盘蚀变带两个结构单元组

  7. Development of Deep-tow Autonomous Cable Seismic (ACS) for Seafloor Massive Sulfides (SMSs) Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Murakami, Fumitoshi; Tsukahara, Hitoshi; Saito, Shutaro; Lee, Sangkyun; Tara, Kenji; Kato, Masafumi; Jamali Hondori, Ehsan; Sumi, Tomonori; Kadoshima, Kazuyuki; Kose, Masami

    2017-04-01

    Within the EEZ of Japan, numerous surveys exploring ocean floor resources have been conducted. The exploration targets are gas hydrates, mineral resources (manganese, cobalt or rare earth) and especially seafloor massive sulphide (SMS) deposits. These resources exist in shallow subsurface areas in deep waters (>1500m). For seismic explorations very high resolution images are required. These cannot be effectively obtained with conventional marine seismic techniques. Therefore we have been developing autonomous seismic survey systems which record the data close to the seafloor to preserve high frequency seismic energy. Very high sampling rate (10kHz) and high accurate synchronization between recording systems and shot time are necessary. We adopted Cs-base atomic clock considering its power consumption. At first, we developed a Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) system that uses hydrophone arrays moored vertically from the ocean bottom to record close to the target area. This system has been successfully applied to SMS exploration. Specifically it fixed over known sites to assess the amount of reserves with the resultant 3D volume. Based on the success of VCS, we modified the VCS system to use as a more efficient deep-tow seismic survey system. Although there are other examples of deep-tow seismic systems, signal transmission cables present challenges in deep waters. We use our autonomous recording system to avoid these problems. Combining a high frequency piezoelectric source (Sub Bottom Profiler:SBP) that automatically shots with a constant interval, we achieve the high resolution deep-tow seismic without data transmission/power cable to the board. Although the data cannot be monitored in real-time, the towing system becomes very simple. We have carried out survey trial, which showed the systems utility as a high-resolution deep-tow seismic survey system. Furthermore, the frequency ranges of deep-towed source (SBP) and surface towed sparker are 700-2300Hz and 10-200Hz

  8. Paleomagnetism of the Red Dog Zn-Pb massive sulfide deposit in northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewchuk, Michael T.; Leach, D.L.; Kelley, K.D.; Symons, David T. A.

    2004-01-01

    Paleomagnetic methods have isolated two ancient magnetizations in and around the Paleozoic shale-hosted Red Dog ore deposit in northern Alaska. A high-latitude, westerly magnetization carried by magnetite, termed characteristic remanent magnetization A, was found in rocks that have barite and/or substantial quartz replacement of barite. An intermediate- to low-latitude, southerly magnetization (characteristic remanent magnetization B) is carried by pyrrhotite and was found in rocks dominated by galena and sphalerite. The ages the two components are constrained by their relationship with geochemistry, radiometric age dating, and hypotheses for the Mesozoic tectonic history of the Brooks Range. Characteristic remanent magnetization A fails the fold test so it must postdate the end of Brookian orogenesis (??? 150 Ma). It is always found with replacement quartz that has a radiometric date (white mica from a vug, 39Ar/40Ar) of 126 Ma. The paleolatitude for characteristic remanent magnetization B is too shallow to be Mesozoic or younger, regardless of the model for the tectonic origin of northern Alaska, and must predate Brookian orogenesis. Geologic mapping suggests that most of the ore is syngenetic, formed at 330 to 340 Ma, and a radiometric date (Re-Os on pyrite) yields an age of 338 Ma. Since characteristic remanent magnetization B predates deformation, is found in mineralized rocks and is carried by pyrrhotite, it was probably acquired during the mineralizing process as well. The combined radiometric ages and paleomagnetic data sets can be best interpreted by assuming that northern Alaska was part of an accreted terrane that was translated northward by about 30?? into its current location relative to the rest of North America and then rotated counterclockwise by 50?? to 70??. This tectonic interpretation yields plausible magnetization ages for both characteristic remanent magnetization A and B. Geologic evidence, isotopic ages, and paleomagnetic data indicate

  9. Massive stars formed in atomic hydrogen reservoirs: HI observations of gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Michałowski, Michał J; Hjorth, J; Krumholz, M R; Tanvir, N R; Kamphuis, P; Burlon, D; Baes, M; Basa, S; Berta, S; Ceron, J M Castro; Crosby, D; D'Elia, V; Elliott, J; Greiner, J; Hunt, L K; Klose, S; Koprowski, M P; Floc'h, E Le; Malesani, D; Murphy, T; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Palazzi, E; Rasmussen, J; Rossi, A; Savaglio, S; Schady, P; Sollerman, J; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Watson, D; van der Werf, P; Vergani, S D; Xu, D

    2015-01-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), among the most energetic events in the Universe, are explosions of massive and short-lived stars, so they pinpoint locations of recent star formation. However, several GRB host galaxies have recently been found to be deficient in molecular gas (H2), believed to be the fuel of star formation. Moreover, optical spectroscopy of GRB afterglows implies that the molecular phase constitutes only a small fraction of the gas along the GRB line-of-sight. Here we report the first ever 21 cm line observations of GRB host galaxies, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, implying high levels of atomic hydrogen (HI), which suggests that the connection between atomic gas and star formation is stronger than previously thought, with star formation being potentially directly fuelled by atomic gas (or with very efficient HI-to-H2 conversion and rapid exhaustion of molecular gas), as has been theoretically shown to be possible. This can happen in low metallicity gas near the onset of star forma...

  10. Co-evolution of nuclear star clusters, massive black holes and their host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Antonini, Fabio; Silk, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Studying how nuclear star clusters (NSCs) form and how they are related to the growth of the central massive black holes (MBHs) and their host galaxies is fundamental for our understanding of the evolution of galaxies and the processes that have shaped their central structures. We present the results of a semi-analytical galaxy formation model that follows the evolution of dark matter halos along merger trees, as well as that of the baryonic components. This model allows us to study the evolution of NSCs in a cosmological context, by taking into account the growth of NSCs due to both dynamical friction-driven migration of stellar clusters and star formation triggered by infalling gas, while also accounting for dynamical heating from (binary) MBHs. We find that in-situ star formation contributes a significant fraction (up to ~40%) of the total mass of NSCs in our model. Both NSC growth through in-situ star formation and through star cluster migration are found to generate NSC -- host galaxy scaling correlation...

  11. Chalcophile element (Ni, Cu, PGE, and Au) variations in the Tamarack magmatic sulfide deposit in the Midcontinent Rift System: implications for dynamic ore-forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranovic, Valentina; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi; Rossell, Dean

    2016-10-01

    The Tamarack magmatic sulfide deposit is hosted by the Tamarack Intrusive Complex (1105.6 ± 1.2 Ma) in the Midcontinent Rift System. The most important sulfide mineralization in the Complex occurs in the northern part, which consists of two separate intrusive units: an early funnel-shaped layered peridotite body containing relatively fine-grained olivine (referred to as the FGO Intrusion) at the top, and a late gabbro-troctolite-peridotite dike-like body containing relatively coarse-grained olivine (referred to as the CGO Intrusion) at the bottom. Disseminated, net-textured, and massive sulfides occur in the base of the FGO Intrusion as well as in the upper part of the CGO Intrusion. The widest part of the CGO Intrusion also hosts a large semi-massive (net-textured) sulfide ore body locally surrounded by disseminated sulfide mineralization. Small massive sulfide veins occur in the footwall of the FGO Intrusion and in the wall rocks of the CGO dike. The sulfide mineralization is predominantly composed of pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and chalcopyrite, plus minor magnetite. Pyrrhotite containing the highest Ni and Co contents occurs in the FGO disseminated sulfides and in the CGO semi-massive sulfide ores, respectively. The most important platinum-group minerals associated with the base metal sulfides are sperrylite (PtAs2), sudburyite (PdSb), and michenerite (PdBiTe). Nickel shows a strong positive correlation with S in all types of sulfide mineralization, and Cu shows a strong positive correlation with S in the disseminated sulfide mineralization. At a given S content, the concentrations of Pt, Pd, and Au in the CGO disseminated sulfides are significantly higher than those in the FGO disseminated sulfides. The semi-massive sulfide ores are characterized by significantly higher IPGE (Ir, Os, Ru, and Rh) concentrations than most of the massive sulfide ores. With few exceptions, all of the various textural types of sulfide mineralization collectively show a good positive

  12. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster...

  13. Helium,neon and argon isotope compositions of fluid inclu-sions in massive sulfides from the Jade hydrothermal field,the Okinawa Trough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Zhigang; QIN Yunshan; ZHAI Shikui

    2004-01-01

    Helium, neon and argon isotope compositions of fluid inclusions have been measured in massive sulfide samples from the Jade hydrothermal field in the central Okinawa Trough. Huid-inclusion 3He/4He ratios are between 6.2 and 10.1 times the air value (Ra), and with a mean of 7.8Ra, which are consistent with the mid-ocean ridge basalt values [3He/4He≈(6Ra~11Ra)]. Values for 20Ne/22Ne are from 10.7 to 11.3, which are significantly higher than the atmospheric ratio (9.8).And the fluid-inclusion 40Ar/36Ar ratios range from 287 to 334, which are close to the atmosperic values (295.5). These results indicate that the noble gases of trapped hydrothermal fluids in massive sulfides are a mixture of mantle- and seawater-derived components, and the helium of fluid inclusions is mainly from mantle, the nelium and argon isotope compositions are mainly from seawater.

  14. Mineral potential for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, (phase V, deliverable 77): Chapter L in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Potential for base- and precious-metal-bearing volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits (VMS) exists in Mauritania in the greenstone belts of the southwestern Rgueïbat Shield and in the allochthonous portions of the central and southern Mauritanides. Additional potential exists for VMS deposits within the Tiris Complex of the central Rgueïbat Shield. Volcanosedimentary successions of Paleoproterozoic rocks of the northeastern portion of the Rgueïbat Shield are also permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. These types of mineral occurrences are common features of marine volcanosedimentary successions worldwide and can be of almost any age, although Proterozoic examples are less abundant.

  15. Sulfur and oxygen isotopes in barite deposits of the western Brooks Range, Alaska, and implications for the origin of the Red Dog massive sulfide deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.A.; Kelley, K.D.; Leach, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Sulfur and oxygen isotope analyses have been obtained for barite samples from the giant stratiform sulfide barite deposits at Red Dog in the western Brooks Range of Alaska, from stratiform barite deposits elsewhere in the Red Dog district, and from stratiform and vein and breccia barite occurrences in the central Brooks Range. Twelve of the 15 deposits studied lie within middle to Upper Mississippian black shale and chert units. The data reveal two different patterns on ?? 34S versus ??18O plots. The first, which is best illustrated by the barite deposit at Anarraaq, shows linear trends with slopes that vary with barite texture. For most samples, ??34S and ??18O values are both higher than the values characteristic of Mississippian marine sulfate. The second pattern, which is evident at the Red Dog deposits, shows no correlation between ??34S and ??18. In most samples, ??18O is below the value for Mississippian marine sulfate. Comparisons with sulfate in modern marine environments suggest a possible model for the mineralizing process. Anarraaq-type barite formed at sea-floor vents where ascending fluids carrying barium and methane encountered sulfate-bearing pore waters or bottom waters. Barite deposition was accompanied by the reduction of sulfate to H2S by means of microbially mediated anaerobic methane oxidation. Red Dog-type barite was formed in a manner similar to Anarraaq-type barite but was over-printed by a massive sulfide-forming event. Red Dog sulfides precipitated where metal-bearing hydrothermal fluids encountered pore waters that had been charged with H2S by anaerobic methane oxidation. Textural and isotopic evidence indicates that the sulfide bodies grew by consuming the available H2S and then by reductively dissolving barite. Dissolution of barite caused barium to be released to higher stratigraphic levels where it was reprecipitated on encountering sulfate. Isotopic evidence is pre sented for a link between methane venting and barite formation and

  16. First U-Pb isotopic data on zircon from andesite of the Saf'yanovka Cu-bearing massive sulfide deposit (Middle Urals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronkin, Yu. L.; Pritchin, M. E.; Soroka, E. I.; Gerdes, A.; Puchkov, V. N.; Busharina, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    New results of U-Pb LA ICP-MS dating of zircon from andesite samples cropping out on the western wall of the Saf'yanovka quarry (57°22'58.88″ N, 61°31'50.85″ E) in the synonymous Cu-Zn-bearing massive sulfide deposit of the Urals type are considered. The position of data points of the U-Pb systematics in the 207Pb/235U-206Pb/238U plot determines a cluster practically corresponding to the concordant U-Pb age: 422.8 ± 2.0 Ma. This date indicates for the first time the presence of Pridolian volcanogenic rocks in the East Urals megazone of the Middle Urals.

  17. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster......, both of which are also suppressed near cluster centres to a comparable extent. These results strongly support the idea that X-ray AGN activity and strong star formation are linked through their common dependence on available reservoirs of cold gas....... fields spanning the redshift range 0.2 cluster galaxy AGN fraction in the central...

  18. Textural and stable isotope studies of the Big Mike cupriferous volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, Pershing County, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, R.O.; Roberts, R.J.; Snyder, W.S.; Lahusen, G.L.; Motica, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Big Mike deposit is a massive sulphide lens entirely within a carbonaceous argillite of the Palaeozoic Havallah pelagic sequence. The massive ore contains two generations of pyrite, a fine- and a coarse-grained variety; framboidal pyrite occurs in the surrounding carbonaceous argillite. Coarse grained pyrite is largely recrystallized fine-grained pyrite and is proportionately more abundant toward the margins of the lens. Chalcopyrite and sphalerite replace fine-grained pyrite and vein-fragmented coarse-grained pyrite. Quartz fills openings in the sulphide fabric. S-isotope data are related to sulphide mineralogy and textures. Isotopically light S in the early fine-grained pyrite was probably derived from framboidal biogenic pyrite. The S-isotope values of the later coarse-grained pyrite and chalcopyrite probably reflect a combination of reduced sea-water sulphate and igneous S. Combined S- and O-isotope and textural data accord with precipitation of fine-grained pyrite from a hydrothermal plume like those at the East Pacific Rise spreading centre at lat. 21oN. The primary material was recystallized and mineralized by later fluids of distinctly different S-isotope composition. -G.J.N.

  19. Some petrologic and oxygen isotopic relationships in the amulet mine, noranda, quebec, and their bearing on the origin of archean massive sulfide deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaty, D.W.; Taylor, H.P. Jr.

    A concentrically zoned alteration pipe is present at the Amulet ''A'' Cu-Zn mine in the Archean Abitibi greenstone belt. The pipe consists of a central core zone of so-called ''dalmatianite'' surrounded by a zone of biotite-bearing grid-fracture alteration. Study of the dalmatianite indicates that these rocks experienced two episodes of recrystallization. Whole-rock /delta//sup 18/O values decrease from about 6 to 10 in most of the Abitibi belt to 5 to 7 in the country rocks surrounding the ore deposit, to values as low as 3.6 in the core of the dalmatianite zone. This oxygen isotopic zoning must have been produced by the hydrothermal activity, because the dehydration reactions associated with contact metamorphism cannot have affected /delta//sup 18/O by more than 0.5 per mil. Assuming an alteration temperature of 300/degree/sub p/lus or minus/50/degree/C and a water/rock ratio greater than two, the hydrothermal fluid must have had /delta//sup 18/O .0.5/plus or minus/1.0. This indicates that the Amulet ore deposit formed from a hydrothermal fluid that had a /delta//sup 18/O value similar both to modern seawater and to the fluids which formed the Phanerozoic massive sulfide deposits of the Kuroko and Cyprus types. 51 refs.

  20. Relationships between microbial communities and environmental parameters at sites impacted by mining of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, A.L.; Munk, L.; Koski, R.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Stillings, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    The relations among geochemical parameters and sediment microbial communities were examined at three shoreline sites in the Prince William Sound, Alaska, which display varying degrees of impact by acid-rock drainage (ARD) associated with historic mining of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. Microbial communities were examined using total fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), a class of compounds derived from lipids produced by eukaryotes and prokaryotes (bacteria and Archaea); standard extraction techniques detect FAMEs from both living (viable) and dead (non-viable) biomass, but do not detect Archaeal FAMEs. Biomass and diversity (as estimated by FAMEs) varied strongly as a function of position in the tidal zone, not by study site; subtidal muds, Fe oxyhydroxide undergoing biogenic reductive dissolution, and peat-rich intertidal sediment had the highest values. These estimates were lowest in acid-generating, intertidal zone sediment; if valid, the estimates suggest that only one or two bacterial species predominate in these communities, and/or that Archeal species are important members of the microbial community in this sediment. All samples were dominated by bacterial FAMEs (median value >90%). Samples with the highest absolute abundance of eukaryotic FAMEs were biogenic Fe oxyhydroxides from shallow freshwater pools (fungi) and subtidal muds (diatoms). Eukaryotic FAMEs were practically absent from low-pH, sulfide-rich intertidal zone sediments. The relative abundance of general microbial functional groups such as aerobes/anaerobes and gram(+)/gram(-) was not estimated due to severe inconsistency among the results obtained using several metrics reported in the literature. Principal component analyses (PCAs) were performed to investigate the relationship among samples as separate functions of water, sediment, and FAMEs data. PCAs based on water chemistry and FAMEs data resulted in similar relations among samples, whereas the PCA based on sediment chemistry

  1. "Retired" Planet Hosts: Not So Massive, Maybe Just Portly After Lunch

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of the planet abundance as a function of stellar mass have suggested a strong increase in the frequency of planet occurrence around stars more massive than $1.5 M_\\odot$, and that such stars are deficit in short period planets. These planet searches have relied on giant stars for a sample of high mass stars, which are hostile to precision Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity while on the main sequence. This paper considers the observed $v\\sin i$ and observationally inferr...

  2. The evolution of massive black holes and their spins in their galactic hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Barausse, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    [Abridged] [...] In this paper, we study the mass and spin evolution of massive black holes within a semianalytical galaxy-formation model that follows the evolution of dark-matter halos along merger trees, as well as that of the baryonic components (hot gas, stellar and gaseous bulges, and stellar and gaseous galactic disks). This allows us to study the mass and spin evolution of massive black holes in a self-consistent way, by taking into account the effect of the gas present in galactic nuclei both during the accretion phases and during mergers. Also, we present predictions, as a function of redshift, for the fraction of gas-rich black-hole mergers -- in which the spins prior to the merger are aligned due to the gravito-magnetic torques exerted by the circumbinary disk -- as opposed to gas-poor mergers, in which the orientation of the spins before the merger is roughly isotropic. These predictions may be tested by LISA or similar spaced-based gravitational-wave detectors such as eLISA/NGO or SGO.

  3. Minerals of Fe in the oxidation zone of massive sulfide ore in the South Pechenga structure zone, Kola region: Identification by the Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kompanchenko A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on the study of iron-bearing minerals formed in the oxidation zone of massive sulfide ores. The minerals are represented by two groups: oxides, i. e. goethite and lepidocrocite, and sulfates, i. e. melanterite and rozenit. Mineral identification has been produced by Raman spectroscopy, these data have been confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The resulting Raman spectra have been compared with the spectra of the known database and the results of previous studies of these minerals. Goethite and lepidocrocite are polymorphic modifications formed under the specific conditions by the influence of special solutions. Goethite has diagnostic bands at 243 cm–1, 300 cm–1, 391 cm–1, 480 cm–1, 552 cm–1, 681 cm–1 , and 995 cm–1, diagnostic bands of lepidocrocite – 252 cm–1, 381 cm–1, 528 cm–1, and 652 cm–1. Discovered small crystals in the lepidocrocite veins have been diagnosed as magnetite, with diagnostic bands at 678 cm–1, 549 cm–1 , and 316 cm–1. Goethite and lepidocrocite are formed on the surface of a complex pyrrhotite-marcasite aggregate with "bird's-eye" structure. The presence of pyrite and marcasite is confirmed by Raman spectrum which has pyrite bands (343 cm–1 and 403 cm–1 and marcasite bands (323 cm–1 and 386 cm–1. Melanterite and rozenite are formed under the influence of surface water on sulfide ores or other readily degradable iron-bearing minerals, as well as in confined spaces with high humidity. Raman spectra of these minerals well differ from each other allowing them reliably diagnose. There are sulfate anion [SO4]2– vibrations in the range of 990–1010 cm–1, and vibrations of the H–O–H in the range of 3 000–4000 cm–1 and 1 500–1700 cm–1 on the spectra. As a result of the research the authors can certainly confirm that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a reliable method for mineral identification

  4. Tidal evolution of CoRoT massive planets and brown dwarfs and of their host stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraz-Mello, Sylvio

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Revisit and improvement of the main results obtained in the study of the tidal evolution of several massive CoRoT planets and brown dwarfs and of the rotation of their host stars. Methods: Simulations of the past and future evolution of the orbital and rotational elements of the systems under the joint action of the tidal torques and the braking due to the stellar wind. Results: Presentation of several paradigms and significant examples of tidal evolution in extrasolar planetary systems. It is shown that the high quality of the photometric and spectrographic observations of the CoRoT objects allow for a precise study of their past and future evolution and to estimate the tidal parameters ruling the dissipation in the systems.

  5. Towards a Comprehensive Fueling-Controlled Theory on the Growth of Massive Black Holes and Host Spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Escala, Andres

    2007-01-01

    We study the relation between nuclear massive black holes and their host spheroid gravitational potential. Using AMR numerical simulations, we analyze how gas is transported in the nuclear (central kpc) regions of galaxies. We study the gas fueling onto the inner accretion disk (sub-pc scale) and the star formation in a massive nuclear disk like those generally found in proto-spheroids (ULIRGs, SCUBA Galaxies). These sub-pc resolution simulation of gas fueling that is mainly depleted by star formation naturally satisfy the `M_BH - $M_virial' relation, with a scatter considerably less than the observed one. We found a generalized version of Kennicutt-Schmidt Law for starbursts is satisfied, in which the total gas depletion rate (dot{M}_gas = dot{M}_BH + dot{M}_SF) is the one that scales as M_gas/t_orbital. We also found that the `M_BH - sigma' relation is a byproduct of the `M_BH - M_virial' relation in the fueling controlled scenario.

  6. Towards a Comprehensive Fueling-Controlled Theory on the Growth of Massive Black Holes And Host Spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escala, Andres; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-06-11

    We study the relation between nuclear massive black holes and their host spheroid gravitational potential. Using AMR numerical simulations, we analyze how gas is transported in the nuclear (central kpc) regions of galaxies. We study the gas fueling onto the inner accretion disk (sub-pc scale) and the star formation in a massive nuclear disk like those generally found in proto-spheroids (ULIRGs, SCUBA Galaxies). These sub-pc resolution simulation of gas fueling that is mainly depleted by star formation naturally satisfy the 'M{sub BH} - M{sub virial}' relation, with a scatter considerably less than the observed one. We found a generalized version of Kennicutt-Schmidt Law for starbursts is satisfied, in which the total gas depletion rate ({dot M}{sub gas} = {dot M}{sub BH} + {dot M}{sub SF}) is the one that scales as M{sub gas}/t{sub orbital}. We also found that the 'M{sub BH} - {sigma}' relation is a byproduct of the 'M{sub BH} - M{sub virial}' relation.

  7. Round Top Mountain rhyolite (Texas, USA), a massive, unique Y-bearing-fluorite-hosted heavy rare earth element (HREE) deposit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PINGITORE Nicholas; CLAGUE Juan; GORSKI Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Round Top Mountain in Hudspeth County, west Texas, USA is a surface-exposed rhyolite intrusion enriched in Y and heavy rare earth elements (HREEs), as well as Nb, Ta, Be, Li, F, Sn, Rb, Th, and U. The massive tonnage, estimated at well over 1 billion tons, of the deposit makes it a target for recovery of valuable yttrium and HREEs (YHREEs), and possibly other scarce ele-ments. Because of the extremely fine grain size of the mineralized rhyolite matrix, it has not been clear which minerals host the YHREEs and in what proportions. REE-bearing minerals reported in the deposit included bastnäsite-Ce, Y-bearing fluorite, xeno-time-Y, zircon, aeschynite-Ce, a Ca-Th-Pb fluoride, and possibly ancylite-La and cerianite-Ce. Extended X-ray absorption fine struc-ture (EXAFS) indicated that virtually all of the yttrium, a proxy for the HREEs, resided in a coordination in the fluorite-type crystal structure, rather than those in the structures of bastnäsite-Ce and xenotime-Y. The YREE grade of the Round Top deposit was just over 0.05%, with 72%of this consisting of YHREEs. This grade was in the range of the South China ionic clay deposits that supply essentially all of the world’s YHREEs. Because the host Y-bearing fluorite is soluble in dilute sulfuric acid at room temperature, a heap leaching of the deposit appeared feasible, aided by the fact that 90%-95%of the rock consists of unreactive and insoluble feld-spars and quartz. The absence of overburden, remarkable consistency of mineralization grade throughout the massive rhyolite, prox-imity (a few km) to a US interstate highway, major rail systems and gas and electricity, temperate climate, and stable political location in the world’s largest economy all enhanced the potential economic appeal of Round Top.

  8. Next-Generation "-omics" Approaches Reveal a Massive Alteration of Host RNA Metabolism during Bacteriophage Infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Chevallereau

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As interest in the therapeutic and biotechnological potentials of bacteriophages has grown, so has value in understanding their basic biology. However, detailed knowledge of infection cycles has been limited to a small number of model bacteriophages, mostly infecting Escherichia coli. We present here the first analysis coupling data obtained from global next-generation approaches, RNA-Sequencing and metabolomics, to characterize interactions between the virulent bacteriophage PAK_P3 and its host Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We detected a dramatic global depletion of bacterial transcripts coupled with their replacement by viral RNAs over the course of infection, eventually leading to drastic changes in pyrimidine metabolism. This process relies on host machinery hijacking as suggested by the strong up-regulation of one bacterial operon involved in RNA processing. Moreover, we found that RNA-based regulation plays a central role in PAK_P3 lifecycle as antisense transcripts are produced mainly during the early stage of infection and viral small non coding RNAs are massively expressed at the end of infection. This work highlights the prominent role of RNA metabolism in the infection strategy of a bacteriophage belonging to a new characterized sub-family of viruses with promising therapeutic potential.

  9. A population of massive, luminous galaxies hosting heavily dust-obscured gamma-ray bursts: Implications for the use of GRBs as tracers of cosmic star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Morgan, A. N. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Hjorth, J.; Krühler, T.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, B. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Fruchter, A.; Kalirai, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Jakobsson, P. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavík (Iceland); Prochaska, J. X. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Silverman, J. M., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present observations and analysis of the host galaxies of 23 heavily dust-obscured gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite during the years 2005-2009, representing all GRBs with an unambiguous host-frame extinction of A{sub V} > 1 mag from this period. Deep observations with Keck, Gemini, Very Large Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, and Spitzer successfully detect the host galaxies and establish spectroscopic or photometric redshifts for all 23 events, enabling us to provide measurements of the intrinsic host star formation rates, stellar masses, and mean extinctions. Compared to the hosts of unobscured GRBs at similar redshifts, we find that the hosts of dust-obscured GRBs are (on average) more massive by about an order of magnitude and also more rapidly star forming and dust obscured. While this demonstrates that GRBs populate all types of star-forming galaxies, including the most massive, luminous systems at z ≈ 2, at redshifts below 1.5 the overall GRB population continues to show a highly significant aversion to massive galaxies and a preference for low-mass systems relative to what would be expected given a purely star-formation-rate-selected galaxy sample. This supports the notion that the GRB rate is strongly dependent on metallicity, and may suggest that the most massive galaxies in the universe underwent a transition in their chemical properties ∼9 Gyr ago. We also conclude that, based on the absence of unobscured GRBs in massive galaxies and the absence of obscured GRBs in low-mass galaxies, the dust distributions of the lowest-mass and the highest-mass galaxies are relatively homogeneous, while intermediate-mass galaxies (∼10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}) have diverse internal properties.

  10. Copper isotope fractionation during sulfide-magma differentiation in the Tulaergen magmatic Ni-Cu deposit, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Chunji; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Symons, David T. A.; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yang, Yongqiang; Ke, Junjun

    2017-08-01

    Although it has been recently demonstrated that Cu isotope fractionation during mantle melting and basaltic magma differentiation is limited, the behavior of Cu isotopes during magmatic differentiation involving significant sulfide segregation remains unclear. Magmatic Ni-Cu deposits, which formed via sulfide segregation from basaltic or picritic magmas, are appropriate targets to address this issue. Here we report Cu isotope data for sulfides (chalcopyrite) from the Tulaergen Ni-Cu sulfide deposit in Xinjiang, NW China. Sulfides, including sparsely disseminated (hosted by hornblende gabbro), moderately disseminated (hosted by hornblende olivine websterite), densely disseminated (hosted by hornblende lherzolite) and massive sulfides (sandwiched between country rocks and mafic-ultramafic rocks), were collected from adits at 1050 m, 1100 m and 1150 m levels. The sparsely and moderately disseminated sulfides on 1150 m and 1050 m levels have a restricted range of δ65Cu values from - 0.38‰ to 0.15‰, whereas disseminated and massive sulfides on 1100 m level have δ65Cu values ranging widely from - 1.98‰ to - 0.04‰ and from - 1.08‰ to - 0.52‰, respectively. The δ65Cu values of disseminated sulfides are negatively correlated with whole-rock S and Cu concentrations, and sulfides formed at later stages have heavier δ65Cu values. These observations suggest significant Cu isotope fractionation during sulfide-magma differentiation above 600 °C. During the formation of the Tulaergen magmatic Ni-Cu deposit, sulfide segregation and crystallization of olivine and pyroxene caused the increase of Fe3 + contents in the residual magmas, which would move the redox reaction Cu+ + Fe3 + = Fe2 + + Cu2 + toward larger amounts of Cu2 + in the melt. The presence of Cu2 + in melt allowed redox transformation to happen during sulfide segregation. The residual magmas are enriched in heavy Cu isotopes due to the removal of 65Cu-depleted sulfides, and sulfides formed at later

  11. TAPAS IV. TYC 3667-1280-1 b - the most massive red giant star hosting a warm Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Niedzielski, A; Nowak, G; Adamów, M; Maciejewski, G; Kowalik, K; Wolszczan, A; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B; Adamczyk, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the latest result of the TAPAS project that is devoted to intense monitoring of planetary candidates that are identified within the PennState-Toru\\'n planet search. We aim to detect planetary systems around evolved stars to be able to build sound statistics on the frequency and intrinsic nature of these systems, and to deliver in-depth studies of selected planetary systems with evidence of star-planet interaction processes. The paper is based on precise radial velocity measurements: 13 epochs collected over 1920 days with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and its High-Resolution Spectrograph, and 22 epochs of ultra-precise HARPS-N data collected over 961 days. We present a warm-Jupiter ($T_{eq}=1350 K$, $m_{2} sin i=5.4\\pm$0.4$M_{J}$) companion with an orbital period of 26.468 days in a circular ($e=0.036$) orbit around a giant evolved ($\\log g=3.11\\pm0.09$, $R=6.26\\pm0.86R_{\\odot}$) star with $M_{\\star}=1.87\\pm0.17M_{\\odot}$. This is the most massive and oldest star found to be hosting a close-in giant p...

  12. Magmatic Cu-Ni sulfide mineralization of the Huangshannan mafic-untramafic intrusion, Eastern Tianshan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Chunji; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yang, YongQiang; Ke, Junjun

    2015-06-01

    The Huangshannan Ni-Cu (-PGE) sulfide deposit, a new discovery from geological prospecting in Eastern Tianshan, is in a belt of magmatic Ni-Cu (-PGE) sulfide deposits along the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The host intrusion of the Huangshannan deposit is composed of a layered ultramafic sequence and a massive gabbro-diorite unit. The major sulfide orebodies occur mainly within websterite and lherzolite in the layered ultramafic sequence. In-situ zircon U-Pb dating analyses yielded a crystallization age of 282.5 ± 1.4 Ma, similar to the ages of the Permian Tarim mantle plume. Samples from the Huangshannan intrusion are characterized by nearly flat rare earth elements patterns, negative Zr, Ti and Nb anomalies, arc-like Th/Yb and Nb/Yb ratios, and significantly lower rare earth element and immobile trace element contents than the Tarim basalts. These characteristics suggest that the Huangshannan intrusion was not generated from the Tarim mantle plume. The primary magma for the Huangshannan intrusion and its associated sulfide mineralization were formed from different pulses of picritic magma with different degrees of crustal contamination. The first pulse underwent an initial removal of 0.016% sulfide in the deep magma chamber. The evolved magma reached sulfide saturation again in the shallow magma chamber and formed sulfide ores in lherzolite. The second pulse of magma reached a level of 0.022% sulfide segregation at staging chamber before ascending up to the shallow magma chamber. In the shallow conduit system, this sulfide-unsaturated magma mixed with the first pulse of magma and with contamination from the country rocks, leading to the formation of sulfide ores in websterite. The third magma pulse from the deep chamber formed the unmineralized massive gabbro-diorite unit of the Huangshannan intrusion.

  13. Monazite geochronology and geothermobarometry in polymetamorphic host rocks of volcanic-hosted massive sulphide mineralizations in the Mesoproterozoic Areachap Terrane, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Kai; Schulz, Bernhard; Bailie, Russell; Gutzmer, Jens

    2015-11-01

    The Areachap Terrane represents the medium-to high-grade metamorphic and deformed remnants of a Mesoproterozoic (ca. 1240-1300 Ma) volcanic arc bound to the margin of the Archean Kaapvaal Craton in the east, and the polydeformed and metamorphosed Proterozoic Namaqua Province in the west. There has been protracted debate as to the exact nature, origin, age and tectonic evolution of this terrane, adjacent to an important Mesoproterozoic crustal suture between the Archean Kaapvaal Craton and the Namaqua Province, which developed during the ∼1200-1000 Ma Namaquan Orogeny. The Areachap Terrane comprises highly deformed bimodal volcanic and volcano sedimentary successions that host a number of massive sulphide base metal orebodies. Samples from three of these orebodies at different locations were analysed to determine the age and P-T conditions of metamorphism along the Areachap Terrane. Metamorphic ages were determined by electron microprobe chemical dating of monazite. Garnet- and amphibole-bearing mineral assemblages were used for geothermobarometry at the Areachap Mine, located in the northern sector of the Areachap Terrane, monazite geochronology yields evidence for two populations of Th-U-Pb-ages at 1432 ± 30 Ma - a possible protolith age - and a metamorphic age of 1153 ± 21 Ma. Kantienpan and Copperton, representing the central and southern sector of the Areachap Terrane respectively, yield monazite ages for a younger metamorphic event with U-Th-Pb-ages of 1108 ± 19 Ma and 1104 ± 17 Ma, respectively. Geothermobarometric data give a differentiated view on the metamorphic evolution of the Areachap Terrane. An arc consistent clockwise P-T evolution path and upper amphibolite-facies peak metamorphic conditions are consistent at the three locations. The Areachap site shows a short prograde development with 8.0 kbar maximum pressure at circa 700 °C maximum temperature and a subsequent retrograde metamorphism. At Kantienpan, on the other hand, maximum metamorphic

  14. Identifying Predictors of Arsenic Bioavailability in Low-Sulfide, Quartz-Hosted Gold Deposits: Case Study at the Empire Mine State Historic Park, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, A. L.; Alpers, C. N.; Burlak Regnier, T.; Blum, A.; Petersen, E. U.; Basta, N. T.; Whitacre, S.; Casteel, S. W.; Kim, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    Introduction: This study addressed a need to identify geochemical and mineralogical parameters that are significantly correlated with arsenic bioavailability at historically-mined, low-sulfide, quartz-hosted ("lode") gold deposits. The study location was the Empire Mine State Historic Park (EMSHP), a site that is typical of many lode deposits in California in that arsenic is a primary contaminant of concern. Methods: A total of 25 large-volume sediment/mine waste samples were collected from sites in the EMSHP, homogenized, and dry sieved (solid-phase chemistry (XRF; n = 25); (4) quantitative mineralogy (n =25); (5) Bulk As- and iron (Fe) speciation (synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy, XAS, n =19); (6) point-based micron-scale composition (electron microprobe, n =12); and (7) micron-scale mineralogical and compositional mapping (QEMSCAN, n = 12). The matrix of bivariate correlations among these datasets was evaluated using a cutoff criterion for significance of p < 0.05. Results:Arsenic bioavailability was positively and significantly correlated with the abundance of Fe (hydr)oxide, the relative abundance of As-bearing hydroxide and As concentration in Fe hydroxide (datasets 4, 5, and 6, respectively). The relative abundance of As associated with Al-bearing secondary minerals (determined by As-XAS) was also positively and significantly correlated with datasets (1) and (2), but the correlation quality was lower. The relative abundance of other arsenic-bearing secondary minerals (e.g., jarosite, calcium arsenate, arseniosiderite) as determined by As XAS had positive correlations with bioaccessibility and/or bioavailability, but the correlations were not statistically significant. We ascribe this result to the fact that these phases only occurred in a few samples, whereas As- bearing Fe (hydr)oxide occurrence was ubiquitous. Highly negative and significant correlations were also observed between the abundance of arsenic-bearing sulfide minerals (datasets 4, 5

  15. High-resolution bathymetry as a primary exploration tool for seafloor massive sulfide deposits - lessons learned from exploration on the Mid-Atlantic and Juan de Fuca Ridges, and northern Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Clague, D. A.; Petersen, S.; Yeo, I. A.; Escartin, J.; Kwasnitschka, T.

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution, autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV)-derived multibeam bathymetry is increasingly being used as an exploration tool for delineating the size and extent of hydrothermal vent fields and associated seafloor massive sulfide deposits. However, because of the limited amount of seafloor that can be surveyed during a single dive, and the challenges associated with distinguishing hydrothermal chimneys and mounds from other volcanic and tectonic features using solely bathymetric data, AUV mapping surveys have largely been employed as a secondary exploration tool once hydrothermal sites have been discovered using other exploration methods such as plume, self-potential and TV surveys, or ROV and submersible dives. Visual ground-truthing is often required to attain an acceptable level of confidence in the hydrothermal origin of features identified in AUV-derived bathymetry. Here, we present examples of high-resolution bathymetric surveys of vent fields from a variety of tectonic environments, including slow- and intermediate-rate mid-ocean ridges, oceanic core complexes and back arc basins. Results illustrate the diversity of sulfide deposit morphologies, and the challenges associated with identifying hydrothermal features in different tectonic environments. We present a developing set of criteria that can be used to distinguish hydrothermal deposits in bathymetric data, and how AUV surveys can be used either on their own or in conjunction with other exploration techniques as a primary exploration tool.

  16. The Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co Sulfide Deposit,Labrador,Canada:Emplacement of Silicate and Sulfide-Laden Magmas into Spaces Created within a Structural Corridor%The Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co Sulfide Deposit,Labrador, Canada: Emplacement of Silicate and Sulfide-Laden Magmas into Spaces Created within a Structural Corridor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter C.Lightfoot; Dawn Evans-Lamswood; Robert Wheeler

    2012-01-01

    Abstract:The Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co sulfide deposit is hosted in a 1.34 Ga mafic intrusion that is part of the Nain Plutonic Suite in Labrador,Canada.The Ni-Cu-Co sulfide mineralization is associated with magmatic breccias that are typically contained in weakly mineralized olivine gabbros,troctolites and ferrogabbros,but also occur as veins in adjacent paragneiss.The mineralization is associated with a dyke-like body which is termed the feeder dyke.This dyke connects the shallow differentiated Eastern Deeps chamber in the east to a deeper intrusion in the west termed the Western Deeps Intrusion.Where the conduit is connected to the Eastern Deeps Intrusion,the Eastern Deeps Deposit is developed at the entry line of the dyke along the steep north wall of the Eastern Deeps Intrusion.The Eastern Deeps Deposit is surrounded by a halo of moderately to weakly mineralized Variable-Textured Troctolite (VTT) that reaches a maximum thickness above the ENE-WSW axis of the Eastern Deeps Deposit.At depth to the west,the conduit is adjacent to the south side of the Western Deeps Intrusion,where the dyke and intrusion contain disseminated magmatic sulfide mineralization.The Reid Brook Zone plunges to the east within the dyke,and both the dyke and adjacent paragneiss are mineralized.The Ovoid Deposit comprises a bowl-shaped body of massive sulfide where the dyke widens near to the present-day surface.It is not clear whether this deposit was developed as a widened-zone within the conduit or at the entry point into a chamber that is now lost to erosion.The massive sulfides and breccia sulfides of the Eastern Deeps are petrologically and chemically different when compared to the disseminated sulfides in the VTT; there is a marked break in Ni tenor (Ni content in 100% sulfide,abbreviated to [Ni] 100) and Ni/Co of sulfide between the two.The boundary of the sulfide types is often marked by strong sub-horizontal alignment of heavily digested and metamorphosed paragneiss fragments

  17. Monsters In The Dark: Exploring The Star-Forming Hosts Of Massive, Dust-Obscured Quasars At Z 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wethers, Clare; Banerji, Manda; Hewett, Paul; DES Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We perform the first population study of luminous, but heavily-reddened quasars in the rest-frame UV at z = 1.5 - 2.7 - a peak epoch of both star formation and black hole accretion. We find resolved, blue emission in the DES imaging, consistent with a star forming host galaxy. Via SED fitting, we derive instantaneous SFRs for the sample and find a trend between quasar luminosity and SFR.

  18. Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems (TAPAS) with HARPS-N. IV. TYC 3667-1280-1: The most massive red giant star hosting a warm Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, A.; Villaver, E.; Nowak, G.; Adamów, M.; Maciejewski, G.; Kowalik, K.; Wolszczan, A.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.; Adamczyk, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. We present the latest result of the TAPAS project that is devoted to intense monitoring of planetary candidates that are identified within the PennState-Toruń planet search. Aims: We aim to detect planetary systems around evolved stars to be able to build sound statistics on the frequency and intrinsic nature of these systems, and to deliver in-depth studies of selected planetary systems with evidence of star-planet interaction processes. Methods: The paper is based on precise radial velocity measurements: 13 epochs collected over 1920 days with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and its High-Resolution Spectrograph, and 22 epochs of ultra-precise HARPS-N data collected over 961 days. Results: We present a warm-Jupiter (Teq = 1350 K, m2 sin i = 5.4 ± 0.4 MJ) companion with an orbital period of 26.468 days in a circular (e = 0.036) orbit around a giant evolved (log g = 3.11 ± 0.09, R = 6.26 ± 0.86 R⊙) star with M⋆ = 1.87 ± 0.17 M⊙. This is the most massive and oldest star found to be hosting a close-in giant planet. Its proximity to its host (a = 0.21 au) means that the planet has a 13.9 ± 2.0% probability of transits; this calls for photometric follow-up study. Conclusions: This massive warm Jupiter with a near circular orbit around an evolved massive star can help set constraints on general migration mechanisms for warm Jupiters and, given its high equilibrium temperature, can help test energy deposition models in hot Jupiters. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto

  19. Massive stars formed in atomic hydrogen reservoirs: H i observations of gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, J.

    2015-01-01

    , implying high levels of atomic hydrogen (HI), which suggests that the connection between atomic gas and star formation is stronger than previously thought. In this case, it is possible that star formation is directly fuelled by atomic gas (or that the H1-to-H2 conversion is very efficient, which rapidly...... exhaust molecular gas), as has been theoretically shown to be possible. This can happen in low-metallicity gas near the onset of star formation because cooling of gas (necessary for star formation) is faster than the H1-to-H2 conversion. Indeed, large atomic gas reservoirs, together with low molecular gas...... masses, stellar, and dust masses are consistent with GRB hosts being preferentially galaxies which have very recently started a star formation episode after accreting metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium. This provides a natural route for forming GRBs in low-metallicity environments. The gas...

  20. Sulfide mineralization in ultramafic rocks of the Faryab ophiolite complex, southern Kerman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Rajabzadeh

    2015-10-01

    melting of the upper mantle. Sulfide mineralization in the complex is confined to cumulate rocks in northern part of ophiolite column. The mineralization is olivine-rich clinopyroxene and wehrlite. Petrographic investigation of sulfides in host ultramafics indicated two sulfide generations. In the first generation, primary magmatic sulfides occurred as interstitial disseminations, generally as anhedral grains. In the second generation, sulfides formed as veinlets along host rock fractures. The primary sulfides include pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and secondary digenite and pyrite. The primary sulfide content increases with increasing size and amount of clinopyroxene in host rocks. Associated chromian spinels in host ultramafics display disseminated and massive textures. Discussion Generally, mineralization in ophiolites is controlled by two major steps: a partial melting of upper mantle rocks and b crystal fractionation in a magma chamber (Rajabzadeh and Moosavinasab, 2013. The chemical compositions of the analyzed minerals were then used in estimating the conditions in these two steps. The composition of chromian spinel corresponds to chromite of boninitic melts formed in supra-subduction zone environments. Boninitic melts are produced at high degrees of partial melting of mantle peridotites in the presence of water (Edwards et al., 2002. Silicates of the host rocks are mainly clinopyroxene (diopside and augite of the composition Wo47.50 En45.48 Fs3.4, olivine Fo92 and orthopyroxene (enstatite - bronzite of En85 to En88. The main host ultramafic rocks of sulfides are wehrlite and clinopyroxenite, indicating that the sulfide saturation occurred during magmatic evolution of these rocks. This suggests that sulfide mineralization will occur in the northern part the ophiolite. The sulfide grains are anhedral, amoeboidal in shape, and appeared as disseminated interstitial phases, indicating that they were trapped as liquid phases during increase in sulfur fugacity and decrease in

  1. Tectonic setting and metallogenesis of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits in the Bonnifield Mining District, Northern Alaska Range: Chapter B in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Aleinikoff, John N.; Premo, Wayne R.; Paradis, Suzanne; Lohr-Schmidt, Ilana; Gough, Larry P.; Day, Warren C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of field and laboratory investigations, including whole-rock geochemistry and radiogenic isotopes, of outcrop and drill core samples from volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits and associated metaigneous rocks in the Wood River area of the Bonnifield mining district, northern Alaska Range (see fig. 1 of Editors’ Preface and Overview). U-Pb zircon igneous crystallization ages from felsic rocks indicate a prolonged period of Late Devonian to Early Mississippian (373±3 to 357±4 million years before present, or Ma) magmatism. This magmatism occurred in a basinal setting along the ancient Pacific margin of North America. The siliceous and carbonaceous compositions of metasedimentary rocks, Precambrian model ages based on U-Pb dating of zircon and neodymium ages, and for some units, radiogenic neodymium isotopic compositions and whole-rock trace-element ratios similar to those of continental crust are evidence for this setting. Red Mountain (also known as Dry Creek) and WTF, two of the largest VMS deposits, are hosted in peralkaline metarhyolite of the Mystic Creek Member of the Totatlanika Schist. The Mystic Creek Member is distinctive in having high concentrations of high-field-strength elements (HFSE) and rare-earth elements (REE), indicative of formation in a within-plate (extensional) setting. Mystic Creek metarhyolite is associated with alkalic, within-plate basalt of the Chute Creek Member; neodymium isotopic data indicate an enriched mantle component for both members of this bimodal (rhyolite-basalt) suite. Anderson Mountain, the other significant VMS deposit, is hosted by the Wood River assemblage. Metaigneous rocks in the Wood River assemblage span a wide compositional range, including andesitic rocks, which are characteristic of arc volcanism. Our data suggest that the Mystic Creek Member likely formed in an extensional, back-arc basin that was associated with an outboard continental-margin volcanic arc that included

  2. Geology, petrography, geochemistry, and genesis of sulfide-rich pods in the Lac des Iles palladium deposits, western Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Charley J.; Barnes, Sarah-Jane; Corkery, John T.

    2016-04-01

    The Lac des Iles Pd deposits are known for their Pd-rich sulfide-poor mineralization. However, previously undocumented sulfide-rich pods also occur within the intrusion that hosts the deposits. Given the complex magmatic and hydrothermal history of the mineralization at Lac des Iles, the sulfide-rich pods could have crystallized from magmatic sulfide liquids or precipitated from hydrothermal fluids. Sulfide-rich pods occur throughout the stratigraphy, in all rock types, and along comagmatic shear zones, and contain net-textured to massive sulfides. They can be divided into four main groups based on the variation in mineral assemblages: (1) pyrrhotite-pentlandite ± pyrite-chalcopyrite-magnetite-ilmenite; (2) chalcopyrite ± pyrrhotite-pentlandite-pyrite-magnetite-ilmenite; (3) pyrite ± pentlandite-chalcopyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite-ilmenite; and (4) magnetite ± ilmenite-pyrrhotite-pentlandite-pyrite-chalcopyrite. Whole rock metal contents and S isotopic compositions do not change with the amount of pyrite present, except for slight enrichments in As and Bi. The presence of an essentially magmatic sulfide mineral assemblage (pyrrhotite-pentlandite ± chalcopyrite) with pentlandite exsolution flames in pyrrhotite in some pods suggests that the pods crystallized from magmatic sulfide liquids. The very low Cu contents of the pods suggests that they are mainly cumulates of monosulfide solid solution (MSS). We propose a model whereby sulfide liquids were concentrated into dilation zones prior to crystallizing cumulus MSS. Intermediate solid solution crystallized from the fractionated liquids at the edges of some pods leaving residual liquids enriched in Pt, Pd, Au, As, Bi, Sb, and Te. These residual liquids are no longer associated with the pods. During subsequent alteration, pyrite replaced MSS/pyrrhotite, but this did not affect the platinum-group element contents of the pods.

  3. The thermal and chemical evolution of hydrothermal vent fluids in shale hosted massive sulphide (SHMS) systems from the MacMillan Pass district (Yukon, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnall, J. M.; Gleeson, S. A.; Blamey, N. J. F.; Paradis, S.; Luo, Y.

    2016-11-01

    At Macmillan Pass (YT, Canada), the hydrothermal vent complexes beneath two shale-hosted massive sulphide (SHMS) deposits (Tom, Jason) are well preserved within Late Devonian strata. These deposits provide a unique opportunity to constrain key geochemical parameters (temperature, salinity, pH, fO2, ΣS) that are critical for metal transport and deposition in SHMS systems, and to evaluate the interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the mudstone host rock. This has been achieved using a combination of detailed petrography, isotopic techniques (δ34S, δ13C and δ18O values), carbonate rare earth element analysis (LA-ICP-MS), fluid inclusion analysis (microthermometry, gas analysis via incremental crush fast scan mass spectrometry), and thermodynamic modelling. Two main paragenetic stages are preserved in both vent complexes: Stage 1 comprises pervasive ankerite alteration of the organic-rich mudstone host rock and crosscutting stockwork ankerite veining (±pyrobitumen, pyrite and quartz) and; Stage 2 consists of main stage massive sulphide (galena-pyrrhotite-pyrite ± chalcopyrite-sphalerite) and siderite (±quartz and barytocalcite) mineralisation. Co-variation of δ18O and δ13C values in ankerite can be described by temperature dependent fractionation and fluid rock interaction. Together with fluid inclusion microthermometry, this provides evidence of a steep thermal gradient (from 300 to ∼100 °C) over approximately 15 m stratigraphic depth, temporally and spatially constrained within the paragenesis of both vent complexes and developed under shallow lithostatic (28), characteristic of diagenetic fluids, are coupled with positive europium anomalies and variable light REE depletion, which are more consistent with chloride complexation in hot (>250 °C) hydrothermal fluids. In this shallow sub-seafloor setting, thermal alteration of organic carbon in the immature, chemically reactive mudstones also had an important role in the evolution of fluid chemistry

  4. Geology, sulfide geochemistry and supercritical venting at the Beebe Hydrothermal Vent Field, Cayman Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Alexander P.; Roberts, Stephen; Murton, Bramley J.; Hodgkinson, Matthew R. S.

    2015-09-01

    The Beebe Vent Field (BVF) is the world's deepest known hydrothermal system, at 4960 m below sea level. Located on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre, Caribbean, the BVF hosts high temperature (˜401°C) "black smoker" vents that build Cu, Zn and Au-rich sulfide mounds and chimneys. The BVF is highly gold-rich, with Au values up to 93 ppm and an average Au:Ag ratio of 0.15. Gold precipitation is directly associated with diffuse flow through "beehive" chimneys. Significant mass-wasting of sulfide material at the BVF, accompanied by changes in metal content, results in metaliferous talus and sediment deposits. Situated on very thin (2-3 km thick) oceanic crust, at an ultraslow spreading centre, the hydrothermal system circulates fluids to a depth of ˜1.8 km in a basement that is likely to include a mixture of both mafic and ultramafic lithologies. We suggest hydrothermal interaction with chalcophile-bearing sulfides in the mantle rocks, together with precipitation of Au in beehive chimney structures, has resulted in the formation of a Au-rich volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit. With its spatial distribution of deposit materials and metal contents, the BVF represents a modern day analogue for basalt hosted, Au-rich VMS systems.

  5. [Fatal outcome of an hydrogen sulfide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querellou, E; Jaffrelot, M; Savary, D; Savry, C; Perfus, J-P

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of fatal outcome poisoning by massive exposure to hydrogen sulfide of a sewer worker. This rare event was associated with a moderate intoxication of two members of the rescue team. The death was due to asystole and massive lung oedema. Autopsy analysis showed diffuse necrotic lesions in lungs. Hydrogen sulfide is a direct and systemic poison, produced by organic matter decomposition. The direct toxicity mechanism is still unclear. The systemic toxicity is due to an acute toxicity by oxygen depletion at cellular level. It is highly diffusable and potentially very dangerous. At low concentration, rotten egg smell must trigger hydrogen sulfide suspicion since at higher concentration it is undetectable, making intoxication possible. In case of acute intoxication, there is an almost instantaneous cardiovascular failure and a rapid death. Hydrogen sulfide exposure requires prevention measures and more specifically the use of respiratory equipment for members of the rescue team.

  6. Massive Gravity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP...

  7. Massive gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia de Rham

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware-Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  8. Massive Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware-Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  9. Massive Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware–Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  10. High and Low Temperature Gold Mineralizations in the Fe–Cu–Zn Sulfide Deposits of Corchia Ophiolite, Northern Italian Apennine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaccarini Federica

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold has been found in the Cyprus-type volcanogenic massive sulfide ore (VMS deposits of Corchia ophiolite (Parma province, Italy in the Cantiere Donnini, Speranza and Pozzo mining sites. At Cantiere Donnini and Speranza, the mineralization occurs at the contact between pillow lava and sedimentary rocks. The Pozzo mineralization is hosted by a serpentinite. Concentrations of gold up to 3070 ppb have been reported for the Cantiere Donnini and up to 6295 ppb in the Pozzo mine. According to the field relationships, gold composition, mineralogical assemblage and sulfur isotope data, we can conclude that two different types of gold mineralization have been recognized in the Corchia ophiolite: (1 formed at low temperature in submarine environment (Cantiere Donnini and Speranza and (2 formed at high temperature in the oceanic mantle (Pozzo by segregation of an immiscible sulfide liquid.

  11. Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  12. The Anarraaq Zn-Pb-Ag and barite deposit, northern Alaska: Evidence for replacement of carbonate by barite and sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, K.D.; Dumoulin, J.A.; Jennings, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Anarraaq deposit in northern Alaska consists of a barite body, estimated to be as much as 1 billion metric tons, and a Zn-Pb-Ag massive sulfide zone with an estimated resource of about 18 Mt at 18 percent Zn, 5.4 percent Pb, and 85 g/t Ag. The barite and sulfide minerals are hosted by the uppermost part of the Mississippian Kuna Formation (Ikalukrok unit) that consists of carbonaceous and siliceous mudstone or shale interbedded with carbonate. The amount of interbedded carbonate in the Anarraaq deposit is atypical of the district as a whole, comprising as much as one third of the section. The total thickness of the Ikalukrok unit is considerably greater in the area of the deposit (210 to almost 350 m) than to the north and south (maximum of 164 m). The mineralized zone at Anarraaq is lens shaped and has a relatively flat top and a convex base. It also ranges greatly in thickness, from a few meters to more than 100 m. Textures of some of the carbonate layers are distinctive, consisting of nodules within siliceous mudstone or layers interbedded with shale. Many of the layers contain calcitized sponge spicules or radiolarians in a carbonate matrix. Textures of barite and sulfide minerals mimic those of carbonate and provide unequivocal evidence that replacement of precursor carbonate was an important process. Barite and sulfide textures include either nodular, bladed grains of various sizes that resemble spicules (observed only with iron sulfides) or well-rounded forms that are replaced radiolarians. Mineralization at Anarraaq probably occurred in a fault-bounded Carboniferous basin during early diagenesis in the shallow subsurface. The shape and size of the mineralized body suggest that barite and sulfides replaced calcareous mass flow deposits in a submarine channel. The distribution of biogenic and/or early diagenetic silica may have served as impermeable barriers to the fluids, thereby focusing and controlling fluid flow through unreplaced carbonate layers

  13. Magmatic Conduit Metallogenic System in Jinchuan Cu-Ni (PGE) Sulfide Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, S.; Tang, Z.; Zhou, M.; Song, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Jinchuan Cu-Ni (PGE) sulfide deposit is located in the southwestern margin of North China Craton. Jinchuan ultramafic intrusion hosts the third largest magmatic Cu-Ni deposit in the world. There are mainly four orebodies, namely, orebody-58, orebody-24, orebody-1, and orebody-2, respectively from west to east in the deposit. The primary characteristics of Jinchuan Cu-Ni sulfide deposit are the following: (1) There is an obvious boundary between orebodys and country rocks, usually orebodys intruded into country rocks. (2) "sulfide melts" migrate and settle in the later stage of magma evolution. (3) Fluid Minerals Assemblages are found in the sulfide ores, there is Phl+Cc+Pn+Ccp+Po in orebody-2; Phl+Dol+AP+Pn+Ccp+Po in orebody-24; Q+Mag+AP+Pn+Ccp+Po in orebody-58. (4) Massive sulfides mainly occur in orebody-2, and its PGE content is very rare. Pt-Pd enrichment zones mainly occur in orebody-1; orebody-24 and orebody-58. Ir vs. Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd show positive relationship in orebody-2, but Ir vs. Ru, Rh show positive relationship, Ir vs. Pt, Pd exhibit negative relationship in orebody-1, orebody-24 and orebody-58. The modeling of Ir-Pd shows that the massive sulfide in orebody-2 maybe the origin of MSS. Pt-Pd enrichment zones in orebody-1 orebody-24 and orebody-58 are the relic liquid of monosulfide solid solution segregation; (5) Cu/Ni value is 1.24 in orebody-58, 1.56 in orebody-24, 1.83 in orebody-1, and 2.06 in orebody-2. These features imply that (1) "ore magma" or "melt-fluid bearing metal" formed in the staging chamber in depth; (2) "ore magma" might contain a lot of fluids; (3) "melt-fluid bearing metal" flow moves as a whole; (4) The moving direction of melt-fluid bearing metal flow is form west to east. The ores are enriched in Ni in the front, and enriched in Cu, Pt, Pd in the back of Jinchuan Magmatic Conduit Metallogenic System.

  14. Extreme star formation in the host galaxies of the fastest growing super-massive black holes at z=4.8

    CERN Document Server

    Mor, Rivay; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Shemmer, Ohad; Lira, Paulina

    2012-01-01

    We report new Herschel observations of 25 z=4.8 extremely luminous optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Five of the sources have extremely large star forming (SF) luminosities, L_SF, corresponding to SF rates (SFRs) of 2800-5600 M_sol/yr assuming a Salpeter IMF. The remaining sources have only upper limits on their SFRs but stacking their Herschel images results in a mean SFR of 700 +/- 150 M_sol/yr. The higher SFRs in our sample are comparable to the highest observed values so far, at any redshift. Our sample does not contain obscured AGNs, which enables us to investigate several evolutionary scenarios connecting super-massive black holes and SF activity in the early universe. The most probable scenario is that we are witnessing the peak of SF activity in some sources and the beginning of the post-starburst decline in others. We suggest that all 25 sources, which are at their peak AGN activity, are in large mergers. AGN feedback may be responsible for diminishing the SF activity in 20 of them bu...

  15. Geology, lithogeochemistry and paleotectonic setting of the host sequence to the Kangasjärvi Zn-Cu deposit, central Finland: implications for volcanogenic massive sulphide exploration in the Vihanti-Pyhäsalmi district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Roberts

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kangasjärvi Zn-Cu deposit is a highly deformed and metamorphosed Paleoproterozoic volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS deposit located in the Vihanti-Pyhäsalmi base metal mining district of central Finland. The host sequence to the deposit, referred to as the Inner Volcanic Sequence (IVS, is comprised of a bimodal suite of metavolcanic rocks and a regionally extensive tonalite-trondhjemite gneiss (sub-volcanic intrusions?. A separate and perhaps younger sequence of mafic volcanic rocks, with irregular intervals of undifferentiated intermediate to felsic schists and metalimestones, referred to as the Outer Volcanic Sequence (OVS, are separated from the IVS sequence by intervals of metagreywacke and U-P-bearing graphitic schists. A stratigraphic scheme for rocks within the IVS is proposed based on outcrop observations, locally preserved volcanic textures, aspects of seafloor-related hydrothermal alteration and lithogeochemistry. In this scheme, rare andesites form the lowermostvolcanic stratigraphy and are overlain by typical island-arc basalts that were erupted in a subaqueous setting. Tonalite-trondhjemite subvolcanic intrusions were locally emplaced within andesites and coeval rhyolites were extruded on the basaltic substrate. The extrusion of rhyolites, including high-silica rhyolites, was coeval with regional-scale, pre-metamorphic seafloor hydrothermal alteration and local sulphide mineralization. Extensively altered rhyolites envelope massive sulphides and are underlain by altered basalts. The latter rocks are now characterized by a variety of low-variance metamorphic mineral assemblages (e.g. orthoamphibole-cordierite rocks and define a domain of intense pre-metamorphic chlorite ± sericite alteration in the stratigraphic footwall of the deposit. The altered nature of these rocks is attributed to reaction with seawater-related hydrothermal fluids within a zone of upflow at or near the seafloor. The fundamental controls on convective

  16. Sulfide Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilles, John

    2007-02-01

    Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry Series, Volume 61 David J. Vaughan, Editor Geochemical Society and Mineralogical Society of America; ISBN 0-939950-73-1 xiii + 714 pp.; 2006; $40. Sulfide minerals as a class represent important minor rock-forming minerals, but they are generally known as the chief sources of many economic metallic ores. In the past two decades, sulfide research has been extended to include important roles in environmental geology of sulfide weathering and resultant acid mine drainage, as well as in geomicrobiology in which bacteria make use of sulfides for metabolic energy sources. In the latter respect, sulfides played an important role in early evolution of life on Earth and in geochemical cycling of elements in the Earth's crust and hydrosphere.

  17. Hierarchical Architecturing for Layered Thermoelectric Sulfides and Chalcogenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jood

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulfides are promising candidates for environment-friendly and cost-effective thermoelectric materials. In this article, we review the recent progress in all-length-scale hierarchical architecturing for sulfides and chalcogenides, highlighting the key strategies used to enhance their thermoelectric performance. We primarily focus on TiS2-based layered sulfides, misfit layered sulfides, homologous chalcogenides, accordion-like layered Sn chalcogenides, and thermoelectric minerals. CS2 sulfurization is an appropriate method for preparing sulfide thermoelectric materials. At the atomic scale, the intercalation of guest atoms/layers into host crystal layers, crystal-structural evolution enabled by the homologous series, and low-energy atomic vibration effectively scatter phonons, resulting in a reduced lattice thermal conductivity. At the nanoscale, stacking faults further reduce the lattice thermal conductivity. At the microscale, the highly oriented microtexture allows high carrier mobility in the in-plane direction, leading to a high thermoelectric power factor.

  18. Nanostructured Metal Oxides and Sulfides for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Mai, Liqiang

    2017-02-03

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries with high energy density and long cycle life are considered to be one of the most promising next-generation energy-storage systems beyond routine lithium-ion batteries. Various approaches have been proposed to break down technical barriers in Li-S battery systems. The use of nanostructured metal oxides and sulfides for high sulfur utilization and long life span of Li-S batteries is reviewed here. The relationships between the intrinsic properties of metal oxide/sulfide hosts and electrochemical performances of Li-S batteries are discussed. Nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides hosts used in solid sulfur cathodes, separators/interlayers, lithium-metal-anode protection, and lithium polysulfides batteries are discussed respectively. Prospects for the future developments of Li-S batteries with nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides are also discussed.

  19. Tracing sources of crustal contamination using multiple S and Fe isotopes in the Hart komatiite-associated Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposit, Abitibi greenstone belt, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, R. S.; Bekker, A.; Houlé, M. G.; Wing, B. A.; Rouxel, O. J.

    2016-10-01

    Assimilation by mafic to ultramafic magmas of sulfur-bearing country rocks is considered an important contributing factor to reach sulfide saturation and form magmatic Ni-Cu-platinum group element (PGE) sulfide deposits. Sulfur-bearing sedimentary rocks in the Archean are generally characterized by mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes that is a result of atmospheric photochemical reactions, which produces isotopically distinct pools of sulfur. Likewise, low-temperature processing of iron, through biological and abiotic redox cycling, produces a range of Fe isotope values in Archean sedimentary rocks that is distinct from the range of the mantle and magmatic Fe isotope values. Both of these signals can be used to identify potential country rock assimilants and their contribution to magmatic sulfide deposits. We use multiple S and Fe isotopes to characterize the composition of the potential iron and sulfur sources for the sulfide liquids that formed the Hart deposit in the Shaw Dome area within the Abitibi greenstone belt in Ontario (Canada). The Hart deposit is composed of two zones with komatiite-associated Ni-Cu-PGE mineralization; the main zone consists of a massive sulfide deposit at the base of the basal flow in the komatiite sequence, whereas the eastern extension consists of a semi-massive sulfide zone located 12 to 25 m above the base of the second flow in the komatiite sequence. Low δ56Fe values and non-zero δ34S and Δ33S values of the komatiitic rocks and associated mineralization at the Hart deposit is best explained by mixing and isotope exchange with crustal materials, such as exhalite and graphitic argillite, rather than intrinsic fractionation within the komatiite. This approach allows tracing the extent of crustal contamination away from the deposit and the degree of mixing between the sulfide and komatiite melts. The exhalite and graphitic argillite were the dominant contaminants for the main zone of mineralization and the eastern

  20. Host rock geochemistry and tectonic setting of the El Roble volcanogenic massive Cu sulfide deposit, Republic of Colombia; Colombia kyowakoku El Roble kazan seikaijo do ryukabutsu kosho bogan no chikyu kagaku to kosho no tectonic setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinozuka, M. [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering; Mariko, T. [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan). School of Education

    1997-06-30

    Major and minor elements and mineral chemistry are presented for 19 green rock samples from the El Roble mining area. These rocks are compositionally bimodal ranging from 47.4 to 52.5% SiO2 and from 56.2 to 62.7% SiO2. The basic rocks are divided into three types according to TiO2 content. The type 1 rocks are richest in TiO2 (2.4-2.8%), and their multi-element spider diagrams normalized against N-MORB and other geochemical discrimination diagrams indicate that they are similar to T-MORB or OIB. The type 2 rocks are lower in TiO2 (1.3-1.6%) than those of the type 1, and their multi-element spider diagrams resemble N-MORB, but merge the island arc characteristics together in rather high content of LIL elements. The type 3 rocks are lowest in TiO2 (1.1-1.3%) among the basic rocks and are transitional between MORB and island arc basalt in their multi-element spider diagrams and minor element (Ti, Zr, V and Sr) chemistry. The intermediate rocks, the type 4, are lower in TiO2 (0.2-0.8%) than the type 3 rocks and include boninite. They have the typical characteristics of island arc and/or fore arc in their multi-element spider diagrams with distinct minus anomaly of Nb, and in Ti, Zr, V and Sr contents. The El Roble ore deposit occurs closely related with the type 2 and 3 rocks which have suffered the ocean-floor alteration ranging from greenschist facies to a transition state from greenschist to amphibolite facies. In contrast, the mineral assemblage of alteration minarals in the type 1 and 4 rocks indicate the prehnite-pumpellyite facies. Comparing with the geochemical data for the Recent volcanic rocks at variable tectonic settings, it is estimated that the type 1, 2 and 3 rocks were formed at the back-arc rift and the type 4 rocks at the island arc and/or fore arc. In the process of spreading and closing of the Colombian back-arc basin of Cretaceous age, the El Roble ore deposit probably formed at the spreading axis when it approached to the subduction zone

  1. STABLE ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY OF MASSIVE ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurij K. Vasil’chuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises stable-isotope research on massive ice in the Russian and North American Arctic, and includes the latest understanding of massive-ice formation. A new classification of massive-ice complexes is proposed, encompassing the range and variabilityof massive ice. It distinguishes two new categories of massive-ice complexes: homogeneousmassive-ice complexes have a similar structure, properties and genesis throughout, whereasheterogeneous massive-ice complexes vary spatially (in their structure and properties andgenetically within a locality and consist of two or more homogeneous massive-ice bodies.Analysis of pollen and spores in massive ice from Subarctic regions and from ice and snow cover of Arctic ice caps assists with interpretation of the origin of massive ice. Radiocarbon ages of massive ice and host sediments are considered together with isotope values of heavy oxygen and deuterium from massive ice plotted at a uniform scale in order to assist interpretation and correlation of the ice.

  2. Interstellar hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, P.; Kutner, M. L.; Penzias, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.; Jefferts, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has been detected in seven Galactic sources by observation of a single line corresponding to the rotational transition from the 1(sub 10) to the 1(sub 01) levels at 168.7 GHz. The observations show that hydrogen sulfide is only a moderately common interstellar molecule comparable in abundance to H2CO and CS, but somewhat less abundant than HCN and much less abundant than CO.

  3. The Destructive Birth of Massive Stars and Massive Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Anna; Krumholz, Mark; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Massive stars play an essential role in the Universe. They are rare, yet the energy and momentum they inject into the interstellar medium with their intense radiation fields dwarfs the contribution by their vastly more numerous low-mass cousins. Previous theoretical and observational studies have concluded that the feedback associated with massive stars' radiation fields is the dominant mechanism regulating massive star and massive star cluster (MSC) formation. Therefore detailed simulation of the formation of massive stars and MSCs, which host hundreds to thousands of massive stars, requires an accurate treatment of radiation. For this purpose, we have developed a new, highly accurate hybrid radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform a suite of three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive stars and MSCs. For individual massive stellar systems, we simulate the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the massive stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of RT instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of the radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. RT instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. To model MSC formation, we simulate the collapse of a dense, turbulent, magnetized Mcl = 106 M⊙ molecular cloud. We find that the influence of the magnetic pressure and radiative feedback slows down star formation. Furthermore, we find that star formation is suppressed along dense filaments where the magnetic field is

  4. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide o...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  5. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide o...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  6. Morganella morganii sepsis with massive hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Cho, Chong Rae; Um, Tae Hyun; Rhu, Ji Yoon; Kim, Eu Suk; Jeong, Jae Won; Lee, Hye Ran

    2007-12-01

    Morganella morganii is a facultative gram-negative and anaerobic rod. It may be a cause of devastating infections in neonates and immunocompromised hosts. Some bacterial infections such as Clostridium and Vibrio are associated with hemolysis. However, massive hemolysis caused by M. morganii sepsis has not yet been reported. We observed a 59-yr-old man who had chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and was found to have massive hemolysis and metabolic acidosis due to sepsis. He died 6 hr after admission in spite of aggressive treatment. Two sets of blood cultures revealed the growth of M. morganii. We report here that M. morganii sepsis can cause fatal massive hemolysis leading to death.

  7. A kuroko-type polymetallic sulfide deposit in a submarine silicic caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizasa; Fiske; Ishizuka; Yuasa; Hashimoto; Ishibashi; Naka; Horii; Fujiwara; Imai; Koyama

    1999-02-12

    Manned submersible studies have delineated a large and actively growing Kuroko-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit 400 kilometers south of Tokyo in Myojin Knoll submarine caldera. The sulfide body is located on the caldera floor at a depth of 1210 to 1360 meters, has an area of 400 by 400 by 30 meters, and is notably rich in gold and silver. The discovery of a large Kuroko-type polymetallic sulfide deposit in this arc-front caldera raises the possibility that the numerous unexplored submarine silicic calderas elsewhere might have similar deposits.

  8. Characterization of exoplanet hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenti Jeff A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopic analysis of exoplanet hosts and the stellar sample from which they are drawn provides abundances and other properties that quantitively constrain models of planet formation. The program Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME determines stellar parameters by fitting observed spectra, though line lists must be selected wisely. For giant planets, it is now well established that stars with higher metallicity are more likely to have detected companions. Stellar metallicity does not seem to affect the formation and/or migration of detectable planets less massive than Neptune, especially when considering only the most massive planet in the system. In systems with at least one planet less than 10 times the mass of Earth, the mass of the most massive planet increases dramatically with host star metallicity. This may reflect metallicity dependent timescales for core formation, envelope accretion, and/or migration into the detection zone.

  9. A Massive Substellar Companion to the Massive Giant HD 119445

    CERN Document Server

    Omiya, Masashi; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Sato, Bun'ei; Kambe, Eiji; Kim, Kang-Min; Yoon, Tae Seog; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Masuda, Seiji; Toyota, Eri; Urakawa, Seitaro; Takada-Hidai, Masahide

    2009-01-01

    We detected a brown dwarf-mass companion around the intermediate-mass giant star HD 119445 (G6III) using the Doppler technique. This discovery is the first result from a Korean-Japanese planet search program based on precise radial velocity measurements. The radial velocity of this star exhibits a periodic Keplerian variation with a period, semi-amplitude and eccentricity of 410.2 days, 413.5 m/s and 0.082, respectively. Adopting a stellar mass of 3.9 M_solar, we were able to confirm the presence of a massive substellar companion with a semimajor axis of 1.71 AU and a minimum mass of 37.6 M_Jup, which falls in the middle of the brown dwarf-mass region. This substellar companion is the most massive ever discovered within 3 AU of a central intermediate-mass star. The host star also ranks among the most massive stars with substellar companions ever detected by the Doppler technique. This result supports the current view of substellar systems that more massive substellar companions tend to exist around more massi...

  10. A ground electromagnetic survey used to map sulfides and acid sulfate ground waters at the abandoned Cabin Branch Mine, Prince William Forest Park, northern Virginia gold-pyrite belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Jeffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: Prince William Forest Park is situated at the northeastern end of the Virginia Gold-Pyrite belt northwest of the town of Dumfries, VA. The U. S. Marine Corps Reservation at Quantico borders the park on the west and south, and occupies part of the same watershed. Two abandoned mines are found within the park: the Cabin Branch pyrite mine, a historic source of acid mine drainage, and the Greenwood gold mine, a source of mercury contamination. Both are within the watershed of Quantico Creek (Fig.1). The Cabin Branch mine (also known as the Dumfries mine) lies about 2.4 km northwest of the town of Dumfries. It exploited a 300 meter-long, lens-shaped body of massive sulfide ore hosted by metamorphosed volcanic rocks; during its history over 200,000 tons of ore were extracted and processed locally. The site became part of the National Capitol Region of the National Park Service in 1940 and is currently managed by the National Park Service. In 1995 the National Park Service, in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy reclaimed the Cabin Branch site. The Virginia Gold-Pyrite belt, also known as the central Virginia volcanic-plutonic belt, is host to numerous abandoned metal mines (Pavlides and others, 1982), including the Cabin Branch deposit. The belt itself extends from its northern terminus near Cabin Branch, about 50 km south of Washington, D.C., approximately 175 km to the southwest into central Virginia. It is underlain by metamorphosed volcanic and clastic (non-carbonate) sedimentary rocks, originally deposited approximately 460 million years ago during the Ordovician Period (Horton and others, 1998). Three kinds of deposits are found in the belt: volcanic-associated massive sulfide deposits, low-sulfide quartz-gold vein deposits, and gold placer deposits. The massive sulfide deposits such as Cabin Branch were historically mined for their sulfur, copper, zinc, and lead contents, but also yielded byproduct

  11. Replacive sulfide formation in anhydrite chimneys from the Pacmanus hydrothermal field, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Catharina; Bach, Wolfgang; Plümper, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal flow within the oceanic crust is an important process for the exchange of energy and mass between the lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Infiltrated seawater heats up and interacts with wall rock, causing mineral replacement reactions. These play a large role in the formation of ore deposits; at the discharge zone, a hot, acidic and metal-rich potential ore fluid exits the crust. It mixes with seawater and forms chimneys, built up of sulfate minerals such as anhydrite (CaSO4), which are subsequently replaced by sulfide minerals. Sulfide formation is related to fluid pathways, defined by cracks and pores in the sulfate chimney. Over time, these systems might develop into massive sulfide deposits. The big question is then: how is sulfate-sulfide replacement related to the evolution of rock porosity? To address this question, sulfide-bearing anhydrite chimneys from the Pacmanus hydrothermal field (Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea) were studied using X-ray tomography, EMPA, FIB-SEM and -TEM. The apparently massive anhydrite turns out highly porous on the micro scale, with sulfide minerals in anhydrite cleavage planes and along grain boundaries. The size of the sulfide grains relates to the pores they grew into, suggesting a tight coupling between dissolution (porosity generation) and growth of replacive minerals. Some of the sulfide grains are hollow and apparently used the dissolving anhydrite as a substrate to start growth in a pore. Another mode of sulfide development is aggregates of euhedral pyrite cores surrounded by colloform chalcopyrite. This occurrence implies that fluid pathways have remained open for some time to allow several stages of precipitation during fluid evolution. To start the replacement and to keep it going, porosity generation is crucial. Our samples show that dissolution of anhydrite occurred along pathways where fluid could enter, such as cleavage planes and grain boundaries. It appears that fluids ascending within the inner

  12. Transparent zinc sulfide processed from nanocrystalline powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, De; Stefanik, Todd S.

    2013-06-01

    Nanocerox produces oxide nanopowders via flame spray pyrolysis that have proven effective in the processing of a host of high quality optical ceramic materials. In order to produce LWIR windows to compete with ZnS, however, oxide materials are not suitable. Nanocerox has therefore developed aqueous synthesis techniques for the production of zinc sulfide nanopowders. The proprietary processing technique allows control of primary particle size, high purity, low levels of agglomeration, and cost effective synthesis. Crystallinity, particle size, and purity of the powders will be presented. Characterization of parts fabricated from these powders via sinter/HIP processing will also be discussed, including optical performance and microstructural characterization.

  13. Sulfide detoxification in plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke, Hannah; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to animals, which release the signal molecule sulfide in small amounts from cysteine and its derivates, phototrophic eukaryotes generate sulfide as an essential intermediate of the sulfur assimilation pathway. Additionally, iron-sulfur cluster turnover and cyanide detoxification might contribute to the release of sulfide in mitochondria. However, sulfide is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondria. Thus, efficient sulfide detoxification mechanisms are required in mitochondria to ensure adequate energy production and consequently survival of the plant cell. Two enzymes have been recently described to catalyze sulfide detoxification in mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana, O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase C (OAS-TL C), and the sulfur dioxygenase (SDO) ethylmalonic encephalopathy protein 1 (ETHE1). Biochemical characterization of sulfide producing and consuming enzymes in mitochondria of plants is fundamental to understand the regulatory network that enables mitochondrial sulfide homeostasis under nonstressed and stressed conditions. In this chapter, we provide established protocols to determine the activity of the sulfide releasing enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase as well as sulfide-consuming enzymes OAS-TL and SDO. Additionally, we describe a reliable and efficient method to purify OAS-TL proteins from plant material.

  14. Epidemiology of Massive Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmin, Märit; Chiesa, Flaminia; Vasan, Senthil K;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is an increasing focus on massive transfusion, but there is a paucity of comprehensive descriptions of the massively transfused patients and their outcomes. The objective of this study is to describe the incidence rate of massive transfusion, patient characteristics, and the mort...

  15. Are gluons massive ?

    CERN Document Server

    Gilani, A H S

    2004-01-01

    It is claimed that only one gluon is massless and the other seven gluons are massive. Out of eight gluons, six are colored and two are neutral. Among neutral gluons, one is massless and other one is massive. Massive neutral gluon is heavier than the colored gluons. Gluons can only be predicted by set theory but not by SU(3).

  16. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  17. Phototrophic sulfide oxidation: environmental insights and a method for kinetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Hanson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we presented data that indicated microbial sulfide oxidation would out-compete strictly chemical, abiotic sulfide oxidation reactions under nearly all conditions relevant to extant ecosystems (Luther et al., 2011. In particular, we showed how anaerobic microbial sulfide oxidation rates were several orders of magnitude higher than even metal catalyzed aerobic sulfide oxidation processes. The fact that biotic anaerobic sulfide oxidation is kinetically superior to abiotic reactions implies that nearly all anaerobic and sulfidic environments should host microbial populations that oxidize sulfide at appreciable rates. This was likely an important biogeochemical process during long stretches of euxinia in the oceans suggested by the geologic record. In particular, phototrophic sulfide oxidation allows the utilization of carbon dioxide as the electron acceptor suggesting that this process should be particularly widespread rather than relying on the presence of other chemical oxidants. Using the Chesapeake Bay as an example, we argue that phototrophic sulfide oxidation may be more important in many environments than is currently appreciated. Finally, we present methodological considerations to assist other groups that wish to study this process.

  18. Globular cluster-massive black hole interactions in galactic centers

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    2016-01-01

    Many, if not all, galaxies host massive compact objects at their centers. They are present as singularities (super massive black holes) or high density star clusters (nuclear tar clusters). In some cases they coexist, and interact more or less strongly. In this short paper I will talk of the 'merger' globular cluster scenario, which has been shown in the past to be an explanation of the substantial mass accumulation in galactic centers. In particular, I will present the many astrophysical implications of such scenario pointing the attention on the mutual feedback of orbitally decaying globular clusters with massive and super massive black holes.

  19. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    nutrition in general. By a global review of sulfide intrusion, coupled with a series of field studies and in situ experiments we elucidate sulfide intrusion and different strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis...... indicating a possible role of sulfide in the sulfur nutrition beside the detoxification function. Our results suggest different adaptations of Z. marina to reduced sediments and sulfide intrusion ranging from bacterial and chemical reoxidation of sulfide to sulfate to incorporation of sulfide into organic...

  20. A novel method for improving cerussite sulfidization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-cheng Feng; Shu-ming Wen; Wen-juan Zhao; Qin-bo Cao; Chao L

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of flotation behavior, solution measurements, and surface analyses were performed to investigate the effects of chloride ion addition on the sulfidization of cerussite in this study. Micro-flotation tests indicate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly increase the flotation recovery of cerussite, which is attributed to the formation of more lead sulfide species on the mineral surface. Solution measurement results suggest that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization induces the transformation of more sul-fide ions from pulp solution onto the mineral surface by the formation of more lead sulfide species. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy indicate that more lead sulfide species form on the mineral surface when chloride ions are added prior to sulfidization. These results demonstrate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly improve the sulfidization of cerussite, thereby enhancing the flotation performance.

  1. Logistics of massive transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2010-01-01

    Care of the patient with massive bleeding involves more than aggressive surgery and infusion of large amounts of blood products. The proper management of massive transfusions-whether they are in trauma patients or other bleeding patients-requires coordination of the personnel in the surgical suite or the emergency department, the blood bank, and laboratory.

  2. Simplifying Massive Contour Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars; Deleuran, Lasse Kosetski; Mølhave, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours.......We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours....

  3. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  4. The formation of auriferous quartz-sulfide veins in the Pataz region, northern Peru: A synthesis of geological, mineralogical, and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, D. W.; Amstutz, G. C.; Fontboté, L.

    1990-12-01

    The Pataz region in the eastern part of the North Peruvian Department La Libertad hosts a number of important gold mining districts like La Lima, El Tingo, Pataz, Parcoy, and Buldibuyo. Economic gold mineralization occurs in quartz-sulfide veins at the margin of the calc-alkaline Pataz Batholith, that mainly consists of granites, granodiorites, and monzodiorites. The batholith is of Paleozoic age and cuts the Precambrian to Early Paleozoic low-grade metamorphic basement series. Its intrusion was controlled by a NNW-trending fault of regional importance. The gold-bearing veins are characterized by a two-stage sulfide mineralization. Bodies of massive pyrite and some arsenopyrite were formed in stage 1, and after subsequent fracturing they served as sites for deposition of gold, electrum, galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite. It is concluded that gold was transported as a AuCl{2/-}-complex by oxidizing chloride solutions and deposited near older pyrite by micro-scale redox changes and a slight temperature decrease. Mineralogical, textural, geochemical, and microthermometric features are interpreted as a consequence of mineralization at considerable depth produced by a hydrothermal system linked with the emplacement of the Pataz Batholith. acteristics in order to outline a general physicochemical model of the hydrothermal ore-forming processes.

  5. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  6. Hydrogen sulfide in signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2015-01-15

    For a long time hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) was considered a toxic compound, but recently H₂S (at low concentrations) has been found to play an important function in physiological processes. Hydrogen sulfide, like other well-known compounds - nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) is a gaseous intracellular signal transducer. It regulates the cell cycle, apoptosis and the oxidative stress. Moreover, its functions include neuromodulation, regulation of cardiovascular system and inflammation. In this review, I focus on the metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (including enzymatic pathways of H₂S synthesis from l- and d-cysteine) and its signaling pathways in the cardiovascular system and the nervous system. I also describe how hydrogen sulfide may be used as therapeutic agent, i.e. in the cardiovascular diseases.

  7. 230Th/238U dating of hydrothermal sulfides from Duanqiao hydrothermal field, Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weifang; Tao, Chunhui; Li, Huaiming; Liang, Jin; Liao, Shili; Long, Jiangping; Ma, Zhibang; Wang, Lisheng

    2016-11-01

    Duanqiao hydrothermal field is located between the Indomed and Gallieni fracture zones at the central volcano, at 50°28'E in the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Twenty-eight subsamples from a relict chimney and massive sulfides were dated using the 230Th/238U method. Four main episodes of hydrothermal activity were determined according to the restricted results: 68.9-84.3, 43.9-48.4, 25.3-34.8, and 0.7-17.3 kyrs. Hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao probably started about 84.3 (±0.5) kyrs ago and ceased about 0.737 (±0.023) kyrs ago. The periodic character of hydrothermal activity may be related to the heat source provided by the interaction of local magmatism and tectonism. The estimated mean growth rate of the sulfide chimney is Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. The massive sulfides are younger than the sulfides from other hydrothermal fields such as Rainbow, Sonne and Ashadze-2. The preliminarily estimated reserves of sulfide ores of Duanqiao are approximately 0.5-2.9 million tons.

  8. Lensed Quasar Hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C Y; Rix, H W; Keeton, C R; Falco, E E; Kochanek, C S; Lehár, J; McLeod, B A; Peng, Chien Y.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Keeton, Charles R.; Falco, Emilio E.; Kochanek, Chris S.; Lehar, Joseph; Leod, Brian A. Mc

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational lensing assists in the detection of quasar hosts by amplifying and distorting the host light away from the unresolved quasar core images. We present the results of HST observations of 30 quasar hosts at redshifts 1 1.7 is a factor of 3--6 higher than the local value. But, depending on the stellar content the ratio may decline at z>4 (if E/S0-like), flatten off to 6--10 times the local value (if Sbc-like), or continue to rise (if Im-like). We infer that galaxy bulge masses must have grown by a factor of 3--6 over the redshift range 3>z>1, and then changed little since z~1. This suggests that the peak epoch of galaxy formation for massive galaxies is above z~1. We also estimate the duty cycle of luminous AGNs at z>1 to be ~1%, or 10^7 yrs, with sizable scatter.

  9. Supersymmetrizing Massive Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Malaeb, Ola

    2013-01-01

    When four scalar fields with global Lorentz symmetry are coupled to gravity and take a vacuum expectation value breaking diffeomorphism invariance spontaneously, the graviton becomes massive. This model is supersymmetrized by considering four N=1 chiral superfields with global Lorentz symmetry. When the scalar components of the chiral multiplets z^A acquire a vacuum expectation value, both diffeomorphism invariance and local supersymmetry are broken spontaneously. The global Lorentz index A becomes identified with the space-time Lorentz index making the scalar fields z^A vectors and the chiral spinors \\psi^A spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fields. The global supersymmetry is promoted to a local one using the rules of tensor calculus of coupling the N=1 supergravity Lagrangian to the four chiral multiplets. We show that the spectrum of the model in the broken phase consists of a massive spin-2 field, two massive spin-3/2 fields with different mass and a massive vector.

  10. Peculiarities of massive vectormesons

    CERN Document Server

    Schroer, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Massive QED, different from its massless counterpart, posesses two conserved charges; one is a screened (vanishing) Maxwell charge which is directly associated with the massive vectormesons through the identically conserved Maxwell current while the particle-antiparticle counting charge has its origin on the matter side. A somewhat peculiar situation arises in case of A-H couplings to Hermitian matter fields; in that case the only current is the screened Maxwell current and the coupling disappears in the massless limit. In case of selfinteracting massive vectormesons the situation becomes even more peculiar in that the usually renormalizability guaranteeing validity of the first order power-counting criterion breaks down in second order and requires the compensatory presence of an additional A-H coupling. In this case the massive counterpart of (spinor or scalar) QCD needs the presence of the A-H coupling which only disappears in the massless limit. Some aspect of these observation have already been noticed i...

  11. S/Se In Sulfide Inclusion In Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassot, E.; Couffignal, F.; Lorand, J.; Bureau, H.; Cartigny, P.; Harris, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Sulfides are among the most common minerals found as inclusions in diamonds. Being protected from any alteration after diamond formation, they likely represent the most pristine sulfide sample of mantle rocks. Their chemical composition in major and minor elements (mainly Ni, Cu and Cr), as determined using Electron Probe Micro Analyse (EPMA), is commonly used to determine the rock type in which the diamond formed. Here we propose to apply the same technique to the trace element abundance determination. We performed selenium (Se) on sulfide inclusion in diamonds. The S/Se value could help understanding whether the diamond formed in an eclogitic or peridotitic environment and may also constrain on the magmatic differentiation of diamonds host rock as well as provide a potential surface (hydrothermal) signature in diamond inclusions. A trace element measurement scheme has been developed by EPMA at the CAMPARIS centre (Paris). Se-abundance was obtained using a 30 kV accelerating voltage and 100nA probe current. Total counting time was 800s for peak (1.1 Å ) and 400s for background on both side of peak. Analyses were duplicated by μPIXE using the LPS nuclear microprobe facility (SIS2M CEA Saclay, France). Maps from 30x30 μm2 to 70x70 μm2 were obtained by scanning a 4x4 μm2 proton beam of 3MeV, 600 pA, (0.4 to 2 μC). The two techniques show good agreement and we conclude that EPMA is well suited for accurate and precise Se measurements. We analysed five samples; two monosulfide solid solution (MSS) (Ni>22wt%) typical of the peridotitic paragenesis (P-type), and three Ni-poor sulfides (Ni<7wt%) typical of the eclogitic paragenesis (E-type). In P-type sulfides, Se-content (260 ppm) is significantly higher than previously reported in sulfides from mantle-derived lherzolites (40-160 ppm), pyroxenites (25-45 ppm) or harzburgite. The value of S/Se in MSS is low (˜1400) compared to those of the primitive mantle reservoir (3,300; McDounough et al., 1995 Chemical Geology

  12. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, F.F. [Universidade Estadual do Piaui, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Variable mineralization processes during the formation of the Permian Hulu Ni-Cu sulfide deposit, Xinjiang, Northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Chunji; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yang, Yongqiang; Ke, Junjun; Zu, Bo

    2016-08-01

    The Permian Hulu Ni-Cu sulfide deposit is located at the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) in Northern Xinjiang, Northwestern China. The host intrusion of the Hulu deposit is composed of a layered mafic-ultramafic sequence and a dike-like unit. The layered sequence is composed of harzburgite, lherzolite, pyroxenite, gabbro, gabbrodiorite and diorite. The dike-like body comprises lherzolite and gabbro. Sulfide orebodies occur mainly within the harzburgite, pyroxenite and lherzolite at the base of the layered sequence and within the lherzolite in the dike-like body. Sulfide mineralization from the Hulu deposit shows significant depletion of PGE relative to Cu and Ni. These elements show good positive correlations with S in the sulfide mineralization from the dike-like unit but relatively weak correlations in the sulfide mineralization from the layered sequence. The sulfide mineralization from the layered unit shows excellent positive correlations between Ir and Os, Ru or Rh, and poor relationships between Ir and Pt or Pd. On the contrary, sulfide mineralization from the dike-like unit shows good correlations in the diagrams of Os, Ru, Rh, Pt and Pd against Ir. Both high Cu/Pd ratios (8855-481,398) and our modeling indicate that PGE depletion resulted from sulfide removal in a deep staging magma chamber. The evolved PGE-depleted magmas then ascended to the shallower magma chamber and became sulfide saturation due to crustal contamination. Both low Se/S ratios (33.5 × 10-6-487.5 × 10-6) and a negative correlation between Se/S and Cu/Pd ratios are consistent with the addition of crustal S. A large number of sulfide liquids segregated with minor crystallization of monosulfide solid solution (MSS) in the shallower magma chamber. When new magma pulses with unfractionated sulfide droplets entered the shallower magma chamber, the sulfide slurry containing crystallized MSS may be disrupted and mixed with the unfractionated sulfide droplets. The

  14. A cosmological context for compact massive galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Stringer, Martin; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma

    2015-01-01

    To provide a quantitative cosmological context to ongoing observational work on the formation histories and location of compact massive galaxies, we locate and study a sample of exceptionally compact systems in the Bolshoi simulation, using the dark matter structural parameters from a real, compact massive galaxy (NGC1277) as a basis for our working criteria. We find that over 80% of objects in this nominal compact category are substructures of more massive groups or clusters, and that the probability of a given massive substructure being this compact increases significantly with the mass of the host structure; rising to ~30% for the most massive clusters in the simulation. Tracking the main progenitors of this subsample back to z=2, we find them all to be distinct structures with scale radii and densities representative of the population as a whole at this epoch. What does characterise their histories, in addition to mostly becoming substructures, is that they have almost all experienced below-average mass a...

  15. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe F. Smet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs. The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  16. A Massive Molecular Gas Reservoir in the z=2.221 Type-2 Quasar Host Galaxy SMM J0939+8315 Lensed by the Radio Galaxy 3C220.3

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, T K Daisy

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of CO(J=3-2) line emission in the strongly-lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J0939+8315 at z=2.221, using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. SMM J0939+8315 hosts a type-2 quasar, and is gravitationally lensed by the radio galaxy 3C220.3 and its companion galaxy at z=0.685. The 104 GHz continuum emission underlying the CO line is detected toward 3C220.3 with an integrated flux density of S_cont = 7.4 +/- 1.4 mJy. Using the CO(J=3-2) line intensity of I_(CO(3-2)) = (12.6 +/- 2.0) Jy km s^-1, we derive a lensing- and excitation-corrected CO line luminosity of L'(CO(3-2)) = (3.4 +/- 0.7) x 10^10 (10.1/mu_L) K km s^-1 pc^2 for the SMG, where mu_L is the lensing magnification factor inferred from our lens modeling. This translates to a molecular gas mass of M_gas = (2.7 +/- 0.6) x 10^10 (10.1/mu_L) Msun. Fitting spectral energy distribution models to the (sub)-millimeter data of this SMG yields a dust temperature of T = 63.1^{+1.1}_{-1.3} K, a dust mass of M_du...

  17. Synthesis of furan from allenic sulfide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of furan derivatives from allenic sulfides. By the reaction with NaH, β-Hydroxyl allenic sulfides were found to generate furan products in excellent yields with the removal of phenylthio group. β-Aldehyde allenic sulfides were found to give similar furan products with one more substituent when treated with additional nucleophilic reagents. β-ketone allenic sulfides can also cyclize to give furan derivatives with the promotion of P2O5.

  18. Synthesis of furan from allenic sulfide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG LingLing; ZHANG Xiu; MA Jie; ZHONG ZhenZhen; ZHANG Zhe; ZHANG Yan; WANG JianBo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of furan derivatives from allenic sulfides. By the reaction with NaH.,β-Hydroxyl allenic sulfides were found to generate furan products in excellent yields with the removal of phenylthio group.β-Aldehyde allenic sulfides were found to give similar furan products with one more substituent when treated with additional nucleophilic reagents. β-ketone allenic sulfides can also cyclize to give furan derivatives with the promotion of P2O5.

  19. The differing locations of massive stellar explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Fruchter, A S; Burud, I; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cerón, J M C; Conselice, C J; Dahlen, T; Ferguson, H C; Fynbo, J P U; Garnavich, P M; Gibbons, R A; Gorosabel, J; Gull, T R; Hjorth, J; Holland, S T; Kouveliotou, C; Levan, A J; Levay, Z; Livio, M; Metzger, M R; Nugent, P; Petro, L; Pian, E; Rhoads, J E; Riess, A G; Sahu, K C; Smette, A; Strolger, L; Tanvir, N R; Thorsett, S E; Vreeswijk, P M; Wijers, R A M J; Woosley, S E

    2006-01-01

    When massive stars exhaust their fuel they collapse and often produce the extraordinarily bright explosions known as core-collapse supernovae. On occasion, this stellar collapse also powers an even more brilliant relativistic explosion known as a long-duration gamma-ray burst. One would then expect that gamma-ray bursts and supernovae should be found in similar environments. Here we show that this expectation is wrong. Using Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the host galaxies of long-duration gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae, we find that the gamma-ray bursts are far more concentrated on the very brightest regions of their hosts than are the supernovae. Furthermore, the host galaxies of the gamma-ray bursts are significantly fainter and more irregular than the hosts of the supernovae. Together these results suggest that long-duration gamma-ray bursts are associated with the very most massive stars and may be restricted to galaxies of limited chemical evolution. Our results directly imply that lon...

  20. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  1. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  2. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of...

  3. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-07

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  4. Influence of arsenic on iron sulfide transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Butler, I.B.; Rickard, D.

    2007-01-01

    The association of arsenate, As(V), and arsenite, As(III), with disordered mackinawite, FeS, was studied in sulfide-limited (Fe:S = 1:1) and excess-sulfide (Fe:S = 1:2) batch experiments. In the absence of arsenic, the sulfide-limited experiments produce disordered mackinawite while the

  5. Cosmic decoherence: massive fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Junyu [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology,Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); School of the Gifted Young, University of Science and Technology of China,Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Sou, Chon-Man; Wang, Yi [Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology,Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2016-10-14

    We study the decoherence of massive fields during inflation based on the Zurek’s density matrix approach. With the cubic interaction between inflaton and massive fields, the reduced density matrix for the massive fields can be calculated in the Schrödinger picture which is related to the variance of the non-Gaussian exponent in the wave functional. The decoherence rate is computed in the one-loop form from functional integration. For heavy fields with m≳O(H), quantum fluctuations will easily stay in the quantum state and decoherence is unlikely. While for light fields with mass smaller than O(H), quantum fluctuations are easily decohered within 5∼10 e-folds after Hubble crossing. Thus heavy fields can play a key role in studying problems involving inflationary quantum information.

  6. Cosmic Decoherence: Massive Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Junyu; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We study the decoherence of massive fields during inflation based on the Zurek's density matrix approach. With the cubic interaction between inflaton and massive fields, the reduced density matrix for the massive fields can be calculated in the Schr\\"odinger picture which is related to the variance of the non-Gaussian exponent in the wave functional. The decoherence rate is computed in the one-loop form from functional integration. For heavy fields with $m\\gtrsim \\mathcal{O}(H)$, quantum fluctuations will easily stay in the quantum state and decoherence is unlikely. While for light fields with mass smaller than $\\mathcal{O}(H)$, quantum fluctuations are easily decohered within $5\\sim10$ e-folds after Hubble crossing. Thus heavy fields can play a key role in studying problems involving inflationary quantum information.

  7. Environments of massive stars and the upper mass limit

    CERN Document Server

    Crowther, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    The locations of massive stars (> 8 Msun) within their host galaxies is reviewed. These range from distributed OB associations to dense star clusters within giant HII regions. A comparison between massive stars and the environments of core-collapse supernovae and long duration Gamma Ray Bursts is made, both at low and high redshift. We also address the question of the upper stellar mass limit, since very massive stars (VMS, Minit >> 100 Msun) may produce exceptionally bright core-collapse supernovae or pair instability supernovae.

  8. Problems of Massive Gravities

    CERN Document Server

    Deser, S; Ong, Y C; Waldron, A

    2014-01-01

    The method of characteristics is a key tool for studying consistency of equations of motion; it allows issues such as predictability, maximal propagation speed, superluminality, unitarity and acausality to be addressed without requiring explicit solutions. We review this method and its application to massive gravity theories to show the limitations of these models' physical viability: Among their problems are loss of unique evolution, superluminal signals, matter coupling inconsistencies and micro-acausality (propagation of signals around local closed timelike/causal curves). We extend previous no-go results to the entire three-parameter range of massive gravity theories. It is also argued that bimetric models suffer a similar fate.

  9. A Massive Molecular Gas Reservoir in the Z = 2.221 Type-2 Quasar Host Galaxy SMM J0939+8315 Lensed by the Radio Galaxy 3C220.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, T. K. Daisy; Riechers, Dominik A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the detection of CO(J = 3 \\to 2) line emission in the strongly lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J0939+8315 at z = 2.221, using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. SMM J0939+8315 hosts a type-2 quasar, and is gravitationally lensed by the radio galaxy 3C220.3 and its companion galaxy at z = 0.685. The 104 GHz continuum emission underlying the CO line is detected toward 3C220.3 with an integrated flux density of Scont = 7.4 ± 1.4 mJy. Using the CO(J = 3 \\to 2) line intensity of ICO(3-2) = (12.6 ± 2.0) Jy km s-1, we derive a lensing- and excitation-corrected CO line luminosity of {L}{{CO(1-0)}}\\prime = (3.4 ± 0.7) × 1010 (10.1/μL) K km s-1 pc2 for the SMG, where μL is the lensing magnification factor inferred from our lens modeling. This translates to a molecular gas mass of Mgas = (2.7 ± 0.6) × 1010 (10.1/μL) M⊙. Fitting spectral energy distribution models to the (sub)-millimeter data of this SMG yields a dust temperature of T = 63.1{}-1.3+1.1 K, a dust mass of Mdust = (5.2 ± 2.1) × 108 (10.1/μL) M⊙, and a total infrared luminosity of LIR = (9.1 ± 1.2) ×1012 (10.1/μL) L⊙. We find that the properties of the interstellar medium of SMM J0939+8315 overlap with both SMGs and type-2 quasars. Hence, SMM J0939+8315 may be transitioning from a starbursting phase to an unobscured quasar phase as described by the “evolutionary link” model, according to which this system may represent an intermediate stage in the evolution of present-day galaxies at an earlier epoch.

  10. Linking geology, fluid chemistry, and microbial activity of basalt- and ultramafic-hosted deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, M; Hansen, M; Seifert, R; Strauss, H; Koschinsky, A; Petersen, S

    2013-07-01

    Hydrothermal fluids passing through basaltic rocks along mid-ocean ridges are known to be enriched in sulfide, while those circulating through ultramafic mantle rocks are typically elevated in hydrogen. Therefore, it has been estimated that the maximum energy in basalt-hosted systems is available through sulfide oxidation and in ultramafic-hosted systems through hydrogen oxidation. Furthermore, thermodynamic models suggest that the greatest biomass potential arises from sulfide oxidation in basalt-hosted and from hydrogen oxidation in ultramafic-hosted systems. We tested these predictions by measuring biological sulfide and hydrogen removal and subsequent autotrophic CO2 fixation in chemically distinct hydrothermal fluids from basalt-hosted and ultramafic-hosted vents. We found a large potential of microbial hydrogen oxidation in naturally hydrogen-rich (ultramafic-hosted) but also in naturally hydrogen-poor (basalt-hosted) hydrothermal fluids. Moreover, hydrogen oxidation-based primary production proved to be highly attractive under our incubation conditions regardless whether hydrothermal fluids from ultramafic-hosted or basalt-hosted sites were used. Site-specific hydrogen and sulfide availability alone did not appear to determine whether hydrogen or sulfide oxidation provides the energy for primary production by the free-living microbes in the tested hydrothermal fluids. This suggests that more complex features (e.g., a combination of oxygen, temperature, biological interactions) may play a role for determining which energy source is preferably used in chemically distinct hydrothermal vent biotopes.

  11. Mineralization of a Proterozoic Sulfide Black Smoker Chimney and Thermophilous Microorganisms in Eastern Hebei, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Xuehui; LIAN Wei; YUAN Congjian; YAN Fei; YUAN Jiazhong

    2008-01-01

    A sulfide black smoker chimney exists in the Gaobanhe seabed exhalation massive sulfidedeposit in the Xinglong-Kuancheng secondary fault basin of the Proterozoic Yanliao rift trough inHebei Province, taking the shape of mounds, individually about 2-3 cm high. Abundant fossils ofthermophilous bacteria and algae in perfect preservation are found in the ore surrounding the blacksmoker chimney. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular biomarker studies on themicroorganismal ore fabric show that the microorganism in the sulfide ore is in fact a sedimentaryproduct of probiotic bacteria and algae. In the special food chain based on black smoker chimney atancient seabed- thermophilous bacteria, the thermophilons bacteria and algae reproduce in largequantity. Intermittently erupting of fluid from the chimney creats conditions for formation of sulfidedeposit. In the process of exhalation action of hot fluid, thermophilous bacteria and algae grow andreproduce around the sulfide black smoker chimney, absorbing mineralizing substances brought bythe fluid. Massive sulfide deposits are formed in this process of absorption of seabed black smokerchimney exhalation-mineralizing fluid puisation.thermophilous microorganism.

  12. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  13. The early evolution of massive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Massive black holes are nowadays believed to reside in most local galaxies. Studies have also established a number of relations between the MBH mass and properties of the host galaxy such as bulge mass and velocity dispersion. These results suggest that central MBHs, while much less massive than the host (~0.1%), are linked to the evolution of galactic structure. When did it all start? In hierarchical cosmologies, a single big galaxy today can be traced back to the stage when it was split up in hundreds of smaller components. Did MBH seeds form with the same efficiency in small proto-galaxies, or did their formation had to await the buildup of substantial galaxies with deeper potential wells? I briefly review here some of the physical processes that are conducive to the evolution of the massive black hole population. I will discuss black hole formation processes for `seed' black holes that are likely to place at early cosmic epochs, and possible observational tests of these scenarios.

  14. Massive and Open

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasimpaur, Karen

    2013-01-01

    MOOCs--massive open online courses--are all the rage these days, with hundreds of thousands of participants signing up and investors plunking down millions to get a piece of the pie. Why is there so much excitement about this new disruptive form of online learning, and how does this model apply to professional learning for teachers? Traditional…

  15. Multiplicity of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Preibisch, T; Zinnecker, H; Preibisch, Thomas; Weigelt, Gerd; Zinnecker, Hans

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the observed multiplicity of massive stars and implications on theories of massive star formation. After a short summary of the literature on massive star multiplicity, we focus on the O- and B-type stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster, which constitute a homogenous sample of very young massive stars. 13 of these stars have recently been the targets of a bispectrum speckle interferometry survey for companions. Considering the visual and also the known spectroscopic companions of these stars, the total number of companions is at least 14. Extrapolation with correction for the unresolved systems suggests that there are at least 1.5 and perhaps as much as 4 companions per primary star on average. This number is clearly higher than the mean number of about 0.5 companions per primary star found for the low-mass stars in the general field population and also in the Orion Nebula cluster. This suggests that a different mechanism is at work in the formation of high-mass multiple systems in the dense Orion Nebu...

  16. Massive antenatal fetomaternal hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Koldkjaer, Ole; Berkowicz, Adela

    2005-01-01

    Massive fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) can lead to life-threatening anemia. Quantification based on flow cytometry with anti-hemoglobin F (HbF) is applicable in all cases but underestimation of large fetal bleeds has been reported. A large FMH from an ABO-compatible fetus allows an estimation...

  17. Dynamic Magma Conduit System Related to the Jinchuan Ni-Cu Sulfide Deposit, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xie-yan; CHEN Lie-meng; TIAN Yu-long; XIAO Jia-fei

    2009-01-01

    @@ The Jinchuan Ni-Cu sulfide deposits, NW China, are hosted in small ultramafic intrusions that were emplaced into Paleoproterozoic metamorphic rocks. The ultramafic intrusions were previously thought to be the segments of a single elongate intrusion that was dismembered by late faults into eastern and western portions, each of which have distinct stratigraphic sequences.

  18. Evolution of massive binary black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Q

    2002-01-01

    Since many or most galaxies have central massive black holes (BHs), mergers of galaxies can form massive binary black holes (BBHs). In this paper, we study the evolution of massive BBHs in realistic galaxy models, using a generalization of techniques used to study tidal disruption rates around massive BHs. The evolution of BBHs depends on BH mass ratio and host galaxy type. BBHs with very low mass ratios (say, $\\la$ 0.001) are hardly ever formed by mergers of galaxies because the dynamical friction timescale is too long for the smaller BH to sink into the galactic center within a Hubble time. BBHs with moderate mass ratios are most likely to form and survive in spherical or nearly spherical galaxies and in high-luminosity or high-dispersion galaxies; they are most likely to have merged in low-dispersion galaxies (line-of-sight velocity dispersion $\\la$ 90 km/s) or in highly flattened or triaxial galaxies. The semimajor axes and orbital periods of surviving BBHs are generally in the range 10^{-3}-10 pc and 10-...

  19. Zinc sulfide in intestinal cell granules of Ancylostoma caninum adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianotti, A.J.; Clark, D.T.; Dash, J. (Portland State Univ., OR (USA))

    1991-04-01

    A source of confusion has existed since the turn of the century about the reddish brown, weakly birefringent 'sphaerocrystals' located in the intestines of strongyle nematodes, Strongylus and Ancylostoma. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometric analyses were used for accurate determination of the crystalline order and elemental composition of the granules in the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The composition of the intestinal pigmented granules was identified unequivocally as zinc sulfide. It seems most probable that the granules serve to detoxify high levels of metallic ions (specifically zinc) present due to the large intake of host blood.

  20. Minimal massive 3D gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Hohm, Olaf; Merbis, Wout; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    We present an alternative to topologically massive gravity (TMG) with the same 'minimal' bulk properties; i.e. a single local degree of freedom that is realized as a massive graviton in linearization about an anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacuum. However, in contrast to TMG, the new 'minimal massive gravity'

  1. New improved massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereli, T.; Yetişmişoğlu, C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first-order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti de-Sitter space AdS 3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  2. SO(3) massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chunshan

    2013-11-25

    In this Letter, we propose a massive gravity theory with 5 degrees of freedom. The mass term is constructed by 3 Stückelberg scalar fields, which respects SO(3) symmetry in the fields' configuration. By the analysis on the linear cosmological perturbations, we found that such 5 d.o.f. are free from ghost instability, gradient instability, and tachyonic instability.

  3. Dual massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morand, Kevin, E-mail: Kevin.Morand@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson - CNRS, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Solodukhin, Sergey N., E-mail: Sergey.Solodukhin@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson - CNRS, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2012-08-29

    The linearized massive gravity in three dimensions, over any maximally symmetric background, is known to be presented in a self-dual form as a first order equation which encodes not only the massive Klein-Gordon type field equation but also the supplementary transverse-traceless conditions. We generalize this construction to higher dimensions. The appropriate dual description in d dimensions, additionally to a (non-symmetric) tensor field h{sub {mu}{nu}}, involves an extra rank-(d-1) field equivalently represented by the torsion rank-3 tensor. The symmetry condition for h{sub {mu}{nu}} arises on-shell as a consequence of the field equations. The action principle of the dual theory is formulated. The focus has been made on four dimensions. Solving one of the fields in terms of the other and putting back in the action one obtains two other equivalent formulations of the theory in which the action is quadratic in derivatives. In one of these representations the theory is formulated entirely in terms of a rank-2 non-symmetric tensor h{sub {mu}{nu}}. This quadratic theory is not identical to the Fierz-Pauli theory and contains the coupling between the symmetric and antisymmetric parts of h{sub {mu}{nu}}. Nevertheless, the only singularity in the propagator is the same as in the Fierz-Pauli theory so that only the massive spin-2 particle is propagating. In the other representation, the theory is formulated in terms of the torsion rank-3 tensor only. We analyze the conditions which follow from the field equations and show that they restrict to 5 degrees of freedom thus producing an alternative description to the massive spin-2 particle. A generalization to higher dimensions is suggested.

  4. Phases of massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovsky, Sergei L.

    2004-10-01

    We systematically study the most general Lorentz-violating graviton mass invariant under three-dimensional Eucledian group. We find that at general values of mass parameters the massive graviton has six propagating degrees of freedom, and some of them are ghosts or lead to rapid classical instabilities. However, there is a number of different regions in the mass parameter space where massive gravity is described by a consistent low-energy effective theory with cutoff ~ (mMPl)1/2. This theory is free of rapid instabilities and vDVZ discontinuity. Each of these regions is characterized by certain fine-tuning relations between mass parameters, generalizing the Fierz Pauli condition. In some cases the required fine-tunings are consequences of the existence of the subgroups of the diffeomorphism group that are left unbroken by the graviton mass. We found two new cases, when the resulting theories have a property of UV insensitivity, i.e. remain well behaved after inclusion of arbitrary higher dimension operators without assuming any fine-tunings among the coefficients of these operators, besides those enforced by the symmetries. These theories can be thought of as generalizations of the ghost condensate model with a smaller residual symmetry group. We briefly discuss what kind of cosmology can one expect in massive gravity and argue that the allowed values of the graviton mass may be quite large, affecting growth of primordial perturbations, structure formation and, perhaps, enhancing the backreaction of inhomogeneities on the expansion rate of the Universe.

  5. Redox Biochemistry of Hydrogen Sulfide*

    OpenAIRE

    Kabil, Omer; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-01-01

    H2S, the most recently discovered gasotransmitter, might in fact be the evolutionary matriarch of this family, being both ancient and highly reduced. Disruption of γ-cystathionase in mice leads to cardiovascular dysfunction and marked hypertension, suggesting a key role for this enzyme in H2S production in the vasculature. However, patients with inherited deficiency in γ-cystathionase apparently do not present vascular pathology. A mitochondrial pathway disposes sulfide and couples it to oxid...

  6. Hydrogen sulfide and translational medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Ze-yu; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule that has undergone large numbers of fundamental investigations. H2S is involved in various physiological activities associated with the regulation of homeostasis, vascular contractility, pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as pro- and anti-apoptotic activities etc. However, the actions of H2S are influenced by its concentration, reaction time, and cell/disease types. Therefore, H2S...

  7. H.E.S.S. observations of massive stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ohm, Stefan; Reimer, Olaf; Hinton, Jim; Rowell, Gavin; Wilhelmi, Emma de Oña; Fernandes, Milton Virgilio; Acero, Fabio; Marcowith, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    Stellar clusters are potential acceleration sites of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100GeV) particles since they host supernova remnants (SNRs) and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). Additionally, in stellar clusters, particles can also be accelerated e.g. at the boundaries of wind-blown bubbles, in colliding wind zones in massive binary systems or in the framework of collective wind or wind/supernova(SN) ejecta scenarios. Motivated by the detection of VHE gamma-ray emission towards Westerlund 2 and assuming similar particle acceleration mechanisms at work, Westerlund 1 is an even more promising target for VHE gamma-ray observations given that massive star content and distance are more favorable for detectable VHE gamma-ray emission compared to Westerlund 2. Here, H.E.S.S. observations of massive stellar clusters in general with special emphasis on the most massive stellar cluster in the galaxy, Westerlund 1 are summarized.

  8. Halo occupation distribution of massive galaxies since z= 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Masaki, S.; Kawara, K.; Sugiyama, N.

    2011-01-01

    We present a clustering analysis of ˜60 000 massive (stellar mass M★ > 1011 M⊙) galaxies out to z= 1 drawn from 55.2 deg2 of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II Supernova Survey. Strong clustering is detected for all the subsamples of massive galaxies characterized by different stellar masses (M★= 1011.0-11.5 M⊙, 1011.5-12.0 M⊙) or rest-frame colours (blue: U-V 1.0). We find that more mature (more massive or redder) galaxies are more clustered, which implies that the more mature galaxies have started stellar-mass assembly earlier within the highly biased region where the structure formation has also started earlier. By means of halo occupation distribution (HOD) models fitted to the observed angular correlation function, we infer the properties of the underlying host dark haloes. We find that the estimated bias factors and host halo masses are systematically larger for galaxies with larger stellar masses, which is consistent with the general agreement that the capability of hosting massive galaxies depends strongly on halo mass. The estimated effective halo masses are ˜1014 M⊙, which gives the stellar-mass to halo-mass ratios of ˜0.003. The observed evolution of bias factors indicates rapid evolution of spatial distributions of cold dark matter relative to those traced by the massive galaxies, while the transition of host halo masses might imply that the fractional mass growth rate of haloes is less than those of stellar systems. The inferred halo masses and high fractions of central galaxies indicate that the massive galaxies in the current sample are possibly equivalent to central galaxies of galaxy clusters.

  9. Microporosity of BIF hosted massive hematite ore, Iron Quadrangle, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    VARAJÃO CÉSAR A.C.; BRUAND ARY; RAMANAIDOU ERICK R.; GILKES ROBERT J.

    2002-01-01

    O minério de hematita compacta (MHC) é um tipo de minério de ferro de alto grau usado como minério granulado na obtenção do ferro via redução direta (DRI). A influência da porosidade sobre a redutibilidade do MHC da Mina de Capitão do Mato (Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brasil), foi investigada em amostras de furos de sonda e de afloramentos da mina, usando-se microscópio óptico e eletrônico de varredura. Hematita é o principal componente mineralógico e ocorre sob diferentes formas: granular (10...

  10. A Massive, Prestellar Clump Hosting no High-Mass Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, P.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhang, Q.; Foster, J.; Guzmán, A.

    2015-12-01

    We observed a high-mass, prestellar clump in dust continuum with SMA (3.5″) and in NH3 line emission with JVLA (2″). We find no core with sufficient mass to form high-mass stars at the current evolutionary stage. In order to form high-mass stars, the embedded cores need to accrete a significant amount of mass over time which is consistent with some models of high-mass star formation. We also find that the gas in the cores is transonic or mildly supersonic. The embedded cores are sub-virialized, which is inconsistent with some models of high-mass star formation unless strong magnetic fields of ˜1 mG are present.

  11. Partition coefficients for Ni, Cu, Pd, Pt, Rh, and Ir between monosulfide solid solution and sulfide liquid and the formation of compositionally zoned Ni-Cu sulfide bodies by fractional crystallization of sulfide liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, S.J.; Makovicky, E.; Makovicky, M.

    1996-01-01

    Many nickel–copper sulfide orebodies contain Cu- and Fe-rich portions. The Fe-rich ore is generally richer in Os, Ir, Ru, and Rh and poorer in Pt, Pd, and Au than the Cu-rich ore. In komatiite-hosted ores Ni tends to be concentrated in the Cu-rich ore, whereas in tholeiitic ores it tends to be co...

  12. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in seagrasses ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis, tracing sulfur compounds combined with ecosystem parameters we found different spatial, intraspecific and interspecific strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1......) Tolerance, by elimination (eg. Zostera marina); where we found precipitation of sulfide as non-toxic elemental sulfur on the inner wall of the root lacunae. 2) Utilization (eg. Z. marina), where seagrasses detoxify and incorporate sulfides by active uptake and metabolize to sulfate, representing a non...

  13. Massively Parallel Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendure, Jay; Fields, Stanley

    2016-06-01

    Human genetics has historically depended on the identification of individuals whose natural genetic variation underlies an observable trait or disease risk. Here we argue that new technologies now augment this historical approach by allowing the use of massively parallel assays in model systems to measure the functional effects of genetic variation in many human genes. These studies will help establish the disease risk of both observed and potential genetic variants and to overcome the problem of "variants of uncertain significance." Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  14. Massive star forming environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Kathryn Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    We present a study of the earliest stages of massive star formation, in which we focus on Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) and young massive clusters. We present Very Large Array spectral line observations of ammonia (NH 3) and CCS toward four IRDCs. The NH3 lines provide diagnostics of the temperature and density structure within IRDCs. Based upon the NH 3 column density, IRDCs have masses of ˜ 103 to 10 4 M⊙ . We detect twenty NH3 clumps within four IRDCs, with radii regions are presented from the Near Infrared Imager (NIRIM) camera on the 3.5 m WIYN telescope. We report J, H, and K' band photometry in the clusters AFGL437, AFGL5180, and AFGL5142 and use these results to probe the stellar populations, extinction, and ages of the clusters. We find that all three clusters suffer significant extinction (AK ˜1), have ages ≤ 5 Myr, and are actively forming stars. We conclude that the properties of these embedded clusters are consistent with their evolving from IRDC clumps.

  15. Phases of massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dubovsky, S L

    2004-01-01

    We systematically study the most general Lorentz-violating graviton mass invariant under three-dimensional Eucledian group using the explicitly covariant language. We find that at general values of mass parameters the massive graviton has six propagating degrees of freedom, and some of them are ghosts or lead to rapid classical instabilities. However, there is a number of different regions in the mass parameter space where massive gravity can be described by a consistent low-energy effective theory with cutoff $\\sim\\sqrt{mM_{Pl}}$ free of rapid instabilities and vDVZ discontinuity. Each of these regions is characterized by certain fine-tuning relations between mass parameters, generalizing the Fierz--Pauli condition. In some cases the required fine-tunings are consequences of the existence of the subgroups of the diffeomorphism group that are left unbroken by the graviton mass. We found two new cases, when the resulting theories have a property of UV insensitivity, i.e. remain well behaved after inclusion of ...

  16. Hydrogen sulfide and vascular relaxation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yan; TANG Chao-shu; DU Jun-bao; JIN Hong-fang

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the vasorelaxant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in arterial rings in the cardiovascular system under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions and the possible mechanisms involved.Data sources The data in this review were obtained from Medline and Pubmed sources from 1997 to 2011 using the search terms "hydrogen sulfide" and ""vascular relaxation".Study selection Articles describing the role of hydrogen sulfide in the regulation of vascular activity and its vasorelaxant effects were selected.Results H2S plays an important role in the regulation of cardiovascular tone.The vasomodulatory effects of H2S depend on factors including concentration,species and tissue type.The H2S donor,sodium hydrosulfide (NarS),causes vasorelaxation of rat isolated aortic rings in a dose-dependent manner.This effect was more pronounced than that observed in pulmonary arterial rings.The expression of KATP channel proteins and mRNA in the aortic rings was increased compared with pulmonary artery rings.H2S is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases.Downregulation of the endogenous H2S pathway is an important factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases.The vasorelaxant effects of H2S have been shown to be mediated by activation of KATP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells and via the induction of acidification due to activation of the CI/HCO3 exchanger.It is speculated that the mechanisms underlying the vasoconstrictive function of H2S in the aortic rings involves decreased NO production and inhibition of cAMP accumulation.Conclusion H2S is an important endogenous gasotransmitter in the cardiovascular system and acts as a modulator of vascular tone in the homeostatic regulation of blood pressure.

  17. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  18. Medical Functions of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gasomediator synthesized from L- and D-cysteine in various tissues. It is involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes. H(2)S exhibits antiatherosclerotic, vasodilator, and proangiogenic properties, and protects the kidney and heart from damage following ischemia/reperfusion injury. H(2)S donors may be natural or synthetic, and may be used for the safe treatment of a wide range of diseases. This review article summarizes the current state of knowledge of the therapeutic function of H(2)S.

  19. Giant hydrogen sulfide plume in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru supports chemolithoautotrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Schunck

    Full Text Available In Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems nutrient-rich waters are transported to the ocean surface, fuelling high photoautotrophic primary production. Subsequent heterotrophic decomposition of the produced biomass increases the oxygen-depletion at intermediate water depths, which can result in the formation of oxygen minimum zones (OMZ. OMZs can sporadically accumulate hydrogen sulfide (H2S, which is toxic to most multicellular organisms and has been implicated in massive fish kills. During a cruise to the OMZ off Peru in January 2009 we found a sulfidic plume in continental shelf waters, covering an area >5500 km(2, which contained ∼2.2×10(4 tons of H2S. This was the first time that H2S was measured in the Peruvian OMZ and with ∼440 km(3 the largest plume ever reported for oceanic waters. We assessed the phylogenetic and functional diversity of the inhabiting microbial community by high-throughput sequencing of DNA and RNA, while its metabolic activity was determined with rate measurements of carbon fixation and nitrogen transformation processes. The waters were dominated by several distinct γ-, δ- and ε-proteobacterial taxa associated with either sulfur oxidation or sulfate reduction. Our results suggest that these chemolithoautotrophic bacteria utilized several oxidants (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide and nitrous oxide to detoxify the sulfidic waters well below the oxic surface. The chemolithoautotrophic activity at our sampling site led to high rates of dark carbon fixation. Assuming that these chemolithoautotrophic rates were maintained throughout the sulfidic waters, they could be representing as much as ∼30% of the photoautotrophic carbon fixation. Postulated changes such as eutrophication and global warming, which lead to an expansion and intensification of OMZs, might also increase the frequency of sulfidic waters. We suggest that the chemolithoautotrophically fixed carbon may be involved in a negative feedback loop that

  20. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  1. Micro and nano sulfide solid lubrication

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Haidou; Liu, Jiajun

    2014-01-01

    Sulfide solid lubrication is a vital field of tribology with the potential to save both energy and materials. This book examines the low-temperature sulfuration technology developed in China, as well as two-step methods for preparing sulfide lubrication films.

  2. Massive Storage Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Feng; Hai Jin

    2006-01-01

    To accommodate the explosively increasing amount of data in many areas such as scientific computing and e-Business, physical storage devices and control components have been separated from traditional computing systems to become a scalable, intelligent storage subsystem that, when appropriately designed, should provide transparent storage interface, effective data allocation, flexible and efficient storage management, and other impressive features. The design goals and desirable features of such a storage subsystem include high performance, high scalability, high availability, high reliability and high security. Extensive research has been conducted in this field by researchers all over the world, yet many issues still remain open and challenging. This paper studies five different online massive storage systems and one offline storage system that we have developed with the research grant support from China. The storage pool with multiple network-attached RAIDs avoids expensive store-and-forward data copying between the server and storage system, improving data transfer rate by a factor of 2-3 over a traditional disk array. Two types of high performance distributed storage systems for local-area network storage are introduced in the paper. One of them is the Virtual Interface Storage Architecture (VISA) where VI as a communication protocol replaces the TCP/IP protocol in the system. VISA's performance is shown to achieve better than that of IP SAN by designing and implementing the vSCSI (VI-attached SCSI) protocol to support SCSI commands in the VI network. The other is a fault-tolerant parallel virtual file system that is designed and implemented to provide high I/O performance and high reliability. A global distributed storage system for wide-area network storage is discussed in detail in the paper, where a Storage Service Provider is added to provide storage service and plays the role of user agent for the storage system. Object based Storage Systems not only

  3. Higher dimensional nonlinear massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Do, Tuan Q

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by a recent ghost-free nonlinear massive gravity in four-dimensional spacetime, we study its higher dimensional scenarios. As a result, we are able to show the constant-like behavior of massive graviton terms for some well-known metrics such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini-(A)dS metrics in a specific five-dimensional nonlinear massive gravity under an assumption that its fiducial metrics are compatible with physical ones. In addition, some simple cosmological solutions of the five-dimensional massive gravity will be figured out consistently.

  4. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  5. Magnetospheres of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küker, M.

    We study the interaction of line-driven winds from massive stars with the magnetic field rooted in these stars by carrying out numerical simulations using the Nirvana MHD code in 2D in spherical polar coordinates. The code's adaptive mesh refinement feature allows high spatial resolution across the whole simulation box. We study both O and Wolf-Rayet stars for a range of magnetic field strengths from weak to strong as measured by the confinement parameter. For weak fields our simulations show that the initially dipolar field opens up far away from the star and a thin disk-like structure forms in the equatorial plane of the magnetic field. For stronger fields the disk is disrupted close to the stellar surface and closed field lines persist at low latitudes. For very strong fields a pronounced magnetosphere forms where the gas is forced to move along the field lines and eventually falls back to the stellar surface.

  6. massive excision of liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-liang LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the promotion effect of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs transplantation and mobilized bone marrow stem cells on the recovery of liver function and liver tissue regeneration after massive partial hepatectomy in rats. Methods The rats were randomly divided into four groups after massive partial hepatectomy (about 85%, namely massive hepatectomy group (control group, n=15, received massive hepatectomy only, G-CSF group [n=15, received rhG-CSF 150μg/(kg•d by intraperitoneal injection after the operation for 5 days], MSCs group [n=15, received 5ml suspension of MSCs (about 1.5×106 by tail vein injection after the operation], and G-CSF+MSCs group [n=14, received 1.5ml suspension of MSCs (about 1.5×106 by tail vein injection and rhG-CSF 150μg/(kg•d by intraperitoneal injection for 5 days after the operation]. The CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood of the rats were assessed by flow cytometry after G-CSF mobilization. Liver function tests including ALT, AST and ALB were performed on the 3rd and 9th day after surgery. All the rats were sacrificed and liver tissue was harvested for histopathological study. The expression of Ki-67 and BrdU positive cells in the liver were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Flow cytometric results identified the isolated cells were MSCs. BMSCs in peripheral blood significantly increased in number after rhG-CSF mobilization, and reaching the maximum number on the 5th day. After mobilization for 3, 5 and 9 days, the positive CD34 cells in G-CSF group were 0.009%, 0.016%, 0.019% respectively, which were higher than those in control group. The level of albumin was significantly elevated in three treatment groups compared with control group on the 9th day after the hepatectomy (P<0.05 or P<0.01. The expression of Ki-67 (110.16±27.64, 103.57±33.90, 98.52±21.87 vs 72.39±27.04 cells and BrdU positive cells (17.96±5.57, 16.45±5.75, 16.66±5.11 vs 11.72±3.83 cells in three

  7. A massive graviton in topologically new massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Park, Young-Jai

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the topologically new massive gravity in three dimensions. It turns out that a single massive mode is propagating in the flat spacetime, comparing to the conformal Chern-Simons gravity which has no physically propagating degrees of freedom. Also we discuss the realization of the BMS/GCA correspondence.

  8. In-Situ Incubation of Iron-Sulfide Mineral in Seawater Reveals Colonization by Iron-Oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and Zetaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, R. A.; Ramírez, G. A.; Sylvan, J. B.; Edwards, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfide mineral precipitation occurs at mid-ocean ridge (MOR) spreading centers, both in the form of plume particles and massive sulfide structures. A common constituent of MOR sulfide mineral is pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS). This mineral was chosen as a substrate for in-situ incubation studies in the shallow waters of Catalina Islands, CA to investigate the colonization of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria largely dominated the bacterial community on pyrrhotite samples incubated in the water column. Pyrrhotite samples incubated at the sediment/water column interface showed more even dominance by Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Cultivations that originated from these pyrrhotite samples resulted in the enrichment of Zetaproteobacteria with either twisted-stalks (Mariprofundus) or sheath structures. Additionally, a candidate novel Gammaproteobacterium was isolated and shown to grow autotrophically via the oxidation of iron.

  9. The Drenchwater deposit, Alaska: An example of a natural low pH environment resulting from weathering of an undisturbed shale-hosted Zn-Pb-Ag deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, G.E.; Kelley, K.D.

    2009-01-01

    The Drenchwater shale-hosted Zn-Pb-Ag deposit and the immediate vicinity, on the northern flank of the Brooks Range in north-central Alaska, is an ideal example of a naturally low pH system. The two drainages, Drenchwater and False Wager Creeks, which bound the deposit, differ in their acidity and metal contents. Moderately acidic waters with elevated concentrations of metals (pH ??? 4.3, Zn ??? 1400 ??g/L) in the Drenchwater Creek drainage basin are attributed to weathering of an exposed base-metal-rich massive sulfide occurrence. Stream sediment and water chemistry data collected from False Wager Creek suggest that an unexposed base-metal sulfide occurrence may account for the lower pH (2.7-3.1) and very metal-rich waters (up to 2600 ??g/L Zn, ??? 260 ??g/L Cu and ???89 ??g/L Tl) collected at least 2 km upstream of known mineralized exposures. These more acidic conditions produce jarosite, schwertmannite and Fe-hydroxides commonly associated with acid-mine drainage. The high metal concentrations in some water samples from both streams naturally exceed Alaska state regulatory limits for freshwater aquatic life, affirming the importance of establishing base-line conditions in the event of human land development. The studies at the Drenchwater deposit demonstrate that poor water quality can be generated through entirely natural weathering of base-metal occurrences, and, possibly unmineralized black shale.

  10. Loss of ETHE1, a mitochondrial dioxygenase, causes fatal sulfide toxicity in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Viscomi, Carlo; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Di Meo, Ivano; Mineri, Rossana; Tiveron, Cecilia; Levitt, Michael D; Prelle, Alessandro; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Rimoldi, Marco; Zeviani, Massimo

    2009-02-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is an autosomal recessive, invariably fatal disorder characterized by early-onset encephalopathy, microangiopathy, chronic diarrhea, defective cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in muscle and brain, high concentrations of C4 and C5 acylcarnitines in blood and high excretion of ethylmalonic acid in urine. ETHE1, a gene encoding a beta-lactamase-like, iron-coordinating metalloprotein, is mutated in ethylmalonic encephalopathy. In bacteria, ETHE1-like sequences are in the same operon of, or fused with, orthologs of TST, the gene encoding rhodanese, a sulfurtransferase. In eukaryotes, both ETHE1 and rhodanese are located within the mitochondrial matrix. We created a Ethe1(-/-) mouse that showed the cardinal features of ethylmalonic encephalopathy. We found that thiosulfate was excreted in massive amounts in urine of both Ethe1(-/-) mice and humans with ethylmalonic encephalopathy. High thiosulfate and sulfide concentrations were present in Ethe1(-/-) mouse tissues. Sulfide is a powerful inhibitor of COX and short-chain fatty acid oxidation, with vasoactive and vasotoxic effects that explain the microangiopathy in ethylmalonic encephalopathy patients. Sulfide is detoxified by a mitochondrial pathway that includes a sulfur dioxygenase. Sulfur dioxygenase activity was absent in Ethe1(-/-) mice, whereas it was markedly increased by ETHE1 overexpression in HeLa cells and Escherichia coli. Therefore, ETHE1 is a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase involved in catabolism of sulfide that accumulates to toxic levels in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

  11. The Smallest AGN Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, J E; Ho, L C

    2005-01-01

    We describe our efforts to study dwarf galaxies with active nuclei, whose black holes, with masses < 10^6 M_sun, provide the best current observational constraints on the mass distribution of primordial seed black holes. Although these low-mass galaxies do not necessarily contain classical bulges, Barth, Greene, & Ho (2005) show that their stellar velocity dispersions and black hole masses obey the same relation as more massive systems. In order to characterize the properties of the dwarf hosts without the glare of the active nucleus, we have compiled a complementary sample of narrow-line active galaxies with low-mass hosts. The host galaxy properties, both their structures and stellar populations, are consistent with the general properties of low-mass, blue galaxies from Sloan. The black holes in these galaxies are probably radiating close to their Eddington limits, suggesting we may have found Type 2 analogues of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  12. Massive Gravity in Three Dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    A particular higher-derivative extension of the Einstein-Hilbert action in three spacetime dimensions is shown to be equivalent at the linearized level to the (unitary) Pauli-Fierz action for a massive spin-2 field. A more general model, which also includes "topologically-massive" gravity as a speci

  13. Sulfide oxidation as a process for the formation of copper-rich magmatic sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser, Cora C.; Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Ballhaus, Chris; Berndt, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Typical magmatic sulfides are dominated by pyrrhotite and pentlandite with minor chalcopyrite, and the bulk atomic Cu/Fe ratio of these sulfides is typically less than unity. However, there are rare magmatic sulfide occurrences that are dominated by Cu-rich sulfides (e.g., bornite, digenite, and chalcopyrite, sometimes coexisting with metallic Cu) with atomic Cu/Fe as high as 5. Typically, these types of sulfide assemblages occur in the upper parts of moderately to highly fractionated layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, a well-known example being the Pd/Au reef in the Upper Middle Zone of the Skaergaard intrusion. Processes proposed to explain why these sulfides are so unusually rich in Cu include fractional crystallization of Fe/(Ni) monosulfide and infiltration of postmagmatic Cu-rich fluids. In this contribution, we explore and experimentally evaluate a third possibility: that Cu-rich magmatic sulfides may be the result of magmatic oxidation. FeS-dominated Ni/Cu-bearing sulfides were equilibrated at variable oxygen fugacities in both open and closed system. Our results show that the Cu/Fe ratio of the sulfide melt increases as a function of oxygen fugacity due to the preferential conversion of FeS into FeO and FeO1.5, and the resistance of Cu2S to being converted into an oxide component even at oxygen fugacities characteristic of the sulfide/sulfate transition (above FMQ + 1). This phenomenon will lead to an increase in the metal/S ratio of a sulfide liquid and will also depress its liquidus temperature. As such, any modeling of the sulfide liquid line of descent in magmatic sulfide complexes needs to address this issue.

  14. Lithologic controls on mineralization at the Lagunas Norte high-sulfidation epithermal gold deposit, northern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerpa, Luis M.; Bissig, Thomas; Kyser, Kurt; McEwan, Craig; Macassi, Arturo; Rios, Hugo W.

    2013-06-01

    The 13.1-Moz high-sulfidation epithermal gold deposit of Lagunas Norte, Alto Chicama District, northern Peru, is hosted in weakly metamorphosed quartzites of the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Chimú Formation and in overlying Miocene volcanic rocks of dacitic to rhyolitic composition. The Dafne and Josefa diatremes crosscut the quartzites and are interpreted to be sources of the pyroclastic volcanic rocks. Hydrothermal activity was centered on the diatremes and four hydrothermal stages have been defined, three of which introduced Au ± Ag mineralization. The first hydrothermal stage is restricted to the quartzites of the Chimú Formation and is characterized by silice parda, a tan-colored aggregate of quartz-auriferous pyrite-rutile ± digenite infilling fractures and faults, partially replacing silty beds and forming cement of small hydraulic breccia bodies. The δ34S values for pyrite (1.7-2.2 ‰) and digenite (2.1 ‰) indicate a magmatic source for the sulfur. The second hydrothermal stage resulted in the emplacement of diatremes and the related volcanic rocks. The Dafne diatreme features a relatively impermeable core dominated by milled slate from the Chicama Formation, whereas the Josefa diatreme only contains Chimú Formation quartzite clasts. The third hydrothermal stage introduced the bulk of the mineralization and affected the volcanic rocks, the diatremes, and the Chimú Formation. In the volcanic rocks, classic high-sulfidation epithermal alteration zonation exhibiting vuggy quartz surrounded by a quartz-alunite and a quartz-alunite-kaolinite zone is observed. Company data suggest that gold is present in solid solution or micro inclusions in pyrite. In the quartzite, the alteration is subtle and is manifested by the presence of pyrophyllite or kaolinite in the silty beds, the former resulting from relatively high silica activities in the fluid. In the quartzite, gold mineralization is hosted in a fracture network filled with coarse alunite

  15. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyphenylene sulfide resins. 177.2490 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene sulfide resins (poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide) resins) may be safely used as coatings or components...

  16. New data on age of ore-hosting sequence of the Saf'yanovka deposit, Central Urals, based on foraminifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvashov, B. I.; Anfimov, A. L.; Soroka, E. I.; Yaroslavtseva, N. S.

    2011-08-01

    The Saf'yanovka copper massive sulfide deposit is situated 10 km northeast from the town of Rezh, on the eastern slope of the Central Urals. The ore-hosting plagiorhyolite-dacitic sequence consists of tephrites and tuffites with interlayers of dark gray siliceous-carboniferous pelites and psephytes from 0.1 to 1.5 m thick. The shells of the Parathurammina tamarae L. Petrovae, 1981 foraminifer were identified in one of the lightened interlayers in the siliceous-carboniferous sequence. The samples for study were taken from the southern part of the orebody in the open-pit between prospecting lines 2 and 3, horizons 170 and 157. The inner part of the shell is composed of quartz and apatite, and the wall, by apatite with rare calcite grains. One shell contains a tacking disk allowing us to refer these foraminifers to the attached benthos typical of the shallow marine basin (sublitoral). In the Urals, the Parathurammina tamarae L. Petrovae, 1981 foraminifer is known in limestones from the Eifel-Givetian (Langurskii and Vysotinskii Horizons); the siliceous-carboniferous rocks from the ore-hosting sequence from the Saf'yanovka deposit has the same age.

  17. Adequate hydrogen sulfide, healthy circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jun-bao; CHEN Stella; JIN Hong-fang; TANG Chao-shu

    2011-01-01

    Previously,hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was considered to be a toxic gas.However,recently it was discovered that it could be produced in mammals and even in plants,throughtheproductionandmetabolismof sulfur-containing amino acids.In mammals,H2S is mainly catalyzed by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE),cystathionin-β-lyase (CBS) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) with the substrate of L-cysteine.Endogenous H2S exerts many important physiological and pathophysiological functions,including hypotensive action,vasorelaxation,myocardial dilation,inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation,and antioxidatve actions.Importantly,it plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of systemic hypertension,pulmonary hypertension,atherosclerosis,myocardialinjury,angiogenesis,hyperhomocysteinemi aandshock.Therefore,H2S is now being considered to be a novel gasotransmitter after nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in the regulation of circulatory system.

  18. Redox biochemistry of hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabil, Omer; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-07-16

    H(2)S, the most recently discovered gasotransmitter, might in fact be the evolutionary matriarch of this family, being both ancient and highly reduced. Disruption of gamma-cystathionase in mice leads to cardiovascular dysfunction and marked hypertension, suggesting a key role for this enzyme in H(2)S production in the vasculature. However, patients with inherited deficiency in gamma-cystathionase apparently do not present vascular pathology. A mitochondrial pathway disposes sulfide and couples it to oxidative phosphorylation while also exposing cytochrome c oxidase to this metabolic poison. This report focuses on the biochemistry of H(2)S biogenesis and clearance, on the molecular mechanisms of its action, and on its varied biological effects.

  19. Massive gauge-flation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Carlos M.; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2016-06-01

    Gauge-flation model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory offers an interesting scenario for realizing inflation within a particle physics context, allowing us to investigate interesting possible connections between inflation and the subsequent evolution of the Universe. Difficulties, however, arise at the perturbative level, thus motivating a modification of the original model. In order to agree with the latest Planck observations, we modify the model such that the new dynamics can produce a relation between the spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r allowed by the data. By including an identical mass term for each of the fields of the system, we find interesting dynamics leading to slow-roll inflation of the right length. The presence of the mass term has the potential to modify the ns versus r relation so as to agree with the data. As a first step, we study the model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory, finding the conditions required for slow-roll inflation and the number of e-foldings of inflation. Numerical solutions are used to explore the impact of the mass term. We conclude that the massive version of gauge-flation offers a viable inflationary model.

  20. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  1. Structural studies in limestone sulfidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenouil, Laurent A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This study investigates the sulfidation of limestone at high temperatures (700--900°C) as the first step in the design of a High-Temperature Coal-Gas Clean-Up system using millimeter-size limestone particles. Several workers have found that the rate of this reaction significantly decreases after an initial 10 to 15% conversion of CaCO3 to CaS. The present work attempts to explain this feature. It is first established that millimeter-size limestone particles do not sinter at temperatures up to the CaCO3 calcination point (899°C at 1.03 bar CO2} partial pressure). It is then shown that CaS sinters rapidly at 750 to 900°C if CO2 is present in the gas phase. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) data reveal that the CaS product layer sinters and forms a quasi-impermeable coating around the CaCO3 grains that greatly hinders more H2S from reaching the still unreacted parts of the stone. Moreover, most of the pores initially present within the limestone structure begin to disappear or, at least, are significantly reduced in size. From then on, subsequent conversion is limited by diffusion of H2S through the CaS layer, possibly by S2- ionic diffusion. The kinetics is then adequately described by a shrinking-core model, in which a sharp front of completely converted limestone is assumed to progress toward the center of the pellet. Finally, experimental evidence and computer simulations using simple sintering models suggest that the CaS sintering, responsible for the sharp decrease in the sulfidation rate, is surface-diffusion controlled.

  2. Removal of methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanagawa, T; Mikami, E.

    1989-01-01

    Methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide were efficiently removed from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m and oxidized to sulfate stoichiometrically. More than 99.99% of dimethyl sulfide was removed when the load was less than 4.0 g of dimethyl sulfide per g (dry cell weight) per day.

  3. Paleoproterozoic high-sulfidation mineralization in the Tapajós gold province, Amazonian Craton, Brazil: geology, mineralogy, alunite argon age, and stable-isotope constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliani, Caetano; Rye, Robert O.; Nunes, Carmen M.D.; Snee, Lawrence W.; Correa, Rafael H.; Monteiro, Lena V.S.; Bettencourt, Jorge S.; Neumann, Rainer; Neto, Arnaldo A.

    2005-01-01

    The Brazilian Tapajós gold province contains the first evidence of high-sulfidation gold mineralization in the Amazonian Craton. The mineralization appears to be in large nested calderas. The Tapajós–Parima (or Ventuari–Tapajós) geological province consists of a metamorphic, igneous, and sedimentary sequence formed during a 2.10 to 1.87 Ga ocean−continent orogeny. The high-sulfidation mineralization with magmatic-hydrothermal alunite is related to hydrothermal breccias hosted in a rhyolitic volcanic ring complex that contains granitic stocks ranging in age from 1.89 to 1.87 Ga. Cone-shaped hydrothermal breccias, which flare upward, contain vuggy silica and have an overlying brecciated cap of massive silica; the deposits are located in the uppermost part of a ring-structure volcanic cone. Drill cores of one of the hydrothermal breccias contain alunite, natroalunite, pyrophyllite, andalusite, quartz, rutile, diaspore, woodhouseite–svanbergite, kaolinite, and pyrite along with inclusions of enargite–luzonite, chalcopyrite, bornite, and covellite. The siliceous core of this alteration center is surrounded by advanced argillic and argillic alteration zones that grade outward into large areas of propylitically altered rocks with sericitic alteration assemblages at depth. Several occurrences and generations of alunite are observed. Alunite is disseminated in the advanced argillic haloes that envelop massive and vuggy silica or that underlie the brecciated silica cap. Coarse-grained alunite also occurs in branching veins and locally is partly replaced by a later generation of fine-grained alunite. Silicified hydrothermal breccias associated with the alunite contain an estimated reserve of 30 tonnes of gold in rock that grades up to 4.5 g t−1 Au. Seven alunite samples gave 40Ar/39Ar ages of 1.869 to 1.846 Ga, with various degrees of apparent minor Ar loss. Stable isotopic data require a magmatic-hydrothermal origin for the alunite, typical for high-sulfidation

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Induces Oxidative Damage to RNA and DNA in a Sulfide-Tolerant Marine Invertebrate

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L.; Stein, Jenny R.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes ...

  5. Nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria as microbial oxidants for rapid biological sulfide removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gusseme, Bart; De Schryver, Peter; De Cooman, Michaël; Verbeken, Kim; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2009-01-01

    The emission of hydrogen sulfide into the atmosphere of sewer systems induces the biological production of sulfuric acid, causing severe concrete corrosion. As a possible preventive solution, a microbial consortium of nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) was enriched in a continuously stirred tank reactor in order to develop a biological technique for the removal of dissolved sulfide. The consortium, dominated by Arcobacter sp., was capable of removing 99% of sulfide. Stable isotope fractioning of the sulfide indicated that the oxidation was a biological process. The capacity of the NR-SOB consortium for rapid removal of sulfide was demonstrated by using it as an inoculum in synthetic and real sewage. Removal rates up to 52 mg sulfide-S g VSS(-1) h(-1) were achieved, to our knowledge the highest removal rate reported so far for freshwater species in the absence of molecular oxygen. Further long-term incubation experiments revealed the capacity of the bacteria to oxidize sulfide without the presence of nitrate, suggesting that an oxidized redox reserve is present in the culture.

  6. Gauge Model with Massive Gravitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning

    2003-01-01

    Gauge theory of gravity is formulated based on principle of local gauge invariance. Because the model hasstrict local gravitational gauge symmetry, and gauge theory of gravity is a perturbatively renormalizable quantum model.However, in the original model, all gauge gravitons are massless. We want to ask whether there exist massive gravitonsin Nature. In this paper, we will propose a gauge model with massive gravitons. The mass term of gravitational gaugefield is introduced into the theory without violating the strict local gravitational gauge symmetry. Massive gravitons canbe considered to be possible origin of dark energy and dark matter in the Universe.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide in hemostasis: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2014-06-25

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well known toxic gas that is synthesized from the amino acids: cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy) by three enzymes: cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Hydrogen sulfide, like carbon monoxide (CO) or nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule in different biological systems, including the cardiovascular system. Moreover, hydrogen sulfide plays a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. It modulates different elements of hemostasis (activation of blood platelet, and coagulation process) as well as proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the biological role and the therapeutic potential of H2S is not clear. This review summarizes the different functions of hydrogen sulfide in hemostasis.

  8. Galaxy bulges and their massive black holes: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Alister W

    2015-01-01

    With references to both key and oft-forgotten pioneering works, this article starts by presenting a review into how we came to believe in the existence of massive black holes at the centres of galaxies. It then presents the historical development of the near-linear (black hole)-(host spheroid) mass relation, before explaining why this has recently been dramatically revised. Past disagreement over the slope of the (black hole)-(velocity dispersion) relation is also explained, and the discovery of sub-structure within the (black hole)-(velocity dispersion) diagram is discussed. As the search for the fundamental connection between massive black holes and their host galaxies continues, the competing array of additional black hole mass scaling relations for samples of predominantly inactive galaxies are presented.

  9. Organic silicon compounds anf hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas by mineral and adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide , as their burning has damaging effects on utilities and humans; organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide can be found in biogas produced from biomass wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product,such as cosmetics, detergents and paints.Siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Ajhar et al., 2010); aim of the present work is to find a single practical andeconomic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both hydrogen sulfide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleoneet al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing both hydrogen sulphide and volatile siloxane (Decamethycyclopentasiloxane or D5) in a nitrogen stream,typically 25-300 ppm D5 over N2, through an clay minerals, Fe oxides and Silica; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best silica shows an adsorption capacity of 0.2 g D5 per gram of silica. The next thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests.The capacity results depend on D5 and hydrogen sulphide concentrations. A regenerative silica process is then carried out byheating the silica bed up to 200 ° C and flushing out the adsorbed D5 and hydrogen sulphide samples in a nitrogen stream in athree step heating procedure up to 200 ° C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cyclingthe samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  10. Satellite Accretion Onto Massive Galaxies With Central Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Boylan-Kolchin, M; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Ma, Chung-Pei

    2006-01-01

    Minor mergers of galaxies are expected to be common in a hierarchical cosmology such as $\\Lambda$CDM and have the potential to significantly affect galactic structure. In this paper we dissect the case-by-case outcome from a set of numerical simulations of a single satellite elliptical galaxy accreting onto a massive elliptical galaxy. We take care to explore cosmologically relevant orbital parameters and to set up realistic initial galaxy models that include all three relevant dynamical components: dark matter halos, stellar bulges, and central massive black holes. The effects of several different parameters are considered, including orbital energy and angular momentum, satellite density and inner density profile, satellite-to-host mass ratio, and presence of a black hole at the center of the host. Black holes play a crucial role in protecting the shallow stellar cores of the hosts, as satellites merging onto a host with a central black hole are more strongly disrupted than those merging onto hosts without b...

  11. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The emissions process of hydrogen sulfide was studied to quantify air–water transfer of hydrogen sulfide in sewer networks. Hydrogen sulfide transfer across the air–water interface was investigated at different turbulence levels (expressed in terms of the Froude number) and pH using batch...... experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...

  12. Mechanism of mechanical activation for sulfide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hui-ping; CHEN Qi-yuan; YIN Zhou-lan; HE Yue-hui; HUANG Bai-yun

    2007-01-01

    Structural changes for mechanically activated pyrite, sphalerite, galena and molybdenite with or without the exposure to ambient air, were systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis(XRD), particle size analysis, gravimetrical method, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy(XPS) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM), respectively. Based on the above structural changes for mechanically activated sulfide ores and related reports by other researchers, several qualitative rules of the mechanisms and the effects of mechanical activation for sulfide ores are obtained. For brittle sulfide ores with thermal instability, and incomplete cleavage plane or extremely incomplete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that a great amount of surface reactive sites are formed during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For brittle sulfide ores with thermal instability, and complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that a great amount of surface reactive sites are formed, and lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For brittle sulfide ores with excellent thermal stability, and complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For sulfide ores with high toughness, good thermal stability and very excellent complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation, but the lattice deformation ratio is very small. The effects of mechanical activation are worst.

  13. Sulfide as a soil phytotoxin - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon P M Lamers

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In wetland soils and underwater sediments of marine, brackish and freshwater systems, the strong phytotoxin sulfide may accumulate as a result of microbial reduction of sulfate during anaerobiosis, its level depending on prevailing edaphic conditions. In this review, we compare an extensive body of literature on phytotoxic effects of this reduced sulfur compound in different ecosystem types, and review the effects of sulfide at multiple ecosystem levels: the ecophysiological functioning of individual plants, plant-microbe associations, and community effects including competition and facilitation interactions. Recent publications on multi-species interactions in the rhizosphere show even more complex mechanisms explaining sulfide resistance. It is concluded that sulfide is a potent phytotoxin, profoundly affecting plant fitness and ecosystem functioning in the full range of wetland types including coastal systems, and at several levels. Traditional toxicity testing including hydroponic approaches generally neglect rhizospheric effects, which makes it difficult to extrapolate results to real ecosystem processes. To explain the differential effects of sulfide at the different organizational levels, profound knowledge about the biogeochemical, plant physiological and ecological rhizosphere processes is vital. This information is even more important, as anthropogenic inputs of sulfur into freshwater ecosystems and organic loads into freshwater and marine systems are still much higher than natural levels, and are steeply increasing in Asia. In addition, higher temperatures as a result of global climate change may lead to higher sulfide production rates in shallow waters.

  14. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Gomez, D K; Cassidy, J; Keesman, K J; Sampaio, R; Lens, P N L

    2014-03-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4(2-) ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing bioreactors. The sulfide was measured using a sulfide ion selective electrode (pS) and the values obtained were used to calculate proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller parameters. The experiments were performed in an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with automated operation using the LabVIEW software version 2009(®). A rapid response and high sulfide increment was obtained through a stepwise increase in the CODin concentration, while a stepwise decrease to the HRT exhibited a slower response with smaller sulfide increment. Irrespective of the way the OLR was decreased, the pS response showed a time-varying behavior due to sulfide accumulation (HRT change) or utilization of substrate sources that were not accounted for (CODin change). The pS electrode response, however, showed to be informative for applications in sulfate reducing bioreactors. Nevertheless, the recorded pS values need to be corrected for pH variations and high sulfide concentrations (>200 mg/L). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa Gomez, D.K.; Cassidy, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Sampaio, R.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4 2- ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing

  16. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  17. Hydrogen sulfide induces oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in a sulfide-tolerant marine invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L; Stein, Jenny R; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (0-3 mmol L(-1) for 1 h) showed dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress (as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence) and superoxide production (as dihydroethidine fluorescence). Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (up to 0.73 mmol L(-1) for 2 h) also acquired increased oxidative damage to RNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) and DNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine). Worms exposed in vivo to sulfide (0-10 mmol L(-1) for 24 h) acquired elevated oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in both coelomocytes and body wall tissue. While the consequences of RNA and DNA oxidative damage are poorly understood, oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine bases preferentially bind thymine, causing G-T transversions and potentially causing heritable point mutations. This suggests that sulfide can be an environmental mutagen in sulfide-tolerant invertebrates.

  18. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa Gomez, D.K.; Cassidy, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Sampaio, R.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4 2- ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing

  19. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  20. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  1. sulfide – reality or fantasy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Brodek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a signaling gasotransmitter, involved in different physiological and pathological processes. H2S regulates apoptosis, the cell cycle and oxidative stress. H2S exerts powerful effects on smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, inflammatory cells, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nuclear transcription factors. H2S is known to be produced from L-cysteine, D-cysteine and L-homocysteine in the body. Four enzymes – cystathionine-b synthase (CBS, mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST, cystathionine-γ lyase (CSE and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT – are involved in H2S synthesis. The biosynthetic pathway for the production of H2S from D-cysteine involves 3-MST and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO. The therapeutic potential of H2S is not clear. However, recently results have demonstrated that H2S has protective action for ischemic heart disease or hypertension, and protects against ischemia of the brain. This review summarizes the negative and the positive roles of H2S in various biological systems, for example the cardiovascular system and nervous system. We also discuss the function of classical, therapeutic and natural (for example garlic donors of H2S in pre-clinical and clinical studies.

  2. Thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

    1994-10-28

    The rate of thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide (HgS) has been measured at temperatures from 265 to 345 C. These data have been analyzed using a first-order chemical reaction model for the time dependence of the reaction and the Arrhenius equation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Using this information, the activation energy for the reaction was found to be 55 kcal/mol. Significant reaction vessel surface effects obscured the functional form of the time dependence of the initial portion of the reaction. The data and the resulting time-temperature reaction-rate model were used to predict the decomposition rate of HgS as a function of time and temperature in thermal treatment systems. Data from large-scale thermal treatment studies already completed were interpreted in terms of the results of this study. While the data from the large-scale thermal treatment studies were consistent with the data from this report, mass transport effects may have contributed to the residual amount of mercury which remained in the soil after most of the large-scale runs.

  3. Indium sulfide buffer/CIGSSe interface engineering: Improved cell performance by the addition of zinc sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allsop, N.A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: allsop@hmi.de; Camus, C. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Haensel, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Gledhill, S.E. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Lauermann, I. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Lux-Steiner, M.C. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Fischer, Ch.-H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-05-31

    Indium sulfide buffer layers deposited by the spray-ion layer gas reaction (Spray-ILGAR) technique are a viable alternative to the traditional cadmium sulfide buffer layer in thin film solar cells. In the present work we report on the results of manipulating the absorber/buffer interface between the chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} absorber (CIGSSe) and the indium sulfide buffer. It is shown that the deposition of a small amount of zinc sulfide at the absorber/buffer interface can be used to increase the open circuit voltage. A small but significant increase of 20 mV (up to 580 mV), as compared to the pure indium sulfide buffered cells is possible leading to an increase in the overall efficiency.

  4. Holographically Viable Extensions of Topologically Massive and Minimal Massive Gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Altas, Emel

    2015-01-01

    Recently, an extension of the topologically massive gravity (TMG) in $2+1$ dimensions, dubbed as minimal massive gravity (MMG), was found which is free of the bulk-boundary unitarity clash that inflicts the former theory and all the other known three dimensional theories. Field equations of MMG differ from those of TMG at quadratic terms in the curvature that do not come from the variation of an action depending on the metric alone. Here we show that MMG is a unique theory and there does not exist a deformation of TMG or MMG at the cubic and quartic order (and beyond) in the curvature that is consistent at the level of the field equations. The only extension of TMG with the desired bulk and boundary properties having a single massive degree of freedom is MMG.

  5. The evolution of massive and very massive stars in clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Vanbeveren, Dany

    2008-01-01

    The present paper reviews massive star (initial mass smaller than 120 M0) and very massive star (initial mass larger than 120 M0) evolution. I will focus on evolutionary facts and questions that may critically affect predictions of population and spectral synthesis of starburst regions. We discuss the ever-lasting factor 2 or more uncertainty in the stellar wind mass loss rates. We may ask ourselves if stellar rotation is one of the keys to understand the universe, why so many massive stars are binary components and why binaries are ignored or are considered as the poor cousins by some people? And finally, do ultra luminous X-ray sources harbor an intermediate mass black hole with a mass of the order of 1000 M0?

  6. Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits of the world: Database and grade and tonnage models

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Information on VMS deposits from around the world. It also presents new grade and tonnage models for three subtypes of VMS deposits and a text file allowing...

  7. A study of the stability of cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide and cadmium sulfide copper-indium-diselenide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, G.; Richard, N.; Gaines, G.

    1984-08-01

    Groups of high efficiency cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide solar cells were exposed to combinations of stresses designed to isolate and accelerate intrinsic degradation mechanisms. Stresses included elevated temperature, illumination intensity, and cell loading conditions. All stress exposures and tests were conducted in a benign (high purity argon) atmosphere. Two primary intrinsic modes of degradation were identified: degradation of the open circuit voltage under continuous illumination and nonzero loading was found to be self recovering upon interruption of illumination or upon shorting or reverse biasing the cells. It was attributed to traps in the depletion region. Recovery from decay of light generated current was not spontaneous but could be partially accomplished by annealing in a reducing (hydrogen) environment. It was attributed to changes in the stoichiometry of the copper sulfide under the influence of electric fields and currents.

  8. Sulfide capacities of fayalite-base slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, S. R.; Sridhar, R.; Toguri, J. M.

    1995-04-01

    The sulfide capacities of fayalite-base slags were measured by a gas-slag equilibration technique under controlled oxygen and sulfur potentials similar to those encountered in the pyrometallurgical processing of nonferrous metals. The oxygen pressure range was from 10-9.5 to 10-11 MPa and the sulfur pressure range from 10-3 to 10-4.5 MPa, over a temperature range of 1473 to 1623 K. The slags studied were FeO-SiO2 at silica saturation and those with addition of CaO, MgO, and Al2O3 to determine their effect on sulfide capacities. For these slags, the sulfide capacities were found to vary from 10-3.3 to 10-5. The sulfide capacities increased with increasing temperature from 1473 to 1623 K. A comparison of the reported plant data on sulfur content of industrial slags shows good agreement with the present experimental results. The present data will be useful in estimating metal losses in slag due to metal sulfide entrainment in nonferrous smelters.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide: neurochemistry and neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, K; Lee, S W; Bian, J S; Low, C-M; Wong, P T-H

    2008-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role in brain functions, probably acting as a neuromodulator as well as an intracellular messenger. In the mammalian CNS, H2S is formed from the amino acid cysteine by the action of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) with serine (Ser) as the by-product. As CBS is a calcium and calmodulin dependent enzyme, the biosynthesis of H2S should be acutely controlled by the intracellular concentration of calcium. In addition, it is also regulated by S-adenosylmethionine which acts as an allosteric activator of CBS. H2S, as a sulfhydryl compound, has similar reducing properties as glutathione. In neurons, H2S stimulates the production of cAMP probably by direct activation of adenylyl cyclase and thus activate cAMP-dependent processes. In astrocytes, H2S increases intracellular calcium to an extent capable of inducing and propagating a "calcium wave", which is a form of calcium signaling among these cells. Possible physiological functions of H2S include potentiating long-term potentials through activation of the NMDA receptors, regulating the redox status, maintaining the excitatory/inhibitory balance in neurotransmission, and inhibiting oxidative damage through scavenging free radicals and reactive species. H2S is also involved in CNS pathologies such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease. In stroke, H2S appears to act as a mediator of ischemic injuries and thus inhibition of its production has been suggested to be a potential treatment approach in stroke therapy.

  10. Origin and fate of sulfide liquids in hotspot volcanism (La Réunion): Pb isotope constraints from residual Fe-Cu oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastélic, I.; Gannoun, A.; Di Muro, A.; Gurioli, L.; Bachèlery, P.; Henot, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Immiscible sulfide liquids in basaltic magmas play an important role in trace metal transport and the sulfur budget of volcanic eruptions. However, sulfides are transient phases, whose origin and fate are poorly constrained. We address these issues by analyzing sulfide destabilization products preserved in lavas from La Réunion Island. Iron oxide globules and coatings, typically 20-80 μm in size, were found to occur in vesicles of differentiated lavas from Piton des Neiges, and recent pumice samples from Piton de la Fournaise. Field and mineralogical evidence indicates that the iron oxides are syn-eruptive phases not resulting from hydrothermal processes. Samples were first studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The globules were separated, whereas the smaller spherules and coatings were concentrated by magnetic sorting and acid leaching, and samples were processed through wet chemistry. The Fe oxide phases comprise 49-74 wt.% Fe, 26-40 wt.% O, and up to 6 wt.% Cu, 811 ppm Ni, 140 ppm Bi, and 8.5 ppm Pb. Compared to the host lava, Cu, Ni, and Bi are enriched by a factor of 101-103. Systematic Pb isotope disequilibrium (between 500 ppm and 2.9% for 206Pb/204Pb) exists between Fe oxides and host rocks, with Fe oxides generally displaying less radiogenic ratios. Unradiogenic Pb is a typical signature of sulfide, which tends to concentrate Pb, but not its parent elements U and Th. Thus, both the chemical and isotopic compositions of the vesicle-hosted Fe oxides suggest that they are more or less direct products of the destabilization of immiscible sulfide liquids. Although Pb dominantly partitions into the gas phase during sulfide breakdown, the original Pb isotope signature of sulfide is preserved in the residual oxide. The composition estimated for the parent sulfides (206Pb/204Pb = 18.20-18.77, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.575, and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.2-38.8) precludes a genetic link with the La Réunion plume, and suggests a lithospheric or crustal origin. It is estimated

  11. Fluid-mediated metal transport in subduction zones and its link to arc-related giant ore deposits: Constraints from a sulfide-bearing HP vein in lawsonite eclogite (Tianshan, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Lei; Gao, Jun; John, Timm; Klemd, Reiner; Su, Wen

    2013-11-01

    High-pressure (HP) veins in eclogites provide insight into element mobility during fluid-rock interaction in subduction zones. Here, we present a petrological-geochemical study of a sulfide-bearing HP vein and its massive lawsonite eclogite host rock from the Chinese Tianshan (ultra-)high-pressure/low-temperature metamorphic belt. The omphacite-dominated vein is enveloped by a garnet-poor, sulfide-bearing eclogite-facies reaction selvage. Lawsonite, garnet, omphacite, glaucophane and other HP minerals occur as inclusions in pyrite porphyroblasts of the selvage rock, indicating that the selvage formed prograde under eclogite-facies conditions. Relicts of wall-rock garnet (Grt_I) cores in recrystallized selvage garnet (Grt_II) close to the wall rock and the Ca distribution in Grt_II, which images the overgrown selvage matrix, indicate that the selvage formed due to dissolution-precipitation processes as a consequence of fluid-rock interaction of the wall rock eclogite with the vein-forming fluid. The peak metamorphic P-T conditions of the wall-rock eclogite are estimated at ca. 590 °C and 23 kbar. Mass-balance calculations indicate that the reaction selvage experienced: (1) a depletion of the large-ion lithophile elements (K-Rb-Ba) of up to 100% relative to their concentrations in the wall-rock eclogite; (2) a moderate depletion of the HREE and some transition metal elements including Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn, Co, Cr, and Mn (10-40%); (3) a significant enrichment of CaO (up to 50-80%), Sr (up to ˜200%), Pb (up to ˜170%) and S (up to ˜210%); (4) a slight to moderate enrichment of the LREE (10-20%) and MREE (0-40%); whereas (5) the HFSE show no significant variations.

  12. Satellite galaxies around present-day massive ellipticals

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, Pablo; Mármol-Queraltó, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Using the spectroscopic and photometric catalogues of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR7), we have explored the satellite distribution around $\\sim$1000 massive (M$_\\star$$\\gtrsim$2$\\times$10$^{11}$M$_\\odot$) visually classified elliptical galaxies down to a satellite mass ratio of 1:400 (i.e. 5$\\times$$10^{8}$$\\lesssim$M$_{sat}$$\\lesssim$2$\\times$10$^{11}$M$_\\odot$). Our host galaxies were selected to be representative of a mass complete sample. The satellites of these galaxies were searched within a projected radial distance of 100 kpc to their hosts. We have found that only 17-23% of the massive ellipticals has at least a satellite down to a mass ratio 1:10. This number increases to 40-52% if we explore satellites down to 1:100 and is $>$55-70% if we go further down to 1:400. The average projected radial distance of the satellites to their hosts is $\\sim$59 kpc (which can be decreased down to 49-51 kpc if we account for incompleteness effects). The number of satellites per galaxy host only increases ve...

  13. Perturbations in Massive Gravity Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Crisostomi, Marco; Pilo, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    We study cosmological perturbations for a ghost free massive gravity theory formulated with a dynamical extra metric that is needed to massive deform GR. In this formulation FRW background solutions fall in two branches. In the dynamics of perturbations around the first branch solutions, no extra degree of freedom with respect to GR ispresent at linearized level, likewise what is found in the Stuckelberg formulation of massive gravity where the extra metric isflat and non dynamical. In the first branch, perturbations are probably strongly coupled. On the contrary, for perturbations around the second branch solutions all expected degrees of freedom propagate. While tensor and vector perturbations of the physical metric that couples with matter follow closely the ones of GR, scalars develop an exponential Jeans-like instability on sub-horizon scales. On the other hand, around a de Sitter background there is no instability. We argue that one could get rid of the instabilities by introducing a mirror dark matter ...

  14. Massive ascites of unknown origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Massive ascites of unknown origin is an uncommon condition, which represent a diagnostic challenge. Patients with delayed diagnosis and treatment may have a poor prognosis. A 22-year-old female was referred to this hospital due to a 4-year progressive abdominal distension with massive ascites of unknown origin. By thorough investigations, she was eventually diagnosed as chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. She received pericardiectomy and had an uneventful postoperative course. With a few day paracentesis, ascites did not progress any more. She was doing well at 5-month follow-up and has returned to work. Extracardiac manifestations, such as massive ascites and liver cirrhosis, were rare in patients with constrictive pericarditis. Pericardiectomy can be a radical solution for the treatment of chronic constrictive pericarditis. In order to avoid delayed diagnosis and treatment, physicians have to bear in mind this rare manifestation of chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. PMID:24600502

  15. Quantum Corrections in Massive Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    de Rham, Claudia; Ribeiro, Raquel H

    2013-01-01

    We compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the potential of ghost-free massive gravity. We show how the mass of external matter fields contribute to the running of the cosmological constant, but do not change the ghost-free structure of the massive gravity potential at one-loop. When considering gravitons running in the loops, we show how the structure of the potential gets destabilized at the quantum level, but in a way which would never involve a ghost with a mass smaller than the Planck scale. This is done by explicitly computing the one-loop effective action and supplementing it with the Vainshtein mechanism. We conclude that to one-loop order the special mass structure of ghost-free massive gravity is technically natural.

  16. Quantum corrections in massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rham, Claudia; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Ribeiro, Raquel H.

    2013-10-01

    We compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the potential of ghost-free massive gravity. We show how the mass of external matter fields contributes to the running of the cosmological constant, but does not change the ghost-free structure of the massive gravity potential at one-loop. When considering gravitons running in the loops, we show how the structure of the potential gets destabilized at the quantum level, but in a way which would never involve a ghost with a mass smaller than the Planck scale. This is done by explicitly computing the one-loop effective action and supplementing it with the Vainshtein mechanism. We conclude that to one-loop order the special mass structure of ghost-free massive gravity is technically natural.

  17. Microbial- and Thiosulfate-Mediated Dissolution of Mercury Sulfide Minerals and Transformation to Gaseous Mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiari eVázquez-Rodríguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is a toxic heavy metal that poses significant human and environmental health risks. Soils and sediments, where Hg can exist as the Hg sulfide mineral metacinnabar (β-HgS, represent major Hg reservoirs in aquatic environments. Metacinnabar has historically been considered a sink for Hg in all but severely acidic environments, and thus disregarded as a potential source of Hg back to aqueous or gaseous pools. Here, we conducted a combination of field and laboratory incubations to identify the potential for metacinnabar as a source of dissolved Hg within near neutral pH environments and the underpinning (abiotic mechanisms at play. We show that the abundant and widespread sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus extensively colonized metacinnabar chips incubated within aerobic, near neutral pH creek sediments. Laboratory incubations of axenic Thiobacillus cultures lead to the release of metacinnabar-hosted Hg(II and subsequent volatilization to Hg(0. This dissolution and volatilization was greatly enhanced in the presence of the sulfur intermediate, thiosulfate, which served a dual role by enhancing HgS dissolution and providing an additional metabolic substrate for Thiobacillus. These findings reveal a new coupled abiotic-biotic pathway for the transformation of metacinnabar-bound Hg(II to Hg(0, while expanding the sulfide substrates available for neutrophilic chemosynthetic bacteria to Hg-laden sulfides. They also point to mineral-hosted Hg as an underappreciated source of gaseous elemental Hg to the environment.

  18. Broadbeam for Massive MIMO Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Deli; Qian, Haifeng; Li, Geoffrey Ye

    2016-05-01

    Massive MIMO has been identified as one of the promising disruptive air interface techniques to address the huge capacity requirement demanded by 5G wireless communications. For practical deployment of such systems, the control message need to be broadcast to all users reliably in the cell using broadbeam. A broadbeam is expected to have the same radiated power in all directions to cover users in any place in a cell. In this paper, we will show that there is no perfect broadbeam. Therefore, we develop a method for generating broadbeam that can allow tiny fluctuations in radiated power. Overall, this can serve as an ingredient for practical deployment of the massive MIMO systems.

  19. Cleaning Massive Sonar Point Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars Allan; Larsen, Kasper Green; Mølhave, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of automatically cleaning massive sonar data point clouds, that is, the problem of automatically removing noisy points that for example appear as a result of scans of (shoals of) fish, multiple reflections, scanner self-reflections, refraction in gas bubbles, and so on. We...... describe a new algorithm that avoids the problems of previous local-neighbourhood based algorithms. Our algorithm is theoretically I/O-efficient, that is, it is capable of efficiently processing massive sonar point clouds that do not fit in internal memory but must reside on disk. The algorithm is also...

  20. Massive Gravitons on Bohmian Congruences

    CERN Document Server

    Fathi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Taking a quantum corrected form of Raychaudhuri equation in a geometric background described by a Lorentz-violating massive theory of gravity, we go through investigating a time-like congruence of massive gravitons affected by a Bohmian quantum potential. We find some definite conditions upon which these gravitons are confined to diverging Bohmian trajectories. The respective behaviour of those quantum potentials are also derived and discussed. Additionally, and through a relativistic quantum treatment of a typical wave function, we demonstrate schematic conditions on the associated frequency to the gravitons, in order to satisfy the necessity of divergence.

  1. Solar thermal extraction of copper from sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, L.; Guesdon, C.; Sturzenegger, M.

    2003-03-01

    With the aim to develop a solar-driven process for the extraction of copper from sulfide concentrates re-search on the decomposition of copper sulfides under inert atmospheres has been initiated. Thermogravimetric measurements on chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S) revealed that copper is formed already at 1823 K. Chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}) also disintegrates at this temperature, although at a lower rate. Copper and iron have been identified in the solid residue. The results confirm the feasibility of copper extraction by direct decomposition of sulfides under atmospheric pressure. The decomposition under inert atmosphere prevents generation of SO{sub 2}, and is beneficial to the removal of volatile impurities. Chemical equilibrium calculations for CuFeS{sub 2} contaminated with enargite (Cu{sub 3}AsS{sub 4}) have shown that the absence of an oxidic slag allows for a complete evaporation of arsenic and subsequent separation. (author)

  2. Volcanic rock-hosted gold and base-metal mineralization associated with neoproterozoic-early Paleozoic back-arc extension in the Carolina terrane, southern Appalachian Piedmont

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiss, P.G. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States)); Vance, R.K. (Georgia Southern Univ., Statesboro (United States)); Wesolowski, D.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-05-01

    Volcanogenic mineral deposits in the Carolina terrane, southern Appalachian Piedmont, include Kuroko-type polymetallic massive sulfide deposits and disseminated gold-pyrite deposits associated with propylitic, silicic, argillic, and advanced argillic alteration. Host rocks are metavolcaniclastic and metaepiclastic rocks of a Neoproterozoic-Early Cambrian magmatic arc. The favorable gold horizon is the transition from a lower succession of andesitic and rhyolitic pyroelastic rocks with basal mafic lavas to an upper sequence of epiclastic sedimentary units and minor lava and ash flows. Kuroko-type deposits are associated with mafic to bimodal volcanic rocks in the upper sequence. Whole-rock oxygen isotope analyses indicate that gold mineralization is associated with a transition from hydrothermal systems dominated by isotopically relatively light ([delta][sup 18]O = -6% to -10%) waters, typical of high-latitude subaerial systems, to seawater ([delta][sup 18]O = 0%). Plots of [delta][sup 18]O vs. SiO[sub 2] of the host rocks show a compositional gap associated with mineralization at the subaerial to submarine transition. Values of [delta][sup 18]O for the hydrothermal waters, lithostratigraphic analyses, and tectonic models of the Carolina terrane demonstrate that mineralization coincided with extension in a rifted arc. 34 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ganigué, Ramon; Werner, Ursula; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant sulfide and methane production by sewer biofilms, particularly in rising mains. Sewer sediments in gravity sewers are also biologically active; however, their contribution to biological transformations in sewers is poorly understood at present. In this study, sediments collected from a gravity sewer were cultivated in a laboratory reactor fed with real wastewater for more than one year to obtain intact sediments. Batch test results show significant sulfide production with an average rate of 9.20 ± 0.39 g S/m(2)·d from the sediments, which is significantly higher than the areal rate of sewer biofilms. In contrast, the average methane production rate is 1.56 ± 0.14 g CH4/m(2)·d at 20 °C, which is comparable to the areal rate of sewer biofilms. These results clearly show that the contributions of sewer sediments to sulfide and methane production cannot be ignored when evaluating sewer emissions. Microsensor and pore water measurements of sulfide, sulfate and methane in the sediments, microbial profiling along the depth of the sediments and mathematical modelling reveal that sulfide production takes place near the sediment surface due to the limited penetration of sulfate. In comparison, methane production occurs in a much deeper zone below the surface likely due to the better penetration of soluble organic carbon. Modelling results illustrate the dependency of sulfide and methane productions on the bulk sulfate and soluble organic carbon concentrations can be well described with half-order kinetics.

  4. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  5. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  6. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  7. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......, it was deduced that they were not deposited but instead grew within the deposit. The presence of unburned char particles within the deposits supports the concept that a reducing environment existed in the deposits. Two processes are proposed for explaining the existence of pyrrhotite crystals within a deposit...

  8. Hydrogen sulfide induced disruption of Na+ homeostasis in the cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Dongman; He, Xiaozhou; Yang, Yilin; Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Kim, Dong H; Xia, Ying

    2012-07-01

    Maintenance of ionic balance is essential for neuronal functioning. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), a known toxic environmental gaseous pollutant, has been recently recognized as a gasotransmitter involved in numerous biological processes and is believed to play an important role in the neural activities under both physiological and pathological conditions. However, it is unclear if it plays any role in maintenance of ionic homeostasis in the brain under physiological/pathophysiological conditions. Here, we report by directly measuring Na(+) activity using Na(+) selective electrodes in mouse cortical slices that H(2)S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) increased Na(+) influx in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect could be partially blocked by either Na(+) channel blocker or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blocker alone or almost completely abolished by coapplication of both blockers but not by non-NMDAR blocker. These data suggest that increased H(2)S in pathophysiological conditions, e.g., hypoxia/ischemia, potentially causes a disruption of ionic homeostasis by massive Na(+) influx through Na(+) channels and NMDARs, thus injuring neural functions. Activation of delta-opioid receptors (DOR), which reduces Na(+) currents/influx in normoxia, had no effect on H(2)S-induced Na(+) influx, suggesting that H(2)S-induced disruption of Na(+) homeostasis is resistant to DOR regulation and may play a major role in neuronal injury in pathophysiological conditions, e.g., hypoxia/ischemia.

  9. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to co

  10. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, J.B.; Graaff, M. de; Bosch, P.L. van den; Boelee, N.C.; Keesman, K.J.; Janssen, A.J.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concl

  11. Multiple sulfur isotope and mineralogical constraints on the genesis of Ni-Cu-PGE magmatic sulfide mineralization of the Monchegorsk Igneous Complex, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, A.; Grokhovskaya, T. L.; Hiebert, R.; Sharkov, E. V.; Bui, T. H.; Stadnek, K. R.; Chashchin, V. V.; Wing, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of a pilot investigation of multiple sulfur isotopes for the Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide mineralization of the ˜2.5 Ga Monchegorsk Igneous Complex (MIC). Base Metal Sulfide (BMS) compositions, Platinum Group Element (PGE) distributions, and Platinum Group Mineral (PGM) assemblages were also studied for different types of Ni-Cu-PGE mineralization. The uniformly low S content of the country rocks for the MIC as well as variable Sm-Nd isotope systematics and low-sulfide, PGE-rich mineralization of the MIC suggest that S saturation was reached via assimilation of silicates rather than assimilation of sulfur-rich lithologies. R-factor modeling suggests that the mixing ratio for silicate-to-sulfide melt was very high, well above 15,000 for the majority of our mineralized samples, as might be expected for the low-sulfide, PGE-rich mineralization of the MIC. Small, negative Δ33S values (from -0.23 to -0.04 ‰) for sulfides in strongly metamorphosed MIC-host rocks indicate that their sulfur underwent mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation (MIF) in the oxygen-poor Archean atmosphere before it was incorporated into the protoliths of the host paragneisses and homogenized during metamorphism. Ore minerals from the MIC have similar Δ33S values (from -0.21 to -0.06 ‰) consistent with country rock assimilation contributing to sulfide saturation, but, also importantly, our dataset suggests that Δ33S values decrease from the center to the margin of the MIC as well as from early to late magmatic phases, potentially indicating that both local assimilation of host rocks and S homogenization in the central part of the large intrusion took place.

  12. Massively parallel quantum computer simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, K.; Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.; Trieu, B.; Arnold, G.; Richter, M.; Lippert, Th.; Watanabe, H.; Ito, N.

    2007-01-01

    We describe portable software to simulate universal quantum computers on massive parallel Computers. We illustrate the use of the simulation software by running various quantum algorithms on different computer architectures, such as a IBM BlueGene/L, a IBM Regatta p690+, a Hitachi SR11000/J1, a Cray

  13. Understanding massively open online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Diane M

    2014-02-01

    Massively open online courses (MOOCs) are an innovative delivery system for educational offerings. MOOCs have been hailed with optimism for making education accessible to many, but at the same time, they have been criticized for poor participant completion rates. Nurse educators are considering whether and how to use MOOCs; this column explains MOOCs and their advantages and disadvantages for nurse educators.

  14. Fast, Massively Parallel Data Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Robert A.; Blevins, Donald W.; Davis, ED

    1994-01-01

    Proposed fast, massively parallel data processor contains 8x16 array of processing elements with efficient interconnection scheme and options for flexible local control. Processing elements communicate with each other on "X" interconnection grid with external memory via high-capacity input/output bus. This approach to conditional operation nearly doubles speed of various arithmetic operations.

  15. Five-loop massive tadpoles

    CERN Document Server

    Luthe, T

    2016-01-01

    We provide an update on a long-term project that aims at evaluating massive vacuum integrals at the five-loop frontier, with high precision and in various space-time dimensions. A number of applications are sketched, mainly concerning the determination of anomalous dimensions, for quantum field theories in four, three and two dimensions.

  16. Cosmological solutions with massive gravitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamseddine, Ali H. [Physics Department, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS-UMR 6083, Universite de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); LE STUDIUM, Loire Valley Institute for Advanced Studies, Tours and Orleans (France); I.H.E.S., F-91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France); Volkov, Mikhail S., E-mail: volkov@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS-UMR 6083, Universite de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2011-10-25

    We present solutions describing spatially closed, open, or flat cosmologies in the massive gravity theory within the recently proposed tetrad formulation. We find that the effect of the graviton mass is equivalent to introducing to the Einstein equations a matter source that can consist of several different matter types - a cosmological term, quintessence, gas of cosmic strings, and non-relativistic cold matter.

  17. Non-local massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Modesto, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We present a general covariant action for massive gravity merging together a class of "non-polynomial" and super-renormalizable or finite theories of gravity with the non-local theory of gravity recently proposed by Jaccard, Maggiore and Mitsou (arXiv:1305.3034 [hep-th]). Our diffeomorphism invariant action gives rise to the equations of motion appearing in non-local massive massive gravity plus quadratic curvature terms. Not only the massive graviton propagator reduces smoothly to the massless one without a vDVZ discontinuity, but also our finite theory of gravity is unitary at tree level around the Minkowski background. We also show that, as long as the graviton mass $m$ is much smaller the today's Hubble parameter $H_0$, a late-time cosmic acceleration can be realized without a dark energy component due to the growth of a scalar degree of freedom. In the presence of the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$, the dominance of the non-local mass term leads to a kind of "degravitation" for $\\Lambda$ at the late cos...

  18. Supernovae from massive AGB stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, A.J.T.; Izzard, R.G.; Herwig, F.; Langer, N.; Heger, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present new computations of the final fate of massive AGB-stars. These stars form ONeMg cores after a phase of carbon burning and are called Super AGB stars (SAGB). Detailed stellar evolutionary models until the thermally pulsing AGB were computed using three di erent stellar evolution codes. The

  19. Causality Constraints on Massive Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Camanho, Xian O; Rahman, Rakibur

    2016-01-01

    The parameter space of the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity ought to be constrained essentially to a line. The theory is shown to admit pp-wave backgrounds on which linear fluctuations otherwise undergo significant time advances, potentially leading to closed time-like curves. This classical phenomenon takes place well within the theory's validity regime.

  20. Trace-element fingerprints of chromite, magnetite and sulfides from the 3.1 Ga ultramafic-mafic rocks of the Nuggihalli greenstone belt, Western Dharwar craton (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Ria; Mondal, Sisir K.; González-Jiménez, José M.; Griffin, William L.; Pearson, Norman J.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.

    2015-06-01

    The 3.1 Ga Nuggihalli greenstone belt in the Western Dharwar craton is comprised of chromitite-bearing sill-like ultramafic-mafic rocks that are surrounded by metavolcanic schists (compositionally komatiitic to komatiitic basalts) and a suite of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite gneissic rocks. The sill-like plutonic unit consists of a succession of serpentinite (after dunite)-peridotite-pyroxenite and gabbro with bands of titaniferous magnetite ore. The chromitite ore-bodies (length ≈30-500 m; width ≈2-15 m) are hosted by the serpentinite-peridotite unit. Unaltered chromites from massive chromitites (>80 % modal chromite) of the Byrapur and Bhaktarhalli chromite mines in the greenstone belt are characterized by high Cr# (100Cr/(Cr + Al)) of 78-86 and moderate Mg# (100 Mg/(Mg + Fe2+)) of 45-55. In situ trace-element analysis (LA-ICPMS) of unaltered chromites indicates that the parental magma of the chromitite ore-bodies was a komatiite lacking nickel-sulfide mineralization. In the Ga/Fe3+# versus Ti/Fe3+# diagram, the Byrapur chromites plot in the field of suprasubduction zone (SSZ) chromites while those from Bhaktarhalli lie in the MOR field. The above results corroborate our previous results based on major-element characteristics of the chromites, where the calculated parental melt of the Byrapur chromites was komatiitic to komatiitic basalt, and the Bhaktarhalli chromite was derived from Archean high-Mg basalt. The major-element chromite data hinted at the possibility of a SSZ environment existing in the Archean. Altered and compositionally zoned chromite grains in our study show a decrease in Ga, V, Co, Zn, Mn and enrichments of Ni and Ti in the ferritchromit rims. Trace-element heterogeneity in the altered chromites is attributed to serpentinization. The trace-element patterns of magnetite from the massive magnetite bands in the greenstone belt are similar to those from magmatic Fe-Ti-V-rich magnetite bands in layered intrusions, and magnetites from

  1. Paleomagnetic dating of non-sulfide Zn-Pb ores in SW Sardinia (Italy: a first attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sagnotti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A first paleomagnetic investigation aimed at constraining the age of the non-sulfide Zn-Pb ore deposits in the Iglesiente district (SW Sardinia, Italy was carried out. In these ores, the oxidation of primary sulfides, hosted in Cambrian carbonate rocks, was related to several paleoweathering episodes spanning from the Mesozoic onward. Paleomagnetic analyses were performed on 43 cores from 4 different localities, containing: a non-oxidized primary sulfides and host rock, b oxidized Fe-rich hydrothermal dolomites and (c supergene oxidation ore («Calamine». Reliable data were obtained from 18 samples; the others show uninterpretable results due to low magnetic intensity or to scattered demagnetization trajectories. Three of them show a scattered Characteristic Remanent Magnetization (ChRM, likely carried by the original (i.e. Paleozoic magnetic iron sulfides. The remaining 15 samples show a well defined and coherent ChRM, carried by high-coercivity minerals, acquired after the last phase of counterclockwise rotation of Sardinia (that is after 16 Myr, in a time interval long enough to span at least one reversal of the geomagnetic field. Hematite is the main magnetic carrier in the limestone, whereas weathered hydrothermal dolomite contains goethite or a mixture of both. The results suggest that paleomagnetism can be used to constrain the timing of oxidation in supergene-enriched ores.

  2. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH

  3. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, Albert

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile Sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH

  4. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, Albert

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile Sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol

  5. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol

  6. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2015-01-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree...... such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers...... (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit...

  7. Mineralizing conditions and source fluid composition of base metal sulfides in the Lon District, southeastern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, C. H.; Thomas, D.; García del Real, P.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Bird, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal base metal mineralization is rare in Iceland due to the scarcity of evolved magma bodies that discharge metal-rich aqueous fluids into bedrock. One exception is the Lon District of southeastern Iceland, where explosively emplaced rhyolitic breccias host base metal sulfide minerals. We performed petrographic, fluid inclusion, and stable isotope analyses on samples collected in Lon to constrain the conditions of sulfide mineral formation. Based on outcrop and hand sample observations, hot, early-stage hydrothermal fluids precipitated sulfide minerals, quartz, and epidote in rhyolitic breccia and basalt flows. Cooler late-stage fluids precipitated carbonates and quartz in rhyolitic breccia and basalt flows. The order of precipitation of the sulfides was: galena, sphalerite, then chalcopyrite. Homogenization temperatures of liquid-dominated multi-phase fluid inclusions in hydrothermal early-stage quartz coeval with chalcopyrite cluster around 303 °C and 330 °C, indicating precipitation of metallic sulfides in two main hydrothermal fluid pulses early in the period of hydrothermal activity in the Lon District. Freezing point depression analyses of fluid inclusions in quartz show that the sulfide minerals precipitated from a solution that was 4 wt. % NaCl. The 𝛿34S values of sulfides indicate that early-stage hydrothermal sulfur was derived from igneous rocks, either through leaching by non-magmatic hydrothermal fluids or by exsolution of magmatic waters. Early stage epidote 𝛿D values were on average -65.96 per mil, about 14 per mil higher than reported values in epidotes from elsewhere in southeastern Iceland. The 𝛿13C and 𝛿18O values of late-stage carbonates indicate that late stage hydrothermal fluids were meteoric in origin. Collectively, fluid inclusion and stable isotope analyses suggest that early-stage aqueous fluids derived from a mixture of magmatic waters exsolved from the proximal Geitafell intrusion and meteoric

  8. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  9. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide in Preeclampsia : Potential Therapeutic Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The thesis provide insights into the production and possible therapeutic effect of the gaseous molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in preeclampsia (PE). H2S is an important molecule in the (human) body. It is among others involved in blood pressure regulation, stimulation of vascular growth and

  11. Nucleation of mercury sulfide by dealkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enescu, Mironel; Nagy, Kathryn L.; Manceau, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Metal sulfide minerals are assumed to form naturally at ambient conditions via reaction of a metallic element with (poly)sulfide ions, usually produced by microbes in oxygen-depleted environments. Recently, the formation of mercury sulfide (β-HgS) directly from linear Hg(II)-thiolate complexes (Hg(SR)2) in natural organic matter and in cysteine solutions was demonstrated under aerated conditions. Here, a detailed description of this non-sulfidic reaction is provided by computations at a high level of molecular-orbital theory. The HgS stoichiometry is obtained through the cleavage of the S-C bond in one thiolate, transfer of the resulting alkyl group (R’) to another thiolate, and subsequent elimination of a sulfur atom from the second thiolate as a thioether (RSR’). Repetition of this mechanism leads to the formation of RS-(HgS)n-R chains which may self-assemble in parallel arrays to form cinnabar (α-HgS), or more commonly, quickly condense to four-coordinate metacinnabar (β-HgS). The mechanistic pathway is thermodynamically favorable and its predicted kinetics agrees with experiment. The results provide robust theoretical support for the abiotic natural formation of nanoparticulate HgS under oxic conditions and in the absence of a catalyst, and suggest a new route for the (bio)synthesis of HgS nanoparticles with improved technological properties.

  12. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... been confirmed. Well-control fluid means drilling mud and completion or workover fluid as appropriate... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Hydrogen Sulfide § 250.490 Hydrogen... section when conducting drilling, well-completion/well-workover, and production operations in zones...

  13. Microaeration reduces hydrogen sulfide in biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although there are a variety of biological and chemical treatments for removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from biogas, all require some level of chemical or water inputs and maintenance. In practice, managing biogas H2S remains a significant challenge for agricultural digesters where labor and opera...

  14. Microbial Fuel Cells for Sulfide Removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabaey, K.; Sompel, van de S.; Maignien, L.; Boon, N.; Aelterman, P.; Clauwaert, P.; Schamphelaire, de L.; The Pham, H.; Vermeulen, J.; Verhaege, M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Verstraete, W.

    2006-01-01

    Thus far, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been used to convert carbon-based substrates to electricity. However, sulfur compounds are ubiquitously present in organic waste and wastewater. In this study, a MFC with a hexacyanoferrate cathodic electrolyte was used to convert dissolved sulfide to eleme

  15. Acid volatile sulfide (AVS)- a comment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The review by Rickard and Morse (this volume) adequately summarizes our current understanding with respect to acid-volatile sulfides (AVS). At the same time, this review addresses some of the misunderstandings with regard to measurements and dynamics of this important sedimentary sulfur pool. In

  16. Comparison of Hydrogen Sulfide Analysis Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Robert M.

    1973-01-01

    A summary and critique of common methods of hydrogen sulfide analysis is presented. Procedures described are: reflectance from silver plates and lead acetate-coated tiles, lead acetate and mercuric chloride paper tapes, sodium nitroprusside and methylene blue wet chemical methods, infrared spectrophotometry, and gas chromatography. (BL)

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide in Preeclampsia : Potential Therapeutic Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The thesis provide insights into the production and possible therapeutic effect of the gaseous molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in preeclampsia (PE). H2S is an important molecule in the (human) body. It is among others involved in blood pressure regulation, stimulation of vascular growth and modulati

  18. Sulfide Precipitation in Wastewater at Short Timescales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Bruno; van de Ven, Wilbert; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2017-01-01

    that this is not the case for sulfide precipitation by ferric iron. Instead, the reaction time was found to be on a timescale where it must be considered when performing end-of-pipe treatment. For real wastewaters at pH 7, a stoichiometric ratio around 14 mol Fe(II) (mol S(−II))−1 was obtained after 1.5 s, while the ratio......Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows...... dropped to about 5 mol Fe(II) (mol S(−II))−1 after 30 s. Equilibrium calculations yielded a theoretic ratio of 2 mol Fe(II) (mol S(−II))−1, indicating that the process had not equilibrated within the span of the experiment. Correspondingly, the highest sulfide conversion only reached 60%. These findings...

  19. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. H.

    were studied in both wastewater and biofilms. Particular emphasis was on the importance of iron in the sulfur cycle. Iron is typically among the dominant metals in wastewater. The experiments showed that, ferric iron (Fe(III)) that was added to anaerobic wastewater was rapidly reduced to ferrous iron...... (Fe(II)) and precipitated subsequently with dissolved sulfide as ferrous sulfide (FeS). The ferrous sulfide precipitation was relatively fast, but not immediate. Despite the very low solubility of ferrous sulfide, initially present iron did not react completely with sulfide. This observation...

  20. The evolution of high-redshift massive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, Marta; Pacucci, Fabio; Tremmel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Massive black holes (MBHs) are nowadays recognized as integral parts of galaxy evolution. Both the approximate proportionality between MBH and galaxy mass, and the expected importance of feedback from active MBHs in regulating star formation in their host galaxies point to a strong interplay between MBHs and galaxies. MBHs must form in the first galaxies and be fed by gas in these galaxies, with continuous or intermittent inflows that, at times, can be larger than the Eddington rate. Feedback from supernovae and from the MBHs themselves modulates the growth of the first MBHs. While current observational data only probe the most massive and luminous MBHs, the tip of the iceberg, we will soon be able to test theoretical models of MBH evolution on more "normal" MBHs: the MBHs that are indeed relevant in building the population that we observe in local galaxies, including our own Milky Way.

  1. The evolution of high-redshift massive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonteri, Marta; Habouzit, Melanie; Pacucci, Fabio; Tremmel, Michael

    Massive black holes (MBHs) are nowadays recognized as integral parts of galaxy evolution. Both the approximate proportionality between MBH and galaxy mass, and the expected importance of feedback from active MBHs in regulating star formation in their host galaxies point to a strong interplay between MBHs and galaxies. MBHs must form in the first galaxies and be fed by gas in these galaxies, with continuous or intermittent inflows that, at times, can be larger than the Eddington rate. Feedback from supernovae and from the MBHs themselves modulates the growth of the first MBHs. While current observational data only probe the most massive and luminous MBHs, the tip of the iceberg, we will soon be able to test theoretical models of MBH evolution on more ``normal'' MBHs: the MBHs that are indeed relevant in building the population that we observe in local galaxies, including our own Milky Way.

  2. Fueling-Controlled the Growth of Massive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, A.

    2009-05-01

    We study the relation between nuclear massive black holes and their host spheroid gravitational potential. Using AMR numerical simulations, we analyze how gas is transported into the nuclear (central kpc) regions of galaxies. We study gas fueling onto the inner accretion disk (sub-pc scale) and star formation in a massive nuclear disk like those generally found in proto-spheroids (ULIRGs, SCUBA Galaxies). These sub-pc resolution simulations of gas fueling, which is mainly depleted by star formation, naturally satisfy the `M_BH-M_{virial}' relation, with a scatter considerably less than that observed. We find that a generalized version of the Kennicutt-Schmidt Law for starbursts is satisfied, in which the total gas depletion rate (dot M_gas=dot M_BH + M_SF scales as M_gas/t_orbital. See Escala (2007) for more details about this work.

  3. FUELING-CONTROLLED THE GROWTH OF MASSIVE BLACK HOLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Escala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the relation between nuclear massive black holes and their host spheroid gravitational potential. Using AMR numerical simulations, we analyze how gas is transported into the nuclear (central kpc regions of galaxies. We study gas fueling onto the inner accretion disk (sub-pc scale and star formation in a massive nuclear disk like those generally found in proto-spheroids (ULIRGs, SCUBA Galaxies. These sub-pc resolution simulations of gas fueling, which is mainly depleted by star formation, naturally satisfy the `MBH -Mvirial' relation, with a scatter considerably less than that observed. We nd that a generalized version of the Kennicutt-Schmidt Law for starbursts is satis ed, in which the total gas depletion rate ( _Mgas = _MBH + _MSF scales as Mgas=torbital. See Escala (2007 for more details about this work.

  4. Normal Faulting, Fluid Upflow Pathways, and Alteration in the Subsurface of a Seafloor Ultramafic-Hosted Hydrothermal System, northern Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, J.; Levine, D.; Crispini, L.; Gaggero, L.; Shanks, W. C., III; Gulbransen, C.

    2016-12-01

    We document the mineralogy and geochemistry of a fault that acted as a hydrothermal upflow zone in the subsurface of a seafloor ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal system in the northern Apennines, Italy. The objectives are to understand fluid flow pathways, and the relative roles of upwelling hydrothermal fluids versus cold seawater and biological effects in such systems on the modern seafloor, which is much more difficult to access and study. Peridotites were exposed on the seafloor by detachment faulting, intruded by MORB gabbros, and are overlain by MORB lavas and pelagic sediments. North of the village of Reppia are two 1-2 m wide fault shear zones in serpentinite, oriented at a high angle to the detachment surface and extending hundreds of meters below the detachment. The host peridotite is 90-100% serpentinized, and serpentinite is highly replaced by talc plus tremolite and sulfide in the shear zones. At the paleo-seafloor, the fault offsets carbonate-cemented serpentinite breccia, talc-altered serpentinite, and serpentinite in the footwall to the west, from pillow basalts of the hanging wall on the east. Here the fault rocks consist of 90% Fe-dolomite with a few percent each of calcite, quartz, serpentine, talc, sulfides, chlorite, and trace relict Cr-spinel. The fault ends upward in massive sulfide overlain by pillow basalts and pelagic sediment. Three main alteration stages are identified. 1. Background serpentinites exhibit slight LREE enrichments and elevated d34S values (+3.9 to +5.2‰) consistent with serpentinization by upwelling hot hydrothermal fluids. 2. Talc alteration of serpentinite leads to strong LREE enrichments, negative Eu anomalies, silica metasomatism, and elevated Cu during the main hydrothermal upflow stage. 3. Carbonate alteration varies from slight veining of serpentinite to near-total replacement in the shallow fault rocks, with variable enrichments of LREE, Ca, Si, and metals. Carbonate oxygen isotope temperatures of 15-150°C and d13C

  5. Sulfide removal by moderate oxygenation of anaerobic sludge environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Zee, F.P.; Villaverde, S.; Polanco, F. [Valladolid Univ., Valladolid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Garcia, P.A.

    2004-07-01

    Treating wastewater through anaerobic bioreactors results in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. The sulfide can be removed from the biogas by introducing air directly into the anaerobic bioreactor system. This study presents the results of batch experiments that provided a better insight into the fate of sulfur compounds and oxygen during microaerobic sulfide oxidation in granular sludge. It was shown that sulfide could be removed rapidly upon introduction of low amounts of oxygen to the sulfide-amended batch vials with granular sludge treating vinasse. Initially, the sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur, thiosulfate and polysulfide. Significant production of sulfate did not occur. The introduction of oxygen, however, could result in the growth of aerobic organic-chemical oxygen demand-oxidizing bacteria that compete with sulfide oxidation for oxygen. 6 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  6. EVALUATION OF FREE PLATFORMS FOR DELIVERY OF MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSES (MOOCS)

    OpenAIRE

    Airton ZANCANARO; Nunes, Carolina Schmitt; DOMINGUES, Maria Jose Carvalho de Souza

    2017-01-01

    For the hosting, management and delivery of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) it is necessary a technological infrastructure that supports it. Various educational institutions do not have or do not wish to invest in such a structure, possibly because MOOCs are not yet part of official programs of universities, but initiatives by a particular teacher or a research group. Focusing on this problem, this study seeks to identify platforms that make it possible to create, host and provide courses ...

  7. Multimedia over massive MIMO wireless systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haichao; Ge, Xiaohu; Zi, Ran; Zhang, Jing; Ni, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    To satisfy the massive wireless traffic transmission generated by multimedia applications, the massive multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) wireless system has emerged as a possible solution for future 5G wireless communication systems. However, the mutual coupling effect of massive MIMO systems has a negative effect potential on the wireless capacity. In this paper, the receive diversity gain is first defined and analyzed for massive MIMO wireless systems. Furthermore, we propose an effective cap...

  8. Massive binary stars as a probe of massive star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiminki, Daniel C.

    2010-10-01

    Massive stars are among the largest and most influential objects we know of on a sub-galactic scale. Binary systems, composed of at least one of these stars, may be responsible for several types of phenomena, including type Ib/c supernovae, short and long gamma ray bursts, high-velocity runaway O and B-type stars, and the density of the parent star clusters. Our understanding of these stars has met with limited success, especially in the area of their formation. Current formation theories rely on the accumulated statistics of massive binary systems that are limited because of their sample size or the inhomogeneous environments from which the statistics are collected. The purpose of this work is to provide a higher-level analysis of close massive binary characteristics using the radial velocity information of 113 massive stars (B3 and earlier) and binary orbital properties for the 19 known close massive binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association. This work provides an analysis using the largest amount of massive star and binary information ever compiled for an O-star rich cluster like Cygnus OB2, and compliments other O-star binary studies such as NGC 6231, NGC 2244, and NGC 6611. I first report the discovery of 73 new O or B-type stars and 13 new massive binaries by this survey. This work involved the use of 75 successful nights of spectroscopic observation at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory in addition to observations obtained using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph at WIYN, the HIRES echelle spectrograph at KECK, and the Hamilton spectrograph at LICK. I use these data to estimate the spectrophotometric distance to the cluster and to measure the mean systemic velocity and the one-sided velocity dispersion of the cluster. Finally, I compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo models, the results of which indicate that the binary fraction of the cluster is 57 +/- 5% and that the indices for the power law distributions, describing the log of the periods, mass

  9. Minimal theory of massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    De Felice, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new theory of massive gravity with only two propagating degrees of freedom. After defining the theory in the unitary gauge in the vielbein language, we shall perform a Hamiltonian analysis to count the number of physical degrees of freedom, and then study some phenomenologies. While the homogeneous and isotropic background cosmology and the tensor linear perturbations around it are described by exactly the same equations as those in the de Rham - Gabadadze - Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity, the scalar and vector gravitational degrees of freedom are absent in the new theory at the fully nonlinear level. Hence the new theory provides a stable nonlinear completion of the self-accelerating cosmological solution that was originally found in the dRGT theory.

  10. Formation of Massive Stars: Theoretical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews theoretical considerations of the formation of massive stars. It addresses the questions that assuming a gravitationally unstable massive clump, how does enough material become concentrated into a sufficiently small volume within a sufficiently short time? and how does the forming massive star influence its immediate surroundings to limit its mass?

  11. Theoretical Considerations of Massive Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the formation of massive stars. The formation of massive stars is different in many ways from the formation of other stars. The presentation shows the math, and the mechanisms that must be possible for a massive star to form.

  12. Massive gravity on a brane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacko, Z.; Graesser, M.L.; Grojean, C.; Pilo, L.

    2003-12-11

    At present no theory of a massive graviton is known that is consistent with experiments at both long and short distances. The problem is that consistency with long distance experiments requires the graviton mass to be very small. Such a small graviton mass however implies an ultraviolet cutoff for the theory at length scales far larger than the millimeter scale at which gravity has already been measured. In this paper we attempt to construct a model which avoids this problem. We consider a brane world setup in warped AdS spacetime and we investigate the consequences of writing a mass term for the graviton on a the infrared brane where the local cutoff is of order a large (galactic) distance scale. The advantage of this setup is that the low cutoff for physics on the infrared brane does not significantly affect the predictivity of the theory for observers localized on the ultraviolet brane. For such observers the predictions of this theory agree with general relativity at distances smaller than the infrared scale but go over to those of a theory of massive gravity at longer distances. A careful analysis of the graviton two-point function, however, reveals the presence of a ghost in the low energy spectrum. A mode decomposition of the higher dimensional theory reveals that the ghost corresponds to the radion field. We also investigate the theory with a brane localized mass for the graviton on the ultraviolet brane, and show that the physics of this case is similar to that of a conventional four dimensional theory with a massive graviton, but with one important difference: when the infrared brane decouples and the would-be massive graviton gets heavier than the regular Kaluza-Klein modes, it becomes unstable and it has a finite width to decay off the brane into the continuum of Kaluza-Klein states.

  13. Massive star clusters in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, William E

    2009-01-01

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCSs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GCS research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  14. The Massive Thermal Basketball Diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, J O; Strickland, Michael T; Andersen, Jens O.; Braaten, Eric; Strickland, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The "basketball diagram" is a three-loop vacuum diagram for a scalar fieldtheory that cannot be expressed in terms of one-loop diagrams. We calculatethis diagram for a massive scalar field at nonzero temperature, reducing it toexpressions involving three-dimensional integrals that can be easily evaluatednumerically. We use this result to calculate the free energy for a massivescalar field with a phi^4 interaction to three-loop order.

  15. The Nature of Massive Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Petcov

    2013-01-01

    massive Majorana neutrinos are summarised. The physics potential of the experiments, searching for ( β β 0 ν -decay for providing information on the type of the neutrino mass spectrum, on the absolute scale of neutrino masses, and on the Majorana CP-violation phases in the PMNS neutrino mixing matrix, is also briefly discussed. The opened questions and the main goals of future research in the field of neutrino physics are outlined.

  16. Re-Os isotope measurements of single sulfide inclusions in a Siberian diamond and its nitrogen aggregation systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, D. G.; Shirey, S. B.; Bulanova, G. P.; Carlson, R. W.; Milledge, H. J.

    1999-03-01

    We have measured the Re-Os isotopic compositions of individual syngenetic sulfide inclusions from three different growth zones within a central cross section plate cut from a single Siberian diamond. Individual sulfides in their diamond host were isolated by laser cutting. The sulfides, and hence the different growth zones of the diamond have been suggested to differ in age by up to 2 Ga on the basis of their Pb isotope compositions. Re-Os model ages of the four inclusions range from 3.1 ± 0.3 to 3.5 ± 0.3 Ga and suggest a Middle Archaean age for the diamond. A sulfide inclusion in the rim of the diamond is very different in elemental composition from those of the core and intermediate zones. It is enriched in Os, Re, Pb, and Zn and has more radiogenic Os and Pb isotopes. The inclusion is connected to the surface of the diamond by a healed crack, revealed by cathodoluminescence. The compositional distinction may be caused either by postformational interaction between an ancient sulfide and a fluid, possibly at the time of kimberlite eruption, or later stage growth of new diamond plus sulfide. Such chemical complexities, and the presence of healed fractures within the host diamond, emphasize the desirability of analyzing individual inclusions from well-characterized diamonds if isotope data for inclusions are to be better understood. Nitrogen contents and aggregation state in the core and intermediate zone of the host diamond closely approximate theoretically calculated isotherms based on consideration of experimentally determined nitrogen aggregation kinetics. The nitrogen content of the rim diamond is too low to obtain spectra that allow accurate deconvolution of relative aggregation levels for use in residence time calculations. The aggregation state of nitrogen in the core and intermediate growth zones is compatible with a long, ca. 3 Ga mantle residence time at normal lithospheric temperatures. The similarity of the sulfide inclusion Re-Os model ages to the

  17. Measuring Massive Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2009-01-01

    The coalescence of two massive black holes produces gravitational waves (GWs) which can be detected by the space-based detector LISA. By measuring these waves, LISA can determine the various parameters which characterize the source. Measurements of the black hole masses and spins will provide information about the growth of black holes and their host galaxies over time. Measurements of a source's sky position and distance may help astronomers identify an electromagnetic counterpart to the GW event. The counterpart's redshift, combined with the GW-measured luminosity distance, can then be used to measure the Hubble constant and the dark energy parameter $w$. Because the potential science output is so high, it is useful to know in advance how well LISA can measure source parameters for a wide range of binaries. We calculate expected parameter estimation errors using the well-known Fisher matrix method. Our waveform model includes the physics of spin precession, as well as subleading harmonics. When these higher-order effects are not included, strong degeneracies between some parameters cause them to be poorly determined by a GW measurement. When precession and subleading harmonics are properly included, the degeneracies are broken, reducing parameter errors by one to several orders of magnitude.

  18. The formation and evolution of massive black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonteri, M

    2012-08-03

    The past 10 years have witnessed a change of perspective in the way astrophysicists think about massive black holes (MBHs), which are now considered to have a major role in the evolution of galaxies. This appreciation was driven by the realization that black holes of millions of solar masses and above reside in the center of most galaxies, including the Milky Way. MBHs also powered active galactic nuclei known to exist just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. Here, I summarize the current ideas on the evolution of MBHs through cosmic history, from their formation about 13 billion years ago to their growth within their host galaxies.

  19. The Formation and Evolution of Massive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, Marta

    2012-01-01

    The past 10 years have witnessed a change of perspective in the way astrophysicists think about massive black holes (MBHs), which are now considered to have a major role in the evolution of galaxies. This appreciation was driven by the realization that black holes of millions solar masses and above reside in the center of most galaxies, including the Milky Way. MBHs also powered active galactic nuclei known to exist just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. Here, I summarize the current ideas on the evolution of MBHs through cosmic history, from their formation about 13 billion years ago to their growth within their host galaxies.

  20. The Massive Star Population in M101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Skyler H.

    ratios are discrepant. Though photometry has proven to be a powerful tool to identify candidate evolved massive stars and their effects on their host galaxy, spectroscopy is necessary to study the physical properties of individual stars. We observed moderate-resolution optical spectra for 56 of the brightest stars in the direction to M101 using the Multiple Mirror Telescope. We also created light curves for each target using multi-epoch U BV R images from the Large Binocular Telescope. We separate the spectroscopially confirmed members of M101 into four groups: hot supergiants, intermediate supergiants, emission-line stars, and LBVs. Several stars in each group are discussed in detail. Of the spectroscopically confirmed members, we find that eight meet our criterion for variability. We present light curves for the known LBV candidates, V2, V4, and V9, and introduce a new candidate: 9492 &barbelow;14 &barbelow;11998. Additionally, we identify 20 new variables in M101. Lacking spectra, we separated the variables, by their photometric properties, into three groups: hot, intermediate, and cool. We find two hot stars with V-band variability of +/-1 magnitude; we flag these stars as LBV candidates. Of the intermediate and cool variables, we identify several stars with low- to moderate-amplitude variability (0.1--0.5 magnitudes).

  1. Causality in 3D Massive Gravity Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Edelstein, Jose D; Kilicarslan, Ercan; Leoni, Matias; Tekin, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    We study the constraints coming from local causality requirement in various 2+1 dimensional dynamical theories of gravity. In Topologically Massive Gravity, with a single parity noninvariant massive degree of freedom, and in New Massive Gravity, with two massive spin-$2$ degrees of freedom, causality and unitarity are compatible with each other and they both require the Newton's constant to be negative. In their extensions, such as the Born-Infeld gravity and the minimal massive gravity the situation is similar and quite different from their higher dimensional counterparts, such as quadratic (e.g., Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet) or cubic theories, where causality and unitarity are in conflict.

  2. Evaluation of Free Platforms for Delivery of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zancanaro, Airton; Nunes, Carolina Schmitt; Domingues, Maria Jose Carvalho de Souza

    2017-01-01

    For the hosting, management and delivery of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) it is necessary a technological infrastructure that supports it. Various educational institutions do not have or do not wish to invest in such a structure, possibly because MOOCs are not yet part of official programs of universities, but initiatives by a particular…

  3. Sulfide, the first inorganic substrate for human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubern, Marc; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Nübel, Tobias; Blachier, François; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced inside the intestine and is known as a poison that inhibits cellular respiration at the level of cytochrome oxidase. However, sulfide is used as an energetic substrate by many photo- and chemoautotrophic bacteria and by animals such as the lugworm Arenicola marina. The concentrations of sulfide present in their habitats are comparable with those present in the human colon. Using permeabilized colonic cells to which sulfide was added by an infusion pump we show that the maximal respiratory rate of colonocyte mitochondria in presence of sulfide compares with that obtained with succinate or L-alpha-glycerophosphate. This oxidation is accompanied by mitochondrial energization. In contrast, other cell types not naturally exposed to high concentration of sulfide showed much lower oxidation rates. Mitochondria showed a very high affinity for sulfide that permits its use as an energetic substrate at low micromolar concentrations, hence, below the toxic level. However, if the supply of sulfide exceeds the oxidation rate, poisoning renders mitochondria inefficient and our data suggest that an anaerobic mechanism involving partial reversion of Krebs cycle already known in invertebrates takes place. In conclusion, this work provides additional and compelling evidence that sulfide is not only a toxic compound. According to our study, sulfide appears to be the first inorganic substrate for mammalian cells characterized thus far.

  4. The Evolution of Sulfide Tolerance in the Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how the function of extant microorganisms has recorded both their evolutionary histories and their past interactions with the environment is a stated goal of astrobiology. We are taking a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the diversification of sulfide tolerance mechanisms in the cyanobacteria, which vary both in their degree of exposure to sulfide and in their capacity to tolerate this inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. Since conditions were very reducing during the first part of Earth's history and detrital sulfides have been found in Archean sediments, mechanisms conferring sulfide tolerance may have been important for the evolutionary success of the ancestors of extant cyanobacteria. Two tolerance mechanisms have been identified in this group: (1) resistance of photosystem II, the principal target of sulfide toxicity; and (2) maintenance of the ability to fix carbon despite photosystem II inhibition by utilizing sulfide as an electron donor in photosystem I - dependent, anoxygenic photosynthesis. We are presently collecting comparative data on aspects of sulfide physiology for laboratory clones isolated from a variety of habitats. These data will be analyzed within a phylogenetic framework inferred from molecular sequence data collected for these clones to test how frequently different mechanisms of tolerance have evolved and which tolerance mechanism evolved first. In addition, by analyzing these physiological data together with environmental sulfide data collected from our research sites using microelectrodes, we can also test whether the breadth of an organism's sulfide tolerance can be predicted from the magnitude of variation in environmental sulfide concentration it has experienced in its recent evolutionary past and whether greater average sulfide concentration and/or temporal variability in sulfide favors the evolution of a particular mechanism of sulfide tolerance.

  5. Discovery and spectroscopic study of the massive Galactic cluster Mercer 81

    CERN Document Server

    de la Fuente, Diego; Davies, Ben; Figer, Donald F

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, hundreds of young massive cluster candidates have been detected in the disk of the Milky Way. We investigate one of these candidates, Mercer 81, which was discovered through a systematic search for stellar overdensities, with follow-up NICMOS/HST infrared narrow-band photometry to find emission-line stars and confirm it as a massive cluster. Surprisingly, the brightest stars turned out to be a chance alignment of foreground stars, while a real massive cluster was found among some fainter stars in the field. From a first spectroscopic study of four emission-line stars (ISAAC/VLT), it follows that Mercer 81 is a very massive young cluster, placed at the far end of the Galactic bar. Additionally, in this work we present some unpublished spectra from a follow-up observation program which confirm that the cluster hosts several Nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet stars (WN) and blue supergiants.

  6. Hydrothermal processes in partially serpentinized peridotites from Costa Rica: evidence from native copper and complex sulfide assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Gazel, Esteban; Caddick, Mark J.

    2014-11-01

    Native metals and metal alloys are common in serpentinized ultramafic rocks, generally representing the redox and sulfur conditions during serpentinization. Variably serpentinized peridotites from the Santa Elena Ophiolite in Costa Rica contain an unusual assemblage of Cu-bearing sulfides and native copper. The opaque mineral assemblage consists of pentlandite, magnetite, awaruite, pyrrhotite, heazlewoodite, violarite, smythite and copper-bearing sulfides (Cu-pentlandite, sugakiite [Cu(Fe,Ni)8S8], samaniite [Cu2(Fe,Ni)7S8], chalcopyrite, chalcocite, bornite and cubanite), native copper and copper-iron-nickel alloys. Using detailed mineralogical examination, electron microprobe analyses, bulk rock major and trace element geochemistry, and thermodynamic calculations, we discuss two models to explain the formation of the Cu-bearing mineral assemblages: (1) they formed through desulfurization of primary sulfides due to highly reducing and sulfur-depleted conditions during serpentinization or (2) they formed through interaction with a Cu-bearing, higher temperature fluid (350-400 °C) postdating serpentinization, similar to processes in active high-temperature peridotite-hosted hydrothermal systems such as Rainbow and Logatchev. As mass balance calculations cannot entirely explain the extent of the native copper by desulfurization of primary sulfides, we propose that the native copper and Cu sulfides formed by local addition of a hydrothermal fluid that likely interacted with adjacent mafic sequences. We suggest that the peridotites today exposed on Santa Elena preserve the lower section of an ancient hydrothermal system, where conditions were highly reducing and water-rock ratios very low. Thus, the preserved mineral textures and assemblages give a unique insight into hydrothermal processes occurring at depth in peridotite-hosted hydrothermal systems.

  7. Resolved Host Studies of Stellar Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Levesque, Emily M

    2016-01-01

    The host galaxies of nearby (z<0.3) core-collapse supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts offer an excellent means of probing the environments and populations that produce these events' varied massive progenitors. These same young stellar progenitors make LGRBs and SNe valuable and potentially powerful tracers of star formation, metallicity, the IMF, and the end phases of stellar evolution. However, properly utilizing these progenitors as tools requires a thorough understanding of their formation and, consequently, the physical properties of their parent host environments. This review looks at some of the recent work on LGRB and SN hosts with resolved environments that allows us to probe the precise explosion sites and surrounding environments of these events in incredible detail.

  8. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  9. Oxidation of Reduced Sulfur Species: Carbonyl Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has been developed, based on a critical evaluation of data from the literature. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results from batch reactors, flow reactors, and shock tubes. The model predicts satisfact......A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has been developed, based on a critical evaluation of data from the literature. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results from batch reactors, flow reactors, and shock tubes. The model predicts...... by the competition between chain‐branching and ‐propagating steps; modeling predictions are particularly sensitive to the branching fraction for the OCS + O reaction to form CO + SO or CO2 + S....

  10. Speciation of arsenic in sulfidic waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Robert G

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation constants for thioarsenite species have been determined in dilute solutions at 25°C, ΣH2S from 10-7.5 to 10-3.0 M, ΣAs from 10-5.6 to 10-4.8 M, and pH 7 and 10. The principal inorganic arsenic species in anoxic aquatic systems are arsenite, As(OH30, and a mononuclear thioarsenite with an S/As ratio of 3:1. Thioarsenic species with S/As ratios of 1 : 1,2 : 1, and 4 : 1 are lesser components in sulfidic solutions that might be encountered in natural aquatic environments. Thioarsenites dominate arsenic speciation at sulfide concentrations > 10-4.3 M at neutral pH. Conversion from neutral As(OH30 to anionic thioarsenite species may regulate the transport and fate of arsenic in sulfate-reducing environments by governing sorption and mineral precipitation reactions.

  11. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2016-06-14

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  12. Microbial Diversity and Population Structure of Extremely Acidic Sulfur-Oxidizing Biofilms From Sulfidic Caves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D.; Stoffer, T.; Lyon, E. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2005-12-01

    Extremely acidic (pH 0-1) microbial biofilms called snottites form on the walls of sulfidic caves where gypsum replacement crusts isolate sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms from the buffering action of limestone host rock. We investigated the phylogeny and population structure of snottites from sulfidic caves in central Italy using full cycle rRNA methods. A small subunit rRNA bacterial clone library from a Frasassi cave complex snottite sample contained a single sequence group (>60 clones) similar to Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Bacterial and universal rRNA clone libraries from other Frasassi snottites were only slightly more diverse, containing a maximum of 4 bacterial species and probably 2 archaeal species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of snottites from Frasassi and from the much warmer Rio Garrafo cave complex revealed that all of the communities are simple (low-diversity) and dominated by Acidithiobacillus and/or Ferroplasma species, with smaller populations of an Acidimicrobium species, filamentous fungi, and protists. Our results suggest that sulfidic cave snottites will be excellent model microbial ecosystems suited for ecological and metagenomic studies aimed at elucidating geochemical and ecological controls on microbial diversity, and at mapping the spatial history of microbial evolutionary events such as adaptations, recombinations and gene transfers.

  13. Environment and Structure of Massive Central Galaxies through the Eye of Hyper Suprime-Cam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song; HSC Survey Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Although the environmental dependence of structures for massive central galaxies is predicted by the promising hierarchical assembly model, observations at low redshift seem to find no convincing evidence of that. With the help of deep i-band images of a large sample of massive central galaxies at 0.3 1.6x10^14 M_sun$) halos have a slightly flattened inner profile within ~15-20 kpc, and a more prominent outer envelope compared to ones in less massive (M_{200,c} sun) halos. For centrals with M_* > 10^11.5 M_sun, the ones in more massive halos show very significant excess of mass in the outskirt when the two samples are matched using proxies of mass assembled at z > 1. Such differences are broadly consistent with richer recent merging history for more massive halos. We suggest that the relation between total stellar mass and mass within inner 5 or 10 kpc is potentially interesting for diagnosing the role played by host halo in shaping the structures of massive central galaxies. These results also highlight the importance of deep photometry and the usage of detailed structural information in the study of the assembly history of galaxies. We also show that the radial profiles of ellipticity and optical color, along with the preliminary weak lensing signals will enable us gain more insights about the evolution of massive galaxies.

  14. The Prevalence and Impact of Wolf-Rayet Stars in Emerging Massive Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sokal, Kimberly R; Indebetouw, Remy; Massey, Philip

    2016-01-01

    We investigate Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4m Mayall Telescope at...

  15. Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-12-10

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  18. Redetermination of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of adventitious water in a reaction between dicyclopentamethylene thiuram-disulfide (C5H10NCS2)(sub 2) and a picoline solution of tricyclopentadienyl indium(III) (C5H5)(sub 3). It resulted in the formation of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide (C5H13NS). The piperidinium hydrogen sulfide produced in this way was unambiguously characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure determination showed that the piperidinium hydrogen sulfide crystal (MW = 119.23 g/mol) has an orthorhombic (Pbcm) unit cell whose parameters are: a = 9.818(2), b = 7.3720(1), c = 9.754(1) A, V = 706.0(3) A(exp 3), Z=4. D(sub chi) = 1.122 g cm(exp -3), Mo K(alpha) (lamda = 0.71073), mu= 3.36 cm(exp -1), F(000) = 264.0, T =293 K, R = 0.036 for 343 reflections with F(sub O)(sup 2) greater than 3 sigma (F(sub O)(sup 2)) and 65 variables. The compound consists of (C5H10NH2)(+) cations and (SH)(-) anions with both species residing on crystallographic mirror planes. N-H -- S hydrogen bonding contributes to the interconnection of neighboring piperidinium components of the compound.

  19. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...... differences in KLaH2S at pH values between 4.5 and 8.0 became larger as the turbulence level increased, whereas those at pH between 4.5 and 7.0 did not statistically show any change. At constant pH, KLaH2S/KLaO2 was observed not to be dependent on the turbulence range studied. KLaH2S/KLaO2 ratio was 0...

  20. Cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, Macarena; Ferreira, Pedro G., E-mail: m.lagos13@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: p.ferreira1@physics.ox.ac.uk [Astrophysics, University of Oxford, DWB, Keble road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of classical scalar, vector and tensor cosmological perturbations in ghost-free massive bigravity. In particular, we find the full evolution equations and analytical solutions in a wide range of regimes. We show that there are viable cosmological backgrounds but, as has been found in the literature, these models generally have exponential instabilities in linear perturbation theory. However, it is possible to find stable scalar cosmological perturbations for a very particular choice of parameters. For this stable subclass of models we find that vector and tensor perturbations have growing solutions. We argue that special initial conditions are needed for tensor modes in order to have a viable model.

  1. Massive hiatal hernia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Arfaj, A L; Khwaja, M S; Upadhyaya, P

    1991-08-01

    Ten children had massive hiatal hernias repaired between January 1982 and February 1991. Their clinical presentation, association with other congenital abnormalities, and postoperative complications were different from those seen in adults. Vomiting (n = 7) and anaemia (n = 7) were the most common symptoms, followed by respiratory distress (n = 5), cough (n = 3), and regurgitation (n = 3). Abdominal pain was uncommon. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed in seven cases by barium meal examination. The most common operation was Nissen's fundoplication (n = 7); the hiatus alone was repaired in the remainder. Five patients developed postoperative complications and two died probably as a result of delay in diagnosis and associated malformations.

  2. Organization of the human mitochondrial hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libiad, Marouane; Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Vitvitsky, Victor; Martinov, Michael; Banerjee, Ruma

    2014-11-07

    Sulfide oxidation is expected to play an important role in cellular switching between low steady-state intracellular hydrogen sulfide levels and the higher concentrations where the physiological effects are elicited. Yet despite its significance, fundamental questions regarding how the sulfide oxidation pathway is wired remain unanswered, and competing proposals exist that diverge at the very first step catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR). We demonstrate that, in addition to sulfite, glutathione functions as a persulfide acceptor for human SQR and that rhodanese preferentially synthesizes rather than utilizes thiosulfate. The kinetic behavior of these enzymes provides compelling evidence for the flow of sulfide via SQR to glutathione persulfide, which is then partitioned to thiosulfate or sulfite. Kinetic simulations at physiologically relevant metabolite concentrations provide additional support for the organizational logic of the sulfide oxidation pathway in which glutathione persulfide is the first intermediate formed.

  3. Sulfide scaling in low enthalpy geothermal environments; A survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C. (Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres (BRGM), 45 - Orleans (France))

    1989-01-01

    A review of the sulfide scaling phenomena in low-temperature environments is presented. While high-temperature fluids tend to deposit metal sulfides because of their high concentrations of dissolved metals and variations of temperature, pressure and fluid chemistry, low temperature media are characterized by very low metal content but much higher dissolved sulfide. In the case of the goethermal wells of the Paris Basin, detailed studies demonstrate that the relatively large concentrations of chloride and dissolved sulfide are responsible for corrosion and consequent formation of iron sulfide scale composed of mackinawite, pyrite and pyrrhotite. The effects of the exploitation schemes are far less important than the corrosion of the casings. The low-enthalpy fluids that do not originate from sedimentary aquifers (such as in Iceland and Bulgaria), have a limited corrosion potential, and the thin sulfide film that appears may prevent the progress of corrosion.

  4. Energy and Carbon Flow: Comparing ultramafic- and basalt-hosted vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, M.; Bach, W.; Seifert, R.; Strauss, H.; Laroche, J.

    2010-12-01

    In deep-sea vent habitats hydrothermal fluids provide the grounds for life by supplying reduced inorganic compounds (e.g. H2, sulfide). Chemolithoautotrophs can oxidize these substrates hereby yielding energy, which can then be used to fuel autotrophic CO2 fixation. Depending on the type of host rocks (and the degree of admixed ambient seawater) the availability of inorganic electron donors can vary considerably. While in ultramafic-hosted vents H2 levels are high and H2-oxidizing metabolisms are thought to dominate, in basalt-hosted vents, H2 is much lower and microbial sulfide oxidation is considered to prevail [1, 2]. We have investigated the effect of H2 and sulfide availability on the microbial community of distinct H2-rich and H2-poor vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Hydrothermally influenced samples were collected from the H2-rich ultramafic-hosted Logatchev field (15°N) and the comparatively H2-poor basalt-hosted vents from 5°S and 9°S. We conducted catabolic energy calculations to estimate the potential of various electron donors to function as microbial energy sources. We performed incubation experiments with hydrothermal fluids amended with H2 or sulfide and radioactively labelled bicarbonate and determined H2 and sulfide consumption and carbon incorporation rates. We constructed metagenomic libraries for sequence-based screening of genes encoding key enzymes for H2 uptake (NiFe uptake hydrogenases, group 1), sulfide oxidation (sulfide quinone oxidoreductase, sqr) and CO2 fixation pathways (RubisCOs of the Calvin cycle [CBB] and beta-subunit of the ATP citrate lyase of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle [rTCA]). We evaluated parts of the metagenomes from basalt-hosted sites by pyrosequencing. Based on our incubation experiments - under the conditions applied - we could not confirm that generally H2 consumption rates and biomass syntheses in fluids derived from ultramafic-hosted locations are significantly enhanced over those from basalt-hosted

  5. Measurement of plasma hydrogen sulfide in vivo and in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Xinggui; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Pardue, Sibile; Bir, Shyamal C.; Wang, Rui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    The gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide is known to regulate multiple cellular functions during normal and pathophysiological states. However, a paucity of concise information exists regarding quantitative amounts of hydrogen sulfide involved in physiological and pathological responses. This is primarily due to disagreement among various methods employed to measure free hydrogen sulfide. In this article, we describe a very sensitive method of measuring the presence of H2S in plasma down to nanom...

  6. Genetic Pd, Pt, Au, Ag, and Rh mineralogy in Noril'sk sulfide ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiridonov, E. M.; Kulagov, E. A.; Serova, A. A.; Kulikova, I. M.; Korotaeva, N. N.; Sereda, E. V.; Tushentsova, I. N.; Belyakov, S. N.; Zhukov, N. N.

    2015-09-01

    The undeformed ore-bearing intrusions of the Noril'sk ore field (NOF) cut through volcanic rocks of the Late Permian-Early Triassic trap association folded in brachysynclines. Due to the nonuniform load on the roof of intrusive bodies, most sulfide melts were squeezed, up to the tops of ore-bearing intrusions; readily fusible Ni-Fe-Cu sulfide melts were almost completely squeezed. In our opinion, not only one but two stages of mineralization developed at the Noril'sk deposits: (i) syntrap magmatic and (ii) epigenetic post-trap metamorphic-hydrothermal. All platinum-group minerals (PGM) and minerals of gold are metasomatic in the Noril'sk ores. They replaced sulfide solid solutions and exsolution structures. All types of PGM and Au minerals occur in the ores, varying in composition from pyrrhotite to chalcopyrite, talnakhite, mooihoekite, and rich in galena; they are localized in the inner and outer contact zones and differ only in the quantitative proportions of ore minerals. The aureoles of PGM and Au-Ag minerals are wider than the contours of sulfide bodies and coincide with halos of fluid impact on orebodies and adjacent host rocks. The pneumatolytic PGM and Au-Ag minerals are correlated in abundance with the dimensions of sulfide bodies. Their amounts are maximal in veins of late fusible ore composed of eutectic PbS ss and iss intergrowths, as well as at their contacts. The Pd and Pt contents in eutectic sulfide ores of NOF are the world's highest. In the process of noble-metal mineral formation, the fluids supply Pd, Pt, Au, As, Sb, Sn, Bi, and a part of Te, whereas Fe, Ni, Cu, Pb, Ag, Rh, a part of Te and Pd are leached from the replaced sulfide minerals. The pneumatolytic PGM of the early stage comprises Pd and Pt intermetallic compounds enriched in Au along with Pd-Pt-Fe-Ni-Cu-Sn-Pb(As) and (Pd,Pt,Au)(Sn,Sb,Bi,Te,As) solid solutions. Pneumatolytic PGM and Au minerals of the middle stage are products of solid-phase transformation and recrystallization of

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide in Physiology and Diseases of the Digestive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha B. Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a Janus-faced molecule. On one hand, several toxic functions have been attributed to H2S and exposure to high levels of this gas is extremely hazardous to health. On the other hand, H2S delivery based clinical therapies are being developed to combat inflammation, visceral pain, oxidative stress related tissue injury, thrombosis and cancer. Since its discovery, H2S has been found to have pleiotropic effects on physiology and health. H2S is a gasotransmitter that exerts its effect on different systems, such as gastrointestinal, neuronal, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and hepatic systems. In the gastrointestinal tract, in addition to H2S production by mammalian cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE, H2S is also generated by the metabolic activity of resident gut microbes, mainly by colonic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB via a dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR pathway. In the gut, H2S regulates functions such as inflammation, ischemia/ reperfusion injury and motility. H2S derived from gut microbes has been found to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome. This underscores the importance of gut microbes and their production of H2S on host physiology and pathophysiology.

  8. Radio observations of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Blomme, Ronny

    2011-01-01

    Detectable radio emission occurs during almost all phases of massive star evolution. I will concentrate on the thermal and non-thermal continuum emission from early-type stars. The thermal radio emission is due to free-free interactions in the ionized stellar wind material. Early ideas that this would lead to an easy and straightforward way of measuring the mass-loss rates were thwarted by the presence of clumping in the stellar wind. Multi-wavelength observations provide important constraints on this clumping, but do not allow its full determination. Non-thermal radio emission is associated with binarity. This conclusion was already known for some time for Wolf-Rayet stars and in recent years it has become clear that it is also true for O-type stars. In a massive-star binary, the two stellar winds collide and around the shocks a fraction of the electrons are accelerated to relativistic speeds. Spiralling in the magnetic field these electrons emit synchrotron radiation, which we detect as non-thermal radio em...

  9. Solid Holography and Massive Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Alberte, Lasma; Khmelnitsky, Andrei; Pujolas, Oriol

    2015-01-01

    Momentum dissipation is an important ingredient in condensed matter physics that requires a translation breaking sector. In the bottom-up gauge/gravity duality, this implies that the gravity dual is massive. We start here a systematic analysis of holographic massive gravity (HMG) theories, which admit field theory dual interpretations and which, therefore, might store interesting condensed matter applications. We show that there are many phases of HMG that are fully consistent effective field theories and which have been left overlooked in the literature. The most important distinction between the different HMG phases is that they can be clearly separated into solids and fluids. This can be done both at the level of the unbroken spacetime symmetries as well as concerning the elastic properties of the dual materials. We extract the modulus of rigidity of the solid HMG black brane solutions and show how it relates to the graviton mass term. We also consider the implications of the different HMGs on the electric...

  10. Limitation of Sulfide Capacity Concept for Molten Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, In-Ho; Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira

    2016-04-01

    The sulfide capacity concept has been widely used in pyrometallurgy to define sulfur removal capacities of slags. Typically, the sulfide capacity is considered to be a unique slag property depending only on temperature regardless of partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur. In the present study, it is demonstrated that sulfide capacities of slags in particular those of Na2O-containing slags can vary with partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur due to large solubility of sulfide in Na2O-containing slag systems.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits the renal fibrosis of obstructive nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Wang, Fen; Li, Qian; Shi, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Hui-Fen; Peng, Hanjing; Shen, Hua-Ying; Liu, Chun-Feng; Hu, Li-Fang

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has recently been found decreased in chronic kidney disease. Here we determined the effect and underlying mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide on a rat model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Compared with normal rats, obstructive injury decreased the plasma hydrogen sulfide level. Cystathionine-β-synthase, a hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme, was dramatically reduced in the ureteral obstructed kidney, but another enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase was increased. A hydrogen sulfide donor (sodium hydrogen sulfide) inhibited renal fibrosis by attenuating the production of collagen, extracellular matrix, and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. Meanwhile, the infiltration of macrophages and the expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the kidney were also decreased. In cultured kidney fibroblasts, a hydrogen sulfide donor inhibited the cell proliferation by reducing DNA synthesis and downregulating the expressions of proliferation-related proteins including proliferating cell nuclear antigen and c-Myc. Further, the hydrogen sulfide donor blocked the differentiation of quiescent renal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts by inhibiting the transforming growth factor-β1-Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Thus, low doses of hydrogen sulfide or its releasing compounds may have therapeutic potentials in treating chronic kidney disease.

  12. INVESTIGATION OF THIN FILM CADMIUM SULFIDE SOLAR CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOLAR CELLS , *CADMIUM COMPOUNDS, FILMS, SULFIDES, VAPOR PLATING, VACUUM APPARATUS, SINGLE CRYSTALS, TITANIUM, COPPER COMPOUNDS, CHLORIDES, INDIUM, MOLYBDENUM, SILICON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ENERGY CONVERSION.

  13. Influence of iron on sulfide inhibition in dark biohydrogen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Nakhla, George

    2012-12-01

    Sulfide impact on biohydrogen production using dark fermentation of glucose at 37 °C was investigated. Dissolved sulfide (S(2-)) at a low concentration (25mg/L) increased biohydrogen production by 54% relative to the control (without iron addition). Whereas on initial dissolved S(2-) concentration of 500 mg/L significantly inhibited the biohydrogen production with total cumulative biohydrogen decreasing by 90% compared to the control (without iron addition). At sulfide concentrations of 500 mg S(2-)/L, addition of Fe(2+) at 3-4 times the theoretical requirement to precipitate 100% of the dissolved S(2-) entirely eliminated the inhibitory effect of sulfide.

  14. Quasistars and the cosmic evolution of massive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, Marta

    2010-01-01

    We explore the cosmic evolution of massive black hole (MBH) seeds forming within 'quasistars' (QSs), accreting black holes embedded within massive hydrostatic gaseous envelopes. These structures could form if the infall of gas into the center of a halo exceeds about 1 solar mass per year. We use a merger-tree approach to estimate the rate at which QSs might form as a function of redshift, and the statistical properties of the resulting QS and seed black hole populations. We relate the triggering of runaway infall to major mergers of gas-rich galaxies, and to a threshold for global gravitational instability, which we link to the angular momentum of the host. This is the main parameter of our models. Once infall is triggered, its rate is determined by the halo potential; the properties of the resulting QS and seed black hole depend on this rate. After the epoch of QSs, we model the growth of MBHs within their hosts in a merger-driven accretion scenario. We compare MBH seeds grown inside quasistars to a seed mod...

  15. MEASURING METAL SULFIDE COMPLEXES IN OXIC RIVER WATERS WITH SQUARE WAVE VOLTAMMETRY. (R825395)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sulfide identification protocol was developed to quantify specific metal sulfides that could exist in river water. Using a series of acid additions, nitrogen purges, and voltammetric analyses, metal sulfides were identified and semiquantified in three specific gr...

  16. Statistical Properties of Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jie-Min Chen; Jin Zhang; Lan-Wei Jia; En-Wei Liang

    2014-09-01

    A statistical analysis of gamma-ray burst host galaxies is presented and a clear metallicity-stellar mass relation is found in our sample. A trend that a more massive host galaxy tends to have a higher star-formation rate is also found. No correlation is found between V and H. GRB host galaxies at a higher redshift also tend to have a higher star formation rate, however, even in the same redshift, the star formation rate may vary for three orders of magnitude.

  17. Filter Bank Multicarrier for Massive MIMO

    OpenAIRE

    Farhang, Arman,; Marchetti, Nicola; Doyle, Linda E.; Farhang-Boroujeny, Behrouz

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces filter bank multicarrier (FBMC) as a potential candidate in the application of massive MIMO communication. It also points out the advantages of FBMC over OFDM (orthogonal frequency division multiplexing) in the application of massive MIMO. The absence of cyclic prefix in FBMC increases the bandwidth efficiency. In addition, FBMC allows carrier aggregation straightforwardly. Self-equalization, a property of FBMC in massive MIMO that is introduced in this paper, has the im...

  18. Massive Gravity with N=1 local Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Malaeb, Ola

    2013-01-01

    A consistent theory of massive gravity, where the graviton acquires mass by spontaneously breaking diffeomorphism invariance, is now well established. We supersymmetrize this construction using N =1 fields. Coupling to N = 1 supergravity is done by applying the rules of tensor calculus to construct an action invariant under local N = 1 supersymmetry. The supersymmetric action is shown, at the quadratic level, to be free of ghosts and have as its spectrum a massive graviton, two gravitinos with different masses, and a massive vector.

  19. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.

    1987-06-04

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are not terms in the perturbative expansion of physical S-matrix elements: These can be defined only with massless external states. Consistent massive amplitudes repuire an off-shell formalism.

  20. Toxicological analysis of 17 autopsy cases of hydrogen sulfide poisoning resulting from the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maebashi, Kyoko; Iwadate, Kimiharu; Sakai, Kentaro; Takatsu, Akihiro; Fukui, Kenji; Aoyagi, Miwako; Ochiai, Eriko; Nagai, Tomonori

    2011-04-15

    Although many cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning have been reported, in most of these cases, it resulted from the accidental inhalation of hydrogen sulfide gas. In recent years, we experienced 17 autopsy cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning due to the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas. In this study, the concentrations of sulfide and thiosulfate in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid and pleural effusion were examined using GC/MS. The sulfide concentrations were blood: 0.11-31.84, urine: 0.01-1.28, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.02-1.59 and pleural effusion: 2.00-8.59 (μg/ml), while the thiosulfate concentrations were blood: 0-0.648, urine: 0-2.669, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.004-0.314 and pleural effusion: 0.019-0.140 (μmol/ml). In previous reports, the blood concentration of thiosulfate was said to be higher than that of sulfide in hydrogen sulfide poisoning cases, although the latter was higher than the former in 8 of the 14 cases examined in this study. These results are believed to be strongly influenced by the atmospheric concentration of hydrogen sulfide the victims were exposed to and the time interval between exposure and death.

  1. Cupriavidus necator H16 uses flavocytochrome c-sulfide dehydrogenase to oxidize self-produced and spiked sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Chuanjuan; Xia, Yongzhen; Liu, Daixi; Zhao, Rui; Gao, Rui; Liu, Honglei; Xun, Luying

    2017-09-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria producing sulfide (H2S, HS(-), and S(2-)) during aerobic growth is a common phenomenon. Some with sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) and persulfide dioxygenase (PDO) can oxidize self-produced sulfide to sulfite and thiosulfate, but others without these enzymes will release sulfide into the medium, from which H2S can volatilize into the gas phase. Here, we report Cupriavidus necator H16 with the fccAB genes, encoding flavocytochrome c-sulfide dehydrogenases (FCSDs), also oxidized self-produced H2S. The mutant with fccAB being deleted accumulated and released H2S. When fccAB were expressed in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain Pa3K with deletions of its sqr and pdo genes, the recombinant rapidly oxidized sulfide to sulfane sulfur. When PDO was also cloned into the recombinant, the recombinant with both FCSD and PDO oxidized sulfide to sulfite and thiosulfate. Thus, the proposed pathway is similar to the pathway catalyzed by SQR and PDO, in which FCSD oxidizes sulfide to polysulfide, polysulfide spontaneously reacts with GSH to produce GSSH, and PDO oxidizes GSSH to sulfite, which chemically reacts with polysulfide to produce thiosulfate. About 20.6% of sequenced bacterial genomes contain SQR, and only 3.9% contain FCSD. This is not a surprise since SQR is more efficient in conserving energy because it passes electrons from sulfide oxidation into the electron transport chain at the quinone level, while FCSD passes electrons to cytochrome c The transport of electrons from the latter to O2 conserves less energy. FCSDs are grouped into three subgroups, well conserved at taxonomic levels. Thus, our data show the diversity in sulfide oxidation by heterotrophic bacteria.Importance Heterotrophic bacteria with SQR and PDO can oxidize self-produced sulfide and do not release H2S into the gas phase. C. necator H16 has FCSD but not SQR, and it does not release H2S. We confirmed that the bacterium used FCSD for the oxidation of self-produced sulfide. The

  2. Evidence supporting biologically mediated sulfide oxidation in hot spring ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A. D.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    The sulfide concentration of fluids in hydrothermal ecosystems is one of several factors determining the transition to microbial photosynthesis (Cox et al., 2011, Chem. Geol. 280, 344-351). To investigate the loss of sulfide in Yellowstone hot spring systems, measurements of total dissolved sulfide with respect to time were made in incubation experiments conducted on 0.2-micron filtered (killed controls) vs. unfiltered hot spring water at locations with three different pH:sulfide combinations (pH 2.5 with 50 μM sulfide, 5.2 with 5.6 μM sulfide, and 8.3 with 86 μM sulfide). At the higher pH values, the experiments yielded similar rates of sulfide loss in filtered and unfiltered water of approximately 0.8 (pH 5.2) and 7.6 nmol sulfide L-1s-1 (pH 8.3). At the acidic spring, the unfiltered water lost sulfide at a rate 1.6 times that of the filtered water (8.2 vs. 5 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). These results suggest that the pelagic biomass at the pH 5.2 and 8.3 springs may not affect sulfide loss, whereas in the pH 2.5 spring there appears to be an effect. In addition, the incubation of filamentous biomass with unfiltered water increased the rate of sulfide loss by approximately two-fold at a pH of 2.5 (59 vs. 31 nmol L-1s-1; Cox et al., 2011), five-fold at a pH of 5.2 (3.9 vs. 0.8 nmol sulfide L-1s-1), and barely increased the rate of sulfide loss at a pH of 8.3 (9.1 vs. 8.4 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). Sulfide is predominately present as HS- at a pH of 8.3, which may not be taken up as easily by microorganisms as the H2S (aq) that dominates sulfide speciation at pH 2.5 and 5.2. That the loss of sulfide at acidic pH is due to biotic rather than abiotic factors is further supported by studies with whole mat samples that show greater sulfide consumption than killed controls (D'Imperio et al., 2008, AEM 74, 5802-5808). Taken together, the results of these experiments suggest that the majority of sulfide oxidation occurs in the filamentous biomass of hot spring ecosystems, although

  3. Rotation and massive close binary evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Langer, N; Yoon, S -C; Hunter, I; Brott, I; Lennon, D J; de Mink, S E; Verheijdt, M

    2008-01-01

    We review the role of rotation in massive close binary systems. Rotation has been advocated as an essential ingredient in massive single star models. However, rotation clearly is most important in massive binaries where one star accretes matter from a close companion, as the resulting spin-up drives the accretor towards critical rotation. Here, we explore our understanding of this process, and its observable consequences. When accounting for these consequences, the question remains whether rotational effects in massive single stars are still needed to explain the observations.

  4. Megaloblastic anemia presenting with massive reversible splenomegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Vineet; Randive, Makarand; Sharma, Praveen; Nair, Velu

    2015-06-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA) is a common disorder with varied manifestations. It generally results in mild to moderate splenomegaly which is due to sequestration of macrocytic erythrocytes in spleen. Massive splenomegaly is generally seen in infections, myeloproliferative diseases, neoplasms, storage disorders or hematological conditions; but is not heard of and has rarely been reported in MA. We discuss a case of massive splenomegaly who presented with symptomatic anemia and was found to have MA. He was extensive evaluated for all other causes of massive splenomegaly which was normal. Further, after a therapeutic trial of MA he showed a regression in spleen size confirming that the massive splenomegaly was attributable to MA.

  5. Increased Understanding of Accretion in Massive YSOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wit, Willem-Jan; Caratti, A.; Kraus, S.

    2017-06-01

    That massive stars up to 20Msol form by disk accretion is by now reasonably well established. We will present the latest observational results for the formation of single and multiple massive YSOs. By means of optical interferometry using the newly commissioned instrument Gravity at the VLT-I, we show the discovery of a young, embedded, 170AU-wide binary and is the most massive and most compact accreting young binary to date. We will also present the results of a multi-site multi-epoch follow-up campaign of the first well studied accretion outburst in a massive YSO.

  6. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rubio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwavelenghts studies of massive star formation regions in the LMC and SMC reveal that a second generation of stars is being formed in dense molecular clouds located in the surroundings of the massive clusters. These dense molecular clouds have survive the action of massive star UV radiation elds and winds and they appear as compact dense H2 knots in regions of weak CO emission. We present results of observations obtained towards massive star forming regions in the low metallicity molecular clouds in the Magellanic Clouds and investigate its implication on star formation in the early universe.

  7. Experimental study on liquid immiscibility of lamprophyre-sulfide melt at high temperature and high pressure and its geological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; HUANG Zhilong; ZHU Chengming

    2009-01-01

    With lamprophyre and pyrite from the Laowangzhai gold deposit, Yunnan Province, China, as starting materials, and at pressures from 1.5 to 3.0 GPa and temperatures from 1160 to 1560℃, an experimental study was carried out on the liquid immiscibility of lamprophyre-sulfide melt at high temperature and ultra-high pressure in the DS-29A cubic 3600T/6-type high pressure apparatus. Results showed that the liquid immiscibility of lampropyre-sulfide melt in the magmatic system would happen during the early magmatic evolution (high temperature and high pressure conditions) and was controlled by temperature and pressure. The sulfide melt which was separated from the lamprophyric melt would make directional movement in the temperature and pressure field and assemble in the low-temperature and low-pressure region. Because the density of SM is higher than that of the lamprophyric melt, the former would gather together at the bottom of the magma chamber and there would exist a striking boundary between the two melts. On the other hand, the results also suggested that there would be little possibility for lamprophyric magma to carry massive gold, and lamprophyres can't provide many of ore-forming materials (Au) in the processes of gold mineralization.

  8. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2015-11-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit with some uncertainty. It was concluded that the model could be applied for the purpose in mind.

  9. Massive Parallel Quantum Computer Simulator

    CERN Document Server

    De Raedt, K; De Raedt, H; Ito, N; Lippert, T; Michielsen, K; Richter, M; Trieu, B; Watanabe, H; Lippert, Th.

    2006-01-01

    We describe portable software to simulate universal quantum computers on massive parallel computers. We illustrate the use of the simulation software by running various quantum algorithms on different computer architectures, such as a IBM BlueGene/L, a IBM Regatta p690+, a Hitachi SR11000/J1, a Cray X1E, a SGI Altix 3700 and clusters of PCs running Windows XP. We study the performance of the software by simulating quantum computers containing up to 36 qubits, using up to 4096 processors and up to 1 TB of memory. Our results demonstrate that the simulator exhibits nearly ideal scaling as a function of the number of processors and suggest that the simulation software described in this paper may also serve as benchmark for testing high-end parallel computers.

  10. Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, C

    2003-01-01

    At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ~180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community.

  11. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  12. Mixing in massive stellar mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Gaburov, E; Zwart, S Portegies

    2007-01-01

    The early evolution of dense star clusters is possibly dominated by close interactions between stars, and physical collisions between stars may occur quite frequently. Simulating a stellar collision event can be an intensive numerical task, as detailed calculations of this process require hydrodynamic simulations in three dimensions. We present a computationally inexpensive method in which we approximate the merger process, including shock heating, hydrodynamic mixing and mass loss, with a simple algorithm which is based on conservation laws and a basic qualitative understanding of the hydrodynamics of stellar mergers. The algorithm is based on Archimedes' principle, which dictates the distribution of the fluid in stable equilibrium situation. We calibrate and apply the method to mergers of massive stars, as these are expected to occur in young and dense star clusters. We find that mergers between spectral type B stars ($\\sim$10\\msun) result in substantial mixing, whereas mergers between stars of different sp...

  13. Derivative couplings in massive bigravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Xian

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity in the presence of non-minimal derivative couplings. For this purpose we consider a specific subclass of Horndeski scalar-tensor interactions that live on the unique composite effective metric. For the viability of the model both metrics have to be dynamical. Nevertheless, the number of allowed kinetic terms is crucial. We adapt to the restriction of having one single kinetic term. After deriving the full set of equations of motion for flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker background, we study linear perturbations on top of it. We show explicitly that only four tensor, two vector and two scalar degrees of freedom propagate, one of which being the Horndeski scalar, while the Boulware-Deser ghost can be integrated out.

  14. Derivative couplings in massive bigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xian; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2016-03-01

    In this work we study the cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity in the presence of non-minimal derivative couplings. For this purpose we consider a specific subclass of Horndeski scalar-tensor interactions that live on the unique composite effective metric. For the viability of the model both metrics have to be dynamical. Nevertheless, the number of allowed kinetic terms is crucial. We adapt to the restriction of having one single kinetic term. After deriving the full set of equations of motion for flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker background, we study linear perturbations on top of it. We show explicitly that only four tensor, two vector and two scalar degrees of freedom propagate, one of which being the Horndeski scalar, while the Boulware-Deser ghost can be integrated out.

  15. C++ and Massively Parallel Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Lickly

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to apply the software engineering advantages of object-oriented programming to the raw power of massively parallel architectures. To do this we have constructed a hierarchy of C++ classes to support the data-parallel paradigm. Feasibility studies and initial coding can be supported by any serial machine that has a C++ compiler. Parallel execution requires an extended Cfront, which understands the data-parallel classes and generates C* code. (C* is a data-parallel superset of ANSI C developed by Thinking Machines Corporation. This approach provides potential portability across parallel architectures and leverages the existing compiler technology for translating data-parallel programs onto both SIMD and MIMD hardware.

  16. Massive Black Holes and Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has been accumulating for several decades that many galaxies harbor central mass concentrations that may be in the form of black holes with masses between a few million to a few billion time the mass of the Sun. I will discuss measurements over the last two decades, employing adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy on large ground-based telescopes that prove the existence of such a massive black hole in the Center of our Milky Way, beyond any reasonable doubt. These data also provide key insights into its properties and environment. Most recently, a tidally disrupting cloud of gas has been discovered on an almost radial orbit that reached its peri-distance of ~2000 Schwarzschild radii in 2014, promising to be a valuable tool for exploring the innermost accretion zone. Future interferometric studies of the Galactic Center Black hole promise to be able to test gravity in its strong field limit.

  17. Cosmological attractors in massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dubovsky, S; Tkachev, I I

    2005-01-01

    We study Lorentz-violating models of massive gravity which preserve rotations and are invariant under time-dependent shifts of the spatial coordinates. In the linear approximation the Newtonian potential in these models has an extra ``confining'' term proportional to the distance from the source. We argue that during cosmological expansion the Universe may be driven to an attractor point with larger symmetry which includes particular simultaneous dilatations of time and space coordinates. The confining term in the potential vanishes as one approaches the attractor. In the vicinity of the attractor the extra contribution is present in the Friedmann equation which, in a certain range of parameters, gives rise to the cosmic acceleration.

  18. Iron Sulfide Minerals in Black Sea Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Christine; Robin, Eric; Henkel, Susann; Courtin-Nomade, Alexandra; Bleil, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    This study presents a mutidisciplinary geochemical and environmental magnetic approach, integrating advanced mineralogical techniques to better understand the physicochemical syn-sedimentary and post-depositional processes in the anoxic sediments from the northwestern Black Sea. The investigated gravity core GC 214 was retrieved in 2007 during RV METEOR cruise M72/1 west of the Crimean Peninsula in a water depth of 1686 mbsf. Geochemical analyses of the pore water and solid phase indicate non-steady state sedimentation. The oxygen-depleted water column conditions, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), and related microbial-driven sulfate reduction favor a highly complex iron sulfide mineral assemblage in the sediment column. The detailed magnetic susceptibility and remanence measurements indicate an irregularly stratified depth profile showing intervals of particularly high values. Further environmental magnetic analyses of hysteresis loops depict strongly elevated coercivity values for those depth horizons, suggesting metastable ferrimagnetic greigite (Fe3S4) as the main magnetic carrier phase. Automated chemical classification (ACC), using electron dispersive spectrometer (EDS) attached to a JEOL 840 scanning electron microscope (SEM) on dispersed particle samples permitted the absolutequantification of the various present iron mineral phases with depth, identified as greigite (Fe3S4), pyrrhotite (Fe7S8), pyrite (FeS2), and monosulfides (FeS), such as troilite or markasite. The statistically stable ACC analyses were carried out on magnetic extracts and density separates to be able to calculate budgets between the different present iron sulfides. We also obtained excellent correlations between the different iron sulfide concentrations and the magnetic signal, which open the possibility to link the absolute particle concentrations to the magnetic signal. Additional synchrotron based micro-XRD analyses on polished sections yield inside into the details of the

  19. Mercury Sulfide Dimorphism in Thioarsenate Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    KASSEM, Mohammad; Sokolov, Anton; Cuisset, Arnaud,; Usuki, Takeshi; Khaoulani, Sohayb; Masselin, Pascal; Le Coq, David,; Feygenson, M.; Benmore, C. J.; Hannon, Alex,; Neuefeind, J. C.; Bychkov, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Crystalline mercury sulfide exists in two drastically different polymorphic forms in different domains of the P,T-diagram: red chain-like insulator α-HgS, stable below 344 °C, and black tetrahedral narrow-band semiconductor β-HgS, stable at higher temperatures. Using pulsed neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction, we show that these two mercury bonding pattern are present simultaneously in mercury thioarsenate glasses HgS-As2S3. The population and interconnectivity o...

  20. Diurnal changes in pore water sulfide concentrations in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum beds: the effects of seagrasses on sulfide dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee; Dunton

    2000-12-20

    The dynamics of the seagrass-sulfide interaction were examined in relation to diel changes in sediment pore water sulfide concentrations in Thalassia testudinum beds and adjacent bare areas in Corpus Christi Bay and lower Laguna Madre, Texas, USA, during July 1996. Pore water sulfide concentrations in seagrass beds were significantly higher than in adjacent bare areas and showed strong diurnal variations; levels significantly decreased during mid-day at shallow sediment depths (0-10 cm) containing high below-ground tissue biomass and surface area. In contrast, diurnal variations in sediment sulfide concentrations were absent in adjacent bare patches, and at deeper (>10 cm) sediment depths characterized by low below-ground plant biomass or when the grasses were experimentally shaded. These observations suggest that the mid-day depressions in sulfide levels are linked to the transport of photosynthetically produced oxygen to seagrass below-ground tissues that fuels sediment sulfide oxidation. Lower sulfide concentrations in bare areas are likely a result of low sulfate reduction rates due to low organic matter available for remineralization. Further, high reoxidation rates due to rapid exchange between anoxic pore water and oxic overlying water are probably stimulated in bare areas by higher current velocity on the sediment surface than in seagrass beds. The dynamics of pore water sulfides in seagrass beds suggest no toxic sulfide intrusion into below-ground tissues during photosynthetic periods and demonstrate that the sediment chemical environment is considerably modified by seagrasses. The reduced sediment sulfide levels in seagrass beds during photosynthetic periods will enhance seagrass production through reduced sulfide toxicity to seagrasses and sediment microorganisms related to the nutrient cycling.

  1. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  2. Hydrogen sulfide: physiological properties and therapeutic potential in ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Eelke M; van Goor, Harry; Joles, Jaap A; Whiteman, Matthew; Leuvenink, Henri G D

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) has become a molecule of high interest in recent years, and it is now recognized as the third gasotransmitter in addition to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on the physiology of endogenous and exogenous H2 S, focusing upon the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide in models of hypoxia and ischaemia.

  3. NGC 346: Looking in the Cradle of a Massive Star Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Hony, Sacha

    2017-03-01

    How does a star cluster of more than few 10,000 solar masses form? We present the case of the cluster NGC 346 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, still embedded in its natal star-forming region N66, and we propose a scenario for its formation, based on observations of the rich stellar populations in the region. Young massive clusters host a high fraction of early-type stars, indicating an extremely high star formation efficiency. The Milky Way galaxy hosts several young massive clusters that fill the gap between young low-mass open clusters and old massive globular clusters. Only a handful, though, are young enough to study their formation. Moreover, the investigation of their gaseous natal environments suffers from contamination by the Galactic disk. Young massive clusters are very abundant in distant starburst and interacting galaxies, but the distance of their hosting galaxies do not also allow a detailed analysis of their formation. The Magellanic Clouds, on the other hand, host young massive clusters in a wide range of ages with the youngest being still embedded in their giant HII regions. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of such star-forming complexes provide a stellar sampling with a high dynamic range in stellar masses, allowing the detailed study of star formation at scales typical for molecular clouds. Our cluster analysis on the distribution of newly-born stars in N66 shows that star formation in the region proceeds in a clumpy hierarchical fashion, leading to the formation of both a dominant young massive cluster, hosting about half of the observed pre-main-sequence population, and a self-similar dispersed distribution of the remaining stars. We investigate the correlation between stellar surface density (and star formation rate derived from star-counts) and molecular gas surface density (derived from dust column density) in order to unravel the physical conditions that gave birth to NGC 346. A power law fit to the data yields a steep correlation between these

  4. Re-Os isotopes and PGE geochemistry of black shales and intercalated Ni-Mo polymetallic sulfide bed from the Lower Cambrian Niutitang Formation, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Shaoyong; YANG Jinghong; LING Hongfei; FENG Hongzhen; CHEN Yongquan; CHEN Jianhua

    2003-01-01

    The Lower Cambrian Niutitang Formation consists of a thick black shale sequence with a regionally distributed conformable Ni-Mo polymetallic sulfide horizon and a chert bed at its basal strata on theYangtze Platform, South China. In this paper, we discuss all available data on Re-Os isotopes and Platinum Group Element (PGE) distribution pattern of the Ni-Mo polymetallic sulfide ore and its host rocks (black shales, cherts, and phosphorites) from Guizhou and Hunan provinces. Our results show that the black shales and the Ni-Mo sulfide ore have a high initial 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.78~0.86, indicating that the Early Cambrian ocean across the Yangtze Platform had a highly radiogenic Os value. This ratio is slightly lower than but still similar to present-day seawater, possibly as a result of high continental weathering at that time. The Ni-Mo sulfide ore yields a Re-Os isochron of 537±10 Ma (MSWD=11.9), possibly representing the depositional age of the Niutitang Formation. The chondrite-normalized PGE pattern, Pt anomaly (Pt/Pt*), Pt/Pd, Ir/Pd, Au/Ir and Re/Mo ratios of the Ni-Mo sulfide ore and its host rocks from South China indicate a varying source contribution of the PGE and other metals for different rocks. It is suggested that the cherts and Ni-Mo sulfide ore may have a significant proportion of PGE and probably other metals deriving from submarine-hydrothermal fluids with a mantle signature.

  5. Properties of massive stars in four clusters of the VVV survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, A.; Martins, F.; Chené, A.-N.; Bouret, J.-C.; Borissova, J.

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of massive stars is only partly understood. Observational constraints can be obtained from the study of massive stars located in young massive clusters. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Lácteá (VVV)" discovered several new clusters hosting massive stars. We present an analysis of massive stars in four of these new clusters. Our aim is to provide constraints on stellar evolution and to better understand the relation between different types of massive stars. We use the radiative transfer code CMFGEN to analyse K-band spectra of twelve stars with spectral types ranging from O and B to WN and WC. We derive the stellar parameters of all targets as well as surface abundances for a subset of them. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, the Wolf-Rayet stars are more luminous or hotter than the O stars. From the log(C/N)-log(C/He) diagram, we show quantitatively that WN stars are more chemically evolved than O stars, WC stars being more evolved than WN stars. Mass loss rates among Wolf-Rayet stars are a factor of 10 larger than for O stars, in agreement with previous findings.

  6. Properties of massive stars in four clusters of the VVV survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hervé, A; Chené, A -N; Bouret, J -C; Borissova, J

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of massive stars is only partly understood. Observational constraints can be obtained from the study of massive stars located in young massive clusters. The ESO Public Survey VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) discovered several new clusters hosting massive stars. We present an analysis of massive stars in four of these new clusters. Our aim is to provide constraints on stellar evolution and to better understand the relation between different types of massive stars. We use the radiative transfer code CMFGEN to analyse K-band spectra of twelve stars with spectral types ranging from O and B to WN and WC. We derive the stellar parameters of all targets as well as surface abundances for a subset of them. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, the Wolf-Rayet stars are more luminous or hotter than the O stars. From the log(C/N) - log(C/He) diagram, we show quantitatively that WN stars are more chemically evolved than O stars, WC stars being more evolved than WN stars. Mass loss rates among Wolf-Raye...

  7. Magmatic sulfide-rich nickel-copper deposits related to picrite and (or) tholeiitic basalt dike-sill complexes-A preliminary deposit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Chandler, Val W.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Magmatic sulfide deposits containing nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu), with or without (?) platinum-group elements (PGEs), account for approximately 60 percent of the world's Ni production and are active exploration targets in the United States and elsewhere. On the basis of their principal metal production, magmatic sulfide deposits in mafic rocks can be divided into two major types: those that are sulfide-rich, typically with 10 to 90 percent sulfide minerals, and have economic value primarily because of their Ni and Cu contents; and those that are sulfide-poor, typically with 0.5 to 5 percent sulfide minerals, and are exploited principally for PGE. Because the purpose of this deposit model is to facilitate the assessment for undiscovered, potentially economic magmatic Ni-Cu?PGE sulfide deposits in the United States, it addresses only those deposits of economic significance that are likely to occur in the United States on the basis of known geology. Thus, this model focuses on deposits hosted by small- to medium-sized mafic and (or) ultramafic dikes and sills that are related to picrite and tholeiitic basalt magmatic systems generally emplaced in continental settings as a component of large igneous provinces (LIPs). World-class examples (those containing greater than 1 million tons Ni) of this deposit type include deposits at Noril'sk-Talnakh (Russia), Jinchuan (China), Pechenga (Russia), Voisey's Bay (Canada), and Kabanga (Tanzania). In the United States, this deposit type is represented by the Eagle deposit in northern Michigan, currently under development by Kennecott Minerals.

  8. How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob; Oliveri, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids and red blood cells (RBC) in the early phase, and plasma and platelets in...

  9. Stefan-Boltzmann law for massive photons

    CERN Document Server

    Moreira, E S

    2015-01-01

    Thirty years ago a paper appeared in the literature generalizing the Stefan-Boltzmann law to include massive photons. The paper suffers from a flaw though: it assumes that a massive photon travels at the speed of (massless) light. The present work fixes the mistake and presents the correct formula for the radiance.

  10. Stefan-Boltzmann Law for Massive Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, E. S.; Ribeiro, T. G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper generalizes the Stefan-Boltzmann law to include massive photons. A crucial ingredient to obtain the correct formula for the radiance is to realize that a massive photon does not travel at the speed of (massless) light. It follows that, contrary to what could be expected, the radiance is not proportional to the energy density times the speed of light.

  11. Mass Loss and Evolution of Massive Stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    I discuss the early observations and the discovery of stellar winds from massive stars, including the development of wind theories, the effects of mass loss on stellar evolution, the role of rotation and the evolutionary connection between different types of massive stars. Because of the special

  12. The massive Kaluza-Klein monopole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E; Eyras, E; Lozano, Y

    1998-01-01

    We construct the (bosonic) effective worldvolume action of an M-theory Kaluza-Klein monopole in a background given by the bosonic sector of eleven-dimensional massive supergravity, i.e, a "massive Kaluza-Klein monopole". As a consistency check we show that the direct dimensional reduction along the

  13. 10 billion years of massive Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Edward Nairne Cunningham

    2009-01-01

    The most massive galaxies in the local universe are not forming new stars -- but we don’t know why. As a step towards figuring out why big galaxies stop forming stars, we set out to measure when they stop forming stars. By looking at the colors of massive galaxies have changed over 10 billion year

  14. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foda, O.

    1987-01-01

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are n

  15. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foda, O.

    1987-01-01

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are

  16. Effect of palladium on sulfide tarnishing of noble metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suoninen, E; Herø, H; Minni, E

    1985-10-01

    Electron spectroscopic studies of Au-Ag-Cu alloys of the type used for dental castings show that small additions (less than or equal to 3 wt%) of palladium reduce essentially the thickness of the sulfide layer formed on surfaces of samples treated in aqueous Na2S solutions. Relative to silver, palladium does not enrich in the sulfide, but statistically significant enrichment is found immediately below the sulfide layer. This enrichment probably takes place during the exposure of the substrate surface to atmosphere before the sulfiding treatment. The mechanism of the impeding effect of palladium on sulfiding is assumed to be a decrease in diffusion from the bulk alloy to the surface due to the enriched layer. The effect cannot be explained by changes in the electronic structure of the alloy due to palladium alloying.

  17. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  18. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  19. Mechanical properties of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, X. Y.; Gu, X. Y.; Wang, X. W.

    2017-01-01

    Gutta-percha is the isomer of caoutchouc and can be used to enhance the performance of asphalt. In this paper, the produce proceedings of gutta-percha sulfide and gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt are introduced. The performance indices of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt samples with different proportions are examined based on laboratory tests and the optimum ratio of gutta-percha and sulfur is decided.The micromechanism, temperature sensitivity, high and low temperature properties and viscoelasticity of the polymer modified asphalt are analyzed to discuss the modified mechanism and to decide the optimal polymer content. Low temperature bending tests are carried out to verify the low temperature performance of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt mixture. Research results showed that gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt has good low temperature performance and a promising application prospect in the cold regions.

  20. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    and the low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate...... to the sediment-water interface and reduce the hydrogen sulfide flux to the water column. Modeling of pore water sulfide concentration profiles indicates that sulfide produced by bacterial sulfate reduction in the uppermost 16 cm of sediment is sufficient to account for the total flux of hydrogen sulfide...... to the water column. However, the total pool of hydrogen sulfide in the water column is too large to be explained by steady state diffusion across the sediment-water interface. Episodic advection of hydrogen sulfide, possibly triggered by methane eruptions, may contribute to hydrogen sulfide in the water...

  1. Structural, chemical and optical properties of the polyethylene–copper sulfide composite thin films synthesized using polythionic acid as sulfur source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancutiene, Ingrida [Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu st. 19, LT-50254 Kaunas (Lithuania); Navea, Juan G. [Chemistry Department, Skidmore College, 815N. Broadway, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 (United States); Baltrusaitis, Jonas, E-mail: job314@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Lehigh University, B336 Iacocca Hall, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: Several crystalline copper sulfide phases (spionkopite, anilite, digenite, djurleite, chalcocite) were obtained in as synthesized samples (PE-Cu{sub x}S) and elucidated using XRD. Thickness of the films obtained ranged from several microns to ∼18 μm and depended on the Cu(II/I) exposure time. Bandgap of the materials obtained was measured and ranged from 1.88 to 1.17 eV. Importantly, heating samples, many copper sulfide crystalline phase containing films at 100 °C in inert atmosphere invariably resulted in a single copper sulfide, anilite (Cu{sub 1.75}S), phase. - Highlights: • We investigated deposition of a single phase copper sulfide on polyethylene. • A single sulfur precursor – H{sub 2}S{sub 33}O{sub 6} – was used. • Increasing exposure time to Cu(II/I) yielded Cu{sub x}S with higher x values. • Heating at 100 °C in N{sub 2} resulted in a single anilite (Cu{sub 1.75}S) phase. • Cu(I) and Cu(II) compounds were detected using XPS. - Abstract: Synthesis and properties of thin copper sulfide films deposited on polyethylene were explored for the development of low cost hybrid organic–inorganic photovoltaic materials. Polyethylene was used as a model organic host material for thin copper sulfide film formation. Adsorption–diffusion method was used which utilized consecutive exposure of polyethylene to polythionic acid followed by aqueous Cu(II/I) solution. Several crystalline copper sulfide phases were obtained in synthesized samples and elucidated using X-ray diffraction. Surface chemical composition determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of copper sulfides in combination with copper hydroxide. Thickness of the composite material films ranged from several microns to ∼18 μm and depended on the Cu(II/I) exposure time. Bandgap of the materials obtained was measured and ranged from 1.88 to 1.17 eV. Importantly, heating these complex copper sulfide crystalline phase containing films at 100

  2. Petrogenesis and ore genesis of the Permian Huangshanxi sulfide ore-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusion in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ya-Jing; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Li, Chusi; Xue, Sheng-Chao; Ripley, Edward M.

    2014-07-01

    The Permian Huangshanxi mafic-ultramafic intrusion hosts one of the two largest magmatic sulfide deposits in the Eastern Tianshan which is situated in the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. In this paper we use mineral compositions and whole-rock geochemical data to decipher the genetic relationship between magma evolution and sulfide mineralization. The Huangshanxi intrusion consists of three separate intrusive units. Important sulfide mineralization occurs in the base of the last intrusive unit, an elongated, layered ultramafic body composed of lherzolite at the bottom, olivine websterite in the middle and websterite at the top. Based on olivine-liquid equilibria and mass balance, the MgO and FeO contents in the parental magma for a lherzolite sample are estimated to be 8.71 and 8.36 wt.%, respectively. The Huangshanxi mafic-ultramafic intrusive rocks and the estimated "trapped liquids" for several olivine-orthopyroxene cumulate rocks all show light rare earth element enrichments relative to heavy rare earth elements and significant Nb depletions relative to Th and La, which are similar to the characteristics of coeval basalts in the region. The arc-like geochemical features are attributed to pre-Permian mantle metasomatism by slab-derived fluids. Partial melting of the previously-modified mantle is thought to have resulted from heating by upwelling asthenosphere associated with post-subduction lithosphere delamination or by mantle plume activity. The relationship between the Fo and Ni contents of olivine crystals from the Huangshanxi sulfide-poor ultramafic rocks (source mantle. Stratigraphic reversals in olivine Fo contents and bulk sulfide PGE tenors suggest that multiple magma replenishments occurred during the development of the Huangshanxi magmatic Ni-Cu sulfide deposit. The sulfide ore formation can be divided into two stages: a conduit stage during which immiscible sulfide droplets and olivine crystals were brought up by ascending magma

  3. New Mid-IR Lasers Based on Rare-Earth-Doped Sulfide and Chloride Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nostrand, M

    2000-09-01

    Applications in remote-sensing and military countermeasures have driven a need for compact, solid-state mid-IR lasers. Due to multi-phonon quenching, non-traditional hosts are needed to extend current solid-state, room-temperature lasing capabilities beyond {approx} 4 {micro}m. Traditional oxide and fluoride hosts have effective phonon energies in the neighborhood of 1000 cm{sup -1} and 500 cm{sup -1}, respectively. These phonons can effectively quench radiation above 2 and 4 {micro}m, respectively. Materials with lower effective phonon energies such as sulfides and chlorides are the logical candidates for mid-IR (4-10 {micro}m) operation. In this report, laser action is demonstrated in two such hosts, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}. The CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} laser operating at 4.3 {micro}m represents the first sulfide laser operating beyond 2 {micro}m. The KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}:Dy{sup 3+} laser operating at 2.4 {micro}m represents the first operation of a chloride-host laser in ambient conditions. Laser action is also reported for CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} at 2.4 {micro}m, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} at 1.4 {micro}m, and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}:Nd{sup 3+} at 1.06 {micro}m. Both host materials have been fully characterized, including lifetimes, absorption and emission cross sections, radiative branching ratios, and radiative quantum efficiencies. Radiative branching ratios and radiative quantum efficiencies have been determined both by the Judd-Ofelt method (which is based on absorption measurements), and by a novel method described herein which is based on emission measurements. Modeling has been performed to predict laser performance, and a new method to determine emission cross section from slope efficiency and threshold data is developed. With the introduction and laser demonstration of rare-earth-doped CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}, direct generation of mid-IR laser radiation in a solid-state host has been demonstrated. In

  4. Calculation of sulfide capacities of multicomponent slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Romero-Serrano, Antonio

    1993-10-01

    The Reddy-Blander model for the sulfide capacities of slags has been modified for the case of acid slags and to include A12O3 and TiO2 as components. The model has been extended to calculate a priori sulfide capacities of multicomponent slags, from a knowledge of the thermodynamic activities of the component oxides, with no adjustable parameters. Agreement with measurements is obtained within experimental uncertainty for binary, ternary, and quinary slags involving the components SiO2-Al2O3-TiO2-CaO-MgO-FeO-MnO over wide ranges of composition. The oxide activities used in the computations are calculated from a database of model parameters obtained by optimizing thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data for oxide systems. Sulfur has now been included in this database. A computing system with automatic access to this and other databases has been developed to permit the calculation of the sulfur content of slags in multicomponent slag/metal/gas/solid equilibria.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as biological mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hideo

    2014-10-09

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as a biological mediator with various roles such as neuromodulation, regulation of the vascular tone, cytoprotection, anti-inflammation, oxygen sensing, angiogenesis, and generation of mitochondrial energy. It is produced by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST). The activity of CBS is enhanced by S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) and glutathionylation, while it is inhibited by nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). The activity of CSE and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT), which produces the 3MST substrate 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP), is regulated by Ca2+. H2S is oxidized to thiosulfate in mitochondria through the sequential action of sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), sulfur dioxygenase, and rhodanese. The rates of the production and clearance of H2S determine its cellular concentration. Polysulfides (H2Sn) have been found to occur in the brain and activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels, facilitate the translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the nucleus, and suppress the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) by sulfurating (sulfhydrating) the target cysteine residues. A cross talk between H2S and NO also plays an important role in cardioprotection as well as regulation of the vascular tone. H2S, polysulfides, and their cross talk with NO may mediate various physiological and pathophysiological responses.

  6. First detection of doubly deuterated hydrogen sulfide

    CERN Document Server

    Vastel, C; Ceccarelli, C; Pearson, J

    2003-01-01

    This work was carried out with using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and presents the observational study of HDS and D2S towards a sample of Class 0 sources, and dense cores. We report the first detection of doubly deuterated hydrogen sulfide (D2S) in two dense cores and analyze the chemistry of these molecules aiming to help understand the deuteration processes in the interstellar medium. The observed values of the D2S/HDS ratio, and upper limits, require an atomic D/H ratio in the accreting gas of 0.1-1. The study presented in this Letter supports the hypothesis that formaldehyde, methanol and hydrogen sulfide are formed on the grain surfaces, during the cold pre-stellar core phase, where the CO depleted gas has large atomic D/H ratios. The high values for the D/H ratios are consistent with the predictions of a recent gas-phase chemical model that includes H3+ and its deuterated isotopomers, H2D+, D2H+ and D3+ (Roberts et al. 2003).

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide and Polysulfides as Biological Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Kimura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as a biological mediator with various roles such as neuromodulation, regulation of the vascular tone, cytoprotection, anti-inflammation, oxygen sensing, angiogenesis, and generation of mitochondrial energy. It is produced by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST. The activity of CBS is enhanced by S-adenosyl methionine (SAM and glutathionylation, while it is inhibited by nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. The activity of CSE and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT, which produces the 3MST substrate 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP, is regulated by Ca2+. H2S is oxidized to thiosulfate in mitochondria through the sequential action of sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR, sulfur dioxygenase, and rhodanese. The rates of the production and clearance of H2S determine its cellular concentration. Polysulfides (H2Sn have been found to occur in the brain and activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 channels, facilitate the translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 to the nucleus, and suppress the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN by sulfurating (sulfhydrating the target cysteine residues. A cross talk between H2S and NO also plays an important role in cardioprotection as well as regulation of the vascular tone. H2S, polysulfides, and their cross talk with NO may mediate various physiological and pathophysiological responses.

  8. Carbonyl sulfide: No remedy for global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Steven J.; Kasting, James F.

    1995-04-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (June 15, 1991), and the subsequent cooling of the earth's lower atmosphere [Dutton and Christy, 1992; Minnis et al., 1993] shows that stratospheric aerosols can have a strong effect on the earth's climate. This supports the notion that the intentional enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer through increased carbonyl sulfide (OCS) emissions might be an effective means for counteracting global warming. Through the use of a one-dimensional photochemical model, we investigate what effect such a program might have on global average stratospheric ozone. In addition, we consider the impact of enhanced OCS emissions on rainwater acidity and on the overall health of both plants and animals. We find that while the warming produced by a single CO2 doubling (1 to 4°C) might be offset with ozone losses of less than 5%, any attempt to use carbonyl sulfide as a permanent solution to global warming could result in depletion of global average ozone by 30% or more. We estimate that in order to achieve cooling of 4°C rainwater pH would fall to between 3.5 and 3.8. Finally, a 4°C cooling at the surface will require that ambient near ground OCS levels rise to above 10 ppmv which is probably greater than the safe exposure limit for humans. Thus, enhanced OCS emissions do not provide an environmentally acceptable solution to the problem of global warming.

  9. Normal state of metallic hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    A generalized theory of the normal properties of metals in the case of electron-phonon (EP) systems with a nonconstant density of electron states has been used to study the normal state of the SH3 and SH2 phases of hydrogen sulfide at different pressures. The frequency dependence of the real Re Σ (ω) and imaginary ImΣ (ω) parts of the self-energy Σ (ω) part (SEP) of the Green's function of the electron Σ (ω), real part Re Z (ω), and imaginary part Im Z (ω) of the complex renormalization of the mass of the electron; the real part Re χ (ω) and the imaginary part Imχ (ω) of the complex renormalization of the chemical potential; and the density of electron states N (ɛ) renormalized by strong electron-phonon interaction have been calculated. Calculations have been carried out for the stable orthorhombic structure (space group Im3¯ m) of the hydrogen sulfide SH3 for three values of the pressure P = 170, 180, and 225 GPa; and for an SH2 structure with a symmetry of I4/ mmm ( D4 h1¯7) for three values of pressure P = 150, 180, and 225 GP at temperature T = 200 K.

  10. XFEM for Thermal Crack of Massive Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal cracking of massive concrete structures occurs as a result of stresses caused by hydration in real environment conditions. The extended finite element method that combines thermal fields and creep is used in this study to analyze the thermal cracking of massive concrete structures. The temperature field is accurately simulated through an equivalent equation of heat conduction that considers the effect of a cooling pipe system. The time-dependent creep behavior of massive concrete is determined by the viscoelastic constitutive model with Prony series. Based on the degree of hydration, we consider the main properties related to cracking evolving with time. Numerical simulations of a real massive concrete structure are conducted. Results show that the developed method is efficient for numerical calculations of thermal cracks on massive concrete. Further analyses indicate that a cooling system and appropriate heat preservation measures can efficiently prevent the occurrence of thermal cracks.

  11. Massive Star Formation: The Power of Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Beuther, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    This article presents recent work to constrain the physical and chemical properties in high-mass star formation based largely on interferometric high-spatial-resolution continuum and spectral line studies at (sub)mm wavelengths. After outlining the concepts, potential observational tests, a proposed evolutionary sequence and different possible definitions for massive protostars, four particular topics are highlighted: (a) What are the physical conditions at the onset of massive star formation? (b) What are the characteristics of potential massive accretion disks and what do they tell us about massive star formation in general? (c) How do massive clumps fragment, and what does it imply to high-mass star formation? (d) What do we learn from imaging spectral line surveys with respect to the chemistry itself as well as for utilizing molecules as tools for astrophysical investigations?

  12. Massive MIMO Wireless Networks: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Hassan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Massive multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO systems use few hundred antennas to simultaneously serve large number of wireless broadband terminals. It has been incorporated into standards like long term evolution (LTE and IEEE802.11 (Wi-Fi. Basically, the more the antennas, the better shall be the performance. Massive MIMO systems envision accurate beamforming and decoding with simpler and possibly linear algorithms. However, efficient signal processing techniques have to be used at both ends to overcome the signaling overhead complexity. There are few fundamental issues about massive MIMO networks that need to be better understood before their successful deployment. In this paper, we present a detailed review of massive MIMO homogeneous, and heterogeneous systems, highlighting key system components, pros, cons, and research directions. In addition, we emphasize the advantage of employing millimeter wave (mmWave frequency in the beamforming, and precoding operations in single, and multi-tier massive MIMO systems.

  13. CALCULATION OF CONDITIONAL EQUILIBRIUM IN SERIAL MULTIPLE PRECIPITATION OF METAL SULFIDES WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE STREAM GENERATED FROM SODIUM SULFIDE: A DIDACTIC TOOL FOR CHEMISTRY TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bellová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is presented in textbooks as toxic, environmentally unacceptable species, however some positive effects in human metabolism were discovered in the last decades. It is important to offer students also some new information about this compound. As didactic tool in this case may serve serial precipitation of Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+ and Pb2+ ions forming various colored sulfides in bubblers with chemically generated hydrogen sulfide stream. This experiment has strong and diverse color effect for enhancing the visual perception to motivate students to understand more abstract and complex information about hydrogen sulfide. It also may be helpful in analytical chemistry courses for conditional precipitation equilibrium teaching and calculations.

  14. The 982 Ma Re-Os age of copper-nickel sulfide ores in the Baotan area, Guangxi and its geological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛景文; 杜安道

    2002-01-01

    Re-Os dating on copper-nickel sulfide ores from the Baotan area, Guangxi, yielded an ore-forming age of 982±21 Ma(2σ), which demonstrates that copper-nickel sulfide deposits and their related mafic-ultramafic rocks occurred in the same period of time with the ophiolites in northeastern Jiangxi. Both of them are the products of collision-convergence between the Cathaysian plate and Yangtze plate and the subsequent extensional environment. Calculation of the γOs of the 982 Ma copper-nickel sulfide ores and its correlation with Re/Os indicate that injection-type massive ores display lower γOs values(-15.6 to -8.2) and lower Re/Os ratios(0.32 to 0.43), while basal liquation-type ores have γOs= -27.9 to -7.3 and Re/Os=5.36 to 11.24. This suggests that these copper-nickel sulfide ores and their related mafic-ultramafic rocks were derived from a Re-depleted mantle source and that contamination with some crustal material occurred during their intrusion.

  15. Suboxic deep seawater in the late Paleoproterozoic: Evidence from hematitic chert and iron formation related to seafloor-hydrothermal sulfide deposits, central Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, J.F.; Grenne, Tor; Bekker, A.; Rouxel, O.J.; Lindberg, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    A current model for the evolution of Proterozoic deep seawater composition involves a change from anoxic sulfide-free to sulfidic conditions 1.8??Ga. In an earlier model the deep ocean became oxic at that time. Both models are based on the secular distribution of banded iron formation (BIF) in shallow marine sequences. We here present a new model based on rare earth elements, especially redox-sensitive Ce, in hydrothermal silica-iron oxide sediments from deeper-water, open-marine settings related to volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. In contrast to Archean, Paleozoic, and modern hydrothermal iron oxide sediments, 1.74 to 1.71??Ga hematitic chert (jasper) and iron formation in central Arizona, USA, show moderate positive to small negative Ce anomalies, suggesting that the redox state of the deep ocean then was at a transitional, suboxic state with low concentrations of dissolved O2 but no H2S. The presence of jasper and/or iron formation related to VMS deposits in other volcanosedimentary sequences ca. 1.79-1.69??Ga, 1.40??Ga, and 1.24??Ga also reflects oxygenated and not sulfidic deep ocean waters during these time periods. Suboxic conditions in the deep ocean are consistent with the lack of shallow-marine BIF ??? 1.8 to 0.8??Ga, and likely limited nutrient concentrations in seawater and, consequently, may have constrained biological evolution. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Solutions to a combined problem of excessive hydrogen sulfide in biogas and struvite scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, W; Cord-Ruwisch, R; Ho, G; Costa, M; Spencer, P

    2006-01-01

    The Woodman Point Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) in Western Australia has experienced two separate problems causing avoidable maintenance costs: the build-up of massive struvite (MgNH4PO4. 6H2O) scaling downstream of the anaerobic digester and the formation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels in the digester gas to levels that compromised gas engine operation and caused high operating costs on the gas scrubber. As both problems hang together with a chemical imbalance in the anaerobic digester, we decided to investigate whether both problems could be (feasibly and economically) addressed by a common solution (such as dosing of iron solutions to precipitate both sulfide and phosphate), or by using separate approaches. Laboratory results showed that, the hydrogen sulfide emission in digesters could be effectively and economically controlled by the addition of iron dosing. Slightly higher than the theoretical value of 1.5 mol of FeCl3 was required to precipitate 1 mol of dissolved sulfide inside the digester. Due to the high concentration of PO4(3-) in the digested sludge liquor, significantly higher iron is required for struvite precipitation. Iron dosing did not appear an economic solution for struvite control via iron phosphate formation. By taking advantage of the natural tendency of struvite formation in the digester liquid, it is possible to reduce the risk of struvite precipitation in and around the sludge-dewatering centrifuge by increasing the pH to precipitate struvite out before passing through the centrifuge. However, as the Mg2+/PO4(3-) molar ratio in digested sludge was low, by increasing the pH alone (using NaOH) the precipitation of PO4(3-) was limited by the amount of cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) available in the sludge. Although this would reduce struvite precipitation in the centrifuge, it could not significantly reduce PO4(3-) recycling back to the plant. For long-term operation, maximum PO4(3-) reduction should be the ultimate aim to minimise PO4

  17. Novel Metal Sulfides to Achieve Effective Capture and Durable Consolidation of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Riley, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, D. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-30

    This report documents the work done under NEUP grant to examine the capability of novel chalcogels and some binary metal chalcogenides as a host matrix for the capture of gaseous iodine and the feasibility of their iodine-laden materials to be converted into a permanent waste form. The presented work was conducted over last two years. A number of novel chalcogels Zn2Sn2S 6, Sb4Sn4S12, NiMoS 4, CoMoS 4, antimony sulfide (SbS x) chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogels and binary metal sulfides (Sb2S3) were developed and studied for their iodine absorption efficacies. A new and simple route was devised for the large scale preparation of antimony sulfide chalcogel. The chalcogel was obtained by treating Sb2S3 with Na2S in the presence of water followed by addition of formamide. The obtained gels have a low-density sponge-like network of meso-porous nature having BET surface area of 125 m2/g. The chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogel and the binary metal sulfides were exposed to iodine vapors in a closed container. Silver-functionalized chalcogels and Sb2S3 powders showed iodine uptake up to 100 wt%, the highest iodine uptake of 200 wt% was observed for the SbS-III chalcogel. The PXRD patterns of iodine-laden specimens revealed that iodine shows spontaneous chemisorption to the matrix used. The iodine loaded chalcogels and the binary chalcogenides were sealed under vacuum in fused silica ampoules and heated in a temperature controlled furnace. The consolidated products were analyzed by PXRD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy. The final products were found to be amorphous in most of the cases with high amount (~4-35 wt%) of iodine and approximately ~60- 90 % of the absorbed iodine could be consolidated into the final waste form. Alginate

  18. Novel Metal Sulfides to Achieve Effective Capture and Durable Consolidation of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Riley, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-30

    This report documents the work done under NEUP grant to examine the capability of novel chalcogels and some binary metal chalcogenides as a host matrix for the capture of gaseous iodine and the feasibility of their iodine-laden materials to be converted into a permanent waste form. The presented work was conducted over last two years. A number of novel chalcogels Zn2Sn2S6, Sb4Sn4S12, NiMoS4, CoMoS4, antimony sulfide (SbSx) chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogels and binary metal sulfides (Sb2S3) were developed and studies for their iodine absorption efficacies. A new and simple route was devised for the large scale preparation of antimony sulfide chalcogel. The chalcogel was obtained by treating Sb2S3 with Na2S in the presence of water followed by addition of formamide. The obtained gels have a low-density sponge like network of meso porous nature having BET surface area of 125 m2/g. The chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogel and the binary metal sulfides were exposed to iodine vapors in a closed container. Silver-functionalized chalcogels and Sb2S3 powders showed iodine uptake up to 100 wt%, the highest iodine uptake of 200 wt% was observed for the SbS-III chalcogel. The PXRD patterns of iodine-laden specimens revealed that iodine shows spontaneous chemisorption to the matrix used. The iodine loaded chalcogels and the binary chalcogenides were sealed under vacuum in fused silica ampoules and heated in a temperature controlled furnace. The consolidated products were analyzed by PXRD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy. The final products were found to be amorphous in most of the cases with high amount (~4-35 wt%) of iodine and aapproximately ~60- 90 % of the absorbed iodine could be consolidated into the final waste form. Alginate

  19. A massively asynchronous, parallel brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki, Semir

    2015-01-01

    Whether the visual brain uses a parallel or a serial, hierarchical, strategy to process visual signals, the end result appears to be that different attributes of the visual scene are perceived asynchronously—with colour leading form (orientation) by 40 ms and direction of motion by about 80 ms. Whatever the neural root of this asynchrony, it creates a problem that has not been properly addressed, namely how visual attributes that are perceived asynchronously over brief time windows after stimulus onset are bound together in the longer term to give us a unified experience of the visual world, in which all attributes are apparently seen in perfect registration. In this review, I suggest that there is no central neural clock in the (visual) brain that synchronizes the activity of different processing systems. More likely, activity in each of the parallel processing-perceptual systems of the visual brain is reset independently, making of the brain a massively asynchronous organ, just like the new generation of more efficient computers promise to be. Given the asynchronous operations of the brain, it is likely that the results of activities in the different processing-perceptual systems are not bound by physiological interactions between cells in the specialized visual areas, but post-perceptually, outside the visual brain. PMID:25823871

  20. The Massive Satellite Population of Milky-Way Sized Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Puebla, A; Drory, N

    2013-01-01

    Occupational distributions for satellite galaxies ms>4E7Msun around Milky-Way-sized(MW-s) hosts are presented and used to predict the internal dynamics of these sats. For the analysis, a galaxy group mock catalog is constructed on the basis of (sub)halo-to-stellar mass relations fully constrained with available observations; the stellar mass function of centrals and satellites, and the 2-point correlation function. 6.6% of MW-s galaxies host 2 sats in the mass range of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC). The probabilities of the MW-s galaxies to have 1 sat>= the LMC or 2 sats>= the SMC or 3 sats>= Saggitarius (Sgr) are ~0.26,0.14, and 0.14. MW-s hosting 3 sats>= Sgr (as the MW) are among the most common cases. However, the most and 2nd most massive sats in these systems are ms) for MW-s galaxies is broad, the case of the MW being of low frequency but not an outlier. The Mh of MW-s galaxies correlates only weakly with N(>ms). Then, it is not possible to accurately determine the MW halo mass by...

  1. Novel Microbial Assemblages Dominate Weathered Sulfide-Bearing Rock from Copper-Nickel Deposits in the Duluth Complex, Minnesota, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel S; Lapakko, Kim A; Wenz, Zachary J; Olson, Michael C; Roepke, Elizabeth W; Sadowsky, Michael J; Novak, Paige J; Bailey, Jake V

    2017-08-15

    The Duluth Complex in northeastern Minnesota hosts economically significant deposits of copper, nickel, and platinum group elements (PGEs). The primary sulfide mineralogy of these deposits includes the minerals pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and cubanite, and weathering experiments show that most sulfide-bearing rock from the Duluth Complex generates moderately acidic leachate (pH 4 to 6). Microorganisms are important catalysts for metal sulfide oxidation and could influence the quality of water from mines in the Duluth Complex. Nevertheless, compared with that of extremely acidic environments, much less is known about the microbial ecology of moderately acidic sulfide-bearing mine waste, and so existing information may have little relevance to those microorganisms catalyzing oxidation reactions in the Duluth Complex. Here, we characterized the microbial communities in decade-long weathering experiments (kinetic tests) conducted on crushed rock and tailings from the Duluth Complex. Analyses of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts showed that differences among microbial communities correspond to pH, rock type, and experimental treatment. Moreover, microbial communities from the weathered Duluth Complex rock were dominated by taxa that are not typically associated with acidic mine waste. The most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were from the genera Meiothermus and Sulfuriferula, as well as from diverse clades of uncultivated Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria Specific taxa, including putative sulfur-oxidizing Sulfuriferula spp., appeared to be primarily associated with Duluth Complex rock, but not pyrite-bearing rocks subjected to the same experimental treatment. We discuss the implications of these results for the microbial ecology of moderately acidic mine waste with low sulfide content, as well as for kinetic testing of mine waste.IMPORTANCE Economic sulfide mineral deposits in the Duluth Complex may represent the largest undeveloped

  2. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the

  3. Turmoil in Orion: The Nearest Massive Protostar

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Jonathan C

    2008-01-01

    I discuss different theories of massive star formation: formation from massive cores, competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion, and protostellar collisions. I summarize basic features of the Turbulent Core Model (TCM). I then introduce the Orion Kleinmann-Low (KL) region, embedded in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and one of the nearest regions of massive star formation. The KL region contains three principal radio sources, known as "I", "n" and "BN". BN is known to be a runaway star, almost certainly set in motion by dynamical ejection within the ONC from a multiple system of massive stars, that would leave behind a recoiling, hard, massive, probably eccentric binary. I review the debate about whether this binary is Theta^1C, the most massive star in the ONC, or source "I", and argue that it is most likely to be Theta^1C, since this is now known be a recoiling, hard, massive, eccentric binary, with properties that satisfy the energy and momentum constraints implied by BN's motion. Source "n" is a relatively low-mas...

  4. Are Young Massive Star Clusters in the Local Universe Analogous to Globular Clusters Progenitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnel, Corinne

    2015-08-01

    Several models do compete to reproduce the present-day characteristics of globular clusters (GC) and to explain the origin of the multiple stellar populations these systems are hosting.In parallel, independent clues on GC early evolution may be derived from observations of young massive clusters (YMC) in the Local Group.But are these two populations of clusters related? In this talk, we discuss how and if GC and YMC data can be reconciled.We revisit in particular the impact of massive stars on the early evolution of massive star clusters, as well as the question of early gas expulsion.We propose several tests to probe whether the YMC we are observing today can be considered as the analogues of GC progenitors.

  5. Synthesis of Diaryl Ethers, Diaryl Sulfides, Heteroaryl Ethers and Heteroaryl Sulfides under Microwave Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Feng; ZOU,Jiong; WANG,Quan-Rui; TAO,Feng-Gang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Diaryl ether moiety is found in a pool of naturally occurring and medicinally important compounds.[1] As a consequent, considerable efforts have been devoted to the assembly of this framework.[2] Recently, we have developed a microwave heating version of the synthesis of diaryl ethers as well as aryl sulfides. Under our conditions, even the extremely electron-poor 4-nitrophenol works well and its reaction with 1-halo-4-nitrobenzenes produces 4-(nitrophenoxy)-benzonitriles in satisfactory yield. The scope of the present protocol has been expanded to hydroxylated six-membered heterocycles as well as 2-pyrimidinethiol with mildly activated aryl halides, affording heteroaryl ethers and respectively sulfides. The advantages of the present method include the wide substrate scope, no use of any metal catalysts, the ease of product isolation and high yields.

  6. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  7. Measurement of plasma hydrogen sulfide in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinggui; Pattillo, Christopher B; Pardue, Sibile; Bir, Shyamal C; Wang, Rui; Kevil, Christopher G

    2011-05-01

    The gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide is known to regulate multiple cellular functions during normal and pathophysiological states. However, a paucity of concise information exists regarding quantitative amounts of hydrogen sulfide involved in physiological and pathological responses. This is primarily due to disagreement among various methods employed to measure free hydrogen sulfide. In this article, we describe a very sensitive method of measuring the presence of H₂S in plasma down to nanomolar levels, using monobromobimane (MBB). The current standard assay using methylene blue provides erroneous results that do not actually measure H₂S. The method presented herein involves derivatization of sulfide with excess MBB in 100 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.5, 0.1 mM DTPA) for 30 min in 1% oxygen at room temperature. The fluorescent product sulfide-dibimane (SDB) is analyzed by RP-HPLC using an eclipse XDB-C18 (4.6 × 250 mm) column with gradient elution by 0.1% (v/v) trifluoroacetic acid in acetonitrile. The limit of detection for sulfide-dibimane is 2 nM and the SDB product is very stable over time, allowing batch storage and analysis. In summary, our MBB method is suitable for sensitive quantitative measurement of free hydrogen sulfide in multiple biological samples such as plasma, tissue and cell culture lysates, or media.

  8. Sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanchen Liu; Chen Wu; Xiaohong Zhou; David Z.Zhu; Hanchang Shi

    2015-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen sulfide in biofilms and sediments in sewer systems can cause severe pipe corrosions and health hazards,and requires expensive programs for its prevention.The aim of this study is to propose a new control strategy and the optimal condition for sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments.The study was carried out based on lab-scale experiments and batch tests using real sewer sediments.The intermittent nitrate dosing mode and the optimal control condition were investigated.The results indicated that the sulfide-intermittent-elimination strategy by nitrate dosing is advantageous for controlling sulfide accumulation in sewer sediment.The oxidation-reduction potential is a sensitive indicator parameter that can reflect the control effect and the minimum N/S (nitrate/sulfide)ratio with slight excess nitrate is necessary for optimal conditions ofefficient sulfide control with lower carbon source loss.The opth-nal control condition is feasible for the sulfide elimination in sewer systems.

  9. Using massive digital libraries a LITA guide

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Some have viewed the ascendance of the digital library as some kind of existential apocalypse, nothing less than the beginning of the end for the traditional library. But Weiss, recognizing the concept of the library as a ""big idea"" that has been implemented in many ways over thousands of years, is not so gloomy. In this thought-provoking and unabashedly optimistic book, he explores how massive digital libraries are already adapting to society's needs, and looks ahead to the massive digital libraries of tomorrow, coveringThe author's criteria for defining massive digital librariesA history o

  10. Geometric massive higher spins and current exchanges

    CERN Document Server

    Francia, Dario

    2008-01-01

    Generalised Fierz-Pauli mass terms allow to describe massive higher-spin fields on flat background by means of simple quadratic deformations of the corresponding geometric, massless Lagrangians. In this framework there is no need for auxiliary fields. We briefly review the construction in the bosonic case and study the interaction of these massive fields with external sources, computing the corresponding propagators. In the same fashion as for the massive graviton, but differently from theories where auxiliary fields are present, the structure of the current exchange is completely determined by the form of the mass term itself.

  11. Massive Star Formation: Accreting from Companion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X. Chen; J. S. Zhang

    2014-09-01

    We report the possible accretion from companion in the massive star forming region (G350.69–0.49). This region seems to be a binary system composed of a diffuse object (possible nebulae or UC HII region) and a Massive Young Stellar Object (MYSO) seen in Spitzer IRAC image. The diffuse object and MYSO are connected by the shock-excited 4.5 m emission, suggesting that the massive star may form through accreting material from the companion in this system.

  12. Geological and geophysical characteristics of massive sulphide deposits: A case study of the Lirhanda massive sulphide deposit of Western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindi, E.; Maneno, J. B. J.

    2016-08-01

    massive sulphide deposit with those of better documented massive sulphides. Despite the fact that very little is known about Lirhanda, there are several similarities on the characteristics compared. These include evidence of back arc regional environment, calc-alkaline volcanic associations, conformity of anomalies to the structural trend of the host rock, proximity of synvolcanic rift, dispersive anomalies of copper and zinc in soils, presence of gossan and association of the deposit with strong EM anomalies.

  13. Gallium sulfide and indium sulfide nanoparticles from complex precursors: Synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, D.P. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: duttadimple@yahoo.co.in; Sharma, G. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kulshreshtha, S.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2007-03-15

    Nanocrystalline gallium sulfide (Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3}) and indium sulfide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) have been prepared by a two-step process. The first step involves metathesis reaction of trimethyl gallium/indium ether adduct (Me{sub 3}Ga/In.OEt{sub 2}) with 1,2-ethanedithiol (HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SH) resulting in the formation of a polymeric precursor. The precursor complex has been characterized using Ga/In analysis, IR, proton NMR and mass spectroscopy. The thermal behavior of both complexes has been studied using thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. In the second step, these precursor complexes have been pyrolysed in furnace under flowing nitrogen atmosphere whereupon they undergo thermodestruction to yield nanometer-sized particles of gallium/indium sulfide. The nanoparticles obtained were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The average size of the nanoparticles ranged from 10 to 12 nm for Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} and 20 to 22 nm for In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, respectively. This is the first report on use of a binary single source precursor to synthesize {beta}-Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles.

  14. Massive Black Hole Binary Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merritt David

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Coalescence of binary supermassive black holes (SBHs would constitute the strongest sources of gravitational waves to be observed by LISA. While the formation of binary SBHs during galaxy mergers is almost inevitable, coalescence requires that the separation between binary components first drop by a few orders of magnitude, due presumably to interaction of the binary with stars and gas in a galactic nucleus. This article reviews the observational evidence for binary SBHs and discusses how they would evolve. No completely convincing case of a bound, binary SBH has yet been found, although a handful of systems (e.g. interacting galaxies; remnants of galaxy mergers are now believed to contain two SBHs at projected separations of <~ 1kpc. N-body studies of binary evolution in gas-free galaxies have reached large enough particle numbers to reproduce the slow, “diffusive” refilling of the binary’s loss cone that is believed to characterize binary evolution in real galactic nuclei. While some of the results of these simulations - e.g. the binary hardening rate and eccentricity evolution - are strongly N-dependent, others - e.g. the “damage” inflicted by the binary on the nucleus - are not. Luminous early-type galaxies often exhibit depleted cores with masses of ~ 1-2 times the mass of their nuclear SBHs, consistent with the predictions of the binary model. Studies of the interaction of massive binaries with gas are still in their infancy, although much progress is expected in the near future. Binary coalescence has a large influence on the spins of SBHs, even for mass ratios as extreme as 10:1, and evidence of spin-flips may have been observed.

  15. Signaling of hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hideo

    2015-02-10

    It has been almost two decades since the first demonstration of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a physiological mediator of cognitive function and vascular tone. H2S is physiologically important because it protects various organs from ischemia-reperfusion injury besides regulating inflammation, oxygen sensing, cell growth, and senescence. The production, metabolism, and regulation of H2S have been studied extensively. H2S modulates target proteins through sulfhydration (or sulfuration) or by the reduction of cysteine disulfide bonds. A large number of novel H2S-donating compounds are being developed owing to the therapeutic potential of H2S. Recently, polysulfides, rather than H2S, have been identified as molecules that sulfhydrate (or sulfurate) their target proteins.

  16. Structure of 4-methylpyridinium Hydrogen Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Martuch, Robert A.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    4-Methylpyridinium hydrogen sulfide, (C6H7NH)HS, M(sub r) = 127.21, consists of C6H7NH(+) cations and HS(-) anions. Z = 2 for the crystal with monoclinic space group Cm (#8), dimensions of a = 8.679(2) A, b = 7.964(1) A, and c = 4.860(2) A, an angle beta of 101.10(2) degrees, and a volume of V = 329.6(3) A(exp 3). R = 0.039 and R(sub w) = 0.048 for 385 reflections with F(sub o)(exp 2) greater than 3 sigma(F(sub o)(exp 2)) and 59 variables. Both the C6H7NH(+) cation and the HS(-) anion lie on crystallographic mirror planes with the N,S, two carbon atoms, and two hydrogen atoms positioned in the planes. The hydrogen atom of the HS(-) anion was not located.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide in a circumstellar envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukita, N.; Morris, M.

    1983-01-01

    A search for hydrogen sulfide in the cool circumstellar envelopes of 25 stars was made using the 1(10)-1(01) rotational line at 1.8 mm. It was detected in the bipolar nebula/OH maser OH231.8+4.2, an object having a high rate of mass loss. An approximate analysis indicates that 1/60 of the sulfur in this outflowing envelope is in the form of H2S, a fraction which may be similar to that in the atmosphere of the central star. In addition, the shape of the observed line profile is discussed in terms of a possible variation of the outflow velocity with latitude above the system's equatorial plane.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide in gastrointestinal and liver physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Sabrina; Mencarelli, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gas that can be formed by the action of two enzymes, cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta synthase (CBS). H(2)S has been known for hundreds of years for its poisoning effect, however the idea that H(2)S is not only a poison, but can exert a physiological role in mammalian organisms, originates from the evidence that this gaseous mediator is produced endogenously. In addition to H(2)S synthesis by gastrointestinal tissue, the intestinal mucosa, particularly in the large intestine, is regularly exposed to high concentrations of H(2)S that are generated by some species of bacteria and through the reduction of unabsorbed intestinal inorganic sulphate. This review reports on the effects of H(2)S in the gastrointestinal tract and liver and provides information on the therapeutic applications of H(2)S-donating drugs.

  19. Modulation of hydrogen sulfide by vascular hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmond JM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jessica M Osmond, Nancy L KanagyVascular Physiology Group, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USAAbstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has emerged as a key regulator of cardiovascular function. This gasotransmitter is produced in the vasculature and is involved in numerous processes that promote vascular homeostasis, including vasodilation and endothelial cell proliferation. Although H2S plays a role under physiological conditions, it has become clear in recent years that hypoxia modulates the production and action of H2S. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that H2S is cytoprotective in the face of hypoxic insults. This review focuses on the synthesis and signaling of H2S in hypoxic conditions in the vasculature, and highlights recent studies providing evidence that H2S is a potential therapy for preventing tissue damage in hypoxic conditions.Keywords: H2S, cystathionine γ-lyase, vascular smooth muscle, endothelium

  20. Effect of radiation on wettability and floatability of sulfide minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility for modifying the wettability and floatability of sulfide minerals by electron beam irradiation has been studied experimentally. The wettability of crystalline pyrite and floatability of some sulfide as pyrite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite and marmatite after irradiation were examined by flotation in a modified Hallimond tube. Experimental results show that the hydrophobicity of crystalline pyrite enhances with the increase of irradiation dose in a low dose range. And the flotation responses of sulfide minerals on irradiation dosevary with the mineral species and particle size. The floatability of minerals can be regulated by altering irradiation dose. An explanationfor the mechanism has been suggested based on the principle of radiation chemistry.

  1. Sulfide capacities of MnO-SiO2 slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ramana G.; Blander, Milton

    1989-04-01

    Sulfide capacities of binary MnO-SiO2 slags at 1773 and 1923 K were calculated thermodynamically. Only known data, such as the standard free energy of formation of MnO and MnS and activities of MnO in the melt, are used in making calculations based on fundamental concepts. Excellent agreement is found between our calculations and published experimental data. Correlations of sulfide capacities, based on optical basicity using Pauling electronegativities or empirically deduced optical basicities, differ from the experimental data in both magnitude and concentration dependence. Our method provides useful predictions of sulfide capacities a priori.

  2. Nanomaterials for the Selective Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, Eduard; Brunet, Jérôme; Pauly, Alain; Ndiaye, Amadou; Varenne, Christelle

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a focused review on the nanomaterials and associated transduction schemes that have been developed for the selective detection of hydrogen sulfide. It presents a quite comprehensive overview of the latest developments, briefly discusses the hydrogen sulfide detection mechanisms, identifying the reasons for the selectivity (or lack of) observed experimentally. It critically reviews performance, shortcomings, and identifies missing or overlooked important aspects. It identifies the most mature/promising materials and approaches for achieving inexpensive hydrogen sulfide sensors that could be employed in widespread, miniaturized, and inexpensive detectors and, suggests what research should be undertaken for ensuring that requirements are met. PMID:28218674

  3. Baculovirus Host-Range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suzanne M. Thiem; Xiao-Wen Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Baculoviruses are used as microbial insecticides, protein expression vectors, epitope display platforms, and most recently as vectors for gene therapy. Understanding the mechanisms that control baculovirus host-range and tissue tropisms are important for assessing their safety and for improving their properties for these biotechnology applications. In the past two decades some progress has been made and several baculovirus genes that influence host-range have been identified. Despite this progress, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that restrict baculovirus host-range is still limited. Here we review what is currently known about baculovirus genes that influence virus host-range.

  4. Micellar-mediated extractive spectrophotometric determination of hydrogen sulfide/sulfide through Prussian Blue reaction: application to environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangappa, Malingappa; Samrat, Devaramani

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive surfactant-mediated extractive spectrophotometric method has been developed, based on the reaction of ferric iron with sulfide to form ferrous iron and its subsequent reaction with ferricyanide to form Prussian Blue, to quantify trace levels of hydrogen sulfide/sulfide in environmental samples. The method obeys Beer's law in the concentration range 2-10 microg of sulfide in 25 mL of aqueous phase with molar absorptivity (epsilon) of 3.92 x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1). The colored species has been extracted into isoamyl acetate in the presence of a cationic surfactant i.e. cetylpyridinium chloride, to enhance the sensitivity of the method with epsilon value 5.2 x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1). The relative standard deviation has been found to be 0.69% for 10 determinations at 4 microg of sulfide and the limit of detection was 0.009 microg mL(-1). The interference from common anions and cations has been studied. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of residual hydrogen sulfide in the laboratory fume hood as well as ambient atmospheric hydrogen sulfide in the vicinity of open sewer lines after fixing the analyte in ionic form using suitable trapping medium.

  5. Micro-aeration for hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangmanee, Thanapong

    The presence of sulfur compounds (e.g. protein, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, etc.) in the feed stream generates highly corrosive and odorous hydrogen sulfide during anaerobic digestion. The high sulfide level in the biogas stream is not only poisonous to many novel metal catalysts employed in thermo-catalytic processes but also reduces the quality of methane to produce renewable energy. This study used an innovative, low-maintenance, low-cost biological sulfide removal technology to remove sulfides simultaneously from both gas and liquid phase. ORP (Oxidation-Reduction-Potential) was used as the controlling parameter to precisely regulate air injection to the sulfide oxidizing unit (SOU). The microaeration technique provided just enough oxygen to partially oxidize sulfides to elemental sulfur without inhibiting methanogenesis. The SOU was equipped with a diffuser at the bottom for the dispersion of sulfide-laden biogas and injected air throughout the column. The SOU can be operated as a standalone unit or coupled with an anaerobic digester to simultaneously remove sulfide from the biogas and effluent. The integrated system was capable of reducing hydrogen sulfide in biogas from 2,450 to less than 2 ppmV with minimal sulfate production at the highest available sulfide loading rate of 0.24 kg/m3-day. More than 98% of sulfide removed was recovered as elemental sulfur. However, the standalone SOU was able to operate at high hydrogen sulfide loading of 1.46 kg/m 3-day at inlet sulfide concentration of 3000 ppmV and reduce the off-gas hydrogen sulfide concentrations to less than 10 ppmV. The experiment also revealed that the ORP controlled aeration was sensitive enough to prevent oxygen overdosing (dampening effect) during unexpected surges of aeration. Using generalized linear regression, a model predicting output H2S concentration based on input H2S concentrations, SOU medium heights, and biogas flow rates, was derived. With 95% confidence, output H2S concentration

  6. Massive Infrared-Quiet Dense Cores: Unveiling the Initial Conditions of High-Mass Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Motte, Frédérique; Schneider, N; Schilke, P; Menten, K M

    2008-01-01

    As Pr. Th. Henning said at the conference, cold precursors of high-mass stars are now "hot topics". We here propose some observational criteria to identify massive infrared-quiet dense cores which can host the high-mass analogs of Class 0 protostars and pre-stellar condensations. We also show how far-infrared to millimeter imaging surveys of entire complexes forming OB stars are starting to unveil the initial conditions of high-mass star formation.

  7. The fate of high-redshift massive compact galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    de la Rosa, Ignacio G; Ferreras, Ignacio; Almeida, Jorge Sánchez; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Martínez-Valpuesta, Inma; Stringer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies (nicknamed red nuggets) have been traditionally connected to present-day elliptical galaxies, often overlooking the relationships that they may have with other galaxy types. We use large bulge-disk decomposition catalogues based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to check the hypothesis that red nuggets have survived as compact cores embedded inside the haloes or disks of present-day massive galaxies. In this study, we designate a "compact core" as the bulge component that satisfies a prescribed compactness criterion. Photometric and dynamic mass-size and mass-density relations are used to show that, in the inner regions of galaxies at z ~ 0.1, there are "abundant" compact cores matching the peculiar properties of the red nuggets, an abundance comparable to that of red nuggets at z ~ 1.5. Furthermore, the morphology distribution of the present-day galaxies hosting compact cores is used to demonstrate that, in addition to the standard channel connecting red ...

  8. The formation of massive, quiescent galaxies at cosmic noon

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmann, Robert; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Keres, Dusan

    2016-01-01

    The cosmic noon (z~1.5-3) marked a period of vigorous star formation for most galaxies. However, about a third of the more massive galaxies at those times were quiescent in the sense that their observed stellar populations are inconsistent with rapid star formation. The reduced star formation activity is often attributed to gaseous outflows driven by feedback from supermassive black holes, but the impact of black hole feedback on galaxies in the young Universe is not yet definitively established. We analyze the origin of quiescent galaxies with the help of ultra-high resolution, cosmological simulations that include feedback from stars but do not model the uncertain consequences of black hole feedback. We show that dark matter halos with specific accretion rates below ~0.25-0.4 per Gyr preferentially host galaxies with reduced star formation rates and red broad-band colors. The fraction of such halos in large dark matter only simulations matches the observed fraction of massive quiescent galaxies (~10^10-10^1...

  9. A Cosmological Study in Massive Gravity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study of the various cosmological aspects in massive gravity theory has been presented in the present work. For the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW model, the deceleration parameter has been evaluated, and, it has been examined whether there is any transition from deceleration to acceleration in recent past, or not. With the proper choice of the free parameters, it has been shown that the massive gravity theory is equivalent to Einstein gravity with a modified Newtonian gravitational constant together with a negative cosmological constant. Also, in this context, it has been examined whether the emergent scenario is possible, or not, in massive gravity theory. Finally, we have done a cosmographic analysis in massive gravity theory.

  10. Gauged/Massive Supergravities in Diverse Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Alberca, N; Alonso-Alberca, Natxo; Ortin, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    We show how massive/gauged maximal supergravities in 11-n dimensions with SO(n-l,l) gauge groups (and other non-semisimple subgroups of Sl(n,R)) can be systematically obtained by dimensional reduction of ``massive 11-dimensional supergravity''. This series of massive/gauged supergravities includes, for instance, Romans' massive N=2A,d=10 supergravity for n=1, N=2,d=9 SO(2) and SO(1,1) gauged supergravities for n=2, and N=8,d=5 SO(6-l,l) gauged supergravity. In all cases, higher p-form fields get masses through the Stuckelberg mechanism which is an alternative to self-duality in odd dimensions.

  11. Symmetries of Massive and Massless Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Wigner's little groups are subgroups of the Lorentz group dictating the internal space-time symmetries of massive and massless particles. These little groups are like O(3) and E(2) for massive and massless particles respectively. While the geometry of the O(3) symmetry is familiar to us, the geometry of the flat plane cannot explain the E(2)-like symmetry for massless particles. However, the geometry of a circular cylinder can explain the symmetry with the helicity and gauge degrees of freedom. It is shown further that the symmetry of the massless particle can be obtained as a zero-mass limit of O(3)-like symmetry for massive particles. It is shown further that the polarization of massless neutrinos is a consequence of gauge invariance, while the symmetry of massive neutrinos is still like O(3).

  12. Massive perturbers in the galactic center

    CERN Document Server

    Perets, H B; Alexander, T; Perets, Hagai B.; Hopman, Clovis; Alexander, Tal

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the role of massive perturbers, such as giant molecular clouds or stellar clusters, in supplying low-angular momentum stars that pass very close to the central massive black hole (MBH) or fall into it. We show that massive pe rturbers can play an important role in supplying both binaries and single stars to the vicinity of the MBH. We discuss possible implications for the ejection of high velocity stars; for the capture of stars on tight orbits around the MBH; for the emission of gravitational waves from low-eccentricity inspiraling stars; and for the origin of the young main sequence B stars observed very near the Gal actic MBH. Massive perturbers may also enhance the the growth rate of MBHs, and may accelerate the dynamical orbital decay of coalescing binary MBHs.

  13. Magnetic monopole solutions with a massive dilaton

    CERN Document Server

    Forgács, Péter; Forgacs, Peter; Gyurusi, Jozsef

    1998-01-01

    Static, spherically symmetric monopole solutions of a spontaneously broken SU(2) gauge theory coupled to a massive dilaton field are studied in detail in function of the dilaton coupling strength and of the dilaton mass.

  14. Current management of massive hemorrhage in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Hemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Trauma and massive transfusion are associated with coagulopathy secondary to tissue injury, hypoperfusion, dilution, and consumption of clotting factors and platelets. Concepts of damage control surgery have evolved...

  15. Quasars Probing Quasars VIII. The Physical Properties of the Cool Circumgalactic medium Surrounding z ~ 2-3 Massive Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Marie Wingyee; Hennawi, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    We characterize the physical properties of the cool T ~ 10^4 K circumgalactic medium surrounding z ~ 2-3 quasar host galaxies, which are predicted to evolve into present day massive ellipticals. Using a statistical sample of 14 quasar pairs with projected separation 100 cm^-3 and subparsec scale gas clumps.

  16. 5G multimedia massive MIMO communications systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Xiaohu; Wang, Haichao; Zi, Ran; Li, Qiang; Ni, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    In the fifth generation (5G) wireless communication systems, a majority of the traffic demands are contributed by various multimedia applications. To support the future 5G multimedia communication systems, the massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) technique is recognized as a key enabler because of its high spectral efficiency. The massive antennas and radio frequency chains not only improve the implementation cost of 5G wireless communication systems but also result in an intense mut...

  17. The Evolution and Explosion of Massive Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2016-01-01

    How a massive star ends its life depends upon how that life has been lived - the rotation, mass and composition it was born with, mass loss and exchange, and the complex convective and nuclear burning episodes it experienced along the way. In the end, the presupernova stellar core has a density structure that can be characterized by its "compactness" - essentially how fast the density declines outside the iron core. The likelihood that a massive star explodes, by any means, is sensitive to th...

  18. Can AGN feedback-driven star formation explain the size evolution of massive galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Ishibashi, W; Canning, R E A

    2013-01-01

    Observations indicate that massive galaxies at z~2 are more compact than galaxies of comparable mass at z~0, with effective radii evolving by a factor of ~3-5. This implies that galaxies grow significantly in size but relatively little in mass over the past ~10 Gyr. Two main physical models have been proposed in order to explain the observed evolution of massive galaxies: "mergers" and "puffing-up" scenarios. Here we introduce another possibility, and discuss the potential role of the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback on the evolution of its host galaxy. We consider triggering of star formation, due to AGN feedback, with radiation pressure on dusty gas as the driving feedback mechanism. In this picture, stars are formed in the feedback-driven outflow at increasingly larger radii and build up the outer regions of the host galaxy. The resulting increase in size and stellar mass can be compared with the observed growth of massive galaxies. Star formation in the host galaxy is likely obscured due to ...

  19. An Emerging Wolf-Rayet Massive Star Cluster in NGC 4449

    CERN Document Server

    Sokal, Kimberly R; Indebetouw, Rémy; Reines, Amy E

    2015-01-01

    We present a panchromatic investigation of the partially-embedded, emerging massive cluster Source 26 (= S26) in NGC 4449 with optical spectra obtained at Apache Point Observatory and archival Hubble, Spitzer, and Herschel Space Telescope images. First identified as a radio continuum source with a thermal component due to ionized material, the massive cluster S26 also exhibits optical Wolf-Rayet (WR) emission lines that reveal a large evolved massive star population. We find that S26 is host to $\\sim$240 massive stars, of which $\\sim$18 are Wolf-Rayet stars; the relative populations are roughly consistent with other observed massive star forming clusters and galaxies. We construct SEDs over two spatial scales (roughly 100 pc and 300 pc) that clearly exhibit warm dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission. The best fit dust and grain models reveal that both the intensity of the exciting radiation and PAH grain destruction increase toward the cluster center. Given that the timescale of evacuation i...

  20. The protoplanetary disks in the nearby massive star forming region Cygnus OB2

    CERN Document Server

    Guarcello, M G; Wright, N J; Drew, J E; Gutermuth, R A; Hora, J L; Naylor, T; Aldcroft, T; Fruscione, A; Garcia-Alvarez, D; Kashyap, V L; King, R

    2013-01-01

    The formation of stars in massive clusters is one of the main modes of the star formation process. However, the study of massive star forming regions is hampered by their typically large distances to the Sun. One exception to this is the massive star forming region Cygnus OB2 in the Cygnus X region, at the distance of about 1400 pc. Cygnus OB2 hosts very rich populations of massive and low-mass stars, being the best target in our Galaxy to study the formation of stars, circumstellar disks, and planets in presence of massive stars. In this paper we combine a wide and deep set of photometric data, from the r band to 24 micron, in order to select the disk bearing population of stars in Cygnus OB2 and identify the class I, class II, and stars with transition and pre-transition disks. We selected 1843 sources with infrared excesses in an area of 1 degree x 1 degree centered on Cyg OB2 in several evolutionary stages: 8.4% class I, 13.1% flat-spectrum sources, 72.9% class II, 2.3% pre-transition disks, and 3.3% tran...

  1. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Micro-Sensor for Biomass Fouling Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)is the leading chemical agent causing human fatalities following inhalation exposures. The overall aim of this project is to develop and...

  3. Selective adsorption of bacteria on sulfide minerals surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Chun-yun; WEI De-zhou; LIU Wen-gang; HAN Cong; GAO Shu-ling; WANG Yu-juan

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of bacteria on sulfide minerals surface was studied, and the selective adsorption mechanism of cells on the sulfide minerals was investigated by means of FTIR, UVS and XPS. The results show that the three strains of bacteria adsorbed more preferentially on pyrite than on other two sulfide minerals surface at neutral and alkaline pH conditions. FTIR and UVS of three strains of bacteria indicate that there are more functional groups on their surface, such as O-H, C=O, N-H, C-O, and the content of saccharide is more than that of protein. The state of every element on sulfide minerals surface was analyzed by XPS. The empty orbital number of electronic shell of metal ions on minerals surface is important in selective adsorption process, and some stable constants of metal coordinates can be used to explain the contribution of some groups in saccharide of cell wall to the selective adsorption.

  4. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. H.

    wastewater and biofilms of sewer networks was studied in detail with emphasis on determination of process kinetics and stoichiometry. In the water phase, sulfide oxidation may be both chemical and biological and the investigations showed that both processes were of significant importance in the sulfur cycle...... transformations. The experiments indicated that biological sulfide oxidation in the water phase and sulfide oxidation by sewer biofilms produce elemental sulfur under the conditions investigated. The stoichiometry of chemical sulfide oxidation was apparently more complex producing both thiosulfate and sulfate......-workers at Aalborg University for more than a decade. In the basic version, the WATS model simulates changes in dissolved oxygen (DO) and organic fractions of different biodegradability under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Evaluation of the model concept has demonstrated that it can be successfully...

  5. Optimization of biological sulfide removal in a CSTR bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Aliakbar; Jahanmiri, Abdolhossein; Mowla, Dariush; Niazi, Ali; Sotoodeh, Hamidreza

    2012-08-01

    In this study, biological sulfide removal from natural gas in a continuous bioreactor is investigated for estimation of the optimal operational parameters. According to the carried out reactions, sulfide can be converted to elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, and polysulfide, of which elemental sulfur is the desired product. A mathematical model is developed and was used for investigation of the effect of various parameters on elemental sulfur selectivity. The results of the simulation show that elemental sulfur selectivity is a function of dissolved oxygen, sulfide load, pH, and concentration of bacteria. Optimal parameter values are calculated for maximum elemental sulfur selectivity by using genetic algorithm as an adaptive heuristic search. In the optimal conditions, 87.76% of sulfide loaded to the bioreactor is converted to elemental sulfur.

  6. Host Galaxy Morphology and the AGN Unified Model

    CERN Document Server

    Trump, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    We use a sample of active galaxies from the Cosmic Evolution Survey to show that host galaxy morphology is tied to the accretion rate and X-ray obscuration of its active galactic nucleus (AGN). Unobscured and rapidly accreting broad-line AGNs are more likely to be in spheroid-dominated hosts than weak or obscured AGNs, and obscured AGNs are more likely to have disturbed host galaxies. Much of the disagreement in previous work on the AGN-merger connection is likely due to each study probing AGNs with different obscuration and accretion properties. Only obscured AGNs seem to merger-driven, while weak AGNs are fed by stochastic processes in disks, and rapidly-accreting broad-line AGNs require massive bulges. Our observed "unified model" for AGN hosts fits with theoretical models for merger-driven AGN evolution, but is also consistent with steady-state AGN activity.

  7. Sedimentary pyrite δ34S differs from porewater sulfide in Santa Barbara Basin: Proposed role of organic sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Morgan Reed; Sessions, Alex L.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Adkins, Jess F.

    2016-08-01

    Santa Barbara Basin sediments host a complex network of abiotic and metabolic chemical reactions that knit together the carbon, sulfur, and iron cycles. From a 2.1-m sediment core collected in the center of the basin, we present high-resolution profiles of the concentrations and isotopic compositions of all the major species in this system: sulfate, sulfide (∑H2S), elemental sulfur (S0), pyrite, extractable organic sulfur (OS), proto-kerogen S, total organic and dissolved inorganic carbon, and total and reducible iron. Below 10 cm depth, the core is characterized by low apparent sulfate reduction rates (biogeochemical cycles and redox structure in sedimentary paleoenvironments.

  8. An eco-friendly oxidation of sulfide compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAVINDRA B WAGH; SITARAM H GUND; JAYASHREE M NAGARKAR

    2016-08-01

    An improved green route has been developed for the oxidation of sulfide compounds. Albendazole is converted to ricobendazole or albendazole sulfone using H₂O₂ as an oxidant and H₂O as the solvent. High yields of the corresponding products were obtained by carrying out the reaction at room temperature. This synthetic method is environmentally clean and safe, operationally simple for the oxidation of other benzimidazole anthelmintics and various sulfide compounds.

  9. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  10. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Z. O. Lipatova; E. V. Kolobkova; V. A. Aseev

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been fou...

  11. Bioavailability and Methylation Potential of Mercury Sulfides in Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    the aquatic environment is a critical step towards accumulation of this toxic metal in the aquatic food chain. MeHg is produced in the environment...much more abundant than mercury (e.g. iron, aluminum, manganese , titanium, zinc). Nanoparticles and polynuclear clusters of metal sulfides such as...trace metal bioavailability and toxicity has yet to be fully realized. Our findings provide a new approach that may be applied to other metal-sulfide

  12. Stripped-envelope supernova rates and host-galaxy properties

    CERN Document Server

    Graur, Or; Modjaz, Maryam; Maoz, Dan; Shivvers, Isaac; Filippenko, Alexei V; Li, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The progenitors of stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe Ibc) remain to be conclsuively identified, but correlations between SN rates and host-galaxy properties can constrain progenitor models. Here, we present one result from a re-analysis of the rates from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. Galaxies with stellar masses less than $\\sim 10^{10}~{\\rm M_\\odot}$ are less efficient at producing SNe Ibc than more massive galaxies. Any progenitor scenario must seek to explain this new observation.

  13. Cosmological Inference from Host-Selected Type Ia Supernova Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Syed A.; Mould, Jeremy; Lidman, Chris; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina; Hardin, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    We compare two Type Ia supernova samples that are drawn from a spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernova sample: a host-selected sample in which SNe Ia are restricted to those that have a spectroscopic redshift from the host; and a broader, more traditional sample in which the redshift could come from either the SN or the host. The host-selected sample is representative of SN samples that will use the redshift of the host to infer the SN redshift, long after the SN has faded from view. We find that SNe Ia that are selected on the availability of a redshift from the host differ from SNe Ia that are from the broader sample. The former tend to be redder, have narrower light curves, live in more massive hosts, and tend to be at lower redshifts. We find that constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, w, and the matter density, ΩM, remain consistent between these two types of samples. Our results are important for ongoing and future supernova surveys, which unlike previous supernova surveys, will have limited real-time follow-up to spectroscopically classify the SNe they discover. Most of the redshifts in these surveys will come from the hosts.

  14. Sulfide capacity of high alumina blast furnace slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Amitabh; Görnerup, Märten; Seetharaman, S.; Lahiri, A. K.

    2006-12-01

    Sulfide capacities of high alumina blast furnace slags were experimentally determined using the gas-slag equilibration technique. Two different slag systems were considered for the current study, namely, CaO-SiO2-MgO-Al2O3 quaternary and CaO-SiO2-MgO-Al2O3-TiO2 quinary system. The liquid slag was equilibrated with the Ar-CO-CO2-SO2 gas mixture. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range of 1773 to 1873 K. The effects of temperature, basicity, and the MgO and TiO2 contents of slags on sulfide capacity were studied. As expected, sulfide capacity was found to increase with the increase in temperature and basicity. At the higher experimental temperature, titania decreases the sulfide capacity of slag. However, at the lower temperature, there was no significant effect of titania on the sulfide capacity of slag. Sulfide capacity increases with the increase in MgO content of slag if the MgO content is more than 5 pct.

  15. Sulfide oxidation in fluidized bed bioreactor using nylon support material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Varsha Midha; M K Jha; Apurba Dey

    2012-01-01

    A continuous fluidized bed bioreactor(FBBR)with nylon support particles was used to treat synthetic sulfide wastewater at different hydraulic retention time of 25,50 and 75 min and upflow velocity of 14,17 and 20 m/hr.The effects of upflow velocity,hydraulic retention time and reactor operation time on sulfide oxidation rate were studied using statistical model.Mixed culture obtained from the activated sludge,taken from tannery effluent treatment plant,was used as a source for microorganisms.The diameter and density of the nylon particles were 2-3 mm and 1140 kg/m3,respectively.Experiments were carried out in the reactor at a temperature of(30± 2)℃,at a fixed bed height of 16 cm after the formation of biofilm on the surface of support particles.Biofilm thickness reached(42±3)μm after 15 days from reactor start-up.The sulfide oxidation,sulfate and sulfur formation is examined at all hydraulic retention times and upflow velocities.The results indicated that almost 90%-92% sulfide oxidation was achieved at all hydraulic retention times.Statistical model could explain 94% of the variability and analysis of variance showed that upflow velocity and hydraulic retention time slightly affected the sulfide oxidation rate.The highest sulfide oxidation of 92% with 70% sulfur was obtained at hydraulic retention time of 75 min and upflow velocity of 14 m/hr.

  16. Sulfide oxidation in fluidized bed bioreactor using nylon support material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Varsha; Jha, M K; Dey, Apurba

    2012-01-01

    A continuous fluidized bed bioreactor (FBBR) with nylon support particles was used to treat synthetic sulfide wastewater at different hydraulic retention time of 25, 50 and 75 min and upflow velocity of 14, 17 and 20 m/hr. The effects of upflow velocity, hydraulic retention time and reactor operation time on sulfide oxidation rate were studied using statistical model. Mixed culture obtained from the activated sludge, taken from tannery effluent treatment plant, was used as a source for microorganisms. The diameter and density of the nylon particles were 2-3 mm and 1140 kg/m3, respectively. Experiments were carried out in the reactor at a temperature of (30 +/- 2) degrees C, at a fixed bed height of 16 cm after the formation of biofilm on the surface of support particles. Biofilm thickness reached (42 +/- 3) microm after 15 days from reactor start-up. The sulfide oxidation, sulfate and sulfur formation is examined at all hydraulic retention times and upflow velocities. The results indicated that almost 90%-92% sulfide oxidation was achieved at all hydraulic retention times. Statistical model could explain 94% of the variability and analysis of variance showed that upflow velocity and hydraulic retention time slightly affected the sulfide oxidation rate. The highest sulfide oxidation of 92% with 70% sulfur was obtained at hydraulic retention time of 75 min and upflow velocity of 14 m/hr.

  17. Massive pre-main-sequence stars in M17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Tannus, M. C.; Kaper, L.; de Koter, A.; Tramper, F.; Bik, A.; Ellerbroek, L. E.; Ochsendorf, B. B.; Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.

    2017-08-01

    The formation process of massive stars is still poorly understood. Massive young stellar objects (mYSOs) are deeply embedded in their parental clouds; these objects are rare, and thus typically distant, and their reddened spectra usually preclude the determination of their photospheric parameters. M17 is one of the best-studied H ii regions in the sky, is relatively nearby, and hosts a young stellar population. We have obtained optical to near-infrared spectra of previously identified candidate mYSOs and a few OB stars in this region with X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope. The large wavelength coverage enables a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the photospheres and circumstellar disks of these candidate mYSOs. We confirm the pre-main-sequence (PMS) nature of six of the stars and characterise the O stars. The PMS stars have radii that are consistent with being contracting towards the main sequence and are surrounded by a remnant accretion disk. The observed infrared excess and the double-peaked emission lines provide an opportunity to measure structured velocity profiles in the disks. We compare the observed properties of this unique sample of young massive stars with evolutionary tracks of massive protostars and propose that these mYSOs near the western edge of the H ii region are on their way to become main-sequence stars ( 6-20 M⊙) after having undergone high mass accretion rates (Ṁacc 10-4-10-3M⊙yr-1). Their spin distribution upon arrival at the zero age main-sequence is consistent with that observed for young B stars, assuming conservation of angular momentum and homologous contraction. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 60.A-9404(A), 085.D-0741, 089.C-0874(A), and 091.C-0934(B)).The full normalised X-shooter spectra are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A78

  18. Origins of massive-type sandstones in braided river systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charlotte A. L.; Turner, Brian R.

    1998-07-01

    This study details largely ignored massive-type, predominantly structureless sandstones preserved within braided fluvial successions of Carboniferous to Triassic age. Architectural element analysis reveals that these sediments were deposited within sand-dominated perennial systems of low braiding index. Cross-stratified braid bar deposits are interbedded with, and laterally equivalent to geometrically distinct, largely structureless massive-type sandbodies identified as two separate architectural elements: channel-like (SMC) and sheet-like (SMS). Sub-divisions within these broad categories define six geometric units which are texturally distinct from each other and from the structured sediments of the same lithological unit. Since massive-type sandstone elements have many features in common with the deposits of highly concentrated, laminar sediment/water flows, they are interpreted in terms of similar depositional processes. SMC elements form elongate channel-like features which trend both at high angles to, and parallel with, the palaeoflow of host fluvial channels. The lower bounding surfaces of SMC elements may be either erosive or non-erosive, and describe symmetrical cross-sections with margins dipping debris flows related to fluvial bank and/or bar collapse. SMS elements form sandsheets up to 8 m in thickness which may be traced >250 m parallel and transverse to the fluvial palaeoflow direction established from cross-stratified sandstones of adjacent architectural elements. The basal surface of SMS elements may either be undulose (where the sandbodies are termed SMSU) or erosional (where they are termed SMSE). Internally SMSU elements preserve parallel laminae marginal to basal scours, diffuse sweeping laminae, isolated cross-sets and water escape structures. The SMSU sediments are compositionally identical to the structured sandstones with which they are associated and are interpreted as the result of deposition from highly concentrated stream flows

  19. Trace- and rare-earth element geochemistry and Pb-Pb dating of black shales and intercalated Ni-Mo-PGE-Au sulfide ores in Lower Cambrian strata, Yangtze Platform, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shao-Yong; Chen, Yong-Quan; Ling, Hong-Fei; Yang, Jing-Hong; Feng, Hong-Zhen; Ni, Pei

    2006-08-01

    The Lower Cambrian black shale sequence of the Niutitang Formation in the Yangtze Platform, South China, hosts an extreme metal-enriched sulfide ore bed that shows >10,000 times enrichment in Mo, Ni, Se, Re, Os, As, Hg, and Sb and >1,000 times enrichment in Ag, Au, Pt, and Pd, when compared to average upper continental crust. We report in this paper trace- and rare-earth-element concentrations and Pb-Pb isotope dating for the Ni-Mo-PGE-Au sulfide ores and their host black shales. Both the sulfide ores and their host black shales show similar trace-element distribution patterns with pronounced depletion in Th, Nb, Hf, Zr, and Ti, and extreme enrichment in U, Ni, Mo, and V compared to average upper crust. The high-field-strength elements, such as Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, Sc, Th, rare-earth elements, Rb, and Ga, show significant inter-element correlations and may have been derived mainly from terrigenous sources. The redox sensitive elements, such as V, Ni, Mo, U, and Mn; base metals, such as Cu, Zn, and Pb; and Sr and Ba may have been derived from mixing of seawater and venting hydrothermal sources. The chondrite-normalized REE patterns, positive Eu and Y anomalies, and high Y/Ho ratios for the Ni-Mo-PGE-Au sulfide ores are also suggestive for their submarine hydrothermal-exhalative origin. A stepwise acid-leaching Pb-Pb isotope analytical technique has been employed for the Niutitang black shales and the Ni-Mo-PGE-Au sulfide ores, and two Pb-Pb isochron ages have been obtained for the black shales (531±24 Ma) and for the Ni-Mo-PGE-Au sulfide ores (521±54 Ma), respectively, which are identical and overlap within uncertainty, and are in good agreement with previously obtained ages for presumed age-equivalent strata.

  20. Integrating Building Functions into Massive External Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hisham Hafez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Well into the twentieth century, brick and stone were the materials used. Bricklaying and stonemasonry were the construction technologies employed for the exterior walls of virtually all major structures. However, with the rise in quality of life, the massive walls alone became incapable of fulfilling all the developed needs. Adjacent systems and layers had then to be attached to the massive layer. Nowadays, the external wall is usually composed of a layered construction. Each external wall function is usually represented by a separate layer or system. The massive layer of the wall is usually responsible for the load-bearing function.Traditional massive external walls vary in terms of their external appearance, their composition and attached layers. However, their design and construction process is usually a repeated process. It is a linear process where each discipline is concerned with a separate layer or system. These disciplines usually take their tasks away and bring them back to be re-integrated in a layered manner. New massive technologies with additional function have recently become available.Such technologies can provide the external wall with other functions in addition to its load-bearing function. The purpose of this research is to map the changes required to the traditional design and construction process when massive technologies with additional function are applied in external walls. Moreover, the research aims at assessing the performance of massive solutions with additional function when compared to traditional solutions in two different contexts, the Netherlands and Egypt.Through the analysis of different additional function technologies in external walls, a guidance scheme for different stakeholders is generated. It shows the expected process changes as related to the product level and customization level. Moreover, the research concludes that the performance of additional insulating technologies, and specifically Autoclaved

  1. Dihydrogen Activation by Titanium Sulfide Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Zachary K.; Polse, Jennifer L.; Bergman*, Robert G.; Andersen*, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The titanocene sulfido complex Cp*2Ti(S)py (1, Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; py = pyridine) is synthesized by addition of a suspension of S8 to a toluene solution of Cp*2Ti-(CH2CH2) (2) and py. The rate of rotation of the pyridine ligand in solution was determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy, and the structure of 1 was determined by X-ray crystallography. Complex 1 reacts reversibly with dihydrogen to give Cp*2Ti(H)SH (6) and py. Reaction of 1 with HD gives an equilibrium mixture of Cp*2Ti(D)SH and Cp*2Ti(H)SD; H2 and D2 are not formed in this reaction. 1D 1H NMR magnetization transfer spectra and 2D EXSY 1H NMR spectra of 6 in the presence of H2 show that in solution the H2, hydride, and hydrosulfido hydrogen atoms exchange. A four-center mechanism for this exchange is proposed. The EXSY studies show that the Ti–H and S–H hydrogens exchange with each other more rapidly than either of those hydrogens exchanges with external H2. A transient dihydrogen complex intermediate is proposed to explain this observation. The infrared spectrum of 6 shows an absorption assigned to the Ti–H stretching mode at 1591 cm−1 that shifts upon deuteration to 1154 cm−1. Reaction of 1 with trimethylsilane, diethylsilane, or dimethylsilane gives Cp*2-Ti(H)SSiMe3 (7), Cp*2Ti(H)SSiHEt2 (8), or Cp*2Ti(H)SSiHMe2 (9), respectively. The isotope effect for the reaction producing 7 has been measured, and a mechanism is proposed. Treatment of 1 with an additional equivalent of S8 results in the formation of the disulfide Cp*2Ti(S2) (4). Acetylene inserts into the Ti–S bond of 4 to produce the vinyl disulfide complex 5. The structures of 4 and 5 have been determined by X-ray diffraction. Compound 4 reacts with 2 in the presence of py to produce 1. Phosphines react with 4 in the presence of H2 to provide 6 and the corresponding phosphine sulfide. Reaction of hydrogen with 4 gives Cp*2-Ti(SH)2 (3). The reactions of 1 and 4 with dihydrogen provide a model for possible mechanisms of H2

  2. Sulfide oxidation and distribution of metals near abandoned copper mines in coastal environments, Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, R.A.; Munk, L.; Foster, A.L.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Stillings, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of sulfide-rich rocks, mostly leftover debris from Cu mining in the early 20th century, is contributing to metal contamination of local coastal environments in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Analyses of sulfide, water, sediment, precipitate and biological samples from the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites show that acidic surface waters generated from sulfide weathering are pathways for redistribution of environmentally important elements into and beyond the intertidal zone at each site. Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits composed of pyrrhotite and (or) pyrite + chalcopyrite + sphalerite with subordinate galena, arsenopyrite, and cobaltite represent potent sources of Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Co, Cd, and Hg. The resistance to oxidation among the major sulfides increases in the order pyrrhotite ??? sphalerite Hg (to 4100 ng/L) in the pore waters probably result from oxidation of sphalerite-rich rocks. The low-pH and high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Al, and SO4 are conducive to precipitation of interstitial jarosite in the intertidal gravels. Although pore waters from the intertidal zone at the Threeman mine site have circumneutral pH values, small amounts of dissolved Fe2+ in the pore waters are oxidized during mixing with seawater, resulting in precipitation of Fe-oxyhydroxide flocs along the beach-seawater interface. At the Beatson site, surface waters funneled through the underground mine workings and discharged across the waste dumps have near-neutral pH (6.7-7.3) and a relatively small base-metal load; however, these streams probably play a role in the physical transport of metalliferous particulates into intertidal and offshore areas during storm events. Somewhat more acidic fluids, to pH 5.3, occur in stagnant seeps and small streams emerging from the Beatson waste dumps. Amorphous Fe precipitates in stagnant waters at Beatson have high Cu (5.2 wt%) and Zn (2.3 wt%) concentrations that probably reflect adsorption onto the extremely high

  3. Bio-orthogonal "click-and-release" donation of caged carbonyl sulfide (COS) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Andrea K; Yang, Yang; Royzen, Maksim; Pluth, Michael D

    2017-01-24

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biomolecule with high therapeutic potential. Here we leverage the inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) click reaction between a thiocarbamate-functionalized trans-cyclooctene and a tetrazine to deliver carbonyl sulfide (COS), which is quickly converted to H2S by the uniquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), thus providing a new strategy for bio-orthogonal COS/H2S donation.

  4. The Chahnaly low sulfidation epithermal gold deposit, western Makran volcanic arc, southeastern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholeh, Ali; Rastad, Ebrahim; Huston, David L.; Gemmell, J. Bruce; Taylor, Ryan D.

    2016-01-01

    The Chahnaly low-sulfidation epithermal Au deposit and nearby Au prospects are located northwest of the intermittently active Bazman stratovolcano on the western end of the Makran volcanic arc, which formed as the result of subduction of the remnant Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the Lut block. The arc hosts the Siah Jangal epithermal and Kharestan porphyry prospects, near Taftan volcano, as well as the Saindak Cu-Au porphyry deposit and world-class Reko Diq Cu-Au porphyry deposit, near Koh-i-Sultan volcano to the east-northeast in Pakistan. The host rocks for the Chahnaly deposit include early Miocene andesite and andesitic volcaniclastic rocks that are intruded by younger dacitic domes. Unaltered late Miocene dacitic ignimbrites overlie these rocks. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) U-Pb zircon geochronology data yield ages between 21.8 and 9.9 Ma for the acidic-intermediate regional volcanism. The most recent volcanic activity of the Bazman stratovolcano involved extrusion of an olivine basalt during Pliocene to Quaternary times. Interpretation of geochemical data indicate that the volcanic rocks are synsubduction and calc-alkaline to subalkaline. The lack of a significant negative Eu anomaly, a listric-shaped rare earth element pattern, and moderate La/Yb ratios of host suites indicate a high water content of the source magma.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide--Mechanisms of Toxicity and Development of an Antidote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingjing; Chan, Adriano; Ali, Sameh; Saha, Arindam; Haushalter, Kristofer J; Lam, Wai-Ling Macrina; Glasheen, Megan; Parker, James; Brenner, Matthew; Mahon, Sari B; Patel, Hemal H; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; Lipton, Stuart A; Pilz, Renate B; Boss, Gerry R

    2016-02-15

    Hydrogen sulfide is a highly toxic gas-second only to carbon monoxide as a cause of inhalational deaths. Its mechanism of toxicity is only partially known, and no specific therapy exists for sulfide poisoning. We show in several cell types, including human inducible pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons, that sulfide inhibited complex IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and induced apoptosis. Sulfide increased hydroxyl radical production in isolated mouse heart mitochondria and F2-isoprostanes in brains and hearts of mice. The vitamin B12 analog cobinamide reversed the cellular toxicity of sulfide, and rescued Drosophila melanogaster and mice from lethal exposures of hydrogen sulfide gas. Cobinamide worked through two distinct mechanisms: direct reversal of complex IV inhibition and neutralization of sulfide-generated reactive oxygen species. We conclude that sulfide produces a high degree of oxidative stress in cells and tissues, and that cobinamide has promise as a first specific treatment for sulfide poisoning.

  6. Mitochondria and sulfide: a very old story of poisoning, feeding, and signaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillaud, Frédéric; Blachier, François

    2011-07-15

    Sulfide is a molecule with toxicity comparable to that of cyanide. It inhibits mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase at submicromolar concentrations. However, at even lower concentrations, sulfide is a substrate for the mitochondrial electron transport chain in mammals, and is comparable to succinate. This oxidation involves a sulfide quinone reductase. Sulfide is thus oxidized before reaching a toxic concentration, which explains why free sulfide concentrations are very low in mammals, even though sulfide is constantly released as a result of cellular metabolism. It has been suggested that sulfide has signaling properties in mammals like two other gases, NO and CO, which are also cytochrome oxidase inhibitors. The oxidation of sulfide by mitochondria creates further complexity in the description/use of sulfide signaling in mammals. In fact, in the many studies reported in the literature, the sulfide concentrations that have been used were well within the range that affects mitochondrial activity. This review focuses on the relevance of sulfide bioenergetics to sulfide biology and discusses the case of colonocytes, which are routinely exposed to higher sulfide concentrations. Finally, we offer perspectives for future studies on the relationship between the two opposing aspects of this Janus-type molecule, sulfide.

  7. H2S exposure elicits differential expression of candidate genes in fish adapted to sulfidic and non-sulfidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, Michael; Henpita, Chathurika; Bassett, Brandon; Kelley, Joanna L; Shaw, Jennifer H

    2014-09-01

    Disentangling the effects of plasticity, genetic variation, and their interactions on organismal responses to environmental stressors is a key objective in ecological physiology. We quantified the expression of five candidate genes in response to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exposure in fish (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae) from a naturally sulfide-rich environment as well as an ancestral, non-sulfidic population to test for constitutive and environmentally dependent population differences in gene expression patterns. Common garden raised individuals that had never encountered environmental H2S during their lifetime were subjected to short or long term H2S exposure treatments or respective non-sulfidic controls. The expression of genes involved in responses to H2S toxicity (cytochrome c oxidase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and cytochrome P450-2J6), H2S detoxification (sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase), and endogenous H2S production (cystathionine γ lyase) was determined in both gill and liver tissues by real time PCR. The results indicated complex changes in expression patterns that--depending on the gene--not only differed between organs and populations, but also on the type of H2S exposure. Populations differences, both constitutive and H2S exposure dependent (i.e., plastic), in gene expression were particularly evident for sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and to a lesser degree for cytochrome P450-2J6. Our study uncovered putatively adaptive modifications in gene regulation that parallel previously documented adaptive changes in phenotypic traits.

  8. Evolution and fate of very massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yusof, Norhasliza; Meynet, Georges; Crowther, Paul A; Ekstrom, Sylvia; Frischknecht, Urs; Georgy, Cyril; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Schnurr, Olivier; 10.1093/mnras/stt794

    2013-01-01

    There is observational evidence that supports the existence of Very Massive Stars in the local universe. First, very massive stars (Mini<=320 M) have been observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud . Second, there are observed SNe that bear the characteristics of Pair Creation Supernovae which have very massive stars as progenitors. The most promising candidate to date is SN2007bi. In order to investigate the evolution and fate of nearby very massive stars, we calculated a new grid of models for such objects, for solar, LMC and SMC metallicities, which covers the initial mass range from 120 to 500M. Both rotating and non-rotating models were calculated using the Geneva stellar evolution code and evolved until at least the end of helium burning and for most models until oxygen burning. Since very massive stars have very large convective cores during the Main-Sequence phase, their evolution is not so much affected by rotational mixing, but more by mass loss through stellar winds. Their evolution is never far fro...

  9. A Hunt for Massive Starless Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Shuo; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Liu, Mengyao; Butler, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We carry out an ALMA $\\rm N_2D^+$(3-2) and 1.3~mm continuum survey towards 32 high mass surface density regions in seven Infrared Dark Clouds with the aim of finding massive starless cores, which may be the initial conditions for the formation of massive stars. Cores showing strong $\\rm N_2D^+$(3-2) emission are expected to be highly deuterated and indicative of early, potentially pre-stellar stages of star formation. We also present maps of these regions in ancillary line tracers, including C$^{18}$O(2-1), DCN(3-2) and DCO$^+$(3-2). Over 100 $\\rm N_2D^+$ cores are identified with our newly developed core-finding algorithm based on connected structures in position-velocity space. The most massive core has $\\gtrsim70\\:M_\\odot$ (potentially $\\sim170\\:M_\\odot$) and so may be representative of the initial conditions for massive star formation. The existence and dynamical properties of such cores constrain massive star formation theories. We measure the line widths and thus velocity dispersion of six of the cores ...

  10. Detection of thiol modifications by hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E; Pead, S; Whiteman, M; Wood, M E; Wilson, I D; Ladomery, M R; Teklic, T; Lisjak, M; Hancock, J T

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gasotransmitter in both animals and plants. Many physiological events, including responses to stress, have been suggested to involve H2S, at least in part. On the other hand, numerous responses have been reported following treatment with H2S, including changes in the levels of antioxidants and the activities of transcription factors. Therefore, it is important to understand and unravel the events that are taking place downstream of H2S in signaling pathways. H2S is known to interact with other reactive signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). One of the mechanisms by which ROS and NO have effects in a cell is the modification of thiol groups on proteins, by oxidation or S-nitrosylation, respectively. Recently, it has been reported that H2S can also modify thiols. Here we report a method for the determination of thiol modifications on proteins following the treatment with biological samples with H2S donors. Here, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is used as a model system but this method can be used for samples from other animals or plants.

  11. Subnanometer Thin β-Indium Sulfide Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Shinjita; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan

    2012-12-20

    Nanosheets are a peculiar kind of nanomaterials that are grown two-dimensionally over a micrometer in length and a few nanometers in thickness. Wide varieties of inorganic semiconductor nanosheets are already reported, but controlling the crystal growth and tuning their thickness within few atomic layers have not been yet explored. We investigate here the parameters that determine the thickness and the formation mechanism of subnanometer thin (two atomic layers) cubic indium sulfide (In2S3) nanosheets. Using appropriate reaction condition, the growth kinetics is monitored by controlling the decomposition rate of the single source precursor of In2S3 as a function of nucleation temperature. The variation in the thickness of the nanosheets along the polar [111] direction has been correlated with the rate of evolved H2S gas, which in turn depends on the rate of the precursor decomposition. In addition, it has been observed that the thickness of the In2S3 nanosheets is related to the nucleation temperature.

  12. Anisotropic Optical Properties of Layered Germanium Sulfide

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Dezhi; Wang, Feijiu; Mohamed, Nur Baizura; Mouri, Shinichiro; Sandhaya, Koirala; Zhang, Wenjing; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohfuchi, Mari; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have attracted much interest from the viewpoints of fundamental physics and device applications. The establishment of new functionalities in anisotropic layered 2D materials is a challenging but rewarding frontier, owing to their remarkable optical properties and prospects for new devices. Here, we report the anisotropic optical properties of layered 2D monochalcogenide of germanium sulfide (GeS). Three Raman scattering peaks corresponding to the B3g, A1g, and A2g modes with strong polarization dependence are demonstrated in the GeS flakes, which validates polarized Raman spectroscopy as an effective method for identifying the crystal orientation of anisotropic layered GeS. Photoluminescence (PL) is observed with a peak at around 1.66 eV that originates from the direct optical transition in GeS at room temperature. Moreover, determination of the polarization dependent characteristics of the PL and absorption reveals...

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Zhong Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1 is also one of the focuses of this review.

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi-Zhong; Liu, Yang; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1) is also one of the focuses of this review. PMID:26881033

  15. Mercury Sulfide Dimorphism in Thioarsenate Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, M; Sokolov, A; Cuisset, A; Usuki, T; Khaoulani, S; Masselin, P; Le Coq, D; Neuefeind, J C; Feygenson, M; Hannon, A C; Benmore, C J; Bychkov, E

    2016-06-16

    Crystalline mercury sulfide exists in two drastically different polymorphic forms in different domains of the P,T-diagram: red chain-like insulator α-HgS, stable below 344 °C, and black tetrahedral narrow-band semiconductor β-HgS, stable at higher temperatures. Using pulsed neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction, we show that these two mercury bonding patterns are present simultaneously in mercury thioarsenate glasses HgS-As2S3. The population and interconnectivity of chain-like and tetrahedral dimorphous forms determine both the structural features and fundamental glass properties (thermal, electronic, etc.). DFT simulations of mercury species and RMC modeling of high-resolution diffraction data provide additional details on local Hg environment and connectivity implying the (HgS2/2)m oligomeric chains (1 ≤ m ≤ 6) are acting as a network former while the HgS4/4-related mixed agglomerated units behave as a modifier.

  16. Cherts from the Yangla copper deposit, western Yunnan Province: geochemical characteristics and relationship with massive sulfide mineralization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN; Jiayong; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Wei Junqi, Zhan Mingguo, Lu Yuanfa et al., Geochemistry of granitoid from the Yangla ore district, Geology and Mineral Resources of South China (in Chinese), 1997 (4): 50.[2]He Longqing, Zhan Mingguo, Lu Yuanfa, Division of sequence stratigraphy and study on ore-bearing beds in the Yangla copper orefield, western Yunnan, Geology and Mineral Resources of South China (in Chinese), 1998 (3): 37.[3]Zhan Mingguo, Lu Yuanfa, Chen Shifang et al., Formation condition and type of the Yangla large scale copper deposit, Western Yunnan, Mineral Deposits (in Chinese), 1998, 17 (supplement): 183.[4]Lu Yuanfa, Chen Kaixu, Zhan Mingguo et al., Geochemical evidence of exhalative-sedimentary ore-bearing skarns in Yangla copper mineralization concentrated Area, Earth Science (in Chinese), 1999, 24(3): 298.[5]Yomamoto, K., Geochemical characteristics and depositional environments of cherts and associated rocks in the Franciscan and Shimanto terranes, Sedimentary Geology, 1987, 52: 65.[6]Zhou, Y. Z., Geochemical characteristics of siliceous rocks originated from a fossil hydrothermal system in the upper Devonian strata, Guangxi, southern China, Acta Sedimentologia, 1990, 8 (3): 75.[7]Zhou Yongzhang, Geology and Geochemistry of Hetai Gold Field, Southern China, Guangzhou: South China University of Technology Press, 1993, 53-107.[8]Bostroem, K., Harold, R., Oiva, J., Provenance and accumulation rates of opaline silica, Al, Fe, Tl, Mn, Cu, Ni and Co in Pacific pelagic sediment, Chem. Geol., 1973, 11: 123.[9]Herzig, P. M., Becker, K. P., Stoffers, P. et al., Hydrothermal silica chimney field in the Galapagos rift center at 81°W, Earth Pla. Sci. Lett., 1987, 52: 65.[10] Douthitt, C. B., The geochemistry of the stable isotopes of the silicon, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1982, 16: 129.[11] Ying Hanlong, Cai Xinping, Liu Bingguang, Geochemical features and formation of auriferous cherts in Mojiang Gold Mine, Yunnan, Geochemistry (in Chinese), 1999, 28 (4): 307.[12] Jiang, S. Y., Plamer, M. R., Ding, T. P. et al., Silicon isotope geochemistry of the Sullivian Pb-Zn deposit, Canada: A preliminary study, Econ. Geol., 1994, 89: 1623.[13] Li, Y. H., Jiang, S. Y., Xue, C. J., Silicon and oxygen isotope evidence for exhalative genesis of the Devonian Pb-Zn deposits in the Feng-Tai region, Qingling Mountain, China, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1995 , 40(1): 87.[14] Ding Tiping, Wan Defang, Li Jincheng et al., A study on analytic method of silicon isotope composition, in Progress of Analytic Methods of Stable Isotopes (in Chinese), Beijing: Beijing Science and Technology Publishing House, 1992, 1-8.

  17. Os and S isotope studies of ultramafic rocks in the Duke Island Complex, Alaska: variable degrees of crustal contamination of magmas in an arc setting and implications for Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stifter, Eric C.; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi

    2016-10-01

    The Duke Island Complex is one of the several "Ural-Alaskan" intrusions of Cretaceous age that occur along the coast of SE Alaska. Significant quantities of magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide mineralization are locally found in the complex, primarily within olivine clinopyroxenites. Sulfide mineralization is Ni-poor, consistent with petrologic evidence which indicates that sulfide saturation was reached after extensive olivine crystallization. Olivine clinopyroxenites were intruded by magmas that produced sulfide-poor, adcumulate dunites. As part of a study to investigate the potential for Ni-rich sulfide mineralization in association with the dunites, a Re-Os and S isotope study of the dunites, as well as sulfide mineralization in the olivine clinopyroxenites, was initiated. Importantly, recent drilling in the complex identified the presence of sulfidic and carbonaceous country rocks that may have been involved in the contamination of magmas and generation of sulfide mineralization. γOs (110 Ma) values of two sulfidic country rocks are 1022 and 2011. δ34S values of the country rocks range from -2.6 to -16.1 ‰. 187Os/188Os ratios of sulfide minerals in the mineralization hosted by olivine clinopyroxenites are variable and high, with γOs (110 Ma) values between 151 and 2059. Extensive interaction with Re-rich sedimentary country rocks is indicated. In contrast, γOs (110 Ma) values of the dunites are significantly lower, ranging between 2 and 16. 187Os/188Os ratios increase with decreasing Os concentration. This inverse relation is similar to that shown by ultramafic rocks from several arc settings, as well as altered abyssal dunites and peridotites. The relation may be indicative of magma derivation from a sub-arc mantle that had experienced metasomatism via slab-derived fluids. Alternatively, the relation may be indicative of minor contamination of magma by crustal rocks with low Os concentrations but high 187Os/188Os ratios. A third alternative is that the low Os

  18. Stability of massive graviton around BTZ black hole in three dimensional massive gravities

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Taeyoon

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the massive graviton stability of the BTZ black hole obtained from three dimensional massive gravities which are classified into the parity-even and parity-odd gravity theories. In the parity-even gravity theory, we perform the $s$-mode stability analysis by using the BTZ black string perturbations, which gives two Schr\\"odinger equations with frequency-dependent potentials. The $s$-mode stability is consistent with the generalized Breitenlohner-Freedman bound for spin-2 field. It seems that for the parity-odd massive gravity theory, the BTZ black hole is stable when the imaginary part of quasinormal frequencies of massive graviton is positive. However, this condition is not consistent with the $s$-mode stability based on the second-order equation obtained after squaring the first-order equation. Finally we explore the black hole stability connection between the parity-odd and parity-even massive gravity theories.

  19. A CANDIDATE MASSIVE BLACK HOLE IN THE LOW-METALLICITY DWARF GALAXY PAIR MRK 709

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reines, Amy E.; Condon, James J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Plotkin, Richard M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Russell, Thomas D. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Mezcua, Mar [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Sivakoff, Gregory R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-181, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Johnson, Kelsey E., E-mail: areines@nrao.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The incidence and properties of present-day dwarf galaxies hosting massive black holes (BHs) can provide important constraints on the origin of high-redshift BH seeds. Here we present high-resolution X-ray and radio observations of the low-metallicity, star-forming, dwarf-galaxy system Mrk 709 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. These data reveal spatially coincident hard X-ray and radio point sources with luminosities suggesting the presence of an accreting massive BH (M {sub BH} ∼ 10{sup 5-7} M {sub ☉}). Based on imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that Mrk 709 consists of a pair of compact dwarf galaxies that appear to be interacting with one another. The position of the candidate massive BH is consistent with the optical center of the southern galaxy (Mrk 709 S), while no evidence for an active BH is seen in the northern galaxy (Mrk 709 N). We derive stellar masses of M {sub *} ∼ 2.5 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} and M {sub *} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} for Mrk 709 S and Mrk 709 N, respectively, and present an analysis of the SDSS spectrum of the BH host Mrk 709 S. At a metallicity of just ∼10% solar, Mrk 709 is among the most metal-poor galaxies with evidence for an active galactic nucleus. Moreover, this discovery adds to the growing body of evidence that massive BHs can form in dwarf galaxies and that deep, high-resolution X-ray and radio observations are ideally suited to reveal accreting massive BHs hidden at optical wavelengths.

  20. The effects of varying humidity on copper sulfide film formation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Missert, Nancy A.; Barbour, John Charles; Sullivan, John Patrick; Copeland, Robert Guild; Campin, Michael J. (International Sematech, Austin, TX)

    2004-02-01

    Detailed experiments involving extensive high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed significant microstructural differences between Cu sulfides formed at low and high relative humidity (RH). It was known from prior experiments that the sulfide grows linearly with time at low RH up to a sulfide thickness approaching or exceeding one micron, while the sulfide initially grows linearly with time at high RH then becomes sub-linear at a sulfide thickness less than about 0.2 microns, with the sulfidation rate eventually approaching zero. TEM measurements of the Cu2S morphology revealed that the Cu2S formed at low RH has large sized grains (75 to greater than 150 nm) that are columnar in structure with sharp, abrupt grain boundaries. In contrast, the Cu2S formed at high RH has small equiaxed grains of 20 to 50 nm in size. Importantly, the small grains formed at high RH have highly disordered grain boundaries with a high concentration of nano-voids. Two-dimensional diffusion modeling was performed to determine whether the existence of localized source terms at the Cu/Cu2S interface could be responsible for the suppression of Cu sulfidation at long times at high RH. The models indicated that the existence of static localized source terms would not predict the complete suppression of growth that was observed. Instead, the models suggest that the diffusion of Cu through Cu2S becomes restricted during Cu2S formation at high RH. The leading speculation is that the extensive voiding that exists at grain boundaries in this material greatly reduces the flux of Cu between grains, leading to a reduction in the rate of sulfide film formation. These experiments provide an approach for adding microstructural information to Cu sulfidation rate computer models. In addition to the microstructural studies, new micro-patterned test structures were developed in this LDRD to offer insight into the point defect structure of Cu2S and to permit measurement of surface reaction

  1. The abundance of satellites depends strongly on the morphology of the host galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, Pablo; Mármol-Queraltó, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Using the spectroscopic catalogue of the Sloan Digital Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10), we have explored the abundance of satellites around a sample of 307 massive (M_star > 10^11 M_sun) local (z 10^9 M_sun and R < 300 kpc depends drastically on the morphology of the central galaxy. The average number of satellites per galaxy host (N_Sat/N_Host) down to a mass ratio of 1:100 is: 5.5 +/- 1.0 for E hosts, 2.7 +/- 0.4 for S0, 1.4 +/- 0.3 for Sa and 1.2 +/- 0.3 for Sb/c. The amount of stellar mass enclosed by the satellites around massive E-type galaxies is a factor of 2, 4, and 6 larger than the mass in the satellites of S0, Sa and Sb/c-types, respectively. If these satellites would eventually infall into the host galaxies, for all the morphological types, the merger channel will be largely dominated by satellites with a mass ratio satellite-host $\\mu$ < 0.1. The fact that massive elliptical galaxies have a significant larger number of satellites than massive spirals could point out that elliptical gal...

  2. Low temperature geomicrobiology follows host rock composition along a geochemical gradient in Lau Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B Sylvan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR comprise a ridge segment in the southwest Pacific Ocean where rapid transitions in the underlying mantle chemistry manifest themselves as gradients in seafloor rock geochemistry. We studied the geology and microbial diversity of three silicate rock samples and three inactive sulfide chimney samples collected, from north to south, at the vent fields Kilo Moana, ABE, Tui Malila and Mariner. This is the first study of microbial populations on basaltic andesite, which was sampled at Mariner vent field. Silicate rock geochemistry exhibits clear latitudinal trends that are mirrored by changes in bacterial community composition. α-proteobacteria, ε-proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes are most common on a silicate collected from Kilo Moana and their proportions decrease linearly on silicates collected further south. Conversely, a silicate from Mariner vent field hosts high proportions of a unique lineage of Chloroflexi unrelated (<90% sequence similarity to previously recovered environmental clones or isolates, which decrease at ABE and are absent at Kilo Moana. The exteriors of inactive sulfide structures are dominated by lineages of sulfur oxidizing α-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria and ε-proteobacteria while the interior of one chimney is dominated by putative sulfur-reducing δ-proteobacteria. A comparison of bacterial communities on inactive sulfides from this and previous studies reveals the presence of a clade of uncultured Bacteroidetes exclusive to sulfidic environments, and a high degree of heterogeneity in bacterial community composition from one sulfide structure to another. In light of the heterogeneous nature of bacterial communities observed here and in previous studies of both active and inactive hydrothermal sulfide structures, the presence of numerous niches may be detected on these structures in the future by finer scale sampling and analysis.

  3. Limited Feedback Precoding for Massive MIMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The large-scale array antenna system with numerous low-power antennas deployed at the base station, also known as massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO, can provide a plethora of advantages over the classical array antenna system. Precoding is important to exploit massive MIMO performance, and codebook design is crucial due to the limited feedback channel. In this paper, we propose a new avenue of codebook design based on a Kronecker-type approximation of the array correlation structure for the uniform rectangular antenna array, which is preferable for the antenna deployment of massive MIMO. Although the feedback overhead is quite limited, the codebook design can provide an effective solution to support multiple users in different scenarios. Simulation results demonstrate that our proposed codebook outperforms the previously known codebooks remarkably.

  4. Massive Particle Reflection from Moving Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfarti, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the reflection of massive particles from moving mirrors. The adoption of the formalism based on the energy-momentum allowed us to derive the most general set of formulas, valid for massive and, in the limit, also for massless particles. We show that the momentum change of the reflecting particle always lies along the normal to the mirror, independent of the mirror speed. The subject is interesting not only to physicists designing concentrators for fascicles of massive particles and electron microscopes but also to computer scientists working in raytracing operating in the photon sector. The paper, far from being only theoretical, has profound and novel practical applications in both domains of engineering design and computer science.

  5. Primordial inhomogeneities from massive defects during inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Karami, Asieh; Rostami, Tahereh

    2016-10-01

    We consider the imprints of local massive defects, such as a black hole or a massive monopole, during inflation. The massive defect breaks the background homogeneity. We consider the limit that the physical Schwarzschild radius of the defect is much smaller than the inflationary Hubble radius so a perturbative analysis is allowed. The inhomogeneities induced in scalar and gravitational wave power spectrum are calculated. We obtain the amplitudes of dipole, quadrupole and octupole anisotropies in curvature perturbation power spectrum and identify the relative configuration of the defect to CMB sphere in which large observable dipole asymmetry can be generated. We observe a curious reflection symmetry in which the configuration where the defect is inside the CMB comoving sphere has the same inhomogeneous variance as its mirror configuration where the defect is outside the CMB sphere.

  6. Primordial inhomogeneities from massive defects during inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Rostami, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    We consider the imprints of local massive defects, such as a black hole or a massive monopole, during inflation. The massive defect breaks the background homogeneity. We consider the limit that the physical Schwarzschild radius of the defect is much smaller than the inflationary Hubble radius so a perturbative analysis is allowed. The inhomogeneities induced in scalar and gravitational wave power spectrum are calculated. We obtain the amplitudes of dipole, quadrupole and octupole anisotropies in curvature perturbation power spectrum and identify the relative configuration of the defect to CMB sphere in which large observable dipole asymmetry can be generated. We observe a curious reflection symmetry in which the configuration where the defect is inside the CMB comoving sphere has the same inhomogeneous variance as its mirror configuration where the defect is outside the CMB sphere.

  7. How to Find Young Massive Cluster Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Bressert, Eli; Battersby, Cara; Bally, John; Longmore, Steven; Testi, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    We propose that bound, young massive stellar clusters form from dense clouds that have escape speeds greater than the sound speed in photo-ionized gas. In these clumps, radiative feedback in the form of gas ionization is bottled up, enabling star formation to proceed to sufficiently high efficiency so that the resulting star cluster remains bound even after gas removal. We estimate the observable properties of the massive proto-clusters (MPCs) for existing Galactic plane surveys and suggest how they may be sought in recent and upcoming extragalactic observations. These surveys will potentially provide a significant sample of MPC candidates that will allow us to better understand extreme star-formation and massive cluster formation in the Local Universe.

  8. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia causing massive breast enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Tiang, Stephen; Harvey, Nathan; McClure, Robert

    2015-10-16

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal proliferative process, initially described by Vuitch et al. We report an unusual case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of bilateral massive, asymmetrical, painful enlargement of her breasts, without a history of trauma. On clinical examination, both breasts were markedly enlarged and oedematous, but there were no discrete palpable masses. Preoperative image-guided core biopsies and surgery showed PASH. PASH is increasingly recognised as an incidental finding on image-guided core biopsy performed for screen detected lesions. There are a few reported cases of PASH presenting as rapid breast enlargement. In our case, the patient presented with painful, asymmetrical, massive breast enlargement. Awareness needs to be raised of this entity as a differential diagnosis in massive, painful breast enlargement.

  9. Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Judith M; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-09-01

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2 S: (i) H2 S accelerated the recovery of photosynthesis after prolonged exposure to darkness and anoxia. We suggest that this is possibly due to regulatory effects of H2 S on photosystem I components and/or on the Calvin cycle. (ii) H2 S concentrations of up to 210 μM temporarily enhanced the photosynthetic rates at low irradiance. Modelling showed that this enhancement is plausibly based on changes in the light-harvesting efficiency. (iii) Above a certain light-dependent concentration threshold H2 S also acted as an inhibitor. Intriguingly, this inhibition was not instant but occurred only after a specific time interval that decreased with increasing light intensity. That photosynthesis is most sensitive to inhibition at high light intensities suggests that H2 S inactivates an intermediate of the oxygen evolving complex that accumulates with increasing light intensity. We discuss the implications of these three effects of H2 S in the context of cyanobacterial photosynthesis under conditions with diurnally fluctuating light and H2 S concentrations, such as those occurring in microbial mats and biofilms. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide exchange between lawn and the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chunmei; Mu, Yujing

    2004-06-01

    The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between lawn and the atmosphere was investigated by using a static enclosure under natural field conditions. The results indicated that the lawn acted as a sink for atmospheric COS and a source of dimethyl sulfide (DMS). The exchange fluxes of COS and DMS ranged between -3.24 pmol m-2 s-1 and -94.52 pmol m-2 s-1, and between 0 and 3.14 pmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The lawn was capable of continuously absorbing COS in nighttime as well as in daytime. The COS fluxes depended strongly on the ambient COS mixing ratios. The dependency of DMS emission fluxes on temperature was observed in November 2002. Soil also acted as a sink for COS during our study. However, the COS exchange fluxes of the lawn were much higher than that of the soil. The average COS and DMS fluxes were much higher in spring than in autumn and in summer. The daytime vertical profiles of COS also indicated that the lawn acted as a net sink for COS.

  12. CSW rules for a massive scalar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boels, Rutger Herman; Schwinn, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We derive the analog of the Cachazo-Svrcek-Witten (CSW) diagrammatic Feynman rules for four-dimensional Yang-Mills gauge theory coupled to a massive colored scalar. The mass term is shown to give rise to a new tower of vertices in addition to the CSW vertices for massless scalars in non-supersymm......We derive the analog of the Cachazo-Svrcek-Witten (CSW) diagrammatic Feynman rules for four-dimensional Yang-Mills gauge theory coupled to a massive colored scalar. The mass term is shown to give rise to a new tower of vertices in addition to the CSW vertices for massless scalars in non...

  13. A Massively Parallel Face Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahdenoja Olli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present methods for processing the LBPs (local binary patterns with a massively parallel hardware, especially with CNN-UM (cellular nonlinear network-universal machine. In particular, we present a framework for implementing a massively parallel face recognition system, including a dedicated highly accurate algorithm suitable for various types of platforms (e.g., CNN-UM and digital FPGA. We study in detail a dedicated mixed-mode implementation of the algorithm and estimate its implementation cost in the view of its performance and accuracy restrictions.

  14. A Massively Parallel Face Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Paasio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We present methods for processing the LBPs (local binary patterns with a massively parallel hardware, especially with CNN-UM (cellular nonlinear network-universal machine. In particular, we present a framework for implementing a massively parallel face recognition system, including a dedicated highly accurate algorithm suitable for various types of platforms (e.g., CNN-UM and digital FPGA. We study in detail a dedicated mixed-mode implementation of the algorithm and estimate its implementation cost in the view of its performance and accuracy restrictions.

  15. Nonlinear interactions for massive spin-2 fields

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt-May, Angnis

    2016-01-01

    We give a basic introduction to ghost-free nonlinear theories involving massive spin-2 fields, focussing on bimetric theory. After motivating the construction of such models from field theoretical considerations, we review the linear theories for massive and massless spin-2 fluctuations propagating on maximally symmetric backgrounds. The structure of general nonlinear spin-2 interactions is explained before we specialise to the ghost-free case. We review the maximally symmetric solutions of bimetric theory, its mass spectrum and the parameter limit which brings the theory close to general relativity. Finally we discuss applications of bimetric theory to cosmology with particular emphasis on the role of the general relativity limit.

  16. M2M massive wireless access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanella, Andrea; Zorzi, Michele; Santos, André F.

    2013-01-01

    In order to make the Internet of Things a reality, ubiquitous coverage and low-complexity connectivity are required. Cellular networks are hence the most straightforward and realistic solution to enable a massive deployment of always connected Machines around the globe. Nevertheless, a paradigm...... of the current cellular standards. Here, we provide insights and introduce potential solutions for the cellular radio protocol that will allow the efficient support of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications. The paper focuses on the massive aspect of M2M. We will introduce PHY and MAC approaches such as Coded...

  17. Olivier Chesneau's work on massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Millour, Florentin

    2016-01-01

    Olivier Chesneau challenged several fields of observational stellar astrophysics with bright ideas and an impressive amount of work to make them real in the span of his career, from his first paper on P Cygni in 2000, up to his last one on V838 Mon in 2014. He was using all the so-called high-angular resolution techniques since it helped his science to be made, namely study in details the inner structure of the environments around stars, be it small mass (AGBs), more massive (supergiant stars), or explosives (Novae). I will focus here on his work on massive stars.

  18. Doubly coupled matter fields in massive bigravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Xian

    2016-01-01

    In the context of massive (bi-)gravity non-minimal matter couplings have been proposed. These couplings are special in the sense that they are free of the Boulware-Deser ghost below the strong coupling scale and can be used consistently as an effective field theory. Furthermore, they enrich the phenomenology of massive gravity. We consider these couplings in the framework of bimetric gravity and study the cosmological implications for background and linear tensor, vector, and scalar perturbations. Previous works have investigated special branch of solutions. Here we perform a complete perturbation analysis for the general background equations of motion completing previous analysis.

  19. SALT Spectroscopy of Evolved Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniazev, A. Y.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Berdnikov, L. N.

    2017-06-01

    Long-slit spectroscopy with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) of central stars of mid-infrared nebulae detected with the Spitzer Space Telescope and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) led to the discovery of numerous candidate luminous blue variables (cLBVs) and other rare evolved massive stars. With the recent advent of the SALT fiber-fed high-resolution echelle spectrograph (HRS), a new perspective for the study of these interesting objects is appeared. Using the HRS we obtained spectra of a dozen newly identified massive stars. Some results on the recently identified cLBV Hen 3-729 are presented.

  20. Massive intracerebral hemorrhage associated with Wegener granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceri, Mevlut; Ortabozkoyun, Levent; Unverdi, Selman; Kirac, Mustafa; Duranay, Murat

    2012-06-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis that predominantly affects airways and kidneys. But central nervous system involvement (7-11%) is an uncommon. Massive ICH may occur in the course of WG, and this serious condition is related with high risk of mortality. Therefore, the new treatment strategies may be considered in addition to classical practices in serious organ involvement and recurrent attack. Here, we present an adult patient with WG whose disease was complicated by a massive intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), which subsequently led to death.