WorldWideScience

Sample records for mass transport corrosion

  1. SITE-94. CAMEO: A model of mass-transport limited general corrosion of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worgan, K.J.; Apted, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the technical basis for the CAMEO code, which models the general, uniform corrosion of a copper canister either by transport of corrodants to the canister, or by transport of corrosion products away from the canister. According to the current Swedish concept for final disposal of spent nuclear fuels, extremely long containment times are achieved by thick (60-100 mm) copper canisters. Each canister is surrounded by a compacted bentonite buffer, located in a saturated, crystalline rock at a depth of around 500 m below ground level. Three diffusive transport-limited cases are identified for general, uniform corrosion of copper: General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of sulphide to the canister surface under reducing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of oxygen to the canister surface under mildly oxidizing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of copper chloride away from the canister surface under highly oxidizing conditions. The CAMEO code includes general corrosion models for each of the above three processes. CAMEO is based on the well-tested CALIBRE code previously developed as a finite-difference, mass-transfer analysis code for the SKI to evaluate long-term radionuclide release and transport in the near-field. A series of scoping calculations for the general, uniform corrosion of a reference copper canister are presented

  2. Pitting corrosion of copper. An equilibrium - mass transport study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taxen, C.

    2002-08-01

    A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is described and used to calculate the potentials below which copper is immune to pitting. The model uses equilibrium data and diffusion coefficients and calculates the stationary concentration profiles of 26 aqueous species from the bulk water outside a corrosion pit to the site of the metal dissolution. Precipitation of oxides and salts of copper is considered. Studied conditions include water compositions from tap waters to seawater at the temperatures 25 deg C and 75 deg C. Carbonate and sulphate are aggressive towards copper because of complex formation with divalent copper. Carbonate is less aggressive in a corrosion pit than outside at the pH of the bulk. Carbonate carries acidity out from the pit, favours oxide formation and may prevent the initiation of acidic corrosion pits. The concentration profiles are used to estimate the maximum propagation rates for a corrosion pit. A high potential is found to be the most important factor for the rate of propagation. The levels of potential copper can sustain, as corrosion potentials are discussed in terms of the stability of cuprous oxide as a cathode material for oxygen reduction relative to non-conducting cupric phases

  3. Pitting corrosion of copper. An equilibrium - mass transport study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxen, C. [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is described and used to calculate the potentials below which copper is immune to pitting. The model uses equilibrium data and diffusion coefficients and calculates the stationary concentration profiles of 26 aqueous species from the bulk water outside a corrosion pit to the site of the metal dissolution. Precipitation of oxides and salts of copper is considered. Studied conditions include water compositions from tap waters to seawater at the temperatures 25 deg C and 75 deg C. Carbonate and sulphate are aggressive towards copper because of complex formation with divalent copper. Carbonate is less aggressive in a corrosion pit than outside at the pH of the bulk. Carbonate carries acidity out from the pit, favours oxide formation and may prevent the initiation of acidic corrosion pits. The concentration profiles are used to estimate the maximum propagation rates for a corrosion pit. A high potential is found to be the most important factor for the rate of propagation. The levels of potential copper can sustain, as corrosion potentials are discussed in terms of the stability of cuprous oxide as a cathode material for oxygen reduction relative to non-conducting cupric phases.

  4. Pitting corrosion of copper. An equilibrium - mass transport study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxen, C

    1996-11-01

    A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits on copper is described. The model is used to predict the potentials below which copper is immune to pitting. The criteria used for immunity against pitting is that the volume of the cuprous oxide formed at the site of the metal oxidation at the bottom of a corrosion pit must be smaller than the volume of the oxidised metal. Equal volumes would give a complete coverage of the metal in a pit by adherent cuprous oxide and propagation would not be possible. For potentials where copper is not immune to pitting an estimate of the maximum growth rate is given. The model uses equilibrium data and diffusion coefficients and calculates the stationary concentration profiles from the bulk water outside a corrosion pit to the site of the metal dissolution at the bottom a corrosion pit. Precipitation of oxides as well as of basic salts of copper is considered. A total of 26 aqueous species are considered in waters with compositions ranging from those of tap waters to that of sea water. Calculations are made for the temperatures 25 deg C and 75 deg C. 38 refs, 60 figs, 17 tabs

  5. Passive, wireless corrosion sensors for transportation infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Many industrial segments including utilities, manufacturing, government and infrastructure have an urgent need for a means to detect corrosion before significant damage occurs. Transportation infrastructure, such as bridges and roads, rely on reinfor...

  6. Corrosion and Wear Analysis in Marine Transport Constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Urbahs, A; Savkovs, K; Rijkuris, G; Andrejeva, D

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion is one of the most common naturally occurring processes studied by thermodynamics, which includes oxidation process, metal disruption, and its chemical and electrochemical effects under environmental influence. Corrosion of metal and equipment accounts for a considerable proportion of total corrosion losses, thus providing the impetus for further investigation and developments related to corrosion protection in order to provide transport systems and industry with corrosion preventiv...

  7. Mass Transport within Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated

  8. Predicting corrosion product transport in nuclear power stations using a solubility-based model for flow-accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.; Cheluget, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    A general model of solubility-driven flow-accelerated corrosion of carbon steel was derived based on the assumption that the solubilities of ferric oxyhydroxide and magnetite control the rate of film dissolution. This process involves the dissolution of an oxide film due to fast-flowing coolant unsaturated in iron. The soluble iron is produced by (i) the corrosion of base metal under a porous oxide film and (ii) the dissolution of the oxide film at the fluid-oxide film interface. The iron released at the pipe wall is transferred into the bulk flow by turbulent mass transfer. The model is suitable for calculating concentrations of dissolved iron in feedtrain lines. These iron levels were used to calculate sludge transport rates around the feedtrain. The model was used to predict sludge transport rates due to flow accelerated corrosion of major feedtrain piping in a CANDU reactor. The predictions of the model compare well with plant measurements

  9. Corrosion-product transport, oxidation state and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brett, M.E.; Tapping, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The issues associated with monitoring and controlling corrosion-product transport (CPT) in the balance-of-plant (BOP) and steam generators (SG) of CANDU stations are briefly reviewed. The efforts are focused on minimizing corrosion of carbon steel, which is used extensively in the CANDU primary and secondary systems. Emphasis is placed on the corrosion-product oxidation state as a monitor of water chemistry effectiveness, and as a monitor of system corrosion effects. The discussion is based mostly on the results and observations from Ontario Hydro plants, and their comparisons with PWRs. The effects of low oxygen and elevated hydrazine chemistry are reviewed, as well as the effects of lay-up and various start-up conditions. Progress in monitoring electrochemical potential (ECP) at Ontario Hydro plants and its relationship to the oxidation state of corrosion products is reviewed. Observations on corrosion-product transport on the primary side of steam generators are also discussed. (author)

  10. Mass transport by groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledoux, E.; Goblet, P.; Jamet, Ph.; De Marsily, G.; Des Orres, P.E.; Lewi, J.

    1991-01-01

    The first analyses of the safety of radioactive waste disposal published in 1970s were mostly of a generic type using the models of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. These simply constructed models gave way to more sophisticated techniques in order to represent better the complexity and diversity of geological media. In this article, it is attempted to review the various concepts used to quantify radionuclide migration and the evolution of their incorporation into the models. First, it was examined how the type of discontinuity occurring in geological media affects the choice of a representative model. The principle of transport in the subsurface was reviewed, and the effect that coupled processes exert to groundwater flow and mass migration was discussed. The processes that act directly to cause groundwater flow were distinguished. The method of validating such models by comparing the results with the geochemical systems in nature was explained. (K.I.)

  11. Reactive-transport model for the prediction of the uniform corrosion behaviour of copper used fuel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Maak, P.

    2008-01-01

    Used fuel containers in a deep geological repository will be subject to various forms of corrosion. For containers made from oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper, the most likely corrosion processes are uniform corrosion, underdeposit corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. The environmental conditions within the repository are expected to evolve with time, changing from warm and oxidizing initially to cool and anoxic in the long-term. In response, the corrosion behaviour of the containers will also change with time as the repository environment evolve. A reactive-transport model has been developed to predict the time-dependent uniform corrosion behaviour of the container. The model is based on an experimentally-based reaction scheme that accounts for the various chemical, microbiological, electrochemical, precipitation/dissolution, adsorption/desorption, redox, and mass-transport processes at the container surface and in the compacted bentonite-based sealing materials within the repository. Coupling of the electrochemical interfacial reactions with processes in the bentonite buffer material allows the effect of the evolution of the repository environment on the corrosion behaviour of the container to be taken into account. The Copper Corrosion Model for Uniform Corrosion predicts the time-dependent corrosion rate and corrosion potential of the container, as well as the evolution of the near-field environment

  12. Radiochemical measurement of mass transport in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.H.; Chiang, S.H.

    1976-01-01

    Mass transport processes in the sodium coolant of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) are significant in determining rates of corrosion and deposition of radioactive nuclides from the fuel cladding, deposition and cold trapping of fission products from defect or failed fuel, carbon and nitrogen redistribution in the containment materials, and removal of impurities by cold trapping or hot trapping. Mass transport between rotating, concentric cylinders in molten sodium has been investigated using a unique radiochemical method. Long-lived (33 year) cesium-137, dissolved in the sodium, decays radioactively emitting a beta to barium-137m, which decays with a short half-life (2.6 minutes) emitting a gamma. Cesium is weakly adsorbed and remains in solution, while the barium is strongly adsorbed on the stainless steel surfaces. Hence, by measuring the barium-137m activity on movable stainless steel surfaces, one can calculate the mass transport to that surface. Mass transfer coefficients in sodium measured by this method are in agreement with published heat transfer correlations when the effect of the volumetric mass source is taken into account. Hence, heat transfer correlations can be confidently utilized by analogy in estimating mass transfer in liquid-metal systems

  13. Corrosion-product transport, oxidation state and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brett, M.E.; Tapping, R.L.

    1998-10-01

    The issues associated with monitoring and controlling corrosion-product transport (CPT) in the balance-of-plant (BOP) and steam generators (SG) of CANDU stations are briefly reviewed. Efforts are focused on minimizing corrosion of carbon steel, which is used extensively in the CANDU primary and secondary systems. Emphasis is placed on the corrosion-product oxidation state as a monitor of water chemistry effectiveness and as a monitor of system corrosion effects. The discussion is based mostly on the results of observations from Ontario Hydro plants, and their comparisons with pressurized-water reactors. The effects of low oxygen and elevated hydrazine chemistry are reviewed, as well as the effects of layup and various startup conditions. Progress in monitoring electrochemical potential (ECP) at Ontario Hydro plants and its relationship to the oxidation state of corrosion products is reviewed. Observations on CPT on the primary side of SGs are also discussed. (author)

  14. Urban Mass Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervine, K. E.

    This bibliography is part of a series of Environmental Resource Packets prepared under a grant from EXXON Education Foundation. The most authoritative and accessible references in the urban transportation field are reviewed. The authors, publisher, point of view, level, and summary are given for each reference. The references are categorized…

  15. Modelling and numerical simulation of the corrosion product transport in the pressurised water reactor primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetto, C.

    2002-05-01

    During operation of pressurised water reactor, corrosion of the primary circuit alloys leads to the release of metallic species such as iron, nickel and cobalt in the primary fluid. These corrosion products are implicated in different transport phenomena and are activated in the reactor core where they are submitted to neutron flux. The radioactive corrosion products are afterwards present in the out of flux parts of primary circuit where they generate a radiation field. The first part of this study deals with the modelling of the corrosion: product transport phenomena. In particular, considering the current state of the art, corrosion and release mechanisms are described empirically, which allows to take into account the material surface properties. New mass balance equations describing the corrosion product behaviour are thus obtained. The numerical resolution of these equations is implemented in the second part of this work. In order to obtain large time steps, we choose an implicit time scheme. The associated system is linearized from the Newton method and is solved by a preconditioned GMRES method. Moreover, a time step auto-adaptive management based on Newton iterations is performed. Consequently, an efficient resolution has been implemented, allowing to describe not only the quasi-steady evolutions but also the fast transients. In a last step, numerical simulations are carried out in order to validate the new corrosion product transport modelling and to illustrate the capabilities of this modelling. Notably, the numerical results obtained indicate that the code allows to restore the on-site observations underlining the influence of material surface properties on reactor contamination. (author)

  16. Chemical and mechanical control of corrosion product transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hede Larsen, O; Blum, R [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark); Daucik, K [I/S Skaerbaekvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The corrosion products formed in the condensate and feedwater system of once-through boilers are precipitated and deposited inside the evaporator tubes mainly in the burner zone at the highest heat flux. Depositions lead to increased oxidation rate and increased metal temperature of the evaporator tubes, hereby decreasing tube lifetime. This effect is more important in the new high efficiency USC boilers due to increased feedwater temperature and hence higher thermal load on the evaporator tubes. The only way to reduce the load on the evaporator tubes is to minimise corrosion product transport to the boiler. Two general methods for minimising corrosion product transport to the boiler have been evaluated through measurement campaigns for Fe in the water/steam cycle in supercritical boilers within the ELSAM area. One method is to reduce corrosion in the low temperature condensate system by changing conditioning mode from alkaline volatile treatment (AVT) to oxygenated treatment (OT). The other method is to filtrate part of the condensate with a mechanical filter at the deaerator. The results show, that both methods are effective at minimising Fe-transport to the boiler, but changing to OT has the highest effect and should always be used, whenever high purity condensate is maintained. Whether mechanical filtration also is required, depends on the boiler, specifically the load on the evaporator. A simplified calculation model for lifetime evaluation of evaporator tubes has been developed. This model has been used for evaluating the effect of corrosion product transport to the boiler on evaporator tube lifetime. Conventional supercritical boilers generally can achieve sufficient lifetime by AVT and even better by OT, whereas all measures to reduce Fe-content of feedwater, including OT and mechanical filtration, should be taken, to ensure sufficient lifetime for the new boilers with advanced steam data - 290 bar/580 deg. C and above. (au)

  17. Framework for reactive mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive transport modeling is applicable for a range of porous materials. Here the modeling framework is focused on cement-based materials, where ion diffusion and migration are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation system. A two phase vapor/liquid flow model, with a sorption hysteresis...... description is coupled to the system. The mass transport is solved by using the finite element method where the chemical equilibrium is solved explicitly by an operator splitting method. The IPHREEQC library is used as chemical equilibrium solver. The equation system, solved by IPHREEQC, is explained...

  18. States and transport of hydrogen in the corrosion process of an AZ91 magnesium alloy in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Wang Jianqiu; Han Enhou; Dong Junhua; Ke Wei

    2008-01-01

    Mott-Schottky measurement and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) were used to investigate the states and transport of hydrogen during the corrosion behavior of an AZ91 magnesium alloy in 0.1 M sodium sulfate solution. The results showed that when samples were immersed or charged in solution, hydrogen atoms diffused into the film and reacted with vacancy to cause the increases of the carrier concentration (excess electron or hole carrier) and diffusion rate of hydrogen. Some hydrogen atoms diffused to interior of matrix and enriched in β phase while others resorted in the corrosive film. With the increase of immersion or charging time, magnesium hydride would be brittle fractured when the inner stress caused by hydrogen pressure and expansion stress of formation of magnesium hydride was above the fracture strength, which provided the direct experimental evidence of the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) mechanism of magnesium and its alloys. After immersion in solution, the transfer of excess electrons to the interfaces of corrosion film and solution would destroy the charge equilibrium in the film and stimulate the adsorption of SO 4 2- , which resulted in the initiation of localized corrosion; after cathodic charging and then immersion, the enrichment of hydrogen atoms at interior of corrosion film would combine into hydrogen gas to form high pressure and result in the rupture of corrosion film, and localized corrosion initiated and developed at surface. Therefore, localized corrosion nucleated earlier on the charged samples than on the uncharged samples. Hydrogen invasion accelerated the corrosion of matrix

  19. The effects of corrosion product colloids on actinide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, M.P.; Smith, A.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report assesses the possible effects of colloidal corrosion products on the transport of actinides from the near field of radioactive waste repositories. The desorption of plutonium and americium from colloidal corrosion products of iron and zirconium was studied under conditions simulating a transition from near-field to far-field environmental conditions. Desorption of actinides occurred slowly from the colloids under far-field conditions. Measurements of particle stability showed all the colloids to be unstable in the near field. Stability increased under far-field conditions or as a result of the evolution of the near field. Migration of colloids from the near field is unlikely except in the presence of organic materials. (Author)

  20. Lead corrosion and transport in simulated secondary feedwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarvey, G.B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Ross, K.J.; McDougall, T.E. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada); Turner, C.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    The ubiquitous presence of lead at trace levels in secondary feedwater is a concern to all operators of steam generators and has prompted laboratory studies of its interaction with Inconel 600, Inconel 690, Monel 400 and Incoloy 800. Acute exposures of steam generator alloys to high levels of,lead in the laboratory and in the field have accelerated the degradation of these alloys. There is some disagreement over the role of lead when the exposure is to chronic levels. It has been proposed that most of the present degradation of steam generator tubes is due to low levels of lead although few if any failures have been experimentally linked to lead when sub-parts per billion levels are present in the feedwater. One reason for the difficulty in assigning the role of the lead is related to its possible immobilization on the surfaces of corrosion products or iron oxide films in the feedwater system. We have measured lead adsorption profiles on the three principal corrosion products in the secondary feedwater; magnetite, lepidocrocite and hematite. In all cases, essentially complete adsorption of the lead is achieved at pH values less than that of the feedwater (9-10). If lead is maintained in this adsorbed state, it may be more chemically benign than lead that is free to dissolve in the feedwater and subsequently adsorb on steam generator tube surfaces. In this paper, we report on lead adsorption onto simulated corrosion products under simulated feedwater conditions and propose a physical model for the transport and fate of lead under operating conditions. The nature of lead adsorption onto the surfaces of different corrosion products will be discussed. The desorption behaviour of lead from iron oxide surfaces following different treatment conditions will be used to propose a model for tile transport and probable fate of lead in the secondary feedwater system. (author)

  1. Lead corrosion and transport in simulated secondary feedwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarvey, G.B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Ross, K.J.; McDougall, T.E. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada); Turner, C.W

    1999-07-01

    The ubiquitous presence of lead at trace levels in secondary feedwater is a concern to all operators of steam generators and has prompted laboratory studies of its interaction with Inconel 600, Inconel 690, Monel 400 and Incoloy 800. Acute exposures of steam generator alloys to high levels of lead in the laboratory and in the field have accelerated the degradation of these alloys. There is some disagreement over the role of lead when the exposure is to chronic levels. It has been proposed that most of the present degradation of steam generator tubes is caused by low levels of lead although few, if any, failures have been experimentally linked to lead when it is present in sub-parts per billion in the feedwater. One reason for the difficulty in assigning the role of the lead is related to its possible immobilization on the surfaces of corrosion products or iron oxide films in the feedwater system. We have measured lead adsorption profiles on the 3 principal corrosion products in the secondary feedwater: magnetite, lepidocrocite and hematite. In all cases, essentially complete adsorption of the lead is achieved at pH values that are lower than the pH of the feedwater (9 to 10). If lead is maintained in this adsorbed state, it may be more chemically benign than lead that is free to dissolve in the feedwater and subsequently adsorb on steam generator tube surfaces. In this paper, we report on lead adsorption onto simulated corrosion products under simulated feedwater conditions and propose a physical model for the transport and fate of lead under operating conditions. The nature of lead adsorption onto the surfaces of different corrosion products will be discussed. The desorption behaviour of lead from iron oxide surfaces after different treatment conditions will be used to propose a model for the transport and probable fate of lead in the secondary feedwater system. (author)

  2. Lead corrosion and transport in simulated secondary feedwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarvey, G.B.; Ross, K.J.; McDougall, T.E.; Turner, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of lead at trace levels in secondary feedwater is a concern to all operators of steam generators and has prompted laboratory studies of its interaction with Inconel 600, Inconel 690, Monel 400 and Incoloy 800. Acute exposures of steam generator alloys to high levels of,lead in the laboratory and in the field have accelerated the degradation of these alloys. There is some disagreement over the role of lead when the exposure is to chronic levels. It has been proposed that most of the present degradation of steam generator tubes is due to low levels of lead although few if any failures have been experimentally linked to lead when sub-parts per billion levels are present in the feedwater. One reason for the difficulty in assigning the role of the lead is related to its possible immobilization on the surfaces of corrosion products or iron oxide films in the feedwater system. We have measured lead adsorption profiles on the three principal corrosion products in the secondary feedwater; magnetite, lepidocrocite and hematite. In all cases, essentially complete adsorption of the lead is achieved at pH values less than that of the feedwater (9-10). If lead is maintained in this adsorbed state, it may be more chemically benign than lead that is free to dissolve in the feedwater and subsequently adsorb on steam generator tube surfaces. In this paper, we report on lead adsorption onto simulated corrosion products under simulated feedwater conditions and propose a physical model for the transport and fate of lead under operating conditions. The nature of lead adsorption onto the surfaces of different corrosion products will be discussed. The desorption behaviour of lead from iron oxide surfaces following different treatment conditions will be used to propose a model for tile transport and probable fate of lead in the secondary feedwater system. (author)

  3. Mass transfer effects in feeder flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietralik, J.

    2008-01-01

    Flow conditions play a dominant role in Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) under certain conditions, e.g., in CANDU feeders. While chemistry and materials set the overall potential for FAC, flow conditions determine the local distribution of wall thinning. Recent plant data of feeders and laboratory tests confirms that there is a close relationship between local flow conditions, expressed by mass transfer coefficient, and FAC rate in CANDU feeder bends. The knowledge of local effects can be useful for minimizing the number of inspected components, predicting the location of the highest FAC rate for a given piping component, and determining what components or feeders should be replaced. A similar evaluation applies also to FAC in heat transfer equipment such as heat exchangers and steam generators. The objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between FAC rate and local mass transfer parameters. For FAC where the flow is dominant, the FAC rate is proportional to mass flux of ferrous ions. The mass flux is the product of the mass transfer coefficient and the concentration difference, or degree of saturation. The mass transfer coefficient describes the intensity of the transport of corrosion products (ferrous ions) from the oxide-water interface into the bulk water. Therefore, this parameter can be used for predicting the local distribution of FAC rate in the mass-transfer controlled FAC. The degree of saturation reduces the mass flux, thus reducing the FAC rate. This effect can be significant in long piping, e.g., in outlet feeders. The paper presents plant and laboratory evidence for the relationship between local mass transfer conditions and the FAC rate. It shows correlations for mass transfer coefficient in components that are highly susceptible to FAC and most important flow parameters that affect mass transfer coefficient. The role of surface roughness, wall shear stress, and local turbulence is also discussed. (author)

  4. Corrosion in systems for storage and transportation of petroleum products and biofuels identification, monitoring and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Groysman, Alec

    2014-01-01

    This book treats corrosion as it occurs and affects processes in real-world situations, and thus points the way to practical solutions. Topics described include the conditions in which petroleum products are corrosive to metals; corrosion mechanisms of petroleum products; which parts of storage tanks containing crude oils and petroleum products undergo corrosion; dependence of corrosion in tanks on type of petroleum products; aggressiveness of petroleum products to polymeric material; how microorganisms take part in corrosion of tanks and pipes containing petroleum products; which corrosion monitoring methods are used in systems for storage and transportation of petroleum products; what corrosion control measures should be chosen; how to choose coatings for inner and outer surfaces of tanks containing petroleum products; and how different additives (oxygenates, aromatic solvents) to petroleum products and biofuels influence metallic and polymeric materials. The book is of interest to corrosion engineers, mat...

  5. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  6. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-09-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. The following areas are discussed in detail: - the origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters, - the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pin deposits (activation), - the release and transport of cobalt-60, - the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarised. Corrosion chemistry aspects of the cobalt build-up in the primary circuit have already been studied on a broad basis and are continuing to be researched in a number of centers. The crystal chemistry of chromium-nickel steel corrosion products poses a number of yet unanswered questions. There are major loopholes associated with the understanding of activation processes of cobalt deposited on the fuel pins and in the mass transfer of cobalt-60. For these processes, the most important influence stems from factors associated with colloid chemistry. Accumulation of data from different BWRs contributes little to the understanding of the activity build-up. However, there are examples that the problem of activity build-up can be kept under control. Although many details for a quantitative understanding are still missing, the most important correlations are visible. The activity build-up in the BWR recirculation systems cannot be kept low by a single measure. Rather a whole series of measures is necessary, which influences not only cobalt-60 deposition but also plant and operation costs. (author) 26 figs., 13 tabs., 90 refs

  7. The effect of corrosion product colloids on actinide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, M.P.; Smith, A.J.; Williams, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The near field of the proposed UK repository for ILW/LLW will contain containers of conditioned waste in contact with a cementious backfill. It will contain significant quantities of iron and steel, Magnox and Zircaloy. Colloids deriving from their corrosion products may possess significant sorption capacity for radioelements. If the colloids are mobile in the groundwater flow, they could act as a significant vector for activity transport into the far field. The desorption of plutonium and americium from colloidal corrosion products of iron and zirconium has been studied under chemical conditions representing the transition from the near field to the far field. Desorption R d values of ≥ 5 x 10 6 ml g -1 were measured for both actinides on these oxides and hydroxides when actinide sorption took place under the near-field conditions and desorption took place under the far-field conditions. Desorption of the actinides occurred slowly from the colloids under far-field conditions when the colloids had low loadings of actinide and more quickly at high loadings of actinide. Desorbed actinide was lost to the walls of the experimental vessel. (author)

  8. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Sheida

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. The research performed here is aimed at: (1) better understanding of corrosion processes in the system including RAFM steel and flowing PbLi in the presence of a strong magnetic field and (2) prediction of corrosion losses in conditions of a Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket, which is at present the key liquid metal blanket concept in the US. To do this, numerical and analytical tools have been developed and then applied to the analysis of corrosion processes. First, efforts were taken to develop a computational suite called TRANSMAG (Transport phenomena in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows) as an analysis tool for corrosion processes in the PbLi/RAFM system, including transport of corrosion products in MHD laminar and turbulent flows. The computational approach in TRANSMAG is based on simultaneous solution of flow, energy and mass transfer equations with or without a magnetic field, assuming mass transfer controlled corrosion and uniform dissolution of iron in the flowing PbLi. Then, the new computational tool was used to solve an inverse mass transfer problem where the saturation concentration of iron in PbLi was reconstructed from the experimental data resulting in the following correlation: CS = e 13.604--12975/T, where T is the temperature of PbLi in K and CS is in wppm. The new correlation for saturation concentration was then used in the analysis of corrosion processes in laminar flows in a rectangular duct in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. As shown in this study, the mass loss increases with the magnetic field such that the corrosion rate in the presence of a magnetic field can be a few times higher compared to purely

  9. Magnesium microelectrode corrosion product transport modelling in relation to chloride induced pitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, R.; Cook, A.; Stevens, N.P.C.

    2012-09-01

    The high magnesium alloy Magnox is used as a fuel clad for the UK gas cooled, graphite moderated reactors of the same name. The fuel is metallic uranium (typically natural enrichment), so a low neutron absorption cross-section clad is required. Following discharge from reactor, spent fuel is stored in water, which acts as an effective heat transfer medium and biological shield. The chemistry of these ponds is carefully controlled to ensure that the Magnox clad remains in a passive state. This is primarily through the maintenance of a high pH and very low anion concentration. Of particular concern is the presence of chloride ions as even very low levels may allow localised corrosion to initiate. Although extensive work has been undertaken historically considering the behaviour of Magnox clad and the acceptable storage envelopes, the challenges of ageing plant and aspirations for accelerated decommissioning give value to further understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of this material. Recently, electrochemical techniques have been employed to characterise performance in a variety of chemistries and microelectrodes have been produced which have shown characteristics of salt film corrosion at moderate chloride concentrations under polarisation. A characteristic of the electrochemical response observed during the mass transport limited (potential independent) salt film regime has been periodic transients which correspond to emission of microscopic hydrogen bubbles from the microelectrode cavity. A simple finite element multi-physics model has been employed to assist in understanding the dominant processes of corrosion product transport away from a magnesium electrode surface which is dissolving under a salt film and this shows that characteristic transients observed in electrochemical tests may be simulated with reasonable agreement by consideration of convection from laminar flow around hydrogen micro-bubbles in the pit cavity combined with aqueous diffusion in the

  10. Initial study and verification of a distributed fiber optic corrosion monitoring system for transportation structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    For this study, a novel optical fiber sensing system was developed and tested for the monitoring of corrosion in : transportation systems. The optical fiber sensing system consists of a reference long period fiber gratings (LPFG) sensor : for corrosi...

  11. Some in-reactor loop experiments on corrosion product transport and water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, P.V.; Allison, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the transport of activated corrosion products in the heat transport circuit of pressurized water-cooled nuclear reactors using an in-reactor loop showed that the concentration of particulate and dissolved corrosion products in the high-temperature water depends on such chemical parameters as pH and dissolved hydrogen concentration. Transients in these parameters, as well as in temperature, generally increase the concentration of suspended corrosion products. The maximum concentration of particles observed is much reduced when high-flow, high-temperature filtration is used. Filtration also reduces the steady-state concentration of particles. Dissolved corrosion products are mainly responsible for activity accumulation on surfaces. The data obtained from this study were used to estimate the rate constants for some of the transfer processes involved in the contamination of the primary heat transport circuit in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

  12. Mass transfer coefficient in disturbed flow due to orifice for flow accelerated corrosion in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Mahendra; Gaikwad, Avinash J.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Parida, Smrutiranjan

    2015-01-01

    The flow of fluid in pipes cause corrosion wherein the inner surface of pipe becomes progressively thinner and susceptible to failure. This form of corrosion dependent on flow dynamics is called Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and has been observed in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Mass transfer coefficient (MTC) is related to extent of wall thinning and it changes from its value in a straight pipe (with same fluid parameters) for flow in orifices, bends, junctions etc. due to gross disturbance of the velocity profile. This paper presents two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for an orifice configuration in a straight pipe. Turbulent model K- ω with shear stress transport and transition flow was the model used for simulation studies. The mass transfer boundary layer (MTBL) thickness δ mtbl is related to the Schmidt number (Sc) and hydrodynamic boundary layer thickness δ h , as δ mtbl ~ δh/(Sc 1/3 ). MTBL is significantly smaller than δ h and hence boundary layer meshing was carried out deep into δ mtbl . Uniform velocity profile was applied at the inlet. Post orifice fluid shows large recirculating flows on the upper and lower wall. At various locations after orifice, mass transfer coefficient is calculated and compared with the value in straight pipe with fully developed turbulent flow. The MTC due to the orifice increases and it is correlated with enhanced FAC in region after orifice. (author)

  13. Data acquisition of mass transport parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Riyo; Hama, Katsuhiro; Morikawa, Keita; Hosoya, Shinichi

    2017-02-01

    Tono Geoscience Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been carrying out the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) Project, which is a scientific study understanding the deep geological environment as a basis of research and development for geological disposal of high level radioactive wastes. The aim of the MIU project is to establish comprehensive techniques for the investigation, analysis and assessment of the deep geological environment in fractured crystalline rock, and to develop a range of engineering techniques for deep underground application. This project has three overlapping phases: Surface-based investigation phase (Phase I), Construction phase (Phase II), and Operation phase (Phase III). Currently, the project is being carried out under the Phase III. Mass transport study is mainly performed as part of Phase III project. In Phase III, the goal of mass transport study is to obtain a better understanding of mass transport phenomena in the geological environment as well as to develop technologies for measurement of the mass transport parameters, model construction, numerical analysis and validation of those technologies. This study was planned to understand the influence of the geological characteristics of fracture on the mass transport parameters. This report presents the results of diffusion experiment, observation of polished thin section, sorption experiment and porophysicality measurement. (author)

  14. Properties of Douglas Point Generating Station heat transport corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montford, B.; Rummery, T.E.

    1975-09-01

    Chemical, radiochemical and structural properties of circulating and fixed corrosion products from the Douglas Point Generating Station are documented. Interaction of Monel-400 and carbon steel corrosion products is described, and the mechanisms of Monel-400 surface deposit release, and activity buildup in the coolant system, are briefly discussed. Efficiencies of filters and ion-exchangers for the removal of released radionuclides are given. (author)

  15. Texture mapping via optimal mass transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the "earth-mover's metric"). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations.

  16. Mass transport in thin supported silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis multi-component mass transport in thin supported amorphous silica membranes is discussed. These membranes are micro-porous, with pore diameters smaller than 4Å and show high fluxes for small molecules (such as hydrogen) combined with high selectivities for these molecules with respect

  17. A Note on Diffusive Mass Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Henry W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Current chemical engineering textbooks teach that the driving force for diffusive mass transport in ideal solutions is the gradient in mole fraction. This is only true for ideal solution liquids. Therefore, it is shown that the appropriate driving force for use with ideal gases is the gradient in partial pressure. (JN)

  18. Satellite measurements of aerosol mass and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, R.S.; Kaufman, Y.J.; Mahoney, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The aerosol optical thickness over land is derived from satellite measurements of the radiance of scattered sunlight. These data are used to estimate the columnar mass density of particulate sulfur on a day with a large amount of sulfur. The horizontal transport of the particulate sulfur is calculated using wing vectors measured with rawins. 33 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  19. Theoretical approach to description of some corrosion product transport processes in PWRs primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmitko, M.

    1990-10-01

    The behavior and mass transport of corrosion products in primary circuits of PWR type reactors are described assuming that the products occur in ionic form, in colloidal form (about 0.01-0.6 μm in size) and in particulate form. The transport of the soluble form is treated as a diffusion process. For the colloidal form, allowance is made for its Van der Waals attraction and repulsion interaction with the surfaces. For particles and their agglomerates, the hydrodynamical effects of the flowing liquid on the agglomerate breakdown and re-formation of the particle suspension are taken into account. Efforts were made to employ theoretical relations rather than particular experimental data, for the conclusions to be applicable to different facilities. It is believed that the complex approach to the problem can contribute to gaining insight into the role of the individual factors and processes involved, particularly as regards colloidal particles whose effect on the formation of radiation fields is not yet fully understood. (author). 3 figs., 10 refs

  20. Atomistic studies of cation transport in tetragonal ZrO2 during zirconium corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are the major fuel cladding materials in current reactors. The water-side corrosion is a significant degradation mechanism of these alloys. During corrosion, the transport of oxidizing species in zirconium dioxide (ZrO 2 ) determines the corrosion kinetics. Previously, it has been argued that the outward diffusion of cations is important for forming protective oxides. In this work, the migration of Zr defects in tetragonal ZrO 2 is studied with temperature accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Zr interstitials have anisotropic diffusion and migrate preferentially along the [001] or c direction in tetragonal ZrO 2 . The compressive stresses can increase the Zr interstitial migration barrier significantly. The migration of Zr interstitials at a grain boundary is much slower than in a bulk oxide. The implications of these atomistic simulation results in the Zr corrosion are discussed. (authors)

  1. Analysis of corrosion product transport in PWR primary system under non-convective condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Sub

    1992-02-01

    The increase of occupational radiation exposure (ORE) due to the increase of the operational period at existing nuclear power plant and also the publication of the new version of ICRP recommendation (ICRP publication No. 60) for radiological protection require much more strict reduction of radiation buildup in the nuclear power plant. The major sources of the radiation, i.e. the radioactive corrosion-products, are generated by the neutron activation of the corrosion products at the reactor core, and then the radioactive corrosion products are transported to the outside of the core, and accumulated near the steam generator side at PWR. Major radioactive corrosion-products of interest in PWR are Cr 51 ,: Mn 54 ,: Co 58 ,: Fe 59 and Co 60 . Among them Co 58 and Co 60 are known to contribute approximately more than 70% of the total ORE. Thus our main concerns are focused on predicting the transport and deposition of the Co radionuclides and suggesting the optimizing method which can minimize and control the ORE of the nuclear power plant. It is well known that Co-source is most effectively controlled by pH-solubility radiation control, and also some complex computer codes such as CORA and PACTOLE have been developed and revised to predict the corrosion product behavior. However these codes still imply some intrisic problems in simulating the real behavior of corrosion products in the reactor because of 1) the lack of important experimental data, coefficients and parameters of the transport and reactions under actual high temperature and pressure conditions, 2) no general theoretical modelling which can describe such many different mechanisms involved in the corrosion product movements, 3) the newly developed and measured behavior of the corrosion product transport mechanism. Since no sufficient and detailed information is available from the above-mentioned codes (also due to propriority problems), we concentrate on developing a new computer code, CP-TRAN (Corrosion

  2. Corrosion of ferritic steels by molten lithium: Influence of competing thermal gradient mass transfer and surface product reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1987-10-01

    An Fe-12Cr-1MoVW steel was exposed to thermally convective lithium for 6962 h. Results showed that the weight change profile of Fe-12Cr-1MoVW steel changed substantially as the maximum loop temperature was raised from 500 to 600 0 C. Furthermore, for a particular loop experiment, changes in the structure and composition of the exposed surfaces did not reflect typical thermal gradient mass transfer effects for all elements: the surface concentration of chromium was often a maximum at intermediate temperatures, while nickel (present at low concentrations in the starting material) tended to be transported to the coldest part of the loop. Such data were interpreted in terms of a qualitative model in which there are different dominant reactions or the various constituents of the ferritic steels (surface product formation involving nitrogen and/or carbon and solubility-driven elemental transport). This competition among different reactions is important in evaluating overall corrosion behavior and the effects of temperature. The overall corrosion rate of the 12Cr-1MoVW steel was relatively low when compared to that for austenitic stainless steel exposed under similar conditions

  3. Mass transport in propagating patterns of convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E.; Steinberg, V.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies of propagating waves in an oscillatory convection of binary mixtures arise questions about transport properties of this flow. Optical visualization of a field of refraction index due to a shadowgraph technique gives information on the temperature and concentration fields. However, experimental observation of rolls propagating along the cell as travelling waves (TW) does not necessarily imply that mass is transferred hydrodynamically by the convective motion along the cell. One of the possibilities discussed, e.g., is that TW observed is only a phase propagation. The traditional examples of such situations come from the domain of linear, superposition-oriented physics. Acoustic waves transfer momentum and energy, but do not cause the mass to make excursions for their equilibrium point that are larger than the oscillation amplitude. In the case of nonlinear physics we were aware that small amplitude surface waves cause only small oscillatory motion round the equilibrium point, while larger amplitudes can cause the mass to start moving in the direction of the TW. This paper discussed the different possibilities of mass transfer by TW. 27 refs., 20 figs

  4. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. Based on a comprehensive literature study concerning this theme, it has been attempted to identify the individual stages of the activity build-up and to classify their importance. The following areas are discussed in detail: The origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters; the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pins deposits (activation); the release and transport of cobalt-60; the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarized. 90 refs, figs and tabs

  5. Mass transfer and transport in salt repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-02-01

    Salt is a unique rock isolation of nuclear waste because it is ''dry'' and nearly impermeable. In this paper we summarize some mass-transfer and transport analyses of salt repositories. First we analyses brine migration. Heating by high-level waste can cause brine in grain boundaries to move due to pressure-gradients. We analyze brine migration treating salt as a thermoelastic solid and found that brine migration is transient and localized. We use previously developed techniques to estimate release rates from waste packages by diffusion. Interbeds exist in salt and may be conduits for radionuclide migration. We analyze steady-state migration due to brine flow in the interbed, as a function of the Peclet number. Then we analyze transient mass transfer, both into the interbed and directly to salt, due only to diffusion. Finally we compare mass transfer rates of a waste cylinder in granite facing a fracture and in salt facing an interbed. In all cases, numerical illustrations of the analytic solution are given. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  6. A computer code PACTOLE to predict activation and transport of corrosion products in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beslu, P.; Frejaville, G.; Lalet, A.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical studies on activation and transport of corrosion products in a PWR primary circuit have been concentrated, at CEA on the development of a computer code : PACTOLE. This code takes into account the major phenomena which govern corrosion products transport: 1. Ion solubility is obtained by usual thermodynamics laws in function of water chemistry: pH at operating temperature is calculated by the code. 2. Release rates of base metals, dissolution rates of deposits, precipitation rates of soluble products are derived from solubility variations. 3. Deposition of solid particles is treated by a model taking into account particle size, brownian and turbulent diffusion and inertial effect. Erosion of deposits is accounted for by a semi-empirical model. After a review of calculational models, an application of PACTOLE is presented in view of analyzing the distribution of in core. (author)

  7. Mass transport in non crystalline metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoge, Y.

    1986-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of mass transport in non crystalline metallic alloys we have developed indirect studies of diffusion based on electron irradiation and hydrostatic pressure effects upon crystallization. In a first part we present the models of crystallization which are used, then we give the experimental results. The main point is the first experimental measurement of the activation volume for diffusion in a metallic glass: the value of which is roughly one atomic volume. We show also recent quantitative results concerning radiation enhanced diffusion in metallic glasses (FeNi) 8 (PB) 2 and Ni 6 Nb 4 . In a last part we discuss the atomic model needed to explain our results

  8. Mass transfer of corrosion products in high temperature, high pressure water circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodd, J.T.; Nicholson, F.D.

    1976-01-01

    The CWL-3 loop is used to study the mass transfer of corrosion products in water at 270 0 C for pressures up to 6.9 MPa. Two parallel Zircaloy-2 test sections are heated directly by a low voltage a.c. electrical current to give a heat flux up to 500 W cm -2 and a heat rating up to 1500 W cm -1 . Coolant flow rates can be varied up to 0.4 kg cm -2 s -1 with or without boiling. A tracer technique has been developed to monitor continuously the deposition of corrosion products in the test sections during operation of the loop. Magnetite deposits 2.6 nm thick can be readily detected. (author)

  9. Phenomena of the ionic transport in the stress corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravano, S.M.

    1986-07-01

    For the study of electrochemical conditions of propagation, a model which calculates the concentrations and potential profiles inside cracks or localized corrosion cavities, was developed. Considering transport by difussion and migration it was applied to pure metals (Zn, Fe) in solutions where pitting occurs (NaCl or Na2SO4, with borate buffer), and also extended to systems where stress corrosion cracking is present, such as Cu and yellow brass in NaNO2. Physical bases of the 'constant intermediate elongation rate technique' to predict stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was analized, studying by mathematical models: 1) dissolution current, that should be the result of superposition of repassivation transients on the fresh metal, exposed to corrosive medium by strain, with the same rate of that of a static specimen; 2) ohmic drop, that in some systems could be quite important and it must be considered in the overpotential evaluation; and 3) metallic ion concentration that, instead of what happens in a crack, never attains saturation in the analized cases. For repassivation transient according to the crak propagation models proposed by Scully and Ford it was found that, at the tip of the crack, it is unlikely that the same repassivation transients occur as in the constant intermediate elongation rate experiments. (M.E.L.)

  10. Carbon Dioxide Corrosion:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2008-01-01

    CO2 corrosion is a general problem in the industry and it is expensive. The focus of this study is an oil gas production related problem. CO2 corrosion is observed in offshore natural gas transportation pipelines. A general overview of the problem is presented in chapter 1. The chemical system...... with the basic thermodynamics of electrolytes in chapter 2, the extension and general description of electrolyte mass transport in chapter 3, and the electrochemical kinetics of corrosion in chapter 4. A literature overview of CO2 corrosion is shown in chapter 5 and possible extensions of the models...... and validated against heat capacity data. The model is also fitted to experimental data produced and shown in chapter 8 for SLE in the Na2CO3-NaHCO3-MEG-H2O system. The application of the above model is shown in chapter 9. Here the thermodynamic correction factors are calculated. These show how the diffusion...

  11. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinsong Liu [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2006-04-15

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10{sup 5} years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10{sup 5} years.

  12. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jinsong [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2006-04-15

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10{sup 5} years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10{sup 5} years.

  13. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinsong Liu

    2006-04-01

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10 5 years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10 5 years

  14. Integral diagnostic in the failure causes of external corrosion of a natural gas transport pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora-Mendoza, J.L.; Saucedo-Robles, L.C.; Rodriguez-Clemente, H. [PEMEX Gas y Petroquimica Basica, Subdireccion de Ductos; Marina Nacional 329, Edificio B-1, Piso 8, Col. Huasteca, D.F., CP 11311 (Mexico); Gonzalez-Nunez, M.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos, CP 62490 (Mexico); Zavala-Olivares, G.; Hernandez-Gayosso, M.J. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Direccion de Exploracion y Produccion, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, D.F., CP 07730 (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    The objective of this study consisted in investigating the possible causes which give rise to the presence of low wall pipe thicknesses on a 16'' natural gas transport pipeline, even though during the last 12-year period cathodic protection (CP) potentials were kept in the protection range at which external corrosion should not occur. Results from in-line inspection from a 16'' natural gas transport pipeline showed 46 indications with more than 80% wall thickness lost due to external corrosion in the second segment of the pipeline. Direct inspection at the indication locations, review of the CP system performance, pipeline maintenance programs and studies, allowed to make an integral diagnostic where it was found out that the main cause of external corrosion was an inappropriate coating application since the pipeline construction, this situation has originated the increase of CP shielding effects through time. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. The mass transportation problem in Illinois : a final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-06-01

    Prepared by the State Mass Transportation Commission for the Honorable William G. Stratton, Governor of Illinois and the Honorable Members of the 71st General Assembly. The study contains the findings and recommendations of the Illinois State Mass Tr...

  16. Analysis of corrosion-product transport using nondestructive XRF and MS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.; Sawicki, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the application of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) techniques to monitor corrosion-product transport (CPT) in water circuits of nuclear reactors. The combination of XRF and MS techniques was applied in studies of CPT crud filters from both primary- and secondary-side water circuits (i.e., radioactive and nonradioactive specimens) of CANDU reactors. The XRF-MS method allows nondestructive analysis of species collected on filters and provides more complete information about corrosion products than commonly used digestive methods of chemical analysis. Recent analyses of CPT specimens from the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) primary side and the Bruce B NGS feedwater system are shown as examples. Some characteristics of primary and secondary water circuits are discussed using these new data. (author)

  17. Coupling between corrosion and biphasic transport in porous media: Application to the evolution of a radioactive wastes disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dridi, W.

    2005-04-01

    In the actual concepts of geological disposal, high level radioactive wastes are packed in metallic containers surrounded by a partially or totally saturated clay media. In contact with the interstitial water, anoxic corrosion of this container will start producing hydrogen. In the scope of safety assessment, the present study deals with two main topics: prediction of the long-term corrosion of carbon steel with respect to clay water content and evaluation of the risk of damage of the clay barrier related to gas production. Elementary processes controlling the kinetics of corrosion are limited to oxide growth and mass transfer through the porosity of this film. Thanks to a macroscopic description of theses processes, followed by an interfacial kinetic law, a mechanistic modeling of the anoxic corrosion in partially saturated porous media is proposed. This approach is validated when confronted to the long-term corrosion tests performed in saturated clay. Both modeling and laboratory experiments have confirmed that kinetics of anoxic corrosion in partially saturated clay is mainly controlled by the surrounding relative humidity as in the case of aerated or atmospheric corrosion. In the gas generation topic, some numerical simulations are performed concerning the oedometric and triaxial test dealing with gas migration in saturated clay. Finally, long-term calculations are conducted concerning hydro-mechanical impact of corrosion in deep geological repositories. Due to a more realistic prediction of the long-term corrosion, the risks of gas overpressures, local desaturation and mechanical damage are reduced. (author)

  18. In situ analysis of corrosion inhibitors using a portable mass spectrometer with paper spray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Li, Anyin; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham; Wei, Pu; Li, Linfan; Ouyang, Zheng; Roqan, Iman S; Cooks, R Graham

    2013-07-07

    Paper spray (PS) ambient ionization is implemented using a portable mass spectrometer and applied to the detection of alkyl quaternary ammonium salts in a complex oil matrix. These salts are commonly used as active components in the formulation of corrosion inhibitors. They were identified in oil and confirmed by their fragmentation patterns recorded using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The cations of alkyl and benzyl-substituted quaternary ammonium salts showed characteristic neutral losses of CnH2n (n carbon number of the longest chain) and C7H8, respectively. Individual quaternary ammonium compounds were detected at low concentrations (oil samples without prior sample preparation or pre-concentration was also demonstrated using a home-built miniature mass spectrometer at levels below 1 ng μL(-1).

  19. A development of multi-Species mass transport model considering thermodynamic phase equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosokawa, Yoshifumi; Yamada, Kazuo; Johannesson, Björn

    2008-01-01

    ) variation in solid-phase composition when using different types of cement, (ii) physicochemical evaluation of steel corrosion initiation behaviour by calculating the molar ratio of chloride ion to hydroxide ion [Cl]/[OH] in pore solution, (iii) complicated changes of solid-phase composition caused......In this paper, a multi-species mass transport model, which can predict time dependent variation of pore solution and solid-phase composition due to the mass transport into the hardened cement paste, has been developed. Since most of the multi-species models established previously, based...... on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory, did not involve the modeling of chemical process, it has been coupled to thermodynamic equilibrium model in this study. By the coupling of thermodynamic equilibrium model, the multi-species model could simulate many different behaviours in hardened cement paste such as: (i...

  20. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (2), flow dynamics calculations for determining mixing factors and mass transfer coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Yasushi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    In order to predict and mitigate flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel piping in PWR and BWR secondary systems, computer program packages for evaluating FAC have been developed by coupling one through three dimensional (1-3D) computational flow dynamics (CFD) models and corrosion models. To evaluate corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) along the flow path, flow pattern and temperature in each elemental volume were obtained with 1D computational flow dynamics (CFD) codes. Precise flow turbulence and mass transfer coefficients at the structure surface were calculated with 3D CFD codes to determine wall thinning rates. One of the engineering options is application of k-ε calculation as a 3D CFD code, which has limitation of detail evaluation of flow distribution at very surface of large scale piping. A combination of k-ε calculation and wall function was proposed to evaluate precise distribution of mass transfer coefficients with reasonable CPU volume and computing time and, at the same time, reasonable accuracy. (author)

  1. A Coupled Chemical and Mass Transport Model for Concrete Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a general continuum theory is used to evaluate the service life of cement based materials, in terms of mass transport processes and chemical degradation of the solid matrix. The model established is a reactive mass transport model, based on an extended version of the Poisson-Nernst-...

  2. Thermodynamics and the transport of corrosion products in PWR primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that practically useful models for the activation, transport and deposition of corrosion products in PWR primary circuits can only be produced on the basis of an improved understanding of the chemical processes which control them. In particular, if a model is to make reliable predictions it is essential that its thermodynamic basis be sound. This is not the case with most current models which employ the erroneous concept of a corrosion product 'solubility'. In addition to the misuse of this term, other complications are discussed. These include the need to take account of the consequences of Gibbs' phase rule and the fact that, for mixed spinels, neither the concept of a thermodynamic solubility nor of a solubility product is valid. There is no reason to believe that measured apparent solubilities of nickel ferrites or spinel mixtures containing cobalt can give any direct guidance on the direction of transport of Ni or Co in PWR primary circuits. This is more likely to be determined by the distribution of stable and unstable ferrites and chromites than by any temperature coefficient of apparent solubility. Most of the transport of Ni and Co into and out of the core probably occurs as a consequence of either chemical or mechanical transients. Most important is likely to be the oxidative destruction and subsequent re-precipitation of chromites which occurs as a consequence of the oxygenated conditions employed during plant shutdown. (author)

  3. Characterization of corrosive bacterial consortia isolated from petroleum-product-transporting pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Anandkumar, Balakrishnan [Sourashtra Coll., Madurai (India). Dept. of Biotechnology; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India). Biocorrosion Group; Rahman, Pattanathu K.S.M. [Teesside Univ., Tees Valley (United Kingdom). Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering Group

    2010-01-15

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion is a problem commonly encountered in facilities in the oil and gas industries. The present study describes bacterial enumeration and identification in diesel and naphtha pipelines located in the northwest and southwest region in India, using traditional cultivation technique and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences of the isolates was carried out, and the samples obtained from the diesel and naphtha-transporting pipelines showed the occurrence of 11 bacterial species namely Serratia marcescens ACE2, Bacillus subtilis AR12, Bacillus cereus ACE4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI1, Klebsiella oxytoca ACP, Pseudomonas stutzeri AP2, Bacillus litoralis AN1, Bacillus sp., Bacillus pumilus AR2, Bacillus carboniphilus AR3, and Bacillus megaterium AR4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were not detected in samples from both pipelines. The dominant bacterial species identified in the petroleum pipeline samples were B. cereus and S. marcescens in the diesel and naphtha pipelines, respectively. Therefore, several types of bacteria may be involved in biocorrosion arising from natural biofilms that develop in industrial facilities. In addition, localized (pitting) corrosion of the pipeline steel in the presence of the consortia was observed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. The potential role of each species in biofilm formation and steel corrosion is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  5. An integrated model of tritium transport and corrosion in Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) – Part I: Theory and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D., E-mail: john.stempien@inl.gov; Ballinger, Ronald G., E-mail: hvymet@mit.edu; Forsberg, Charles W., E-mail: cforsber@mit.edu

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A model was developed for use with FHRs and benchmarked with experimental data. • Model results match results of tritium diffusion experiments. • Corrosion simulations show reasonable agreement with molten salt loop experiments. • This is the only existing model of tritium transport and corrosion in FHRs. • Model enables proposing and evaluating tritium control options in FHRs. - Abstract: The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) is a pebble bed nuclear reactor concept cooled by a liquid fluoride salt known as “flibe” ({sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}). A model of TRITium Diffusion EvolutioN and Transport (TRIDENT) was developed for use with FHRs and benchmarked with experimental data. TRIDENT is the first model to integrate the effects of tritium production in the salt via neutron transmutation, with the effects of the chemical redox potential, tritium mass transfer, tritium diffusion through pipe walls, tritium uptake by graphite, selective chromium attack by tritium fluoride, and corrosion product mass transfer. While data from a forced-convection polythermal loop of molten salt containing tritium did not exist for comparison, TRIDENT calculations were compared to data from static salt diffusion tests in flibe and flinak (0.465LiF-0.115NaF-0.42KF) salts. In each case, TRIDENT matched the transient and steady-state behavior of these tritium diffusion experiments. The corrosion model in TRIDENT was compared against the natural convection flow-loop experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from the 1960s and early 1970s which used Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel-salt containing UF{sub 4}. Despite the lack of data required by TRIDENT for modeling the loops, some reasonable results were obtained. The TRIDENT corrosion rates follow the experimentally observed dependence on the square root of the product of the chromium solid-state diffusion coefficient with time. Additionally the TRIDENT model predicts mass

  6. Terminology for mass transport and exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassingthwaighte, J B; Chinard, F P; Crone, C

    1986-01-01

    Virtually all fields of physiological research now encompass various aspects of solute transport by convection, diffusion, and permeation across membranes. Accordingly, this set of terms, symbols, definitions, and units is proposed as a means of clear communication among workers in the physiologi......Virtually all fields of physiological research now encompass various aspects of solute transport by convection, diffusion, and permeation across membranes. Accordingly, this set of terms, symbols, definitions, and units is proposed as a means of clear communication among workers...... in the physiological, engineering, and physical sciences. The goal is to provide a setting for quantitative descriptions of physiological transport phenomena....

  7. Shape signature based on Ricci flow and optimal mass transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Su, Zengyu; Zhang, Min; Zeng, Wei; Dai, Junfei; Gu, Xianfeng

    2014-11-01

    A shape signature based on surface Ricci flow and optimal mass transportation is introduced for the purpose of surface comparison. First, the surface is conformally mapped onto plane by Ricci flow, which induces a measure on the planar domain. Second, the unique optimal mass transport map is computed that transports the new measure to the canonical measure on the plane. The map is obtained by a convex optimization process. This optimal transport map encodes all the information of the Riemannian metric on the surface. The shape signature consists of the optimal transport map, together with the mean curvature, which can fully recover the original surface. The discrete theories of surface Ricci flow and optimal mass transportation are explained thoroughly. The algorithms are given in detail. The signature is tested on human facial surfaces with different expressions accquired by structured light 3-D scanner based on phase-shifting method. The experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of the method.

  8. Electric current induced forward and anomalous backward mass transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somaiah, Nalla; Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Multilayered test samples were fabricated in form of standard Blech structure, where W was used as the interlayer between SiO 2 substrate and Cu film. Electromigration test was performed at 250 °C by passing an electric current with a nominal density of 3.9  ×  10 10 A m −2 . In addition to the regular electromigration induced mass transport ensuing from the cathode towards the anode, we also observed anomalous mass transport from the anode to the cathode, depleting Cu from the anode as well. We propose an electromigration-thermomigration coupling based reasoning to explain the observed mass transport. (letter)

  9. Flow and mass transfer downstream of an orifice under flow accelerated corrosion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Wael H.; Bello, Mufatiu M.; El Nakla, Meamer; Al Sarkhi, Abdelsalam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass transfer downstream of orifices was numerically and experimentally investigated. ► The surface wear pattern is measured and used to validate the present numerical results. ► The maximum mass transfer coefficient found to occur at approximately 2–3 pipe diameters downstream of the orifice. ► The FAC wear rates were correlated with the turbulence kinetic energy and wall mass transfer in terms of Sherwood number. ► The current study offered very useful information for FAC engineers for better preparation of nuclear plant inspection scope. - Abstract: Local flow parameters play an important role in characterizing flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) downstream of sudden area change in power plant piping systems. Accurate prediction of the highest FAC wear rate locations enables the mitigation of sudden and catastrophic failures, and the improvement of the plant capacity factor. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effect of the local flow and mass transfer parameters on flow accelerated corrosion downstream of an orifice. In the present study, orifice to pipe diameter ratios of 0.25, 0.5 and 0.74 were investigated numerically by solving the continuity and momentum equations at Reynolds number of Re = 20,000. Laboratory experiments, using test sections made of hydrocal (CaSO 4 ·½H 2 O) were carried out in order to determine the surface wear pattern and validate the present numerical results. The numerical results were compared to the plants data as well as to the present experiments. The maximum mass transfer coefficient found to occur at approximately 2–3 pipe diameters downstream of the orifice. This location was also found to correspond to the location of elevated turbulent kinetic energy generated within the flow separation vortices downstream of the orifice. The FAC wear rates were correlated with the turbulence kinetic energy and wall mass transfer in terms of Sherwood number. The current study found to offer very

  10. Reduction transport of corrosion products through the secondary circuit by increasing the dosage of ammonia; Reduccion del transporte de productos de corrosion a traves del circuito secundario mediante el aumento de la dosificacion de amoniaco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espanol, J.; Boronat, M.

    2015-07-01

    Reduce transport of corrosion products through the Secondary Circuit, mainly magnetite, by increasing the dosage of ammonia in order to reduce oxides accumulation in the Steam Generators top of tube sheet where become hard sludge, as one of the TTS denting mitigation actions. (Author)

  11. RAPK-7. code for calculating mass transfer and corrosion products activation in the circulation loops of water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaylov, A.V.; Moryakov, A.V.; Nikitin, A.V.

    2012-09-01

    The RAPK-7 code was developed to simulate formation of non-irradiated and activated corrosion products, their transport and deposition on inner surfaces of primary components and in primary coolant of water-cooled reactors during their operation on power and after shutdown. The key feature of this code is its particular emphasis on the contamination of circulation loops by radioactive corrosion products of reactor which operates on variable modes. Such reactors typically are: research reactors and their experimental loops, naval nuclear power systems, etc. It's typical for such reactors to have repeated (over the campaign) and frequent variations in power (activating neutron fluxes), thermal-physical, hydrodynamic and other parameters of coolant, intensive water mass exchange between the circulation loop and the pressuriser, etc. The processes of mass-transfer are described by the RAPK-7 code with the use of models similar to those employed by the COTRAN and PACTOLE codes. The circulation circuit is broken down into computation areas. The user will then set the concentrations of water chemistry adjusting additives (alkali, boric acid, ammonia, hydrogen), as well as parameters in each area, such as wall temperature, coolant flow core temperature, pressure, flow rate, velocity, the radial component of coolant flowrate and activating neutron flux density. All the above parameters can be set as time-dependent step functions (bar charts), with independent time steps for each of them. The number of computation areas, the number of time dependencies and the level of detail in their description are limited by computer capabilities only. A 'brake' mode with a single-step change of the required set of parameters is provided to allow for jump-type events, such as replacement of contaminated components with clean ones during core refueling or repairs, emergency injection of boric acid, water mass exchange between the circulation circuit and the pressuriser, etc

  12. In situ analysis of corrosion inhibitors using a portable mass spectrometer with paper spray ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark; Li, Anyin; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K.; Wei, Pu; Li, Linfan; Ouyang, Zheng; Roqan, Iman S.; Cooks, Robert Graham

    2013-01-01

    Paper spray (PS) ambient ionization is implemented using a portable mass spectrometer and applied to the detection of alkyl quaternary ammonium salts in a complex oil matrix. These salts are commonly used as active components in the formulation of corrosion inhibitors. They were identified in oil and confirmed by their fragmentation patterns recorded using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The cations of alkyl and benzyl-substituted quaternary ammonium salts showed characteristic neutral losses of CnH2n (n carbon number of the longest chain) and C7H8, respectively. Individual quaternary ammonium compounds were detected at low concentrations (<1 ng μL-1) and over a dynamic range of ∼5 pg μL-1 to 500 pg μL-1 (ppb). Direct detection of these compounds in complex oil samples without prior sample preparation or pre-concentration was also demonstrated using a home-built miniature mass spectrometer at levels below 1 ng μL-1.© 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. X-rays diffraction characterization of corrosion products transported by secondary side of a CANDU NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinu, A.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.

    2016-01-01

    To verify the chemistry of secondary side of CANDU steam generators, Millipore filters are used to sampling from condensing extraction pump, from feed water header and blow down of steam generator. These filters retain the corrosion products as very fine particles and are used as samples in chemistry water control. X-Ray diffraction technique is the able to distinguish the different crystallographic compounds present in oxide films deposited on the Millipore filters and gives information referring to the nature of corrosion products transported in secondary side. The XRD analysis has identified the following substance in deposited layer: magnetite (Fe_3O_4), hematite (Fe_2O_3), and iron oxide hydroxide (FeOOH). By optical microscopy it was observed a brown-reddish background specific to hematite and iron oxide hydroxide, especially for filters extracted from condensing extraction pump. The black colour of crud present on filters extracted from feed water header and blow down of steam generator shows the presence of magnetite. (authors)

  14. Transport and transformation of surface water masses across the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transport and transformation of surface water masses across the Mascarene Plateau during the Northeast Monsoon season. ... Mixing occurs in the central gap between intermediate water masses (Red Sea Water [RSW] and Antarctic Intermediate Water [AAIW]) as well as in the upper waters (Subtropical Surface Water ...

  15. Space Geodesy Monitoring Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-cryosphere-solid Earth-core system (the 'global geophysical fluids') are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, oceanic and solid tides, hydrological water and idsnow redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. The temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have proven to be an effective tool in monitorihg certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in observing and understanding of these geodynamic effects. This paper will use several prominent examples to illustrate the triumphs in research over the past years under a 'Moore's law' in space geodesy. New space missions and projects promise to further advance our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as of the solid Earth's response to such changes in terms of Earth's mechanical properties.

  16. Lithium mass transport in ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, P.E.; Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this activity is to measure the lithium vaporization from lithium oxide breeder material under differing temperature and moisture partial pressure conditions. Lithium ceramics are being investigated for use as tritium breeding materials. The lithium is readily converted to tritium after reacting with a neutron. With the addition of 1000 ppM H 2 to the He purge gas, the bred tritium is readily recovered from the blanket as HT and HTO above 400 degree C. Within the solid, tritium may also be found as LiOT which may transport lithium to cooler parts of the blanket. The pressure of LiOT(g), HTO(g), or T 2 O(g) above Li 2 O(s) is the same as that for reactions involving hydrogen. In our experiments we were limited to the use of hydrogen. The purpose of this work is to investigate the transport of LiOH(g) from the blanket material. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  17. Optimal urban networks via mass transportation

    CERN Document Server

    Buttazzo, Giuseppe; Stepanov, Eugene; Solimini, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Recently much attention has been devoted to the optimization of transportation networks in a given geographic area. One assumes the distributions of population and of services/workplaces (i.e. the network's sources and sinks) are known, as well as the costs of movement with/without the network, and the cost of constructing/maintaining it. Both the long-term optimization and the short-term, "who goes where" optimization are considered. These models can also be adapted for the optimization of other types of networks, such as telecommunications, pipeline or drainage networks. In the monograph we study the most general problem settings, namely, when neither the shape nor even the topology of the network to be constructed is known a priori.

  18. Use of a free-jet expansion, molecular beam mass spectrometer to understand processes involving volatile corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    Many high-temperature corrosion processes generate volatile products in addition to condensed phase products. Examples of these volatile products are chlorides, oxychlorides, and certain oxides and hydroxyl species. One of the best techniques to identify high temperature vapor molecules is mass spectrometry. Most mass spectrometers operate in high vacuum and are generally used to examine processes ocurring at greatly reduced pressures. However, a free-jet expansion, molecular beam mass spectrometer system allows direct sampling of volatile corrosion products. This instrument is described. Several examples from our studies on chlorination/oxidation of metals and ceramics are discussed. In addition, reactions of Cr 2 O 3 , SiO 2 , and Al 2 O 3 with water vapor, which produce volatile hydroxyl species are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Analysis of corrosions-products in tissue samples near surgical implants by means of LAMMA (Laser Microprobe Mass Analyzer) and ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlagenhaufen, C.

    1996-08-01

    In this work corrosion products of surgical implants in tissue samples were identified. For the characterization of the corrosion products the LAMMA 500 (Laser Microprobe Mass Analyzer) was used. Additional analysis were made with the ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer) to determine the concentration of chromium, cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum in the tissues. In the first part several synthetic chromium- and molybdenum compounds were investigated with LAMMA. With the anionic mass spectra of the chromium-compounds it is possible to the oxidation state of chromium. The mass spectra of the synthetic compounds were used to identify, the compounds in the corrosion products. In the second part thin sections prepared from the tissue samples from the surrounding of the implants were analyzed. Several embedding and cutting methods were tested. Histological staining methods and LAMMA spectra were used to characterize the deposits in the tissue. Three different deposits were found in the tissue. In all tissues metal splinters from the implant were found. In most of the tissues iron-rich deposits were found, that were identified as iron-phosphate. As definitive corrosion products of the implant mixtures of chromium(III)phosphate, calcium molybdate, calcium phosphate and chromium(III) molybdate were identified. The ICP-MS results show in comparison to normal values, very high concentrations for chromium, nickel, cobalt and molybdenum. These results support the conclusions based on LAMMA results. The results of these investigations clearly indicate, that stainless steel implants, are not corrosion-resistant in the body. Relatively high amounts of the constituents, of the implant dissolved, and are deposited as solid compounds in the tissue next to the implant. (author)

  20. Frontiers in Cancer Nanomedicine: Directing Mass Transport through Biological Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The physics of mass transport within body compartments and across biological barriers differentiates cancers from healthy tissues. Variants of nanoparticles can be manufactured in combinatorially large sets, varying only one transport-affecting design parameter at a time. Nanoparticles can also be used as building blocks for systems that perform sequences of coordinated actions, in accordance to a prescribed logic. These are referred to as Logic-Embedded Vectors “(LEV)” in the following. Nanoparticles and LEVs are ideal probes for the determination of mass transport laws in tumors, acting as imaging contrast enhancers, and can be employed for the lesion-selective delivery of therapy. Their size, shape, density and surface chemistry dominate convective transport in the blood stream, margination, cell adhesion, selective cellular uptake, as well as sub-cellular trafficking and localization. As argued here, the understanding of transport differentials in cancer, termed ‘transport oncophysics’ unveils a new promising frontier in oncology: the development of lesion-specific delivery particulates that exploit mass transport differentials to deploy treatment of greater efficacy and reduced side effects. PMID:20079548

  1. Ion sampling and transport in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative accuracy and high sensitivity in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) depend on consistent and efficient extraction and transport of analyte ions from an inductively coupled plasma to a mass analyzer, where they are sorted and detected. In this review we examine the fundamental physical processes that control ion sampling and transport in ICP-MS and compare the results of theory and computerized models with experimental efforts to characterize the flow of ions through plasma mass spectrometers' vacuum interfaces. We trace the flow of ions from their generation in the plasma, into the sampling cone, through the supersonic expansion in the first vacuum stage, through the skimmer, and into the ion optics that deliver the ions to the mass analyzer. At each stage we consider idealized behavior and departures from ideal behavior that affect the performance of ICP-MS as an analytical tool.

  2. Optimisation of mass ranging for atom probe microanalysis and application to the corrosion processes in Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, D.; Smith, G.D.W.; Gault, B.

    2011-01-01

    Atom probe tomography uses time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the chemical nature of atoms from their mass-to-charge-state ratios. Within a mass spectrum, ranges are defined so as to attribute a chemical identity to each peak. The accuracy of atom probe microanalysis relies on the definition of these ranges. Here we propose and compare several automated ranging techniques, tested against simulated mass spectra. The performance of these metrics compare favourably with a trial of users asked to manually range a simplified simulated dataset. The optimised automated ranging procedure was then used to precisely evaluate the very low iron concentration (0.003-0.018 at%) in a zirconium alloy to reveal its behaviour in the matrix during corrosion; oxygen is injected into solution and has the effect of increasing the local iron concentration near the oxide-metal interface, which in turn affects the corrosion properties of the metal substrate. -- Research Highlights: → Realistic simulated mass spectra were generated so as to reproduce experimental data with a perfectly determined composition. → Several metrics were tested against these simulated mass spectra to determine an optimal methodology for ranging mass peaks in atom probe tomography. Systematic automated ranging provides a significant reduction in the deviation between true and measured concentrations compared to manual ranging by multiple users on the same data. → Experimental datasets were subsequently investigated, and Fe has been shown to be distributed as a random solid solution within the matrix of 'as-received' recrystallised ZIRLO, a zirconium alloy.

  3. Evaluation of CRUDTRAN code to predict transport of corrosion products and radioactivity in the PWR primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    CRUDTRAN code is to predict transport of the corrosion products and their radio-activated nuclides such as cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 in the PWR primary coolant system. In CRUDTRAN code the PWR primary circuit is divided into three principal sections such as the core, the coolant and the steam generator. The main driving force for corrosion product transport in the PWR primary coolant comes from coolant temperature change throughout the system and a subsequent change in corrosion product solubility. As the coolant temperature changes around the PWR primary circuit, saturation status of the corrosion products in the coolant also changes such that under-saturation in steam generator and super-saturation in the core. CRUDTRAN code was evaluated by comparison with the results of the in-reactor loop tests simulating the PWR primary coolant system and PWR plant data. It showed that CRUDTRAN could predict variations of cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 radioactivity with time, plant cycle and coolant chemistry in the PWR plant. (author)

  4. The effect of sulphide and moisture content on steel corrosion during transport of fine wet coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waanders, F. B.; Vorster, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation the influence of compaction pressure (stress) on the corrosivity of wet coal was investigated. Two coal samples, one high in sulphur content (3 %) and the other low in sulphur content (0.6 %) were used to determine the influence of compaction stress on the corrosion rates of steel samples in contact with compacted coal. It was found that the pressure exerted on finely divided wet coal is an important factor in determining its water content and corrosivity towards mild steel. Corrosion of the steel was typically in the form of pitting and the sulphur content of the coal was an important factor in determining the corrosivity of the coal. The corrosion rate of the high sulphur content coal was higher than that of the low sulphur coal. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that a FeS species developed on the steel surface.

  5. Mass Transport Through Carbon Nanotube-Polystyrene Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rongzhou; Tran, Tuan

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been widely used as test channels to study nanofluidic transport, which has been found to have distinctive properties compared to transport of fluids in macroscopic channels. A long-standing challenge in the study of mass transport through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is the determination of flow enhancement. Various experimental investigations have been conducted to measure the flow rate through CNTs, mainly based on either vertically aligned CNT membranes or individual CNTs. Here, we proposed an alternative approach that can be used to quantify the mass transport through CNTs. This is a simple method relying on the use of carbon nanotube-polystyrene bundles, which are made of CNTs pulled out from a vertically aligned CNT array and glued together by polystyrene. We experimentally showed by using fluorescent tagging that the composite bundles allowed measureable and selective mass transport through CNTs. This type of composite bundle may be useful in various CNT research areas as they are simple to fabricate, less likely to form macroscopic cracks, and offer a high density of CNT pores while maintaining the aligned morphology of CNTs.

  6. Optimal partial mass transportation and obstacle Monge-Kantorovich equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbida, Noureddine; Nguyen, Van Thanh

    2018-05-01

    Optimal partial mass transport, which is a variant of the optimal transport problem, consists in transporting effectively a prescribed amount of mass from a source to a target. The problem was first studied by Caffarelli and McCann (2010) [6] and Figalli (2010) [12] with a particular attention to the quadratic cost. Our aim here is to study the optimal partial mass transport problem with Finsler distance costs including the Monge cost given by the Euclidian distance. Our approach is different and our results do not follow from previous works. Among our results, we introduce a PDE of Monge-Kantorovich type with a double obstacle to characterize active submeasures, Kantorovich potential and optimal flow for the optimal partial transport problem. This new PDE enables us to study the uniqueness and monotonicity results for the active submeasures. Another interesting issue of our approach is its convenience for numerical analysis and computations that we develop in a separate paper [14] (Igbida and Nguyen, 2018).

  7. Coolant Chemistry Control: Oxygen Mass Transport in Lead Bismuth Eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisenburger, A.; Mueller, G.; Bruzzese, C.; Glass, A.

    2015-01-01

    In lead-bismuth cooled transmutation systems, oxygen, dissolved in the coolant at defined quantities, is required for stable long-term operation by assuring the formation of protective oxide scales on structural steel surfaces. Extracted oxygen must be permanently delivered to the system and distributed in the entire core. Therefore, coolant chemistry control involves detailed knowledge on oxygen mass transport. Beside the different flow regimes a core might have stagnant areas at which oxygen delivery can only be realised by diffusion. The difference between oxygen transport in flow paths and in stagnant zones is one of the targets of such experiments. To investigate oxygen mass transport in flowing and stagnant conditions, a dedicated facility was designed based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD also was applied to define the position of oxygen sensors and ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry transducers for flow measurements. This contribution will present the test facility, design relevant CFD calculations and results of first tests performed. (authors)

  8. Review of available data on the release, transport and deposition of corrosion products in PWR, BWR and SGHWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, N.K.

    1976-03-01

    A survey has been carried out of data which are relevant to the theoretical and experimental aspects of corrosion product release, transport, activation and deposition and which were available from operational experience of water reactors and associated experiments. The data have been assessed in connection with commercial SGHWR systems with regard to construction, commissioning and operational procedures. A few areas of work where the existing evidence is inconclusive or incomplete are listed. (author)

  9. Development of a multi-species mass transport model for concrete with account to thermodynamic phase equilibriums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosokawa, Yoshifumi; Yamada, Kazuo; Johannesson, Björn

    2011-01-01

    different types of cements. For example, the physicochemical evaluation of steel corrosion initiation can be studied by calculating the molar ratio of chloride ion to hydroxide ion in the pore solution. The model can, further, for example, calculate changes of solid-phase composition caused......) theory alone, not involving chemical processes, have no real practical interest since the chemical action is very dominant for cement based materials. Coupled mass transport and chemical equilibrium models can be used to calculate the variation in pore solution and solid-phase composition when using...

  10. Thermodynamically coupled mass transport processes in a saturated clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Gradients of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition in saturated clays give rise to coupled transport processes (thermal and chemical osmosis, thermal diffusion, ultrafiltration) in addition to the direct processes (advection and diffusion). One-dimension transport of water and a solute in a saturated clay subjected to mild gradients of temperature and pressure was simulated numerically. When full coupling was accounted for, volume flux (specific discharge) was controlled by thermal osmosis and chemical osmosis. The two coupled fluxes were oppositely directed, producing a point of stagnation within the clay column. Solute flows were dominated by diffusion, chemical osmosis, and thermal osmosis. Chemical osmosis produced a significant flux of solute directed against the gradient of solute concentration; this effect reduced solute concentrations relative to the case without coupling. Predictions of mass transport in clays at nuclear waste repositories could be significantly in error if coupled transport processes are not accounted for. 14 refs., 8 figs

  11. Thermodynamically coupled mass transport processes in a saturated clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1984-11-01

    Gradients of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition in saturated clays give rise to coupled transport processes (thermal and chemical osmosis, thermal diffusion, ultrafiltration) in addition to the direct processes (advection and diffusion). One-dimensional transport of water and a solute in a saturated clay subjected to mild gradients of temperature and pressure was simulated numerically. When full coupling was accounted for, volume flux (specific discharge) was controlled by thermal osmosis and chemical osmosis. The two coupled fluxes were oppositely directed, producing a point of stagnation within the clay column. Solute flows were dominated by diffusion, chemical osmosis, and thermal osmosis. Chemical osmosis produced a significant flux of solute directed against the gradient of solute concentration; this effect reduced solute concentrations relative to the case without coupling. Predictions of mass transport in clays at nuclear waste repositories could be significantly in error if coupled transport processes are not accounted for. 14 references, 8 figures, 1 table

  12. Biodegradation and corrosion behavior of manganese oxidizer Bacillus cereus ACE4 in diesel transporting pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekar, A.; Ganesh Babu, T.; Karutha Pandian, S.; Maruthamuthu, S.; Palaniswamy, N.; Rajendran, A.

    2007-01-01

    The degradation problem of petroleum products arises since hydrocarbon acts as an excellent food source for a wide variety of microorganisms. Microbial activity leads to unacceptable level of turbidity, corrosion of pipeline and souring of stored product. The present study emphasizes the role of Bacillus cereus ACE4 on degradation of diesel and its influence on corrosion of API 5LX steel. A demonstrating bacterial strain ACE4 was isolated from corrosion products and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that it has more than 99% similarity with B. cereus. The biodegradation and corrosion studies revealed that B. cereus degraded the aliphatic protons and aromatic protons in diesel and is capable of oxidizing ferrous/manganese into oxides. This is the first report that discloses the involvement of manganese oxidizer B. cereus ACE4 on biodegradation of diesel and its influence on corrosion in a tropical country pipeline

  13. Optimal Filtering in Mass Transport Modeling From Satellite Gravimetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditmar, P.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Klees, R.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring natural mass transport in the Earth's system, which has marked a new era in Earth observation, is largely based on the data collected by the GRACE satellite mission. Unfortunately, this mission is not free from certain limitations, two of which are especially critical. Firstly, its sensitivity is strongly anisotropic: it senses the north-south component of the mass re-distribution gradient much better than the east-west component. Secondly, it suffers from a trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution: a high (e.g., daily) temporal resolution is only possible if the spatial resolution is sacrificed. To make things even worse, the GRACE satellites enter occasionally a phase when their orbit is characterized by a short repeat period, which makes it impossible to reach a high spatial resolution at all. A way to mitigate limitations of GRACE measurements is to design optimal data processing procedures, so that all available information is fully exploited when modeling mass transport. This implies, in particular, that an unconstrained model directly derived from satellite gravimetry data needs to be optimally filtered. In principle, this can be realized with a Wiener filter, which is built on the basis of covariance matrices of noise and signal. In practice, however, a compilation of both matrices (and, therefore, of the filter itself) is not a trivial task. To build the covariance matrix of noise in a mass transport model, it is necessary to start from a realistic model of noise in the level-1B data. Furthermore, a routine satellite gravimetry data processing includes, in particular, the subtraction of nuisance signals (for instance, associated with atmosphere and ocean), for which appropriate background models are used. Such models are not error-free, which has to be taken into account when the noise covariance matrix is constructed. In addition, both signal and noise covariance matrices depend on the type of mass transport processes under

  14. Selected Topics on Mass Transport in Gas-solid Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The present article is a short review containing examples of the role of mass transport in the solid state during gas-solid interactions. Examples are taken from the authors' research on the interaction of carbon and/or nitrogen with iron-based metals. Topics dealt with are diffusion-controlled d......The present article is a short review containing examples of the role of mass transport in the solid state during gas-solid interactions. Examples are taken from the authors' research on the interaction of carbon and/or nitrogen with iron-based metals. Topics dealt with are diffusion...... on the kinetics of phenomena in the solid state. Various experimental techniques were applied to investigate these phenomena; it is however beyond the scope of the present article to treat experimental conditions in detail. The interested reader is referred to the original work for in depth discussions...

  15. Mass transport in bedded salt and salt interbeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.; Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-08-01

    Salt is the proposed host rock for geologic repositories of nuclear waste in several nations because it is nearly dry and probably impermeable. Although experiments and experience at potential salt sites indicate that salt may contain brine, the low porosity, creep, and permeability of salt make it still a good choice for geologic isolation. In this paper we summarize several mass-transfer and transport analyses of salt repositories. The mathematical details are given in our technical reports

  16. Mass transport thermodynamics in nonisothermal molecular liquid mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, Semen N [Institute for Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Schimpf, M E [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, ID (United States)

    2009-10-31

    Mass transport in a nonisothermal binary molecular mixture is systematically discussed in terms of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, which for the first time allows a consistent and unambiguous description of the process. The thermodynamic and hydrodynamic approaches are compared, revealing that nonequilibrium thermodynamics and physicochemical hydrodynamics yield essentially the same results for molecular systems. The applicability limits for the proposed version of the thermodynamic approach are determined for large particles. (methodological notes)

  17. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Holt, Jason [Berkeley, CA; Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Park, Hyung Gyu [Oakland, CA

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  18. Photo-induced Mass Transport through Polymer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yuan; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2014-03-01

    Among adaptable materials, photo-responsive polymers are especially attractive as they allow for spatiotemporal stimuli and response. We have recently developed a macromolecular network capable of photo-induced mass transport of covalently bound species. The system comprises of crosslinked chains that form an elastic network and photosensitive fluorescent arms that become mobile upon irradiation. We form loosely crosslinked polymer networks by Michael-Addition between multifunctional thiols and small molecule containing acrylate end-groups. The arms are connected to the network by allyl sulfide, that undergoes addition-fragmentation chain transfer (AFCT) in the presence of free radicals, releasing diffusible fluorophore. The networks are loaded with photoinitiator to allow for spatial modulation of the AFCT reactions. FRAP experiments within bulk elastomers are conducted to establish correlations between the fluorophore's diffusion coefficient and experimental variables such as network architecture, temperature and UV intensity. Photo-induced mass transport between two contacted films is demonstrated, and release of fluorophore into a solvent is investigated. Spatial and temporal control of mass transport could benefit drug release, printing, and sensing applications.

  19. Contribution of the characterization of radioactive surfaces after sodium corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menken, G.; Holl, M.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1972 INTERATOM is performing sodium mass and activity transfer investigations in an SNR-corrosion mockup loop which allows to study the transport of activated corrosion products in the primary heat transfer system of a sodium cooled reactor. The loop simulates the temperature and flow conditions and the materials combination of the SNR 300. The mass transfer examinations were aimed at the determination of the following: the linear corrosion and deposition rates; the selective corrosion of the alloying elements; the transfer of activated corrosion products. The results of a number of corrosion runs will be used in the following contribution to characterize the contaminated and corroded surface layers of reactor components. The loop reached a total operation time of 12300 h while the cold trap temperature was changed between 105 deg. C and 165 deg. C in successive runs

  20. Application of secondary ion mass spectrometry to the study of a corrosion process: oxidation of uranium by water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, S.S.; Condon, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Corrosion of metals is an extremely important field with great economic and engineering implications at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. To effectively combat corrosion, one must understand the processes occurring. This paper shows the utility of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) data for elucidating the processes occurring in one particular corrosion process - the oxidation of uranium by water - and for validating a theoretical model. It had long been known that the oxidation of uranium by water is retarded by the presence of oxygen gas and the retardation has been assumed to occur by site blocking at the surface. However, when alternate isotopic exposures were made, followed by exposure to a mixture of 16 O 2 and 18 OH 2 , the rapid exchange of 16 O and 18 O occurred in the oxide layer, but the further oxidation by water in this and subsequent exposures was retarded for up to 21 hours. This shows graphically that OH 2 is not held up at the surface and that the retarding mechanism is effective at the oxide/metal interface rather than at the surface. The effectiveness of the O 2 to retard the further water oxidation was much reduced if no water-formed oxide layer were present. The effectiveness was also crystallite related. 12 refs., 5 figs

  1. Spatially and time-resolved element-specific in situ corrosion investigations with an online hyphenated microcapillary flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry set-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homazava, N.; Ulrich, A.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique for in situ spatial, time-resolved element-specific investigations of corrosion processes is developed. The technique is based on an online hyphenation of a specially designed microflow-capillary set-up to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) using flow injection sample introduction. Detailed aspects of the method development, optimization of the sample microflow introduction and flow injection characteristics for the localized corrosion analysis are described. Moreover, specific challenges of the ICP-MS analysis as applied to the analysis of corrosion sample probes, e.g. high matrix load and limited sample volume, are discussed. The efficiency of the developed technique is proved by corrosion susceptibility analysis of a commercial Al alloy. Results of the corrosion experiments of the aluminum alloy AA 6111 are presented to demonstrate the influence of various factors such as exposure time and pH value of the corrosive medium on the element-specific dissolution rates of the alloy. This novel technique provides new aspects in corrosion science and sheds new light on corrosion mechanisms

  2. Kinematics of Mass Transport Deposits revealed by magnetic fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, R.; Levi, T.; Alsop, G. I.; Marco, S.

    2017-08-01

    The internal deformation and movement directions of Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) are key factors in understanding the kinematics and dynamics of their emplacement. Although these are relatively easy to recover from well-bedded sediments, they are more difficult to deduce from massive beds without visible strain markers. In order to test the applicability of using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to determine MTD movement, we compare AMS fabrics, with structural measurements of visible kinematic indicators. Our case study involves the structural analysis of slumped lake sediments extensively exposed in MTDs within the Dead Sea Basin. Structural analyses of MTDs outcropping for >100 km reveal radial transport directions toward the basin depocenter. We show that the AMS fabrics display the same transport directions as inferred from structural analyses. Based on this similarity, we outline a robust procedure to obtain the transport direction of slumped MTDs from AMS fabrics. Variations in the magnetic fabrics and anisotropies in fold-thrust systems within the slumps match the various structural domains. We therefore suggest that magnetic fabrics and anisotropy variations in drill cores may reflect internal deformation within the slumps rather than different slumps. Obtaining magnetic fabrics from MTDs provides a viable way to infer the transport directions and internal deformation of MTDs and reconstruct the basin depocenter in ancient settings. The present results also have implications beyond the kinematics of MTDs, as their geometry resembles fold-thrust systems in other geological settings, scales, and tectonic environments.

  3. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J.; Norde, Willem; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate bacterium-substratum interactions, understanding of bacterial mass transport is necessary. Comparisons of experimentally observed initial deposition rates with mass transport rates in parallel-plate-flow-chambers (PPFC) predicted by convective-diffusion yielded deposition

  4. Transport Visualization for Studying Mass Transfer and Solute Transport in Permeable Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy Haggerty

    2004-01-01

    Understanding and predicting mass transfer coupled with solute transport in permeable media is central to several energy-related programs at the US Department of Energy (e.g., CO 2 sequestration, nuclear waste disposal, hydrocarbon extraction, and groundwater remediation). Mass transfer is the set of processes that control movement of a chemical between mobile (advection-dominated) domains and immobile (diffusion- or sorption-dominated) domains within a permeable medium. Consequences of mass transfer on solute transport are numerous and may include (1) increased sequestration time within geologic formations; (2) reduction in average solute transport velocity by as much as several orders of magnitude; (3) long ''tails'' in concentration histories during removal of a solute from a permeable medium; (4) poor predictions of solute behavior over long time scales; and (5) changes in reaction rates due to mass transfer influences on pore-scale mixing of solutes. Our work produced four principle contributions: (1) the first comprehensive visualization of solute transport and mass transfer in heterogeneous porous media; (2) the beginnings of a theoretical framework that encompasses both macrodispersion and mass transfer within a single set of equations; (3) experimental and analytical tools necessary for understanding mixing and aqueous reaction in heterogeneous, granular porous media; (4) a clear experimental demonstration that reactive transport is often not accurately described by a simple coupling of the convection-dispersion equation with chemical reaction equations. The work shows that solute transport in heterogeneous media can be divided into 3 regimes--macrodispersion, advective mass transfer, and diffusive mass transfer--and that these regimes can be predicted quantitatively in binary media. We successfully predicted mass transfer in each of these regimes and verified the prediction by completing quantitative visualization experiments in each of the regimes, the

  5. Multi-physics and multi-scale deterioration modelling of reinforced concrete part I: Coupling transport and corrosion at the material scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    is fully coupled, i.e. information, such as temperature and moisture distribution, phase assemblage, corrosion current density, damage state of concrete cover, etc., are continuously exchanged between the models. Although not explicitly outlined in this paper, such an analysis may be further integrated...... models are sketched to describe (i) transport of heat and matter in porous media as well as phase assemblage in hardened Portland cement, (ii) corrosion of reinforcement, and (iii) material performance including corrosion-induced damages on the meso and macro scale. The presented modelling framework...

  6. Mass transport and chloride ion complexes in occluded cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuru, T.; Hashimoto, K.; Nishikata, A.; Haruyama, S.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in the transport and the concentration of ions in a model occluded cell are traced during galvanostatic anodic polarization of a mild steel and a stainless steel. Apparent transport numbers of anions and cations, which were estimated from chemical analysis of solution, were different from those calculated from known mobility data. At the initial stage of the polarization, the transport number of chloride ion was almost unity, and then decreased gradually. For the mild steel, the concentration of total chloride ion accumulated in the occluded compartment increased with the anodic charge passed, and the amount of chloride ion complexed with cations also increased. The chloride complex was estimated as FeCl + . For SUS304 stainless steel, the total chloride ion increased, however, the free chloride ion, which responded to an Ag/AgCl electrode remained approximately 2 mol/dm 3 . Therefore, most of the chloride ions transferred into the occluded cell formed complex ions, such as CrCl n 3-n . The number of chloride ion coordinated to ferrous and chromic ions was estimated from the data fo mass transport for the case of the mild steel and the stainless steel. (author) 9 refs., 14 figs

  7. Cellular automaton model of coupled mass transport and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karapiperis, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mass transport, coupled with chemical reactions, is modelled as a cellular automaton in which solute molecules perform a random walk on a lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔c and a + b →c, where we observe interesting macroscopic effects resulting from microscopic fluctuations and spatial correlations between molecules. We also simulate autocatalytic reaction schemes displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. Finally, we propose and discuss the limitations of a simple model for mineral-solute interaction. (author) 5 figs., 20 refs

  8. Mass and charge transport in micro and nanofluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Okkels, Fridolin

    2007-01-01

    and charge transport coefficients that satisfy Onsager relations. In the limit of nonoverlapping Debye layers the transport coefficients are simply expressed in terms of parameters of the electrolyte as well as the hydraulic radiusR ¼ 2A=P with Aand P being the cross-sectional area and perimeter......, respectively. In particular, we consider the limits of thin nonoverlapping as well as strongly overlapping Debye layers, respectively, and calculate the corrections to the hydraulic resistance due to electrohydrodynamic interactions.......We consider laminar flow of incompressible electrolytes in long, straight channels driven by pressure and electroosmosis. We use aHilbert space eigenfunction expansion to address the general problem of an arbitrary cross section and obtain general results in linear-response theory for the mass...

  9. Mass Transport: Circulatory System with Emphasis on Nonendothermic Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Dane A; Burggren, Warren W; Reiber, Carl L; Altimiras, Jordi; Rodnick, Kenneth J

    2016-12-06

    Mass transport can be generally defined as movement of material matter. The circulatory system then is a biological example given its role in the movement in transporting gases, nutrients, wastes, and chemical signals. Comparative physiology has a long history of providing new insights and advancing our understanding of circulatory mass transport across a wide array of circulatory systems. Here we focus on circulatory function of nonmodel species. Invertebrates possess diverse convection systems; that at the most complex generate pressures and perform at a level comparable to vertebrates. Many invertebrates actively modulate cardiovascular function using neuronal, neurohormonal, and skeletal muscle activity. In vertebrates, our understanding of cardiac morphology, cardiomyocyte function, and contractile protein regulation by Ca2+ highlights a high degree of conservation, but differences between species exist and are coupled to variable environments and body temperatures. Key regulators of vertebrate cardiac function and systemic blood pressure include the autonomic nervous system, hormones, and ventricular filling. Further chemical factors regulating cardiovascular function include adenosine, natriuretic peptides, arginine vasotocin, endothelin 1, bradykinin, histamine, nitric oxide, and hydrogen sulfide, to name but a few. Diverse vascular morphologies and the regulation of blood flow in the coronary and cerebral circulations are also apparent in nonmammalian species. Dynamic adjustments of cardiovascular function are associated with exercise on land, flying at high altitude, prolonged dives by marine mammals, and unique morphology, such as the giraffe. Future studies should address limits of gas exchange and convective transport, the evolution of high arterial pressure across diverse taxa, and the importance of the cardiovascular system adaptations to extreme environments. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:17-66, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John

  10. Coupling of Nuclear Waste Form Corrosion and Radionuclide Transports in Presence of Relevant Repository Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, Nathalie A.; Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Assessments of waste form and disposal options start with the degradation of the waste forms and consequent mobilization of radionuclides. Long-term static tests, single-pass flow-through tests, and the pressurized unsaturated flow test are often employed to study the durability of potential waste forms and to help create models that predict their durability throughout the lifespan of the disposal site. These tests involve the corrosion of the material in the presence of various leachants, with different experimental designs yielding desired information about the behavior of the material. Though these tests have proved instrumental in elucidating various mechanisms responsible for material corrosion, the chemical environment to which the material is subject is often not representative of a potential radioactive waste repository where factors such as pH and leachant composition will be controlled by the near-field environment. Near-field materials include, but are not limited to, the original engineered barriers, their resulting corrosion products, backfill materials, and the natural host rock. For an accurate performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository, realistic waste corrosion experimental data ought to be modeled to allow for a better understanding of waste form corrosion mechanisms and the effect of immediate geochemical environment on these mechanisms. Additionally, the migration of radionuclides in the resulting chemical environment during and after waste form corrosion must be quantified and mechanisms responsible for migrations understood. The goal of this research was to understand the mechanisms responsible for waste form corrosion in the presence of relevant repository sediments to allow for accurate radionuclide migration quantifications. The rationale for this work is that a better understanding of waste form corrosion in relevant systems will enable increased reliance on waste form performance in repository environments and potentially

  11. Coupling of Nuclear Waste Form Corrosion and Radionuclide Transports in Presence of Relevant Repository Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Nathalie A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Assessments of waste form and disposal options start with the degradation of the waste forms and consequent mobilization of radionuclides. Long-term static tests, single-pass flow-through tests, and the pressurized unsaturated flow test are often employed to study the durability of potential waste forms and to help create models that predict their durability throughout the lifespan of the disposal site. These tests involve the corrosion of the material in the presence of various leachants, with different experimental designs yielding desired information about the behavior of the material. Though these tests have proved instrumental in elucidating various mechanisms responsible for material corrosion, the chemical environment to which the material is subject is often not representative of a potential radioactive waste repository where factors such as pH and leachant composition will be controlled by the near-field environment. Near-field materials include, but are not limited to, the original engineered barriers, their resulting corrosion products, backfill materials, and the natural host rock. For an accurate performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository, realistic waste corrosion experimental data ought to be modeled to allow for a better understanding of waste form corrosion mechanisms and the effect of immediate geochemical environment on these mechanisms. Additionally, the migration of radionuclides in the resulting chemical environment during and after waste form corrosion must be quantified and mechanisms responsible for migrations understood. The goal of this research was to understand the mechanisms responsible for waste form corrosion in the presence of relevant repository sediments to allow for accurate radionuclide migration quantifications. The rationale for this work is that a better understanding of waste form corrosion in relevant systems will enable increased reliance on waste form performance in repository environments and potentially

  12. Study of the formation and transport of corrosion products in PWR primary circuit simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Camp, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The formation, migration and deposition of corrosion products in PWR primary circuits are studied in out-of-reactor loops. The aim of these studies is to limit the build-up of the radiation fields impinging on out-of-flux walls and to reduce the danger of rapid corrosion of fuel cans, taking into account the tougher conditions imposed on current trends in the operation of such industrial plants. Four simulator loops and their respective possibilities and research methods are described. (author)

  13. CORROSION RATE OF STEELS DX51D AND S220GD IN DIFFERENT CORROSION ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Crina CIUBOTARIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion in the marine environment is an important issue because the costs causes by marine corrosion increased year upon year. It is necessary a correctly approach to materials selection, protection and corrosion control to reduce this burden of wasted materials, wasted energy and wasted money. Many different types of corrosion attack can be observed to structures, ships and other equipment used in sea water service. Shipping containers are exposed to various corrosive mediums like as airborne salt, industrial pollutants, rain and saltwater. Transport damage during loading onto and unloading off trucks, train beds and ships breaches the paint coating which further contributes to corrosion. The result is shortened container life and high costs for container repair or replacement. The paper intends to evaluate, by gravimetric method, the corrosion rate and corrosion penetration rate of two types of carbon steel DX51D and S220GD. Carbon steel DX51D and hot-dip galvanized steel S220GD are used in marine and industrial applications for buildings cargo vessels, container ships and oil tankers. For testing it was used different corrosive environments: 5% NaOH solution; 5% HCL solution and 0.5M NaCl solution. The samples were immersed in 400mL of testing solution for exposure period of 28 days. Periodically at 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days and 28 days was measured de mass loss and evaluate the corrosion rate and corrosion stability coefficient. The steel DX51D was stable in 5% NaOH solution for 28 days, the values of corrosion stability coefficient was 7 after 3 days and 6 after 28 days of immersion in corrosive medium. In 5% HCL solution steels DX51D and S220GD was completely corroded in 21 days with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 9 for 7 days and 8 for 21 days of immersion in corrosive solution. It was observed a good resistance for 3 days in 0.5M NaCl solution with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 5, but after that

  14. Benchmarking of electrolyte mass transport in next generation lithium batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Lindberg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Beyond conductivity and viscosity, little is often known about the mass transport properties of next generation lithium battery electrolytes, thus, making performance estimation uncertain when concentration gradients are present, as conductivity only describes performance in the absence of these gradients. This study experimentally measured the diffusion resistivity, originating from voltage loss due to a concentration gradient, together with the ohmic resistivity, obtained from ionic conductivity measurements, hence, evaluating electrolytes both with and without the presence of concentration gradients. Under galvanostatic conditions, the concentration gradients, of all electrolytes examined, developed quickly and the diffusion resistivity rapidly dominated the ohmic resistivity. The electrolytes investigated consisted of lithium salt in: room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL, RTIL mixed organic carbonates, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, and a conventional Li-ion battery electrolyte. At steady state the RTIL electrolytes displayed a diffusion resistivity ~ 20 times greater than the ohmic resistivity. The DMSO-based electrolyte showed mass transport properties similar to the conventional Li-ion battery electrolyte. In conclusion, the results presented in this study show that the diffusion polarization must be considered in applications where high energy and power density are desired.

  15. Measurements of local mass transfer coefficient of Flow Accelerated Corrosion at feeder outlet pipes in CANDU using Plaster of Paris method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyuk Kwon; Dong Un Seo; Goon-Cherl Park

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) is a corrosion mechanism that results in wall thinning in piping systems and components. FAC on carbon steels in pure water has occurred in a number of industry and power plant. A pipe wall thinning due to the FAC at nuclear power plant is just reported in confined to carbon steel pipe on the secondary system which does not equip a radioactive component. Recently, at Canadian Deuterium Uranium type reactor, it is reported that the feeder lines suffer the wall thinning on the primary system to equip 380 feeder pipes. Differently from the fast FAC rate of the secondary system on PWR, FAC rate of feeder pipes on CANDU is not more than the 0.2 mm/year. Although the FAC rate of feeder pipe is relatively slow, the narrow thickness margin of 2.6089 mm is endangered sufficiently by only the slow FAC rate. The FAC is governed by the mass transfer coefficient which is determined by the flow field. To well predict the FAC rate, mass transfer coefficient should be well measured or calculated. New measurement method of mass transfer coefficient is developed to obtain the coefficient for the complex shape like feeder pipe. The method evaluated the naphthalene sublimation method to apply it under the water flow. The naphthalene sublimation method can be used to study mass and heat transfer with confidence for a variety of applications, but with certain restrictions. At present, Plaster of paris method can modified the sublimation method to overcome the restrictions. This method is particularly useful in complex flows on geometries and for flows with large gradients in wall transport rate. The test specimen can be easily prepared by several methods, including dipping, machining, spraying, and casting. The local transfer coefficients can be determined with high accuracy and in detail by automated measurement systems that eliminate most human errors during the measurement process. To evaluate the method, the

  16. Dusty air masses transport between Amazon Basin and Caribbean Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euphrasie-Clotilde, Lovely; Molinie, Jack; Prospero, Joseph; Feuillard, Tony; Brute, Francenor; Jeannot, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Depend on the month, African desert dust affect different parts of the North Atlantic Ocean. From December to April, Saharan dust outbreaks are often reported over the amazon basin and from May to November over the Caribbean islands and the southern regions of USA. This annual oscillation of Saharan dust presence, related to the ITCZ position, is perturbed some time, during March. Indeed, over Guadeloupe, the air quality network observed between 2007 and 2012 several dust events during March. In this paper, using HISPLIT back trajectories, we analyzed air masses trajectories for March dust events observed in Guadeloupe, from 2007 to 2012.We observed that the high pressure positions over the Atlantic Ocean allow the transport of dusty air masses from southern region of West Africa to the Caribbean Sea with a path crossing close to coastal region of French Guyana. Complementary investigations including the relationship between PM10 concentrations recorded in two sites Pointe-a-Pitre in the Caribbean, and Cayenne in French Guyana, have been done. Moreover we focus on the mean delay observed between the times arrival. All the results show a link between pathway of dusty air masses present over amazon basin and over the Caribbean region during several event of March. The next step will be the comparison of mineral dust composition for this particular month.

  17. Corrosion behaviour of reinforcements in a carbonaceous concrete: influence of the chemistry of the interstitial solution and of a transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, B.

    2005-10-01

    The phenomenon of steel reinforcements corrosion in a carbonaceous concrete is a many-sided process, little understood and of a great economical importance. The aim of this work is to identify, in condition of concrete carbonation, the corrosion mechanisms of reinforcements in order to anticipate the long term damage of the buildings. An analytical and experimental study has been carried out and has revealed two hypotheses. These ones consist to characterize the control of the corrosion velocity, either by the anodic reaction or by addition of an oxidant. The corrosion experiments in solution which represents the interstitial solution of a carbonaceous cement paste show that the evolution of the metal/medium interface is very sensitive to the species introduced in the medium during the carbonation process. The change of the ionic strength and of the sulfate and alkali metals concentrations are the main factors influencing the localization of the reactional areas, the nature of the phases formed at the interface as well as the corrosion velocities and their change with time. The evolution of the water saturation degree of the coating is the preponderant factor on the corrosion velocity. The analytical calculations and the experimental results show that for fixed hydrous conditions, the corrosion velocity in stationary conditions is negligible. The taking into account of transient conditions of transport as well as humidification and drying cycles is required for the long term anticipation of the damage of reinforced concrete buildings. (O.M.)

  18. Irradiation-enhanced and-induced mass transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation can be used to enhance diffusion, that is, to increase the rate at which equilibrium is attained, as well as to induce nonequilibrium changes. The main factors influencing whether irradiation will drive a material toward or away from equilibrium are the initial specimen microstructure and geometry, irradiation temperature, and primary recoil spectrum. This paper summarizes known effects of irradiation temperature and primary recoil spectrum on mass transport during irradiation. In comparison to either electron or heavy-ion irradiation, it is concluded that relatively low-energy, light-ion bombardment at intermediate temperatures offers the greatest potential to enhance the rate at which equilibrium is attained. The greatest departures from equilibrium can be expected from irradiation with similar particles at very low temperatures

  19. Mass transport of soluble species through backfill into surrounding rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chul Hyung; Park, Hun Hwee

    1992-01-01

    Some soluble species may not be solubility-limited or congruent-released with the matrix species. For example, during the operation of the nuclear reactor, the fission products can be accumulated in the fuel-cladding gap, void, and grain boundaries of the fuel rods. In the waste package for spent-fuel placed in a geologic repository, the high solubility species of these fission products accumulated in the 'gap', e.g. cesium or iodine are expected to dissolve rapidly when ground water penetrates fuel rods. The time and space dependent mass transport for high solubility nuclides in the gap is analyzed, and its numerical illustrations are demonstrated. The approximate solution that is valid for all times is developed, and validated by comparison with an asymptotic solution and the solution obtained by the numerical inversion of Laplace transform covering the entire time span. (Author)

  20. Chemistry and mass transport of iodine in containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.; Kress, T.S.; Shockley, W.E.; Daish, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    TRENDS is a computer code for modeling behavior of iodine in containment. It tracks both chemical and physical changes and features such as calculation of radiation dose rates in water pools , radiolysis effects, hydrolysis, and deposition/revaporization on aerosols and structural surfaces. Every attempt has been made to account for all significant processes. Reaction rate constants for iodine hydrolysis and radiolysis were obtained by a variable algorithm that gives values closely modeling experimental data. TRENDS output provides the distribution of iodine in containment and release from containment as a function of time during a severe accident sequence. Initial calculations with TRENDS have shown that the amount of volatile iodine released from containment is sensitive to the value of the liquid-gas (evaporation) mass transport coefficient for I 2 . 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  1. A Coupled Chemical and Mass Transport Model for Concrete Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2012-01-01

    -Raphson iteration scheme arising from the non-linearity. The overall model is a transient problem, solved using a single parameter formulation. The sorption hysteresis and chemical equilibrium is included as source or sink terms. The advantages with this formulation is that each node in the discrete system has...... their individual sorption hysteresis isotherm which is of great importance when describing non fully water saturated system e.g. caused by time depended boundary conditions. Chemical equilibrium is also established in each node of the discrete system, where the rate of chemical degradation is determined.......g. charge balance, from the mass transport calculation could cause the above mentioned numerical problems. Two different test cases are studied, the sorption hysteresis in different depth of the sample, caused by time depended boundary condition and the chemical degradation of the solid matrix in a ten year...

  2. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  3. Materials with engineered mesoporosity for programmed mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Dara V.

    Transport in nanostructured materials is of great interest for scientists in various fields, including molecular sequestration, catalysis, artificial photosynthesis and energy storage. This thesis will present work on the transport of molecular and ionic species in mesoporous materials (materials with pore sizes between 2 and 50 nm). Initially, discussion will focus on the synthesis of mesoporous ZnS nanorattles and the size selected mass transport of small molecules through the mesopores. Discussion will then shift of exploration of cation exchange and electroless plating of metals to alter the mesoporous hollow sphere (MHS) materials and properties. The focus of discussion will then shift to the transport of ions into and out of a hierarchically structured gold electrode. Finally, a model gamma-bactiophage was developed to study the electromigration of charged molecules into and out of a confined geometry. A catalytically active biomolecular species was encapsulated within the central cavity of ZnS MHS. Both the activity of the encapsulated enzyme and the size-selective transport through the wall of the MHS were verified through the use of a common fluorogen, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium azide. Additionally, the protection of the enzyme was shown through size-selected blocking of a protease. The mesoporous hollow sphere system introduces size-selectivity to catalyzed chemical reactions; future work may include variations in pore sizes, and pore wall chemical functionalization. The pore size in ZnS mesoporous hollow spheres is controlled between 2.5 and 4.1 nm through swelling of the lyotropic liquid crystal template. The incorporation of a swelling agent is shown to linearly vary the hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase, which templates the mesopores, while allowing the high fidelity synthesis of mesoporous hollow spheres. Fluorescnently labeled ssDNA was utilized as a probe to explore the change in mesopore permeability afforded by the swollen template

  4. Mass and charge transport in IPMC actuators with fractal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Longfei; Wu, Yucheng; Zhu, Zicai; Li, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) actuators have been attracting a growing interest in extensive applications, which consequently raises the demands on the accuracy of its theoretical modeling. For the last few years, rough landscape of the interface between the electrode and the ionic membrane of IPMC has been well-documented as one of the key elements to ensure a satisfied performance. However, in most of the available work, the interface morphology of IPMC was simplified with structural idealization, which lead to perplexity in the physical interpretation on its interface mechanism. In this paper, the quasi-random rough interface of IPMC was described with fractal dimension and scaling parameters. And the electro-chemical field was modeled by Poisson equation and a properly simplified Nernst-Planck equation set. Then, by simulation with Finite Element Method, a comprehensive analysis on he inner mass and charge transportation in IPMC actuators with different fractal interfaces was provided, which may be further adopted to instruct the performance-oriented interface design for ionic electro-active actuators. The results also verified that rough interface can impact the electrical and mechanical response of IPMC, not only from the respect of the real surface increase, but also from mass distribution difference caused by the complexity of the micro profile.

  5. Monoporous micropillar wick structures, I-Mass transport characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, Saitej; Horner, David; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study concerning the relation between the geometry of micropillar array wicks and their thermohydraulic performance. In this paper, a parametric study of pillar array geometries is conducted, and the efficacies of existing capillary pressure and permeability models in predicting the experimental results are examined. A new method is utilized to independently measure the permeability and capillary pressure of a wick structure. A permeability model based on creeping flow past infinitely long cylinders, corrected to account for the effect of meniscus curvature on mass flow rate through pillar arrays with a limited height, closely predicts the experimental data. Also, a model that relates the capillary pressure to the wick geometry using a thermodynamic approach better predicts the experimental results. The approach adopted by this model involves using a surface energy minimization algorithm to determine the shape of the meniscus within the pillars. These permeability and capillary pressure models were coupled with Darcy's law for fluid flow to obtain an overall expression for flow through micropillar arrays. The overall model is utilized in the second part of this study to determine optimized micropillar wick geometries and the theoretical limits of their performance. - Highlights: • New method for independent measurement of capillary pressure and permeability. • Validated various capillary pressure and permeability models from literature. • Overall model to characterize mass transport capacity of micropillar arrays

  6. Corrosion and mass transfer of ferrous alloys in Pb-17 at. % Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Long term exposures of type 316 stainless and Fe--12Cr--1MoVW steels to thermally convective Pb-17 at. % Li demonstrated the aggressiveness of this environment, the greater corrosion susceptibility of the austenitic stainless steel, the constancy of the Fe--12Cr surface composition, and the applicability of a surface destabilization model. Cold work affected the penetration of type 316 stainless steel. Deposition in the type 316 stainless steel system appeared to be influenced by the effectiveness of nucleation and/or adhesion of deposits. In the Fe--12Cr--1MoVW steel loop, solubility-driven reactions appeared to be the most important process in deposition. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Dynamic characterization of external and internal mass transport in heterotrophic biofilms from microsensors measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimerà, Xavier; Dorado, Antonio David; Bonsfills, Anna; Gabriel, Gemma; Gabriel, David; Gamisans, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of mass transport mechanisms in biofilm-based technologies such as biofilters is essential to improve bioreactors performance by preventing mass transport limitation. External and internal mass transport in biofilms was characterized in heterotrophic biofilms grown on a flat plate bioreactor. Mass transport resistance through the liquid-biofilm interphase and diffusion within biofilms were quantified by in situ measurements using microsensors with a high spatial resolution (mass transport coefficients. The sensitivity of external and internal mass transport resistances to flow conditions within the range of typical fluid velocities over biofilms (Reynolds numbers between 0.5 and 7) was assessed. Estimated external mass transfer coefficients at different liquid phase flow velocities showed discrepancies with studies considering laminar conditions in the diffusive boundary layer near the liquid-biofilm interphase. The correlation of effective diffusivity with flow velocities showed that the heterogeneous structure of biofilms defines the transport mechanisms inside biofilms. Internal mass transport was driven by diffusion through cell clusters and aggregates at Re below 2.8. Conversely, mass transport was driven by advection within pores, voids and water channels at Re above 5.6. Between both flow velocities, mass transport occurred by a combination of advection and diffusion. Effective diffusivities estimated at different biofilm densities showed a linear increase of mass transport resistance due to a porosity decrease up to biofilm densities of 50 g VSS·L(-1). Mass transport was strongly limited at higher biofilm densities. Internal mass transport results were used to propose an empirical correlation to assess the effective diffusivity within biofilms considering the influence of hydrodynamics and biofilm density. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary review of mass transfer and flow visualization studies and techniques relevant to the study of erosion-corrosion of reactor piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Halle, H.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides some background information on the failed piping at the Surry-2 reactor; a summary of pertinent literature on mass transfer in related geometries; and a description of methodologies for visualization and erosion rate measurements in laboratory model studies that can provide greater insight into the role of flow geometry in erosion-corrosion. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  9. Preliminary review of mass transfer and flow visualization studies and techniques relevant to the study of erosion-corrosion of reactor piping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Halle, H.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides some background information on the failed piping at the Surry-2 reactor; a summary of pertinent literature on mass transfer in related geometries; and a description of methodologies for visualization and erosion rate measurements in laboratory model studies that can provide greater insight into the role of flow geometry in erosion-corrosion. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Cerebrospinal and interstitial fluid transport via the glymphatic pathway modeled by optimal mass transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-05-15

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4min over ∼3h in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Wet-gas transport in the Mediterranean Sea. Selection of a combined kinetic hydrate/corrosion inhibitor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettlitzer, M. [RWE Dea AG, Wietze (Germany); Rozengard, N.; Koeckritz, V. [Technical Univ. Freiberg (Germany); Malt, E. [RWE Dea AG (Egypt)

    2007-09-13

    Raw gas will be collected on a platform in the centre of the field. Due to volume and weight constraints, condensing fluids will not be separated from the gas on the platform so that the raw gas will be transported in three-phase mode (gas, water, and condensate) via a 33 km long pipeline to a gas treatment plant. Under the calculated pipeline pressure of about 100 barg, hydrate formation is - according to the outcome of thermodynamic simulations - to be expected at temperatures of 19 C and below while the pipeline may cool down to about 15 C in winter conditions. Due to logistical, environmental and economic reasons, RWE Dea decided to inhibit hydrate formation with kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHI). As the gas also contains carbon dioxide, certain corrosivity was forecasted and addition of a corrosion inhibitor turned out to be necessary. Laboratory tests were carried out to confirm the feasibility of the concept and to define the required dosage of KHI. Service companies were contacted and several kinetic hydrate and corrosion inhibitors were screened. Experiments with the different chemicals were performed at the University of Freiberg in a high-pressure cell at the pipeline pressure of 100 barg. Hydrate formation was detected by continuous pressure registration during temperature changes and by observation through a glass window. In order to preselect the chemicals, first tests were performed with pure methane. These tests also served for calibration of the equipment with literature data and especially as an indication for the minimum chemical concentration required. A second test series was performed with synthetic gas in a composition close to that of the field gas under consideration in order to verify the results obtained with methane. Finally, the optimum kinetic hydrate inhibitor was identified as well as the required dosage concentration. Compatibility of KHI and corrosion inhibitor was experimentally proven. A further set of kinetic inhibitor tests with

  12. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  13. The latent fingerprint in mass transport of polycrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2016-02-01

    Herein, a systematic investigation was carried out to reach a rational understanding and to provide information concerning the possible causes for a significant influence of pressure variation in the underlying processes of mass transport in polycrystalline materials. The authors focused their research in solid-state diffusion, a part of the subject "Mass Transport in Solids". Theories on diffusion are the subject by itself which exists as a latent fingerprint in every text of higher learning in interdisciplinary science. In this research, authors prepared sandwich samples of titanium alloy and stainless steel using nickel as an intermediate metal. The samples were processed at three different levels of bonding pressure (3, 4 and 5 MPa) while bonding temperature and bonding time was maintained at 750 °C and 1 h, respectively, throughout the experiments. It was observed that the net flux of atomic diffusion of nickel atoms into Ti-alloy at TiA/Ni interface increased by ~63 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 3 to 4 MPa, but decreased by ~40 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 4 to 5 MPa. At the same time, the net flux of atomic diffusion of nickel atoms into stainless steel at Ni/SS interface increased by ~19 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 3 to 4 MPa, but increased by ~17 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 4 to 5 MPa. Here authors showed that the pressure variations have different effects at the TiA/Ni interface and Ni/SS interface, and tried to explain the explicit mechanisms operating behind them. In general for sandwich samples processed irrespective of bonding pressure chosen, the net flux of Ni-atoms diffused into SS is greater than that of the net flux of Ni-atoms diffused in Ti-alloy matrix by four orders of magnitude. The calculated diffusivity of Ni-atoms into Ti-alloy reaches its highest value of ~5.083 × 10-19 m2/s for the sandwich sample processed using 4-MPa bonding-pressure, whereas the diffusivity of Ni

  14. Multi-dimensional transport modelling of corrosive agents through a bentonite buffer in a Canadian deep geological repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Scott; McKelvie, Jennifer; Sleep, Brent; Krol, Magdalena

    2017-12-01

    The use of a deep geological repository (DGR) for the long-term disposal of used nuclear fuel is an approach currently being investigated by several agencies worldwide, including Canada's Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO). Within the DGR, used nuclear fuel will be placed in copper-coated steel containers and surrounded by a bentonite clay buffer. While copper is generally thermodynamically stable, corrosion can occur due to the presence of sulphide under anaerobic conditions. As such, understanding transport of sulphide through the engineered barrier system to the used fuel container is an important consideration in DGR design. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) model of sulphide transport in a DGR was developed. The numerical model is implemented using COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercial finite element software package. Previous sulphide transport models of the NWMO repository used a simplified one-dimensional system. This work illustrates the importance of 3D modelling to capture non-uniform effects, as results showed locations of maximum sulphide flux are 1.7 times higher than the average flux to the used fuel container. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Multiscale modeling of fluid flow and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Bijeljic, B.; Lin, Q.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, there are some reports on a simulation of fluid flow in pore spaces of rocks using Navier-Stokes equations. These studies mostly adopt a X-ray CT to create 3-D numerical grids of the pores in micro-scale. However, results may be of low accuracy when the rock has a large pore size distribution, because pores, whose size is smaller than resolution of the X-ray CT may be neglected. We recently found out by tracer tests in a laboratory using a brine saturated Ryukyu limestone and inject fresh water that a decrease of chloride concentration took longer time. This phenomenon can be explained due to weak connectivity of the porous networks. Therefore, it is important to simulate entire pore spaces even those of very small sizes in which diffusion is dominant. We have developed a new methodology for multi-level modeling for pore scale fluid flow in porous media. The approach is to combine pore-scale analysis with Darcy-flow analysis using two types of X-ray CT images in different resolutions. Results of the numerical simulations showed a close match with the experimental results. The proposed methodology is an enhancement for analyzing mass transport and flow phenomena in rocks with complicated pore structure.

  16. Analysis of diffusive mass transport in a cracked buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, N.C.; Garisto, F.

    1989-11-01

    In the disposal vault design for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, cylindrical containers of used nuclear fuel would be placed in vertical boreholes in rock and surrounded with a bentonite-based buffer material. The buffer is expected to absorb and/or retard radionuclides leaching from the fuel after the containers fail. There is some evidence, however, that the buffer may be susceptible to cracking. In this report we investigate numerically the consequences of cracking on uranium diffusion through the buffer. The derivation of the mass-transport equations and the numerical solution method are presented for the solubility-limited diffusion of uranium in a cracked buffer system for both swept-away and semi-impermeable boundary conditions at the rock-buffer interface. The results indicate that for swept-away boundary conditions the total uranium flux through the cracked buffer system is, as expected, greater than through the uncracked buffer. The effect of the cracks is strongly dependent on the ratio D/D eff , where D and D eff are the pore-water and the effective buffer diffusion coefficient, respectively. However, although a decrease in D eff enhances the effect of cracks on the total cumulative flux (relative to the uncracked buffer), it also decreases the total cumulative flux through the cracked buffer system (relative to a cracked buffer with a larger D eff value). Finally, for semi-impermeable boundary conditions, the effect of cracks on the total radionuclide flux is relatively small

  17. Transport phenomena of macro and micro flows behind orifice and flow accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Ohara, Taku; Ikohagi, Toshiaki

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes experiment and numerical simulations for macro and micro flows behind an orifice model in a square pipe, which are carried from the viewpoint of flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). The measurements of velocity field behind the orifice model were carried out using particle image velocimetry, and the variations of velocity field with respect to the accuracy of the orifice position were studied. It is found that the reattachment behavior of the flow is highly influenced by the orifice position, which is a critical problem for predicting the pipe thinning phenomena by FAC. The DNS simulation was also conducted for calculating the macro flow behind the orifice. The result suggests that the DNS simulation is applicable to the prediction of pipe thinning macro flow for highly aged nuclear plant. The micro flow simulation can predict the pipe thinning phenomena near the wall. (author)

  18. Transport of radioactive corrosion products in primary system of sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor 'MONJU'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Hasegawa, Masanori; Maegawa, Yoshiharu; Miyahara, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive corrosion products (CP) are primary cause of personal radiation exposure during maintenance work at FBR plants with no breached fuel. The PSYCHE code has been developed based on the Solution-Precipitation model for analysis of CP transfer behavior. We predicted and analyzed the CP solution and precipitation behavior of MONJU to evaluate the applicability of the PSYCHE code to MONJU, using the parameters verified in the calculations for JOYO. From the calculation result pertaining to the MONJU system, distribution of 54 Mn deposited in the primary cooling system over 20 years of operation is predicted to be approximately 7 times larger than that of 60 Co. In particular, predictions show a notable tendency for 54 Mn precipitation to be distributed in the primary pump and cold-leg. The calculated distribution of 54 Mn and 60 Co in the primary cooling system of MONJU agreed with tendencies of measured distribution of JOYO. (author)

  19. Fighting corrosion in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, K S; Rangaswamy, N S

    1979-03-01

    A survey covers the cost of corrosion in India; methods of preventing corrosion in industrial plants; some case histories, including the prevention of corrosion in pipes through which fuels are pumped to storage and the stress-corrosion cracking of evaporators in fertilizer plants; estimates of the increase in demand in 1979-89 for anticorrosion products and processes developed by the Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI) at Karaikudi, India; industries that may face corrosion problems requiring assistance from CECRI, including the light and heavy engineering structural, and transport industries and the chemical industry; and some areas identified for major efforts, including the establishment of a Corrosion Advisory Board with regional centers and the expansion of the Tropical Corrosion Testing Station at Mandapam Camp, Tamil Nadu.

  20. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  1. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Transport and mass exchange processes in sand and gravel aquifers (v.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moltyaner, G.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this conference were to exchange information on promising field measurement techniques used for the characterization of spatial variability of geologic formations and on new methods used for quantifying the effect of spatial variability on groundwater flow and transport of materials; to discuss novel developments in the theory of transport processes and simulation methods; and to present views and opinions on future initiatives and directions in the design of large-scale field tracer experiments and the development of conceptual and mathematical models of transport and mass exchange processes. The 46 papers presented in these proceedings are divided into six sections: field studies of transport processes; groundwater tracers and novel field measurement techniques; promising methods and field measurement techniques for quantifying the effect of geological heterogeneities on groundwater flow and transport; novel developments in the theory of transport processes; numerical modelling of transport and mass exchange processes; and field and modelling studies of mass exchange processes. (L.L.)

  3. 49 CFR 192.477 - Internal corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.477... Control § 192.477 Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. If corrosive gas is being transported, coupons... internal corrosion. Each coupon or other means of monitoring internal corrosion must be checked two times...

  4. Analysis of 14C-bearing compounds released by the corrosion of irradiated steel using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, B Z; Salazar, G; Kunz, D; Szidat, S; Wieland, E

    2018-06-25

    The combination of ion chromatography (IC) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was developed to determine the speciation of 14C-(radiocarbon) bearing organic compounds in the femto to pico molar concentration range. The development of this compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) of carboxylic acids is reported and the application of the method on a leaching solution from neutron-irradiated steel is demonstrated. The background and the dynamic range of the AMS-based method were quantified. On using 14C-labelled standards, the measurements demonstrate the repeatability of the analytical method and the reproducible recovery of the main target carboxylic acids (i.e., acetate, formate, malonate, and oxalate). The detection limit was determined to be in the mid fmol 14C per L level while the dynamic range of the analytical method covers three orders of magnitude from the low fmol to the mid pmol 14C per L level. Cross contamination was found to be negligible during IC fractionation and was accounted for during eluate processing and 14C detection by AMS. The 14C-bearing carboxylates released from an irradiated steel nut into an alkaline leaching solution were analysed using the CSRA-based analytical method with the aim to check the applicability of the approach and develop appropriate sample preparation. The concentrations of 14C-bearing formate and acetate, the main organic corrosion products, were at a low pmol 14C per L level for convenient dimensions of the alkaline leaching experiment which demonstrates that compound-specific 14C AMS is an extremely sensitive analytical method for analysing 14C-bearing compounds. The content of total organic 14C in solution (TO14C) determined by the direct measurement of an aliquot of the leaching solution agrees well with the sum of the 14C concentrations of the individual carboxylates within the uncertainty of the data. Furthermore, the TO14C content is in good agreement with the calculated value using the corrosion rate

  5. Physical models of mass transport of iron and nickel in liquid sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, B.S.J.; Polley, M.V.; Skyrme, G.

    1975-12-01

    Experimental observations on corrosion of pure iron and nickel specimens in non-isothermal loops containing flowing sodium have been used to derive values of the concentration of dissolved material at the entrance to the test section and diffusion coefficients of the test material in sodium. The former values differ from the saturation value by only 10 -3 ppm, which is small compared to currently recommended solubility values. The phenomenon cannot be explained in terms of circulating particles. Two other possible explanations are also dismissed. The diffusion coefficient values are consistent with the corroding species being atoms, or molecules containing a few atoms. It is also shown that the observations are better explained in terms of boundary layer controlled mass transfer, rather than a surface controlled process. A computer model based on an alternative solubility relationship is shown to produce results which describe well the observed variation of corrosion rate with oxygen concentration, sodium velocity and downstream position. (author)

  6. Three-dimensional two-phase mass transport model for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.W.; Zhao, T.S.; Xu, C.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) steady-state model for liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) is presented in this paper. This 3D mass transport model is formed by integrating five sub-models, including a modified drift-flux model for the anode flow field, a two-phase mass transport model for the porous anode, a single-phase model for the polymer electrolyte membrane, a two-phase mass transport model for the porous cathode, and a homogeneous mist-flow model for the cathode flow field. The two-phase mass transport models take account the effect of non-equilibrium evaporation/ condensation at the gas-liquid interface. A 3D computer code is then developed based on the integrated model. After being validated against the experimental data reported in the literature, the code was used to investigate numerically transport behaviors at the DMFC anode and their effects on cell performance

  7. Stochastic theory of fatigue corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyun

    1999-10-01

    A stochastic theory of corrosion has been constructed. The stochastic equations are described giving the transportation corrosion rate and fluctuation corrosion coefficient. In addition the pit diameter distribution function, the average pit diameter and the most probable pit diameter including other related empirical formula have been derived. In order to clarify the effect of stress range on the initiation and growth behaviour of pitting corrosion, round smooth specimen were tested under cyclic loading in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  8. Screening and Quantification of Aliphatic Primary Alkyl Corrosion Inhibitor Amines in Water Samples by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Damon, Deidre E; Barrett, Richard M; Syed, S U; Heeren, Ron M A; Taylor, Stephen; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-01-19

    Direct analysis and identification of long chain aliphatic primary diamine Duomeen O (n-oleyl-1,3-diaminopropane), corrosion inhibitor in raw water samples taken from a large medium pressure water tube boiler plant water samples at low LODs (corrosion inhibitors in an industrial water boiler plant and other related samples in the water treatment industry. This approach was applied for the analysis of three complex water samples including feedwater, condensate water, and boiler water, all collected from large medium pressure (MP) water tube boiler plants, known to be dosed with varying amounts of polyamine and amine corrosion inhibitor components. Polyamine chemistry is widely used for example in large high pressure (HP) boilers operating in municipal waste and recycling facilities to prevent corrosion of metals. The samples used in this study are from such a facility in Coventry waste treatment facility, U.K., which has 3 × 40 tonne/hour boilers operating at 17.5 bar.

  9. Thickness Optimisation of Textiles Subjected to Heat and Mass Transport during Ironing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korycki Ryszard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Let us next analyse the coupled problem during ironing of textiles, that is, the heat is transported with mass whereas the mass transport with heat is negligible. It is necessary to define both physical and mathematical models. Introducing two-phase system of mass sorption by fibres, the transport equations are introduced and accompanied by the set of boundary and initial conditions. Optimisation of material thickness during ironing is gradient oriented. The first-order sensitivity of an arbitrary objective functional is analysed and included in optimisation procedure. Numerical example is the thickness optimisation of different textile materials in ironing device.

  10. A mass conservative numerical solution of vertical water flow and mass transport equations in unsaturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S.C.; Lee, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Galerkin finite element method is used to solve the problem of one-dimensional, vertical flow of water and mass transport of conservative-nonconservative solutes in unsaturated porous media. Numerical approximations based on different forms of the governing equation, although they are equivalent in continuous forms, can result in remarkably different solutions in an unsaturated flow problem. Solutions given by a simple Galerkin method based on the h-based Richards equation yield a large mass balance error and an underestimation of the infiltration depth. With the employment of the ROMV (restoration of main variable) concept in the discretization step, the mass conservative numerical solution algorithm for water flow has been derived. The resulting computational schemes for water flow and mass transport are applied to sandy soil. The ROMV method shows good mass conservation in water flow analysis, whereas it seems to have a minor effect on mass transport. However, it may relax the time-step size restriction and so ensure an improved calculation output. (author)

  11. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CORROSIVE label. 172.442 Section 172.442... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label must... CORROSIVE label must be white in the top half and black in the lower half. [Amdt. 172-123, 56 FR 66259, Dec...

  12. FEM Analyses for T-H-M-M Coupling Processes in Dual-Porosity Rock Mass under Stress Corrosion and Pressure Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jun Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The models of stress corrosion and pressure solution established by Yasuhara et al. were introduced into the 2D FEM code of thermo-hydro-mechanical-migratory coupling analysis for dual-porosity medium developed by the authors. Aiming at a hypothetical model for geological disposal of nuclear waste in an unsaturated rock mass from which there is a nuclide leak, two computation conditions were designed. Then the corresponding two-dimensional numerical simulation for the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-migratory processes were carried out, and the states of temperatures, rates and magnitudes of aperture closure, pore and fracture pressures, flow velocities, nuclide concentrations and stresses in the rock mass were investigated. The results show: the aperture closure rates caused by stress corrosion are almost six orders higher than those caused by pressure solution, and the two kinds of closure rates climb up and then decline, furthermore tend towards stability; when the effects of stress corrosion and pressure solution are considered, the negative fracture pressures in near field rise very highly; the fracture aperture and porosity are decreases in the case 1, so the relative permeability coefficients reduce, therefore the nuclide concentrations in pore and fracture in this case are higher than those in case 2.

  13. Corrosion and flow resistance of metal filter elements used in the cleanup of syngas from the Transport Gasifier at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Dahlin; E. Carl Landham; Xiaofeng Guan [Southern Research Institute, Wilsonville, AL (United States). Power Systems Development Facility

    2008-07-01

    At the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), a variety of filter elements and failsafes are being tested for the cleanup of coal-generated syngas from the Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR) Transport Gasifier. Thus far, no evidence of corrosion or plugging has been found in the HR-160 failsafes or sinterned metal fiber elements. However, a progressive corrosion and increase in pressure drop has been noted in the iron aluminide elements. The corrosion was first detected as reddish-brown spots of iron oxide after about 2,000 to 3,000 hours of syngas exposure. As the corrosion progressed, the spots of iron oxide merged to form a continuous scale after about 5,000 to 5,500 hours of exposure. With additional exposure, a black scale containing iron sulfide also appeared, and localized areas of sulfidation and plugging were noted in element cross sections. These effects have not resulted in any significant reduction in tensile strength, but a gradual increase in the clean element pressure drop has been noted. Flow test results suggest that there is an interaction between the corroded filter surface and the dustcake that effectively increases the residual cake flow resistance and baseline pressure drop. 10 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  14. FEFLOW finite element modeling of flow, mass and heat transport in porous and fractured media

    CERN Document Server

    Diersch, Hans-Jörg G

    2013-01-01

    Placing advanced theoretical and numerical methods in the hands of modeling practitioners and scientists, this book explores the FEFLOW system for solving flow, mass and heat transport processes in porous and fractured media. Offers applications and exercises.

  15. Multiple nucleon transfer in damped nuclear collisions. [Lectures, mass charge, and linear and angular momentum transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randrup, J.

    1979-07-01

    This lecture discusses a theory for the transport of mass, charge, linear, and angular momentum and energy in damped nuclear collisions, as induced by multiple transfer of individual nucleons. 11 references.

  16. The effect of mass transport on the graphite/CO2 reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephen, W.J.

    1984-11-01

    The Graphite/CO 2 reaction is strongly inhibited by the reaction product CO and therefore any model for the influence of mass transport on reaction rate should consider this. The problem of internal mass transport alone has been considered in previous notes. This note extends the models to include external mass transport. Results are compared with simple first order reaction with no volume change. The calculations demonstrate that, for strong CO inhibition, external mass transport limits reaction at a much lower rate than for first order kinetics and that the usual concept of three reaction zones corresponding to chemical control, in-pore diffusion control and boundary layer control can be unrealistically idealised. (U.K.)

  17. Solvable Model for Dynamic Mass Transport in Disordered Geophysical Media

    KAUST Repository

    Marder, M.; Eftekhari, Behzad; Patzek, Tadeusz

    2018-01-01

    We present an analytically solvable model for transport in geophysical materials on large length and time scales. It describes the flow of gas to a complicated absorbing boundary over long periods of time. We find a solution to this model using Green's function techniques, and apply the solution to three absorbing networks of increasing complexity.

  18. Solvable Model for Dynamic Mass Transport in Disordered Geophysical Media

    KAUST Repository

    Marder, M.

    2018-03-29

    We present an analytically solvable model for transport in geophysical materials on large length and time scales. It describes the flow of gas to a complicated absorbing boundary over long periods of time. We find a solution to this model using Green\\'s function techniques, and apply the solution to three absorbing networks of increasing complexity.

  19. The Spread of Corrosion in Cast Iron and its Effect on the Life Cycle of Transportation Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Binar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the spread of corrosion in material at different exposure times, and its effect on the measured brittle fracture and notch impact strength under different temperature conditions. To assess the degradational effect of corrosion on the material characteristics represented by the measured impact strength, we conducted a fractographic analysis of fracture surfaces, the aim of which was to evaluate the spread of corrosion in the material. In the first part of the experiment, two corrosion tests are simulated with a duration time of 432 and 648 hours, to compare the degradation effect of corrosion on the notch impact strength, depending on the duration of the corrosion tests. The following part shows the results of the impact bending test, where the experiment was conducted in an area of reduced and increased temperatures. The final part summarizes the results of the fractographic analysis of sample fracture surfaces from the impact bending tests. Based on the measured the length of the corrosion cracks, we analyzed the sample at the notch and from the material surface after the impact bending test.

  20. Study on flow and mass transport through fractured soft sedimentary rocks (Contact research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, Michito; Kumamoto, Sou; Maekawa, Keisuke

    2007-03-01

    It is important for safety assessment of HLW geological disposal to evaluate groundwater flow and mass transport in deep underground accurately. Though it is considered that the mass transport in sedimentary rock occurs in pores between grains mainly, fractures of sedimentary rock can be main paths. The objective of this study is to establish a conceptual model for flow and mass transport in fractured soft sedimentary rock. In previous study, a series of laboratory hydraulic and tracer tests and numerical analyses were carried out using sedimentary rock specimens obtained from Koetoi and Wakkanai formation. Single natural fractured cores and rock block specimen were used for the tests and analyses. The results indicated that the matrix diffusion played an important role for mass transport in the fractured soft sedimentary rocks. In this study, the following two tasks were carried out: (1) laboratory hydraulic and tracer experiments of rock cores of Koetoi and Wakkanai formation obtained at HDB-9, HDB-10 and HDB-11 boreholes and a rock block specimen, Wakkanai formation, obtained at an outcrop in the Horonobe area, (2) a numerical study on the conceptual model of flow and mass transport through fractured soft sedimentary rocks. Non-sorbing tracer experiments using naturally fractured cores and rock block specimens were carried out. Pottasium iodide was used as a tracer. The obtained breakthrough curves were interpreted and fitted by using a numerical simulator, and mass transport parameters, such as longitudinal dispersivity, matrix diffusion coefficient, transport aperture, were obtained. Mass transport simulations using a fracture network model, a continuum model and a double porosity model were performed to study the applicability of continuum model and double porosity model for transport in fractured sedimentary rock. (author)

  1. Cable Connected Spinning Spacecraft, 1. the Canonical Equations, 2. Urban Mass Transportation, 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitchin, A.

    1972-01-01

    Work on the dynamics of cable-connected spinning spacecraft was completed by formulating the equations of motion by both the canonical equations and Lagrange's equations and programming them for numerical solution on a digital computer. These energy-based formulations will permit future addition of the effect of cable mass. Comparative runs indicate that the canonical formulation requires less computer time. Available literature on urban mass transportation was surveyed. Areas of the private rapid transit concept of urban transportation are also studied.

  2. Mass transport modelling for the electroreduction of CO2 on Cu nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciti, David; Mao, Mark; Wang, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Mass transport plays an important role in CO2 reduction electrocatalysis. Albeit being more pronounced on nanostructured electrodes, the studies of mass transport for CO2 reduction have yet been limited to planar electrodes. We report here the development of a mass transport model for the electroreduction of CO2 on Cu nanowire electrodes. Fed with the experimental data from electrocatalytic studies, the local concentrations of CO2, {{{{HCO}}}3}-,{{{{CO}}}3}2- and OH- on the nanostructured electrodes are calculated by solving the diffusion equations with spatially distributed electrochemical reaction terms incorporated. The mass transport effects on the catalytic activity and selectivity of the Cu nanowire electrocatalysts are thus discussed by using the local pH as the descriptor. The established correlations between the electrocatalytic performance and the local pH shows that, the latter does not only determine the acid-base reaction equilibrium, but also regulates the mass transport and reaction kinetics. Based on these findings, the optimal range of local pH for CO2 reduction is discussed in terms of a fine balance among the suppression of hydrogen evolution, improvement of C2 product selectivity and limitation of CO2 supply. Our work highlights the importance of understanding the mass transport effects in interpretation of CO2 reduction electrocatalysis on high-surface-area catalysts.

  3. Coupling between corrosion and biphasic transport in porous media: Application to the evolution of a radioactive wastes disposal; Couplage entre corrosion et comportement diphasique dans un milieu poreux: Application a l'evolution d'un stockage des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dridi, W

    2005-04-15

    In the actual concepts of geological disposal, high level radioactive wastes are packed in metallic containers surrounded by a partially or totally saturated clay media. In contact with the interstitial water, anoxic corrosion of this container will start producing hydrogen. In the scope of safety assessment, the present study deals with two main topics: prediction of the long-term corrosion of carbon steel with respect to clay water content and evaluation of the risk of damage of the clay barrier related to gas production. Elementary processes controlling the kinetics of corrosion are limited to oxide growth and mass transfer through the porosity of this film. Thanks to a macroscopic description of theses processes, followed by an interfacial kinetic law, a mechanistic modeling of the anoxic corrosion in partially saturated porous media is proposed. This approach is validated when confronted to the long-term corrosion tests performed in saturated clay. Both modeling and laboratory experiments have confirmed that kinetics of anoxic corrosion in partially saturated clay is mainly controlled by the surrounding relative humidity as in the case of aerated or atmospheric corrosion. In the gas generation topic, some numerical simulations are performed concerning the oedometric and triaxial test dealing with gas migration in saturated clay. Finally, long-term calculations are conducted concerning hydro-mechanical impact of corrosion in deep geological repositories. Due to a more realistic prediction of the long-term corrosion, the risks of gas overpressures, local desaturation and mechanical damage are reduced. (author)

  4. A correction technique for the dispersive effects of mass lumping for transport problems

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc; Pasquetti, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the well-known dispersion effect that mass lumping induces when solving transport-like equations. A simple anti-dispersion technique based on the lumped mass matrix is proposed. The method does not require any non-trivial matrix

  5. Fluid and mass transport in a single lymphatic blood vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestman, A.R.

    1987-08-01

    The problem considers the single blood vessel model in pulmonary circulation in the presence of gravitation and mass transfer. The tissue surrounding the blood vessel is modelled as a permeable medium distinct from the blood vessel which is a normal free space. On the assumption that the mass concentration varies slowly at the interface between the blood vessel and the tissue, the problem is tackled by asymptotic approximation. A crucial point of the analysis is the dependence of the flow variables on the permeability K of the tissue in a completely arbitrary manner. A primary conjecture of the study is the intimacy of the pathological pulmonary edema and the parameter K. (author). 4 refs

  6. An effective approach for restraining electrochemical corrosion of polycrystalline silicon caused by an HF-based solution and its application for mass production of MEMS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yunfei; Xie, Jing; Zhao, Hui; Luo, Wei; Yang, Jinling; An, Ji; Yang, Fuhua

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to effectively protect the structural material polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) from electrochemical corrosion, which often occurs when the MEMS device is released in HF-based solutions, especially when the device contains a noble metal. This corrosion seriously degrades the electrical and mechanical performance as well as the reliability of MEMS devices. In this method, a photoresist (PR) is employed to cover the noble metal, which is electrically coupled with the underlying polysilicon layer. This PR cover can effectually prevent an HF-based solution from diffusing through and arriving at the surface of the noble metal, thus cutting off the electrical current of the electrochemical corrosion reaction. The polysilicon is well protected for longer than 80 min in 49% concentrated HF solutions by a 3 µm-thick AZ 6130 PR film. This fabrication process is simple, reliable and suitable for mass production of high-end micromechanical disk resonators. Benefiting from the technology breakthrough mentioned above, a novel low-cost microfabrication method for disk resonators with high performance has been developed, and the VHF polysilicon disk resonators with resonance frequencies around 282 MHz and Q values larger than 2000 at atmosphere have been produced at wafer level. (paper)

  7. Thermal convection loop experiments and analysis of mass transport process in Lithium/Fe-12Cr-1MoVW systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, G.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Lithium is an attractive coolant and breeder material for first- generation fusion reactor blankets. The compatibility of lithium with structural alloys, in the form of mass transport and deposition, may impose restrictions on blanket operating parameters such as temperature and lithium purity. A ferritic steel, such as Fe-12CrlMoVW, is a candidate for use as a structural alloy in a self-cooled lithium blanket design. Experimental data on mass transport in lithium/Fe-12CrlMoVW were obtained from two thermal convection loops which spanned the fusion relevant temperature range; one operated from 360 to 505/degree/C for 3040 hours and the other from 525 to 655/degree/C for 2510 hours. The experimental effort was supported by analysis of the mechanisms and processes of mass transport and deposition. It was found that mass transport and deposition, as measured by specimen weight change, were not simple functions of temperature for the entire temperature range investigated. The mass transfer behavior and surface morphology at low temperatures were dominated by impurity reactions of nitrogen and carbon in the lithium with the steel. In the experiment between 360 and 505/degree/C, nitrogen levels were sufficient below 450/degree/C to allow the formation of the adherent, protective corrosion product Li 9 CrN 5 . Weight losses in the 360 to 505/degree/C experiment were insensitive to temperature below 450/degree/C. Between 450 and 505/degree/C, the precipitation of carbon in the form of chromium-rich M 23 C 6 (M = Fe or Cr) carbides, due to the formation of Li 9 CrN 5 and corresponding release of carbon, resulted in weight gains for the highest temperature specimens in the experiment. 98 refs., 83 figs., 9 tabs

  8. Activity-Based Costing Application in an Urban Mass Transport Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popesko Boris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a basic overview of the application of Activity-Based Costing in an urban mass transport company which operates land public transport via buses and trolleys within the city. The case study was conducted using the Activity-Based Methodology in order to calculate the true cost of individual operations and to measure the profitability of particular transport lines. The case study analysis showed the possible effects of the application of the Activity-Based Costing for an urban mass transport company as well as the limitations of using the ABC methodology in the service industry. With regards to the application of the ABC methodology, the primary limitation of the accuracy of the conclusions is the quality of the non-financial information which had to be gathered throughout the implementation process. A basic limitation of the accurate data acquisition is the nature of the fare system of the transport company which does not allow the identification of the route that is taken by an individual passenger. The study illustrates the technique of ABC in urban mass transport and provides a real company example of information outputs of the ABC system. The users indicated that, the ABC model is very useful for profitability reporting and profit management. Also, the paper shows specific application of the Activity-Based Methodology in conditions of urban mass transport companies with regional specifics.

  9. Cellular automaton model of mass transport with chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karapiperis, T.; Blankleider, B.

    1993-10-01

    The transport and chemical reactions of solutes are modelled as a cellular automaton in which molecules of different species perform a random walk on a regular lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. The model describes advection and diffusion in a simple way, and as no restriction is placed on the number of particles at a lattice site, it is also able to describe a wide variety of chemical reactions. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. Simulations on one-and two-dimensional lattices show that the discrete model can be used to approximate the solutions of the continuum equations. We discuss discrepancies which arise from correlations between molecules and how these discrepancies disappear as the continuum limit is approached. Of particular interest are simulations displaying long-time behaviour which depends on long-wavelength statistical fluctuations not accounted for by the standard equations. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔ c and a + b → c with homogeneous and inhomogeneous initial conditions as well as to systems subject to autocatalytic reactions and displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. (author) 9 figs., 34 refs

  10. Nine years of mass transport data in the eastern boundary of the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; MachíN, Francisco; VéLez-Belchí, Pedro; López-Laatzen, Federico; Borges, Rafael; BeníTez-Barrios, Verónica; HernáNdez-Guerra, Alonso

    2010-09-01

    One of the longest current meter time series in the Lanzarote Passage in the eastern boundary of the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre has been used to determine and quantify the 9-year mean transport, the inter-annual and seasonal mass transport variability for the three water masses present in the area. Results show North Atlantic Central Water (NACW) flowing southward in the upper levels with a mean mass transport of -0.81 ± 1.48 Sv, Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) flowing northward at intermediate levels with a mean transport of +0.09 ± 0.57 Sv and Mediterranean Water (MW) flowing southward in the deep part of the passage with a mean transport of -0.05 ± 0.17 Sv. Harmonic and wavelet analysis show the presence of a seasonal pattern in the passage for the three water masses. A maximum southward transport in winter and spring has been observed for the NACW followed by a minimum in summer and fall. Near zero values during winter and spring are found for AAIW, with a maximum northward value in summer and a negative value in fall, when this water mass reverses its flow. MW has a similar seasonal pattern to NACW. The vertical structure in the Lanzarote Passage can be approximated by four significant oscillatory modes which cumulatively explain 86.4% of the variance. The strong transport fluctuation found at the seasonal and inter-annual timescales demonstrates that the Eastern Boundary Current transport has a strong impact on meridional overturning estimates, thus indicating that to understand Meridional Overturning Circulation variability, these transport estimates at the eastern Atlantic margin are necessary.

  11. Stochastic modeling of mass transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Kun Jai

    1990-01-01

    The stochastic moments analysis technique is developed to investigate radionuclide migration in geologic porous media. The mechanisms for radionuclide transport are assumed to be advection in the micropore, radioactive decay of the species, and sorption on the pore wall. Two covariance functions of groundwater velocity, retardation factor, and concentration are derived to incorporate the geologic parameter uncertainty in porous media of small medium dispersivity. The parametric studies show that the correlation length of groundwater velocity has significant influence on the migration behavior of radionuclide. Macro dispersivity is dominantly affected by the fluctuation of groundwater velocity, while the fluctuation of retardation factor has a considerable effect on the retarded stochastic velocity. The upper estimated concentration evaluated from this stochastic moments analysis can be used as a practical conservative value for the performance assessment of nuclear waste repository

  12. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  13. Directional mass transport in an atmospheric pressure surface barrier discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, A; Morabit, Y; Hasan, M I; Walsh, J L

    2017-10-25

    In an atmospheric pressure surface barrier discharge the inherent physical separation between the plasma generation region and downstream point of application reduces the flux of reactive chemical species reaching the sample, potentially limiting application efficacy. This contribution explores the impact of manipulating the phase angle of the applied voltage to exert a level of control over the electrohydrodynamic forces generated by the plasma. As these forces produce a convective flow which is the primary mechanism of species transport, the technique facilitates the targeted delivery of reactive species to a downstream point without compromising the underpinning species generation mechanisms. Particle Imaging Velocimetry measurements are used to demonstrate that a phase shift between sinusoidal voltages applied to adjacent electrodes in a surface barrier discharge results in a significant deviation in the direction of the plasma induced gas flow. Using a two-dimensional numerical air plasma model, it is shown that the phase shift impacts the spatial distribution of the deposited charge on the dielectric surface between the adjacent electrodes. The modified surface charge distribution reduces the propagation length of the discharge ignited on the lagging electrode, causing an imbalance in the generated forces and consequently a variation in the direction of the resulting gas flow.

  14. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-01-01

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K d model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect 14 C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies

  15. 49 CFR 192.475 - Internal corrosion control: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: General. 192.475... Control § 192.475 Internal corrosion control: General. (a) Corrosive gas may not be transported by... taken to minimize internal corrosion. (b) Whenever any pipe is removed from a pipeline for any reason...

  16. Temporal variability of mass transport across Canary Islands Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Santana, Ángel; José Machín, Francisco; García-Weil, Luis; Sangrà, Pablo; Vélez-Belchí, Pedro; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio

    2014-05-01

    The equatorward flowing Canary Current (CC) is the main feature of the circulation in the Canary Islands region. The CC flow perturbation by the Canary Islands originate the Canary Eddy Corridor which is the major pathway for long lived eddies in the subtropical North Atlantic (Sangrà et al., 2009, DSR). Therefore the variability of the CC passing through the Canary Archipelago will have both local and regional importance. Past studies on the CC variability trough the Canary Islands point out a clearly seasonal variability (Fraile-Nuez et al, 2010 (JGR); Hernández-Guerra et al, 2002 (DSR)). However those studies where focused on the eastern islands channels missing the variability through the western island channels which are the main source of long lived eddies. In order to fill this gap from November 2012 until September 2013 we conducted trimonthly surveys crossing the whole islands channels using opportunity ships (Naviera Armas Ferries). XBT and XCTD where launched along the cross channels transects. Additionally a closed box circling the Archipelago was performed on October 2013 as part of the cruise RAPROCAN-2013 (IEO) using also XBT and XCTD. Dynamical variables where derived inferring salinity from S(T,p) analytical relationships for the region updated with new XCTD data. High resolution, vertical sections of temperature, potential density, geostrophic velocity and transport where obtained. Our preliminary results suggest that the CC suffer a noticeable acceleration in those islands channels where eddy shedding is more frequent. They also indicate a clearly seasonal variability of the flows passing the islands channels. With this regard we observed significant differences on the obtained seasonal variability with respect the cited past studies on the eastern islands channel (Lanzarote / Fuerteventura - Africa coast). This work was co-funded by Canary Government (TRAMIC project: PROID20100092) and the European Union (FEDER).

  17. On the use of mass-conserving wind fields in chemistry-transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bregman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method has been developed that provides mass-conserving wind fields for global chemistry-transport models. In previous global Eulerian modeling studies a mass-imbalance was found between the model mass transport and the surface pressure tendencies. Several methods have been suggested to correct for this imbalance, but so far no satisfactory solution has been found. Our new method solves these problems by using the wind fields in a spherical harmonical form (divergence and vorticity by mimicing the physics of the weather forecast model as closely as possible. A 3-D chemistry-transport model was used to show that the calculated ozone fields with the new processing method agree remarkably better with ozone observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. In addition, the calculated age of air in the lower stratosphere show better agreement with observations, although the air remains still too young in the extra-tropical stratosphere.

  18. Mass Transport Modeling for The Electroreduction of CO2 on Cu Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciti, David; Mao, Mark; Wang, Chao

    2017-11-20

    Mass transport plays an important role in the CO2 reduction electrocatalysis. Albeit being more pronounced on nanostructured electrodes, the studies of mass transport for CO2 reduction have yet been limited to planar electrodes. We report here the development of a mass transport model for the electroreduction of CO2 on Cu nanowire electrodes. Fed with the experimental data from electrocatalytic studies, the local concentrations of CO2, HCO3-, CO32- and OH- on the nanostructured electrodes are calculated by solving the diffusion equations with spatially distributed electrochemical reaction terms incorporated. The mass transport effects on the catalytic activity and selectivity of the Cu nanowire electrocatalysts are thus discussed by using the local pH as the descriptor. The established correlations between the electrocatalytic performance and the local pH shows that, the latter does not only determine the acid-base reaction equilibrium, but also regulates the mass transport and reaction kinetics. Based on these findings, the optimal range of local pH for the CO2 reduction is discussed in terms of a fine balance of the suppression of hydrogen evolution, improvement of C2 product selectivity and limitation of CO2 supply. Our work highlights the importance of understanding the mass transport effects in interpretation of the CO2 reduction electrocatalysis on high-surface-area catalysts. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. A measurement of hydrogen transport in deuterium discharges using the dynamic response of the effective mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudok de Wit, T.; Duval, B.P.; Joye, B.; Lister, J.B.

    1992-02-01

    Particle tagging in a tokamak provides an attractive method for studying transport mechanisms. The injection of test particles at the plasma edge and the subsequent measurement of the evolution of their concentration at the centre can be used to quantify the underlying transport mechanisms. This has been carried out on the TCA tokamak by injecting hydrogen into a deuterium discharge, and simultaneously measuring the temporal evolution of the effective mass and the edge ionisation rate. (author) 3 figs., 9 refs

  20. Simplified semi-analytical model for mass transport simulation in unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa, Bernadete L. Vieira de; Hiromoto, Goro

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a simple model to determine the flux of radionuclides released from a concrete vault repository and its implementation through the development of a computer program. The radionuclide leach rate from waste is calculated using a model based on simple first order kinetics and the transport through porous media bellow the waste is determined using a semi-analytical solution of the mass transport equation. Results obtained in the IAEA intercomparison program are also related in this communication. (author)

  1. A model to quantify the resilience of mass railway transportation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjetey-Bahun, Kpotissan; Birregah, Babiga; Châtelet, Eric; Planchet, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Traditional risk management approaches focus on perturbation events' likelihood and their consequences. However, recent events show that not all perturbation events can be foreseen. The concept of resilience has been introduced to measure not only the system's ability to absorb perturbations, but also its ability to rapidly recover from perturbations. In this work, we propose a simulation-based model for quantifying resilience in mass railway transportation systems by quantifying passenger delay and passenger load as the system's performance indicators. We integrate all subsystems that make up mass railway transportation systems (transportation, power, telecommunication and organisation subsystems) and their interdependencies. The model is applied to the Paris mass railway transportation system. The model's results show that since trains continue running within the system even by decreasing their speed, the system remains resilient. During the normal operation of the system as well as during perturbation, the model shows similarities with reality. The perturbation management plan that consists of setting up temporary train services on part of the impacted line while repairing the failed system's component is considered in this work. We also assess the extent to which some resilient system's capacities (i.e. absorption, adaptation and recovery) can increase the resilience of the system. - Highlights: • The need of resilience quantification models in sociotechnical systems. • We propose a simulation-based model. • This model is applied to Paris mass railway transportation system.

  2. MASS TRANSPORT AND TURBULENCE IN GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISK GALAXIES. II. THE EFFECTS OF STAR FORMATION FEEDBACK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldbaum, Nathan J. [National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1205 W. Clark St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Krumholz, Mark R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Forbes, John C., E-mail: ngoldbau@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre Q parameters to ∼1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies’ star formation rates by a factor of ∼5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular interstellar medium. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the rate of inward mass transport. Nevertheless, we find that, even with feedback included, our galactic disks self-regulate to Q ∼ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to supply a substantial fraction of the inner disk star formation. We argue that gravitational instability is therefore likely to be the dominant source of turbulence and transport in galactic disks, and that it is responsible for fueling star formation in the inner parts of galactic disks over cosmological times.

  3. Thermo-fluidic devices and materials inspired from mass and energy transport phenomena in biological system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian XIAO; Jing LIU

    2009-01-01

    Mass and energy transport consists of one of the most significant physiological processes in nature, which guarantees many amazing biological phenomena and activ-ities. Borrowing such idea, many state-of-the-art thermo-fluidic devices and materials such as artificial kidneys, carrier erythrocyte, blood substitutes and so on have been successfully invented. Besides, new emerging technologies are still being developed. This paper is dedicated to present-ing a relatively complete review of the typical devices and materials in clinical use inspired by biological mass and energy transport mechanisms. Particularly, these artificial thermo-fluidic devices and materials will be categorized into organ transplantation, drug delivery, nutrient transport, micro operation, and power supply. Potential approaches for innovating conventional technologies were discussed, corresponding biological phenomena and physical mechan-isms were interpreted, future promising mass-and-energy-transport-based bionic devices were suggested, and prospects along this direction were pointed out. It is expected that many artificial devices based on biological mass and energy transport principle will appear to better improve vari-ous fields related to human life in the near future.

  4. Required momentum, heat, and mass transport experiments for liquid-metal blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; Sze, D.K.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Through the effects on fluid flow, many aspects of blanket behavior are affected by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects, including pressure drop, heat transfer, mass transfer, and structural behavior. In this paper, a set of experiments is examined that could be performed in order to reduce the uncertainties in the highly related set of issues dealing with momentum, heat, and mass transport under the influence of a strong magnetic field (i.e., magnetic transport phenomena). By improving our basic understanding and by providing direct experimental data on blanket behavior, these experiments will lead to improved designs and an accurate assessment of the attractiveness of liquid-metal blankets

  5. Amplified CPEs enhancement of chorioamnion membrane mass transport by encapsulation in nano-sized PLGA particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagury, Aharon; Amar-Lewis, Eliz; Appel, Reut; Hallak, Mordechai; Kost, Joseph

    2017-08-01

    Chemical penetration enhancers (CPEs) have long been used for mass transport enhancement across membranes. Many CPEs are used in a solution or gel and could be a solvent. The use of CPEs is mainly limited due to their toxicity/irritation levels. This study presents the evaluation of encapsulated CPEs in nano-sized polymeric particles on the chorioamnion (CA) membrane mass transport. CPEs' mass encapsulated in nanoparticles was decreased by 10,000-fold. Interestingly, this approach resulted in a 6-fold increase in mass transport across the CA. This approach may also be used with other CPEs' base applications necessitating lower CPE concentration. Applying Ultrasound (US) has shown to increase the release rate of and also the mass transport across the CA membrane. It is proposed that encapsulated CPEs penetrate into the CA membrane thus prolonging their exposure, possibly extending their penetration into the CA membrane, while insonation also deepens their penetration into the CA membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterisation of chloride transport and reinforcement corrosion in concrete under cyclic wetting and drying by electrical resistivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Concrete prisms were made with four cement types including cements with fly ash and/or blast furnace slag and three waterto- cement (w/c) ratios. Chloride penetration and corrosion of rebars were stimulated by subjecting prisms to cyclic loading with salt solution and drying. Concrete resistivity,

  7. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  8. Momentum, heat, and mass transfer analogy for vertical hydraulic transport of inert particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaćimovski Darko R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer in vertical liquid-solids flow, as well as in single phase flow, were studied. The aim of this investigation was to establish the analogy among those phenomena. Also, effect of particles concentration on momentum, heat and mass transfer was studied. The experiments in hydraulic transport were performed in a 25.4 mm I.D. cooper tube equipped with a steam jacket, using spherical glass particles of 1.94 mm in diameter and water as a transport fluid. The segment of the transport tube used for mass transfer measurements was inside coated with benzoic acid. In the hydraulic transport two characteristic flow regimes were observed: turbulent and parallel particle flow regime. The transition between two characteristic regimes (γ*=0, occurs at a critical voidage ε≈0.85. The vertical two-phase flow was considered as the pseudofluid, and modified mixture-wall friction coefficient (fw and modified mixture Reynolds number (Rem were introduced for explanation of this system. Experimental data show that the wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer coefficients, in vertical flow of pseudofluid, for the turbulent regime are significantly higher than in parallel regime. Wall-to-bed, mass and heat transfer coefficients in hydraulic transport of particles were much higher then in single-phase flow for lower Reynolds numbers (Re15000, there was not significant difference. The experimental data for wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer in vertical flow of pseudofluid in parallel particle flow regime, show existing analogy among these three phenomena. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172022

  9. A High-Resolution Model of Water Mass Transformation and Transport in the Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, J.; Stewart, A.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean circulation around the Antarctic margins has a pronounced impact on the global ocean and climate system. One of these impacts includes closing the global meridional overturning circulation (MOC) via formation of dense Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), which ventilates a large fraction of the subsurface ocean. AABW is also partially composed of modified Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW), a warm, mid-depth water mass whose transport towards the continent has the potential to induce rapid retreat of marine-terminating glaciers. Previous studies suggest that these water mass exchanges may be strongly influenced by high-frequency processes such as downslope gravity currents, tidal flows, and mesoscale/submesoscale eddy transport. However, evaluating the relative contributions of these processes to near-Antarctic water mass transports is hindered by the region's relatively small scales of motion and the logistical difficulties in taking measurements beneath sea ice.In this study we develop a regional model of the Weddell Sea, the largest established source of AABW. The model is forced by an annually-repeating atmospheric state constructed from the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System data and by annually-repeating lateral boundary conditions constructed from the Southern Ocean State Estimate. The model incorporates the full Filchner-Ronne cavity and simulates the thermodynamics and dynamics of sea ice. To analyze the role of high-frequency processes in the transport and transformation of water masses, we compute the model's overturning circulation, water mass transformations, and ice sheet basal melt at model horizontal grid resolutions ranging from 1/2 degree to 1/24 degree. We temporally decompose the high-resolution (1/24 degree) model circulation into components due to mean, eddy and tidal flows and discuss the geographical dependence of these processes and their impact on water mass transformation and transport.

  10. A correction technique for the dispersive effects of mass lumping for transport problems

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the well-known dispersion effect that mass lumping induces when solving transport-like equations. A simple anti-dispersion technique based on the lumped mass matrix is proposed. The method does not require any non-trivial matrix inversion and has the same anti-dispersive effects as the consistent mass matrix. A novel quasi-lumping technique for P2 finite elements is introduced. Higher-order extensions of the method are also discussed. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHM) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1996-08-01

    The finite element code FEHMN, developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developing hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent Kd model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The new chemical capabilities of FEHMN are illustrated by using Los Alamos National Laboratory's site scale model of Yucca Mountain to model two-dimensional, vadose zone 14 C transport. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect 14 C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also prove that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies

  12. Global vertical mass transport by clouds - A two-dimensional model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olofsson, Mats

    1988-05-01

    A two-dimensional global dispersion model, where vertical transport in the troposphere carried out by convective as well as by frontal cloud systems is explicitly treated, is developed from an existing diffusion model. A parameterization scheme for the cloud transport, based on global cloud statistics, is presented. The model has been tested by using Kr-85, Rn-222 and SO 2 as tracers. Comparisons have been made with observed distributions of these tracers, but also with model results without the cloud transport, using eddy diffusion as the primary means of vertical transport. The model results indicate that for trace species with a turnover time of days to weeks, the introduction of cloud-transport gives much more realistic simulations of their vertical distribution. Layers of increased mixing ratio with height, which can be found in real atmosphere, are reproduced in our cloud-transport model profiles, but can never be simulated with a pure eddy diffusion model. The horizontal transport in the model, by advection and eddy diffusion, gives a realistic distribution between the hemispheres of the more long-lived tracers (Kr-85). A combination of vertical transport by convective and frontal cloud systems is shown to improve the model simulations, compared to limiting it to convective transport only. The importance of including cumulus clouds in the convective transport scheme, in addition to the efficient transport by cumulonimbus clouds, is discussed. The model results are shown to be more sensitive to the vertical detrainment distribution profile than to the absolute magnitude of the vertical mass transport. The scavenging processes for SO 2 are parameterized without the introduction of detailed chemistry. An enhanced removal, due to the increased contact with droplets in the in-cloud lifting process, is introduced in the model. (author)

  13. An assessment of transportation issues under exceptional conditions : the case of the mass media and the Northridge Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    This study explores how the mass media covered transportation issues following the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The mass media were a vital channel for travel information, and they provided considerable information to the public about the safety of tr...

  14. Influence of Capillary Condensation Effects on Mass Transport through Porous Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uchytil, Petr; Petričkovič, Roman; Thomas, S.; Siedel-Morgenstern, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2003), s. 273-281 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : capillary condensation * mass transport * gas separation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.355, year: 2003

  15. No association between striatal dopamine transporter binding and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Hesse, Swen; Caan, Matthan W A

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine is one among several neurotransmitters that regulate food intake and overeating. Thus, it has been linked to the pathophysiology of obesity and high body mass index (BMI). Striatal dopamine D(2) receptor availability is lower in obesity and there are indications that striatal dopamine...... transporter (DAT) availability is also decreased. In this study, we tested whether BMI and striatal DAT availability are associated....

  16. Next-generation satellite gravimetry for measuring mass transport in the Earth system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira Encarnação, J.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the thesis is to identify the optimal set-up for future satellite gravimetry missions aimed at monitoring mass transport in the Earth’s system.The recent variability of climatic patterns, the spread of arid regions and associ- ated changes in the hydrological cycle, and

  17. Mass transport mechanism in the collision of sulphur on medium-weight nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejeune, A.; Richert, J.

    1980-01-01

    The reactions of 32 S on 59 Co, 65 Cu, 74 Ge, 79 Br, 85 Rb, 89 Y are studied. An explanation for the specific shape of the double differential cross sections as a function of the scattering angle and the mass asymmetry is given in the framework of a transport model. Conclusions about the reaction mechanism are drawn

  18. Volumetric vs Mass Velocity in Analyzing Convective-Diffusive Transport Processes in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Howard

    2000-11-01

    Because mass rather than volume is preserved in fluid-mechanical problems involving density changes, a natural predilection exists for quantifying convective-diffusive transport phenomena in terms of a velocity field based upon mass, rather than volume. Indeed, in the classic BSL "Transport Phenomena" textbook, but a single reference exists even to the very concept of a volume velocity, and even then it is relegated to a homework assignment. However, especially when dealing with transport in fluids in which the mass density of the conserved property being transported (e.g., chemical species, internal energy, etc.) is independent of the prevailing pressure, as is largely true in the case of liquids, overwhelming advantages exist is preferring the volume velocity over the more ubiquitous and classical mass velocity. In a generalization of ideas pioneered by D. D. Joseph and co-workers, we outline the reasons for this volumetric velocity preference in a broad general context by identifying a large class of physical problems whose solutions are rendered more accessible by exploiting this unconventional velocity choice.

  19. Investigation of corrosion behavior of biodegradable magnesium alloys using an online-micro-flow capillary flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry setup with electrochemical control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, A., E-mail: andrea.ulrich@empa.ch [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Ott, N. [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); EPFL-Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Tournier-Fillon, A. [Laboratory for Corrosion and Material Integrity, EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Homazava, N. [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Swiss Centre for Applied Ecotoxicology, Eawag/EPFL, Ueberlandstrasse 133, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Schmutz, P. [Laboratory for Corrosion and Material Integrity, EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    The development of biodegradable metallic materials designed for implants or medical stents is new and is one of the most interesting new fields in material science. Besides biocompatibility, a detailed understanding of corrosion mechanisms and dissolution processes is required to develop materials with tailored degradation behavior. The materials need to be sufficiently stable as long as they have to fulfill their medical task. However, subsequently they should dissolve completely in a controlled manner in terms of maximum body burden. This study focuses on the elemental and time resolved dissolution processes of a magnesium rare earth elements alloy which has been compared to pure magnesium with different impurity level. The here described investigations were performed using a novel analytical setup based on a micro-flow capillary online-coupled via a flow injection system to a plasma mass spectrometer. Differences in element-specific and time-dependent dissolution were monitored for various magnesium alloys in contact with sodium chloride or mixtures of sodium and calcium chloride as corrosive media. The dissolution behavior strongly depends on bulk matrix elements, secondary alloying elements and impurities, which are usually present even in pure magnesium.

  20. Investigation of corrosion behavior of biodegradable magnesium alloys using an online-micro-flow capillary flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry setup with electrochemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, A.; Ott, N.; Tournier-Fillon, A.; Homazava, N.; Schmutz, P.

    2011-01-01

    The development of biodegradable metallic materials designed for implants or medical stents is new and is one of the most interesting new fields in material science. Besides biocompatibility, a detailed understanding of corrosion mechanisms and dissolution processes is required to develop materials with tailored degradation behavior. The materials need to be sufficiently stable as long as they have to fulfill their medical task. However, subsequently they should dissolve completely in a controlled manner in terms of maximum body burden. This study focuses on the elemental and time resolved dissolution processes of a magnesium rare earth elements alloy which has been compared to pure magnesium with different impurity level. The here described investigations were performed using a novel analytical setup based on a micro-flow capillary online-coupled via a flow injection system to a plasma mass spectrometer. Differences in element-specific and time-dependent dissolution were monitored for various magnesium alloys in contact with sodium chloride or mixtures of sodium and calcium chloride as corrosive media. The dissolution behavior strongly depends on bulk matrix elements, secondary alloying elements and impurities, which are usually present even in pure magnesium.

  1. Investigation of corrosion behavior of biodegradable magnesium alloys using an online-micro-flow capillary flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry setup with electrochemical control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, A.; Ott, N.; Tournier-Fillon, A.; Homazava, N.; Schmutz, P.

    2011-07-01

    The development of biodegradable metallic materials designed for implants or medical stents is new and is one of the most interesting new fields in material science. Besides biocompatibility, a detailed understanding of corrosion mechanisms and dissolution processes is required to develop materials with tailored degradation behavior. The materials need to be sufficiently stable as long as they have to fulfill their medical task. However, subsequently they should dissolve completely in a controlled manner in terms of maximum body burden. This study focuses on the elemental and time resolved dissolution processes of a magnesium rare earth elements alloy which has been compared to pure magnesium with different impurity level. The here described investigations were performed using a novel analytical setup based on a micro-flow capillary online-coupled via a flow injection system to a plasma mass spectrometer. Differences in element-specific and time-dependent dissolution were monitored for various magnesium alloys in contact with sodium chloride or mixtures of sodium and calcium chloride as corrosive media. The dissolution behavior strongly depends on bulk matrix elements, secondary alloying elements and impurities, which are usually present even in pure magnesium.

  2. 49 CFR 195.589 - What corrosion control information do I have to maintain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What corrosion control information do I have to... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.589 What corrosion control... sufficient detail to demonstrate the adequacy of corrosion control measures or that corrosion requiring...

  3. Mass flow and velocity profiles in Neurospora hyphae: partial plug flow dominates intra-hyphal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadeh, Aryan; Lew, Roger R

    2013-11-01

    Movement of nuclei, mitochondria and vacuoles through hyphal trunks of Neurospora crassa were vector-mapped using fluorescent markers and green fluorescent protein tags. The vectorial movements of all three were strongly correlated, indicating the central role of mass (bulk) flow in cytoplasm movements in N. crassa. Profiles of velocity versus distance from the hyphal wall did not match the parabolic shape predicted by the ideal Hagen-Poiseuille model of flow at low Reynolds number. Instead, the profiles were flat, consistent with a model of partial plug flow due to the high concentration of organelles in the flowing cytosol. The intra-hyphal pressure gradients were manipulated by localized external osmotic treatments to demonstrate the dependence of velocity (and direction) on pressure gradients within the hyphae. The data support the concept that mass transport, driven by pressure gradients, dominates intra-hyphal transport. The transport occurs by partial plug flow due to the organelles in the cytosol.

  4. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine...

  5. Mass transport in Ti0.5Sb2Te3 phase-change nanobridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Xinglong; Wu, Liangcai; Lv, Shilong; Rao, Feng; Zhu, Min; Song, Zhitang; Zhou, Xilin; Feng, Songlin

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of atomic migration behavior in nanoscale phase-change material is very valuable for phase-change memory applications. In this work, Ti 0.5 Sb 2 Te 3 -based phase-change nanobridges were fabricated and mass transport by atomic migration was studied. A 3-D finite-element simulation on the electrothermal field was introduced to describe the electrothermal environment in the phase-change region. During the nanosecond operation, an obvious compositional distribution resulting from atomic migration was observed in the Ti 0.5 Sb 2 Te 3 phase-change nanobridge. Based on the mass continuity equation, a physical model for mass transport is proposed to illustrate that the density variation during the amorphous-to-crystalline structural transformation is the main reason for the atomic migration in nanoscale Ti 0.5 Sb 2 Te 3 phase-change material

  6. Water mass distributions and transports for the 2014 GEOVIDE cruise in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ibáñez, Maribel I.; Pérez, Fiz F.; Lherminier, Pascale; Zunino, Patricia; Mercier, Herlé; Tréguer, Paul

    2018-04-01

    We present the distribution of water masses along the GEOTRACES-GA01 section during the GEOVIDE cruise, which crossed the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean and the Labrador Sea in the summer of 2014. The water mass structure resulting from an extended optimum multiparameter (eOMP) analysis provides the framework for interpreting the observed distributions of trace elements and their isotopes. Central Waters and Subpolar Mode Waters (SPMW) dominated the upper part of the GEOTRACES-GA01 section. At intermediate depths, the dominant water mass was Labrador Sea Water, while the deep parts of the section were filled by Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) and North-East Atlantic Deep Water. We also evaluate the water mass volume transports across the 2014 OVIDE line (Portugal to Greenland section) by combining the water mass fractions resulting from the eOMP analysis with the absolute geostrophic velocity field estimated through a box inverse model. This allowed us to assess the relative contribution of each water mass to the transport across the section. Finally, we discuss the changes in the distribution and transport of water masses between the 2014 OVIDE line and the 2002-2010 mean state. At the upper and intermediate water levels, colder end-members of the water masses replaced the warmer ones in 2014 with respect to 2002-2010, in agreement with the long-term cooling of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre that started in the mid-2000s. Below 2000 dbar, ISOW increased its contribution in 2014 with respect to 2002-2010, with the increase being consistent with other estimates of ISOW transports along 58-59° N. We also observed an increase in SPMW in the East Greenland Irminger Current in 2014 with respect to 2002-2010, which supports the recent deep convection events in the Irminger Sea. From the assessment of the relative water mass contribution to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) across the OVIDE line, we conclude that the larger AMOC intensity in

  7. Water mass distributions and transports for the 2014 GEOVIDE cruise in the North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. García-Ibáñez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the distribution of water masses along the GEOTRACES-GA01 section during the GEOVIDE cruise, which crossed the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean and the Labrador Sea in the summer of 2014. The water mass structure resulting from an extended optimum multiparameter (eOMP analysis provides the framework for interpreting the observed distributions of trace elements and their isotopes. Central Waters and Subpolar Mode Waters (SPMW dominated the upper part of the GEOTRACES-GA01 section. At intermediate depths, the dominant water mass was Labrador Sea Water, while the deep parts of the section were filled by Iceland–Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW and North-East Atlantic Deep Water. We also evaluate the water mass volume transports across the 2014 OVIDE line (Portugal to Greenland section by combining the water mass fractions resulting from the eOMP analysis with the absolute geostrophic velocity field estimated through a box inverse model. This allowed us to assess the relative contribution of each water mass to the transport across the section. Finally, we discuss the changes in the distribution and transport of water masses between the 2014 OVIDE line and the 2002–2010 mean state. At the upper and intermediate water levels, colder end-members of the water masses replaced the warmer ones in 2014 with respect to 2002–2010, in agreement with the long-term cooling of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre that started in the mid-2000s. Below 2000 dbar, ISOW increased its contribution in 2014 with respect to 2002–2010, with the increase being consistent with other estimates of ISOW transports along 58–59° N. We also observed an increase in SPMW in the East Greenland Irminger Current in 2014 with respect to 2002–2010, which supports the recent deep convection events in the Irminger Sea. From the assessment of the relative water mass contribution to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC across the OVIDE line, we conclude

  8. Electrocatalytic performance of fuel cell reactions at low catalyst loading and high mass transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalitis, Christopher M; Kramer, Denis; Kucernak, Anthony R

    2013-03-28

    An alternative approach to the rotating disk electrode (RDE) for characterising fuel cell electrocatalysts is presented. The approach combines high mass transport with a flat, uniform, and homogeneous catalyst deposition process, well suited for studying intrinsic catalyst properties at realistic operating conditions of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Uniform catalyst layers were produced with loadings as low as 0.16 μgPt cm(-2) and thicknesses as low as 200 nm. Such ultra thin catalyst layers are considered advantageous to minimize internal resistances and mass transport limitations. Geometric current densities as high as 5.7 A cm(-2)Geo were experimentally achieved at a loading of 10.15 μgPt cm(-2) for the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) at room temperature, which is three orders of magnitude higher than current densities achievable with the RDE. Modelling of the associated diffusion field suggests that such high performance is enabled by fast lateral diffusion within the electrode. The electrodes operate over a wide potential range with insignificant mass transport losses, allowing the study of the ORR at high overpotentials. Electrodes produced a specific current density of 31 ± 9 mA cm(-2)Spec at a potential of 0.65 V vs. RHE for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and 600 ± 60 mA cm(-2)Spec for the peak potential of the HOR. The mass activity of a commercial 60 wt% Pt/C catalyst towards the ORR was found to exceed a range of literature PEFC mass activities across the entire potential range. The HOR also revealed fine structure in the limiting current range and an asymptotic current decay for potentials above 0.36 V. These characteristics are not visible with techniques limited by mass transport in aqueous media such as the RDE.

  9. Corrosion of reinforcement induced by environment containing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    carbonation and chlorides causing corrosion of steel reinforcement. ... interesting and important when the evaluation of the service life of the ... preferably in the areas of industrial and transport activities. ... For controlling the embedded corrosion sensors, elec- .... danger of corrosion of reinforcement seems to be more.

  10. Structural instability of atmospheric flows under perturbations of the mass balance and effect in transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Núñez, M A; Mendoza, R

    2015-01-01

    Several methods to estimate the velocity field of atmospheric flows, have been proposed to the date for applications such as emergency response systems, transport calculations and for budget studies of all kinds. These applications require a wind field that satisfies the conservation of mass but, in general, estimated wind fields do not satisfy exactly the continuity equation. An approach to reduce the effect of using a divergent wind field as input in the transport-diffusion equations, was proposed in the literature. In this work, a linear local analysis of a wind field, is used to show analytically that the perturbation of a large-scale nondivergent flow can yield a divergent flow with a substantially different structure. The effects of these structural changes in transport calculations are illustrated by means of analytic solutions of the transport equation

  11. Corrosion calculations report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    This report is a compilation of the quantitative assessments of corrosion of the copper canisters in a KBS-3 repository. The calculations are part of the safety assessment SR-Site that is the long-term safety assessment to support the license application for building a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, Sweden. The safety assessment methodology gives the frame for the structured and documented approach to assess all conceivable corrosion processes. The quantitative assessments are done in different ways depending on the nature of the process and on the implications for the long-term safety. The starting point for the handling of the corrosion processes is the description of all known corrosion processes for copper with the current knowledge base and applied to the specific system and geology. Already at this stage some processes are excluded for further analysis, for example if the repository environment is not a sufficient prerequisite for the process to occur. The next step is to identify processes where the extent of corrosion could be bounded, e.g. by a mass balance approach. For processes where a mass balance is not limiting, the mass transport of corrodants (or corrosion products) is taken into account. A simple approach would be just to calculate the diffusive transport of corrodants through the bentonite, but generally the transport resistance for the interface between groundwater in a rock fracture intersecting the deposition hole and the bentonite buffer is more important. In SR-Site, the concept of equivalent flowrate, Q eq , is used. This assessment is done integrated with the evaluation of the geochemical and hydrogeological evolution of the repository. For most of the corrosion processes analysed, the corrosion depth is much smaller than the copper shell thickness, even for the assessment time of 10 6 years. Several processes give corrosion depths less than 100 μm, but no process give corrosion depths larger than a few millimetres

  12. Corrosion calculations report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    This report is a compilation of the quantitative assessments of corrosion of the copper canisters in a KBS-3 repository. The calculations are part of the safety assessment SR-Site that is the long-term safety assessment to support the license application for building a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, Sweden. The safety assessment methodology gives the frame for the structured and documented approach to assess all conceivable corrosion processes. The quantitative assessments are done in different ways depending on the nature of the process and on the implications for the long-term safety. The starting point for the handling of the corrosion processes is the description of all known corrosion processes for copper with the current knowledge base and applied to the specific system and geology. Already at this stage some processes are excluded for further analysis, for example if the repository environment is not a sufficient prerequisite for the process to occur. The next step is to identify processes where the extent of corrosion could be bounded, e.g. by a mass balance approach. For processes where a mass balance is not limiting, the mass transport of corrodants (or corrosion products) is taken into account. A simple approach would be just to calculate the diffusive transport of corrodants through the bentonite, but generally the transport resistance for the interface between groundwater in a rock fracture intersecting the deposition hole and the bentonite buffer is more important. In SR-Site, the concept of equivalent flowrate, Q{sub eq}, is used. This assessment is done integrated with the evaluation of the geochemical and hydrogeological evolution of the repository. For most of the corrosion processes analysed, the corrosion depth is much smaller than the copper shell thickness, even for the assessment time of 106 years. Several processes give corrosion depths less than 100 mum, but no process give corrosion depths larger than a few

  13. Pitting corrosion of copper. Further model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taxen, C.

    2002-08-01

    The work presented in this report is a continuation and expansion of a previous study. The aim of the work is to provide background information about pitting corrosion of copper for a safety analysis of copper canisters for final deposition of radioactive waste. A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is used to estimate the conditions required for stationary propagation of a localised anodic corrosion process. The model uses equilibrium data for copper and its corrosion products and parameters for the aqueous mass transport of dissolved species. In the present work we have, in the model, used a more extensive set of aqueous and solid compounds and equilibrium data from a different source. The potential dependence of pitting in waters with different compositions is studied in greater detail. More waters have been studied and single parameter variations in the composition of the water have been studied over wider ranges of concentration. The conclusions drawn in the previous study are not contradicted by the present results. However, the combined effect of potential and water composition on the possibility of pitting corrosion is more complex than was realised. In the previous study we found what seemed to be a continuous aggravation of a pitting situation by increasing potentials. The present results indicate that pitting corrosion can take place only over a certain potential range and that there is an upper potential limit for pitting as well as a lower. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the model gives meaningful predictions of the minimum pitting potential also when relatively large errors in the input parameters are allowed for

  14. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmuth, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  15. Mass transport in fracture media: impact of the random function model assumed for fractures conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capilla, J. E.; Rodrigo, J.; Gomez Hernandez, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the uncertainty of flow and mass transport models requires the definition of stochastic models to describe hydrodynamic parameters. Porosity and hydraulic conductivity (K) are two of these parameters that exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. K is usually the parameter whose variability influence to a more extended degree solutes movement. In fracture media, it is critical to properly characterize K in the most altered zones where flow and solutes migration tends to be concentrated. However, K measurements use to be scarce and sparse. This fact calls to consider stochastic models that allow quantifying the uncertainty of flow and mass transport predictions. This paper presents a convective transport problem solved in a 3D block of fractured crystalline rock. the case study is defined based on data from a real geological formation. As the scarcity of K data in fractures does not allow supporting classical multi Gaussian assumptions for K in fractures, the non multi Gaussian hypothesis has been explored, comparing mass transport results for alternative Gaussian and non-Gaussian assumptions. The latter hypothesis allows reproducing high spatial connectivity for extreme values of K. This feature is present in nature, might lead to reproduce faster solute pathways, and therefore should be modeled in order to obtain reasonably safe prediction of contaminants migration in a geological formation. The results obtained for the two alternative hypotheses show a remarkable impact of the K random function model in solutes movement. (Author) 9 refs

  16. Study on flow and mass transport through fractured sedimentary rocks (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, Michito; Kumamoto, Sou; Karasaki, Kenzi; Sato, Hisashi; Sawada, Atsushi

    2009-03-01

    It is important for safety assessment of HLW geological disposal to understand hydro-geological conditions at the investigation area, and to evaluate groundwater flow and mass transport model and parameters, at each investigation phase. Traditionally, for Neogene sedimentary rock, the grain spacing of sediments has been considered as the dominant migration path. However, fractures of sedimentary rock could act as dominant paths, although they were soft sedimentary rocks. In this study, as part of developing groundwater flow and mass transport evaluation methodologies of such a fractured sedimentary rock' distributed area, we conducted two different scale of studies; 1) core rock sample scale and 2) several kilometer scale. For the core rock sample scale, some of laboratory hydraulic and tracer experiments have conducted using the rock cores with tailored parallel fracture, obtained at pilot borehole drilled in the vicinity of ventilation shaft. From the test results, hydraulic conductivity, diffusion coefficient, transport aperture, dispersion length and etc. was evaluated. Based on these test results, the influence of these parameters onto mass transport behavior of fractures sedimentary rocks was examined. For larger scale, such as several kilometer scale, the regional scale groundwater flow was examined using temperature data observed along the boreholes at Horonobe site. The results show that the low permeable zone between the boreholes might be estimated. (author)

  17. Mass transfer processes and field-scale transport of organic solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusseau, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of mass transfer processes, such as sorption/desorption and mass transfer between immiscible liquids and water, on the transport of organic solutes is discussed. Rate-limited sorption of organic solutes caused by a diffusion-constrained mechanism is shown to be significant under laboratory conditions. The significance of the impact of nonequilibrium sorption on field-scale transport is scale dependent. The impact of organic liquids on mass transfer and transport of organic solutes depends upon the nature of the solute and the nature and form of the organic liquid. For example, while retardation of nonionic solutes is decreased in mixed-solvent systems, (i.e. systems comprised of water and a miscible organic liquid or an immiscible liquid present in concentrations below phase separation), the retardation of organic acids may, in some cases, increase with addition of a cosolvent. While the presence of an immiscible liquid existing as a mobile phase will reduce retention of organic solutes, the presence of residual saturation of an immiscible liquid can significantly increase retention. A model is presented that incorporates the effects of retention resulting from residual saturation, as well as nonequilibrium sorption, on the transport of organic solutes. (Author) (70 refs., 3 figs.)

  18. Multicomponent mass transport model: a model for simulating migration of radionuclides in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, J.F.; Kaszeta, F.E.; Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of the development of a one-dimensional radionuclide transport code, MMT2D (Multicomponent Mass Transport), for the AEGIS Program. Multicomponent Mass Transport is a numerical solution technique that uses the discrete-parcel-random-wald (DPRW) method to directly simulate the migration of radionuclides. MMT1D accounts for: convection;dispersion; sorption-desorption; first-order radioactive decay; and n-membered radioactive decay chains. Comparisons between MMT1D and an analytical solution for a similar problem show that: MMT1D agrees very closely with the analytical solution; MMT1D has no cumulative numerical dispersion like that associated with solution techniques such as finite differences and finite elements; for current AEGIS applications, relatively few parcels are required to produce adequate results; and the power of MMT1D is the flexibility of the code in being able to handle complex problems for which analytical solution cannot be obtained. Multicomponent Mass Transport (MMT1D) codes were developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to predict the movement of radiocontaminants in the saturated and unsaturated sediments of the Hanford Site. All MMT models require ground-water flow patterns that have been previously generated by a hydrologic model. This report documents the computer code and operating procedures of a third generation of the MMT series: the MMT differs from previous versions by simulating the mass transport processes in systems with radionuclide decay chains. Although MMT is a one-dimensional code, the user is referred to the documentation of the theoretical and numerical procedures of the three-dimensional MMT-DPRW code for discussion of expediency, verification, and error-sensitivity analysis

  19. The use of the dusty-gas model for the description of mass transport with chemical reaction in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldsink, J.W.; Veldsink, J.W.; van Damme, Rudolf M.J.; Versteeg, Geert; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, mass transport accompanied by chemical reactions in porous media is studied according to the Fick model and the dusty-gas model. For mass transport accompanied by a chemical reaction in catalyst structures showing a plane, line, or point of symmetry, the approximate analytical

  20. Species Uptake and Mass Transport in Membranes for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgammal, Ramez A.; Tang, Zhijiang; Sun, Che-Nan; Lawton, Jamie; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution, we provide a synthesis of results to date describing uptake and mass transport of water, vanadium species and protons in Nafion membranes for use as separators in VRFBs. Resistance issues as well as species cross-over are important contributors to performance loss in VRFBs. After a brief discussion of our state-of-the-art cell performance, we consider the uptake and transport of various species through a number of membrane materials. We draw together numerous previous studies and augment them with new data to provide a summary of our present state of understanding of the experimental facts regarding membrane behavior.

  1. Transient Mass and Thermal Transport during Methane Adsorption into the Metal-Organic Framework HKUST-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Hasan; McGaughey, Alan J H; Wilmer, Christopher E

    2018-01-24

    Methane adsorption into the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 and the resulting heat generation and dissipation are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Transient simulations reveal that thermal transport in the MOF occurs two orders of magnitude faster than gas diffusion. A large thermal resistance at the MOF-gas interface (equivalent to 127 nm of bulk HKUST-1), however, prevents fast release of the generated heat. The mass transport resistance at the MOF-gas interface is equivalent to 1 nm of bulk HKUST-1 and does not present a bottleneck in the adsorption process. These results provide important insights into the application of MOFs for gas storage applications.

  2. Computer codes for three dimensional mass transport with non-linear sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1985-03-01

    The report describes the mathematical background and data input to finite element programs for three dimensional mass transport in a porous medium. The transport equations are developed and sorption processes are included in a general way so that non-linear equilibrium relations can be introduced. The programs are described and a guide given to the construction of the required input data sets. Concluding remarks indicate that the calculations require substantial computer resources and suggest that comprehensive preliminary analysis with lower dimensional codes would be important in the assessment of field data. (author)

  3. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  4. Gluon transport equation with effective mass and dynamical onset of Bose–Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    We study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose–Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. The presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  5. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion control...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by— (a...

  7. Performance of intact and partially degraded concrete barriers in limiting mass transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.C.

    1992-06-01

    Mass transport through concrete barriers and release rate from concrete vaults are quantitatively evaluated. The thorny issue of appropriate diffusion coefficients for use in performance assessment calculations is covered, with no ultimate solution found. Release from monolithic concrete vaults composed of concrete waste forms is estimated with a semi-analytical solution. A parametric study illustrates the importance of different parameters on release. A second situation of importance is the role of a concrete shell or vault placed around typical waste forms in limiting mass transport. In both situations, the primary factor controlling concrete performance is cracks. The implications of leaching behavior on likely groundwater concentrations is examined. Frequently, lower groundwater concentrations can be expected in the absence of engineered covers that reduce infiltration

  8. Traffic lanes for vehicles of mass public passenger transport on city streets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladović Pavle V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of the basic measures of regulating public mass passenger transport in a city network are the introduction and management of traffic lanes reserved for the public transportation. These traffic lanes are important for several reasons: faster moving and shorter travelling time for the vehicles, reducing operating costs, improving the safety, increasing passenger comfort, maintaining of the timetable quality, etc. In most cities, an intensive use of the public transport is concentrated in the morning and the afternoon peak period. The state of the public transport system during these periods is reflected in the crowds inside the vehicles, long vehicle queues at intersections and at bus stops, which cause congestion on the streets and result in delays of public transport vehicles. This paper provides an overview of the current situation on an example in the city of Belgrade. The capacity and the quality of service for the street surfaces reserved for the public transportation vehicles were analysed on the aforementioned example.

  9. Nanoparticle Traffic on Helical Tracks: Thermophoretic Mass Transport through Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, Philipp A.E.; Walther, Jens Honore; Arcidiacono, Salvatore

    2006-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate and quantify thermophoretic motion of solid gold nanoparticles inside carbon nanotubes subject to wall temperature gradients ranging from 0.4 to 25 K/nm. For temperature gradients below 1 K/nm, we find that the particles move "on tracks......" in a predictable fashion as they follow unique helical orbits depending on the geometry of the carbon nanotubes. These findings markedly advance our knowledge of mass transport mechanisms relevant to nanoscale applications....

  10. Facile synthesis of mesostructured ZSM-5 zeolite with enhanced mass transport and catalytic performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chao; Ren, Yanqun [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Gou, Jinsheng [College Material Science and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, Key Laboratory of Wooden Material Science and Application, Ministry of Education, 35 Tsinghua East Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Baoyu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Xi, Hongxia, E-mail: cehxxi@scut.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A mesostructured MFI zeolite was synthesized via dual-functional surfactant approach. • Mass transport was investigated by applying zero length column technique. • The catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic activity and long lifetime. • Gaussian DFT was employed to study the role of surfactant in crystallization process. - Abstract: A mesostructured ZSM-5 zeolite with multilamellar structure was successfully synthesized by employing a tetra-headgroup rigid bolaform quaternary ammonium surfactant. It was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, amines temperature programmed desorption (amines-TPD), and computer simulation. These results indicated that the dual-functional amphiphilic surfactants play a critical role for directing the multilamellar structure with high mesoporosity. The mass transport and catalytic performances of the zeolite were investigated by zero length column (ZLC) technique and aldol condensation reactions to evaluate the structure-property relationship. These results clearly indicated that the mass transport of selected molecules in hierarchical zeolite can be accelerated by introducing mesoporous structure with mesostructure with reduced diffusion length and an overall enhanced resistance against deactivation in reactions involving large molecules. Furthermore, the dual-functional surfactant approach of making hierarchical zeolite with MFI nanosheets framework would open up new opportunities for design and synthesis of hierarchical zeolites with controllable mesoporous structures.

  11. The Impact of Microstructure Geometry on the Mass Transport in Artificial Pores: A Numerical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Galinsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of porous materials used in heterogeneous catalysis determines the mass transport inside networks, which may vary over many length scales. The theoretical prediction of mass transport phenomena in porous materials, however, is incomplete and is still not completely understood. Therefore, experimental data for every specific porous system is needed. One possible experimental technique for characterizing the mass transport in such pore networks is pulse experiments. The general evaluation of experimental outcomes of these techniques follows the solution of Fick’s second law where an integral and effective diffusion coefficient is recognized. However, a detailed local understanding of diffusion and sorption processes remains a challenge. As there is lack of proved models covering different length scales, existing classical concepts need to be evaluated with respect to their ability to reflect local geometries on the nanometer level. In this study, DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models were used to investigate the impact of pore microstructures on the diffusion behaviour of gases. It can be understood as a virtual pulse experiment within a single pore or a combination of different pore geometries.

  12. The influence of mass transfer on solute transport in column experiments with an aggregated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Paul V.; Goltz, Mark N.; Summers, R. Scott; Crittenden, John C.; Nkedi-Kizza, Peter

    1987-06-01

    The spreading of concentration fronts in dynamic column experiments conducted with a porous, aggregated soil is analyzed by means of a previously documented transport model (DFPSDM) that accounts for longitudinal dispersion, external mass transfer in the boundary layer surrounding the aggregate particles, and diffusion in the intra-aggregate pores. The data are drawn from a previous report on the transport of tritiated water, chloride, and calcium ion in a column filled with Ione soil having an average aggregate particle diameter of 0.34 cm, at pore water velocities from 3 to 143 cm/h. The parameters for dispersion, external mass transfer, and internal diffusion were predicted for the experimental conditions by means of generalized correlations, independent of the column data. The predicted degree of solute front-spreading agreed well with the experimental observations. Consistent with the aggregate porosity of 45%, the tortuosity factor for internal pore diffusion was approximately equal to 2. Quantitative criteria for the spreading influence of the three mechanisms are evaluated with respect to the column data. Hydrodynamic dispersion is thought to have governed the front shape in the experiments at low velocity, and internal pore diffusion is believed to have dominated at high velocity; the external mass transfer resistance played a minor role under all conditions. A transport model such as DFPSDM is useful for interpreting column data with regard to the mechanisms controlling concentration front dynamics, but care must be exercised to avoid confounding the effects of the relevant processes.

  13. Facile synthesis of mesostructured ZSM-5 zeolite with enhanced mass transport and catalytic performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao; Ren, Yanqun; Gou, Jinsheng; Liu, Baoyu; Xi, Hongxia

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A mesostructured MFI zeolite was synthesized via dual-functional surfactant approach. • Mass transport was investigated by applying zero length column technique. • The catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic activity and long lifetime. • Gaussian DFT was employed to study the role of surfactant in crystallization process. - Abstract: A mesostructured ZSM-5 zeolite with multilamellar structure was successfully synthesized by employing a tetra-headgroup rigid bolaform quaternary ammonium surfactant. It was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, amines temperature programmed desorption (amines-TPD), and computer simulation. These results indicated that the dual-functional amphiphilic surfactants play a critical role for directing the multilamellar structure with high mesoporosity. The mass transport and catalytic performances of the zeolite were investigated by zero length column (ZLC) technique and aldol condensation reactions to evaluate the structure-property relationship. These results clearly indicated that the mass transport of selected molecules in hierarchical zeolite can be accelerated by introducing mesoporous structure with mesostructure with reduced diffusion length and an overall enhanced resistance against deactivation in reactions involving large molecules. Furthermore, the dual-functional surfactant approach of making hierarchical zeolite with MFI nanosheets framework would open up new opportunities for design and synthesis of hierarchical zeolites with controllable mesoporous structures.

  14. Corrosion of iron-base alloys by lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A review of corrosion mechanisms operating in lithium-iron-base alloy systems is presented along with data obtained with thermal-convection loops of niobium-stabilized 2 1 / 4 percent Cr-1 percent Mo steel and types 304L and 321 stainless steels. A corrosion rate of 2.3 μm/year (0.09 mil/year) was obtained on the 2 1 / 4 percent Cr-1 percent Mo steel at 600 0 C. Considerably more mass transport of alloying constituents and a maximum corrosion rate of about 14 μm/year (0.55 mil/year) was obtained with the austenitic stainless steels. Results of metallography, x-ray fluorescence analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and weight-change data are presented and discussed

  15. Monitoring corrosion and chemistry phenomena in supercritical aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Liu, C.; Kriksunov, L.; Medina, E.; Villa, J.; Bueno, J.

    1994-01-01

    The in situ monitoring of the chemistry and electrochemistry of aqueous heat transport fluids in thermal (nuclear and fossil) power plants is now considered essential if adequate assessment and close control of corrosion and mass transfer phenomena are to be achieved. Because of the elevated temperatures and pressures involved. new sensor technologies are required that are able to measure key parameters under plant operating conditions for extended periods of time. In this paper, the authors outline a research and development program that is designed to develop practical sensors for use in thermal power plants. The current emphasis is on sensors for measuring corrosion potential, pH, the concentrations of oxygen and hydrogen, and the electrochemical noise generated by corrosion processes at temperatures ranging from ∼250 C to 500 C. The program is currently at the laboratory stage, but testing of prototype sensors in a coal-fired supercritical power plant in Spain will begin shortly

  16. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  17. Modeling of liquid-metal corrosion/deposition in a fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Smith, D.L.

    1984-04-01

    A model has been developed for the investigation of the liquid-metal corrosion and the corrosion product transport in a liquid-metal-cooled fusion reactor blanket. The model describes the two-dimensional transport of wall material in the liquid-metal flow and is based on the following assumptions: (1) parallel flow in a straight circular tube; (2) transport of wall material perpendicular to the flow direction by diffusion and turbulent exchange; in flow direction by the flow motion only; (3) magnetic field causes uniform velocity profile with thin boundary layer and suppresses turbulent mass exchange; and (4) liquid metal at the interface is saturated with wall material. A computer code based on this model has been used to analyze the corrosion of ferritic steel by lithium lead and the deposition of wall material in the cooler part of a loop. Three cases have been investigated: (1) ANL forced convection corrosion experiment (without magnetic field); (2) corrosion in the MARS liquid-metal-cooled blanket (with magnetic field); and (3) deposition of wall material in the corrosion product cleanup system of the MARS blanket loop

  18. Coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element models for soft tissues using ABAQUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Simon, B R; Rigby, Paul H; Newberg, Tyler P

    2011-04-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) including characteristic large deformations in highly nonlinear materials (hyperelasticity and coupled diffusive/convective transport of neutral mobile species) will allow quantitative study of in vivo tissues. Such FEMs will provide basic understanding of normal and pathological tissue responses and lead to optimization of local drug delivery strategies. We present a coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element approach developed using a commercially available ABAQUS finite element software. The PHEXPT transient simulations are based on sequential solution of the porohyperelastic (PHE) and mass transport (XPT) problems where an Eulerian PHE FEM is coupled to a Lagrangian XPT FEM using a custom-written FORTRAN program. The PHEXPT theoretical background is derived in the context of porous media transport theory and extended to ABAQUS finite element formulations. The essential assumptions needed in order to use ABAQUS are clearly identified in the derivation. Representative benchmark finite element simulations are provided along with analytical solutions (when appropriate). These simulations demonstrate the differences in transient and steady state responses including finite deformations, total stress, fluid pressure, relative fluid, and mobile species flux. A detailed description of important model considerations (e.g., material property functions and jump discontinuities at material interfaces) is also presented in the context of finite deformations. The ABAQUS-based PHEXPT approach enables the use of the available ABAQUS capabilities (interactive FEM mesh generation, finite element libraries, nonlinear material laws, pre- and postprocessing, etc.). PHEXPT FEMs can be used to simulate the transport of a relatively large neutral species (negligible osmotic fluid flux) in highly deformable hydrated soft tissues and tissue-engineered materials.

  19. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  20. The Sedimentology and Origins of a Giant Mass Transport Deposit: The Nataraja Slide, Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, S. K.; Clift, P. D.; Kulhanek, D. K.; Calves, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Nataraja Slide was recently discovered by seismic mapping off the west coast of India in the Arabian Sea. Volumetrically estimated to be 19,000 km3, it is the second largest mass transport deposit known on a passive margin. Understanding how this deposit was emplaced is important to constrain how mass wasting affects the bathymetry of sedimentary basins, as well as the effects triggered by such a large event, including tsunamis. The Nataraja Slide was emplaced at 10.8 Ma as a result of collapse of the western India margin, which traveled 550 km into the basin. The deposit has been cored in two locations by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 355, where it is 330 m (Site U1456) and 190 m thick (Site U1457). The presence of various deformation structures and the occurrence of a predominantly reworked calcareous nannofossil assemblages are used to define the top of the deposit. The deposit appears to consist of two units at Site U1456 with 22 m of upper Miocene hemipelagic sediment separating them, suggesting emplacement in two large pulses. At both sites, the mass transport deposit has a coarse carbonate-dominated base, composed of clast-supported breccia overlain by massive calcarenite associated with high-energy current transport, and calcilutite. These strata are overlain by steeply inclined, slumped but otherwise coherent pyritized, siliciclastic mudstones and minor volumes of matrix-supported conglomerates, interpreted as debris flows. Emplacement appears to have eroded significant thicknesses of Indus Fan turbidites at Site U1456, as there is a hiatus that is a minimum of 2.5 m.y. at the base. At Site U1457, the slide directly overlies Paleocene reddish mudstones on the eastern flank of the Laxmi Ridge, which likely diverted the sediment to the south in the Laxmi Basin and away from the main Arabian Sea basin. Bulk sediment Nd and Sr isotope geochemistry show a provenance, similar to those of the Tapti and Narmada rivers in western

  1. Pore-scale investigation of mass transport and electrochemistry in a solid oxide fuel cell anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grew, Kyle N.; Joshi, Abhijit S.; Peracchio, Aldo A.; Chiu, Wilson K.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, Storrs, CT 06269-3139 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The development and validation of a model for the study of pore-scale transport phenomena and electrochemistry in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) anode are presented in this work. This model couples mass transport processes with a detailed reaction mechanism, which is used to model the electrochemical oxidation kinetics. Detailed electrochemical oxidation reaction kinetics, which is known to occur in the vicinity of the three-phase boundary (TPB) interfaces, is discretely considered in this work. The TPB regions connect percolating regions of electronic and ionic conducting phases of the anode, nickel (Ni) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), respectively; with porous regions supporting mass transport of the fuel and product. A two-dimensional (2D), multi-species lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to describe the diffusion process in complex pore structures that are representative of the SOFC anode. This diffusion model is discretely coupled to a kinetic electrochemical oxidation mechanism using localized flux boundary conditions. The details of the oxidation kinetics are prescribed as a function of applied activation overpotential and the localized hydrogen and water mole fractions. This development effort is aimed at understanding the effects of the anode microstructure within TPB regions. This work describes the methods used so that future studies can consider the details of SOFC anode microstructure. (author)

  2. Mass-corrections for the conservative coupling of flow and transport on collocated meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waluga, Christian, E-mail: waluga@ma.tum.de [Institute for Numerical Mathematics (M2), Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstraße 3, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Wohlmuth, Barbara [Institute for Numerical Mathematics (M2), Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstraße 3, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Rüde, Ulrich [Department of Computer Science 10, University Erlangen–Nuremberg, Cauerstr. 11, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Buoyancy-driven flow models demand a careful treatment of the mass-balance equation to avoid spurious source and sink terms in the non-linear coupling between flow and transport. In the context of finite-elements, it is therefore commonly proposed to employ sufficiently rich pressure spaces, containing piecewise constant shape functions to obtain local or even strong mass-conservation. In three-dimensional computations, this usually requires nonconforming approaches, special meshes or higher order velocities, which make these schemes prohibitively expensive for some applications and complicate the implementation into legacy code. In this paper, we therefore propose a lean and conservatively coupled scheme based on standard stabilized linear equal-order finite elements for the Stokes part and vertex-centered finite volumes for the energy equation. We show that in a weak mass-balance it is possible to recover exact conservation properties by a local flux-correction which can be computed efficiently on the control volume boundaries of the transport mesh. We discuss implementation aspects and demonstrate the effectiveness of the flux-correction by different two- and three-dimensional examples which are motivated by geophysical applications.

  3. Ion-neutral transport through quadrupole interfaces of mass-spectrometer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jugroot, M.; Groth, C.P.T.; Thomson, B.A.; Baranov, V.; Collings, B.A.; French, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The transport of free ions through highly under-expanded jet flows of neutral gases and in the presence of applied electric fields is investigated by continuum-based numerical simulations. In particular, numerical results are described which are relevant to ion flows occurring in quadrupole interfaces of mass spectrometer systems. A five-moment mathematical model and parallel multi-block numerical solution procedure is developed for predicting the ion transport. The model incorporates the effects of ion-neutral collision processes and is used in conjunction with a Navier-Stokes model and flow solver for the neutral gas to examine the key influences controlling the ion motion. The effects of the neutral gas flow, electric fields (both dc and rf), and flow field geometry on ion mobility are carefully assessed. The capability of controlling the charged particle motions through a combination of directed neutral flow and applied electric field is demonstrated for these high-speed, hypersonic, jet flows. (author)

  4. Effective Heat and Mass Transport Properties of Anisotropic Porous Ceria for Solar Thermochemical Fuel Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Haussener

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution X-ray computed tomography is employed to obtain the exact 3D geometrical configuration of porous anisotropic ceria applied in solar-driven thermochemical cycles for splitting H2O and CO2. The tomography data are, in turn, used in direct pore-level numerical simulations for determining the morphological and effective heat/mass transport properties of porous ceria, namely: porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, extinction coefficient, thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient, permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and tortuosity and residence time distributions. Tailored foam designs for enhanced transport properties are examined by means of adjusting morphologies of artificial ceria samples composed of bimodal distributed overlapping transparent spheres in an opaque medium.

  5. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Cao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−, and the formation of protective AlO(OH, which further affects the corrosion speed.

  6. Mechanistic modelling of the corrosion behaviour of copper nuclear fuel waste containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F; Kolar, M

    1996-10-01

    A mechanistic model has been developed to predict the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a Canadian disposal vault. The model is based on a detailed description of the electrochemical, chemical, adsorption and mass-transport processes involved in the uniform corrosion of copper, developed from the results of an extensive experimental program. Predictions from the model are compared with the results of some of these experiments and with observations from a bronze cannon submerged in seawater saturated clay sediments. Quantitative comparisons are made between the observed and predicted corrosion potential, corrosion rate and copper concentration profiles adjacent to the corroding surface, as a way of validating the long-term model predictions. (author). 12 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Min; Liu, Li; Fan, Lei; Yu, Zhongfen; Li, Ying; Oguzie, Emeka E.; Wang, Fuhui

    2018-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C) has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−), and the formation of protective AlO(OH), which further affects the corrosion speed. PMID:29401690

  8. A mercury transport and fate model (LM2-mercury) for mass budget assessment of mercury cycling in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    LM2-Mercury, a mercury mass balance model, was developed to simulate and evaluate the transport, fate, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. The model simulates total suspended solids (TSS), disolved organic carbon (DOC), and total, elemental, divalent, ...

  9. Corrosion '98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What's All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO 2 Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  10. Eutectic fusion used for the survey of transport of mass in metallic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savane, Y.S.; Katty, S.; Balde, M.L.; Cisse, S.; Rogov, V.I.

    1997-09-01

    The phenomenon of eutectic fusion could be used for the survey of transport of mass in metallic solutions, which allows to determine the part of the ionic conductibility in the solutions. The survey done in the system In 2 Bi Bi-In at a temperature of 72 deg. C with a current of 4A allowed to find a ionic current of 2,6.10 -3 which constitutes about 0,07% of the total current. So the part of ionic conductibility in the eutectic fusion of the system In 2 Bi Bi-In is of 0,07%. (author)

  11. Identification of biomolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters in living cells by inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirmohammadi Adel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of in-vivo biomolecule mass transport and reaction rate parameters from experimental data obtained by Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP is becoming more important. Methods and results The Osborne-Moré extended version of the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm was coupled with the experimental data obtained by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP protocol, and the numerical solution of a set of two partial differential equations governing macromolecule mass transport and reaction in living cells, to inversely estimate optimized values of the molecular diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor. The results indicate that the FRAP protocol provides enough information to estimate one parameter uniquely using a nonlinear optimization technique. Coupling FRAP experimental data with the inverse modeling strategy, one can also uniquely estimate the individual values of the binding rate coefficients if the molecular diffusion coefficient is known. One can also simultaneously estimate the dissociation rate parameter and molecular diffusion coefficient given the pseudo-association rate parameter is known. However, the protocol provides insufficient information for unique simultaneous estimation of three parameters (diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters owing to the high intercorrelation between the molecular diffusion coefficient and pseudo-association rate parameter. Attempts to estimate macromolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters simultaneously from FRAP data result in misleading conclusions regarding concentrations of free macromolecule and bound complex inside the cell, average binding time per vacant site, average time for diffusion of macromolecules from one site to the next, and slow or rapid mobility of biomolecules in cells. Conclusion To obtain unique values for molecular diffusion coefficient and

  12. Study of point defects in non crystalline alloys by high temperature mass transport experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoge, Y.

    1986-09-01

    We present in this communication the results of new experiments designed to study the mass transport mechanism in non-crystalline metallic alloys. They are based on the isothermal measurement of the crystallization kinetics, either without constraint or under electron irradiation or hydrostatic pressure. These experiments show that in the alloys studied, (FeNi) 8 (Pb) 2 and Ni 6 Nb 4 ), irradiation enhances the diffusion on the one hand, and on the other that there exist an activation volume for diffusion, of the order of one atomic volume. We discuss then the atomic model of diffusion needed to explain our results

  13. Interannual variability of mass transport in the Canary region from LADCP data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas-Rodríguez, Isis; Hernández-Guerra, Alonso; Vélez-Belchí, Pedro; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio

    2010-05-01

    The variability of the Canary Current is a widely studied topic regarding its role as eastern boundary of the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre. The Canary region provides indeed an interesting study area in terms of estimating variability scales of the Subtropical Gyre as well as the water masses dynamics. RAPROCAN (RAdial PROfunda de CANarias - Canary deep hydrographic section) is a project based on the reaching of these goals through the obtaining of hydrographic measures during cruises taking place approximately along 29°N, to the North of the Canary Archipelago, twice a year since 2006. The full depth sampling carried out allows the study of temperature and salinity distribution and the calculation of mass transports across the section. The transport estimates are compared to those obtained from previous measurements and estimates in the region. Therefore, transports and their variability through the last decade are quantified. The most significant advance made to previous works is the use of LADCP (Lowered Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) data informing the initial geostrophic calculations. Thus, corrections are applied to each geostrophic profile considering the reference velocity obtained from LADCP data. ADCP-referenced transport estimates are obtained, providing a successful comparison between the velocity fields obtained from the hydrographic measures. While this work shows the interannual variability observed in winter since 1997, preliminary results confirm previous hypotheses about the magnitude of the Canary Current. Those results including LADCP data also provide new aspects in the circulation distribution across the Canary Archipelago. Also moored current meter data were taken into account in the up close study of the Current through the Lanzarote Passage. Interesting conclusions were drawn that certify the usefulness of LADCP data in referencing geostrophic calculations, while corroborating the results obtained through this methodology. Hence

  14. Numerical simulation of mass and energy transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpino, F. [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Strutture, Ambiente e Territorio (DiMSAT), University of Cassino, via Di Biasio 43, Cassino (Italy); Massarotti, N. [Dipertimento per le Tecnologie (DiT), University of Naples ' ' Parthenope' ' , Centro Direzionale, isola C4, 80143 Napoli (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) represent a very promising technology for near future energy conversion thanks to a number of advantages, including the possibility of using different fuels. In this paper, a detailed numerical model, based on a general mathematical description and on a finite element Characteristic based Split (CBS) algorithm code is employed to simulate mass and energy transport phenomena in SOFCs. The model predicts the thermodynamic quantity of interest in the fuel cell. Full details of the numerical solution obtained are presented both in terms of heat and mass transfer in the cell and in terms of electro-chemical reactions that occur in the system considered. The results obtained with the present algorithm is compared with the experimental data available in the literature for validation, showing an excellent agreement. (author)

  15. Submarine Landslides and Mass-Transport Deposition in the Nankai fore-arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, M.; Henry, P.; Kanamatsu, T.; Moe, K.; Moore, G. F.; IODP Expedition 333 Scientists

    2011-12-01

    Multiple lines of evidence exist for a range of sediment mass movement processes within the shallow megasplay fault zone (MSFZ) area and the adjacent slope basin in the outer fore-arc of the Nankai subduction zone, Japan. Diagnostic features observed in 3-D reflection seismic data and in cores from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 316 document a complex mass movement history spanning at least ˜2.87 million years. Various modes and scales of sediment remobilization can be related to the different morphotectonic settings in which they occurred and allow integration of knowledge on the spatial and temporal distribution of submarine landslides into a holistic reconstruction of the tectonostratigraphic evolution. New data from the most-recent Nankai IODP Expedition 333, which drilled and cored a Pleistocene-to-Holocene succession of the slope-basin seaward of the MSFZ, provides unprecedented details on submarine landslide processes occurring over the last Million year. The slope-basin represents the depocentre for downslope sediment transport and is characterized in 3-D reflection seismic data by several mass-transport deposits (MTDs), including an up to 180 m thick MTD. Here we present D/V Chikyu shipboard results and first post cruise results from Site C0018, including litho- bio- magneto- tephra- and stable isotope-stratigraphy, X-ray computed tomography analysis and physical properties data. Six MTDs were identified from visual core description and X-ray CT-scans. The thickest MTD is also the oldest (emplaced between 0.85 and 1.05 Ma) and it coincides with a lithological transition between a sandy turbidite sequence below, and ash-bearing hemipelagites comprising several MTDs above. Deformation styles within the MTD are heterogeneous: intervals of disturbed sediments are interbedded within intervals inferred to retain original, coherent bedding. In three occurrences the base of the MTD is defined by a shear zone within fine-grained sediments

  16. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  17. New particle formation in air mass transported between two measurement sites in Northern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Komppula

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study covers four years of aerosol number size distribution data from Pallas and Värriö sites 250 km apart from each other in Northern Finland and compares new particle formation events between these sites. In air masses of eastern origin almost all events were observed to start earlier at the eastern station Värriö, whereas in air masses of western origin most of the events were observed to start earlier at the western station Pallas. This demonstrates that particle formation in a certain air mass type depends not only on the diurnal variation of the parameters causing the phenomenon (such as photochemistry but also on some properties carried by the air mass itself. The correlation in growth rates between the two sites was relatively good, which suggests that the amount of condensable vapour causing the growth must have been at about the same level in both sites. The condensation sink was frequently much higher at the downwind station. It seems that secondary particle formation related to biogenic sources dominate in many cases over the particle sinks during the air mass transport between the sites. Two cases of transport from Pallas to Värriö were further analysed with an aerosol dynamics model. The model was able to reproduce the observed nucleation events 250 km down-wind at Värriö but revealed some differences between the two cases. The simulated nucleation rates were in both cases similar but the organic concentration profiles that best reproduced the observations were different in the two cases indicating that divergent formation reactions may dominate under different conditions. The simulations also suggested that organic compounds were the main contributor to new particle growth, which offers a tentative hypothesis to the distinct features of new particles at the two sites: Air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean typically spent approximately only ten hours over land before arriving at Pallas, and thus the time for the

  18. Mass gathering medicine: a predictive model for patient presentation and transport rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbon, P; Bridgewater, F H; Smith, C

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on research into the influence of environmental factors (including crowd size, temperature, humidity, and venue type) on the number of patients and the patient problems presenting to first-aid services at large, public events in Australia. Regression models were developed to predict rates of patient presentation and of transportation-to-a-hospital for future mass gatherings. To develop a data set and predictive model that can be applied across venues and types of mass gathering events that is not venue or event specific. Data collected will allow informed event planning for future mass gatherings for which health care services are required. Mass gatherings were defined as public events attended by in excess of 25,000 people. Over a period of 12 months, 201 mass gatherings attended by a combined audience in excess of 12 million people were surveyed throughout Australia. The survey was undertaken by St. John Ambulance Australia personnel. The researchers collected data on the incidence and type of patients presenting for treatment and on the environmental factors that may influence these presentations. A standard reporting format and definition of event geography was employed to overcome the event-specific nature of many previous surveys. There are 11,956 patients in the sample. The patient presentation rate across all event types was 0.992/1,000 attendees, and the transportation-to-hospital rate was 0.027/1,000 persons in attendance. The rates of patient presentations declined slightly as crowd sizes increased. The weather (particularly the relative humidity) was related positively to an increase in the rates of presentations. Other factors that influenced the number and type of patients presenting were the mobility of the crowd, the availability of alcohol, the event being enclosed by a boundary, and the number of patient-care personnel on duty. Three regression models were developed to predict presentation rates at future events. Several

  19. Multicomponent mass transport model: theory and numerical implementation (discrete-parcel-random-walk version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, S.W.; Foote, H.P.; Arnett, R.C.; Cole, C.R.; Serne, R.J.

    1977-05-01

    The Multicomponent Mass Transfer (MMT) Model is a generic computer code, currently in its third generation, that was developed to predict the movement of radiocontaminants in the saturated and unsaturated sediments of the Hanford Site. This model was designed to use the water movement patterns produced by the unsaturated and saturated flow models coupled with dispersion and soil-waste reaction submodels to predict contaminant transport. This report documents the theorical foundation and the numerical solution procedure of the current (third) generation of the MMT Model. The present model simulates mass transport processes using an analog referred to as the Discrete-Parcel-Random-Walk (DPRW) algorithm. The basic concepts of this solution technique are described and the advantages and disadvantages of the DPRW scheme are discussed in relation to more conventional numerical techniques such as the finite-difference and finite-element methods. Verification of the numerical algorithm is demonstrated by comparing model results with known closed-form solutions. A brief error and sensitivity analysis of the algorithm with respect to numerical parameters is also presented. A simulation of the tritium plume beneath the Hanford Site is included to illustrate the use of the model in a typical application. 32 figs

  20. Mass transport aspects of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under two-phase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, D.

    2007-03-27

    This work deals with selected aspects of mass transport phenomena in PEFCs and DMFCs. Emphasis is placed on the implications originating from the occurrence of two-phase flow within these devices. Optimality of supply, distribution, and removal of the fuel, the oxidant, and the reaction products is of utmost importance for the stability, efficiency, and durability of the devices. Being a prerequisite for high current densities while maintaining sufficient voltage, mass transport optimization contributes to the development of cost effective as well as compact designs and hence competitive fuel cells. [German] Die Visualisierung und Quantifizierung von Fluessigwasseransammlungen in Polymerelektrolytmembran-Brennstoffzellen konnte mittels Neutronenradiographie erreicht werden. Dank dieser neuartigen diagnostischen Methode konnte erstmals die Fluessigwasseransammlung in den poroesen Gasdiffusionsschichten direkt nachgewiesen und quantifiziert werden. Die Kombination von Neutronenradiographie mit ortsaufgeloesten Stromdichtemessungen bzw. lokaler Impedanzspektroskopie erlaubte die Korrelation des inhomogenen Fluessigwasseranfalls mit dem lokalen elektrochemischen Leistungsverhalten. Systematische Untersuchungen an Polymerelektrolyt- und Direkt-Methanol-Brennstoffzellen verdeutlichen sowohl den Einfluss von Betriebsbedingungen als auch die Auswirkung von Materialeigenschaften auf die Ausbildung zweiphasiger Stroemungen.

  1. How does the Mass Transport in Disk Galaxy Models Influence the Character of Orbits?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zotos Euaggelos E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We explore the regular or chaotic nature of orbits of stars moving in the meridional (R, z plane of an axially symmetric time-dependent disk galaxy model with a central, spherically symmetric nucleus. In particular, mass is linearly transported from the disk to the galactic nucleus, in order to mimic, in a way, the case of self-consistent interactions of an actual N-body simulation. We thus try to unveil the influence of this mass transportation on the different families of orbits of stars by monitoring how the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of orbits of the main regular resonant families, evolve as the galaxy develops a dense and massive nucleus in its core. The SALI method is applied to samples of orbits in order to distinguish safely between ordered and chaotic motion. In addition, a method based on the concept of spectral dynamics is used for identifying the various families of regular orbits and also for recognizing the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. Our computations strongly suggest that the amount of the observed chaos is substantially increased as the nucleus becomes more massive. Furthermore, extensive numerical calculations indicate that there are orbits which change their nature from regular to chaotic and vice versa and also orbits which maintain their orbital character during the galactic evolution. The present outcomes are compared to earlier related work.

  2. A two-dimensional, two-phase mass transport model for liquid-feed DMFCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.W.; Zhao, T.S.

    2007-01-01

    A two-dimensional, isothermal two-phase mass transport model for a liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is presented in this paper. The two-phase mass transport in the anode and cathode porous regions is formulated based on the classical multiphase flow in porous media without invoking the assumption of constant gas pressure in the unsaturated porous medium flow theory. The two-phase flow behavior in the anode flow channel is modeled by utilizing the drift-flux model, while in the cathode flow channel the homogeneous mist-flow model is used. In addition, a micro-agglomerate model is developed for the cathode catalyst layer. The model also accounts for the effects of both methanol and water crossover through the membrane. The comprehensive model formed by integrating those in the different regions is solved numerically using a home-written computer code and validated against the experimental data in the literature. The model is then used to investigate the effects of various operating and structural parameters, such as methanol concentration, anode flow rate, porosities of both anode and cathode electrodes, the rate of methanol crossover, and the agglomerate size, on cell performance

  3. Mass transport enhancement in redox flow batteries with corrugated fluidic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisboa, Kleber Marques; Marschewski, Julian; Ebejer, Neil; Ruch, Patrick; Cotta, Renato Machado; Michel, Bruno; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-08-01

    We propose a facile, novel concept of mass transfer enhancement in flow batteries based on electrolyte guidance in rationally designed corrugated channel systems. The proposed fluidic networks employ periodic throttling of the flow to optimally deflect the electrolytes into the porous electrode, targeting enhancement of the electrolyte-electrode interaction. Theoretical analysis is conducted with channels in the form of trapezoidal waves, confirming and detailing the mass transport enhancement mechanism. In dilute concentration experiments with an alkaline quinone redox chemistry, a scaling of the limiting current with Re0.74 is identified, which compares favourably against the Re0.33 scaling typical of diffusion-limited laminar processes. Experimental IR-corrected polarization curves are presented for high concentration conditions, and a significant performance improvement is observed with the narrowing of the nozzles. The adverse effects of periodic throttling on the pumping power are compared with the benefits in terms of power density, and an improvement of up to 102% in net power density is obtained in comparison with the flow-by case employing straight parallel channels. The proposed novel concept of corrugated fluidic networks comes with facile fabrication and contributes to the improvement of the transport characteristics and overall performance of redox flow battery systems.

  4. Effect of mass and charge transport speed and direction in porous anodes on microbial electrolysis cell performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    The use of porous electrodes like graphite felt as anode material has the potential of achieving high volumetric current densities. High volumetric current densities, however, may also lead to mass transport limitations within these porous materials. Therefore, in this study we investigated the mass

  5. Electrical transport, electrothermal transport, and effective electron mass in single-crystalline In2O3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Natalie; Bierwagen, Oliver; Ramu, Ashok T.; Speck, James S.

    2013-08-01

    A comprehensive study of the room-temperature electrical and electrothermal transport of single-crystalline indium oxide (In2O3) and indium tin oxide (ITO) films over a wide range of electron concentrations is reported. We measured the room-temperature Hall mobility μH and Seebeck coefficient S of unintentionally doped and Sn-doped high-quality, plasma-assisted molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown In2O3 for volume Hall electron concentrations nH from 7×1016 cm-3 (unintentionally doped) to 1×1021 cm-3 (highly Sn-doped, ITO). The resulting empirical S(nH) relation can be directly used in other In2O3 samples to estimate the volume electron concentration from simple Seebeck coefficient measurements. The mobility and Seebeck coefficient were modeled by a numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. Ionized impurity scattering and polar optical phonon scattering were found to be the dominant scattering mechanisms. Acoustic phonon scattering was found to be negligible. Fitting the temperature-dependent mobility above room temperature of an In2O3 film with high mobility allowed us to find the effective Debye temperature (ΘD=700 K) and number of phonon modes (NOPML=1.33) that best describe the polar optical phonon scattering. The modeling also yielded the Hall scattering factor rH as a function of electron concentration, which is not negligible (rH≈1.4) at nondegenerate electron concentrations. Fitting the Hall-scattering-factor corrected concentration-dependent Seebeck coefficient S(n) for nondegenerate samples to the numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and to widely used, simplified equations allowed us to extract an effective electron mass of m*=(0.30±0.03)me (with free electron mass me). The modeled mobility and Seebeck coefficient based on polar optical phonon and ionized impurity scattering describes the experimental results very accurately up to electron concentrations of 1019 cm-3, and qualitatively explains a mobility plateau or local

  6. Electroneutrality and ionic interactions in the modeling of mass transport in dilute electrochemical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Swarnavo, E-mail: ss927@cornell.edu [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Aquino, Wilkins, E-mail: wa27@cornell.edu [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > A simple ionic transport model including Coulombic interactions is proposed. > A connection between electroneutrality and Onsager's cross-flux terms is established. > Interionic flux densities are obtained from a constrained variational statement. > The numerical stiffness of the classical P-N-P system is bypassed using our proposed approach. - Abstract: We propose a simple, but novel mathematical and numerical approach to describe mass transport in dilute solutions, taking into consideration ionic interactions. Our proposed approach treats fluxes due to ionic interactions as additional unknowns in the transport equation. Through variational arguments, we derive a simple expression for these ionic fluxes in terms of the electroneutrality condition, which allows for a straightforward treatment of the new unknowns. Furthermore, a finite element formulation based on our mathematical model is presented. Finally, using the distribution of the interionic flux density and an energy dissipation function, we show that besides properly capturing flow due to ionic interactions, our model can also describe independent ionic flow as predicted by the conventional Nernst-Planck equation in regions where ionic interactions are weak.

  7. A heuristic simulation model of Lake Ontario circulation and mass balance transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, J.E.; Chalupnicki, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The redistribution of suspended organisms and materials by large-scale currents is part of natural ecological processes in large aquatic systems but can contribute to ecosystem disruption when exotic elements are introduced into the system. Toxic compounds and planktonic organisms spend various lengths of time in suspension before settling to the bottom or otherwise being removed. We constructed a simple physical simulation model, including the influence of major tributaries, to qualitatively examine circulation patterns in Lake Ontario. We used a simple mass balance approach to estimate the relative water input to and export from each of 10 depth regime-specific compartments (nearshore vs. offshore) comprising Lake Ontario. Despite its simplicity, our model produced circulation patterns similar to those reported by more complex studies in the literature. A three-gyre pattern, with the classic large counterclockwise central lake circulation, and a simpler two-gyre system were both observed. These qualitative simulations indicate little offshore transport along the south shore, except near the mouths of the Niagara River and Oswego River. Complex flow structure was evident, particularly near the Niagara River mouth and in offshore waters of the eastern basin. Average Lake Ontario residence time is 8 years, but the fastest model pathway indicated potential transport of plankton through the lake in as little as 60 days. This simulation illustrates potential invasion pathways and provides rough estimates of planktonic larval dispersal or chemical transport among nearshore and offshore areas of Lake Ontario. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  8. Solvent-Induced Crystallization in Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate) during Mass Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hao

    2001-03-01

    The solvent transport in poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and related phase transformation were investigated. The data of mass sorption were analyzed according to Harmon¡¦s model for Case I (Fickian), Case II (swelling) and anomalous transport. This transport process in PET is accompanied by the induced crystallization of the original amorphous state. The transformation was studied by wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), density gradient column, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). During this process, the matrix is under a compressive strain that causes different kinetic path of crystallization as compared to that by thermal annealing. This state of strain will assist the development of the solvent-induced crystallization. It also can be explained in terms of the principle of Le Chatelier if the local equilibrium is assumed. The model regarding the crystallization was proposed in terms of the study of long period L, the crystal thickness lc and the thickness of amorphous layer la, obtained from the linear correlation function and interface distribution function.

  9. Microbial air quality in mass transport buses and work-related illness among bus drivers of Bangkok Mass Transit Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Sundhiyodhin, Viboonsri; Luksamijarulkul, Soavalug; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan

    2004-06-01

    The air quality in mass transport buses, especially air-conditioned buses may affect bus drivers who work full time. Bus numbers 16, 63, 67 and 166 of the Seventh Bus Zone of Bangkok Mass Transit Authority were randomly selected to investigate for microbial air quality. Nine air-conditioned buses and 2-4 open-air buses for each number of the bus (36 air-conditioned buses and 12 open-air buses) were included. Five points of in-bus air samples in each studied bus were collected by using the Millipore A ir Tester Totally, 180 and 60 air samples collected from air-conditioned buses and open-air buses were cultured for bacterial and fungal counts. The bus drivers who drove the studied buses were interviewed towards histories of work-related illness while working. The results revealed that the mean +/- SD of bacterial counts in the studied open-air buses ranged from 358.50 +/- 146.66 CFU/m3 to 506 +/- 137.62 CFU/m3; bus number 16 had the highest level. As well as the mean +/- SD of fungal counts which ranged from 93.33 +/- 44.83 CFU/m3 to 302 +/- 294.65 CFU/m3; bus number 166 had the highest level. Whereas, the mean +/- SD of bacterial counts in the studied air-conditioned buses ranged from 115.24 +/- 136.01 CFU/m3 to 244.69 +/- 234.85 CFU/m3; bus numbers 16 and 67 had the highest level. As well as the mean +/- SD of fungal counts which rangedfrom 18.84 +/- 39.42 CFU/m3 to 96.13 +/- 234.76 CFU/m3; bus number 166 had the highest level. When 180 and 60 studied air samples were analyzed in detail, it was found that 33.33% of the air samples from open-air buses and 6.11% of air samples from air-conditioned buses had a high level of bacterial counts (> 500 CFU/m3) while 6.67% of air samples from open-air buses and 2.78% of air samples from air-conditioned buses had a high level of fungal counts (> 500 CFU/m3). Data from the history of work-related illnesses among the studied bus drivers showed that 91.67% of open-air bus drivers and 57.28% of air-conditioned bus drivers had

  10. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  11. Arabian Night and Sea Story - Biomarkers from a Giant Mass Transport Deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratenkov, Sophia; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Clift, Peter D.; George, Simon C.

    2016-04-01

    The study of mass transport deposits (MTDs) is an important field of research due to the potential insights into catastrophic events in the past and modern geohazard threats (e.g. tsunamis). Submarine mass movements are very significant processes in sculpturing the structure of continental margins, particularly in their extent and magnitude that have consequences both in the modern day, as well as in the geological past. An understanding of the complex stratigraphy of a submarine mass transport deposit (MTD) might help in reconstructing the provenance and transport pathways of sedimentary material and thus give important insights into sedimentary dynamics and processes triggering specific events. Drilling operations during International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 355 Arabian Sea Monsoon, which took place during April and May, 2015 cored two sites in Laxmi Basin. Site U1456 was cored to 1109.4 m below seafloor (mbsf), with the oldest recovered rock dated to ~13.5-17.7 Ma. Site U1457 was cored to 1108.6 mbsf, with the oldest rock dated to ~62 Ma. At each site, we cored through ~330 m and ~190 m of MTD material. The MTD layers mainly consist of interbedded lithologies of dark grey claystone, light greenish calcarenite and calcilutite, and conglomerate/breccia, with ages based on calcareous nannofossil and foraminifer biostratigraphy ranging from the Eocene to early Miocene (Pandey et al., 2015). This MTD, known as Nataraja Slide, is the third largest MTD known from the geological record and the second largest on a passive margin. Calvés et al. (2015) identified a potential source area offshore Sourashstra on the Indian continental margin and invoked the single step mass movement model to explain the mechanism of emplacement. Initial shipboard work demonstrated the high variability in total organic carbon and total nitrogen levels in different layers within the MTD, which raises a number of questions related to the source and composition of the organic

  12. Monthly Variation of Taiwan Strait Through-flow Transports and Associated Water Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, S.; Sheu, D.; Kuo, H.

    2005-05-01

    Through-flow transports and associated water masses are analyzed using current data measured by bottom-mounted and ship-board ADCP (1999-2001) across the central Taiwan Strait and strait-wide hydrographic data acquired from 79 CTD survey cruises (1986-2003). The East Asian monsoon, from southwest in July to August and northeast in October to March, controls the transport fluctuation which peaks in August (2.34 Sv northward), is hampered by the northeast monsoon after September and diminishes to the minimum (0.26 Sv southward) in December. The standard deviation of the calculated transport ranges from 0.56 to 1.05 Sv during northeast monsoon months and is relatively small in other months. A cluster analysis together with conventional T-S diagrams identifies the saline and warm Kuroshio Branch Water (KBW), the less saline South China Sea Surface Water (SCSSW), the brackish and cold China Coastal Water (CCW), the saline Subsurface Water (SW) (depth > 100 m) and the Diluted Coastal Water (DCW). The majority of the northward transport in summer carries the SCSSW to the East China Sea. Meanwhile, the DCW appears off the northwest bank of the strait and the SW resides in the bottom layer of a deep trench in the southeastern strait. The onset of the northeast monsoon in September drives the CCW from the Yangtze river mouth to the northern strait. In the southern strait, the northward-moving KBW replaces the SCSSW and meets the southward-intruding CCW in the middle strait during November to April.

  13. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  14. Corrosion Cost and Corrosion Map of Korea - Based on the Data from 2005 to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Lim, H. K.; Kim, J. J.; Hwang, W. S.; Park, Y. S.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion of metallic materials occurs by the reaction with corrosive environment such as atmosphere, marine, soil, urban, high temperature etc. In general, reduction of thickness and cracking and degradation are resulted from corrosion. Corrosion in all industrial facilities and infrastructure causes large economic losses as well as a large number of accidents. Economic loss by corrosion has been reported to be nearly 1-6% of GNP or GDP. In order to reduce corrosion damage of industrial facilities, corrosion map as well as a systematic investigation of the loss of corrosion in each industrial sector is needed. The Corrosion Science Society of Korea in collaboration with 15 universities and institutes has started to survey on the cost of corrosion and corrosion map of Korea since 2005. This work presents the results of the survey on cost of corrosion by Uhlig, Hoar, and input-output methods, and the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion rate of carbon steel, weathering steel, galvanized steel, copper, and aluminum in Korea. The total corrosion cost was estimated in terms of the percentage of the GDP of industry sectors and the total GDP of Korea. According to the result of Input/output method, corrosion cost of Korea was calculated as 2.9% to GDP (2005). Time of wetness was shown to be categories 3 to 4 in all exposure areas. A definite seasonal difference was observed in Korea. In summer and fall, time of wetness was higher than in other seasons. Because of short exposure period (12 months), significant corrosion trends depending upon materials and exposure corrosion environments were not revealed even though increased mass loss and decreased corrosion rate by exposure time

  15. Electrochemical evaluation of corrosion and tribocorrosion behaviour of amorphous and nanocrystalline cobalt–tungsten electrodeposited coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathollahzade, N.; Raeissi, K., E-mail: k_raeissi@cc.iut.ac.ir

    2014-11-14

    Amorphous and nanocrystalline Co–W coatings were electrodeposited on copper substrates from a citrate–ammonia bath. The coatings showed nodular surface morphologies, but a microcrack network was detected in the amorphous coating. However, a better corrosion resistance was achieved for the amorphous coating. During sliding under open circuit potential (OCP) condition, the potential of amorphous coating gradually became more active probably due to the widening of wear scar, and thus expansion of active area. The amorphous coatings showed a higher volume loss at OCP probably due to its lower microhardness. In anodic sliding, a sharp increase in current density was observed due to mass transport and depassivation effects. In all sliding conditions, the proportion of mass transport was higher than wear accelerated corrosion, which implied that the dissolution reaction of the coatings was mainly a mass-transport controlled process. The results also showed that the effect of sliding on degradation is more intense for the nanocrystalline coating. For both coatings, the formation of the superficial microcracks in the vicinity of wear scars indicating on a surface fatigue wear mechanism. - Highlights: • Mass-transport effect had higher proportion in tribocorrosion of Co–W coatings. • The major electrochemical-wear degradation was for the nanocrystalline coating. • The higher proportion of wear accelerated corrosion was for the amorphous coating. • Superficial microcracks were formed near scars due to the coatings brittleness.

  16. Study of hydrogen migration produced during the corrosion of PWR reactors fuel cans in zircaloy 4 and zirconia; Etude du transport de l`hydrogene produit lors de la corrosion des gaines d`elements combustibles des reacteurs a eau sous pression dans la zircone et le zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufore, L

    1997-12-12

    The corrosion of Zircaloy-4-claddings by water from the primary circuit of nuclear power plant goes hand in hand with the release of hydrogen which penetrates the oxide and then the metal. This work focuses on the mechanisms of hydrogen transport in oxide and in metal. Hydrogen transport in oxide is studied on the basis of corrosion tests performed in the autoclave at 360 deg C. These tests are performed on Zircaloy-4 claddings under different chemical conditions (pure water, and pure water with lithium hydroxide). The distribution of hydrogen in oxide film is measured by SIMS. Hydrogen profiles in the oxide are dependent on the oxide microstructure and vary with oxidation time. These observations are confirmed by experiments in which some samples, previously oxidized in the autoclave, are immersed in heavy water. In the oxide layer, two zones are observed: one external porous zone and one internal dense zone. Deuterium diffusion coefficients in dense oxide are determined using SIMS profiles and Fischer diffusion model. Hydrogen transport in metal is also studied by means of gas-phase permeation experiments. These are set up at different temperature (400-500 deg. C) and under different hydrogen pressures and make it possible to determine the hydrogen diffusion coefficients in a Zircaloy-4 cladding under experimental conditions. All these results lead us to discuss of hydrogen transport evolution in cladding during oxidation. A model taking into account hydrogen transport in oxide and in metal, and the hydrides precipitations is proposed. (author) 110 refs.

  17. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion......Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  18. Corrosion in airframes

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  19. Porous media fluid flow, heat, and mass transport model with rock stress coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runchal, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the physical and mathematical basis of a general purpose porous media flow model, GWTHERM. The mathematical basis of the model is obtained from the coupled set of the classical governing equations for the mass, momentum and energy balance. These equations are embodied in a computational model which is then coupled externally to a linearly elastic rock-stress model. This coupling is rather exploratory and based upon empirical correlations. The coupled model is able to take account of time-dependent, inhomogeneous and anisotropic features of the hydrogeologic, thermal and transport phenomena. A number of applications of the model have been made. Illustrations from the application of the model to nuclear waste repositories are included

  20. Mass transport aspects of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under two-phase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, D.

    2007-03-15

    This well-illustrated, comprehensive dissertation by Dr. Ing. Denis Kramer takes an in-depth look at polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) and the possibilities for their application. First of all, the operating principles of polymer electrolyte fuel cells are described and discussed, whereby thermodynamics aspects and loss mechanisms are examined. The mass transport diagnostics made with respect to the function of the cells are discussed. Field flow geometry, gas diffusion layers and, amongst other things, liquid distribution, the influence of flow direction and the low-frequency behaviour of air-fed PEFCs are discussed. Direct methanol fuel cells are examined, as are the materials chosen. The documentation includes comprehensive mathematical and graphical representations of the mechanisms involved.

  1. The role of mass transport pathway in wormholelike mesoporous carbon for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yeru; Liang, Fengxue; Li, Zhenghui; Wu, Dingcai; Yan, Fangyu; Li, Siyu; Fu, Ruowen

    2010-09-28

    In the present paper, we demonstrate the importance of the role of a mass transport pathway (MTP) in wormholelike mesoporous carbon (WMC) through studying the ion diffusion behaviors within two different wormholelike mesopore networks with and without MTP. Our results reveal that the introduction of MTP is very helpful in improving ion diffusion properties. The as-prepared WMC with a MTP of ca. 9.7 nm exhibits notably better electric double layer performance as compared to the conventional WMC without a MTP. For example, even at the quick sweep rate of 50 mV s(-1), the surface specific capacitance of the former is 21.6 microF cm(-2), which is almost 4 times as high as that of the latter (5.5 microF cm(-2)).

  2. Influence of mass transport towards deactivation in tert-butyl-source driven isobutane/2-butene alkylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschauer, S.J.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2011-07-01

    The deactivation of i-butane/trans-2-butene alkylation using tert-butyl-halide promoted ionic liquid catalysts is studied.Here, the mass transport was modified by varying the feed rate and the type of promoter addition. The experimental data show that the deactivation increases with increasing feed rate. Moreover, a biliquid foam is formed when feed rates above 1 g/min are adjusted. As the results indicate a strong influence of the biliquid foam and its formation on deactivation, both aspects are also discussed.When the promoter is added to the feed mixture an increase of conversion with time on stream is observed. A deactivation in continuous promoter addition mode could not be noted in the investigated time-on-stream range. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for mass transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prickett, T.A.; Voorhees, M.L.; Herzog, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    This technical memorandum compares one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for studying regional mass transport of radionuclides in groundwater associated with deep repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In addition, this report outlines the general conditions for which a one- or two-dimensional model could be used as an alternate to a three-dimensional model analysis. The investigation includes a review of analytical and numerical models in addition to consideration of such conditions as rock and fluid heterogeneity, anisotropy, boundary and initial conditions, and various geometric shapes of repository sources and sinks. Based upon current hydrologic practice, each review is taken separately and discussed to the extent that the researcher can match his problem conditions with the minimum number of model dimensions necessary for an accurate solution

  4. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Omidi, N.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversy surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  5. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Burch, J.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Kuntz, Kip; Omidi, N.; Read, A.; Robertson, Ina; hide

    2010-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversies surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  6. Architecture for improved mass transport and system performance in redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Jacob; Pezeshki, Alan; Clement, Jason T.; Aaron, Douglas; Mench, Matthew M.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, electrochemical performance and parasitic losses are combined in an overall system-level efficiency metric for a high performance, all-vanadium redox flow battery. It was found that pressure drop and parasitic pumping losses are relatively negligible for high performance cells, i.e., those capable of operating at a high current density while at a low flow rate. Through this finding, the Equal Path Length (EPL) flow field architecture was proposed and evaluated. This design has superior mass transport characteristics in comparison with the standard serpentine and interdigitated designs at the expense of increased pressure drop. An Aspect Ratio (AR) design is discussed and evaluated, which demonstrates decreased pressure drop compared to the EPL design, while maintaining similar electrochemical performance under most conditions. This AR design is capable of leading to improved system energy efficiency for flow batteries of all chemistries.

  7. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  8. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the `glymphatic pathway' plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs . It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. Keywords: inverse problem, optimal mass transport, diffusion equation, cerebrospinal fluid flow in brain, optical flow, liquid flow modeling, Monge Kantorovich problem, diffusion tensor estimation

  9. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...... showed that x-ray attenuation measurements allow determination of the actual concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel measured by x-ray attenuation was found to be in very good agreement with the calculated mass loss obtained by Faraday......’s law. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the depth of penetration of corrosion products as well as time to corrosion-induced cracking is varying for the different water-to-cement ratios and applied corrosion current densities....

  10. Three-Dimensional Network Model for Coupling of Fracture and Mass Transport in Quasi-Brittle Geomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Grassl

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dual three-dimensional networks of structural and transport elements were combined to model the effect of fracture on mass transport in quasi-brittle geomaterials. Element connectivity of the structural network, representing elasticity and fracture, was defined by the Delaunay tessellation of a random set of points. The connectivity of transport elements within the transport network was defined by the Voronoi tessellation of the same set of points. A new discretisation strategy for domain boundaries was developed to apply boundary conditions for the coupled analyses. The properties of transport elements were chosen to evolve with the crack opening values of neighbouring structural elements. Through benchmark comparisons involving non-stationary transport and fracture, the proposed dual network approach was shown to be objective with respect to element size and orientation.

  11. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N. [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Le Roy, L. [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  12. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Joglekar, A. S. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ortega, M. I. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Moll, R. [University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Fenn, D. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  13. A thermodynamic/mass-transport model for the release of ruthenium from irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, F.; Iglesias, F.C.; Hunt, C.E.L.

    1990-01-01

    Some postulated nuclear reactor accidents lead to fuel failures and hence release of fission products into the primary heat transport system (PHTS). To determine the consequences of such accidents, it is important to understand the behavior of fission products both in the PHTS and in the reactor containment building. Ruthenium metal has a high boiling point and is nonvolatile under reducing conditions. However, under oxidizing conditions ruthenium can form volatile oxides at relatively low temperatures and, hence, could escape from failed fuel and enter the containment building. The ruthenium radioisotope Ru-106 presents a potentially significant health risk if it is released outside the reactor containment building. Consequently, it is important to understand the behavior of ruthenium during a nuclear reactor accident. The authors review the thermodynamic behavior of ruthenium at high temperatures. The qualitative behavior of ruthenium, predicted using thermodynamic calculations, is then compared with experimental results from the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL). Finally, a simple thermodynamic/mass-transport model is proposed to explain the release behavior of ruthenium in a steam atmosphere

  14. Anisotropy effect of the clay soil masses on the stress-strain state of transport tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushkov Boris Semenovich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the kinds of clay soil mass anisotropy in the form of the spatial heterogeneity of properties of thawed and frozen soils, ambiguity of the frost heaving values and shrinkage in different directions. The questions of anisotropy of the clay soil properties at the positive temperatures are reported. The dependence of the heterogeneity of the physical and mechanical properties of frozen soils from the cryogenic texture, natural arrangement, different types of stratification and interbedding is considered. Indexes of the strength and strain anisotropy are noted. The accounting possibilities of the basic numerical indexes of heaving phenomena from the standpoint of anisotropy of the properties and processes inherent in the freezing through soil are analyzed by substitution in the heaving strain formula. The unevenness of thawed soil shrinkage in vertical and horizontal directions is noted during the freezing of the top layer. The unevenness of shrinkage in different directions is connected with kind of stress and cryogenic texture. Anisotropy of the frost heaving process is considered in the context of one-dimensional and non-one-dimensional problem depending on the amount of the freezing fronts and their direction. There is summarized the effect of anisotropy appearances on the stress-strain state of the transport tunnel. One can conclude that the resulting non-uniformity of heaving and shrinkage in conjunction with anisotropic properties of frozen soils, is a significant component in the complex of power factors determining the optimal design solution of a transport tunnel.

  15. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  16. Mass-transport limitation to in-cloud reaction rates: Implications of new accommodation coefficient measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1988-10-01

    Although it has been recognized for some time that the rate of reactive uptake of gases in cloudwater can depend on the value of the mass-accommodation coefficient (α) describing interfacial mass transport (MT), definitive evaluation of such rates is only now becoming possible with the availability of measurements of α for gases of atmospheric interest at air-water interfaces. Examination of MT limitation to the rate of in-cloud aqueous-phase oxidation of SO 2 by O 3 and H 2 O 2 shows that despite the low value of α/sub O3/ (5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4/), interfacial MT of this species is not limiting under essentially all conditions of interest; the high values of α for SO 2 (≥ 0.2) and H 2 O 2 (≥ 0.08) indicate no interfacial MT limitation for these species also. Although gas- and aqueous-phase MT can be limiting under certain extremes of conditions, treating the system as under chemical kinetic control is generally an excellent approximation. Interfacial MT limitation also is found not to hinder the rate of H 2 O 2 formation by aqueous-phase disproportionation of HO 2 . Finally, the rapid uptake of N 2 O 5 by cloud droplets implies that the yield of aqueous HNO 3 from in-cloud gas-phase oxidation of NO 2 by O 3 can be substantial even under daytime conditions. This report consists of copies of viewgraphs prepared for this presentation

  17. Dynamics and mass transport of solutal convection in a closed porous media system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Baole; Akhbari, Daria; Hesse, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Most of the recent studies of CO2 sequestration are performed in open systems where the constant partial pressure of CO2 in the vapor phase results in a time-invariant saturated concentration of CO2 in the brine (Cs). However, in some closed natural CO2 reservoirs, e.g., Bravo Dome in New Mexico, the continuous dissolution of CO2 leads to a pressure drop in the gas that is accompanied by a reduction of Cs and thereby affects the dynamics and mass transport of convection in the brine. In this talk, I discuss the characteristics of convective CO2 dissolution in a closed system. The gas is assumed to be ideal and its solubility given by Henry's law. An analytical solution shows that the diffusive base state is no longer self-similar and that diffusive mass transfer declines rapidly. Scaling analysis reveals that the volume ratio of brine and gas η determines the behavior of the system. DNS show that no constant flux regime exists for η > 0 nevertheless, the quantity F /Cs2 remains constant, where F is the dissolution flux. The onset time is only affected by η when the Rayleigh number Ra is small. In this case, the drop in Cs during the initial diffusive regime significantly reduces the effective Ra and therefore delays the onset.

  18. Corrosion inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A O

    1965-12-29

    An acid corrosion-inhibiting composition consists essentially of a sugar, and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of iodides and bromides. The weight ratio of the sugar to the alkali metal salt is between 2:1 and about 20,000:1. Also, a corrosion- inhibited phosphoric acid composition comprising at least about 20 wt% of phosphoric acid and between about 0.1 wt% and about 10 wt% of molasses, and between about 0.0005 wt% and about 1 wt% of potassium iodide. The weight ratio of molasses to iodide is greater than about 2:1. (11 claims)

  19. Mass transport of heavy metal ions and radon in gels used as sealing agents in containment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos, I.; Bauer, K.; Lakatos-Szabo, J.; Kretzschmar, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The diffusion and hydrodynamic mass transport of multivalent cations, mostly Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions and radon in polymer/silicate gels and Montanwax emulsions were studied. It was concluded that the self-conforming gels may decrease the hydrodynamic mass transport in porous and fractured media by 4-6 orders of magnitude. In water saturated systems, however, the diffusion transport can be restricted by hydrogels only to a moderate extent. On the other hand, the high and selective retention capacity of gels towards different diffusing species may open new vistas in the sealing technologies. Similar results were obtained for transport phenomena of radon. The almost perfect quenching process of radon and its nuclides in gels and emulsions further enhances the positive effects of the encapsulation methods. The laboratory experiments provided valuable new information to design the different containment technologies

  20. Mass transport of heavy metal ions and radon in gels used as sealing agents in containment technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, I.; Bauer, K.; Lakatos-Szabo, J. [Research Lab. for Mining Chemistry, Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary); Kretzschmar, H.J. [DBI Gas- und Umwelttechnik GmbH, Feiberg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The diffusion and hydrodynamic mass transport of multivalent cations, mostly Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions and radon in polymer/silicate gels and Montanwax emulsions were studied. It was concluded that the self-conforming gels may decrease the hydrodynamic mass transport in porous and fractured media by 4-6 orders of magnitude. In water saturated systems, however, the diffusion transport can be restricted by hydrogels only to a moderate extent. On the other hand, the high and selective retention capacity of gels towards different diffusing species may open new vistas in the sealing technologies. Similar results were obtained for transport phenomena of radon. The almost perfect quenching process of radon and its nuclides in gels and emulsions further enhances the positive effects of the encapsulation methods. The laboratory experiments provided valuable new information to design the different containment technologies.

  1. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods.Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The release of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was studied. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed.The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, incorporated directly and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  2. PIPELINE CORROSION CONTROL IN OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion in pipelines is one of the major challenges faced by oil and gas industries all over the world. This has made corrosion control or management a major factor to consider before setting up any industry that will transport products via pipelines. In this study the types of corrosion found on system 2A pipeline were; ...

  3. Drift effect and "negative" mass transport in an inhomogeneous medium: limiting case of a two-component lattice gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanets, Sergei P; Kliushnychenko, Oleksandr V

    2010-11-01

    The mass transport in an inhomogeneous medium is modeled as the limiting case of a two-component lattice gas with excluded volume constraint and one of the components fixed. In the long-wavelength approximation, the density relaxation of mobile particles is governed by diffusion and interaction with a medium inhomogeneity represented by the static component distribution. It is shown that the density relaxation can be locally accompanied by density distribution compression, i.e., the local mass transport directed from low-to high-density regions. The origin of such a "negative" mass transport is shown to be associated with the presence of a stationary drift flow defined by the medium inhomogeneity. In the quasi-one-dimensional case, the compression dynamics manifests itself in the hoppinglike motion of packet front position of diffusing substance due to staged passing through inhomogeneity barriers, and it leads to fragmentation of the packet and retardation of its spreading. The root-mean-square displacement reflects only the averaged packet front dynamics and becomes inappropriate as the transport characteristic in this regime. In the stationary case, the mass transport throughout the whole system may be directed from the boundary with lower concentration towards the boundary with higher concentration. Implications of the excluded volume constraint and particle distinguishability for these effects are discussed.

  4. 49 CFR 195.579 - What must I do to mitigate internal corrosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must I do to mitigate internal corrosion? 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.579 What must I do to mitigate internal corrosion? (a) General. If you transport any hazardous liquid or carbon dioxide that...

  5. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  6. Surface layer effects on waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.

    1993-01-01

    Water contact subjects waste glass to chemical attack that results in the formation of surface alteration layers. Two principal hypotheses have been advanced concerning the effect of surface alteration layers on continued glass corrosion: (1) they act as a mass transport barrier and (2) they influence the chemical affinity of the glass reaction. In general, transport barrier effects have been found to be less important than affinity effects in the corrosion of most high-level nuclear waste glasses. However, they can be important under some circumstances, for example, in a very alkaline solution, in leachants containing Mg ions, or under conditions where the matrix dissolution rate is very low. The latter suggests that physical barrier effect may affect the long-term glass dissolution rate. Surface layers influence glass reaction affinity through the effects of the altered glass and secondary phases on the solution chemistry. The reaction affinity may be controlled by various precipitates and crystalline phases, amorphous silica phases, gel layer, or all the components of the glass. The surface alteration layers influence radionuclide release mainly through colloid formation, crystalline phase incorporation, and gel layer retention. This paper reviews current understanding and uncertainties

  7. Corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  8. Using mass spectrometry for identification of ABC transporters from Xanthomonas citri and mutants expressed in different growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, J.N.; Balan, A.; Paes Leme, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Xanthomonas citri is a phytopathogenic bacterium that infects citrus plants causing significant losses for the economy. In our group, we have focused on the identification and characterization of ABC transport proteins of this bacterium, in order to determinate their function for growth in vitro and in vivo, during infection. ABC transporters represent one of the largest families of proteins, which transport since small molecules as ions up to oligopeptides and sugars. In prokaryotic cells many works have reported the ABC transport function in pathogenesis, resistance, biofilm formation, infectivity and DNA repair, but until our knowledge, there is no data related to these transporters and X. citri. So, In order to determinate which transporters are expressed in X. citri, we started a proteomic analysis based on mono and bi-dimensional gels associated to mass spectrometry analyses. After growing X. citri and two different mutants deleted for ssuA and nitA genes in LB and minimum media, cellular extracts were obtained and used for preparation of mono and bi-dimensional gels. Seven bands covering the expected mass of ABC transporter components (20 kDa to 50 kDa) in SDS-PAGE were cut off the gel, treated with trypsin and submitted to the MS for protein identification. The results of 2D gels were good enough and will serve as a standard for development of similar experiments in large scale. (author)

  9. In-pile loop experiments in water chemistry and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kysela, J.; Jindrich, K.; Masarik, V.; Fric, Z.; Chotivka, V.; Hamerska, H.; Vsolak, R.; Erben, O.

    1986-08-01

    Methods and techniques used were as follows: (a) Method of polarizing resistance for remote monitoring of instantaneous rate of uniform corrosion. (b) Out-of-pile loop at the temperature 350 degC, pressure 19 MPa, circulation 20 kgs/h, testing time 1000 h. (c) High temperature electromagnetic filter with classical solenoid and ball matrix for high pressure filtration tests. (d) High pressure and high temperature in-pile water loop with coolant flow rate 10 000 kgs/h, neutron flux in active channel 7x10 13 n/cm 2 .s, 16 MPa, 330 degC. (e) Evaluation of experimental results by chemical and radiochemical analysis of coolant, corrosion products and corrosion layer on surface. The results of measurements carried out in loop facilities can be summarized into the following conclusions: (a) In-pile and out-of-pile loops are suitable means of investigating corrosion processes and mass transport in the nuclear power plant primary circuit. (b) In studying transport phenomena in the loop, it is necessary to consider the differences in geometry of the loop and the primary circuit, mainly the ratio of irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces and volumes. (c) In the experimental facility simulating the WWER-type nuclear power plant primary circuit, solid suspended particles of a chemical composition corresponding most frequently to magnetite or nickel ferrite, though with non-stoichiometric composition Me x 2+ Fe 3-x 3+ O 4 , were found. (d) Continuous filtration of water by means of an electromagnetic filter removing large particles of corrosion products leads to a decrease in radioactivity of the outer epitactic layer only. The effect of filtration on the inner topotactic layer is negligible

  10. Carbonate Channel-Levee Systems Influenced by Mass-Transport Deposition, Browse Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, D.; Janson, X.; Sanchez-Phelps, C.; Covault, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Submarine channels are primary conduits for clastic sediment transport to deep-water basins, thereby controlling the location of marine depocenters and sediment bypass. The evolution and depositional character of submarine channels have broad implications to sediment dispersal, sediment quality, and hydrocarbon exploration potential. Siliciclastic channel systems have been extensively studied in modern environments, seismic and outcrop; however, carbonate channel-levee deposits have only recently been explored. Here we utilize newly released high-resolution (90 Hz) seismic-reflection data from the Australian Browse Basin to document the influence of mass-transport complex (MTC) deposition on the stratigraphic architecture of carbonate channel-levee systems. The 2014 vintage seismic survey is 2500 km2 and hosts numerous large Miocene-age carbonate channel-levee complexes basinward of the shelf edge. Regional horizons and individual channel forms were mapped. Channels range from 200-300 m wide and are bounded by high-relief levee-overbank wedges (>100 ms TWTT). These channels extend across the survey area >70 km. The leveed-channels were sourced from middle and late Miocene slope gullies linked to platform carbonates. Slope-attached and locally derived MTC's are evident throughout the Miocene section likely related to periods of basin inversion and shelf-edge gully incision. We interpret that regionally extensive (>1000 km2) slope-attached MTC's can shut down a channel-levee system and trigger the initiation of a new system, whereas more locally derived (wasting and turbidity currents, which informs depositional models of carbonate slope systems and calls for re-evaluation of the controls on stratigraphic patterns in mixed siliciclastic-carbonate deep-water basins.

  11. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  12. Influence of temporal resolution and processing of exposure data on modeling of chloride ingress and reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flint, Madeleine; Michel, Alexander; Billington, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    a numerical heat and mass transport model that includes full coupling of heat, moisture and ion transport. Heat, moisture, and chloride concentration distributions were passed to a simplified reinforcement corrosion initiation and propagation model. The numerical study indicates that processing and temporal...... resolution of the exposure data has a considerable impact on long-term hygrothermal distribution, chloride ingress, and reinforcement section loss results. Use of time-averaged exposure data in the heat and mass transport model reduces the rate of chloride ingress in concrete and affects prediction...

  13. Mass-transport deposits and the advantages of a real three-dimensional perspective (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardelli, L. G.; Wood, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    Mass-transport deposits (MTDs) form a significant component of the stratigraphic record in ancient and modern deepwater basins worldwide. However, the difficulties encountered when performing direct observations of these submarine units, the limited area covered by geophysical surveys acquired by research institutions, and the often surficial nature of seafloor data collected by federal agencies represent major hurdles in understanding submarine mass-movement dynamics. Three-dimensional seismic reflectivity imaging, drawn mainly from energy exploration in deepwater regions of the world, has allowed researchers to describe the architecture of MTDs at unprecedented spatial and temporal scales. In this talk, we present observations made using thousands of square kilometers of three-dimensional seismic data acquired by the oil and gas industry in offshore Trinidad, Morocco, and the Gulf of Mexico, where MTDs are a common occurrence in the stratigraphic record. Detailed mapping of MTD architecture has allowed us to better understand the role that MTDs have in continental-margin evolution. Morphometric data obtained from the mapping of MTDs is used to model tsunamigenic waves and their potential affect of coastal areas. The effect of low permeability MTDs on reservoir and aquifer fluid behavior has important implications, enhancing the economic importance of understanding the occurrence and distribution of these deposits. The recognition of MTD processes and morphology leads to new understanding of the processes possibly active in shaping other planets. Such analogs speak to a possible deepwater origin for features on Mars previously attributed to subaerial events. As industry-quality 3D seismic data become increasingly available to academic institutions, current studies become important bell weathers for future analysis of MTDs and processes in oceans of this planet and beyond.

  14. Vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedures for automotive in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Liza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An accelerated corrosion test, known as proving ground accelerated test, is commonly performed by automotive manufacturers to evaluate the corrosion performance of a vehicle. The test combines corrosion and durability inputs to detect potential failures that may occur during in-service conditions. Currently, the test is conducted at an external test center overseas. Such test is aimed to simulate the effects of one year accelerated corrosion in severe corrosive environment of the north-east and south east of America. However, the test results obtained do not correlate with the actual corrosion conditions observed in the Malaysian market, which is likely attributed to the different test environment of the tropical climate of vehicles in service. Therefore, a vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedure that suits the Malaysian market is proposed and benchmarked with other global car manufacturers that have their own dedicated corrosion test procedure. In the present work, a test track is used as the corrosion test ground and consists of various types of roads for structural durability exposures. Corrosion related facilities like salt trough, mud trough and gravel road are constructed as addition to the existing facilities. The establishment of accelerated corrosion test facilities has contributed to the development of initial accelerated corrosion test procedure for the national car manufacturer. The corrosion exposure is monitored by fitting test coupons at the underbody of test vehicle using mass loss technique so that the desired corrosion rate capable of simulating the real time corrosion effects for its target market.

  15. Coastal currents and mass transport of surface sediments over the shelf regions of Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, S.C.

    1970-01-01

    southward except near Monterey Canyon which acts as a physiographic barrier and the extreme southern end of the bay where currents are non persistent. Some sediments are also transported offshore by rip currents and other agencies and deposited in deeper, quieter waters. Supply of sediments to the canyon head results in over-filling and steepening with subsequent mass movement of sediments seaward followed by deposition in channels and on the broad deep sea fan. ?? 1970.

  16. Phonon transport in a one-dimensional harmonic chain with long-range interaction and mass disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hangbo; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-11-01

    Atomic mass and interatomic interaction are the two key quantities that significantly affect the heat conduction carried by phonons. Here, we study the effects of long-range (LR) interatomic interaction and mass disorder on the phonon transport in a one-dimensional harmonic chain with up to 105 atoms. We find that while LR interaction reduces the transmission of low-frequency phonons, it enhances the transmission of high-frequency phonons by suppressing the localization effects caused by mass disorder. Therefore, LR interaction is able to boost heat conductance in the high-temperature regime or in the large size regime, where the high-frequency modes are important.

  17. Corrosion of ferrous alloys in nitrogen contaminated liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.L.; Bradley, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    Liquid lithium penetration of 304L stainless steel and Armco iron grain boundaries has been studied. The penetration kinetics for the 304L stainless steel was found to be diffusion controlled. The measured temperature dependent delay time has been associated with the initial formation of the corrosion product at the grain boundary. Nitrogen in the stainless steel or the liquid lithium has been found to accelerate the rate of attack without changing the apparent activation energy. Grain boundary grooving of Armco iron in liquid lithium indicates that the controlling mass transport is also through a corrosion product present as a surface film. Stresses as small as 12 MPa have been found to give rise to a fifty-fold increase in the rate of penetration of Armco iron by liquid lithium

  18. Additively manufactured metallic porous biomaterials based on minimal surfaces : A unique combination of topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, F S L; Lietaert, K; Eftekhari, A A; Pouran, B; Ahmadi, S M; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2017-01-01

    Porous biomaterials that simultaneously mimic the topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties of bone are in great demand but are rarely found in the literature. In this study, we rationally designed and additively manufactured (AM) porous metallic biomaterials based on four different

  19. Analytical solution and simplified analysis of coupled parent-daughter steady-state transport with multirate mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Haggerty

    2013-01-01

    In this technical note, a steady-state analytical solution of concentrations of a parent solute reacting to a daughter solute, both of which are undergoing transport and multirate mass transfer, is presented. Although the governing equations are complicated, the resulting solution can be expressed in simple terms. A function of the ratio of concentrations, In (daughter...

  20. Improved performance of porous bio-anodes in microbial electrolysis cells by enhancing mass and charge transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Lodder, R.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    To create an efficient MEC high current densities and high coulombic efficiencies are required. The aim of this study was to increase cur-rent densities and coulombic efficiencies by influencing mass and charge transport in porous electrodes by: (i) introduction of a forced flow through the anode to

  1. Characterizing aerosol transport into the Canadian High Arctic using aerosol mass spectrometry and Lagrangian modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, T.; Damoah, R.; Bacak, A.; Sloan, J. J.

    2010-05-01

    We report the analysis of measurements made using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Aerodyne Research Inc.) that was installed in the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in summer 2006. PEARL is located in the Canadian high Arctic at 610 m above sea level on Ellesmere Island (80° N 86° W). PEARL is unique for its remote location in the Arctic and because most of the time it is situated within the free troposphere. It is therefore well suited as a receptor site to study the long range tropospheric transport of pollutants into the Arctic. Some information about the successful year-round operation of an AMS at a high Arctic site such as PEARL will be reported here, together with design considerations for reliable sampling under harsh low-temperature conditions. Computational fluid dynamics calculations were made to ensure that sample integrity was maintained while sampling air at temperatures that average -40 °C in the winter and can be as low as -55 °C. Selected AMS measurements of aerosol mass concentration, size, and chemical composition recorded during the months of August, September and October 2006 will be reported. During this period, sulfate was at most times the predominant aerosol component with on average 0.115 μg m-3 (detection limit 0.003 μg m-3). The second most abundant component was undifferentiated organic aerosol, with on average 0.11 μg m-3 detection limit (0.04 μg m-3). The nitrate component, which averaged 0.007 μg m-3, was above its detection limit (0.002 μg m-3), whereas the ammonium ion had an apparent average concentration of 0.02 μg m-3, which was approximately equal to its detection limit. A few episodes having increased mass concentrations and lasting from several hours to several days are apparent in the data. These were investigated further using a statistical analysis to determine their common characteristics. High correlations among some of the components arriving during the short term episodes provide

  2. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, David M; Benoit, Michael R; Nelson, Emily S; Hammond, Timmothy G

    2004-03-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  3. Association of central serotonin transporter availability and body mass index in healthy Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Swen; van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Zientek, Franziska

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Serotonin-mediated mechanisms, in particular via the serotonin transporter (SERT), are thought to have an effect on food intake and play an important role in the pathophysiology of obesity. However, imaging studies that examined the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and SERT...... are sparse and provided contradictory results. The aim of this study was to further test the association between SERT and BMI in a large cohort of healthy subjects. METHODS: 127 subjects of the ENC DAT database (58 females, age 52 ± 18 years, range 20-83, BMI 25.2 ± 3.8 kg/m(2), range 18.2-41.1) were...... associated in the thalamus, but not in the midbrain. In the ROI-analysis, the interaction between gender and BMI showed a trend with higher correlation coefficient for men in the midbrain albeit not significant (0.033SBRm(2)/kg, p=0.1). CONCLUSIONS: The data are in agreement with previous PET findings...

  4. Microfluidic Transduction Harnesses Mass Transport Principles to Enhance Gene Transfer Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Reginald; Myers, David R; Denning, Gabriela; Shields, Jordan E; Lytle, Allison M; Alrowais, Hommood; Qiu, Yongzhi; Sakurai, Yumiko; Li, William C; Brand, Oliver; Le Doux, Joseph M; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B; Lam, Wilbur A

    2017-10-04

    Ex vivo gene therapy using lentiviral vectors (LVs) is a proven approach to treat and potentially cure many hematologic disorders and malignancies but remains stymied by cumbersome, cost-prohibitive, and scale-limited production processes that cannot meet the demands of current clinical protocols for widespread clinical utilization. However, limitations in LV manufacture coupled with inefficient transduction protocols requiring significant excess amounts of vector currently limit widespread implementation. Herein, we describe a microfluidic, mass transport-based approach that overcomes the diffusion limitations of current transduction platforms to enhance LV gene transfer kinetics and efficiency. This novel ex vivo LV transduction platform is flexible in design, easy to use, scalable, and compatible with standard cell transduction reagents and LV preparations. Using hematopoietic cell lines, primary human T cells, primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) of both murine (Sca-1 + ) and human (CD34 + ) origin, microfluidic transduction using clinically processed LVs occurs up to 5-fold faster and requires as little as one-twentieth of LV. As an in vivo validation of the microfluidic-based transduction technology, HSPC gene therapy was performed in hemophilia A mice using limiting amounts of LV. Compared to the standard static well-based transduction protocols, only animals transplanted with microfluidic-transduced cells displayed clotting levels restored to normal. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ring waves as a mass transport mechanism in air-driven core-annular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassa, Roberto; Forest, M Gregory; Lee, Long; Ogrosky, H Reed; Olander, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Air-driven core-annular fluid flows occur in many situations, from lung airways to engineering applications. Here we study, experimentally and theoretically, flows where a viscous liquid film lining the inside of a tube is forced upwards against gravity by turbulent airflow up the center of the tube. We present results on the thickness and mean speed of the film and properties of the interfacial waves that develop from an instability of the air-liquid interface. We derive a long-wave asymptotic model and compare properties of its solutions with those of the experiments. Traveling wave solutions of this long-wave model exhibit evidence of different mass transport regimes: Past a certain threshold, sufficiently large-amplitude waves begin to trap cores of fluid which propagate upward at wave speeds. This theoretical result is then confirmed by a second set of experiments that show evidence of ring waves of annular fluid propagating over the underlying creeping flow. By tuning the parameters of the experiments, the strength of this phenomenon can be adjusted in a way that is predicted qualitatively by the model.

  6. 49 CFR 192.476 - Internal corrosion control: Design and construction of transmission line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: Design and... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.476 Internal corrosion control: Design and construction... the risk of internal corrosion. At a minimum, unless it is impracticable or unnecessary to do so, each...

  7. Long-range transport biomass burning emissions to the Himalayas: insights from high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, X.; Liu, Y.; Shichang, K.; Ma, Y.

    2017-12-01

    An intensive measurement was conducted at a remote, background, and high-altitude site (Qomolangma station, QOMS, 4276 m a.s.l.) in the northern Himalayas, using an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) along with other collocated instruments. The field measurement was performed from April 12 to May 12, 2016 to chemically characterize high time-resolved submicron particulate matter (PM1) and obtain the influence of biomass burning emissions to the Himalayas, frequently transported from south Asia during pre-monsoon season. Two high aerosol loading periods were observed during the study. Overall, the average (± 1σ) PM1 mass concentration was 4.44 (± 4.54) µg m-3 for the entire study, comparable with those observed at other remote sites worldwide. Organic aerosols (OA) was the dominant PM1 species (accounting for 54.3% of total PM1 mass on average) and its contribution increased with the increase of total PM1 mass loading. The average size distributions of PM1 species all peaked at an overlapping accumulation mode ( 500 nm), suggesting that aerosol particles were internally well-mixed and aged during long-range transportations. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis on the high-resolution organic mass spectra identified three distinct OA factors, including a biomass burning related OA (BBOA, 43.7%) and two oxygenated OA (Local-OOA and LRT-OOA; 13.9% and 42.4%) represented sources from local emissions and long-range transportations, respectively. Two polluted air mass origins (generally from the west and southwest of QOMS) and two polluted episodes with enhanced PM1 mass loadings and elevated BBOA contributions were observed, respectively, suggesting the important sources of wildfires from south Asia. One of polluted aerosol plumes was investigated in detail to illustrate the evolution of aerosol characteristics at QOMS driving by different impacts of wildfires, air mass origins, meteorological conditions and

  8. Mass-conserving tracer transport modelling on a reduced latitude-longitude grid with NIES-TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Belikov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The need to perform long-term simulations with reasonable accuracy has led to the development of mass-conservative and efficient numerical methods for solving the transport equation in forward and inverse models. We designed and implemented a flux-form (Eulerian tracer transport algorithm in the National Institute for Environmental Studies Transport Model (NIES TM, which is used for simulating diurnal and synoptic-scale variations of tropospheric long-lived constituents, as well as their seasonal and inter-annual variability. Implementation of the flux-form method requires the mass conservative wind fields. However, the model is off-line and is driven by datasets from a global atmospheric model or data assimilation system, in which vertically integrated mass changes are not in balance with the surface pressure tendency and mass conservation is not achieved. To rectify the mass-imbalance, a flux-correction method is employed. To avoid a singularity near the poles, caused by the small grid size arising from the meridional convergence problem, the proposed model uses a reduced latitude–longitude grid scheme, in which the grid size is doubled several times approaching the poles. This approach overcomes the Courant condition in the Polar Regions, maintains a reasonably high integration time-step, and ensures adequate model performance during simulations. To assess the model performance, we performed global transport simulations for SF6, 222Rn, and CO2. The results were compared with observations available from the World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases, GLOBALVIEW, and the Hateruma monitoring station, Japan. Overall, the results show that the proposed flux-form version of NIES TM can produce tropospheric tracer transport more realistically than previously possible. The reasons for this improvement are discussed.

  9. An application of the 'end-point' method to the minimum critical mass problem in two group transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2003-01-01

    A two group integral equation derived using transport theory, which describes the fuel distribution necessary for a flat thermal flux and minimum critical mass, is solved by the classical end-point method. This method has a number of advantages and in particular highlights the changing behaviour of the fissile mass distribution function in the neighbourhood of the core-reflector interface. We also show how the reflector thermal flux behaves and explain the origin of the maximum which arises when the critical size is less than that corresponding to minimum critical mass. A comparison is made with diffusion theory and the necessary and somewhat artificial presence of surface delta functions in the fuel distribution is shown to be analogous to the edge transients that arise naturally in transport theory

  10. Separation Method for Oxygen Mass Transport Coefficient in Two Phase Porous Air Electrodes - Transport in Gas and Solid Polymer or Liquid Electrolyte Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    of the problem studied Proton exchange membrane fuel cells ( PEMFCs ) are the most promising candidate systems for alternative electricity...characteristic. The limiting current can be used as a tool to study mass transport phenomena in PEMFC because it can provide experimental data for the...coefficient for PEMFCs under in situ conditions based on the galvanostatic discharge of a cell with an interrupted reactant supply. The results indicated

  11. Aircraft Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    attribud au choix de traitements et de rev~tements spproprids. Au contrairo, dens d’sutros structures des corrosions iirportsntea se sont msnifestdes...au traitement . micaniqus qui provoque une compression de surface - h1l’spplication i1’une double protection comportant oxydation snodique et...chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont

  12. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-01-01

    , testing means, experimental techniques, internal corrosion of zircaloy sheath - the iodine effect, stress corrosion of nickel alloys - hydrogen influence, stress corrosion of stainless steels; C - wear corrosion: a coupled phenomenon, research in the framework of service life extension of the French electronuclear park; 3 - Corrosion in future reactors: A - corrosion in gas reactors: corrosion by helium impurities, oxidation resistance of silicon carbide, corrosion of graphite and carbon-carbon composites; B - corrosion in liquid metal reactors: sodium FBRs, lead and lead alloys reactors; C- corrosion in molten salt reactors: corrosion of Hastelloy N-type nickel alloys by molten fluorides, mass transfer in aniso-thermal fluoride systems, tellurium embrittlement, electrochemical study of pure metals corrosion in molten fluorides; 4 - Materials corrosion and alteration in the back-end of the fuel cycle: A - corrosion in concentrated nitric environment: materials behaviour, self-catalytic mechanism of nitric acid reduction; B - corrosion in unsaturated aqueous environment: metallic corrosion in unsaturated environment - application to the storage of waste containers, bitumens alteration, reinforced concrete behaviour and iron framework corrosion, concrete behaviour in severe thermal environment; C - Corrosion in saturated aqueous environment: metals corrosion in clayey environment, long-term behaviour of glasses, ceramics alteration, underwater concrete durability, clays transformation; D - materials biodegradation: microorganisms and nuclear wastes, biodegradation of bitumen, concretes and steels; 5 - Conclusion, glossary

  13. Development of models and online diagnostic monitors of the high-temperature corrosion of refractories in oxy/fuel glass furnaces : final project report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Gupta, Amul (Monofrax Inc., Falconer, NY); Walsh, Peter M.; Rice, Steven F.; Velez, Mariano (University of Missouri, Rolla, MO); Allendorf, Mark D.; Pecoraro, George A. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Nilson, Robert H.; Wolfe, H. Edward (ANH Refractories, Pittsburgh, PA); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Bugeat, Benjamin () American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Spear, Karl E. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Marin, Ovidiu () American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Ghani, M. Usman (American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL)

    2005-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a five-year effort to understand the mechanisms and develop models that predict the corrosion of refractories in oxygen-fuel glass-melting furnaces. Thermodynamic data for the Si-O-(Na or K) and Al-O-(Na or K) systems are reported, allowing equilibrium calculations to be performed to evaluate corrosion of silica- and alumina-based refractories under typical furnace operating conditions. A detailed analysis of processes contributing to corrosion is also presented. Using this analysis, a model of the corrosion process was developed and used to predict corrosion rates in an actual industrial glass furnace. The rate-limiting process is most likely the transport of NaOH(gas) through the mass-transport boundary layer from the furnace atmosphere to the crown surface. Corrosion rates predicted on this basis are in better agreement with observation than those produced by any other mechanism, although the absolute values are highly sensitive to the crown temperature and the NaOH(gas) concentration at equilibrium and at the edge of the boundary layer. Finally, the project explored the development of excimer laser induced fragmentation (ELIF) fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of gas-phase alkali hydroxides (e.g., NaOH) that are predicted to be the key species causing accelerated corrosion in these furnaces. The development of ELIF and the construction of field-portable instrumentation for glass furnace applications are reported and the method is shown to be effective in industrial settings.

  14. Benefits from corrosion management of ORBEL-I pipeline; Resultados obtidos com o gerenciamento da corrosao do oleoduto ORBEL-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Aline de Souza [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fernandes Junior, Anibal Augusto; Viana, Flavio Godinho [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    This work has for objective to present the results gotten with the management of the implanted internal corrosion in the pipeline Rio de Janeiro - Belo Horizonte I (ORBEL I), with 363 kilometers of extension and 18 inch of diameter. This management has for purpose to prevent and to control the corrosive process in the internal structure of the pipe through the identification of the basic causes of the corrosive process and the implantation of actions adjusted for the control of the process. The applied techniques and actions had been based on the described recommendations in the Communication Technique 116/99 No. - Management of the Corrosion of ORBEL I emitted for the Center of Research of PETROBRAS (CENPES). The applied actions had been: determination of the corrosion rate with the coupon use of loss of mass and probe, races of pig of cleanness, chemical analyses of the pumped product and the residue of corrosion, inhibitor injection and water reduction in the product. The results obtained show the decrease of corrosion rates and of corrosiveness of the products transported. (author)

  15. Modelling the effects of porous and semi-permeable layers on corrosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1996-09-01

    Porous and semi-permeable layers play a role in many corrosion processes. Porous layers may simply affect the rate of corrosion by affecting the rate of mass transport of reactants and products to and from the corroding surface. Semi-permeable layers can further affect the corrosion process by reacting with products and/or reactants. Reactions in semi-permeable layers include redox processes involving electron transfer, adsorption, ion-exchange and complexation reactions and precipitation/dissolution processes. Examples of porous and semi-permeable layers include non-reactive salt films, precipitate layers consisting of redox-active species in multiple oxidation states (e.g., Fe oxide films), clay and soil layers and biofilms. Examples of these various types of processes will be discussed and modelling techniques developed from studies for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste presented. (author). 48 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs

  16. Developing effective mass transit systems : proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Public Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA), in conjunction with the U.S. Embassy, the Russian Ministry of Transportation, the City of Moscow, and the Ministry of Transport of the Moscow Oblast (Regional) Government, hosted a bilateral conference to dis...

  17. Effect of Al2Cu precipitates size and mass transport on the polarisation behaviour of age-hardened Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloys in 0.05 M NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, A.C.; Pinto, A.M.; Rocha, L.A.; Mischler, S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Influence of the size distribution of Al-Cu phases on the electrochemical behaviour of well defined alloys under controlled mass transport conditions (RDE). → Oxygen reduction occurs only the Al 2 Cu phases. → Thinner Al-Cu grains the oxygen reduction current deviates at high rotation rates from the Levich behaviour. - Abstract: The electrochemical behaviour of age-hardened Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloys was investigated in a 0.05 M NaCl solution under controlled mass transport conditions using a rotating disk electrode. This work aimed at getting better understanding of the effect of the alloy microstructure, in particular the size distribution of Al 2 Cu phase, on the corrosion behaviour of the alloy. Three different size distributions of the Al 2 Cu phase were obtained through appropriate heat treatments. The cathodic reduction of oxygen was found to occur mainly on the Al 2 Cu phases acting as preferential cathodes. Small sized Al 2 Cu phases were found to promote at high rotation rates a transition from a 4 electron to a 2 electron dominated oxygen reduction mechanisms.

  18. Concept on groundwater flow and mass transport through heterogeneous porous media and application to in-situ test analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, Koichiro; Umeki, Hiroyuki.

    1995-01-01

    Generally, geological media is modelled as porous or fractured media depending on their characteristics. Since the channels of groundwater flow and the transport paths are determined by the heterogeneity of the geological media, quantitative understanding of the heterogeneity is an important issue for modelling flow and transport processes through them. Therefore, it becomes popular way to develop statistical identification approaches of the heterogeneous field by using data from in-situ test and conduct validation studies of flow and transport models through the field by comparing with observed data. In this report, the theories of the identification approach and the concept on groundwater flow and mass transport are explained briefly and the application to tracer tests conducted at Grimsel test site, Switzerland, are described. (author)

  19. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry; La Corrosion et l'alteration des materiaux du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-07-01

    , testing means, experimental techniques, internal corrosion of zircaloy sheath - the iodine effect, stress corrosion of nickel alloys - hydrogen influence, stress corrosion of stainless steels; C - wear corrosion: a coupled phenomenon, research in the framework of service life extension of the French electronuclear park; 3 - Corrosion in future reactors: A - corrosion in gas reactors: corrosion by helium impurities, oxidation resistance of silicon carbide, corrosion of graphite and carbon-carbon composites; B - corrosion in liquid metal reactors: sodium FBRs, lead and lead alloys reactors; C- corrosion in molten salt reactors: corrosion of Hastelloy N-type nickel alloys by molten fluorides, mass transfer in aniso-thermal fluoride systems, tellurium embrittlement, electrochemical study of pure metals corrosion in molten fluorides; 4 - Materials corrosion and alteration in the back-end of the fuel cycle: A - corrosion in concentrated nitric environment: materials behaviour, self-catalytic mechanism of nitric acid reduction; B - corrosion in unsaturated aqueous environment: metallic corrosion in unsaturated environment - application to the storage of waste containers, bitumens alteration, reinforced concrete behaviour and iron framework corrosion, concrete behaviour in severe thermal environment; C - Corrosion in saturated aqueous environment: metals corrosion in clayey environment, long-term behaviour of glasses, ceramics alteration, underwater concrete durability, clays transformation; D - materials biodegradation: microorganisms and nuclear wastes, biodegradation of bitumen, concretes and steels; 5 - Conclusion, glossary

  20. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  1. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  2. Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformation in a solution: Including mass transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, S R; Ford, I J; Saffari, N

    2018-01-14

    Effects of acoustic waves on a phase transformation in a metastable phase were investigated in our previous work [S. R. Haqshenas, I. J. Ford, and N. Saffari, "Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on nucleation," J. Chem. Phys. 145, 024315 (2016)]. We developed a non-equimolar dividing surface cluster model and employed it to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallisation induced by an acoustic field in a mass-conserved system. In the present work, we developed a master equation based on a hybrid Szilard-Fokker-Planck model, which accounts for mass transportation due to acoustic waves. This model can determine the kinetics of nucleation and the early stage of growth of clusters including the Ostwald ripening phenomenon. It was solved numerically to calculate the kinetics of an isothermal sonocrystallisation process in a system with mass transportation. The simulation results show that the effect of mass transportation for different excitations depends on the waveform as well as the imposed boundary conditions and tends to be noticeable in the case of shock waves. The derivations are generic and can be used with any acoustic source and waveform.

  3. Onsite well screening with a transportable gas chromatography/mass spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossabi, J.; Eckenrode, B.A.; Owens, B.

    1992-01-01

    The number of hazardous waste site operations continue to multiply. The requirements for efficient chemical assessment and monitoring of these sites become more stringent daily. As more samples are required, the time required for cleanup operations also increases and may make analytical costs prohibitive. Thus improvements in operation efficiency and reduction of cost in evaluating specific sites to minimize or eliminate their toxic effects on the surrounding environment are critical. For many years a formal policy did not exist for the disposal of waste solvents and other chemicals, thus many of these compounds were disposed of ensite. So long as these materials were contained onsite they were not considered to pose a threat to the surrounding environment. We have since determined that many of these compounds found their way into the groundwater. Contaminants such as trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene, which were heavily used for cleaning and degreasing purposes, must be monitored. Groundwater wells can be used to define the location and extent of the migration of any contaminant plume and aid in the determination of required cleanup. The major problem is that monitoring of hundreds of wells may be necessary, requiring several hundred samples on a quarterly basis to characterize the degree and extent of any contamination. Onsite analysis of monitoring wells for this characterization of waste operations could provide time savings and significant cost reduction. Field analyses can provide the required analytical results quickly and at a reduced cost without compromising either sample integrity or data quality. By using onsite analytical instrumentation, such as a field-transportable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), screening analyses can be performed to eliminate retturning to the laboratory with meaningless samples. Onsite GC/MS will provide qualitative or semi-quantitative information that can significantly simplify subsequent laboratory analyses

  4. A Numerical Model of Anisotropic Mass Transport Through Grain Boundary Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibo

    Tin (Sn) thin films are commonly used in electronic circuit applications as coatings on contacts and solders for joining components. It is widely observed, for some such system, that whiskers---long, thin crystalline structures---emerge and grow from the film. The Sn whisker phenomenon has become a highly active research area since Sn whiskers have caused a large amount of damage and loss in manufacturing, military, medical and power industries. Though lead (Pb) addition to Sn has been used to solve this problem for over five decades, the adverse environmental and health effects of Pb have motivated legislation to severely constrain Pb use in society. People are researching and seeking the reasons which cause whiskers and corresponding methods to solve the problem. The contributing factors to cause a Sn whisker are potentially many and much still remains unknown. Better understanding of fundamental driving forces should point toward strategies to improve (a) the accuracy with which we can predict whisker formation, and (b) our ability to mitigate the phenomenon. This thesis summarizes recent important research achievements in understanding Sn whisker formation and growth, both experimentally and theoretically. Focus is then placed on examining the role that anisotropy in grain boundary diffusivity plays in determining whisker characteristics (specifically, whether they form and, if so, where on a surface). To study this aspect of the problem and to enable future studies on stress driven grain boundary diffusion, this thesis presents a numerical anisotropic mass transport model. In addition to presenting details of the model and implementation, model predictions for a set of increasingly complex grain boundary networks are discussed. Preliminary results from the model provide evidence that anisotropic grain boundary diffusion may be a primary driving mechanism in whisker formation.

  5. Mass transport of direct methanol fuel cell species in sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, V.S.; Ruffmann, B.; Vetter, S.; Boaventura, M.; Mendes, A.M.; Madeira, L.M.; Nunes, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Homogeneous membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with different sulfonation degrees (SD) were prepared and characterized. In order to perform a critical analysis of the SD effect on the polymer barrier and mass transport properties towards direct methanol fuel cell species, proton conductivity, water/methanol pervaporation and nitrogen/oxygen/carbon dioxide pressure rise method experiments are proposed. This procedure allows the evaluation of the individual permeability coefficients in hydrated sPEEK membranes with different sulfonation degrees. Nafion[reg] 112 was used as reference material. DMFC tests were also performed at 50 deg. C. It was observed that the proton conductivity and the permeability towards water, methanol, oxygen and carbon dioxide increase with the sPEEK sulfonation degree. In contrast, the SD seems to not affect the nitrogen permeability coefficient. In terms of selectivity, it was observed that the carbon dioxide/oxygen selectivity increases with the sPEEK SD. In contrast, the nitrogen/oxygen selectivity decreases. In terms of barrier properties for preventing the DMFC reactants loss, the polymer electrolyte membrane based on the sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) with SD lower or equal to 71%, although having slightly lower proton conductivity, presented much better characteristics for fuel cell applications compared with the well known Nafion[reg] 112. In terms of the DMFC tests of the studied membranes at low temperature, the sPEEK membrane with SD = 71% showed to have similar performance, or even better, as that of Nafion[reg] 112. However, the highest DMFC overall efficiency was achieved using sPEEK membrane with SD = 52%

  6. Effects of radiation transport on mass ablation rate and conversion efficiency in numerical simulations of inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of radiation transport on hydrodynamic parameters of laser produced plasmas are studied. LTE and non-LTE atomic models are used to calculate multi group opacities and emissivities. Screened hydrogenic atom model is used to calculate the energy levels. The population densities of neutral to fully ionized ions are obtained by solving the steady state rate equations. Radiation transport is treated in multi-group diffusion or Sn method. A comparison is made between 1 and 100 group radiation transport and LTE and non-LTE models. For aluminium, multi group radiation transport leads to much higher mass ablation as compared to the 1 group and no radiation transport cases. This in turn leads to higher ablation pressures. However, for gold gray approximation gives higher mass ablation as compared to multi group simulations. LTE conversion efficiency of laser light into x-rays is more than the non-LTE estimates. For LTE as well as non-LTE cases, the one group approximation over-predicts the conversion efficiency Multi group non-LTE simulations predict that the conversion efficiency increases with laser intensity up to a maximum and then it decreases. (author)

  7. Corrosion technology. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book has been produced for dissemination of information on corrosion technology, corrosion hazards and its control. Chapter one of this book presents an overall view of the subject and chapter 2-5 deals with electrochemical basics, types of corrosion, pourbaix diagrams and form of corrosion. The author explains polarization/kinetics of corrosion, passivity, aqueous corrosion and corrosion testing and monitoring in 6-11 chapters. The author hopes it will provide incentive to all those interested in the corrosion technology. (A.B.)

  8. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  9. Advanced modelling of concrete deterioration due to reinforcement corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isgor, O.B.; Razaqpur, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive model is presented for predicting the rate of steel corrosion in concrete structures and the consequent formation and propagation of cracks around the steel reinforcement. The corrosion model considers both the initiation and the propagation stages of corrosion. Processes commencing in the initiation stage, such as the transport of chloride ions and oxygen within the concrete and variation in temperature and moisture, are assumed to continue in the propagation stage while active corrosion is occurring contemporaneously. This allows the model to include the effects of changes in exposure conditions on the corrosion rate and the effects of the corrosion reactions on the transport properties of concrete. The corrosion rates are calculated by applying the finite-element solution of the Laplace equation for electrochemical potential, with appropriate boundary conditions. Because these boundary conditions are nonlinear, a nonlinear solution algorithm is used. The results of the analysis are compared with available test data, and the comparison is found to be satisfactory. (author)

  10. Chemical mass transport between fluid fine tailings and the overlying water cover of an oil sands end pit lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dompierre, Kathryn A.; Barbour, S. Lee; North, Rebecca L.; Carey, Sean K.; Lindsay, Matthew B. J.

    2017-06-01

    Fluid fine tailings (FFT) are a principal by-product of the bitumen extraction process at oil sands mines. Base Mine Lake (BML)—the first full-scale demonstration oil sands end pit lake (EPL)—contains approximately 1.9 × 108 m3 of FFT stored under a water cover within a decommissioned mine pit. Chemical mass transfer from the FFT to the water cover can occur via two key processes: (1) advection-dispersion driven by tailings settlement; and (2) FFT disturbance due to fluid movement in the water cover. Dissolved chloride (Cl) was used to evaluate the water cover mass balance and to track mass transport within the underlying FFT based on field sampling and numerical modeling. Results indicated that FFT was the dominant Cl source to the water cover and that the FFT is exhibiting a transient advection-dispersion mass transport regime with intermittent disturbance near the FFT-water interface. The advective pore water flux was estimated by the mass balance to be 0.002 m3 m-2 d-1, which represents 0.73 m of FFT settlement per year. However, the FFT pore water Cl concentrations and corresponding mass transport simulations indicated that advection rates and disturbance depths vary between sample locations. The disturbance depth was estimated to vary with location between 0.75 and 0.95 m. This investigation provides valuable insight for assessing the geochemical evolution of the water cover and performance of EPLs as an oil sands reclamation strategy.

  11. Estimation of the dangers of corrosion of steel containers and pipes used for storage and transport of hydrogen and hydrogen-containing gases under high pressure. Abschaetzung der Korrosionsgefaehrdung von Behaeltern und Rohrleitungen aus Stahl fuer Speicherung und Transport von Wasserstoff und wasserstoffhaltigen Gasen unter hohen Druecken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poepperling, R; Schwenk, W; Venkateswarlu, J

    1982-01-01

    In the field of energy transportation, questions are increasingly being asked about possible corrosion damage through cold pressurized water. This concerns both pure hydrogen and hydrogen-containing gas mixtures, e.g. synthesis gas. For the estimation of probability of corrosion, data extracted from the literature concerning known cases of damage and the degree of influence on corrosion classed according to gas, material and operational parameters was evaluated. Damage from hydrogen can occur with dry and moist gases. It is mainly caused by low frequency pressure variations under high load and by the presence of geometric unevenness (high Kerb factor) on the inner side of the pipe. In order to avoid damage practical experience has shown that the safety coefficient for existing piping should be over 2 and preferably over 3. A significant reduction in corrosion probability can be achieved by inhibitors, whereby 0.1 Vol% O/sub 2/ additive has been shown to be most effective. The question of counter-effects of the remaining gas components remains open.

  12. Comparison of mass transport using average and transient rainfall boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguid, J.O.; Reeves, M.

    1976-01-01

    A general two-dimensional model for simulation of saturated-unsaturated transport of radionuclides in ground water has been developed and is currently being tested. The model is being applied to study the transport of radionuclides from a waste-disposal site where field investigations are currently under way to obtain the necessary model parameters. A comparison of the amount of tritium transported is made using both average and transient rainfall boundary conditions. The simulations indicate that there is no substantial difference in the transport for the two conditions tested. However, the values of dispersivity used in the unsaturated zone caused more transport above the water table than has been observed under actual conditions. This deficiency should be corrected and further comparisons should be made before average rainfall boundary conditions are used for long-term transport simulations

  13. Status of the nation's local mass transportation: performance and conditions. Report to the congress, June 1988. Biennial report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This document is the third biennial Report of the Secretary of Transportation to the United States Congress on the current performance and condition of the Nation's public mass-transportation systems. It updates the information and recommendations of the previous report and should be of value to the Congress and the Department for developing policy and program requirements to administer the Federal mass-transportation assistance program.

  14. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, H.F. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  15. Optical conductivity and optical effective mass in a high-mobility organic semiconductor: Implications for the nature of charge transport

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuan

    2014-12-03

    We present a multiscale modeling of the infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data that point to nonmonotonic features in the optical conductivity spectrum and small optical effective masses. We find that, in the static-disorder approximation, the nonlocal electron-phonon interactions stemming from low-frequency lattice vibrations can decrease the optical effective masses and lead to lighter quasiparticles. On the other hand, the charge-transport and infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal at room temperature are demonstrated to be governed by localized carriers driven by inherent thermal disorders. Our findings underline that the presence of apparently light carriers in high-mobility organic semiconductors does not necessarily imply bandlike transport.

  16. Residual Stress Relaxation Induced by Mass Transport Through Interface of the Pd/SrTiO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarpour S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metal interconnections having a small cross-section and short length can be subjected to very large mass transport due to the passing of high current densities. As a result, nonlinear diffusion and electromigration effects which may result in device failure and electrical instabilities may be manifested. Various thicknesses of Pd were deposited over SrTiO3 substrate. Residual stress of the deposited film was evaluated by measuring the variation of d-spacing versus sin2ψ through conventional X-ray diffraction method. It has been found that the lattice misfit within film and substrate might be relaxed because of mass transport. Besides, the relation between residual intrinsic stress and oxygen diffusion through deposited film has been expressed. Consequently, appearance of oxide intermediate layer may adjust interfacial characteristics and suppress electrical conductivity by increasing electron scattering through metallic films.

  17. A numerical study of transient mass transport through a circular hole connecting two semi-infinite media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Scott, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical model of transient diffusive mass transfer through a circular hole that connects two semi-infinite media was used as a means of determining potential effects of waste container penetrations on the release of immobilized contaminants into the environment. The finite difference model as developed necessarily includes treatment of mass transport in both the waste and surrounding medium and allows calculation of release rates for cases with and without preferential adsorption and differing diffusivities of the two media. The dimensionless contaminant release rate was found to vary over several orders of magnitude depending on the product of the ratio of the distribution coefficient and the media diffusivities only. As would be intuitively expected, partitioning favoring the surrounding medium and higher relative waste medium diffusivity cause higher transport rates. There was definitely no unexpected enhancement in the release rate in the case of perforations over that of an uncontained waste form

  18. Optical conductivity and optical effective mass in a high-mobility organic semiconductor: Implications for the nature of charge transport

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuan; Yi, Yuanping; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    We present a multiscale modeling of the infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data that point to nonmonotonic features in the optical conductivity spectrum and small optical effective masses. We find that, in the static-disorder approximation, the nonlocal electron-phonon interactions stemming from low-frequency lattice vibrations can decrease the optical effective masses and lead to lighter quasiparticles. On the other hand, the charge-transport and infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal at room temperature are demonstrated to be governed by localized carriers driven by inherent thermal disorders. Our findings underline that the presence of apparently light carriers in high-mobility organic semiconductors does not necessarily imply bandlike transport.

  19. Influence of a thermal gradient on water-rock interactions and mass transport in geologic media (marine pelagic clay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyfried, W.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A brief outline of the role of thermodiffusional processes in mass transport and sediment alteration for a sediment/seawater system that is subjected to a thermal gradient and maximum temperature and pressure condition, such as in a subseabed repository is presented. The author underscores the need to investigate the effect of basic physical and chemical parameters on Soret coefficients for various electrolyte fluids. Such experiments will require the design and development of unique hydrothermal apparatus

  20. Electromigration-induced drift in damascene and plasma-etched Al(Cu). II. Mass transport mechanisms in bamboo interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proost, Joris; Maex, Karen; Delacy, Luc

    2000-01-01

    We have discussed electromigration (EM)-induced drift in polycrystalline damascene versus reactive ion etched (RIE) Al(Cu) in part I. For polycrystalline Al(Cu), mass transport is well documented to occur through sequential stages : an incubation period (attributed to Cu depletion beyond a critical length) followed by the Al drift stage. In this work, the drift behavior of bamboo RIE and damascene Al(Cu) is analyzed. Using Blech-type test structures, mass transport in RIE lines was shown to proceed both by lattice and interfacial diffusion. The dominating mechanism depends on the Cu distribution in the line, as was evidenced by comparing as-patterned (lattice EM) and RTP-annealed (interface EM) samples. The interfacial EM only occurs at metallic interfaces. In that case, Cu alloying was observed to retard Al interfacial mass transport, giving rise to an incubation time. Although the activation energy for the incubation time was found similar to the one controlling Al lattice drift, for which no incubation time was observed, lattice EM is preferred over interfacial EM because it is insensitive to enhancing geometrical effects upon scaling. When comparing interfacial electromigration in RIE with bamboo damascene Al(Cu), with the incubation time rate controlling for both, the higher EM threshold observed for damascene was shown to be insufficient to compensate for its significantly increased Cu depletion rate, contrary to the case of polycrystalline Al(Cu) interconnects. Two factors were demonstrated to contribute. First, there are more metallic interfaces, intrinsically related to the use of wetting or barrier layers in recessed features. Second, specific to this study, the additional formation of TiAl3 at the trench sidewalls further enhanced the Cu depletion rate, and reduced the rate-controlling incubation time. A separate drift study on RIE via-type test structures indicated that it is very difficult to suppress interfacial mass transport in favor of lattice EM

  1. Effect of Mass Transport in the Synthesis of Partially Acetylated Dendrimer: Implications for Functional Ligand–Nanoparticle Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Mullen, Douglas G.; Borgmeier, Emilee L.; Fang, Ming; McNerny, Daniel Q.; Desai, Ankur; Baker, James R.; Orr, Bradford G.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak

    2010-01-01

    Partial acetylation of the amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimer has been used in the preparation of dendrimer particles conjugated with a wide variety of functional ligands including targeting moieties, therapeutic agents, and dye molecules. The effectiveness of mass transport during the partial acetylation reaction was found to have a major effect on subsequent distributions of dendrimer–ligand components and to be a major source of inconsistency between batches. This study has broad ...

  2. Mass transport in low permeability rocks under the influence of coupled thermomechanical and hydrochemical effects - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.

    1984-10-01

    The present paper gives a general overview of mass transport in low permeability rocks under the coupled thermomechanical and hydrochemical effects associated with a nuclear waste repository. A classification of coupled processes is given. Then an ess is presented. example of a coupled process is presented. Discussions of coupled processes based on a recent LBL Panel meeting are summarized. 5 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  3. The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.H. Payer

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective

  4. Apparent directional mass-transfer capacity coefficients in three-dimensional anisotropic heterogeneous aquifers under radial convergent transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, D.; Fernàndez-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    Aquifer hydraulic properties such as hydraulic conductivity (K) are ubiquitously heterogeneous and typically only a statistical characterization can be sought. Additionally, statistical anisotropy at typical characterization scales is the rule. Thus, regardless of the processes governing solute transport at the local (pore) scale, transport becomes non-Fickian. Mass-transfer models provide an efficient tool that reproduces observed anomalous transport; in some cases though, these models lack predictability as model parameters cannot readily be connected to the physical properties of aquifers. In this study, we focus on a multirate mass-transfer model (MRMT), and in particular the apparent capacity coefficient (β), which is a strong indicator of the potential of immobile zones to capture moving solute. We aim to find if the choice of an apparent β can be phenomenologically related to measures of statistical anisotropy. We analyzed an ensemble of random simulations of three-dimensional log-transformed multi-Gaussian permeability fields with stationary anisotropic correlation under convergent flow conditions. It was found that apparent β also displays an anisotropic behavior, physically controlled by the aquifer directional connectivity, which in turn is controlled by the anisotropic correlation model. A high hydraulic connectivity results in large β values. These results provide new insights into the practical use of mass-transfer models for predictive purposes.

  5. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate

  6. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Chemistry, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate.

  7. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  8. Biomonitor-Reflection of Large-Distance Air Mass Transported Trace Elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriques Vieira, B.J.

    2017-01-01

    The present thesis’ topic is the biomonitoring of atmospheric trace elements with attention focused on the long-range transported trace elements. The aim was to provide improved understanding of aerosol characteristics under the atmospheric transport dynamics of Central North Atlantic at different

  9. Corrosion protection and steel-concrete bond improvement of prestressing strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Corrosion can lead to the premature deterioration and failure of transportation structures. In pre-stressed bridge structures corrosion is more severe, : leading to sudden failures when cracking is induced at pitting sites by tensile or compressive s...

  10. A theoretical evaluation of the oxygen concentration in a corrosion-fatigue crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, A.

    1981-01-01

    The oxygen concentration in a corrosion-fatigue crack has been evaluated theoretically by assuming that oxygen was consumed by cathodic reduction on the walls of the crack and mass transport occurred by diffusion and advection (forced convection), with the latter resulting from the sinusoidal variation of the displacement of the crack walls. By using parameters relevant to a compact tension specimen, the time-dependent distribution of the oxygen concentration in the crack was calculated as a function of ΔK (the range of the stress intensity factor), R-value (minimum load/maximum load), frequency, crack length, and electrode potential. The influence of advection was to significantly enhance the mass transport of oxygen in the crack compared with ''diffusion-only'' even at low frequencies and low ΔK. Regions in the crack were identified in which advection dominance or diffusion dominance of the mass transport of oxygen occurred

  11. Transport of mass goods on the top run and bottom run of belt conveyors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, D

    1977-06-01

    For combined coal winning from the collieries 'General Blumenthal' and 'Ewald Fortsetzung' a large belt conveyor plant was taken into operation which is able to transport 1360 tons/h in the top run and 300 tons/h of dirt in the bottom run. The different types of coal are transported separately in intermittent operation with the aid of bunker systems connected to the front and rear of the belt conveyor. Persons can be transported in the top run as well as in the bottom run.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of cladded nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandl, W.; Ruczinski, D.; Nolde, M.; Blum, J.

    1995-01-01

    As a consequence of the high cost of nickel base alloys their use as surface layers is convenient. In this paper the properties of SA-as well as RES-cladded NiMo 16Cr16Ti and NiCr21Mo14W being produced in single and multi-layer technique are compared and discussed with respect to their corrosion behaviour. Decisive criteria describing the qualities of the claddings are the mass loss, the susceptibility against intergranular corrosion and the pitting corrosion resistance. The results prove that RES cladding is the most suitable technique to produce corrosion resistant nickel base coatings. The corrosion behaviour of a two-layer RES deposition shows a better resistance against pitting than a three layer SAW cladding. 7 refs

  13. Steamgenerators corrosion monitoring and chemical cleanings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otchenashev, G.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important secondary side water chemistry objectives is optimization of chemistry conditions to reduce materials corrosion and their products transport into steam generators. Corrosion products (mainly iron and copper oxides) can form deposits on the SG's tubes and essentially decrease their operating resource. The transport of corrosion products by the constant flowrate of feed and blowdown water depends only on their content in these streams. All the internal surfaces (walls, collectors, tubes) were covered with the tough deposit firmly connected with the surface. Corrosion under this deposit was not detected. In some places sludge unconnected with the surface was detected. The lower tubes are located the more unconnected sludge was detected. On SG bottom near the hatch the sludge thickness was about 3 cm. (R.P.)

  14. 49 CFR 195.573 - What must I do to monitor external corrosion control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.573 What must I do to... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must I do to monitor external corrosion control? 195.573 Section 195.573 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued...

  15. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...

  16. 49 CFR 195.583 - What must I do to monitor atmospheric corrosion control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.583 What must I do to... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must I do to monitor atmospheric corrosion control? 195.583 Section 195.583 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued...

  17. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Treaty Organization, Brussels, 1971), p. 449. 14. D. 0. Sprowls, T. J. Summerson, G. M. Ugianski, S. G. Epstein, and H. L. Craig , Jr., in Stress...National Association of Corrosion Engineers Houston, TX, 1972). 22. H. L. Craig , Jr. (ed.), Stress Corrosion-New Approaches, ASTM-STP- 610 (American...62. M. Hishida and H. Nakada, Corrosion 33 (11) 403 (1977). b3. D. C. Deegan and B. E. Wilde, Corrosion 34 (6), 19 (1978). 64. S. Orman, Corrosion Sci

  18. Variability in Mass Spectrometry-based Quantification of Clinically Relevant Drug Transporters and Drug Metabolizing Enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegler, C.; Gaugaz, F.Z.; Andersson, T.B.; Wiśniewski, J.R.; Busch, D.; Gröer, C.; Oswald, S.; Norén, A.; Weiss, F.; Hammer, H.S.; Joos, T.O.; Poetz, O.; Achour, B.; Rostami-Hodjegan, A.; Steeg, E. van de; Wortelboer, H.M.; Artursson, P.

    2017-01-01

    Many different methods are used for mass-spectrometry-based protein quantification in pharmacokinetics and systems pharmacology. It has not been established to what extent the results from these various methods are comparable. Here, we compared six different mass spectrometry-based proteomics

  19. Optimal Mass Transport for Statistical Estimation, Image Analysis, Information Geometry, and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-10

    advances on formulating and solving optimal transport problems on discrete spaces (networks) while ensuring robustness of the transportation plan. This...Metric Uncertainty for Spectral Estimation based on Nevanlinna-Pick Interpolation, (with J. Karlsson) Intern. Symp. on the Math . Theory of Networks and...Systems, Melbourne 2012. 22. Geometric tools for the estimation of structured covariances, (with L. Ning, X. Jiang) Intern. Symposium on the Math . Theory

  20. Corrosion products in power generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, D.H.

    1980-06-01

    The important mechanisms of corrosion and corrosion product movement and fouling in the heat transport systems of thermal electric generating stations are reviewed. Oil- and coal-fired boilers are considered, along with nuclear power systems - both direct and indirect cycle. Thus, the fireside and waterside in conventional plants, and the primary coolant and steam-raising circuits in water-cooled reactors, are discussed. Corrosion products in organic- and liquid-metal-cooled reactors also are shown to cause problems if not controlled, while their beneficial effects on the cooling water side of condensers are described. (auth)

  1. Sintering kinetics and mass transport in ceramic engobes; Cinetica de sinterizacion y transporte de masa en engobes ceramicos por el metodo Pechini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Bo, M.; Boschi, A. O.; Hotza, D.

    2013-10-01

    This work is concerned to study the sintering rate and mass transport mechanism in ceramic engobes. Specimens of engobes were prepared from a determined formulation by slip casting. Sintering was carried in two steps: (i) at constant heating rate of 7.5 degree centigrade/min and (ii) with an isothermal treatment, during 120 min. According to the dilatometric curves obtained with the engobe sintering during isothermal treatment, the dominant sintering mechanism and the rate of reactions, between the 775 and 975 degree centigrade, were determined. The results showed that between 775 and 800 degree centigrade, the sintering rate can be described by ln[d({Delta}L/L{sub 0})/dt] = -5.64 + 1.77.E10{sup -}3T. At higher temperatures, from 850 to 975 degree centigrade, this rate can be expressed by ln[d({Delta}L/L{sub 0})/ dt] = -30.73 + 3.E10{sup -}2T. The dominant transport mass mechanisms were the grain rearrangement, solution-precipitation and grain boundaries reaction. (Author)

  2. Numerical method for time-dependent localized corrosion analysis with moving boundaries by combining the finite volume method and voxel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yuki; Takiyasu, Jumpei; Amaya, Kenji; Yakuwa, Hiroshi; Hayabusa, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel numerical method to analyze time dependent localized corrosion is developed. ► It takes electromigration, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and moving boundaries. ► Our method perfectly satisfies the conservation of mass and electroneutrality. ► The behavior of typical crevice corrosion is successfully simulated. ► Both verification and validation of our method are carried out. - Abstract: A novel numerical method for time-dependent localized corrosion analysis is presented. Electromigration, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and moving boundaries are considered in the numerical simulation of localized corrosion of engineering alloys in an underwater environment. Our method combines the finite volume method (FVM) and the voxel method. The FVM is adopted in the corrosion rate calculation so that the conservation of mass is satisfied. A newly developed decoupled algorithm with a projection method is introduced in the FVM to decouple the multiphysics problem into the electrostatic, mass transport, and chemical reaction analyses with electroneutrality maintained. The polarization curves for the corroding metal are used as boundary conditions for the metal surfaces to calculate the corrosion rates. The voxel method is adopted in updating the moving boundaries of cavities without remeshing and mesh-to-mesh solution mapping. Some modifications of the standard voxel method, which represents the boundaries as zigzag-shaped surfaces, are introduced to generate smooth surfaces. Our method successfully reproduces the numerical and experimental results of a capillary electrophoresis problem. Furthermore, the numerical results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results for several examples of crevice corrosion.

  3. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  4. Corrosion study of API 5L x-series pipeline steels in 3.5% NaCl solution under varying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Qureshi, M.I.; Farooq, M.U.; Khan, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Pipelines provide convenient and efficient means for mass transportation of variety of fluids, such as oil and gas, over varying distances. In the last two decades or so, pipeline designers focused mainly on the usage of larger sizes and higher operating pressures for achieving higher transportation efficiency. This has been accomplished through the provision of steels with progressive increase in yield strength coupled with good weldability and sufficient toughness to restrict crack propagation. In addition to higher strength and toughness, developing pipeline technologies have required improved resistance to corrosion, which has been tried with specific alloy additions and special control over non-metallic inclusions. Corrosion investigations were carried out on various grades of pipeline steels (API 5L X-46, X-52, X-56, X-60 and X- 70) under varying environmental conditions. This paper describes the results pertaining to corrosion behavior of the steels in 3.5% NaCl solutions in stagnant, turbulent and deaerated conditions. It was found that all grades corrode in this solution and their corrosion potentials and corrosion currents are in close vicinity of each other. Turbulent solutions, however, have shown an increase in corrosion rates whereas deaeration has revealed a relative decrease in aggressivity of the electrolyte. (author)

  5. Commuter exposure to black carbon, carbon monoxide, and noise in the mass transport khlong boats of Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, A. D.; Velasco, E.; Ho, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Khlong (canal) boats are a unique mass transport alternative in the congested city of Bangkok. Canals and rivers provide exclusive transit-ways for reducing the commuting time of thousands of city residents daily. However, as a consequence of the service characteristics and boats design and state of repair, they can represent a potential public health risk and an important source of black carbon and greenhouse gases. This work quantifies commuter exposure to black carbon, CO and noise when waiting for and travelling in these diesel fueled boats. Exposure to toxic pollutants and acute noise is similar or worse than for other transportation modes. Mean black carbon concentrations observed at one busy pier and along the main canal were much higher than ambient concentrations at sites impacted by vehicular traffic. Concentrations of CO were similar to those reported for roadside areas of Bangkok. The equivalent continuous sound levels registered at the landing pier were similar to those reported for roadsides, but values recorded inside the boats were significantly higher. We believe that the boat service is a viable alternative mode of mass transport, but public safety could be improved to provide a high quality service, comparable to modern rail systems or emerging bus rapid transit systems. These investments would also contribute to reduce the emission of black carbon and other greenhouse and toxic pollutants.

  6. Standard test method for determining the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of 5XXX series Aluminum alloys by mass loss after exposure to nitric acid (NAMLT Test)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a procedure for constant immersion intergranular corrosion testing of 5XXX series aluminum alloys. 1.2 This test method is applicable only to wrought products. 1.3 This test method covers type of specimen, specimen preparation, test environment, and method of exposure. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. State of the art review of degradation processes in LMFBR materials. Volume II. Corrosion behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    Degradation of materials exposed to Na in LMFBR service is reviewed. The degradation processes are discussed in sections on corrosion and mass transfer, erosion, wear and self welding, sodium--water reactions, and external corrosion. (JRD)

  8. Heat, mass, and momentum transport model for hydrogen diffusion flames in nuclear reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    It is now possible to analyze the time-dependent, fully three-dimensional behavior of hydrogen diffusion flames in nuclear reactor containments. This analysis involves coupling the full Navier-Stokes equations with multi-species transport to the global chemical kinetics of hydrogen combustion. A transport equation for the subgrid scale turbulent kinetic energy density is solved to produce the time and space dependent turbulent transport coefficients. The heat transfer coefficient governing the exchange of heat between fluid computational cells adjacent to wall cells is calculated by a modified Reynolds analogy formulation. The analysis of a MARK-III containment indicates very complex flow patterns that greatly influence fluid and wall temperatures and heat fluxes. 18 refs., 24 figs

  9. Overexpression and deletion of phospholipid transfer protein reduce HDL mass and cholesterol efflux capacity but not macrophage reverse cholesterol transport[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwano, Takashi; Bi, Xin; Cipollari, Eleonora; Yasuda, Tomoyuki; Lagor, William R.; Szapary, Hannah J.; Tohyama, Junichiro; Millar, John S.; Billheimer, Jeffrey T.; Lyssenko, Nicholas N.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) may affect macrophage reverse cholesterol transport (mRCT) through its role in the metabolism of HDL. Ex vivo cholesterol efflux capacity and in vivo mRCT were assessed in PLTP deletion and PLTP overexpression mice. PLTP deletion mice had reduced HDL mass and cholesterol efflux capacity, but unchanged in vivo mRCT. To directly compare the effects of PLTP overexpression and deletion on mRCT, human PLTP was overexpressed in the liver of wild-type animals using an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, and control and PLTP deletion animals were injected with AAV-null. PLTP overexpression and deletion reduced plasma HDL mass and cholesterol efflux capacity. Both substantially decreased ABCA1-independent cholesterol efflux, whereas ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux remained the same or increased, even though preβ HDL levels were lower. Neither PLTP overexpression nor deletion affected excretion of macrophage-derived radiocholesterol in the in vivo mRCT assay. The ex vivo and in vivo assays were modified to gauge the rate of cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma. PLTP activity did not affect this metric. Thus, deviations in PLTP activity from the wild-type level reduce HDL mass and ex vivo cholesterol efflux capacity, but not the rate of macrophage cholesterol efflux to plasma or in vivo mRCT. PMID:28137768

  10. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  11. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, James; Carr, Ron; Chebl, Maroun; Coleman, Robert; Costantini, William; Cox, Robert; Dial, William; Jenkins, Robert; McGovern, James; Mueller, Peter

    2006-01-01

    ...., trains, ships, etc.) and maximizing intermodal efficiency. A healthy balance must be achieved between the flow of international commerce and security requirements regardless of transportation mode...

  12. A desk study of surface diffusion and mass transport in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Research into the properties of clays as barrier materials for nuclear waste disposal has led to the realization that they have important transport properties which are relatively insignificant in most other geological materials. Sorption has always been regarded as a purely retarding mechanism, but laboratory experiments over the past decade have indicated that surface diffusion of sorbed cations is a potentially significant transport mechanism in both compacted montmorillonite, and biotite gneiss. The present desk study about these issues was part of the CEC coordinated project Mirage-Second phase, research area Natural analogues

  13. Development of sensors for in-situ monitoring of corrosion and water chemistry parameters for the electric power utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Liu, C.; Medina, E.; Villa, J.; Bueno, J.

    1993-01-01

    The in situ monitoring of the chemistry and electrochemistry of aqueous heat transport fluids in thermal (nuclear and fossil) power plants is now considered essential if adequate assessment and close control of corrosion and mass transfer phenomena are to be achieved. Because of the elevated temperatures and pressures involved, new sensor technologies are required that are able to measure key parameters under plant operating conditions for extended periods of time. In this paper, the authors outline a research and development program that is designed to develop practical sensors for use in thermal power plants. The current emphasis is on sensors for measuring corrosion potential, pH, the concentrations of oxygen and hydrogen, and the electrochemical noise generated by corrosion processes at temperatures ranging from ∼250 C to 500 C. The program is currently at the laboratory stage, but testing of prototype sensors in a coal-fired supercritical power plant in Spain will begin shortly

  14. Multi-layer membrane model for mass transport in a direct ethanol fuel cell using an alkaline anion exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Hafez; Faghri, Amir

    2012-11-01

    A one-dimensional, isothermal, single-phase model is presented to investigate the mass transport in a direct ethanol fuel cell incorporating an alkaline anion exchange membrane. The electrochemistry is analytically solved and the closed-form solution is provided for two limiting cases assuming Tafel expressions for both oxygen reduction and ethanol oxidation. A multi-layer membrane model is proposed to properly account for the diffusive and electroosmotic transport of ethanol through the membrane. The fundamental differences in fuel crossover for positive and negative electroosmotic drag coefficients are discussed. It is found that ethanol crossover is significantly reduced upon using an alkaline anion exchange membrane instead of a proton exchange membrane, especially at current densities higher than 500 A m

  15. Numerical evaluation of oxide growth in metallic support microstructures of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and its influence on mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Persson, Åsa Helen

    2015-01-01

    is evaluated by determining an effective diffusion coefficient and the equivalent electrical area specific resistance (ASR) due to diffusion over time. It is thus possible to assess the applicability (in terms of corrosion behaviour) of potential metallic supports without costly long-term experiments......-temperature corrosion theory, and the required model parameters can be retrieved by standard corrosion weight gain measurements. The microstructure is reconstructed from X-ray computed tomography, and converted into a computational grid. The influence of the changing microstructure on the fuel cell performance...

  16. Nitrogen transport, transformation, and retention in the Three Gorges Reservoir : A mass balance approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ran, Xiangbin; Bouwman, Lex; Yu, Zhigang; Beusen, Arthur; Chen, Hongtao; Yao, Qingzhen

    2017-01-01

    Dam construction in river systems affects the biogeochemistry of nitrogen (N), yet most studies on N cycling in reservoirs do not consider the transformations and retention of the different N species. This study addresses the N inputs, transport, transformations, and retention in the Three Gorges

  17. The influence of Reynolds number on the galvanic corrosion of the copper/AISI 304 pair in aqueous LiBr solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanes, M.T.; Sanchez-Tovar, R.; Garcia-Anton, J.; Perez-Herranz, V.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of Reynolds number on the galvanic corrosion of the copper/AISI 304 stainless steel pair in a concentrated lithium bromide solution was investigated according to the mixed potential theory. A hydraulic circuit was designed to study dynamic corrosion processes in situ. A potential relation between corrosion current density (i corr ) and Reynolds number (Re) was found for copper, showing a mixed control of a chemical step and mass transport through the corrosion products film with the predominance of the former. No dependence of i corr on Re could be established for AISI 304, showing a chemical step control. Moreover, under stagnant conditions, partial passivation may occur in AISI 304; however, under flowing conditions passivation is not possible. Copper is the anodic element of the pair under all flowing conditions analysed. The galvanic phenomenon is more important as Re increases, but the results show compatibility of both materials at all Re values analysed. Similarly, a potential relation between galvanic current density (i G ) and Re was found, showing a mixed control of a chemical step and mass transport with the predominance of the latter. Copper corrosion resistance decreases more rapidly as Re increases due to the AISI 304 galvanic effect: there is a synergy between the galvanic effect and the hydrodynamic conditions. Under stagnant conditions, the galvanic behaviour of the materials is close to the compatibility limit and an inversion of the anodic element of the galvanic pair takes place.

  18. Final Report: Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications (2012-2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian David [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Huya-Kouadio, Jennie Moton [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Houchins, Cassidy [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); DeSantis, Daniel Allen [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes project activities for Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) Contract Number DE-EE0005236 to the U.S. Department of Energy titled “Transportation Fuel Cell System Cost Assessment”. The project defined and projected the mass production costs of direct hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell power systems for light-duty vehicles (automobiles) and 40-foot transit buses. In each year of the five-year contract, the fuel cell power system designs and cost projections were updated to reflect technology advances. System schematics, design assumptions, manufacturing assumptions, and cost results are presented.

  19. Modelling of activity transport in PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veena, S.N.; Rangarajan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Horvath, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    The modelling of mass and activity transport in PHWR is of importance in predicting the build up of radiation field in and around the Primary Heat Transport system which will consequently help in planning the Dilute Chemical Decontamination and man rem budgeting. Modeling also helps in understanding the different parameters controlling the transport behaviour. Some of the important parameters include coolant chemistry like pH, physical parameters like temperature, the nature of the corrosion film and hence the effect of passivation techniques. VVER code for activity transport uses six nodes for the primary system and is essentially devised for stainless steel system. In the present work though based on this model, major modifications have been incorporated to suit the PHWR conditions. In the code, the PHT system of PHWR is suitably divided into 14 nodes, 5 in-core and 9 out of core nodes based on material and heat transfer properties. This paper describes the mechanisms involved in the various processes like generation of corrosion products, their release as well as their transport into the primary coolant, the activation of inactive corrosion product nuclides and the build up of radiation field due to 60 Co around the PHT system. (author)

  20. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  1. The impact of corrosion on oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermani, M.B.; Harrop, D.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of corrosion on the oil industry has been viewed in terms of its effect on both capital and operational expenditures (CAPEX and OPEX) and health, safety and the environment (HSE). To fight against the high cost and the impact of corrosion within the oil industry, an overview of topical research and engineering activities is presented. This covers corrosion and metallurgy issues related to drilling, production, transportation and refinery activities

  2. Microphysics of mass-transport in coupled droplet-pairs at low Reynolds number and the role of convective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qingming; Sau, Amalendu

    2016-06-01

    Interfacial mass-transport and redistribution in the micro-scale liquid droplets are important in diverse fields of research interest. The role of the "inflow" and the "outflow" type convective eddy-pairs in the entrainment of outer solute and internal relocation are examined for different homogeneous and heterogeneous water droplet pairs appearing in a tandem arrangement. Two micro-droplets of pure (rain) water interact with an oncoming outer air stream (Re ≤ 100) contaminated by uniformly distributed SO2. By virtue of separation/attachment induced non-uniform interfacial shear-stress gradient, the well-defined inflow/outflow type pairs of recirculating eddy-based convective motion quickly develops, and the eddies effectively attract/repel the accumulated outer solute and control the physical process of mass-transport in the droplet-pair. The non-uniformly shear-driven flow interaction and bifurcation of the circulatory internal flow lead to growth of important micro-scale "secondary" eddies which suitably regroup with the adjacent "primary" one to create the sustained inflow/outflow type convective dynamics. The presently derived flow characteristics and in-depth analysis help to significantly improve our understanding of the micro-droplet based transport phenomena in a wider context. By tuning "Re" (defined in terms of the droplet diameter and the average oncoming velocity of the outer air) and gap-ratio "α," the internal convective forcing and the solute entrainment efficiency could be considerably enhanced. The quantitative estimates for mass entrainment, convective strength, and saturation characteristics for different coupled micro-droplet pairs are extensively examined here for 0.2 ≤ α ≤ 2.0 and 30 ≤ Re ≤ 100. Interestingly, for the compound droplets, with suitably tuned radius-ratio "B" (of upstream droplet with respect to downstream one) the generated "inflow" type coherent convective dynamics helped to significantly augment the centre

  3. Monitoring mass transport in heterogeneously catalyzed reactions by field-gradient NMR for assessing reaction efficiency in a single pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljubasich, L.; Blümich, B.; Stapf, S.

    2011-09-01

    An important aspect in assessing the performance of a catalytically active reactor is the accessibility of the reactive sites inside the individual pellets, and the mass transfer of reactants and products to and from these sites. Optimal design often requires a suitable combination of micro- and macropores in order to facilitate mass transport inside the pellet. In an exothermic reaction, fluid exchange between the pellet and the surrounding medium is enhanced by convection, and often by the occurrence of gas bubbles. Determining mass flow in the vicinity of a pellet thus represents a parameter for quantifying the reaction efficiency and its dependence on time or external reaction conditions. Field gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methods are suggested as a tool for providing parameters sensitive to this mass flow in a contact-free and non-invasive way. For the example of bubble-forming hydrogen peroxide decomposition in an alumina pellet, the dependence of the mean-squared displacement of fluid molecules on spatial direction, observation time and reaction time is presented, and multi-pulse techniques are employed in order to separate molecular displacements from coherent and incoherent motion on the timescale of the experiment. The reaction progress is followed until the complete decomposition of H 2O 2.

  4. Enhancing corrosion resistance of reinforced concrete structures with hybrid fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt, J.; Jen, G.; Ostertag, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Reinforced concrete beams were subjected to cyclic flexural loading. • Hybrid fiber reinforced composites were effective in reducing corrosion rates. • Crack resistance due to fibers increased corrosion resistance of steel rebar. • Galvanic corrosion measurements underestimated corrosion rates. • Polarization resistance measurements predicted mass loss more accurately. - Abstract: Service loads well below the yield strength of steel reinforcing bars lead to cracking of reinforced concrete. This paper investigates whether the crack resistance of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete (HyFRC) reduces the corrosion rate of steel reinforcing bars in concrete after cyclic flexural loading. The reinforcing bars were extracted to examine their surface for corrosion and compare microcell and macrocell corrosion mass loss estimates against direct gravimetric measurements. A delay in corrosion initiation and lower active corrosion rates were observed in the HyFRC beam specimens when compared to reinforced specimens containing plain concrete matrices cycled at the same flexural load

  5. Corrosion particles in the primary coolant of VVER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, N.; Molnar, Z.; Macsik, Z.; Szeles, E.; Hargittai, P.; Csordas, A.; Pinter, T.; Pinter, T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion and activity build-up processes are of major concern in ageing and life-extension of nuclear power reactors. Researches to study the migration of radioactive corrosion particles have been initiated at Paks Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Hungary in order to better understand the corrosion of the primary circuit surfaces, the transport and activation of the particles of corrosion origin and their deposition on in-core and out-of-core surfaces. Radioactive corrosion particles were collected from the primary coolant and the steam generator surfaces of the 4 reactor units and subjected to detailed microanalytical and radioanalytical investigations. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX) were used to study the morphology and the composition of the matrix elements in the particles and the deposited corrosion layers. Particles identified by SEM-EDX were re-located under optical microscope by means of a coordinate transformation algorithm and were separated with a micromanipulator for further studies. Activities of γ emitting radionuclides were determined by high resolution γ spectrometry, and those of β decaying isotopes were measured by liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry after radiochemical processing. High sensitivity of the nuclear measuring techniques allowed us to determine the low activity concentrations of the long-lived radionuclides, i.e. 60 Co, 54 Mn, 63 Ni, 55 Fe in the individual particles. Finally, high resolution sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) was applied to determine the ultralow concentrations of Co, Fe, Ni in the same particles. Specific activities of 60 Co/Co, 54 Mn/Fe, 55 Fe/Fe and 63 Ni/Ni were derived from the measured activity and concentration data. Specific activities of the radioactive corrosion products reveal the history of activity buildup processes in the particle. Typically, Fe-Cr-Ni oxide particles formed as a result of corrosion of the steel

  6. A new method to estimate global mass transport and its implication for sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, S.; Heki, K.

    2017-12-01

    Estimates of changes in global land mass by using GRACE observations can be achieved by two methods, a mascon method and a forward modeling method. However, results from these two methods show inconsistent secular trend. Sea level budget can be adopted to validate the consistency among observations of sea level rise by altimetry, steric change by the Argo project, and mass change by GRACE. Mascon products from JPL, GSFC and CSR are compared here, we find that all these three products cannot achieve a reconciled sea level budget, while this problem can be solved by a new forward modeling method. We further investigate the origin of this difference, and speculate that it is caused by the signal leakage from the ocean mass. Generally, it is well recognized that land signals leak into oceans, but it also happens the other way around. We stress the importance of correction of leakage from the ocean in the estimation of global land masses. Based on a reconciled sea level budget, we confirmed that global sea level rise has been accelerating significantly over 2005-2015, as a result of the ongoing global temperature increase.

  7. Erosion corrosion in wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavast, J.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of different remedies against erosion corrosion in wet steam has been studied in Barsebaeck 1. Accessible steam systems were inspected in 1984, 1985 and 1986. The effect of hydrogen peroxide injection of the transport of corrosion products in the condensate and feed water systems has also been followed through chemical analyses. The most important results of the project are: - Low alloy chromium steels with a chromium content of 1-2% have shown excellent resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. - A thermally sprayed coating has shown good resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. In a few areas with restricted accessibility minor attacks have been found. A thermally sprayed aluminium oxide coating has given poor results. - Large areas in the moisture separator/reheater and in steam extraction no. 3 have been passivated by injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide to the high pressure steam. In other inspected systems no significant effect was found. Measurements of the wall thickness in steam extraction no. 3 showed a reduced rate of attack. - The injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide has not resulted in any significant reduction of the iron level result is contrary to that of earlier tests. An increase to 40 ppb resulted in a slight decrease of the iron level. - None of the feared disadvantages with hydrogen peroxide injection has been observed. The chromium and cobalt levels did not increase during the injection. Neither did the lifetime of the precoat condensate filters decrease. (author)

  8. Investigation of silicate surface chemistry and reaction mechanisms associated with mass transport in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.F.; Perry, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The concentration and rate of transport of radionuclides through geologic media can be strongly influenced by the extent of sorption on aquifer surfaces. Over time intervals relevant to such transport processes, rock and mineral surfaces cannot be considered as inert, unreactive substrates but rather as groundwater/solidphase interfaces which are commonly in a state of natural or artificially induced disequilibrium. The goal of the present research is to define experimentally the type of water/rock interactions that will influence surface chemistry and hence sorption characteristics and capacities of natural aquifers. As wide a range of silicate minerals as possible was selected for study to represent rock-forming minerals in basalt, tuff, and granite. The minerals include K-feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, olivine, hornblende, biotite, and volcanic glass

  9. A desk study of surface diffusion and mass transport in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.J.

    1988-09-01

    The concept of a geological barrier to radionuclide migration from theoretical radioactive waste repositories has drawn attention to the physico-chemical properties of clays, which are traditionally regarded as retarding media. This report addresses the different mechanisms of transport of radionuclides through clay and in particular focuses on the surface diffusion movement of sorbed cations. The relative contributory importance of the different transport mechanisms is governed by the pore size distributions and interconnections within the clay fabric. Surface diffusion data in the literature have been from experiments using compacted montmorillonite and biotite gneiss. A possible programme of laboratory work is outlined, based on diffusion experiments, which describes the way of measuring the effect of surface diffusion more accurately in clays, mudstones and shales. (author)

  10. Mass and Momentum Transport in Microcavities for Diffusion-Dominant Cell Culture Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Alvin G.; Pinero, Daniel; Hsieh, Adam H.; Atencia, Javier

    2012-01-01

    For the informed design of microfluidic devices, it is important to understand transport phenomena at the microscale. This letter outlines an analytically-driven approach to the design of rectangular microcavities extending perpendicular to a perfusion microchannel for microfluidic cell culture devices. We present equations to estimate the spatial transition from advection- to diffusion-dominant transport inside cavities as a function of the geometry and flow conditions. We also estimate the time required for molecules, such as nutrients or drugs to travel from the microchannel to a given depth into the cavity. These analytical predictions can facilitate the rational design of microfluidic devices to optimize and maintain long-term, physiologically-based culture conditions with low fluid shear stress.

  11. Corrosion-product inventory: the Bruce-B secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Price, J.; Brett, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion inspection and corrosion-product characterization in water and steam systems are important for component and systems maintenance in nuclear power stations. Corrosion products are produced, released and redeposited at various sites in the secondary system. Depending on the alloys used in the condenser and feedwater heaters, particulate iron oxides and hydroxides can account for about 95-99% of the total corrosion-product transport. Where brass or cupro-nickel alloys are present, copper and zinc contribute significantly to the total transport and deposition. Particulates are transported by the feedwater to the steam generators, where they accumulate and can cause a variety of problems, such as loss of heat transfer capability through deposition on boiler tubes, blockage of flow through boiler-tube support plates and accelerated corrosion in crevices, either in deep sludge piles or at blocked tube supports. The influx of oxidized corrosion products may have a particularly adverse effect on the redox environment of steam generator tubing, thereby increasing the probability of localized corrosion and other degradation mechanisms. In this paper, there is a description of a survey of general corrosion deposits in Bruce-B, Units 5-8, which helps to identify the origin, evolution and inventory of corrosion products along the secondary system of Candu reactors

  12. Relationships of dispersive mass transport and stochastic convective flow through hydrologic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Uncertainty in water flow velocity appears to be a major factor in determining the magnitude of contaminant dispersion expected in a ground water system. This report discusses some concepts and mathematical methods relating dispersive contaminant transport to stochastic aspects of ground water flow. The theory developed should not be construed as absolutely rigorous mathematics, but is presented with the intention of clarifying the physical concepts

  13. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    OpenAIRE

    Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-01-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the ‘glymphatic pathway’ plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs1,2. It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through ...

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Interstitial Fluid Motion via the Glymphatic Pathway Modelled by Optimal Mass Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Benveniste, Helene; Nedergaard, Maikan; Lee, Hedok; Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen; Ratner, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the `glymphatic pathway' plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs [1,2]. It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly throu...

  15. Exceptional Air Mass Transport and Dynamical Drivers of an Extreme Wintertime Arctic Warm Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Hanin; Boettcher, Maxi; Grams, Christian M.; Joos, Hanna; Pfahl, Stephan; Wernli, Heini

    2017-12-01

    At the turn of the years 2015/2016, maximum surface temperature in the Arctic reached record-high values, exceeding the melting point, which led to a strong reduction of the Arctic sea ice extent in the middle of the cold season. Here we show, using a Lagrangian method, that a combination of very different airstreams contributed to this event: (i) warm low-level air of subtropical origin, (ii) initially cold low-level air of polar origin heated by surface fluxes, and (iii) strongly descending air heated by adiabatic compression. The poleward transport of these warm airstreams occurred along an intense low-level jet between a series of cyclones and a quasi-stationary anticyclone. The complex 3-D configuration that enabled this transport was facilitated by continuous warm conveyor belt ascent into the upper part of the anticyclone. This study emphasizes the combined role of multiple transport processes and transient synoptic-scale dynamics for establishing an extreme Arctic warm event.

  16. Catastrophes caused by corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, huge attention has been paid to the problem of corrosion damage and destruction of metallic materials. Experience shows that failures due to corrosion problems are very important, and statistics at the world level shows that the damage resulting from the effects of various forms of corrosion is substantial and that, for example, in industrialized countries it reaches 4-5% of national incomes. Significant funds are determined annually for the prevention and control of corrosion...

  17. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  18. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, D. W; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  19. Study on corrosion of carbon steel in DEA aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun Han; Xie, Jia Lin; Zhang, Li

    2018-02-01

    Corrosion of carbon steel in the CO2 capture process using diethanolamine (DEA) aqueous solutions was investigated. The effects of the mass concentrations of DEA, solution temperature and CO2 loading on the corrosion rate of carbon steel were demonstrated. The experimental results provided comprehensive information on the appropriate concentration range of DEA aqueous solutions under which low corrosion of carbon steel can be achieved.

  20. Mathematical model of vertical mass transport in the mine dumps Western Donbass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevhrashkina T.P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The multivariate mathematical models of the recultivated, recultivated and dumping with dry system, recultivated in systematically irrigation conditions and free of overgrowth by wild plants are proposed, designed and quantified. The theory of physico-chemical hydrodynamics of pore space using analytical and numerical methods for solving the equations of motion and mass conservation of matter all models are based on. The adequacy of built models and man-maid processes that proceed inside the mine dumps is proved.

  1. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  2. Microbiological corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladislavlev, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Problems is considered of development of the microbiological corrosion of the NPP equipment. The main attention is paid to the selective character of microbiological corrosion in zones of welded joints of austenitic steels. It is noted that the presence of technological defects promotes growth of corrosional damages. Methods for microbiological corrosion protection are discussed

  3. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  4. Combined Corrosion and Wear of Aluminium Alloy 7075-T6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Mol, J.M.C.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The aluminium alloy 7075-T6 is widely used in engineering. In some applications, like slurry transport, corrosion and abrasion occur simultaneously, resulting in early material failure. In the present work, we investigated the combined effect of corrosion and wear on the aluminium alloy 7075-T6. We

  5. Location-dependent coronary artery diffusive and convective mass transport properties of a lipophilic drug surrogate measured using nonlinear microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Joseph T; Simon, Bruce R; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2013-04-01

    Arterial wall mass transport properties dictate local distribution of biomolecules or locally delivered dugs. Knowing how these properties vary between coronary artery locations could provide insight into how therapy efficacy is altered between arterial locations. We introduced an indocarbocyanine drug surrogate to the lumens of left anterior descending and right coronary (LADC; RC) arteries from pigs with or without a pressure gradient. Interstitial fluorescent intensity was measured on live samples with multiphoton microscopy. We also measured binding to porcine coronary SMCs in monoculture. Diffusive transport constants peaked in the middle sections of the LADC and RC arteries by 2.09 and 2.04 times, respectively, compared to the proximal and distal segments. There was no statistical difference between the average diffusivity value between LADC and RC arteries. The convection coefficients had an upward trend down each artery, with the RC being higher than the LADC by 3.89 times. This study demonstrates that the convective and diffusive transport of lipophilic molecules changes between the LADC and the RC arteries as well as along their length. These results may have important implications in optimizing drug delivery for the treatment of coronary artery disease.

  6. Winter and summer monsoon water mass, heat and freshwater transport changes in the Arabian Sea near 8°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramma, Lothar; Brandt, Peter; Schott, Friedrich; Quadfasel, Detlef; Fischer, Jürgen

    The differences in the water mass distributions and transports in the Arabian Sea between the summer monsoon of August 1993 and the winter monsoon of January 1998 are investigated, based on two hydrographic sections along approximately 8°N. At the western end the sections were closed by a northward leg towards the African continent at about 55°E. In the central basin along 8°N the monsoon anomalies of the temperature and density below the surface-mixed layer were dominated by annual Rossby waves propagating westward across the Arabian Sea. In the northwestern part of the basin the annual Rossby waves have much smaller impact, and the density anomalies observed there were mostly associated with the Socotra Gyre. Salinity and oxygen differences along the section reflect local processes such as the spreading of water masses originating in the Bay of Bengal, northward transport of Indian Central Water, or slightly stronger southward spreading of Red Sea Water in August than in January. The anomalous wind conditions of 1997/98 influenced only the upper 50-100 m with warmer surface waters in January 1998, and Bay of Bengal Water covered the surface layer of the section in the eastern Arabian Sea. Estimates of the overturning circulation of the Arabian Sea were carried out despite the fact that many uncertainties are involved. For both cruises a vertical overturning cell of about 4-6 Sv was determined, with inflow below 2500 m and outflow between about 300 and 2500 m. In the upper 300-450 m a seasonally reversing shallow meridional overturning cell appears to exist in which the Ekman transport is balanced by a geostrophic transport. The heat flux across 8°N is dominated by the Ekman transport, yielding about -0.6 PW for August 1993, and 0.24 PW for January 1998. These values are comparable to climatological and model derived heat flux estimates. Freshwater fluxes across 8°N also were computed, yielding northward freshwater fluxes of 0.07 Sv in January 1998 and 0

  7. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  8. Numerical simulation of heat and mass transport during hydration of Portland cement mortar in semi-adiabatic and steam curing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Bautista, E.; Bentz, D. P.; Sandoval-Torres, S.; de Cano-Barrita, P. F. J.

    2016-01-01

    A model that describes hydration and heat-mass transport in Portland cement mortar during steam curing was developed. The hydration reactions are described by a maturity function that uses the equivalent age concept, coupled to a heat and mass balance. The thermal conductivity and specific heat of mortar with water-to-cement mass ratio of 0.30 was measured during hydration, using the Transient Plane Source method. The parameters for the maturity equation and the activation energy were obtaine...

  9. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  10. Columnar aerosol optical and radiative properties according to season and air mass transport pattern over East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young M; Müller, Detlef; Lee, Hanlim; Lee, Kwonho; Kim, Young Joon

    2012-08-01

    The column-integrated optical and radiative properties of aerosols in the downwind area of East Asia were investigated based on sun/sky radiometer measurements performed from February 2004 to June 2005 at Gwangju (35.23° N, 126.84° E) and Anmyeon (36.54° N, 126.33° E), Korea. The observed aerosol data were analyzed for differences among three seasons: spring (March-May), summer (June-August), and autumn/winter (September-February). The data were also categorized into five types depending on the air mass origin in arriving in the measurement sites: (a) from a northerly direction in spring (S(N)), (b) from a westerly direction in spring (S(W)), (c) cases with a low Ångström exponent (air mass origin. The forcing efficiency in summer was -131.7 and -125.6 W m(-2) at the surface in Gwangju and Anmyeon, respectively. These values are lower than those under the atmospheric conditions of spring and autumn/winter. The highest forcing efficiencies in autumn/winter were -214.3 and -255.9 W m(-2) at the surface in Gwangju and Anmyeon, respectively, when the air mass was transported from westerly directions.

  11. Earth System Data Records of Mass Transport from Time-Variable Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, V.; Talpe, M.; Nerem, R. S.; Landerer, F. W.; Watkins, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite measurements of time variable gravity have revolutionized the study of Earth, by measuring the ice losses of Greenland, Antarctica and land glaciers, changes in groundwater including unsustainable losses due to extraction of groundwater, the mass and currents of the oceans and their redistribution during El Niño events, among other findings. Satellite measurements of gravity have been made primarily by four techniques: satellite tracking from land stations using either lasers or Doppler radio systems, satellite positioning by GNSS/GPS, satellite to satellite tracking over distances of a few hundred km using microwaves, and through a gravity gradiometer (radar altimeters also measure the gravity field, but over the oceans only). We discuss the challenges in the measurement of gravity by different instruments, especially time-variable gravity. A special concern is how to bridge a possible gap in time between the end of life of the current GRACE satellite pair, launched in 2002, and a future GRACE Follow-On pair to be launched in 2017. One challenge in combining data from different measurement systems consists of their different spatial and temporal resolutions and the different ways in which they alias short time scale signals. Typically satellite measurements of gravity are expressed in spherical harmonic coefficients (although expansions in terms of 'mascons', the masses of small spherical caps, has certain advantages). Taking advantage of correlations among spherical harmonic coefficients described by empirical orthogonal functions and derived from GRACE data it is possible to localize the otherwise coarse spatial resolution of the laser and Doppler derived gravity models. This presentation discusses the issues facing a climate data record of time variable mass flux using these different data sources, including its validation.

  12. Standard practice for preparing, cleaning, and evaluating corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers suggested procedures for preparing bare, solid metal specimens for tests, for removing corrosion products after the test has been completed, and for evaluating the corrosion damage that has occurred. Emphasis is placed on procedures related to the evaluation of corrosion by mass loss and pitting measurements. (Warning—In many cases the corrosion product on the reactive metals titanium and zirconium is a hard and tightly bonded oxide that defies removal by chemical or ordinary mechanical means. In many such cases, corrosion rates are established by mass gain rather than mass loss.) 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see 1 and 7.2.

  13. The Transport of Mass, Energy, and Entropy in Cryogenic Support Struts for Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchert, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Engineers working to understand and reduce cryogenic boil-off must solve a variety of transport problems. An important class of nonlinear problems involves the thermal and mechanical design of cryogenic struts. These classic problems are scattered about the literature and typically require too many resources to obtain. So, to save time for practicing engineers, the author presents this essay. Herein, a variety of new, old, and revisited analytical and finite difference solutions of the thermal problem are covered in this essay, along with commentary on approach and assumptions. This includes a few thermal radiation and conduction combined mode solutions with a discussion on insulation, optimum emissivity, and geometrical phenomenon. Solutions to cooling and heat interception problems are also presented, including a discussion of the entropy generation. The literature on the combined mechanical and thermal design of cryogenic support struts is reviewed with an introduction to the associated numerical methods.

  14. Corrosion of Cast Iron Mill Plates in Wet Grinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony ANDREWS

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion studies were carried out on two different maize grinding plates. Maize was soaked in water for three days and the water decanted and used as electrolyte. Mass loss and pH measurements were carried out every 3 days for 15-day period. Results show that, for each plate, mass loss and pH increased with exposure time. Corrosion rates determined from mass loss data was found to be strongly dependent on pH. The observed behaviour may be explained in terms of the chemical composition and/or microstructures of the plates. Results are briefly discussed in terms of the contribution of corrosion to wear.

  15. Re-assessing Present Day Global Mass Transport and Glacial Isostatic Adjustment From a Data Driven Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X.; Jiang, Y.; Simonsen, S.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Ligtenberg, S.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; van der Wal, W.; Vermeersen, B. L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Determining present-day mass transport (PDMT) is complicated by the fact that most observations contain signals from both present day ice melting and Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Despite decades of progress in geodynamic modeling and new observations, significant uncertainties remain in both. The key to separate present-day ice mass change and signals from GIA is to include data of different physical characteristics. We designed an approach to separate PDMT and GIA signatures by estimating them simultaneously using globally distributed interdisciplinary data with distinct physical information and a dynamically constructed a priori GIA model. We conducted a high-resolution global reappraisal of present-day ice mass balance with focus on Earth's polar regions and its contribution to global sea-level rise using a combination of ICESat, GRACE gravity, surface geodetic velocity data, and an ocean bottom pressure model. Adding ice altimetry supplies critically needed dual data types over the interiors of ice covered regions to enhance separation of PDMT and GIA signatures, and achieve half an order of magnitude expected higher accuracies for GIA and consequently ice mass balance estimates. The global data based approach can adequately address issues of PDMT and GIA induced geocenter motion and long-wavelength signatures important for large areas such as Antarctica and global mean sea level. In conjunction with the dense altimetry data, we solved for PDMT coefficients up to degree and order 180 by using a higher-resolution GRACE data set, and a high-resolution a priori PDMT model that includes detailed geographic boundaries. The high-resolution approach solves the problem of multiple resolutions in various data types, greatly reduces aliased errors from a low-degree truncation, and at the same time, enhances separation of signatures from adjacent regions such as Greenland and Canadian Arctic territories.

  16. An electrochemical study of the corrosion behavior of primer coated 2219-T87 aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Higgins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The corrosion behavior for 2219-T87 aluminum coated with various primers, including those used for the external tank and solid rocket boosters of the Space Shuttle Transportation System, were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Corrosion potential time, polarization resistance time, electrical resistance time, and corrosion rate time measurements were all investigated. It was found that electrical resistance time and corrosion rate time measurement were most useful for studying the corrosion behavior of painted aluminum. Electrical resistance time determination give useful information concerning the porosity of paint films, while corrosion rate time curves give important information concerning overall corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms. In general, the corrosion rate time curves all exhibited at least one peak during the 30 day test period, which was attributed, according to the proposed mechanisms, to the onset of the hydrogen evolution reaction and the beginning of destruction of the protective properties of the paint film.

  17. Erosion-corrosion of structural materials of wet steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomarov, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    A model of erosion-corrosion wear of elements of a wet steam zone and a condensate-feeding path of turbines is considered. It is shown that diffusion of impurities and corrosion products in pores of an oxide layer is the control mechanism under conditions of laminar flow of a media. Processes of mass transfer are controlling factors in turbulent flow

  18. Nanofluidic transport over a curved surface with viscous dissipation and convective mass flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehmood, Zaffar; Iqbal, Z.; Azhar, Ehtsham; Maraj, E.N. [HITEC Univ., Taxila (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-06-01

    This article is a numerical investigation of boundary layer flow of nanofluid over a bended stretching surface. The study is carried out by considering convective mass flux condition. Contribution of viscous dissipation is taken into the account along with thermal radiation. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to simplify the system of nonlinear partial differential equations into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Computational results are extracted by means of a shooting method embedded with a Runge-Kutta Fehlberg technique. Key findings include that velocity is a decreasing function of curvature parameter K. Moreover, Nusselt number decreases with increase in curvature of the stretching surface while skin friction and Sherwood number enhance with increase in K.

  19. Global stability and exact solution of an arbitrary-solute nonlinear cellular mass transport system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, James D

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of the cellular state as a function of extracellular concentrations and temperatures has been of interest to physiologists for nearly a century. One of the most widely used models in the field is one where mass flux is linearly proportional to the concentration difference across the membrane. These fluxes define a nonlinear differential equation system for the intracellular state, which when coupled with appropriate initial conditions, define the intracellular state as a function of the extracellular concentrations of both permeating and nonpermeating solutes. Here we take advantage of a reparametrization scheme to extend existing stability results to a more general setting and to a develop analytical solutions to this model for an arbitrary number of extracellular solutes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dissolution of copper in chloride/ammonia mixtures and the implications for the stress corrosion cracking of copper containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Greidanus, G.; Jobe, D.J.

    1999-05-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking is a possible failure mechanism for copper nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. One species known to cause the stress corrosion of copper alloys is ammonia. It is conceivable that ammonia could be produced in a disposal vault under certain, very specific conditions. There are a number of conditions, however, that mitigate against container failure by stress corrosion, one of which is the presence of chloride ions in deep Canadian Shield groundwaters. There are a number of reports in the literature that suggest that Cl - has an inhibitive effect on the stress corrosion of Cu alloys in ammonia solutions. The electrochemical behaviour of Cu in Cl - /ammonia solutions has been studied as a function of ammonia concentration, pH, the rate of mass transport and electrochemical potential. In particular, the effects of these parameters on the formation Of Cu 2 O films and the steady-state dissolution behaviour have been determined. All experiments were carried out in 0.1 mol·dm -3 NaC1 as a base solution. A series of aqueous speciation and equilibrium potential/pH diagrams are also presented for the quaternary system Cu-C1 - NH 3 /NH 4 + H 2 O. These diagrams are used to interpret the results of the electrochemical experiments reported here. In addition, it is demonstrated how these diagrams could be used to predict the time-dependence of the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of Cu containers in a disposal vault. (author)

  1. Activation product transport in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. Similar problems are experienced around fission reactor systems. The determination of the transport of radioactive corrosion and neutron sputtering products through the system is achieved using the computer code RAPTOR. This code calculates the mass transfer of a number of activation products based on the corrosion and sputtering rates through the system, the deposition and release characteristics of various plant components, the neturon flux spectrum, as well as other plant parameters. RAPTOR assembles a system of first order linear differential equations into a matrix equation based upon the reactor system parameters. Included in the transfer matrix are the deposition and erosion coefficients, and the decay and activation data for the various plant nodes and radioactive isotopes. A source vector supplies the corrosion and neutron sputtering source rates. This matrix equation is then solved using a matrix operator technique to give the specific activity distribution of each radioactive species throughout the plant. Once the amount of mass transfer is determined, the photon transport due to the radioactive corrosion and sputtering product sources can be evaluated, and dose rates around the plant components of interest as a function of time can be determined. This method has been used to estimate the radiation hazards around a number of fusion reactor system designs

  2. Evaluation of corrosion resistance of various concrete reinforcing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Vermont Agency of Transportation undertook a simple experiment to determine the corrosion : resistance ability of various reinforcing steels (rebar) that may be used in bridges and other concrete : structures. Eight types of rebar were used in th...

  3. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A. [Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, Michael I., E-mail: m.ojovan@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface. - Highlights: • The radionuclides yield is determined by the transport from the glass through the surface corrosion layer. • Formation of the surface layer is due to the dissolution of the glass network and the formation of insoluble compounds. • The model proposed accounts for glass dissolution, formation of corrosion layer, specie diffusion and chemical reactions. • Analytical solutions are found for corrosion layer growth rate and glass components component leaching rates.

  4. Water-base acrylic terpolymer as a corrosion inhibitor for SAE1018 in simulated sour petroleum solution in stagnant and hydrodynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakili Azghandi, M.; Davoodi, A.; Farzi, G.A.; Kosari, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion inhibition of a water-base copolymer, ATP, was studied. ► Efficiency more than 90% was obtained with 0.8 mmol/L ATP in 2000 rpm. ► ATP obeys Langmuir isotherm in static and hydrodynamic conditions. ► With the presence of ATP, OM images showed a decrease in surface attack. - Abstract: The effect of static and hydrodynamic conditions (0–2000 rpm) on corrosion inhibition of a water-base acrylic terpolymer (ATP), methyl methacrylate/butyl acrylate/acrylic acid, for SAE1018 steel in simulated sour petroleum corrosive solution (NACE 1D196) were investigated by AC/DC electrochemical tests. Increase in rotation speed accelerates the corrosion rate; however the corrosion inhibitor efficiency increases. This was attributed to the enhanced mass transport of inhibitor molecules to the metal surface. OM examinations also demonstrate that in presence of ATP, a decrease in corrosion attacks is observed. Thermodynamic calculations also showed that ATP obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm and adsorbs chemically into the surface.

  5. Evaluation of mass transport property using natural uranium-series and thorium-series nuclides in the Toki Granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Katsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) project is being pursued by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to enhance the reliability of relevant disposal technologies through investigations of the deep geological environment within the host crystalline rock at Mizunami City in Gifu Prefecture, central Japan. The project proceeds in three overlapping phases, 'Phase I: Surface-based investigation Phase', 'Phase II: Construction Phase' and 'Phase III: Operation Phase'. As a part of the Phase III investigation, the mass transport property has been evaluated by using natural uranium-series and thorium-series nuclides in the Toki Granite. In this report, the compilation of existing data and preliminary evaluation was carried out. (author)

  6. Mass transport at rotating disk electrodes: effects of synthetic particles and nerve endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Veronica M; Lukus, Peter A; Doyle, Jamie L; Schenk, James O

    2011-11-01

    An unstirred layer (USL) exists at the interface of solids with solutions. Thus, the particles in brain tissue preparations possess a USL as well as at the surface of a rotating disk electrode (RDE) used to measure chemical fluxes. Time constraints for observing biological kinetics based on estimated thicknesses of USLs at the membrane surface in real samples of nerve endings were estimated. Liposomes, silica, and Sephadex were used separately to model the tissue preparation particles. Within a solution stirred by the RDE, both diffusion and hydrodynamic boundary layers are formed. It was observed that the number and size of particles decreased the following: the apparent diffusion coefficient excluding Sephadex, boundary layer thicknesses excluding silica, sensitivity excluding diluted liposomes (in agreement with results from other laboratories), limiting current potentially due to an increase in the path distance, and mixing time. They have no effect on the detection limit (6 ± 2 nM). The RDE kinetically resolves transmembrane transport with a timing of approximately 30 ms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors that affect mass transport from drug eluting stents into the artery wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsh Michael T

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Coronary artery disease can be treated by implanting a stent into the blocked region of an artery, thus enabling blood perfusion to distal vessels. Minimally invasive procedures of this nature often result in damage to the arterial tissue culminating in the re-blocking of the vessel. In an effort to alleviate this phenomenon, known as restenosis, drug eluting stents were developed. They are similar in composition to a bare metal stent but encompass a coating with therapeutic agents designed to reduce the overly aggressive healing response that contributes to restenosis. There are many variables that can influence the effectiveness of these therapeutic drugs being transported from the stent coating to and within the artery wall, many of which have been analysed and documented by researchers. However, the physical deformation of the artery substructure due to stent expansion, and its influence on a drugs ability to diffuse evenly within the artery wall have been lacking in published work to date. The paper highlights previous approaches adopted by researchers and proposes the addition of porous artery wall deformation to increase model accuracy.

  8. Water injection into vapor- and liquid-dominated reservoirs: Modeling of heat transfer and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.; Moridis, G.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent advances in methods for simulating water and tracer injection, and presents illustrative applications to liquid- and vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. High-resolution simulations of water injection into heterogeneous, vertical fractures in superheated vapor zones were performed. Injected water was found to move in dendritic patterns, and to experience stronger lateral flow effects than predicted from homogeneous medium models. Higher-order differencing methods were applied to modeling water and tracer injection into liquid-dominated systems. Conventional upstream weighting techniques were shown to be adequate for predicting the migration of thermal fronts, while higher-order methods give far better accuracy for tracer transport. A new fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator is described which allows a more accurate description of geofluids, and includes mineral dissolution and precipitation effects with associated porosity and permeability change. Comparisons between numerical simulation predictions and data for laboratory and field injection experiments are summarized. Enhanced simulation capabilities include a new linear solver package for TOUGH2, and inverse modeling techniques for automatic history matching and optimization.

  9. Experimental application of design principles in corrosion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyrl, W.H.; Pohlman, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental design criteria for corrosion investigations are based on established principles for systems that have uniform, or nearly uniform, corrosive attack. Scale-up or scale-down may be accomplished by proper use of dimensionless groups that measure the relative importance of interfacial kinetics, solution conductivity, and mass transfer. These principles have been applied to different fields of corrosion which include materials selection testing and protection; and to a specific corrosion problem involving attack of a substrate through holes in a protective overplate

  10. Quantification of segregation and mass transport in InxGa1-xASGaAs Stranski-Krastanow layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenauer, A.; Gerthsen, D.; Van Dyck, D.; Arzberger, M.; Boehm, G.; Abstreiter, G.

    2001-01-01

    We report on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy measurement of mass transport and segregation in InAs Stranski-Krastanow layers grown on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy at growth temperatures of 480 and 530 deg. C. Plan-view TEM reveals regularly shaped islands with a density of 7.8x10 10 cm -2 (480 deg. C) and 1.5x10 10 cm -2 (530 deg. C), respectively. Uncapped islands were investigated by strain state analysis of electron wave functions reconstructed from high-resolution TEM images. In-concentration profiles of the islands were obtained by the measurement of lattice-parameter profiles of the islands and the application of finite-element calculations. We find that the islands contain Ga-atoms with a percentage of 50% (480 deg. C) and 67% (530 deg. C). The capped InAs-layers were investigated with PL and TEM. In agreement with TEM, PL indicates a smaller and deeper potential well of the islands grown at 480 deg. C. Concentration profiles of the wetting layers were measured with TEM using the composition evaluation of lattice fringe images method, clearly revealing segregation profiles. The obtained segregation efficiency of In-atoms is 0.77±0.02 (480 deg. C) and 0.82±0.02 (530 deg. C). As an explanation for the strong mass transport of Ga from the substrate to the islands we show that the segregation of In atoms during the growth of the binary InAs can lead to the generation of vacancies in the metal sublattice. The vacancies are filled by Ga-atoms migrating along the surface or by a diffusion of the vacancies from the wetting layer and the islands into the GaAs buffer, leading to a unidirectional diffusion of Ga atoms from the buffer into the Stranski-Krastanow layer

  11. Mass transport and the bootstrap current from Ohm's law in steady-state tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.-S.; Greene, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The consequences of mass conservation and Ohm's law are examined for steady state Tokamaks. In a Tokamak, magnetofluid-dynamic waves rapidly equilibrate pressure and toroidal field along magnetic surfaces. As a result, the detailed current distribution is determined by the flux surface averaged poloidal and toroidal currents. The electrons that carry the plasma current are impeded in their motion by interactions with ions, which is resistivity and its generalizations, and by interactions with electrons, which is viscosity and its generalizations. The important viscous terms arise from the interaction between trapped and untrapped electrons, and so viscosity acts by impeding poloidal current. properly chosen, the results of neoclassical theory are The neoclassical viscous coefficient is here regarded as less likely than Spitzer conductivity to be experimentally relevant in a turbulent Tokamak. Thus, the toroidal Ohm's law is regarded as being more reliable than the poloidal Ohm's law. A combination of toroidal and poloidal Ohm's law, namely the component parallel to the magnetic field, eliminates the influence of plasma fueling, and directly relates the bootstrap current and the pressure gradient. The latter is the usual relation, but, since i

  12. Corrosion principles and surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter examines the important strategies provided by the newer ideas of corrosion science and engineering that surface modification techniques must utilize to help prevent corrosion, especially the most damaging kind of aqueous corrosion, localized corrosion. Provides a brief introduction to the principles underlying the phenomenon of corrosion in order to use them to discuss surface modification strategies to combat corrosion. Discusses the electrochemistry of corrosion; the thermodynamics of corrosion; the kinetics of corrosion; thermodynamic strategies; and kinetic strategies (formation of more protective passive films; resistance to breakdown; ductility; repassivation)

  13. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Faculty ii INDUSTRY TRAVEL Domestic Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Transportation Policy), Washington, DC Department of...developed between the railroad and trucking industries. Railroads: Today’s seven Class I freight railroad systems move 42% of the nation’s intercity ...has been successfully employed in London to reduce congestion and observed by this industry study during its travels . It is currently being

  14. Quantum statistical effects in the mass transport of interstitial solutes in a crystalline solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, C. H.; Wen, Haohua

    2017-09-01

    The impact of quantum statistics on the many-body dynamics of a crystalline solid at finite temperatures containing an interstitial solute atom (ISA) is investigated. The Mori-Zwanzig theory allows the many-body dynamics of the crystal to be formulated and solved analytically within a pseudo-one-particle approach using the Langevin equation with a quantum fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR) based on the Debye model. At the same time, the many-body dynamics is also directly solved numerically via the molecular dynamics approach with a Langevin heat bath based on the quantum FDR. Both the analytical and numerical results consistently show that below the Debye temperature of the host lattice, quantum statistics significantly impacts the ISA transport properties, resulting in major departures from both the Arrhenius law of diffusion and the Einstein-Smoluchowski relation between the mobility and diffusivity. Indeed, we found that below one-third of the Debye temperature, effects of vibrations on the quantum mobility and diffusivity are both orders-of-magnitude larger and practically temperature independent. We have shown that both effects have their physical origin in the athermal lattice vibrations derived from the phonon ground state. The foregoing theory is tested in quantum molecular dynamics calculation of mobility and diffusivity of interstitial helium in bcc W. In this case, the Arrhenius law is only valid in a narrow range between ˜300 and ˜700 K. The diffusivity becomes temperature independent on the low-temperature side while increasing linearly with temperature on the high-temperature side.

  15. Spectroscopic imaging studies of nanoscale polarity and mass transport phenomena in self-assembled organic nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Nagasaka, Shinobu; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Takashi; Higgins, Daniel A

    2017-08-02

    Synthetic organic nanotubes self-assembled from bolaamphiphile surfactants are now being explored for use as drug delivery vehicles. In this work, several factors important to their implementation in drug delivery are explored. All experiments are performed with the nanotubes immersed in ethanol. First, Nile Red (NR) and a hydroxylated Nile Red derivative (NR-OH) are loaded into the nanotubes and spectroscopic fluorescence imaging methods are used to determine the apparent dielectric constant of their local environment. Both are found in relatively nonpolar environments, with the NR-OH molecules preferring regions of relatively higher dielectric constant compared to NR. Unique two-color imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (imaging FCS) measurements are then used along with the spectroscopic imaging results to deduce the dielectric properties of the environments sensed by mobile and immobile populations of probe molecules. The results reveal that mobile NR molecules pass through less polar regions, likely within the nanotube walls, while immobile NR molecules are found in more polar regions, possibly near the nanotube surfaces. In contrast, mobile and immobile NR-OH molecules are found to locate in environments of similar polarity. The imaging FCS results also provide quantitative data on the apparent diffusion coefficient for each dye. The mean diffusion coefficient for the NR dye was approximately two-fold larger than that of NR-OH. Slower diffusion by the latter could result from its additional hydrogen bonding interactions with polar triglycine, amine, and glucose moieties near the nanotube surfaces. The knowledge gained in these studies will allow for the development of nanotubes that are better engineered for applications in the controlled transport and release of uncharged, dipolar drug molecules.

  16. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-03-01

    An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  17. Effects of surface roughening on the mass transport and mechanical properties of ionic polymer-metal composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Longfei; Asaka, Kinji; Zhu, Zicai; Wang, Yanjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2014-06-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) has been well-documented of being a promising functional material in extensive applications. In its most popular and traditional manufacturing technique, roughening is a key process to ensure a satisfying performance. In this paper, based on a lately established multi-physical model, the effect of roughening process on the inner mass transportation and the electro-active output of IPMC were investigated. In the model, the electro-chemical field was monitored by Poisson equation and a properly simplified Nernst-Planck equation set, while the mechanical field was evaluated on the basis of volume strain effect. Furthermore, with Ramo-Shockley theorem, the out-circuit current and accumulated charge on the electrode were bridged with the inner cation distribution. Besides, nominal current and charge density as well as the curvature of the deformation were evaluated to characterize the performance of IPMC. The simulation was implemented by Finite Element Method with Comsol Multi-physics, based on two groups of geometrical models, those with various rough interface and those with different thickness. The results of how the roughening impact influences on the performance of IPMC were discussed progressively in three aspects, steady-state distribution of local potential and mass concentration, current response and charge accumulation, as well as the curvature of deformation. Detailed explanations for the performance improvement resulted from surface roughening were provided from the micro-distribution point of view, which can be further explored for the process optimization of IPMC.

  18. The Role of Rotation in Convective Heat Transport: an Application to Low-Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilsky, Loren; Hindman, Bradley W.; Toomre, Juri; Featherstone, Nicholas

    2018-06-01

    It is often supposed that the convection zones (CZs) of low-mass stars are purely adiabatically stratified. This is thought to be because convective motions are extremely efficient at homogenizing entropy within the CZ. For a purely adiabatic fluid layer, only very small temperature variations are required to drive convection, making the amplitude and overall character of the convection highly sensitive to the degree of adiabaticity established in the CZ. The presence of rotation, however, fundamentally changes the dynamics of the CZ; the strong downflow plumes that are required to homogenize entropy are unable to penetrate through the entire fluid layer if they are deflected too soon by the Coriolis force. This talk discusses 3D global models of spherical-shell convection subject to different rotation rates. The simulation results emphasize the possibility that for stars with a high enough rotation rate, large fractions of their CZs are not in fact adiabatically stratified; rather, there is a finite superadiabatic gradient that varies in magnitude with radius, being at a minimum in the CZ’s middle layers. Two consequences of the varying superadiabatic gradient are that the convective amplitudes at the largest length scales are effectively suppressed and that there is a strong latitudinal temperature gradient from a cold equator to a hot pole, which self-consistently drives a thermal wind. A connection is naturally drawn to the Sun’s CZ, which has supergranulation as an upper limit to its convective length scales and isorotational contours along radial lines, which can be explained by the presence of a thermal wind.

  19. Mechanisms of material removal and mass transport in focused ion beam nanopore formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Kallol, E-mail: das7@illinois.edu; Johnson, Harley T., E-mail: htj@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, MC-244, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Freund, Jonathan B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, MC-244, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 306 Talbot Laboratory, MC-236, 104 South Wright Street Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Despite the widespread use of focused ion beam (FIB) processing as a material removal method for applications ranging from electron microscope sample preparation to nanopore processing for DNA sequencing, the basic material removal mechanisms of FIB processing are not well understood. We present the first complete atomistic simulation of high-flux FIB using large-scale parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanopore fabrication in freestanding thin films. We focus on the root mechanisms of material removal and rearrangement and describe the role of explosive boiling in forming nanopores. FIB nanopore fabrication is typically understood to occur via sputter erosion. This can be shown to be the case in low flux systems, where individual ion impacts are sufficiently separated in time that they may be considered as independent events. But our detailed MD simulations show that in high flux FIB processing, above a threshold level at which thermal effects become significant, the primary mechanism of material removal changes to a significantly accelerated, thermally dominated process. Under these conditions, the target is heated by the ion beam faster than heat is conducted away by the material, leading quickly to melting, and then continued heating to nearly the material critical temperature. This leads to explosive boiling of the target material with spontaneous bubble formation and coalescence. Mass is rapidly rearranged at the atomistic scale, and material removal occurs orders of magnitude faster than would occur by simple sputtering. While the phenomenology is demonstrated computationally in silicon, it can be expected to occur at lower beam fluxes in other cases where thermal conduction is suppressed due to material properties, geometry, or ambient thermal conditions.

  20. Determinants of black carbon, particle mass and number concentrations in London transport microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Ioar; Kumar, Prashant; Hagen-Zanker, Alex; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Slovic, Anne Dorothee; Pritchard, John P.; Geurs, Karst T.

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the determinants of personal exposure concentrations of commuters' to black carbon (BC), ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNC), and particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5 and PM10) in different travel modes. We quantified the contribution of key factors that explain the variation of the previous pollutants in four commuting routes in London, each covered by four transport modes (car, bus, walk and underground). Models were performed for each pollutant, separately to assess the effect of meteorology (wind speed) or ambient concentrations (with either high spatial or temporal resolution). Concentration variations were mainly explained by wind speed or ambient concentrations and to a lesser extent by route and period of the day. In multivariate models with wind speed, the wind speed was the common significant predictor for all the pollutants in the above-ground modes (i.e., car, bus, walk); and the only predictor variable for the PM fractions. Wind speed had the strongest effect on PM during the bus trips, with an increase in 1 m s-1 leading to a decrease in 2.25, 2.90 and 4.98 μg m-3 of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations in car trips were better explained by ambient concentrations with high temporal resolution although from a single monitoring station. On the other hand, ambient concentrations with high spatial coverage but lower temporal resolution predicted better the concentrations in bus trips, due to bus routes passing through streets with a high variability of traffic intensity. In the underground models, wind speed was not significant and line and type of windows on the train explained 42% of the variation of PNC and 90% of all PM fractions. Trains in the district line with openable windows had an increase in concentrations of 1 684 cm-3 for PNC and 40.69 μg m-3 for PM2.5 compared with trains that had non-openable windows. The results from this work can be used to target efforts to reduce personal exposures of

  1. Study of niobium corrosion in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, S.H. de.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative study of niobium electrochemical behaviour in NaOH and KOH solution, with concentrations between 0,5 and 6,1M is presented. The studies were done through electrochemicals assays, consisting in the corrosion potential and anodic and cathodic polarization curves, complemented by loss of mass experiments. The niobium anodic behaviour in alkaline medium is characterized by passivation occurrence, with a stable film formation. The Na oH solution in alkaline medium are more corrosible to niobium than the KOH solution. The loss of mass assays showed that the corrosion velocit is more dependente of hydroxide concentration in KOH medium than the NaOH medium. (C.G.C.) [pt

  2. Corrosion of copper under Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of copper was studied under Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal conditions. The groundwater in a Canadian waste vault is expected to be saline, with chloride concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0 mol/l. The container would be packed in a sand/clay buffer, and the maximum temperature on the copper surface would be 100C; tests were performed up to 150C. Radiation fields will initially be around 500 rad/h, and conditions will be oxidizing. Sulfides may be present. The minimum design lifetime for the container is 500 years. Most work has been done on uniform corrosion, although pitting has been considered. It was found that the rate of uniform corrosion in aerated NaCl at room temperature is limited by the rate of the anodic reaction, which is controlled mainly by the rate of transport of dissolved metal species away from the copper surface. The rate of corrosion should become controlled by the transport of oxygen to the copper surface only at very low oxygen concentrations. In the presence of gamma radiation the corrosion rate may never become cathodically transport limited. In compacted buffer material, the corrosion rate appears to be limited by the rate of transport of copper species away from the corroding surface. The authors recommend that long-term predictions of container lifetime should be based on the known rate-determining step for the overall corrosion process. 8 refs

  3. Modeling of flow and mass transport processes in unsaturated soils in combination with technical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Issa

    2014-01-01

    The modelling of complex systems such as the underground is a means to describe the processes occurring in the reality. The conducting of experiments on a model to obtain qualitative evidence about a real system is referred to as a simulation. Thereby, various models (e.g. physical and mathematical models) can be used. The unsaturated zone (vadose zone) is the region between the land surface and the water table, in which the water content is less than full saturation, and the pressure is lower than the atmospheric pressure. The unsaturated zone is very significant for agriculture, geobiology, aerobic degradation processes and groundwater recharge. The processes of water flow and solute transport in the unsaturated zone can be described by means of numerical simulation programs. The aim of the present work is a comprehensive validation of the simulation program PCSiWaPro registered (developed at the TU-Dresden, Institute of Waste Management and Contaminated Site Treatment) for different applications. Another aim of this work is to investigate the applicability of the current version of PCSiWaPro registered for different cases of a combination between the unsaturated zone and technical facilities. Four application cases with different objectives were investigated within the present work, which are: the simulation of decentralized wastewater infiltration with corresponding column and field experiments, the computation of groundwater recharge by means of lysimeters, the water balance of earth dams and the modelling of landfill covering systems. The application cases differ from each other by the objective of the simulation, the geometry, the size, the specified initial and boundary conditions, the simulation time, the applied materials, the coordinate system, the input and output data. The simulation results clearly showed that PCSiWaPro registered is applicable for all investigated cases under consideration of different flow and solute transport regimes, parameters

  4. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques......Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  5. SRB seawater corrosion project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  6. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways.

  7. The corrosion of depleted uranium in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, C; Milodowski, A E; Baker, A C

    2014-02-01

    Depleted Uranium alloyed with titanium is used in armour penetrating munitions that have been fired in a number of conflict zones and testing ranges including the UK ranges at Kirkcudbright and Eskmeals. The study presented here evaluates the corrosion of DU alloy cylinders in soil on these two UK ranges and in the adjacent marine environment of the Solway Firth. The estimated mean initial corrosion rates and times for complete corrosion range from 0.13 to 1.9 g cm(-2) y(-1) and 2.5-48 years respectively depending on the particular physical and geochemical environment. The marine environment at the experimental site was very turbulent. This may have caused the scouring of corrosion products and given rise to a different geochemical environment from that which could be easily duplicated in laboratory experiments. The rate of mass loss was found to vary through time in one soil environment and this is hypothesised to be due to pitting increasing the surface area, followed by a build up of corrosion products inhibiting further corrosion. This indicates that early time measurements of mass loss or corrosion rate may be poor indicators of late time corrosion behaviour, potentially giving rise to incorrect estimates of time to complete corrosion. The DU alloy placed in apparently the same geochemical environment, for the same period of time, can experience very different amounts of corrosion and mass loss, indicating that even small variations in the corrosion environment can have a significant effect. These effects are more significant than other experimental errors and variations in initial surface area. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Inhibition Effect of Deanol on Mild Steel Corrosion in Dilute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    2014-06-23

    Jun 23, 2014 ... allows for extensive use as the material of construction in petro- leum industries .... steel specimens was investigated after mass-loss analysis ..... Ogbuliec, Inhibition of pseudo-anaerobic corrosion of oil pipeline steel in ...

  9. Robotic transport complex of automotive vehicles for handling of rock mass at the process of open cast mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly KOLGA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned with the applicability of the robotic transportation complex of automotive barrows for haulage transportation along various transport routes of mining enterprises. The simultaneous application of robotic transport and telemetry links makes the door-to-door transportation possible, i.e. direct transportation from the starting to the final point avoiding intermediate storage and a considerable part of auxiliary equipment.

  10. Local effects in flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietralik, J.

    2006-01-01

    'Full text:' There is enough evidence that flow conditions play the dominant role locally in Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) under certain conditions, e.g., in CANDU feeders. While chemistry and materials set the overall potential for FAC, which can be low or high, flow conditions determine the local distribution of wall thinning. This relationship is not new and recent accurate measurements of FAC rate of a plant feeder bend confirm that the relationship between flow local conditions expressed by local mass transfer coefficient and FAC rate in CANDU feeder bends is close. There is also a lot of other direct and indirect, experimental and laboratory evidence about this relationship. This knowledge can be useful for minimizing inspection, predicting new locations for inspection, predicting the location with the highest FAC rate for a given piping component, e.g., feeder element, and determining what components or feeders and to what extent they should be replaced. It applies also to heat exchangers and steam generators. The objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between FAC rate and local flow parameters. For FAC, the most important flow parameter is mass transfer coefficient. The mass transfer coefficient describes the intensity of the transport of corrosion products from the oxide-water interface into the bulk water. Therefore, this parameter can be used for predicting the local distribution of FAC rate. It could also be used in planning experiments because time-varying surface roughness can explain the time-dependence of FAC rates. The paper presents plant and laboratory evidence about the relationship. In addition, it shows correlations for mass transfer coefficient in components that are highly susceptible to FAC. The role of surface roughness, wall shear stress, and local turbulence is also discussed. (author)

  11. Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malumbela, Goitseone; Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

  12. Corrosion control. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to train engineers and technologists not just to understand corrosion but to control it. Materials selection, coatings, chemical inhibitors, cathodic and anodic protection, and equipment design are covered in separate chapters. High-temperature oxidation is discussed in the final two chapters ne on oxidation theory and one on controlling oxidation by alloying and with coatings. This book treats corrosion and high-temperature oxidation separately. Corrosion is divided into three groups: (1) chemical dissolution including uniform attack, (2) electrochemical corrosion from either metallurgical or environmental cells, and (3) stress-assisted corrosion. Corrosion is logically grouped according to mechanisms rather than arbitrarily separated into different types of corrosion as if they were unrelated. For those university students and industry personnel who approach corrosion theory very hesitantly, this text will present the electrochemical reactions responsible for corrosion summed up in only five simple half-cell reactions. When these are combined on a polarization diagram, which is also explained in detail, the electrochemical processes become obvious. For those who want a text stripped bare of electrochemical theory, several noted sections can be omitted without loss of continuity. However, the author has presented the material in such a manner that these sections are not beyond the abilities of any high school graduate who is interested in technology

  13. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  14. Prediction of reinforcement corrosion using corrosion induced cracks width in corroded reinforced concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Inamullah; François, Raoul; Castel, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the evolution of reinforcement corrosion in comparison to corrosion crack width in a highly corroded reinforced concrete beam. Cracking and corrosion maps of the beam were drawn and steel reinforcement was recovered from the beam to observe the corrosion pattern and to measure the loss of mass of steel reinforcement. Maximum steel cross-section loss of the main reinforcement and average steel cross-section loss between stirrups were plotted against the crack width. The experimental results were compared with existing models proposed by Rodriguez et al., Vidal et al. and Zhang et al. Time prediction models for a given opening threshold are also compared to experimental results. Steel cross-section loss for stirrups was also measured and was plotted against the crack width. It was observed that steel cross-section loss in the stirrups had no relationship with the crack width of longitudinal corrosion cracks. -- Highlights: •Relationship between crack and corrosion of reinforcement was investigated. •Corrosion results of natural process and then corresponds to in-situ conditions. •Comparison with time predicting model is provided. •Prediction of load-bearing capacity from crack pattern was studied

  15. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondel, D [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); Edwards, R [Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States); Hayman, A [Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France); Hill, D [Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States); Mehta, S [Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom); Semerad, T [Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia)

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  16. Aluminum corrosion product release kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matt, E-mail: Matthew.Edwards@cnl.ca; Semmler, Jaleh; Guzonas, Dave; Chen, Hui Qun; Toor, Arshad; Hoendermis, Seanna

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Release of Al corrosion product was measured in simulated post-LOCA sump solutions. • Increased boron was found to enhance Al release kinetics at similar pH. • Models of Al release as functions of time, temperature, and pH were developed. - Abstract: The kinetics of aluminum corrosion product release was examined in solutions representative of post-LOCA sump water for both pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors. Coupons of AA 6061 T6 were exposed to solutions in the pH 7–11 range at 40, 60, 90 and 130 °C. Solution samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and coupon samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results show a distinct “boron effect” on the release kinetics, expected to be caused by an increase in the solubility of the aluminum corrosion products. New models were developed to describe both sets of data as functions of temperature, time, and pH (where applicable)

  17. The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.H. Payer

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape, size, and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain Repository is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in the waste packages for long times and to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. Therefore, long-lived waste packages are important. The corrosion resistance of the waste package outer canister is reviewed, and a framework for the analysis of localized corrosion processes is presented. An overview is presented of the Materials Performance targeted thrust of the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Office of Science and Technology and International. The thrust program strives for increased scientific understanding, enhanced process models and advanced technologies for corrosion control

  18. Corrosion of carbon steel in contact with bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, D.; Vokal, A.; Bruha, P.

    2010-01-01

    of approximately 2-3 mm/yr in bentonite pore water solution. No significant pressure increase was observed due to generation of hydrogen. The results of surprising behaviour of carbon steels in bentonite could be explained by the different composition of solution after granitic water flow through bentonite or by hypothesis based on our modelling experiments that corrosion rate increase is caused by so called pumping effect of bentonite which is in turn caused by different solubilities of corrosion products in the corrosion layer and bentonite. Influence of corrosion products on bentonite is another important question. It was clearly visible that the transport of corrosion products into Volclay bentonite is approximately 1 mm after 30 days of corrosion at 70 deg. C. The reason why no pressure increase was observed due to hydrogen evolution could be explained by higher rate of hydrogen transport in bubbles than is its evolution rate. But these hydrogen bubbles might be also accumulated between carbon steel layer and bentonite what results in inhomogeneity of corrosion layer. The results achieved significantly affect performance assessment of concept of disposal with carbon steel and bentonite. Only rather short term (30 days) experiments were carried out. In the next period longer experiments will have to give answer if the increase of corrosion rate of carbon steel in contact with bentonite is transient or will last for long time. (authors)

  19. Corrosion Prevention of Aluminum Nanoparticles by a Polyurethane Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Toshiyasu; Raman, Vedarajan

    2014-06-19

    In order to prevent corrosion, aluminum nanoparticles were coated with a polyurethane polymer. The coverage of the polyurethane polymer was controlled from 0 to 100%, which changed the corrosion rate of the nanoparticles quantitatively. The surface of the polymer coating was investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and the corrosion resistance of the nanoparticles was estimated by a wet/dry corrosion test on a Pt plate with a NaCl solution. From a TEM with EDAX analysis, the 10 mass% polymer coated Al particles in the synthesis were almost 100% covered on the surface by a polymer film of 10 nm thick. On the other hand, the 3 mass% polymer coated Al was almost 40% covered by a film. In the AFM, the potential around the Al particles had a relatively low value with the polymer coating, which indicated that the conductivity of the Al was isolated from the Pt plate by the polymer. Both the corrosion and H₂ evolution reaction rates were quantitatively reduced by the mass% of polymer coating. In the case of the 10 mass% coated sample, there was no corrosion of Al nanoparticles. This fact suggested that the electrochemical reaction was suppressed by the polymer coating. Moreover, the reaction rate of Al nanoparticles was suppressed in proportion to the coverage percentage of the coating. Thus, to conclude, it was found that the corrosion rate of Al nanoparticles could be quantitatively suppressed by the coverage percentage of the polymer coating.

  20. Additively manufactured metallic porous biomaterials based on minimal surfaces: A unique combination of topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, F S L; Lietaert, K; Eftekhari, A A; Pouran, B; Ahmadi, S M; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2017-04-15

    Porous biomaterials that simultaneously mimic the topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties of bone are in great demand but are rarely found in the literature. In this study, we rationally designed and additively manufactured (AM) porous metallic biomaterials based on four different types of triply periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) that mimic the properties of bone to an unprecedented level of multi-physics detail. Sixteen different types of porous biomaterials were rationally designed and fabricated using selective laser melting (SLM) from a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The topology, quasi-static mechanical properties, fatigue resistance, and permeability of the developed biomaterials were then characterized. In terms of topology, the biomaterials resembled the morphological properties of trabecular bone including mean surface curvatures close to zero. The biomaterials showed a favorable but rare combination of relatively low elastic properties in the range of those observed for trabecular bone and high yield strengths exceeding those reported for cortical bone. This combination allows for simultaneously avoiding stress shielding, while providing ample mechanical support for bone tissue regeneration and osseointegration. Furthermore, as opposed to other AM porous biomaterials developed to date for which the fatigue endurance limit has been found to be ≈20% of their yield (or plateau) stress, some of the biomaterials developed in the current study show extremely high fatigue resistance with endurance limits up to 60% of their yield stress. It was also found that the permeability values measured for the developed biomaterials were in the range of values reported for trabecular bone. In summary, the developed porous metallic biomaterials based on TPMS mimic the topological, mechanical, and physical properties of trabecular bone to a great degree. These properties make them potential candidates to be applied as parts of orthopedic implants and/or as bone

  1. Mass balance and isotope effects during nitrogen transport through septic tank systems with packed-bed (sand) filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, S.R.; Böhlke, J.K.; Fisher, L.H.

    2008-01-01

    Septic tank systems are an important source of NO3- to many aquifers, yet characterization of N mass balance and isotope systematics following septic tank effluent discharge into unsaturated sediments has received limited attention. In this study, samples of septic tank effluent before and after transport through single-pass packed-bed filters (sand filters) were evaluated to elucidate mass balance and isotope effects associated with septic tank effluent discharge to unsaturated sediments. Chemical and isotopic data from five newly installed pairs and ten established pairs of septic tanks and packed-bed filters serving single homes in Oregon indicate that aqueous solute concentrations are affected by variations in recharge (precipitation, evapotranspiration), NH4+ sorption (primarily in immature systems), nitrification, and gaseous N loss via NH3 volatilization and(or) N2 or N2O release during nitrification/denitrification. Substantial NH4+ sorption capacity was also observed in laboratory columns with synthetic effluent. Septic tank effluent ??15N-NH4+ values were almost constant and averaged + 4.9??? ?? 0.4??? (1 ??). In contrast, ??15N values of NO3- leaving mature packed-bed filters were variable (+ 0.8 to + 14.4???) and averaged + 7.2??? ?? 2.6???. Net N loss in the two networks of packed-bed filters was indicated by average 10-30% decreases in Cl--normalized N concentrations and 2-3??? increases in ??15N, consistent with fractionation accompanying gaseous N losses and corroborating established links between septic tank effluent and NO3- in a local, shallow aquifer. Values of ??18O-NO3- leaving mature packed-bed filters ranged from - 10.2 to - 2.3??? (mean - 6.4??? ?? 1.8???), and were intermediate between a 2/3 H2O-O + 1/3 O2-O conceptualization and a 100% H2O-O conceptualization of ??18O-NO3- generation during nitrification.

  2. WASTE PACKAGE CORROSION STUDIES USING SMALL MOCKUP EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.E. Anderson; K.B. Helean; C.R. Bryan; P.V. Brady; R.C. Ewing

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion of spent nuclear fuel and subsequent mobilization of radionuclides is of great concern in a geologic repository, particularly if conditions are oxidizing. Corroding A516 steel may offset these transport processes within the proposed waste packages at the Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR) by retaining radionuclides, creating locally reducing conditions, and reducing porosity. Ferrous iron, Fe 2+ , has been shown to reduce UO 2 2+ to UO 2(s) [1], and some ferrous iron-bearing ion-exchange materials adsorb radionuclides and heavy metals [2]. Of particular interest is magnetite, a potential corrosion product that has been shown to remove TcO 4 - from solution [3]. Furthermore, if Fe 2+ minerals, rather than fully oxidized minerals such as goethite, are produced during corrosion, then locally reducing conditions may be present. High electron availability leads to the reduction and subsequent immobilization of problematic dissolved species such as TcO 4 - , NpO 2 + , and UO 2 2+ and can also inhibit corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Finally, because the molar volume of iron material increases during corrosion due to oxygen and water incorporation, pore space may be significantly reduced over long time periods. The more water is occluded, the bulkier the corrosion products, and the less porosity is available for water and radionuclide transport. The focus of this paper is on the nature of Yucca Mountain waste package steel corrosion products and their effects on local redox state, radionuclide transport, and porosity

  3. Monitoring reinforcement corrosion and corrosion-induced cracking using non-destructive x-ray attenuation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2011-01-01

    To test the applicability of the x-ray attenuation method to monitor the movement of corrosion products as well as the formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials reinforced mortar samples were prepared and tested under accelerated corrosion conditions. It is evident from the ex...... of the corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel, obtained by the x-ray attenuation method, was found to be in very good agreement with the mass loss obtained by gravimetric method as well as Faraday's law....

  4. Corrosion evaluation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo.

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of ± 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs

  5. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study

  6. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  7. Archaeological analogs and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  8. The impact of the transient uptake flux on bioaccumulation : Linear adsorption and first-order internalisation coupled with spherical semi-infinite mass transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galceran, J.; Monné, J.; Puy, J.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of a chemical species (such as an organic molecule or a toxic metal ion) by an organism is modelled considering linear pre-adsorption followed by a first-order internalisation. The active biosurface is supposed to be spherical or semi-spherical and the mass transport in the medium is

  9. The specchio unit (northern apennines, Italy): An ancient mass transport complex originated from near-coastal areas in an intra-slope setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogata, Kei; Tinterri, Roberto; Pini, Gian Andrea; Mutti, Emiliano

    2012-01-01

    Within the Eocene-Oligocene syn-orogenic deposits of the Epiligurian succession (Northern Apennines of Italy), a field-based study of the Specchio Unit (lower Rupelian) reveals that this complex is made up of three distinct but amalgamated mass-transport deposits (MTDs), the largest of which reaches

  10. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber Part II : Use of fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2011-01-01

    Using a new phase-contrast microscopy-based method of analysis, sedimentation has recently been demonstrated to be the major mass transport mechanism of bacteria towards substratum surfaces in a parallel plate flow chamber (J. Li, H.J. Busscher, W. Norde, J. Sjollema, Colloid Surf. B. 84 (2011)76).

  11. Exploratory shaft liner corrosion estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An estimate of expected corrosion degradation during the 100-year design life of the Exploratory Shaft (ES) is presented. The basis for the estimate is a brief literature survey of corrosion data, in addition to data taken by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The scope of the study is expected corrosion environment of the ES, the corrosion modes of general corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, dissimilar metal corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking. The expected internal and external environment of the shaft liner is described in detail and estimated effects of each corrosion mode are given. The maximum amount of general corrosion degradation was estimated to be 70 mils at the exterior and 48 mils at the interior, at the shaft bottom. Corrosion at welds or mechanical joints could be significant, dependent on design. After a final determination of corrosion allowance has been established by the project it will be added to the design criteria. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Corrosion penetration monitoring of advanced ceramics in hot aqueous fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus G. Nickel

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramics are considered as components in energy related systems, because they are known to be strong, wear and corrosion resistant in many environments, even at temperatures well exceeding 1000 °C. However, the presence of additives or impurities in important ceramics, for example those based on Silicon Nitride (Si3N4 or Al2O3 makes them vulnerable to the corrosion by hot aqueous fluids. The temperatures in this type of corrosion range from several tens of centigrade to hydrothermal conditions above 100 °C. The corrosion processes in such media depend on both pH and temperature and include often partial leaching of the ceramics, which cannot be monitored easily by classical gravimetric or electrochemical methods. Successful corrosion penetration depth monitoring by polarized reflected light optical microscopy (color changes, Micro Raman Spectroscopy (luminescence changes and SEM (porosity changes will be outlined. The corrosion process and its kinetics are monitored best by microanalysis of cross sections, Raman spectroscopy and eluate chemistry changes in addition to mass changes. Direct cross-calibrations between corrosion penetration and mechanical strength is only possible for severe corrosion. The methods outlined should be applicable to any ceramics corrosion process with partial leaching by fluids, melts or slags.

  13. A strain-mediated corrosion model for bioabsorbable metallic stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, E; O'Brien, D; Cummins, C; Mac Donald, B J; Lally, C

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a strain-mediated phenomenological corrosion model, based on the discrete finite element modelling method which was developed for use with the ANSYS Implicit finite element code. The corrosion model was calibrated from experimental data and used to simulate the corrosion performance of a WE43 magnesium alloy stent. The model was found to be capable of predicting the experimentally observed plastic strain-mediated mass loss profile. The non-linear plastic strain model, extrapolated from the experimental data, was also found to adequately capture the corrosion-induced reduction in the radial stiffness of the stent over time. The model developed will help direct future design efforts towards the minimisation of plastic strain during device manufacture, deployment and in-service, in order to reduce corrosion rates and prolong the mechanical integrity of magnesium devices. The need for corrosion models that explore the interaction of strain with corrosion damage has been recognised as one of the current challenges in degradable material modelling (Gastaldi et al., 2011). A finite element based plastic strain-mediated phenomenological corrosion model was developed in this work and was calibrated based on the results of the corrosion experiments. It was found to be capable of predicting the experimentally observed plastic strain-mediated mass loss profile and the corrosion-induced reduction in the radial stiffness of the stent over time. To the author's knowledge, the results presented here represent the first experimental calibration of a plastic strain-mediated corrosion model of a corroding magnesium stent. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Corrosion fatigue of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaehn, H.; Wagner, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue phenomena can be classified into two main groups according to the electrochemical state of the metal surface in the presence of electrolytes: the active and the passive state with an important sub-group of corrosion fatigue in the unstable passive state. The allowable stress for structures exposed to the conjoint action of corrosion and fatigue is influenced by many factors: kind of media, number of cycles, frequency, mean stress, size, notches, loading mode, alloy composition and mechanical strength. A critical literature review shows contradictory results if a classification by the electrochemical surface state is not applied. Case histories and counter measures illustrate the practical importance of corrosion fatigue in many branches of industry as well as the urgent need for a better knowledge about the mutual influence of the phenomena to get rules by which the engineer can appraise the risk of corrosion fatigue. (orig.) [de

  15. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearman, B. P.; Calle, L. M.; Zhang, X.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Johnsey, M. N.; Montgomery, E. L.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Surma, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center's Corrosion Technology Lab at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S.A. has been developing multifunctional smart coatings based on the microencapsulation of environmentally friendly corrosion indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods. Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The release of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was studied. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed. The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, incorporated directly and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  16. Growth kinetics and mass transport mechanisms of GaN columns by selective area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Hartmann, Jana; Mandl, Martin; Sadat Mohajerani, Matin; Wehmann, Hergo-H.; Strassburg, Martin; Waag, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional GaN columns recently have attracted a lot of attention as the potential basis for core-shell light emitting diodes for future solid state lighting. In this study, the fundamental insights into growth kinetics and mass transport mechanisms of N-polar GaN columns during selective area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy on patterned SiOx/sapphire templates are systematically investigated using various pitch of apertures, growth time, and silane flow. Species impingement fluxes on the top surface of columns Jtop and on their sidewall Jsw, as well as, the diffusion flux from the substrate Jsub contribute to the growth of the GaN columns. The vertical and lateral growth rates devoted by Jtop, Jsw and Jsub are estimated quantitatively. The diffusion length of species on the SiOx mask surface λsub as well as on the sidewall surfaces of the 3D columns λsw are determined. The influences of silane on the growth kinetics are discussed. A growth model is developed for this selective area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy processing.

  17. Thermal, chemical, and mass transport processes induced in abyssal sediments by the emplacement of nuclear wastes: Experimental and modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, D.F.; Erickson, K.L.; Seyfried, W.E. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In this chapter the authors discuss the current status of heat and mass transport studies in the marine red clay sediments that are being considered as a nuclear waste isolation medium and review analytical and experimental studies. Calculations based on numerical models indicate that for a maximum allowable sediment-canister interface temperatures of 200 0 to 250 0 C, the sediment can absorb about 1.5kW initial power from waste buried 30 m in the sediment in a canister that is 3 m long and 0.3 m in diameter. The resulting fluid displacement due to convections is found to be small, less than 1 m. Laboratory studies of the geochemical effects induced by heating sediment-seawater mixtures indicate that the canister and waste form should be designed to resist a hot, relatively acidic oxidizing environment. Since the thermally altered sediment volume of about 5.5 m/sup 3/ is small relative to the sediment volume overlying the canister, the acid and oxidizing conditions should significantly affect the properties of the far field only if thermodiffusional process (Soret effect) prove to be significant. If thermodiffusional effects are important, however, near-field chemistry will differ considerably from that predicted from results of constant temperature sediment-seawater interaction experiments

  18. Investigation of the shape change of bio-flocs and its influence on mass transport using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, T T; Xiao, F; Sun, W J; Sun, F Y; Lam, K M; Li, X Y

    2014-01-01

    In this laboratory study, an advanced flow visualization technique - particle image velocimetry (PIV) - was employed to investigate the change of shape of activated sludge flocs in water and its influence on the material transport characteristics of the flocs. The continuous shape change of the bio-flocs that occurred within a very short period of time could be captured by the PIV system. The results demonstrate that the fluid turbulence caused the shift of parts of a floc from one side to the other in less than 200 ms. During the continuous shape change, the liquid within the floc was forced out of the floc, which was then refilled with the liquid from the surrounding flow. For the bio-flocs saturated with a tracer dye, it was shown that the dye could be released from the flocs at a faster rate when the flocs were swayed around in water. The experimental results indicate that frequent shape change of bio-flocs facilitates the exchange of fluid and materials between the floc interior and the surrounding water. This mass transfer mechanism can be more important than molecular diffusion and internal permeation to the function and behavior of particle aggregates, including bio-flocs, in natural waters and treatment systems.

  19. Risk evaluation on internal corrosion of a gas pipeline cut section based on metal mechanic tests and physiochemical analysis of the solids deposited in the pipes; Determinacion del riesgo por corrosion interna de un tramo cortado de una linea de transporte de gas natural a partir de ensayos metalmecanicos y del analisis fisicoquimico de los solidos depositados en la tuberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditta Sarmiento, Johanna Milena [PETROBRAS International (BRASPETRO) (Colombia). Ingenieria de Corrosion DPSU

    2003-07-01

    After inspecting a one of the most important pipelines in Colombia, using intelligent tool, the pipe sections were selected that presented losses of thickness which probably they would be risking integrity of the same one and after, these sections were cut and replaced. To one of the cut sections a study with the objective was made him establish the present forms of corrosion and to determine the phenomena that influenced the presence of the damages. For this study were moderate thicknesses of the wall of the tube and was determined the criticality comparing it with its nominal thickness, according to Standard ASME B - 31G. Taking advantage of the presence solids in the surface, one became both, physical and chemical analysis, DRX and elementary analysis, with the objective to determine its origin and to correlate it with the types of corrosion that were in the line. The morphology that determined were Microbiological Influenced Corrosion, Erosion - Corrosion, Pitting and CO2 corrosion. Then, from all this information the analysis becomes of risks by internal corrosion in pipeline, the plan of mitigation and the plans of monitoring and inspection of the line to avoid the presence of anyone of these forms of corrosion in the future immediate. (author)

  20. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to